WorldWideScience

Sample records for collision time approximation

  1. Time development of cascades by the binary collision approximation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, A.; Ishino, S.; Sekimura, N.

    1991-01-01

    To link a molecular dynamic calculation to binary collision approximation codes to explore high energy cascade damage, time between consecutive collisions is introduced into the binary collision MARLOWE code. Calculated results for gold by the modified code show formation of sub-cascades and their spatial and time overlapping, which can affect formation of defect clusters. (orig.)

  2. The accuracy of the time-dependent self-consistent-field approximation for inelastic collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1992-01-01

    We study the accuracy of the time-dependent self-consistent-field approximation for collinear inelastic collisions between an atom and a diatomic molecule. Individual state-to-state transition probabilities, total energy transfer. and the global description of the wavefunction is considered...

  3. The binary collision approximation: Background and introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.T.

    1992-08-01

    The binary collision approximation (BCA) has long been used in computer simulations of the interactions of energetic atoms with solid targets, as well as being the basis of most analytical theory in this area. While mainly a high-energy approximation, the BCA retains qualitative significance at low energies and, with proper formulation, gives useful quantitative information as well. Moreover, computer simulations based on the BCA can achieve good statistics in many situations where those based on full classical dynamical models require the most advanced computer hardware or are even impracticable. The foundations of the BCA in classical scattering are reviewed, including methods of evaluating the scattering integrals, interaction potentials, and electron excitation effects. The explicit evaluation of time at significant points on particle trajectories is discussed, as are scheduling algorithms for ordering the collisions in a developing cascade. An approximate treatment of nearly simultaneous collisions is outlined and the searching algorithms used in MARLOWE are presented

  4. The temporal development of collision cascades in the binary collision approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.T.

    1989-07-01

    A modified binary collision approximation (BCA) was developed to allow explicit evaluation of the times at which projectiles in a collision cascade reach significant points in their trajectories, without altering the ''event-driven'' character of the model. The modified BCA was used to study the temporal development of cascades in copper and gold, initiated by primary atoms of up to 10 keV initial kinetic energy. Cascades generated with time-ordered collisions show fewer ''distant'' Frenkel pairs than do cascades generated with velocity-ordered collisions. In the former, the slower projectiles tend to move in less-damaged crystal than they do in the latter. The effect is larger in Au than in Cu and increases with primary energy. As an approach to cascade nonlinearities, cascades were generated in which stopped cascade atoms were allowed to be redisplaced in later encounters. There were many more redisplacements in time-ordered cascades than in velocity-ordered ones. Because of the additional stopping introduced by the redisplacement events, the cascades in which they were allowed had fewer defects than occurred otherwise. This effect also was larger in Au than in Cu and larger at high energies although most of the redisplacement encounters involved only low-energy particles. 13 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Semiclassical approximations in a mean-field theory with collision terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galetti, D.

    1986-01-01

    Semiclassical approximations in a mean-field theory with collision terms are discussed taking the time dependent Hartree-Fock method as framework in the obtainment of the relevant parameters.(L.C.) [pt

  6. The relaxation time approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gairola, R.P.; Indu, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    A plausible approximation has been made to estimate the relaxation time from a knowledge of the transition probability of phonons from one state (r vector, q vector) to other state (r' vector, q' vector), as a result of collision. The relaxation time, thus obtained, shows a strong dependence on temperature and weak dependence on the wave vector. In view of this dependence, relaxation time has been expressed in terms of a temperature Taylor's series in the first Brillouin zone. Consequently, a simple model for estimating the thermal conductivity is suggested. the calculations become much easier than the Callaway model. (author). 14 refs

  7. The single-collision thermalization approximation for application to cold neutron moderation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritenour, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The single collision thermalization (SCT) approximation models the thermalization process by assuming that neutrons attain a thermalized distribution with only a single collision within the moderating material, independent of the neutron's incident energy. The physical intuition on which this approximation is based is that the salient properties of neutron thermalization are accounted for in the first collision, and the effects of subsequent collisions tend to average out statistically. The independence of the neutron incident and outscattering energy leads to variable separability in the scattering kernel and, thus, significant simplification of the neutron thermalization problem. The approximation also addresses detailed balance and neutron conservation concerns. All of the tests performed on the SCT approximation yielded excellent results. The significance of the SCT approximation is that it greatly simplifies thermalization calculations for CNS design. Preliminary investigations with cases involving strong absorbers also indicates that this approximation may have broader applicability, as in the upgrading of the thermalization codes

  8. The accuracy of time dependent transport equation ergodic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancic, V.

    1995-01-01

    In order to predict the accuracy of the ergodic approximation for solving the time dependent transport equation, a comparison with respect to multiple collision and time finite difference methods, has been considered. (author)

  9. Application of a non-integer Bessel uniform approximation to inelastic molecular collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.N.L.; Mayne, H.R.

    1979-01-01

    A non-integer Bessel uniform approximation has been used to calculate transition probabilities for collinear atom-oscillator collisions. The collision systems used are a harmonic oscillator interacting via a Lennard-Jones potential and a Morse oscillator interacting via an exponential potential. Both classically allowed and classically forbidden transitions have been treated. The order of the Bessel function is chosen by a physical argument that makes use of information contained in the final-action initial-angle plot. Limitations of this procedure are discussed. It is shown that the non-integer Bessel approximation is accurate for elastic 0 → 0 collisions at high collision energies, where the integer Bessel approximation is inaccurate or inapplicable. (author)

  10. The degenerate-internal-states approximation for cold collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, A.C.; Tiesinga, E.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Degenerate-Internal-States approximation as well as its first-order correction are shown to provide a convenient method for calculating elastic and inelastic collision amplitudes for low temperature atomic scattering.

  11. Collision kernels in the eikonal approximation for Lennard-Jones interaction potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, S.

    1985-03-01

    The velocity changing collisions are conveniently described by collisional kernels. These kernels depend on an interaction potential and there is a necessity for evaluating them for realistic interatomic potentials. Using the collision kernels, we are able to investigate the redistribution of atomic population's caused by the laser light and velocity changing collisions. In this paper we present the method of evaluating the collision kernels in the eikonal approximation. We discuss the influence of the potential parameters Rsub(o)sup(i), epsilonsub(o)sup(i) on kernel width for a given atomic state. It turns out that unlike the collision kernel for the hard sphere model of scattering the Lennard-Jones kernel is not so sensitive to changes of Rsub(o)sup(i) as the previous one. Contrary to the general tendency of approximating collisional kernels by the Gaussian curve, kernels for the Lennard-Jones potential do not exhibit such a behaviour. (author)

  12. An improved coupled-states approximation including the nearest neighbor Coriolis couplings for diatom-diatom inelastic collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongzheng; Hu, Xixi; Zhang, Dong H.; Xie, Daiqian

    2018-02-01

    Solving the time-independent close coupling equations of a diatom-diatom inelastic collision system by using the rigorous close-coupling approach is numerically difficult because of its expensive matrix manipulation. The coupled-states approximation decouples the centrifugal matrix by neglecting the important Coriolis couplings completely. In this work, a new approximation method based on the coupled-states approximation is presented and applied to time-independent quantum dynamic calculations. This approach only considers the most important Coriolis coupling with the nearest neighbors and ignores weaker Coriolis couplings with farther K channels. As a result, it reduces the computational costs without a significant loss of accuracy. Numerical tests for para-H2+ortho-H2 and para-H2+HD inelastic collision were carried out and the results showed that the improved method dramatically reduces the errors due to the neglect of the Coriolis couplings in the coupled-states approximation. This strategy should be useful in quantum dynamics of other systems.

  13. Improving the equivalent-photon approximation in electron-positron collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Schuler, G A

    1996-01-01

    The validity of the equivalent-photon approximation for two-photon processes in electron--positron collisions is critically examined. Commonly used forms to describe hadronic two-photon production are shown to lead to sizeable errors. An improved two-photon luminosity function is presented, which includes beyond-leading-logarithmic effects and scalar-photon contributions. Comparisons of various approximate expressions with the exact calculation in the case of the total hadronic cross section are given. Furthermore, effects of the poorly known low-Q2 behaviour of the virtual hadronic cross sections are discussed.

  14. J/sub z/-preserving propensities in molecular collisions. I. Quantal coupled states and classical impulsive approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, V.; Kouri, D.J.; Hoffman, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    The occurrence of j/sub z/-preserving propensities in atom--linear molecule collisions is considered within the contexts of the quantum mechanical CS approximation and of a classical model collision system. The latter involves an impulsive interaction which is the extreme limit of the class of potentials for which the CS approximation is expected to be valid. The classical model results in exact conservation of j/sub z/ along a ''kinematic apse.'' Quantum mechanically, the CS approximation is reformulated in a manner that clearly shows the relationship between the l choice and the degree and direction of j/sub z/ preservation. Away from the forward direction, the simplest choice obeying time reversal symmetry l=(l-script+l')/2, is shown to result in a propensity for preserving j/sub z/ along a ''geometric apse'' which coincides with the kinematic apse in the energy sudden limit, and for nonenergy sudden systems only differs significantly from it close to the forward direction

  15. Improving the Weizsäcker-Williams approximation in electron-proton collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Frixione, Stefano; Nason, P; Ridolfi, G

    1993-01-01

    We critically examine the validity of the Weizs\\"acker-Williams approximation in electron-hadron collisions. We show that in its commonly used form it can lead to large errors, and we show how to improve it in order to get accurate results. In particular, we present an improved form that is valid beyond the leading logarithmic approximation in the case when a small-angle cut is applied to the scattered electron. Furthermore we include comparisons of the approximate expressions with the exact electroproduction calculation in the case of heavy-quark production.

  16. Time-dependent shell-model theory of dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayik, S.; Noerenberg, W.

    1982-01-01

    A transport theory is formulated within a time-dependent shell-model approach. Time averaging of the equations for macroscopic quantities lead to irreversibility and justifies weak-coupling limit and Markov approximation for the (energy-conserving) one- and two-body collision terms. Two coupled equations for the occupation probabilities of dynamical single-particle states and for the collective variable are derived and explicit formulas for transition rates, dynamical forces, mass parameters and friction coefficients are given. The applicability of the formulation in terms of characteristic quantities of nuclear systems is considered in detail and some peculiarities due to memory effects in the initial equilibration process of heavy-ion collisions are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Time dependent mean field approximation to the many-body S-matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassid, Y.; Koonin, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations are a good description of some inclusive properties of deep inelastic heavy-ion collisions. The first steps toward a mean-field theory that approximates specific elements of the many-body S matrix are presented. A many-body system with pairwise interactions excited by an external, time-dependent one-body field is considered. The methods are used to solve the forced Lipkin model. The moduli of elastic and excitation amplitudes are plotted. 3 figures

  18. Time Dependence of Collision Probabilities During Satellite Conjunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Doyle T.; Hejduk, Matthew D.; Johnson, Lauren C.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis (CARA) team has recently implemented updated software to calculate the probability of collision (P (sub c)) for Earth-orbiting satellites. The algorithm can employ complex dynamical models for orbital motion, and account for the effects of non-linear trajectories as well as both position and velocity uncertainties. This “3D P (sub c)” method entails computing a 3-dimensional numerical integral for each estimated probability. Our analysis indicates that the 3D method provides several new insights over the traditional “2D P (sub c)” method, even when approximating the orbital motion using the relatively simple Keplerian two-body dynamical model. First, the formulation provides the means to estimate variations in the time derivative of the collision probability, or the probability rate, R (sub c). For close-proximity satellites, such as those orbiting in formations or clusters, R (sub c) variations can show multiple peaks that repeat or blend with one another, providing insight into the ongoing temporal distribution of risk. For single, isolated conjunctions, R (sub c) analysis provides the means to identify and bound the times of peak collision risk. Additionally, analysis of multiple actual archived conjunctions demonstrates that the commonly used “2D P (sub c)” approximation can occasionally provide inaccurate estimates. These include cases in which the 2D method yields negligibly small probabilities (e.g., P (sub c)) is greater than 10 (sup -10)), but the 3D estimates are sufficiently large to prompt increased monitoring or collision mitigation (e.g., P (sub c) is greater than or equal to 10 (sup -5)). Finally, the archive analysis indicates that a relatively efficient calculation can be used to identify which conjunctions will have negligibly small probabilities. This small-P (sub c) screening test can significantly speed the overall risk analysis computation for large numbers of conjunctions.

  19. Cascade statistics in the binary collision approximation and in full molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, M.; Pan, Z.Y.

    1995-01-01

    The Binary Collision Approximation (BCA) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) are used to simulate low energy atomic collision cascades in solids. Results are compared and discussed on the example of copper and gold self irradiation. For MD, long range N-body potentials are built, similar to those deduced from the second moment semi-empirical tight binding model. The pair interaction contribution is splined to a Moliere screened Coulomb potential at small separation distances. The BCA calculations are performed with the MARLOWE program, using the same Moliere potential as for MD, and modelling the N-body contribution by a binding of the atoms to their equilibrium lattice sites. The scattering integrals are estimated by means of a 4 points Gauss-Mehler quadrature. In MD, the NVT equations of motion are integrated with a constant time step of 2 fs. For the NVE cascade simulations, the Newton equations of motion are solved with a dynamically adjusted time step, kept lower than 2 fs. The influence of the time step on the simulated trajectories is discussed. The mean number of moving atoms with total energy above threshold values ranging from 1 to 100 eV is estimated as a function of time over 300 fs both with MARLOWE and by MD. This estimate is repeated for external primary energies ranging from 250 eV to 1 keV. In the case of copper, the BCA results are found to be in remarkable agreement with MD over about 200 fs cascade development, provided the size of the crystallite used in MD is sufficiently large in order to account for the early mechanical response of the close environment. This agreement between the two methods is found to be the best when the binding energy of the target atoms as modelled in the BCA is adjusted to a value close to the cohesive energy. In the case of gold, the agreement between BCA and MD is reasonable and the results suggest the need of an accurate modelling of linear collision sequences in the BCA. (orig.)

  20. A rational approximation to Reich-Moore collision matrix of non-fissile nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devan, K.; Keshavamurthy, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The cross sections of many important nuclides are represented in Reich-Moore (RM) formalism in the recent American Evaluated Nuclear Data file, ENDF/B-VI. Processing of cross sections with RM resonance parameters is much more difficult than the other multilevel formalisms such as MLBW and Adler-Adler. In this paper, we derive a rational approximation to the RM collision matrix in the vicinity of a resonance. This simplifies the cross section processing. The energy range of the validity of this approximation in the vicinity of a resonance is also derived. Choosing Ni 58 as an example, results of our approximation for a non-fissile nuclide are given for two typical s-wave resonances. Our rational approximation method is found to work with good accuracies in the vicinity of resonances

  1. Approximate first collision probabilities for neutrons in cylindrical and cluster lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.S.

    1979-05-01

    Methods for calculating approximate first collision probabilities for neutrons in cylindrical and cluster lattices are presented and compared with numerical solution methods. The methods differ from those of other authors in the inclusion of anisotropic boundary conditions for both geometries. The methods, which are fast enough for routine use in multigroup and resonance subgroup calculations, have been coded in FORTRAN and included in modules of the AUS scheme for reactor neutronics calculations

  2. Binary-collision-approximation-based simulation of noble gas irradiation to tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    To reveal the possibility of fuzz formation of tungsten material under noble gas irradiation, helium, neon, and argon atom injections into tungsten materials are performed by binary-collision-approximation-based simulation. The penetration depth is strongly depends on the structure of the target material. Therefore, the penetration depth for amorphous and bcc crystalline structure is carefully investigated in this paper

  3. Approximate solutions of the two-dimensional integral transport equation by collision probability methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Richard

    1977-01-01

    A set of approximate solutions for the isotropic two-dimensional neutron transport problem has been developed using the Interface Current formalism. The method has been applied to regular lattices of rectangular cells containing a fuel pin, cladding and water, or homogenized structural material. The cells are divided into zones which are homogeneous. A zone-wise flux expansion is used to formulate a direct collision probability problem within a cell. The coupling of the cells is made by making extra assumptions on the currents entering and leaving the interfaces. Two codes have been written: the first uses a cylindrical cell model and one or three terms for the flux expansion; the second uses a two-dimensional flux representation and does a truly two-dimensional calculation inside each cell. In both codes one or three terms can be used to make a space-independent expansion of the angular fluxes entering and leaving each side of the cell. The accuracies and computing times achieved with the different approximations are illustrated by numerical studies on two benchmark pr

  4. On the validity of the equivalent-photon approximation for virtual photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carimalo, C.; Kessler, P.; Parisi, J.

    1979-05-01

    For virtual photon-photon collisions in electron storage rings, one derive the equivalent-photon approximation from a helicity treatment, and present it in two forms, involving respectively (i) polarized transverse photons ('transverse-photon approximation') and (ii) unpolarized ones ('Williams-Weizsaecker approximation'). One first postulates the conditions of validity of the approximation on the basis of analytic considerations, and then check them numerically in the case of the process e e → e e μ + μ - . For this check, we consider the completely differentiated cross section as far as approximation (i) is concerned; and in the case of approximation (ii), the cross section differentiated with respect to all variables except the azimuthal angles. The results are given in the form of Tables showing the lower and higher limit of the error involved in the approximation for a large variety of kinematic configurations (i. e., energy losses and scattering angles of both electrons). Those Tables are discussed in detail, and conclusions are drawn as to the applicability of the equivalent-photon approximation to future experiments to be performed with high-energy electron storage rings

  5. Time ordering of two-step processes in energetic ion-atom collisions: Basic formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolterfoht, N.

    1993-01-01

    The semiclassical approximation is applied in second order to describe time ordering of two-step processes in energetic ion-atom collisions. Emphasis is given to the conditions for interferences between first- and second-order terms. In systems with two active electrons, time ordering gives rise to a pair of associated paths involving a second-order process and its time-inverted process. Combining these paths within the independent-particle frozen orbital model, time ordering is lost. It is shown that the loss of time ordering modifies the second-order amplitude so that its ability to interfere with the first-order amplitude is essentially reduced. Time ordering and the capability for interference is regained, as one path is blocked by means of the Pauli exclusion principle. The time-ordering formalism is prepared for papers dealing with collision experiments of single excitation [Stolterfoht et al., following paper, Phys. Rev. A 48, 2986 (1993)] and double excitation [Stolterfoht et al. (unpublished)

  6. Bulk viscosity of strongly interacting matter in the relaxation time approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Alina; Hauksson, Sigtryggur; Shen, Chun; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2018-04-01

    We show how thermal mean field effects can be incorporated consistently in the hydrodynamical modeling of heavy-ion collisions. The nonequilibrium correction to the distribution function resulting from a temperature-dependent mass is obtained in a procedure which automatically satisfies the Landau matching condition and is thermodynamically consistent. The physics of the bulk viscosity is studied here for Boltzmann and Bose-Einstein gases within the Chapman-Enskog and 14-moment approaches in the relaxation time approximation. Constant and temperature-dependent masses are considered in turn. It is shown that, in the small mass limit, both methods lead to the same value of the ratio of the bulk viscosity to its relaxation time. The inclusion of a temperature-dependent mass leads to the emergence of the βλ function in that ratio, and it is of the expected parametric form for the Boltzmann gas, while for the Bose-Einstein case it is affected by the infrared cutoff. This suggests that the relaxation time approximation may be too crude to obtain a reliable form of ζ /τR for gases obeying Bose-Einstein statistics.

  7. Comment on the accuracy of Rabitz' effective potential approximation for rotational excitation by collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, S.

    1975-01-01

    Cross sections for rotational excitation of HCN by low energy collisions with He have been computed with the effective potential approximation of Rabitz and compared with accurate quantum close-coupling results. Elastic cross sections are found to agree to about 20%; inelastic cross sections agree in general magnitude but not in detailed values for specific quantum transitions

  8. Gravitational waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yang, Jongmann; Yeom, Dong-han

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic bubbles are nucleated through the quantum tunneling process. After nucleation they would expand and undergo collisions with each other. In this paper, we focus in particular on collisions of two equal-sized bubbles and compute gravitational waves emitted from the collisions. First, we study the mechanism of the collisions by means of a real scalar field and its quartic potential. Then, using this model, we compute gravitational waves from the collisions in a straightforward manner. In the quadrupole approximation, time-domain gravitational waveforms are directly obtained by integrating the energy-momentum tensors over the volume of the wave sources, where the energy-momentum tensors are expressed in terms of the scalar field, the local geometry and the potential. We present gravitational waveforms emitted during (i) the initial-to-intermediate stage of strong collisions and (ii) the final stage of weak collisions: the former is obtained numerically, in full General Relativity and the latter analytically, in the flat spacetime approximation. We gain qualitative insights into the time-domain gravitational waveforms from bubble collisions: during (i), the waveforms show the non-linearity of the collisions, characterized by a modulating frequency and cusp-like bumps, whereas during (ii), the waveforms exhibit the linearity of the collisions, featured by smooth monochromatic oscillations. (orig.)

  9. Integral transport multiregion geometrical shadowing factor for the approximate collision probability matrix calculation of infinite closely packed lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jowzani-Moghaddam, A.

    1981-01-01

    An integral transport method of calculating the geometrical shadowing factor in multiregion annular cells for infinite closely packed lattices in cylindrical geometry is developed. This analytical method has been programmed in the TPGS code. This method is based upon a consideration of the properties of the integral transport method for a nonuniform body, which together with Bonalumi's approximations allows the determination of the approximate multiregion collision probability matrix for infinite closely packed lattices with sufficient accuracy. The multiregion geometrical shadowing factors have been calculated for variations in fuel pin annular segment rings in a geometry of annular cells. These shadowing factors can then be used in the calculation of neutron transport from one annulus to another in an infinite lattice. The result of this new geometrical shadowing and collision probability matrix are compared with the Dancoff-Ginsburg correction and the probability matrix using constant shadowing on Yankee fuel elements in an infinite lattice. In these cases the Dancoff-Ginsburg correction factor and collision probability matrix using constant shadowing are in difference by at most 6.2% and 6%, respectively

  10. The adiabatic approximation in multichannel scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    Using two-dimensional models, an attempt has been made to get an impression of the conditions of validity of the adiabatic approximation. For a nucleon bound to a rotating nucleus the Coriolis coupling is neglected and the relation between this nuclear Coriolis coupling and the classical Coriolis force has been examined. The approximation for particle scattering from an axially symmetric rotating nucleus based on a short duration of the collision, has been combined with an approximation based on the limitation of angular momentum transfer between particle and nucleus. Numerical calculations demonstrate the validity of the new combined method. The concept of time duration for quantum mechanical collisions has also been studied, as has the collective description of permanently deformed nuclei. (C.F.)

  11. Restricted Collision List method for faster Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macrossan, Michael N., E-mail: m.macrossan@uq.edu.au

    2016-08-15

    The ‘Restricted Collision List’ (RCL) method for speeding up the calculation of DSMC Variable Soft Sphere collisions, with Borgnakke–Larsen (BL) energy exchange, is presented. The method cuts down considerably on the number of random collision parameters which must be calculated (deflection and azimuthal angles, and the BL energy exchange factors). A relatively short list of these parameters is generated and the parameters required in any cell are selected from this list. The list is regenerated at intervals approximately equal to the smallest mean collision time in the flow, and the chance of any particle re-using the same collision parameters in two successive collisions is negligible. The results using this method are indistinguishable from those obtained with standard DSMC. The CPU time saving depends on how much of a DSMC calculation is devoted to collisions and how much is devoted to other tasks, such as moving particles and calculating particle interactions with flow boundaries. For 1-dimensional calculations of flow in a tube, the new method saves 20% of the CPU time per collision for VSS scattering with no energy exchange. With RCL applied to rotational energy exchange, the CPU saving can be greater; for small values of the rotational collision number, for which most collisions involve some rotational energy exchange, the CPU may be reduced by 50% or more.

  12. Binary-collision-approximation simulation for noble gas irradiation onto plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M

    2014-01-01

    A number of experiments show that helium plasma constructs filament (fuzz) structures whose diameter is in nanometer-scale on the tungsten material under the suitable experimental condition. In this paper, binary-collision-approximation-based simulation is performed to reveal the mechanism and the conditions of fuzz formation of tungsten material under plasma irradiation. The irradiation of the plasma of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium, and also the plasma of noble gas such as helium, neon, and argon atoms are investigated. The possibility of fuzz formation is discussed on the simulation result of penetration depth of the incident atoms

  13. How do we decide whether the first Born approximation applies to inelastic collisions of charged particles with an atom or molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, M.; Manson, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    A motivation of our study is to help resolve a general issue in atomic-collision physics. There are two major sources of uncertainties in the evaluation of cross sections. First, one uses an approximation for treating the collision process, e.g., the FBA, the distorted-wave approximation, or the close-coupling approximation. Second, explicit evaluation of cross sections within any of these approximations must use as input eigenfunctions for the target in the initial state and in the final state at least, and possibly in the intermediate states. It is important to distinguish these two sources of uncertainties as clearly as possible. For instance, once the authors are sure that the FBA holds, the uncertainties in the cross-section evaluation are fully attributable to the uncertainties in the target eigenfunctions. Strong plausibility arguments are given for the validity of the FBA

  14. On particle emission in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maedler, P.

    1984-01-01

    Investigations of fast particle emission in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock mean-field approximation (TDHF) have been performed for one-dimensional slab collisions. For a fixed target mass number and incident velocity the total yields of PEP exhibit pronounced srtructures as a function of the pro ectile mass number, which strongly correcate with the binding energy of the last nucleon in the projectnle. This is in explicit disagreement with experiment. The conclusion has been drawn that the Fermi-jet mechanism cannot be responsible for most of the fast particles observed in experiment, even if quantum diffraction is taken into account (as in TDHF). After PEP emission large amplitude density oscillations, which are the only possible modes in the slab geometry, are found to be damped by further particle emission

  15. Collision strengths from ground levels of Ti XIII using relativistic-Breit-Pauli approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, M.; Hibbert, H.; Burke, P.G.; Keenan, F.

    1998-09-01

    The R-matrix method is used to calculate collision strengths from ground state to the first twenty-six fine structure levels of neon-like titanium by including the relativistic term coupling coefficients in the semi-Breit-Pauli approximation. Configuration interaction wave-functions are used to represent the first fifteen lowest LS-coupled target states in the R-matrix expansion. Results obtained are compared with other calculations. This is the first detailed calculation on this ion in which relativistic, exchange, channel couplings and short-range correlation effects are taken into account. (author)

  16. Computer simulation studies of high energy collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.T.

    1991-07-01

    A modified binary collision approximation allowing the proper order of the collisions in time was used to study cascades in Cu and Au at primary kinetic energies up to 100 keV. Nonlinearities were approximated by letting already-stopped cascade atoms become targets in later collisions, using an improved method of locating potential targets to extend the calculations to energies much higher than heretofore. Beside the effect of the approximate nonlinearity, the effect of thermal disorder in the targets was examined. Target redisplacements reduce the damage in Cu by 3% at most, but in Au they reduce it by amounts up to 20% at 100 keV. Thermal disorder is also important: by disrupting crystal effects, the damage is reduced significantly. 11 refs., 4 figs

  17. Time-based collision risk modeling for air traffic management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Alan E.

    Since the emergence of commercial aviation in the early part of last century, economic forces have driven a steadily increasing demand for air transportation. Increasing density of aircraft operating in a finite volume of airspace is accompanied by a corresponding increase in the risk of collision, and in response to a growing number of incidents and accidents involving collisions between aircraft, governments worldwide have developed air traffic control systems and procedures to mitigate this risk. The objective of any collision risk management system is to project conflicts and provide operators with sufficient opportunity to recognize potential collisions and take necessary actions to avoid them. It is therefore the assertion of this research that the currency of collision risk management is time. Future Air Traffic Management Systems are being designed around the foundational principle of four dimensional trajectory based operations, a method that replaces legacy first-come, first-served sequencing priorities with time-based reservations throughout the airspace system. This research will demonstrate that if aircraft are to be sequenced in four dimensions, they must also be separated in four dimensions. In order to separate aircraft in four dimensions, time must emerge as the primary tool by which air traffic is managed. A functional relationship exists between the time-based performance of aircraft, the interval between aircraft scheduled to cross some three dimensional point in space, and the risk of collision. This research models that relationship and presents two key findings. First, a method is developed by which the ability of an aircraft to meet a required time of arrival may be expressed as a robust standard for both industry and operations. Second, a method by which airspace system capacity may be increased while maintaining an acceptable level of collision risk is presented and demonstrated for the purpose of formulating recommendations for procedures

  18. Improved time-dependent harmonic oscillator method for vibrationally inelastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePristo, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    A quantal solution to vibrationally inelastic collisions is presented based upon a linear expansion of the interaction potential around the time-dependent classical positions of all translational and vibrational degrees of freedom. The full time-dependent wave function is a product of a Gaussian translational wave packet and a multidimensional harmonic oscillator wave function, both centered around the appropriate classical position variables. The computational requirements are small since the initial vibrational coordinates are the equilibrium values in the classical trajectory (i.e., phase space sampling does not occur). Different choices of the initial width of the translational wave packet and the initial classical translational momenta are possible, and two combinations are investigated. The first involves setting the initial classical momenta equal to the quantal expectation value, and varying the width to satisfy normalization of the transition probability matrix. The second involves adjusting the initial classical momenta to ensure detailed balancing for each set of transitions, i→f and f→i, and varying the width to satisfy normalization. This choice illustrates the origin of the empirical correction of using the arithmetic average momenta as the initial classical momenta in the forced oscillator approximation. Both methods are tested for the collinear collision systems CO 2 --(He, Ne), and are found to be accurate except for near-resonant vibration--vibration exchange at low initial kinetic energies

  19. Collision dynamics of H+ + N2 at low energies based on time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, F. S.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.; Gao, C.-Z.; Wei, B.

    2018-02-01

    Using time-dependent density-functional theory at the level of local density approximation augmented by a self-interaction correction and coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics, we study, from a theoretical perspective, scattering dynamics of the proton in collisions with the N2 molecule at 30 eV. Nine different collision configurations are employed to analyze the proton energy loss spectra, electron depletion, scattering angles and self-interaction effects. Our results agree qualitatively with the experimental data and previous theoretical calculations. The discrepancies are ascribed to the limitation of the theoretical models in use. We find that self-interaction effects can significantly influence the electron capture and the excited diatomic vibrational motion, which is in consistent with other calculations. In addition, it is found that the molecular structure can be readily retrieved from the proton energy loss spectra due to a significant momentum transfer in head-on collisions.

  20. Numerical relativity for D dimensional space-times: Head-on collisions of black holes and gravitational wave extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witek, Helvi; Nerozzi, Andrea; Zilhao, Miguel; Herdeiro, Carlos; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Cardoso, Vitor; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Higher dimensional black holes play an exciting role in fundamental physics, such as high energy physics. In this paper, we use the formalism and numerical code reported in [1] to study the head-on collision of two black holes. For this purpose we provide a detailed treatment of gravitational wave extraction in generic D dimensional space-times, which uses the Kodama-Ishibashi formalism. For the first time, we present the results of numerical simulations of the head-on collision in five space-time dimensions, together with the relevant physical quantities. We show that the total radiated energy, when two black holes collide from rest at infinity, is approximately (0.089±0.006)% of the center of mass energy, slightly larger than the 0.055% obtained in the four-dimensional case, and that the ringdown signal at late time is in very good agreement with perturbative calculations.

  1. Elementary Statistical Models for Vector Collision-Sequence Interference Effects with Poisson-Distributed Collision Times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper (Lewis, 2008) a class of models suitable for application to collision-sequence interference was introduced. In these models velocities are assumed to be completely randomized in each collision. The distribution of velocities was assumed to be Gaussian. The integrated induced dipole moment μk, for vector interference, or the scalar modulation μk, for scalar interference, was assumed to be a function of the impulse (integrated force) fk, or its magnitude fk, experienced by the molecule in a collision. For most of (Lewis, 2008) it was assumed that μk fk and μk fk, but it proved to be possible to extend the models, so that the magnitude of the induced dipole moment is equal to an arbitrary power or sum of powers of the intermolecular force. This allows estimates of the in filling of the interference dip by the dis proportionality of the induced dipole moment and force. One particular such model, using data from (Herman and Lewis, 2006), leads to the most realistic estimate for the in filling of the vector interference dip yet obtained. In (Lewis, 2008) the drastic assumption was made that collision times occurred at equal intervals. In the present paper that assumption is removed: the collision times are taken to form a Poisson process. This is much more realistic than the equal-intervals assumption. The interference dip is found to be a Lorentzian in this model

  2. How to combine binary collision approximation and multi-body potential for molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M.; Kenmotsu, Takahiro

    2010-01-01

    Our group has been developing a hybrid simulation of the molecular dynamics (MD) and the binary collision approximation (BCA) simulation. One of the main problems of this hybridization model is that the multi-body potential suddenly appears at the moment when the simulation method switches from the BCA to the MD. This instantaneously emerged multi-body potential causes the acceleration or deceleration of atoms of the system. To solve this problem, the kinetic energy of atoms should be corrected to conserve the total energy in the system. This paper gives the solution. The hybrid simulation for hydrogen atom injection into a graphite material is executed in order to demonstrate the solution. (author)

  3. Impulse approximation treatment of electron-electron excitation and ionization in energetic ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouros, T.J.M.; Lee, D.H.; Sanders, J.M.; Richard, P.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of electron-electron interactions between projectile and target electrons observed in recent measurements of projectile K-shell excitation and ionization using 0 projectile Auger electron spectroscopy are analysed within the framework of the impulse approximation (IA). The IA formulation is seen to give a good account of the threshold behavior of both ionization and excitation, while providing a remarkably simple intuitive picture of such electron-electron interactions in ion-atom collisions in general. Thus, the applicability of the IA treatment is extended to cover most known processes involving such interactions including resonance transfer excitation, binary encounter electron production, electron-electron excitation and ionization. (orig.)

  4. Approximate number and approximate time discrimination each correlate with school math abilities in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odic, Darko; Lisboa, Juan Valle; Eisinger, Robert; Olivera, Magdalena Gonzalez; Maiche, Alejandro; Halberda, Justin

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between our intuitive sense of number (e.g., when estimating how many marbles are in a jar), and our intuitive sense of other quantities, including time (e.g., when estimating how long it has been since we last ate breakfast)? Recent work in cognitive, developmental, comparative psychology, and computational neuroscience has suggested that our representations of approximate number, time, and spatial extent are fundamentally linked and constitute a "generalized magnitude system". But, the shared behavioral and neural signatures between number, time, and space may alternatively be due to similar encoding and decision-making processes, rather than due to shared domain-general representations. In this study, we investigate the relationship between approximate number and time in a large sample of 6-8 year-old children in Uruguay by examining how individual differences in the precision of number and time estimation correlate with school mathematics performance. Over four testing days, each child completed an approximate number discrimination task, an approximate time discrimination task, a digit span task, and a large battery of symbolic math tests. We replicate previous reports showing that symbolic math abilities correlate with approximate number precision and extend those findings by showing that math abilities also correlate with approximate time precision. But, contrary to approximate number and time sharing common representations, we find that each of these dimensions uniquely correlates with formal math: approximate number correlates more strongly with formal math compared to time and continues to correlate with math even when precision in time and individual differences in working memory are controlled for. These results suggest that there are important differences in the mental representations of approximate number and approximate time and further clarify the relationship between quantity representations and mathematics. Copyright

  5. Collision cross sections of N2 by H+ impact at keV energies within time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, W.; Gao, C.-Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, F. S.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y.; Wei, B.

    2018-03-01

    We calculate electron capture and ionization cross sections of N2 impacted by the H+ projectile at keV energies. To this end, we employ the time-dependent density-functional theory coupled nonadiabatically to molecular dynamics. To avoid the explicit treatment of the complex density matrix in the calculation of cross sections, we propose an approximate method based on the assumption of constant ionization rate over the period of the projectile passing the absorbing boundary. Our results agree reasonably well with experimental data and semi-empirical results within the measurement uncertainties in the considered energy range. The discrepancies are mainly attributed to the inadequate description of exchange-correlation functional and the crude approximation for constant ionization rate. Although the present approach does not predict the experiments quantitatively for collision energies below 10 keV, it is still helpful to calculate total cross sections of ion-molecule collisions within a certain energy range.

  6. A new kinetic description for turbulent collisions including mode-coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misguich, J.H.; Tchen, C.M.

    1982-07-01

    The usual introduction of higher-order mode-coupling terms in the description of turbulent collisions beyond usual Renormalized Quasi-Linear approximation (RQL) is briefly analyzed. Here new results are derived in the framework of the general kinetic theory, and the equivalence is proved with the long time limit of simple results deduced from the Vlasov equation. The correction to the RQL turbulent collision term is analyzed and a new approximation is proposed. Turbulent collisions are also described by perturbation around the Lagrangian autocorrelation of fluctuating fields. For an homogeneous turbulence, however, the asymptotic integral of this Lagrangian autocorrelation vanishes identically, similarly to what occurs in Brownian motion. For inhomogeneous turbulence this method can nevertheless be used, and higher-order mode-coupling terms can be interpreted as a shielding of elementary Lagrangian turbulent collisions

  7. Albedo of low-energy light ions: case of anisotropic approximation of the collision integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simovic, R.; Vukanic, J. . E-mail address of corresponding author: simovicr@vin.bg.ac.yu; Simovic, R.)

    2005-01-01

    For diffusion and slowing-down of low-energy light ions, the linear transport equation in the path length form was rederived taking into account a common anisotropic approximation of the collision integral. Assuming that the transport cross section depends only on the ion initial energy, the equation was Laplace-transformed over the relative path length and half-space albedo problem was considered by using the ordinary DPN technique. The Laplace-transformed reflection function was found in the lowest order of DPN flux approximation, and then was inverted analytically leading to the distribution of backscattered particles in the relative path-length. For the general power potential V(R)∞R -1/m the particle reflection coefficient was obtained as a series, while for the special case of the inverse square potential (m=1/2) this coefficient was determined in a compact form. The present approach was compared with the TRIM simulations of helium ion reflection, as well as with the Tilinin - Betz fitting formula and the MARLOWE simulations of proton reflection. (author)

  8. Neural Network in Fixed Time for Collision Detection between Two Convex Polyhedra

    OpenAIRE

    M. Khouil; N. Saber; M. Mestari

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a different architecture of a collision detection neural network (DCNN) is developed. This network, which has been particularly reviewed, has enabled us to solve with a new approach the problem of collision detection between two convex polyhedra in a fixed time (O (1) time). We used two types of neurons, linear and threshold logic, which simplified the actual implementation of all the networks proposed. The study of the collision detection is divided into two sections, the coll...

  9. Time delay for resonant vibrational excitation in electron--molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauyacq, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the time delay associated with vibrational excitation in electron--molecule collision is presented. It consists of a direct study of the time dependence of the process for three model systems. An electron wave packet, that is narrow in time, is sent on the target and the amplitudes in the different inelastic channels are studied as functions of time. The time delay is found to correspond to very different time effects: broadenings, shifts in time of the wave packet, but also complex distortions that cannot be represented by a time delay. The direct analysis of the scattered wave also provides new insights into the vibrational excitation process. It should be a useful tool to analyze complex collision processes

  10. Adaptive time-stepping Monte Carlo integration of Coulomb collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särkimäki, K.; Hirvijoki, E.; Terävä, J.

    2018-01-01

    We report an accessible and robust tool for evaluating the effects of Coulomb collisions on a test particle in a plasma that obeys Maxwell-Jüttner statistics. The implementation is based on the Beliaev-Budker collision integral which allows both the test particle and the background plasma to be relativistic. The integration method supports adaptive time stepping, which is shown to greatly improve the computational efficiency. The Monte Carlo method is implemented for both the three-dimensional particle momentum space and the five-dimensional guiding center phase space. Detailed description is provided for both the physics and implementation of the operator. The focus is in adaptive integration of stochastic differential equations, which is an overlooked aspect among existing Monte Carlo implementations of Coulomb collision operators. We verify that our operator converges to known analytical results and demonstrate that careless implementation of the adaptive time step can lead to severely erroneous results. The operator is provided as a self-contained Fortran 95 module and can be included into existing orbit-following tools that trace either the full Larmor motion or the guiding center dynamics. The adaptive time-stepping algorithm is expected to be useful in situations where the collision frequencies vary greatly over the course of a simulation. Examples include the slowing-down of fusion products or other fast ions, and the Dreicer generation of runaway electrons as well as the generation of fast ions or electrons with ion or electron cyclotron resonance heating.

  11. Experimental study of K-shell ionization of low-Z solids in collisions with intermediate-velocity carbon ions and the local plasma approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadhane, U [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Montanari, C C [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Tribedi, Lokesh C [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2003-07-28

    K-shell vacancy production in low-atomic-number (Z{sub t} = 17-29) solid targets has been measured in collisions of highly charged carbon ions with energies of 1.5-6 MeV u{sup -1}. The K-shell ionization cross sections of Cl, K, Ti, Fe and Cu are derived from the measured K x-ray cross sections. The present data-set has been used to test the predictions of a theoretical model based on the local plasma approximation (LPA). This theory takes into account the response of solid core electrons working within the dielectric formalism. We find that this ab initio ion-solid model gives very good agreement with the measured data for Fe and Cu targets, while it tends to under-estimate the data for the most symmetric collision systems studied here. We discuss the range of validity of the LPA in terms of the symmetry parameter and the impact velocity. On the other hand, a model based on the perturbed stationary state approximation, designed for ion-atom collisions (ECPSSR) is found to give excellent agreement with the measured data for all target elements over the whole energy range. All the measured cross sections for different targets are found to follow a universal scaling rule predicted by the ECPSSR.

  12. LHC Report: LHC smashes collision records

    CERN Multimedia

    Sarah Charley

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is now producing more than a billion proton-proton collisions per second.   The LHC is colliding protons at a faster rate than ever before: approximately 1 billion times per second. Since April 2016, the LHC has delivered more than 30 inverse femtobarns (fb-1) to both ATLAS and CMS. This means that around 2.4 quadrillion (2.4 million billion) collisions have been seen by each of the experiments this year. The inverse femtobarn is the unit of measurement for integrated luminosity, indicating the cumulative number of potential collisions. This compares with the total of 33.2 fb-1 produced between 2010 and 2015. The unprecedented performance this year is the result of both the incremental increases in collision rate and the sheer amount of time the LHC has been up and running. This comes after a slow start-up in 2015, when scientists and engineers still needed to learn how to operate the machine at a much higher energy. “With more energy, the machine is much more sen...

  13. Microscopic approach to subthreshold pion production in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, M.; Kaps, R.; Masak, D.; Mosel, U.

    1985-01-01

    A microscopic approach to subthreshold pion production in heavy-ion collisions is proposed, in which the wave function of the nucleon system is approximated in the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory and an effective interaction for the pion-production process is taken from (p,π) reaction theories. The model is applied to pion production in 16 O + 16 O collisions. (orig.)

  14. Event-By-Event Initial Conditions for Heavy Ion Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, S; Fries, R J

    2017-01-01

    The early time dynamics of heavy ion collisions can be described by classical fields in an approximation of Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) called Color Glass Condensate (CGC). Monte-Carlo sampling of the color charge for the incoming nuclei are used to calculate their classical gluon fields. Following the recent work by Chen et al. we calculate the energy momentum tensor of those fields at early times in the collision event-by-event. This can then be used for subsequent hydrodynamic evolution of the single events. (paper)

  15. Event-By-Event Initial Conditions for Heavy Ion Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, S.; Fries, R. J.

    2017-04-01

    The early time dynamics of heavy ion collisions can be described by classical fields in an approximation of Quantum ChromoDynamics (QCD) called Color Glass Condensate (CGC). Monte-Carlo sampling of the color charge for the incoming nuclei are used to calculate their classical gluon fields. Following the recent work by Chen et al. we calculate the energy momentum tensor of those fields at early times in the collision event-by-event. This can then be used for subsequent hydrodynamic evolution of the single events.

  16. Estimating Time-to-Collision with Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tim

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on the ability of observers who are sighted and those with low vision to make time-to-collision (TTC) estimations using video. The TTC estimations made by the observers with low vision were comparable to those made by the sighted observers, and both groups made underestimation errors that were similar to those that were…

  17. Approximation of antiproton spectra in pp- and pA collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidova, E.V.; Sibirtsev, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Phenomenological expressions, describing the inclusive cross sections of antiproton production in proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions in 10-100 GeV energy range were obtained. 12 refs.; 10 figs

  18. A neural computational model for animal's time-to-collision estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Yao, Dezhong

    2013-04-17

    The time-to-collision (TTC) is the time elapsed before a looming object hits the subject. An accurate estimation of TTC plays a critical role in the survival of animals in nature and acts as an important factor in artificial intelligence systems that depend on judging and avoiding potential dangers. The theoretic formula for TTC is 1/τ≈θ'/sin θ, where θ and θ' are the visual angle and its variation, respectively, and the widely used approximation computational model is θ'/θ. However, both of these measures are too complex to be implemented by a biological neuronal model. We propose a new simple computational model: 1/τ≈Mθ-P/(θ+Q)+N, where M, P, Q, and N are constants that depend on a predefined visual angle. This model, weighted summation of visual angle model (WSVAM), can achieve perfect implementation through a widely accepted biological neuronal model. WSVAM has additional merits, including a natural minimum consumption and simplicity. Thus, it yields a precise and neuronal-implemented estimation for TTC, which provides a simple and convenient implementation for artificial vision, and represents a potential visual brain mechanism.

  19. Computer simulation of displacement cascade damages in metals using binary collision approximation code 'MARLOWE'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Nishio; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    1985-01-01

    The derivation of basic equations of the computer simulation code 'MARLOWE' was examined in detail, which was treated by the binary collision approximation developed by Robinson and Torrens. The 'MARLOWE' program was used for the simulation of the three dimensional structure of displacement cascade damages of Au, Cu and Al, which were generated by primary knock-on atoms (PKA) of 1 keV to 40 keV. Results were seriously affected by the selection of parameter of Frenkel defect formation E disp and ion movement E quit with the close Frenkel defect recombination criteria and E disp = E quit , it was found that E disp of 11 eV, 5 eV, 5 eV are reasonable for the simulation calculation for Au, Cu, and Al, respectively. Cascade seems to have subcascade structures even for 40 keV PKA. (author)

  20. Cluster-collision frequency. II. Estimation of the collision rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amadon, A.S.; Marlow, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    Gas-phase cluster-collision rates, including effects of cluster morphology and long-range intermolecular forces, are calculated. Identical pairs of icosahedral or dodecahedral carbon tetrachloride clusters of 13, 33, and 55 molecules in two different relative orientations were discussed in the preceding paper [Phys. Rev. A 43, 5483 (1991)]: long-range interaction energies were derived based upon (i) exact calculations of the iterated, or many-body, induced-dipole interaction energies for the clusters in two fixed relative orientations; and (ii) bulk, or continuum descriptions (Lifshitz--van der Waals theory), of spheres of corresponding masses and diameters. In this paper, collision rates are calculated according to an exact description of the rates for small spheres interacting via realistic potentials. Utilizing the interaction energies of the preceding paper, several estimates of the collision rates are given by treating the discrete clusters in fixed relative orientations, by computing rotationally averaged potentials for the discrete clusters, and by approximating the clusters as continuum spheres. For the discrete, highly symmetric clusters treated here, the rates using the rotationally averaged potentials closely approximate the fixed-orientation rates and the values of the intercluster potentials for cluster surface separations under 2 A have negligible effect on the overall collision rates. While the 13-molecule cluster-collision rate differs by 50% from the rate calculated as if the cluster were bulk matter, the two larger cluster-collision rates differ by less than 15% from the macroscopic rates, thereby indicating the transition of microscopic to macroscopic behavior

  1. Expansion, thermalization, and entropy production in high-energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiselberg, H.; Wang, X.

    1996-01-01

    The thermalization process is studied in an expanding parton gas using the Boltzmann equation with two types of collision terms. In the relaxation time approximation we determine the criteria under which a time-dependent relaxation time leads to thermalization of the partons. We calculate the entropy production due to collisions for the general time-dependent relaxation time. In a perturbative QCD approach on the other hand, we can, given the initial conditions, estimate the effective relaxation time due to elastic collisions; this will be an upper limit only since radiative processes will also contribute to thermalization. We find that the parton gas does thermalize eventually but only after having undergone a phase of free streaming and gradual equilibration where considerable entropy is produced (open-quote open-quote after burning close-quote close-quote). The final entropy and thus particle density depends on the collision time as well as the initial conditions (a open-quote open-quote memory effect close-quote close-quote). Results for entropy production are presented based upon various model estimates of early parton production. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. Real-time Collision Avoidance and Path Optimizer for Semi-autonomous UAVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawary, A. F.; Razak, N. A.

    2018-05-01

    Whilst UAV offers a potentially cheaper and more localized observation platform than current satellite or land-based approaches, it requires an advance path planner to reveal its true potential, particularly in real-time missions. Manual control by human will have limited line-of-sights and prone to errors due to careless and fatigue. A good alternative solution is to equip the UAV with semi-autonomous capabilities that able to navigate via a pre-planned route in real-time fashion. In this paper, we propose an easy-and-practical path optimizer based on the classical Travelling Salesman Problem and adopts a brute force search method to re-optimize the route in the event of collisions using range finder sensor. The former utilizes a Simple Genetic Algorithm and the latter uses Nearest Neighbour algorithm. Both algorithms are combined to optimize the route and avoid collision at once. Although many researchers proposed various path planning algorithms, we find that it is difficult to integrate on a basic UAV model and often lacks of real-time collision detection optimizer. Therefore, we explore a practical benefit from this approach using on-board Arduino and Ardupilot controllers by manually emulating the motion of an actual UAV model prior to test on the flying site. The result showed that the range finder sensor provides a real-time data to the algorithm to find a collision-free path and eventually optimized the route successfully.

  3. Daylight saving time can decrease the frequency of wildlife–vehicle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, William A.; FitzGibbon, Sean I.; Barth, Benjamin J.; Niehaus, Amanda C.; David, Gwendolyn K.; Taylor, Brendan D.; Matsushige, Helena; Melzer, Alistair; Bercovitch, Fred B.; Carrick, Frank; Jones, Darryl N.; Dexter, Cathryn; Gillett, Amber; Predavec, Martin; Lunney, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Daylight saving time (DST) could reduce collisions with wildlife by changing the timing of commuter traffic relative to the behaviour of nocturnal animals. To test this idea, we tracked wild koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in southeast Queensland, where koalas have declined by 80% in the last 20 years, and compared their movements with traffic patterns along roads where they are often killed. Using a simple model, we found that DST could decrease collisions with koalas by 8% on weekdays and 11% at weekends, simply by shifting the timing of traffic relative to darkness. Wildlife conservation and road safety should become part of the debate on DST. PMID:27881767

  4. Collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Saenz, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent close-coupling calculations of the ionization and excitation cross section for antiproton collisions with molecular hydrogen ions are performed in an impact energy range from 0.5 keV to 10 MeV. The Born-Oppenheimer and Franck-Condon approximations as well as the impact parameter...

  5. Time-reversal invariance in multiple collisions between coupled masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, F.S.

    1989-01-01

    The time evolution of two mechanical oscillators coupled by a spring can (but need not) exhibit an instant t = 2t' when the initial conditions at t = 0 have been exactly restored. When that is the case, then at t = t' energy and momentum have been exchanged exactly as in an elastic collision between two free particles, and the evolution of the system from t = t' to 2t' is related to that from 0 to t' by time-reversal invariance. A similar ''simulation of elastic scattering'' at t = t' can occur for two free particles coupled via collisions with an intermediary mass that bounces back and forth between the two particles provided the intermediary is left at rest at t = t'. Examined here is the time evolution of the exchange of momentum and energy for these two examples, determining the values of the coupling spring constant (or mass value) of the intermediating spring (or mass) needed to simulate single elastic scattering between free particles, and looking at the manifestation of time-reversal invariance

  6. Semiclassical approximation to time-dependent Hartree--Fock theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworzecka, M.; Poggioli, R.

    1976-01-01

    Working within a time-dependent Hartree-Fock framework, one develops a semiclassical approximation appropriate for large systems. It is demonstrated that the standard semiclassical approach, the Thomas-Fermi approximation, is inconsistent with Hartree-Fock theory when the basic two-body interaction is short-ranged (as in nuclear systems, for example). However, by introducing a simple extension of the Thomas-Fermi approximation, one overcomes this problem. One also discusses the infinite nuclear matter problem and point out that time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory yields collective modes of the zero sound variety instead of ordinary hydrodynamic (first) sound. One thus emphasizes that one should be extremely circumspect when attempting to cast the equations of motion of time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory into a hydrodynamic-like form

  7. Time-dependent observables in heavy ion collisions. Part I. Setting up the formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Kovchegov, Yuri V.

    2018-03-01

    We adapt the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism to study heavy-ion collisions in perturbative QCD. Employing the formalism, we calculate the two-point gluon correlation function G 22 aμ, bν due to the lowest-order classical gluon fields in the McLerran-Venugopalan model of heavy ion collisions and observe an interesting transition from the classical fields to the quasi-particle picture at later times. Motivated by this observation, we push the formalism to higher orders in the coupling and calculate the contribution to G 22 aμ, bν coming from the diagrams representing a single rescattering between two of the produced gluons. We assume that the two gluons go on mass shell both before and after the rescattering. The result of our calculation depends on which region of integration over the proper time of the rescattering τ Z gives the correct correlation function at late proper time τ when the gluon distribution is measured. For (i) τ Z ≫ 1 /Q s and τ - τ Z ≫ 1 /Q s (with Q s the saturation scale) we obtain the same results as from the Boltzmann equation. For (ii) τ - τ Z ≫ τ Z ≫ 1 /Q s we end up with a result very different from kinetic theory and consistent with a picture of "free-streaming" particles. Due to the approximations made, our calculation is too coarse to indicate whether the region (i) or (ii) is the correct one: to resolve this controversy, we shall present a detailed diagrammatic calculation of the rescattering correction in the φ 4 theory in the second paper of this duplex.

  8. Formation and disintegration of high-density nuclear matter in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazoe, Yasuhiro; Matsuoka, Kazuo; Sano, Mitsuo

    1976-01-01

    The formation of high-density nuclear matter which may be expected to be attained in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and the subsequent disintegration of dense matter are investigated by means of the hydrodynamics. Head-on collisions of identical nuclei are considered in the nonrelativistic approximation. The compressed density cannot exceed 4 times of the normal one so long as the freedom of only nucleons is considered, and can become higher than 4 times when other freedoms such as the productions of mesons and also nucleon isobars are additionally taken into account. The angular distributions for ejected particles predominate both forwards and backwards at low collision energies, corresponding to the formation of nuclear density less than 2 times of the normal density and become isotropic at the point of 2 times of the normal one. As the collision energy increases further, lateral ejection is intensified gradually. (auth.)

  9. One- and two-body dissipation in peripheral heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, J.; Feldmeier, H.

    1980-01-01

    For peripheral collisions of heavy ions we solve the man-body Schroedinger equation in second order time-dependent perturbation theory. The two nuclei interact via a two-body interaction of finite range. With controllable approximations we get to a sensible comparison between 1p-1h excitations caused by the coherent Hartree part and direct 2p-2h excitations both created by the same two-body interaction. The results of the calculation show that for peripheral collisions almost all excitation energy originates from one-body dissipation. Furthermore we encounter large virtual excitations during the collision indicating a non Markovian process. (orig.)

  10. Translational Entanglement and Teleportation of Matter Wavepackets by Collisions and Half-Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, L.; Tal, A.; Kurizki, G.

    To date, the translationally-entangled state originally proposed by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) in 1935 has not been experimentally realized for massive particles. Opatrný and Kurizki [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3180 (2000)] have suggested the creation of a position- and momentum-correlated, i.e., translationally-entangled, pair of particles approximating the EPR state by dissociation of cold diatomic molecules, and further manipulation of the EPR pair effecting matter-wave teleportation. Here we aim at setting the principles of and quantifying translational entanglement by collisions and half-collisions. In collisions, the resonance width s and the initial phase-space distributions are shown to determine the degree of post-collisional momentum entanglement. Half-collisions (dissociation) are shown to yield different types of approximate EPR states. We analyse a feasible realization of translational EPR entanglement and teleportation via cold-molecule Raman dissociation and subsequent collisions, resolving both practical and conceptual difficulties it has faced so far: How to avoid entanglement loss due to the wavepacket spreading of the dissociation fragments? How to measure both position and momentum correlations of the dissociation fragments with sufficient accuracy to verify their EPR correlations? How to reliably perform two-particle (Bell) position and momentum measurements on one of the fragments and the wavepacket to be teleported?

  11. Formation time of hadrons and density of matter produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisut, J.; Zavada, P.

    1994-06-01

    Densities of interacting hadronic matter produced in Oxygen-Lead and Sulphur-Lead collisions at 200 GeV/nucleon are estimated as a function of the formation time of hadrons. Uncertainties in our knowledge of the critical temperature T c and of the formation time of hadrons τ 0 permit at present three scenarios: an optimistic one (QGP has already been produced in collisions of Oxygen and Sulphur with heavy ions and will be copiously in Lead collisions), a pessimistic one (QGP cannot be produced at 200 GeV/nucleon) and an intermediate one (QGP has not been produced in Oxygen and Sulphur Interactions with heavy ions and will be at best produced only marginally in Pb-collisions). The last option is found to be the most probable. (author)

  12. Bubble collisions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siklos, S.T.C.; Wu, Z.C.; University of Science and Technology of China, Hofei, Anhwei)

    1983-01-01

    The collision of two bubbles of true vacuum in a background of false vacuum is considered in the context of General Relativity. It is found that in the thin wall approximation, the problem, can be solved exactly. The region to the future of the collision is described by the pseudo-Schwarzschild de Sitter metric. The parameters in this metric are found by solving the junction conditions at each collision. (author)

  13. Applications of Boltzmann Langevin equation to nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suraud, E.; Belkacem, M.; Stryjewski, J.; Ayik, S.

    1991-01-01

    An approximate method for obtaining numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-Langevin equation is proposed. The method is applied to calculate the time evolution of the mean value and dispersion of the quadrupole and octupole moments of the momentum distribution in nucleus-nucleus collisions, and some consequences are discussed

  14. Nernst effect beyond the relaxation-time approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Pikulin, D. I.; Hou, Chang-Yu; Beenakker, C. W. J.

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by recent interest in the Nernst effect in cuprate superconductors, we calculate this magneto-thermo-electric effect for an arbitrary (anisotropic) quasiparticle dispersion relation and elastic scattering rate. The exact solution of the linearized Boltzmann equation is compared with the commonly used relaxation-time approximation. We find qualitative deficiencies of this approximation, to the extent that it can get the sign wrong of the Nernst coefficient. Ziman's improvement of the...

  15. Comparison of the Born series and rational approximants in potential scattering. [Pade approximants, Yikawa and exponential potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibotti, C R; Grinstein, F F [Rosario Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenieria

    1976-05-08

    It is discussed the real utility of Born series for the calculation of atomic collision processes in the Born approximation. It is suggested to make use of Pade approximants and it is shown that this approach provides very fast convergent sequences over all the energy range studied. Yukawa and exponential potential are explicitly considered and the results are compared with high-order Born approximation.

  16. Determination of recombination radius in Si for binary collision approximation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Displacement damage caused by ions or neutrons in microelectronic devices can have significant effect on the performance of these devices. Therefore, it is important to predict not only the displacement damage profile, but also its magnitude precisely. Analytical methods and binary collision approximation codes working with amorphous targets use the concept of displacement energy, the energy that a lattice atom has to receive to create a permanent replacement. It was found that this “displacement energy” is direction dependent; it can range from 12 to 32 eV in silicon. Obviously, this model fails in BCA codes that work with crystalline targets, such as Marlowe. Marlowe does not use displacement energy; instead, it uses lattice binding energy only and then pairs the interstitial atoms with vacancies. Then based on the configuration of the Frenkel pairs it classifies them as close, near, or distant pairs, and considers the distant pairs the permanent replacements. Unfortunately, this separation is an ad hoc assumption, and the results do not agree with molecular dynamics calculations. After irradiation, there is a prompt recombination of interstitials and vacancies if they are nearby, within a recombination radius. In order to implement this recombination radius in Marlowe, we used the comparison of MD and Marlowe calculation in a range of ion energies in single crystal silicon target. The calculations showed that a single recombination radius of ∼7.4 Å in Marlowe for a range of ion energies gives an excellent agreement with MD.

  17. Slab-diffusion approximation from time-constant-like calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.W.

    1976-12-01

    Two equations were derived which describe the quantity and any fluid diffused from a slab as a function of time. One equation is applicable to the initial stage of the process; the other to the final stage. Accuracy is 0.2 percent at the one point where both approximations apply and where accuracy of either approximation is the poorest. Characterizing other rate processes might be facilitated by the use of the concept of NOLOR (normal of the logarithm of the rate) and its time dependence

  18. Case studies in atomic collision physics

    CERN Document Server

    McDaniel, E W

    1974-01-01

    Case Studies in Atomic Physics III focuses on case studies on atomic and molecular physics, including atomic collisions, transport properties of electrons, ions, molecules, and photons, interaction potentials, spectroscopy, and surface phenomena. The selection first discusses detailed balancing in the time-dependent impact parameter method, as well as time-reversal in the impact parameter method and coupled state approximation. The text also examines the mechanisms of electron production in ion. Topics include measurement of doubly differential cross sections and electron spectra, direct Coul

  19. Early time evolution of high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Rainer J [Cyclotron Institute and Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); RIKEN/BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    We solve the Yang-Mills equations in the framework of the McLerran-Venugopalan model for small times {tau} after a collision of two nuclei. An analytic expansion around {tau} = 0 leads to explicit results for the field strength and the energy-momentum tensor of the gluon field at early times. We then discuss constraints for the energy density, pressure and flow of the plasma phase that emerges after thermalization of the gluon field.

  20. Thermal, chemical and spectral equilibration in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almási, Gábor András, E-mail: g.almasi@gsi.de [Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wolf, György, E-mail: wolf.gyorgy@wigner.mta.hu [Wigner RCP, Budapest (Hungary)

    2015-11-15

    We have considered the equilibration in relativistic heavy ion collisions at energies 1–7 A GeV using our transport model. We applied periodic boundary conditions to close the system in a box. We found that the thermal equilibration takes place in the first 20–40 fm/c whose time is comparable to the duration of a heavy ion collision. The chemical equilibration is a much slower process and the system does not equilibrate in a heavy ion collision. We have shown that in the testparticle simulation of the Boltzmann equation the mass spectra of broad resonances follow instantaneously their in-medium spectral functions as expected from the Markovian approximation to the Kadanoff–Baym equations employed via the (local) gradient expansion.

  1. Classical parallel transport in a multi-species plasma from a 21 moment approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, G.J.

    1993-11-01

    Momentum equations from a 21 moment Grad approximation are presented, including full expressions for the collision terms for the case of elastic collisions. Collision terms for the particular case of an electron-ion-impurity plasma are then given. In addition, for the positive ions, approximations to the collision terms are given for a common ion temperature, T z = T i , and a massive impurity species, m z >> m i and general temperatures. The moment equations are solved for the classical parallel transport coefficients for the specific case of a low impurity density plasma and the results compared with those give by other authors. The range of forms for the collision terms is given to allow more general or other types of solutions to be obtained. (Author)

  2. Microscopic description of low-energy nuclear collisions: review and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonche, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of this lecture is a review of the microscopic approaches to nuclear reactions. Semi-phenomenological theories will not be discussed. First the Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock formalism is recalled. The effective nucleon-nucleon interactions used in TDHF calculations are discussed. Applications to collisions are presented in different approximation scheme, one-dimensional dynamics, approximate three-dimensional ones.... Finally two microscopic extensions beyond mean-field are reviewed: the variational principal of Balian and Veneroni and the implementation of residual two-body interactions in the Time-Dependent Density Matrix (TDDM) and the Extended Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock schemes (ET-DHF). (author)

  3. Impact of daylight saving time on road traffic collision risk: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Rachel N; Sarma, Kiran M

    2017-07-02

    Bills have been put forward in the UK and Republic of Ireland proposing a move to Central European Time (CET). Proponents argue that such a change will have benefits for road safety, with daylight being shifted from the morning, when collision risk is lower, to the evening, when risk is higher. Studies examining the impact of daylight saving time (DST) on road traffic collision risk can help inform the debate on the potential road safety benefits of a move to CET. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the impact of DST on collision risk. Major electronic databases were searched, with no restrictions as to date of publication (the last search was performed in January 2017). Access to unpublished reports was requested through an international expert group. Studies that provided a quantitative analysis of the effect of DST on road safety-related outcomes were included. The primary outcomes of interest were road traffic collisions, injuries and fatalities. Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen examined the short-term impact of transitions around DST and 12 examined long-term effects. Findings from the short-term studies were inconsistent. The long-term findings suggested a positive effect of DST. However, this cannot be attributed solely to DST, as a range of road collision risk factors vary over time. The evidence from this review cannot support or refute the assertion that a permanent shift in light from morning to evening will have a road safety benefit. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Extreme and First-Passage Time of Ship Collision Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    1983-01-01

    The paper outlines a general theory from which the distribution function of the extreme peak collision load encountered during a certain intended lifetime can be cal culated assuming the arrival of ship collisions to be specified by a Poisson counting proces s.......The paper outlines a general theory from which the distribution function of the extreme peak collision load encountered during a certain intended lifetime can be cal culated assuming the arrival of ship collisions to be specified by a Poisson counting proces s....

  5. Time-dependent Hartree approximation and time-dependent harmonic oscillator model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaizot, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    We present an analytically soluble model for studying nuclear collective motion within the framework of the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) approximation. The model reduces the TDH equations to the Schroedinger equation of a time-dependent harmonic oscillator. Using canonical transformations and coherent states we derive a few properties of the time-dependent harmonic oscillator which are relevant for applications. We analyse the role of the normal modes in the time evolution of a system governed by TDH equations. We show how these modes couple together due to the anharmonic terms generated by the non-linearity of the theory. (orig.)

  6. Time and Memory Efficient Online Piecewise Linear Approximation of Sensor Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützmacher, Florian; Beichler, Benjamin; Hein, Albert; Kirste, Thomas; Haubelt, Christian

    2018-05-23

    Piecewise linear approximation of sensor signals is a well-known technique in the fields of Data Mining and Activity Recognition. In this context, several algorithms have been developed, some of them with the purpose to be performed on resource constrained microcontroller architectures of wireless sensor nodes. While microcontrollers are usually constrained in computational power and memory resources, all state-of-the-art piecewise linear approximation techniques either need to buffer sensor data or have an execution time depending on the segment’s length. In the paper at hand, we propose a novel piecewise linear approximation algorithm, with a constant computational complexity as well as a constant memory complexity. Our proposed algorithm’s worst-case execution time is one to three orders of magnitude smaller and its average execution time is three to seventy times smaller compared to the state-of-the-art Piecewise Linear Approximation (PLA) algorithms in our experiments. In our evaluations, we show that our algorithm is time and memory efficient without sacrificing the approximation quality compared to other state-of-the-art piecewise linear approximation techniques, while providing a maximum error guarantee per segment, a small parameter space of only one parameter, and a maximum latency of one sample period plus its worst-case execution time.

  7. Age and gender differences in time to collision at braking from the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Jade; Kusano, Kristofer D; Gabler, Hampton C

    2014-01-01

    Forward collision warning (FCW) is an active safety system that aims to mitigate the effect of forward collisions by warning the driver of objects in front of the vehicle. Success of FCW relies on how drivers react to the alerts. Drivers who receive too many warnings that they deem as unnecessary-that is, nuisance alarms-may grow to distrust and turn the system off. To reduce the perception of nuisance alarms, FCW systems can be tailored to individual driving styles, but these driving styles must first be characterized. The objective of this study was to characterize differences in braking behavior between age and gender groups in car-following scenarios using data from the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study. The data source for this study was the 100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study, which recorded the driving of 108 primary drivers for approximately a year. Braking behavior was characterized in terms of time to collision (TTC) at brake application, a common metric used in the design of warning thresholds of FCW. Because of the large volume of data analyzed, the TTC at which drivers braked during car-following situations was collected via an automated search algorithm. The minimum TTC for each vehicle speed 10 mph increment from 10 mph to 80 mph was recorded for each driver. Mixed model analysis of variance was used to examine the differences between age and gender groups. In total, 527,861 brake applications contained in 11,503 trips were analyzed. Differences in TTC at braking were statistically significant for age and gender (Pbraking of 2.5±0.8 s, and females age 31-50 (n=6) had the highest average minimum TTC at braking of 6.4±0.9 s. On average, women (n=32) braked at a TTC 1.3 s higher than men (n=52). Age was a statistically significant factor for TTC at braking between participants under 30 (n=42) and participants over 30 (n=42), with the latter braking 1.7 s on average before the former. No statistical significance was found between ages 18-20 (n=15) and

  8. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalla, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain nucleus-nucleus collisions based on nuclear emulsion experiments. Peripheral and central collisions are described in detail. Assuming the fireball model, the concepts of geometry, kinematics and thermodynamics in this model are discussed. Projectile and target fragmentations are studied. The advantages of using nuclear emulsions as detectors, are mentioned. Proton-nucleus collisions and nucleus-nucleus collisions are compared. Interactions, of projectiles such as Ca, B and C on targets such as Pb, Ag, Br etc. at very high energies (approximately 300 to 1700 Gev) are listed. A comparison of the near multiplicities in these interactions is given. A generalized explanation is given on the processes involved in these interactions. (A.K.)

  9. New directions in low energy electron molecule collision calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, P.G.; Noble, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    New theoretical and computational methods for studying low energy electron molecule collisions are discussed. Having considered the fixed-nuclei approximation and the form of the expansion of the total collision wavefunction, the various approximations which have been made are examined, including the static plus model exchange approximation, the static exchange approximation and the close coupling approximation, particular attention being paid to methods of including the molecular charge polarisation. Various ways which have been developed to solve the resultant equations are discussed and it is found that there is increasing emphasis being given to methods which combine the advantages of discrete multi-centre analytic bases with single centre numerical bases. (U.K.)

  10. Discrete-Time Stable Generalized Self-Learning Optimal Control With Approximation Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinglai; Li, Benkai; Song, Ruizhuo

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a generalized policy iteration (GPI) algorithm with approximation errors is developed for solving infinite horizon optimal control problems for nonlinear systems. The developed stable GPI algorithm provides a general structure of discrete-time iterative adaptive dynamic programming algorithms, by which most of the discrete-time reinforcement learning algorithms can be described using the GPI structure. It is for the first time that approximation errors are explicitly considered in the GPI algorithm. The properties of the stable GPI algorithm with approximation errors are analyzed. The admissibility of the approximate iterative control law can be guaranteed if the approximation errors satisfy the admissibility criteria. The convergence of the developed algorithm is established, which shows that the iterative value function is convergent to a finite neighborhood of the optimal performance index function, if the approximate errors satisfy the convergence criterion. Finally, numerical examples and comparisons are presented.

  11. Analysis of corrections to the eikonal approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebborn, C.; Capel, P.

    2017-11-01

    Various corrections to the eikonal approximations are studied for two- and three-body nuclear collisions with the goal to extend the range of validity of this approximation to beam energies of 10 MeV/nucleon. Wallace's correction does not improve much the elastic-scattering cross sections obtained at the usual eikonal approximation. On the contrary, a semiclassical approximation that substitutes the impact parameter by a complex distance of closest approach computed with the projectile-target optical potential efficiently corrects the eikonal approximation. This opens the possibility to analyze data measured down to 10 MeV/nucleon within eikonal-like reaction models.

  12. Future directions in electron--ion collision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, K.J.; Griffin, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Summary of session on synergistic co-ordination of theory and experiment; synergism between experiment and theory in atomic physics; comparison of theory and experiment for electron-ion excitation and ionization; summary of session on new theoretical and computational methods; new theoretical and computational methods-r-matrix calculations; the coulomb three-body problem: a progress report; summary of session on needs and applications for electron-ion collisional data; electron-ion collisions in the plasma edge; needs and applications of theoretical data for electron impact excitation; summary of session on relativistic effects, indirect effects, resonance, etc; direct and resonant processes in electron-ion collisions; relativistic calculations of electron impact ionization and dielectronic recombination cross section for highly charged ions; electron-ion recombination in the close-coupling approximation; modified resonance amplitudes with strongly correlated channels; a density-matrix approach to the broadening of spectral lines by autoionization, radiative transitions and electron-ion collisions; towards a time-dependent description of electron-atom/ion collisions two electron systems; and comments on inclusion of the generalized bright interaction in electron impact excitation of highly charged ions

  13. Study of the performance of collision short time approximation for neutron scattering using discrete frequency distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Oliveira, A.B.; Amorim, E.S. do; Galvao, O.B.

    1981-03-01

    Double differential cross sections for thermal neutrons, based on incoherent approximation, using continum distribution as discrete frequency set are theoretically estimated, regarding two models previously done. The FASTT computer program is used in order to obtain a numerical estimation. (L.C.) [pt

  14. Continuum orbital approximations in weak-coupling theories for inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peek, J.M.; Mann, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    Two approximations, motivated by heavy-particle scattering theory, are tested for weak-coupling electron-atom (ion) inelastic scattering theory. They consist of replacing the one-electron scattering orbitals by their Langer uniform approximations and the use of an average trajectory approximation which entirely avoids the necessity for generating continuum orbitals. Numerical tests for a dipole-allowed and a dipole-forbidden event, based on Coulomb-Born theory with exchange neglected, reveal the error trends. It is concluded that the uniform approximation gives a satisfactory prediction for traditional weak-coupling theories while the average approximation should be limited to collision energies exceeding at least twice the threshold energy. The accuracy for both approximations is higher for positive ions than for neutral targets. Partial-wave collision-strength data indicate that greater care should be exercised in using these approximations to predict quantities differential in the scattering angle. An application to the 2s 2 S-2p 2 P transition in Ne VIII is presented

  15. DFT studies on proton-ethylene collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiping; Zhang Fengshou; Wang Jing

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the time-dependent local-density approximation (TDLDA)which applied to valence electrons, coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics of ions, the microscopic mechanisms of collisions between energetic protons and ethylene are studied. Not only the amount of energy lost of the projectile, but also the electron and vibration excitations of the target are identified. In addition, the influences of the collision orientation on the energy loss of the proton and excitation dynamics of ethylene are discussed. It is found that the ionization is enhanced and more electrons are captured by the proton when the proton with the impact energy less than 250 eV moves perpendicularly to the molecular plane. A strong relation between the proton energy lost and the impact orientation is obtained when the impact energy is larger than 250 eV. (authors)

  16. Driving-Simulator-Based Test on the Effectiveness of Auditory Red-Light Running Vehicle Warning System Based on Time-To-Collision Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuedong Yan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The collision avoidance warning system is an emerging technology designed to assist drivers in avoiding red-light running (RLR collisions at intersections. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of auditory warning information on collision avoidance behaviors in the RLR pre-crash scenarios and further to examine the casual relationships among the relevant factors. A driving-simulator-based experiment was designed and conducted with 50 participants. The data from the experiments were analyzed by approaches of ANOVA and structural equation modeling (SEM. The collisions avoidance related variables were measured in terms of brake reaction time (BRT, maximum deceleration and lane deviation in this study. It was found that the collision avoidance warning system can result in smaller collision rates compared to the without-warning condition and lead to shorter reaction times, larger maximum deceleration and less lane deviation. Furthermore, the SEM analysis illustrate that the audio warning information in fact has both direct and indirect effect on occurrence of collisions, and the indirect effect plays a more important role on collision avoidance than the direct effect. Essentially, the auditory warning information can assist drivers in detecting the RLR vehicles in a timely manner, thus providing drivers more adequate time and space to decelerate to avoid collisions with the conflicting vehicles.

  17. Fragment ion distribution in charge-changing collisions of 2-MeV Si ions with C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, A.; Tsuchida, H.; Miyabe, K.; Majima, T.; Nakai, Y.

    2001-09-01

    We have measured positive fragment ions produced in collisions of 2 MeV Siq+ (q=0, 1, 2, 4) projectiles with a C60 molecular target. The measurement was performed with a time-of-flight coincidence method between fragment ions and charge-selected outgoing projectiles. For all the charge-changing collisions investigated here, the mass distribution of small fragment ions C+n (n=1-12) can be approximated fairly well by a power-law form of n-λ as a function of the cluster size n. The power λ derived from each mass distribution is found to change strongly according to different charge-changing collisions. As a remarkable experimental finding, the values of λ(loss) in electron loss collisions are almost the same for the same final charge states k irrespective of the initial charge q, exhibiting a nearly perfect linear relationship with k. We also performed calculations of the projectile ionization on the basis of the semiclassical approximation and obtained inelastic energy deposition for individual collision processes. The estimated energy deposition is found to have a simple correlation with the experimentally determined values of λ(loss).

  18. Determination of the event collision time with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Janssen, M M; Andrei, C.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C. D.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Anwar, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buhler, P.; Iga Buitron, S. A.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A R; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, Sukhee; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crkovská, J.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; De Caro, A.; De Cataldo, G.; De Conti, C.; De Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Souza, R. Derradi; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, O.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Duggal, A. K.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eulisse, G.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A S; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; De Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Garg, P.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; Germain, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Greiner, L. C.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Guzman, I. B.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.W.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Islam, M. S.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H S Y; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L.D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.M.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Khuntia, A.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.-S.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.L.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kundu, Seema; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lazaridis, L.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Strunz-Lehner, Christine; Lehrbach, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Llope, W. J.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal’Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, Alicia; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, Isabel M.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Mishra, T.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Myers, C. J.; Naik, B.; Nair, Rajiv; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal Da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Negrao De Oliveira, R. A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Ohlson, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pacik, V.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, J.; Park, J.-W.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, X.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L M; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Poppenborg, H.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Pozdniakov, V.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Rana, D. B.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Ratza, V.; Ravasenga, I.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Sas, M. H.P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sett, P.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q. Y.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J.M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A P; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; tripathy, S.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Umaka, E. N.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vázquez Doce, O.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Vértesi, R.; Vickovic, L.; Vigolo, S.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Voscek, D.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Willems, G. A.; Williams, M. C S; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Witt, W. E.; Yalcin, S.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I. K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zmeskal, J.

    2017-01-01

    Particle identification is an important feature of the ALICE detector at the LHC. In particular, for particle identification via the time-of-flight technique, the precise determination of the event collision time represents an important ingredient of the quality of the measurement. In this paper,

  19. Evolution of rotating stellar clusters at the stage of inelastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of a gas-stellar disk in a dense stellar cluster of small ellipticity (epsilon or approximately 0.2-0.3. Possible existence of a thin stellar disk in a dense stellar cluster is analysed. With epsilon in the above range, collisions between cluster and disk stars are shown to have no effect on the evolution of the disk up to the instability time, provided that the ratio of disk stellar mass to the cluster stellar mass > or approximately 0.04

  20. Qsub(N) approximation for slowing-down in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte.

    1976-05-01

    An accurate and simple determination of the neutron energy spectra in fast reactors poses several problems. The slowing-down models (Fermi, Wigner, Goertzel-Greuling...) which are different forms of the approximation with order N=0 may prove inaccurate, in spite of recent improvements. A new method of approximation is presented which turns out to be a method of higher order: the Qsub(N) method. It is characterized by a rapid convergence with respect to the order N, by the use of some global parameters to represent the slowing-down and by the expression of the Boltzmann integral equation in a differential formalism. Numerous test verify that, for the order N=2 or 3, the method gives precision equivalent to that of the multigroup numerical integration for the spectra with greatly reduced calculational effort. Furthermore, since the Qsub(N) expressions are a kind of synthesis method, they allow calculation of the spatial Green's function, or the use of collision probabilities to find the flux. Both possibilities have been introduced into existing reactor codes: EXCALIBUR, TRALOR, RE MINEUR... Some applications to multi-zone media (core, blanket, reflector of Masurca pile and exponential slabs) are presented in the isotropic collision approximation. The case of linearly anisotropic collisions is theoretically resolved [fr

  1. Thermal equilibrium in strongly damped collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaddar, S.K.; De, J.N.; Krishan, K.

    1985-01-01

    Energy division between colliding nuclei in damped collisions is studied in the statistical nucleon exchange model. The reactions 56 Fe+ 165 Ho and 56 Fe+ 238 U at incident energy of 465 MeV are considered for this purpose. It is found that the excitation energy is approximately equally shared between the nuclei for the peripheral collisions and the systems slowly approach equilibrium for more central collisions. This is in conformity with the recent experimental observations. The calculated variances of the charge distributions are found to depend appreciably on the temperature and are in very good agreement with the experimental data

  2. The eclectic approach to gravitational waves from black hole collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, J.

    2001-01-01

    I present the first results in a new program intended to make the best use of all available technologies to provide an effective understanding of waves from inspiraling black hole binaries in time for imminent observations. In particular, I address the problem of combining the close-limit approximation describing ringing black holes and full numerical relativity, required for essentially nonlinear interactions. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach using general methods for a model problem, the head-on collision of black holes. Our method allows a more direct physical understanding of these collisions indicating clearly when non-linear methods are important. The success of this method supports our expectation that this unified approach will be able to provide astrophysically relevant results for black hole binaries in time to assist gravitational wave observations. (author)

  3. Violent heavy ion collisions around the Fermi energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borderie, B.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results on central collisions will be presented and it will be shown that a fusion process still occurs; deexcitation of the hot fused systems formed will be discussed. Then, from the qualitative evolution of central collision products from different reactions studied in the E/A range 20-84 MeV, the vanishing of fusion processes will be inferred; it will be discussed in terms of critical energy deposit and maximum excitation energy per nucleon that nuclei can carry. Finally results concerning the large production of light fragments (3 < approximately Z < approximately 12) experimentally observed in the Fermi energy domain will be presented and discussed in terms of a multifragmentation of the whole nuclear system or of part of it for intermediate impact parameter collisions (109 refs, 49 fig)

  4. Mean field approximation versus exact treatment of collisions in few-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemm, J.; Weiguny, A.; Giraud, B.G.

    1990-01-01

    A variational principle for calculating matrix elements of the full resolvent operator for a many-body system is studied. Its mean field approximation results in non-linear equations of Hartree (-Fock) type, with initial and final channel wave functions as driving terms. The mean field equations will in general have many solutions whereas the exact problem being linear, has a unique solution. In a schematic model with separable forces the mean field equations are analytically soluble, and for the exact problem the resulting integral equations are solved numerically. Comparing exact and mean field results over a wide range of system parameters, the mean field approach proves to be a very reliable approximation, which is not plagued by the notorious problem of defining asymptotic channels in the time-dependent mean field method. (orig.)

  5. Space-time structure of particle production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuka, Naohiko; Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Nara, Yasushi; Maruyama, Tomoyuki

    1998-07-01

    Space-Time structure of freeze-out of produced particles in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of two different cascade models, either with or without higher baryonic resonances. While higher excited baryonic resonances do not influence the spatial source size of freeze-out point, the freeze-out time distribution is shifted to be later by these resonances. (author)

  6. Accuracy of the centrifugal sudden approximation in the H + CHD3 → H2 + CD3 reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Chen, Jun; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.

    2014-01-01

    The initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method has been extended to calculate the coupled-channel reaction probabilities with total angular momentum J tot > 0 for the title reaction with seven degrees of freedom included. Fully converged integral cross sections were obtained for the ground and a number of vibrational excited initial states on a new potential energy surface recently constructed by this group using neural network fitting. As found from a previous study with the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation, all these initial vibrational excitations investigated in this study enhance the reactivity considerably at a given collision energy, in particular the CH stretch excited state. The energy initially deposited in CH stretch motion is more effective than translational energy on promoting the reaction in the entire energy region, while for CH bending or CD 3 umbrella excitations only at the high collision energy the vibrational energy becomes more effective. Our calculations also revealed that the accuracy of the CS approximation considerably deteriorates with the increase of J tot , in particular on the threshold energy. The CS approximation underestimates the integral cross sections for all these initial states, albeit not very severely. In general, it works better at high collision energies and for vibrationally excited initial states, with the increase of integral cross section

  7. Real-time dynamics of matrix quantum mechanics beyond the classical approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buividovich, Pavel; Hanada, Masanori; Schäfer, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    We describe a numerical method which allows to go beyond the classical approximation for the real-time dynamics of many-body systems by approximating the many-body Wigner function by the most general Gaussian function with time-dependent mean and dispersion. On a simple example of a classically chaotic system with two degrees of freedom we demonstrate that this Gaussian state approximation is accurate for significantly smaller field strengths and longer times than the classical one. Applying this approximation to matrix quantum mechanics, we demonstrate that the quantum Lyapunov exponents are in general smaller than their classical counterparts, and even seem to vanish below some temperature. This behavior resembles the finite-temperature phase transition which was found for this system in Monte-Carlo simulations, and ensures that the system does not violate the Maldacena-Shenker-Stanford bound λL < 2πT, which inevitably happens for classical dynamics at sufficiently small temperatures.

  8. On the quantum Landau collision operator and electron collisions in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daligault, Jérôme, E-mail: daligaul@lanl.gov [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The quantum Landau collision operator, which extends the widely used Landau/Fokker-Planck collision operator to include quantum statistical effects, is discussed. The quantum extension can serve as a reference model for including electron collisions in non-equilibrium dense plasmas, in which the quantum nature of electrons cannot be neglected. In this paper, the properties of the Landau collision operator that have been useful in traditional plasma kinetic theory and plasma transport theory are extended to the quantum case. We outline basic properties in connection with the conservation laws, the H-theorem, and the global and local equilibrium distributions. We discuss the Fokker-Planck form of the operator in terms of three potentials that extend the usual two Rosenbluth potentials. We establish practical closed-form expressions for these potentials under local thermal equilibrium conditions in terms of Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein integrals. We study the properties of linearized quantum Landau operator, and extend two popular approximations used in plasma physics to include collisions in kinetic simulations. We apply the quantum Landau operator to the classic test-particle problem to illustrate the physical effects embodied in the quantum extension. We present useful closed-form expressions for the electron-ion momentum and energy transfer rates. Throughout the paper, similarities and differences between the quantum and classical Landau collision operators are emphasized.

  9. On the quantum Landau collision operator and electron collisions in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-03-01

    The quantum Landau collision operator, which extends the widely used Landau/Fokker-Planck collision operator to include quantum statistical effects, is discussed. The quantum extension can serve as a reference model for including electron collisions in non-equilibrium dense plasmas, in which the quantum nature of electrons cannot be neglected. In this paper, the properties of the Landau collision operator that have been useful in traditional plasma kinetic theory and plasma transport theory are extended to the quantum case. We outline basic properties in connection with the conservation laws, the H-theorem, and the global and local equilibrium distributions. We discuss the Fokker-Planck form of the operator in terms of three potentials that extend the usual two Rosenbluth potentials. We establish practical closed-form expressions for these potentials under local thermal equilibrium conditions in terms of Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein integrals. We study the properties of linearized quantum Landau operator, and extend two popular approximations used in plasma physics to include collisions in kinetic simulations. We apply the quantum Landau operator to the classic test-particle problem to illustrate the physical effects embodied in the quantum extension. We present useful closed-form expressions for the electron-ion momentum and energy transfer rates. Throughout the paper, similarities and differences between the quantum and classical Landau collision operators are emphasized.

  10. Damping in nuclear collective modes in a semiclassical fluid-dynamical approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignolo, C.E.; Hernandez, Susana

    1989-01-01

    A semiclassical fluiddynamical model based on an usual scaling approximation (SCA) was extended to investigate the role of one and two-body dissipation in the widths of nuclear collective modes. The competition between one and two-body viscosity in: i) the collisionless (elastic) limit; ii) the hydrodynamical case and iii) the general viscoelastic regime is examined over the whole range of nuclear collision time scales. Numerical solutions are investigated for the first magnetic 2 - twist mode in 208 Pb. (Author) [es

  11. A multi scale approximation solution for the time dependent Boltzmann-transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.

    2004-03-01

    The basis of all transient simulations for nuclear reactor cores is the reliable calculation of the power production. The local power distribution is generally calculated by solving the space, time, energy and angle dependent neutron transport equation known as Boltzmann equation. The computation of exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation is very time consuming. For practical numerical simulations approximated solutions are usually unavoidable. The objective of this work is development of an effective multi scale approximation solution for the Boltzmann equation. Most of the existing methods are based on separation of space and time. The new suggested method is performed without space-time separation. This effective approximation solution is developed on the basis of an expansion for the time derivative of different approximations to the Boltzmann equation. The method of multiple scale expansion is used for the expansion of the time derivative, because the problem of the stiff time behaviour can't be expressed by standard expansion methods. This multiple scale expansion is used in this work to develop approximation solutions for different approximations of the Boltzmann equation, starting from the expansion of the point kinetics equations. The resulting analytic functions are used for testing the applicability and accuracy of the multiple scale expansion method for an approximation solution with 2 delayed neutron groups. The results are tested versus the exact analytical results for the point kinetics equations. Very good agreement between both solutions is obtained. The validity of the solution with 2 delayed neutron groups to approximate the behaviour of the system with 6 delayed neutron groups is demonstrated in an additional analysis. A strategy for a solution with 4 delayed neutron groups is described. A multiple scale expansion is performed for the space-time dependent diffusion equation for one homogenized cell with 2 delayed neutron groups. The result is

  12. QCD and the space-time evolution of high energy e+e-, p anti p, and heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1982-06-01

    We begin with a discussion of e + e - annihilation into hadrons, a process blessed with well-known elements of simplicity. We consider the opposite extreme of highly relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions. Here a space-time description has its own elements of simplicity, elements which might conceivably be applicable in hadron-hadron collisions. We also address the more immediate issues of how these ideas relate to present-day observations, especially high-energy hadron-hadron collisions. 40 references

  13. Collision-free gases in spatially homogeneous space-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maartens, R.; Maharaj, S.D.

    1985-01-01

    The kinematical and dynamical properties of one-component collision-free gases in spatially homogeneous, locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) space-times are analyzed. Following Ray and Zimmerman [Nuovo Cimento B 42, 183 (1977)], it is assumed that the distribution function f of the gas inherits the symmetry of space-time, in order to construct solutions of Liouville's equation. The redundancy of their further assumption that f be based on Killing vector constants of the motion is shown. The Ray and Zimmerman results for Kantowski--Sachs space-time are extended to all spatially homogeneous LRS space-times. It is shown that in all these space-times the kinematic average four-velocity u/sup i/ can be tilted relative to the homogeneous hypersurfaces. This differs from the perfect fluid case, in which only one space-time admits tilted u/sup i/, as shown by King and Ellis [Commun. Math. Phys. 31, 209 (1973)]. As a consequence, it is shown that all space-times admit nonzero acceleration and heat flow, while a subclass admits nonzero vorticity. The stress π/sub i/j is proportional to the shear sigma/sub i/j by virtue of the invariance of the distribution function. The evolution of tilt and the existence of perfect fluid solutions is also discussed

  14. Charge-transfer collisions involving few-electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, T.

    2016-01-01

    Ion-atom collision systems that involve more than one electron constitute nonseparable few-body problems, whose full solution is difficult to say the least. At impact energies well below 1 keV/amu an expansion of the stationary scattering wave function in terms of a limited number of products of nuclear and molecular state wave functions (amended to satisfy scattering boundary conditions) is feasible and usually sufficient to obtain accurate charge-transfer cross sections provided the electronic wave functions include configuration interaction. At energies above 1 keV/amu this approach becomes inefficient and close-coupling methods within the semi classical approximation are better suited to treat the problem. For bare-ion collisions from helium target atoms explicit solutions of the two-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation can be achieved, but are computationally costly and cannot be extended to problems which involve more than two electrons.

  15. Development of three-dimensional patient face model that enables real-time collision detection and cutting operation for a dental simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yamada, Yuya; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Noborio, Hiroshi; Imazato, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The virtual reality (VR) simulator is a useful tool to develop dental hand skill. However, VR simulations with reactions of patients have limited computational time to reproduce a face model. Our aim was to develop a patient face model that enables real-time collision detection and cutting operation by using stereolithography (STL) and deterministic finite automaton (DFA) data files. We evaluated dependence of computational cost and constructed the patient face model using the optimum condition for combining STL and DFA data files, and assessed the computational costs for operation in do-nothing, collision, cutting, and combination of collision and cutting. The face model was successfully constructed with low computational costs of 11.3, 18.3, 30.3, and 33.5 ms for do-nothing, collision, cutting, and collision and cutting, respectively. The patient face model could be useful for developing dental hand skill with VR.

  16. Systematics of atom-atom collision strengths at high speeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, G.H.; Inokuti, M.

    1980-01-01

    The collision strengths for atom-atom collisions at high speeds are calculated in the first Born approximation. We studied four classes of collisions, distinguished depending upon whether each of the collision partners becomes excited or not. The results of numerical calculations of the collision strengths are presented for all neutral atoms with Z< or =18. The calculations are based on atomic form factors and incoherent scattering functions found in the literature. The relative contribution of each class of collision processes to the total collision cross section is examined in detail. In general, inelastic processes dominate for low-Z atoms, while elastic scattering is more important for large Z. Other systematics of the collision strengths are comprehensively discussed. The relevant experimental literature has been surveyed and the results of this work for the three collision systems H-He, He-He, and H-Ar are compared with the data for electron-loss processes. Finally, suggestions are made for future work in measurements of atom-atom and ion-atom collision cross sections

  17. Effective collision frequency of electrons in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baille, P.; Chang, J.-S.; Claude, A.; Yau, A.W.; Hobson, R.M.; Ogram, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    The electron-neutral collision frequency in the noble gases has been calculated using recent numerical results for momentum transfer cross sections by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of electron velocities. In all these gases, except for argon, good agreement is obtained with most previously published experimental and theoretical data. Mean free path, mobilities and diffusion coefficients are also calculated from the resulting effective collision frequencies. The empirical formulae are presented for an electron temperature dependence of the electron-neutral collision frequency for all noble gases up to Tsub(e) < approximately 25.000 K. (author)

  18. Waiting-time approximations in multi-queue systems with cyclic service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxma, O.J.; Meister, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    This study is devoted to mean waiting-time approximations in a single-server multi-queue model with cyclic service and zero switching times of the server between consecutive queues. Two different service disciplines are considered: exhaustive service and (ordinary cyclic) nonexhaustive service. For

  19. The Concept of Collision-Free Motion Planning Using a Dynamic Collision Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Bae Cho

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address a new method for the collision-free motion planning of a mobile robot in dynamic environments. The motion planner is based on the concept of a conventional collision map (CCM, represented on the L(travel length-T(time plane. We extend the CCM with dynamic information about obstacles, such as linear acceleration and angular velocity, providing useful information for estimating variation in the collision map. We first analyse the effect of the dynamic motion of an obstacle in the collision region. We then define the measure of collision dispersion (MOCD. The dynamic collision map (DCM is generated by drawing the MOCD on the CCM. To evaluate a collision-free motion planner using the DCM, we extend the DCM with MOCD, then draw the unreachable region and deadlocked regions. Finally, we construct a collision-free motion planner using the information from the extended DCM.

  20. n dependence of l-changing collisions between He+ ions and Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacAdam, K.B.; Crosby, D.A.; Rolfes, R.

    1980-01-01

    l-changing collisions were observed in a crossed He + -ion/Na--Rydberg-atom beam experiment. Transitions nd → (l > or = 3) induced in Na by ion impact at 450 and 600 eV were studied for n=20--34. Cross sections vary approximately as n 5 and have magnitudes of order 10 8 A 2 , a few hundred times the geometric cross section of the Rydberg atoms

  1. Energy dependence of the ionization of highly excited atoms by collisions with excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, T.; Nakai, Y.; Nakamura, H.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate analytical expressions are derived for the ionization cross sections in the high- and low-collision-energy limits using the improved impulse approximation based on the assumption that the electron-atom inelastic-scattering amplitude is a function only of the momentum transfer. Both cases of simultaneous excitation and de-excitation of one of the atoms are discussed. The formulas are applied to the collisions between two excited hydrogen atoms and are found very useful for estimating the cross sections in the wide range of collisions energies

  2. On the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final states of e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fuming; Liu Feng; Liu Lianshou

    1999-01-01

    The scaling property of factorial moments in the multiparticle final-states of e + e - collisions is studied in both the laboratory and the thrust-axis coordinate systems by using the Jetset generator. It turns out that in both of the two cases, the 3-dimensional lnF 2 -lnM are approximately straight lines when the phase space are divided isotropically in different directions, showing that the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final-state of e + e - collisions are approximately isotropic. In the lab system, the three γ parameters obtained by fitting F 2 -M of p x , p y , p z to Ochs formula respectively are approximately equal. In the thrust system, the three γ values obtained by fitting F 2 (y)-M, F 2 (p t )-M and F 2 (φ)-M are also close to each other provided the starting point in fitting F 2 (φ)-M is chosen appropriately. All of these provide further evidence for the above assertion. The results show that the essential feature, i.e. anisotropy of approximate) isotropy, of the dynamical fluctuations in soft and hard processes can be revealed by studying the scaling property of factorial moments in the collisions. Therefore, further investigation of the scaling properties of factorial moments in various kinds of collisions processes is significant for the understanding of the essential characteristics of collision dynamics

  3. Actinide collisions for QED and superheavy elements with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory and the Balian-Vénéroni variational principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kedziora David J.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Collisions of actinide nuclei form, during very short times of few zs (10−21 s, the heaviest ensembles of interacting nucleons available on Earth. Such collisions are used to produce super-strong electric fields by the huge number of interacting protons to test spontaneous positron-electron pair emission (vacuum decay predicted by the quantum electrodynamics (QED theory. Multi-nucleon transfer in actinide collisions could also be used as an alternative way to fusion in order to produce neutron-rich heavy and superheavy elements thanks to inverse quasifission mechanisms. Actinide collisions are studied in a dynamical quantum microscopic approach. The three-dimensional time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF code tdhf3d is used with a full Skyrme energy density functional to investigate the time evolution of expectation values of one-body operators, such as fragment position and particle number. This code is also used to compute the dispersion of the particle numbers (e.g., widths of fragment mass and charge distributions from TDHF transfer probabilities, on the one hand, and using the BalianVeneroni variational principle, on the other hand. A first application to test QED is discussed. Collision times in 238U+238U are computed to determine the optimum energy for the observation of the vacuum decay. It is shown that the initial orientation strongly affects the collision times and reaction mechanism. The highest collision times predicted by TDHF in this reaction are of the order of ~ 4 zs at a center of mass energy of 1200 MeV. According to modern calculations based on the Dirac equation, the collision times at Ecm > 1 GeV are sufficient to allow spontaneous electron-positron pair emission from QED vacuum decay, in case of bare uranium ion collision. A second application of actinide collisions to produce neutron-rich transfermiums is discussed. A new inverse quasifission mechanism associated to a specific orientation of the nuclei is proposed to

  4. Pauli blocking and laser manipulation of the electron dynamics in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, T.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The dynamics of ion-atom collisions are governed primarily by the Coulomb interactions between the active electrons and the projectile and target nuclei. This contribution is devoted to the question whether and how other phenomena can modify the outcome of atomic scattering experiments. Firstly, the role of the Pauli exclusion principle on electronic transitions will be considered. Supported by experimental data it will be argued that Pauli blocking may have an important influence on electron transfer processes if collision systems with electrons on target and projectile in the initial channel are addressed [1]. Secondly, it will be discussed to which extent the electron dynamics can be modified and manipulated by an external interaction, namely by a suitable laser field [2]. The prototype scattering system He 2+ -H will be considered in the framework of the semiclassical approximation, i.e., projectile and laser interactions are described in terms of time-dependent external potentials which govern the quantum dynamics of the electron. The focus will be on slow collisions, in which electron transfer dominates, and on relatively short wavelengths such that both time dependent potentials vary on comparable time scales. A strong enhancement of laser-assisted electron transfer is found at collision energies below 1 keV/amu [3]. Its origin and its disappearance at higher energies as well as implications for planned experiments will be discussed

  5. Systematics in Rydberg state excitations for ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, B.; Jensen, K.; Petersen, N.B.; Veje, E.

    1976-01-01

    Rydberg state excitations in the Ne + , Mg + -He collisions have been studied in the projectile energy range 10-75 keV by means of optical spectrometry in a search for systematic trends. The relative excitation cross sections for levels of a Rydberg term series are found to follow a general (nsup(x))sup(P) behaviour with P < approximately -3 varying with collision energy and particles, regardless of whether the excited state population results from direct excitation, single electron transfer, or double electron transfer. At higher collision energies P is approximately -3 as predicted by theory. Polarization of the emitted line radiation indicates that there is no general rule for the relative excitation of the different magnetic substates of the same level. A statistical distribution of excitation is found for levels within the same term when the fine structure splitting is small. (Auth.)

  6. Some notes on time dependent Thomas Fermi approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzwarth, G.

    1979-01-01

    The successful use of effective density-dependent potentials in static Hartree-Fock calculations for nuclear ground-state properties has led to the question whether it is possible to obtain significant further simplification by approximating also the kinetic energy part of the ground state energy by a functional of the local density alone. The great advantage of such an approach is that its complexity is independent of particle number; the size of the system enters only through parameters, Z and N. The simple 'extended Thomas Fermi' functionals are based on the assumption of a spherically symmetric local Fermi surface throughout the nucleus and they represent the 'liquid drop' part of the static total energy. Given this static formalism which is solved directly for the local density without considering individual particles one might ask for a possible dynamical extension in the same sense as TDHF is a dynamical extension of the static HF approach. The aim of such a Time Dependent Thomas Fermi (TDTF) approximation would be to determine directly the time-dependent local single-particle density from given initial conditions and the single-particle current density without following each particle on its individual orbit

  7. Hybrid approximations via second order combined dynamic derivatives on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Sheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the approximation of conventional second order derivative via the combined (diamond-$\\alpha$ dynamic derivative on time scales with necessary smoothness conditions embedded. We will show the constraints under which the second order dynamic derivative provides a consistent approximation to the conventional second derivative; the cases where the dynamic derivative approximates the derivative only via a proper modification of the existing formula; and the situations in which the dynamic derivative can never approximate consistently even with the help of available structure correction methods. Constructive error analysis will be given via asymptotic expansions for practical hybrid modeling and computational applications.

  8. The effect on collisions with injuries of a reduction in traffic citations issued by police officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Etienne; Gagné, Marie-Pier

    2010-12-01

    To assess the effect on collisions with injuries of a 61% reduction in the number of traffic citations issued by police officers over a 21-month period. Using descriptive analyses as well as ARIMA intervention time-series analyses, this study estimated the impact of this reduction in citations issued for traffic violations on the monthly number of collisions with injuries. Simple descriptive analysis reveals that the 61% reduction in the number of citations issued for traffic violations during the experimental period coincided with an increase in collisions with injuries. Results from the interrupted time-series analyses reveal that, on average, eight additional collisions with injuries occurred every month during which the number of tickets issued for traffic violations was lower than normal. As this pressure tactic was applied for 21 months, it is estimated that this situation was associated with approximately 184 additional collisions with injuries: equivalent to 239 traffic injuries (either deaths, minor or serious injuries). In the province of Quebec, police officers are an important component of road safety policy. Issuing citations prevents drivers from adopting reckless driving habits such as speeding, running red lights and failing to fasten their seat belt.

  9. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He + collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential

  10. Photon-photon and photon-hadron processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, N.C.

    1993-11-01

    Photon-photon and photon-hadron interactions in relativistic heavy ion collisions are studied in the framework of the impact parameter dependent equivalent photon approximation. Improvements of this method, like formfactor inclusion and geometrical modifications are developed. In disruptive relativistic heavy ion collisions where the heavy ions overlapp during the collision, electromagnetic processes are an important background to other mechanisms. In peripheral (non-disruptive) relativistic heavy ion collisions where the ions pass each other without strong interactions, the electromagnetic processes can be studied in their pure form. The lepton pair production is an important diagnostic tool in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The coherent γγ lepton pair production is therefore extensively studied in disruptive but also in non-disruptive collisions. The effects of strong interactions on the coherent γγ lepton pair production in disruptive collisions are discussed in terms of a simple stopping model. Coherent γγ dielectron production contributes to the dilepton production in high energy hadron-hadron collisions. As an example, the coherent dielectron production in π - p collisions is studied in terms of the equivalent photon approximation. Peripheral ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions open up new possibilities for γγ physics. Taking into account γA background reactions, typical γγ processes in the relevant invariant mass ranges are discussed. The extreme high energy part of the equivalent photon spectrum leads to hard photon-parton reactions. As a potential tool to investigate the gluon distribution function of nucleons, thee q anti q production via the γg fusion in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is studied. It is the purpose of this work to investigate how photon-photon and photon-hadron reactions in relativistic heavy ion collisions may contribute to the understanding of QCD and the standard model. (orig.) [de

  11. Direct photons in heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeuchle, Bjoern

    2010-12-13

    Direct photon emission from heavy-ion collisions has been calculated and compared to available experimental data. Three different models have been combined to extract direct photons from different environments in a heavy-ion collision: Thermal photons from partonic and hadronic matter have been extracted from relativistic, non-viscous 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations. Thermal and non-thermal photons from hadronic interactions have been calculated from relativistic transport theory. The impact of different physics assumptions about the thermalized matter has been studied. The models used for the determination of photons from both hydrodynamic and transport calculations have been elucidated and their numerical properties tested. The origin of direct photons, itemised by emission stage, emission time, channel and baryon number density, has been investigated for various systems, as have the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow patterns of direct photons. Taking into account the full (vacuum) spectral function of the rho-meson decreases the direct photon emission by approximately 10% at low photon transverse momentum. In all systems that have been considered -- heavy-ion collisions at E{sub lab}=35 AGeV and 158 AGeV, (s{sub NN}){sup 1/2}=62.4 GeV, 130 GeV and 200 GeV -- thermal emission from a system with partonic degrees of freedom is greatly enhanced over that from hadronic systems, while the difference between the direct photon yields from a viscous and a non-viscous hadronic system (transport vs. hydrodynamics) is found to be very small. Predictions for direct photon emission in central U+U-collisions at 35 AGeV have been made. (orig.)

  12. Direct photons in heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeuchle, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    Direct photon emission from heavy-ion collisions has been calculated and compared to available experimental data. Three different models have been combined to extract direct photons from different environments in a heavy-ion collision: Thermal photons from partonic and hadronic matter have been extracted from relativistic, non-viscous 3+1-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations. Thermal and non-thermal photons from hadronic interactions have been calculated from relativistic transport theory. The impact of different physics assumptions about the thermalized matter has been studied. The models used for the determination of photons from both hydrodynamic and transport calculations have been elucidated and their numerical properties tested. The origin of direct photons, itemised by emission stage, emission time, channel and baryon number density, has been investigated for various systems, as have the transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow patterns of direct photons. Taking into account the full (vacuum) spectral function of the rho-meson decreases the direct photon emission by approximately 10% at low photon transverse momentum. In all systems that have been considered -- heavy-ion collisions at E lab =35 AGeV and 158 AGeV, (s NN ) 1/2 =62.4 GeV, 130 GeV and 200 GeV -- thermal emission from a system with partonic degrees of freedom is greatly enhanced over that from hadronic systems, while the difference between the direct photon yields from a viscous and a non-viscous hadronic system (transport vs. hydrodynamics) is found to be very small. Predictions for direct photon emission in central U+U-collisions at 35 AGeV have been made. (orig.)

  13. APPROXIMATION OF THE TIME TO INITIATE THE EVACUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří POKORNÝ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic prerequisites for securing the safety of people at large group events is to ensure their evacuation in case of emergencies. This article deals with the approximations of time to initiate the evacuation of persons in case of a fire at large group events organized in outdoor spaces. The solution is based on the principles of determining the period to initiate the evacuation of persons in terms of international ISO standards. Considering the specificities of the given outdoor space and possible related security measures, the article recommends the relevant sufficient amount of time to initiate an evacuation.

  14. Airborne Collision Detection and Avoidance for Small UAS Sense and Avoid Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahawneh, Laith Rasmi

    The increasing demand to integrate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the national airspace is motivated by the rapid growth of the UAS industry, especially small UAS weighing less than 55 pounds. Their use however has been limited by the Federal Aviation Administration regulations due to collision risk they pose, safety and regulatory concerns. Therefore, before civil aviation authorities can approve routine UAS flight operations, UAS must be equipped with sense-and-avoid technology comparable to the see-and-avoid requirements for manned aircraft. The sense-and-avoid problem includes several important aspects including regulatory and system-level requirements, design specifications and performance standards, intruder detecting and tracking, collision risk assessment, and finally path planning and collision avoidance. In this dissertation, our primary focus is on developing an collision detection, risk assessment and avoidance framework that is computationally affordable and suitable to run on-board small UAS. To begin with, we address the minimum sensing range for the sense-and-avoid (SAA) system. We present an approximate close form analytical solution to compute the minimum sensing range to safely avoid an imminent collision. The approach is then demonstrated using a radar sensor prototype that achieves the required minimum sensing range. In the area of collision risk assessment and collision prediction, we present two approaches to estimate the collision risk of an encounter scenario. The first is a deterministic approach similar to those been developed for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) in manned aviation. We extend the approach to account for uncertainties of state estimates by deriving an analytic expression to propagate the error variance using Taylor series approximation. To address unanticipated intruders maneuvers, we propose an innovative probabilistic approach to quantify likely intruder trajectories and estimate the probability of

  15. Subthreshold K- production in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shor, A.; Carroll, J.; Barasch, E.

    1983-06-01

    We have measured the production cross section and momentum distribution of K - produced at 0 0 in 28 Si + 28 Si collisions at an energy of 2.1 GeV/nucleon. The K - spectrum is approximately exponential. The large yield in the subthreshold production of K - that we observe corresponds to a production rate of 1K - per 50 collisions at impact parameters less than 1f. Productions mechanisms involving collective effects and thermal equilibration are discussed

  16. Precise and accurate train run data: Approximation of actual arrival and departure times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Troels; Landex, Alex; Andersen, Jonas Lohmann Elkjær

    with the approximated actual arrival and departure times. As a result, all future statistics can now either be based on track circuit data with high precision or approximated actual arrival times with a high accuracy. Consequently, performance analysis will be more accurate, punctuality statistics more correct, KPI...

  17. Multiple electron capture in close ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Berkner, K.H.

    1989-01-01

    Collisions in which a fast highly charged ion passes within the orbit of K electron of a target gas atom are selected by emission of a K x-ray from the projectile or target. Measurement of the projectile charge state after the collision, in coincidence with the K x-ray, allows measurement of the charge-transfer probability during these close collisions. When the projectile velocity is approximately the same as that of target electrons, a large number of electrons can be transferred to the projectile in a single collision. The electron-capture probability is found to be a linear function of the number of vacancies in the projectile L shell for 47-MeV calcium ions in an Ar target. 18 refs., 9 figs

  18. Specific features of time-dependent Psub(N) approximations in spherical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltzer, P.; Pucker, N.

    1979-01-01

    Approximations to the time-dependent linear transport equation can result in more serious distortions in the description of the actual physical situation than in the stationary problem. This is demonstrated in detail for the case of a neutron pulse in spherical geometry, treated within a P 1 approximation. One has to pay special attention to the singularity at r = 0 and to the effect of the boundary conditions. Effects similar to those shown here are also to be expected in connection with Psub(N) approximations of higher order. (Auth.)

  19. Microstructure evolution of irradiated tungsten: Crystal effects in He and H implantation as modelled in the Binary Collision Approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, M.; Ortiz, C.J.; Becquart, C.S.; Domain, C.; Sarkar, U.; Debacker, A.

    2010-01-01

    It is important to develop an understanding of the evolution of W microstructure the conditions the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as well as the DEMOnstration Power Plan (DEMO), and modelling techniques can be very helpful. In this paper, the Binary Collision Approximation of Molecular Dynamics as implemented in the Marlowe code is used to model the slowing down of atomic helium and hydrogen on tungsten in the 1-100 keV range. The computed helium and Frenkel Pairs (FP) distributions are then used as input for the simulation of isochronal annealing experiments with an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model. Parameterisation is discussed in a companion paper to this one. To model inelastic energy losses beyond the Lindhard regime, a new module has been implemented in the Marlowe code which is presented here, along with a discussion on various parameters of the model important in the modelling of channelled trajectories. For a given total inelastic stopping cross section, large differences in low energy channelling ranges are identified depending on whether inelastic energy loss is considered to be purely continuous or to also occur during the atomic collisions. In polycrystals, the channelling probability is shown to be significant over the whole range of slowing down energies considered. Channelling together with short replacement sequences has the effect of reducing the FP production efficiency by more than a factor two in polycrystalline as compared with an hypothetical structureless tungsten. This has a crucial effect on the helium isochronal desorption spectra predicted by the OKMC simulations. Those predicted with structureless tungsten are at variance with experiment, due to the overestimation of He trapping on the radiation induced defects.

  20. Microstructure evolution of irradiated tungsten: Crystal effects in He and H implantation as modelled in the Binary Collision Approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, M., E-mail: mhou@ulb.ac.b [Physique des Solides Irradies et des Nanostructures CP234, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bd du Triomphe, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Ortiz, C.J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion por Confinamiento Magnetico, CIEMAT, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Domain, C. [EDF-R and D Departement MMC, Les Renardieres, F-77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Sarkar, U. [Physics Department, Assam University, Silchar (India); Debacker, A. [Unite Materiaux Et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-08-15

    It is important to develop an understanding of the evolution of W microstructure the conditions the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as well as the DEMOnstration Power Plan (DEMO), and modelling techniques can be very helpful. In this paper, the Binary Collision Approximation of Molecular Dynamics as implemented in the Marlowe code is used to model the slowing down of atomic helium and hydrogen on tungsten in the 1-100 keV range. The computed helium and Frenkel Pairs (FP) distributions are then used as input for the simulation of isochronal annealing experiments with an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model. Parameterisation is discussed in a companion paper to this one. To model inelastic energy losses beyond the Lindhard regime, a new module has been implemented in the Marlowe code which is presented here, along with a discussion on various parameters of the model important in the modelling of channelled trajectories. For a given total inelastic stopping cross section, large differences in low energy channelling ranges are identified depending on whether inelastic energy loss is considered to be purely continuous or to also occur during the atomic collisions. In polycrystals, the channelling probability is shown to be significant over the whole range of slowing down energies considered. Channelling together with short replacement sequences has the effect of reducing the FP production efficiency by more than a factor two in polycrystalline as compared with an hypothetical structureless tungsten. This has a crucial effect on the helium isochronal desorption spectra predicted by the OKMC simulations. Those predicted with structureless tungsten are at variance with experiment, due to the overestimation of He trapping on the radiation induced defects.

  1. Collision of H+ + CH4 at 30 eV: A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Cong-Zhang; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2013-01-01

    The process of proton impinging upon CH 4 molecule has been theoretically studied at 30 eV. The study is based on time-dependent local density approximation coupled with molecular dynamics model. The electronic density evolution, ionic motion, and the scattering angle are presented. We found that the mechanism of target ionization in present simulation is electron capture. The predicted rainbow angle is in good agreement with experiments and previous calculations. By comparing the scattering angle from present calculation with that from classical collision, we found that the nuclear stopping is dominant in small impact parameters, and the discrepancy in large impact parameters may be due to the neglect of electronic stopping in classical collision

  2. Effects of forcing time scale on the simulated turbulent flows and turbulent collision statistics of inertial particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, B.; Parishani, H.; Ayala, O.; Wang, L.-P.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study systematically the effects of forcing time scale in the large-scale stochastic forcing scheme of Eswaran and Pope [“An examination of forcing in direct numerical simulations of turbulence,” Comput. Fluids 16, 257 (1988)] on the simulated flow structures and statistics of forced turbulence. Using direct numerical simulations, we find that the forcing time scale affects the flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number. Other flow statistics can be predicted using the altered flow dissipation rate and flow Reynolds number, except when the forcing time scale is made unrealistically large to yield a Taylor microscale flow Reynolds number of 30 and less. We then study the effects of forcing time scale on the kinematic collision statistics of inertial particles. We show that the radial distribution function and the radial relative velocity may depend on the forcing time scale when it becomes comparable to the eddy turnover time. This dependence, however, can be largely explained in terms of altered flow Reynolds number and the changing range of flow length scales present in the turbulent flow. We argue that removing this dependence is important when studying the Reynolds number dependence of the turbulent collision statistics. The results are also compared to those based on a deterministic forcing scheme to better understand the role of large-scale forcing, relative to that of the small-scale turbulence, on turbulent collision of inertial particles. To further elucidate the correlation between the altered flow structures and dynamics of inertial particles, a conditional analysis has been performed, showing that the regions of higher collision rate of inertial particles are well correlated with the regions of lower vorticity. Regions of higher concentration of pairs at contact are found to be highly correlated with the region of high energy dissipation rate

  3. Approximate distance oracles for planar graphs with improved query time-space tradeoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We consider approximate distance oracles for edge-weighted n-vertex undirected planar graphs. Given fixed ϵ > 0, we present a (1 + ϵ)-approximate distance oracle with O(n(log log n)2) space and O((loglogr?,)3) query time. This improves the previous best product of query time and space...... of the oracles of Thorup (FOCS 2001, J. ACM 2004) and Klein (SODA 2002) from O(nlogn) to O(n(loglogn)5)....

  4. Dissipation in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanu Pal

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the mechanism of one- and two-body dissipations in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The average energy transferred to nuclear excitations is calculated using a time-dependent density matrix approach with lowest-order approximations. Considering the nuclei as Fermi gases, and using a gaussian-type NN interaction as the basic perturbation, simplified expressions are obtained for energy dissipations. These expressions are quite instructive to follow a number of interesting aspects of one- and two-body dissipations. It is theoretically observed that the memory time for the two-body dissipation is significantly smaller than that of one-body dissipation. A threshold-type dependence of the transferred energy on the relative velocity between the two nuclei is also observed. This threshold velocity is found to be related with the intrinsic nucleon kinetic energy for two-body dissipation and with the nuclear size for the one-body case. This observation further suggests that the total dissipated energy is shared between the two nuclei approximately in the ratio of their masses. The physical origin of these observations is also explained. Numerical calculations further illustrate some characteristic features of one- and two-body dissipations. (orig.)

  5. Transverse-momentum and collision-energy dependence of high-pT hadron suppression in Au+Au collisions at ultrarelativistic energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Drees, K A; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-10-24

    We report high statistics measurements of inclusive charged hadron production in Au+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. A large, approximately constant hadron suppression is observed in central Au+Au collisions for 5collision energy dependence of the yields and the centrality and p(T) dependence of the suppression provide stringent constraints on theoretical models of suppression. Models incorporating initial-state gluon saturation or partonic energy loss in dense matter are largely consistent with observations. We observe no evidence of p(T)-dependent suppression, which may be expected from models incorporating jet attenuation in cold nuclear matter or scattering of fragmentation hadrons.

  6. Generalized synthetic kernel approximation for elastic moderation of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Koji; Sekiya, Tamotsu; Yamamura, Yasunori.

    1975-01-01

    A method of synthetic kernel approximation is examined in some detail with a view to simplifying the treatment of the elastic moderation of fast neutrons. A sequence of unified kernel (fsub(N)) is introduced, which is then divided into two subsequences (Wsub(n)) and (Gsub(n)) according to whether N is odd (Wsub(n)=fsub(2n-1), n=1,2, ...) or even (Gsub(n)=fsub(2n), n=0,1, ...). The W 1 and G 1 kernels correspond to the usual Wigner and GG kernels, respectively, and the Wsub(n) and Gsub(n) kernels for n>=2 represent generalizations thereof. It is shown that the Wsub(n) kernel solution with a relatively small n (>=2) is superior on the whole to the Gsub(n) kernel solution for the same index n, while both converge to the exact values with increasing n. To evaluate the collision density numerically and rapidly, a simple recurrence formula is derived. In the asymptotic region (except near resonances), this recurrence formula allows calculation with a relatively coarse mesh width whenever hsub(a)<=0.05 at least. For calculations in the transient lethargy region, a mesh width of order epsilon/10 is small enough to evaluate the approximate collision density psisub(N) with an accuracy comparable to that obtained analytically. It is shown that, with the present method, an order of approximation of about n=7 should yield a practically correct solution diviating not more than 1% in collision density. (auth.)

  7. Orbital alignment effects in near-resonant Rydberg atoms-rare gas collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, W.A.; Morrison, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical studies of near-resonant energy transfer collisions involving rare-gas atoms and alkali or alkaline earth atoms which have been initially excited to an aligned state via one or more linearly polarized rasters have yielded a wealth of insight into orbital alignment and related effects. We have extended this inquiry to initially aligned Rydberg states, examining state-to-state and alignment-selected cross sections using quantum collision theory augmented by approximations appropriate to the special characteristics of the Rydberg state (e.g., the quasi-free-electron model and the impulse approximation)

  8. The Control Packet Collision Avoidance Algorithm for the Underwater Multichannel MAC Protocols via Time-Frequency Masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing high-speed and reliable underwater acoustic networks among multiunmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs is basic to realize cooperative and intelligent control among different UUVs. Nevertheless, different from terrestrial network, the propagation speed of the underwater acoustic network is 1500 m/s, which makes the design of the underwater acoustic network MAC protocols a big challenge. In accordance with multichannel MAC protocols, data packets and control packets are transferred through different channels, which lowers the adverse effect of acoustic network and gradually becomes the popular issues of underwater acoustic networks MAC protocol research. In this paper, we proposed a control packet collision avoidance algorithm utilizing time-frequency masking to deal with the control packets collision in the control channel. This algorithm is based on the scarcity of the noncoherent underwater acoustic communication signals, which regards collision avoiding as separation of the mixtures of communication signals from different nodes. We first measure the W-Disjoint Orthogonality of the MFSK signals and the simulation result demonstrates that there exists time-frequency mask which can separate the source signals from the mixture of the communication signals. Then we present a pairwise hydrophones separation system based on deep networks and the location information of the nodes. Consequently, the time-frequency mask can be estimated.

  9. Approximation for the adjoint neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suster, Luis Carlos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2002-01-01

    The proposal of this work is the determination of an analytical approximation which is capable to reproduce the adjoint neutron flux for the energy range of the narrow resonances (NR). In a previous work we developed a method for the calculation of the adjoint spectrum which was calculated from the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were obtained by the collision probabilities method, this method involved a considerable quantity of numerical calculation. In the analytical method some approximations were done, like the multiplication of the escape probability in the fuel by the adjoint flux in the moderator, and after these approximations, taking into account the case of the narrow resonances, were substituted in the adjoint neutron balance equation for the fuel, resulting in an analytical approximation for the adjoint flux. The results obtained in this work were compared to the results generated with the reference method, which demonstrated a good and precise results for the adjoint neutron flux for the narrow resonances. (author)

  10. Using MUSIC to study relativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    A large Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) has been developed as a part of the Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS). This facility is being used for the study of relativistic nuclear collisions at the Bevalac of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Preliminary data from MUSIC indicate that a charge resolution of one unit should be achieved from Z approximately equal to 7 to Z approximately equal to 100. (author)

  11. Diabatic interaction potential for nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerenberg, W.; Lukasiak, A.

    1984-01-01

    Within a refined method for the construction of diabatic states allowing for the treatment of the full spin-orbit coupling, characteristic features of the diabatic potential for nucleus-nucleus collisions are investigated. Approximately 90% of the strong repulsion results from diabatic particle-hole excitations, while only 10% is due to compression. The diabatic interaction potential describes a physical situation intermediate between adiabatic and sudden approximations. (orig.)

  12. A New Approach to Rational Discrete-Time Approximations to Continuous-Time Fractional-Order Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Matos , Carlos; Ortigueira , Manuel ,

    2012-01-01

    Part 10: Signal Processing; International audience; In this paper a new approach to rational discrete-time approximations to continuous fractional-order systems of the form 1/(sα+p) is proposed. We will show that such fractional-order LTI system can be decomposed into sub-systems. One has the classic behavior and the other is similar to a Finite Impulse Response (FIR) system. The conversion from continuous-time to discrete-time systems will be done using the Laplace transform inversion integr...

  13. On the local theory of resonant inelastic collisions of slow electrons with carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazansky, A.K.; Sergeeva, L.Yu.

    1994-01-01

    A method of calculating the cross sections of inelastic vibronic transitions in collisions of slow electrons with polyatomic molecules in the framework of the local theory (the 'boomerang' model) is proposed. The method is based on the study of the time evolution of the initial vibronic wavefunction; the evolution is governed by the (complex valued) Hamiltonian of the intermediate anion state. The method has been applied to the consideration of inelastic electron collisions with the CO 2 molecule in the two-mode approximation (symmetrical stretching and bending). The results obtained demonstrate the importance of the two-mode description for the system which can undergo the Renner transition. (Author)

  14. Vibrationally resolved charge transfer for proton collisions with CO and H collisions with CO+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Stancil, P. C.; Li, Y.; Gu, J. P.; Liebermann, H. P.; Buenker, R. J.; Kimura, M.

    2007-01-01

    Electron capture by protons following collisions with carbon monoxide, and the reverse process, is studied with a quantal molecular-orbital coupled-channel method utilizing the infinite order sudden approximation for collision energies between 0.5 and 1000 eV/u. The potential surfaces and couplings, computed with the multireference single- and double-excitation method for a range of H + -CO orientation angles and C-O separations, are adopted in the scattering calculations. Results including vibrationally resolved and orientation-angle-dependent cross sections are presented for a range of CO and CO + vibrational levels. Comparison with experiment is made where possible and the relevance of the reaction in astrophysics and atmospheric physics is discussed

  15. Relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions: Zone of reactions and space-time structure of fireball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchishkin, D.; Muskeyev, A.; Yezhov, S.

    2010-01-01

    A zone of reactions is determined and then exploited as a tool in studying the space-time structure of an interacting system formed in a collision of relativistic nuclei. The time dependence of the reaction rates integrated over spatial coordinates is also considered. Evaluations are made with the help of the microscopic transport model UrQMD. The relation of the boundaries of different zones of reactions and the hypersurfaces of sharp chemical and kinetic freeze-outs is discussed.

  16. Emittance increase caused by core depletion in collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R

    2009-01-01

    A new effect is presented, which changes the emittance during colliding-beam operation in circular colliders. If the initial transverse distribution is Gaussian, the collision probability is much higher for particles in the core of the beam than in the tails. When small-amplitude particles are removed, the remaining ones therefore have a larger transverse emittance. This effect, called core depletion, may cause a decrease in luminosity. An approximate analytic model is developed to study the effect and benchmarked against a multiparticle tracking simulation. Finally, the time evolution of the intensity and emittances of a Pb bunch in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is calculated, taking into account also other processes than collisions. The results show that integrated luminosity drops by 3--4% if core depletion is taken into account. It is also found that core depletion causes the transverse emittance to be larger when more experiments are active. This observation could be checked against experimenta...

  17. Nodal approximations in space and time for neutron kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.M.; Hennart, J.P.

    2005-01-01

    A general formalism is described of the nodal type in time and space for the neutron kinetics equations. In space, several nodal methods are given of the Raviart-Thomas type (RT0 and RT1), of the Brezzi-Douglas-Marini type (BDM0 and BDM1) and of the Brezzi-Douglas-Fortin-Marini type (BDFM 1). In time, polynomial and analytical approximations are derived. In the analytical case, they are based on the inclusion of an exponential term in the basis function. They can be continuous or discontinuous in time, leading in particular to the well-known Crank-Nicolson, Backward Euler and θ schemes

  18. Evaluation of a Portable Collision Warning Device for Patients With Peripheral Vision Loss in an Obstacle Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundlik, Shrinivas; Tomasi, Matteo; Luo, Gang

    2015-04-01

    A pocket-sized collision warning device equipped with a video camera was developed to predict impending collisions based on time to collision rather than proximity. A study was conducted in a high-density obstacle course to evaluate the effect of the device on collision avoidance in people with peripheral field loss (PFL). The 41-meter-long loop-shaped obstacle course consisted of 46 stationary obstacles from floor to head level and oncoming pedestrians. Twenty-five patients with tunnel vision (n = 13) or hemianopia (n = 12) completed four consecutive loops with and without the device, while not using any other habitual mobility aid. Walking direction and device usage order were counterbalanced. Number of collisions and preferred percentage of walking speed (PPWS) were compared within subjects. Collisions were reduced significantly by approximately 37% (P < 0.001) with the device (floor-level obstacles were excluded because the device was not designed for them). No patient had more collisions when using the device. Although the PPWS were also reduced with the device from 52% to 49% (P = 0.053), this did not account for the lower number of collisions, as the changes in collisions and PPWS were not correlated (P = 0.516). The device may help patients with a wide range of PFL avoid collisions with high-level obstacles while barely affecting their walking speed.

  19. Using time-to-contact information to assess potential collision modulates both visual and temporal prediction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T Coull

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimates of the time-to-contact (TTC of approaching objects are crucial for survival. We used an ecologically valid driving simulation to compare and contrast the neural substrates of egocentric (head-on approach and allocentric (lateral approach TTC tasks in a fully factorial, event-related fMRI design. Compared to colour control tasks, both egocentric and allocentric TTC tasks activated left ventral premotor cortex/frontal operculum and inferior parietal cortex, the same areas that have previously been implicated in temporal attentional orienting. Despite differences in visual and cognitive demands, both TTC and temporal orienting paradigms encourage the use of temporally predictive information to guide behaviour, suggesting these areas may form a core network for temporal prediction. We also demonstrated that the temporal derivative of the perceptual index tau (tau-dot held predictive value for making collision judgements and varied inversely with activity in primary visual cortex (V1. Specifically, V1 activity increased with the increasing likelihood of reporting a collision, suggesting top-down attentional modulation of early visual processing areas as a function of subjective collision. Finally, egocentric viewpoints provoked a response bias for reporting collisions, rather than no-collisions, reflecting increased caution for head-on approaches. Associated increases in SMA activity suggest motor preparation mechanisms were engaged, despite the perceptual nature of the task.

  20. Formation of massive, dense cores by cloud-cloud collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahira, Ken; Shima, Kazuhiro; Habe, Asao; Tasker, Elizabeth J.

    2018-05-01

    We performed sub-parsec (˜ 0.014 pc) scale simulations of cloud-cloud collisions of two idealized turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) with different masses in the range of (0.76-2.67) × 104 M_{⊙} and with collision speeds of 5-30 km s-1. Those parameters are larger than in Takahira, Tasker, and Habe (2014, ApJ, 792, 63), in which study the colliding system showed a partial gaseous arc morphology that supports the NANTEN observations of objects indicated to be colliding MCs using numerical simulations. Gas clumps with density greater than 10-20 g cm-3 were identified as pre-stellar cores and tracked through the simulation to investigate the effects of the mass of colliding clouds and the collision speeds on the resulting core population. Our results demonstrate that the smaller cloud property is more important for the results of cloud-cloud collisions. The mass function of formed cores can be approximated by a power-law relation with an index γ = -1.6 in slower cloud-cloud collisions (v ˜ 5 km s-1), and is in good agreement with observation of MCs. A faster relative speed increases the number of cores formed in the early stage of collisions and shortens the gas accretion phase of cores in the shocked region, leading to the suppression of core growth. The bending point appears in the high-mass part of the core mass function and the bending point mass decreases with increase in collision speed for the same combination of colliding clouds. The higher-mass part of the core mass function than the bending point mass can be approximated by a power law with γ = -2-3 that is similar to the power index of the massive part of the observed stellar initial mass function. We discuss implications of our results for the massive-star formation in our Galaxy.

  1. Studies of the hydrodynamic evolution of matter produced in fluctuations in p-barp collisions and in ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. II. Transverse-momentum distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataja, M.; Ruuskanen, P.V.; McLerran, L.D.; von Gersdorff, H.

    1986-01-01

    We study solutions to the hydrodynamic equations appropriate for ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. We find that the matter produced in such collisions spends time t>30 fm/c at temperatures larger than 150 MeV. The transverse momentum of protons, kaons, and pions is computed in the central region of ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions. Assuming Bjorken's initial conditions for the hydrodynamic equations, and a bag-model equation of state, we show that the transverse-momentum distribution as a function of dN/dy does reflect properties of the equation of state. We demonstrate that such a distribution approximately scales as a function of (1/A)dN/dy. The relation between p/sub t/ and dN/dy is shown to be significantly altered under different assumptions about the equation of state. The transverse-momentum distribution of heavy hadrons is shown to be much enhanced relative to that of light pions. These distributions are little changed by differences in the assumptions about the initial transverse density and velocity profile. We are unable to fit the observed correlation between p/sub t/ and dE/dy observed in the Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment

  2. Double electron transfer in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.E

    1990-01-01

    Continuum distorted wave (CDW) and CDW-EIS (electron-ion scattering) approximations are used to study the resonant double capture by collision of alpha particles on He targets for intermediate and high energies. Calculations of total cross-sections based on the Independent Event Approximation are presented. A good agreement with experimental results was found, even without the inclusion of the dynamic and angular correlation of captured electrons. (Author). 11 refs., 1 fig

  3. New space--time model for hadron--nucleus collisions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialkowski, G.; Chiu, C.B.; Tow, D.M.

    1976-12-01

    A new space-time model for hadron-nucleus collisions is proposed, where particles at the instant of creation are immature and their maturity rate is enhanced in the presence of other hadronic matter, as in a nucleus. With only one free parameter, the model can explain dn/sub A//sup p//d eta, dn/sub A//sup pi//d eta, R/sub A//sup p/(E/sub L/), and the A-dependences of sigma/sub in/sup pA/ and sigma/sub in/sup pi A/

  4. Assessment of Time Series Complexity Using Improved Approximate Entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong De-Ren; Xie Hong-Bo

    2011-01-01

    Approximate entropy (ApEn), a measure quantifying complexity and/or regularity, is believed to be an effective method of analyzing diverse settings. However, the similarity definition of vectors based on Heaviside function may cause some problems in the validity and accuracy of ApEn. To overcome the problems, an improved approximate entropy (iApEn) based on the sigmoid function is proposed. The performance of iApEn is tested on the independent identically distributed (IID) Gaussian noise, the MIX stochastic model, the Rossler map, the logistic map, and the high-dimensional Mackey—Glass oscillator. The results show that iApEn is superior to ApEn in several aspects, including better relative consistency, freedom of parameter selection, robust to noise, and more independence on record length when characterizing time series with different complexities. (general)

  5. Atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation - Time dependence and the asymptotic wave function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    A time-dependent, wave-packet description of atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation is extracted from the more conventional time-independent, stationary-state description. This approach resolves certain difficulties of interpretation in the time-independent approach which arise in the case of asymptotic near resonance. In the two-state model investigated, the approach predicts the existence of three spherically scattered waves in this asymptotically near-resonant case.

  6. Approach to equilibrium in high energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epelbaum, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with the theory of the early stages of a heavy ion collision. Just after such a collision, the matter produced - called the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP) - has been shown to be far out of thermal equilibrium. One would like to know whether the QGP thermalizes, and what is the typical time scale for this. Proving that the QGP thermalizes would also justify from first principles the hydrodynamical treatment of the subsequent evolution of a heavy ion collision. After having recalled some essential theoretical concepts, the manuscript addresses these questions in two different theories. In a first part, we study a scalar field theory. Starting from an out of equilibrium initial condition, one studies the approach to equilibrium in a fixed volume or in a one-dimensional expanding system. In both cases, clear signs of thermalization are obtained: an equation of state is formed, the pressure tensor becomes isotropic and the occupation number approaches a classical thermal distribution. These results are obtained thanks to the classical statistical approximation (CSA), that includes contributions beyond the Leading Order perturbative calculation. In a second part, the Color Glass Condensate - a quantum chromodynamics (QCD) effective theory well suited to describe the early life of the QGP - is used to treat more realistically the approach to thermalization in heavy ion collisions. After having derived some analytical prerequisites for the application of the CSA, the numerical simulations performed with the Yang-Mills equations show evidences of an early onset of hydrodynamical behavior of the QGP: the system becomes isotropic on short time scales, while the shear viscosity over entropy ratio is very small, which is characteristic of a quasi perfect fluid. (author) [fr

  7. Studies of fluctuation processes in nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayik, S.

    1991-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress on grant No. DE-FG05-89ER40530 during the period April 15, 1990 to February 15, 1991. Our studies of heavy-ion collisions in the framework of ''a stochastic one-body transport model'' has progress in several directions. We developed a method for obtaining approximate numerical solutions of the transport-equation in semi-classical limit, i.e., Boltzmann-Langevin equation, and tested the method in realistic cases of heavy-ion collisions at energies below 100 MeV per nucleon. Some results of the numerical simulations for a head-on collision of 12 C + 12 C system is included in this report. Work has also continued on studying the stochastic one-body transport model in a quantal representation, which provides a microscopic basis for a consistent description of dissipation and fluctuation properties of large amplitude collective nuclear motion. The previous derivation of the stochastic one-body transport model was presented within the density matrix formalisam. We generalized this treatment and proposed an alternative derivation of the model by employing the Green's function approach within the real-time path formalism of Keldish. One manuscript has been submitted to Nucl. Phys. A for publication. Two other manuscripts are in preparation for publication. Several seminars and contributed talks were presented at various meeting

  8. An approximate method to calculate ionization of LTE and non-LTE plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jun; Gu Peijun

    1987-01-01

    When matter, especially high Z element, is heated to high temperature, it will be ionized many times. The degree of ionization has a strong effect on many plasma properties. So an approximate method to calculate the mean ionization degree is needed for solving many practical problems. An analytical expression which is convenient for the approximate numerical calculation is given by fitting it to the scaling law and numerical results of the ionization potential of Thomas-Fermi statistical model. In LTE case, the ionization degree of Au calculated by using the approximate method is in agreement with that of the average ion model. By extending the approximate method to non-LTE case, the ionization degree of Au is similarly calculated according to Corona model and Collision-Radiatoin model(C-R). The results of Corona model agree with the published data quite well, while the results of C-R approach those of Corona model as the density is reduced and approach those of LTE as the density is increased. Finally, all approximately calculated results of ionization degree of Au and the comparision of them are given in figures and tables

  9. Central collisions in intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The critical collisions in intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions are examined from both a microscopic and macroscopic viewpoint. In the microscopic description the proper tool is the extended TDHF approximation involving both the mean field and the particle collisions. To understand the underlying physics, the effect of the mean field and the effect of particle collisions are studied separately. It is found that th sudden increase in the density of the overlapping region can cause the volcano effect, leading to the complete disintegration of one of the nuclei. The self-consistent mean field also gives rise to the bunching instability when the two Fermi spheres of the colliding nucleons separate. The collision between nucleons, on the other hand, leads to irreversible dissipation, thermalization, and the possibility of a hydrodynamical description of the dynamics. Next is studied the dynamics of central collisions using the hydrodynamical description for many combinations of targets and projectiles at different energies. The formation of shock waves, sidesplash, and the complete disintegration of the whole nucleus are examined. Nuclear viscosity is found to affect the angular distribution of the reaction products and also the maximum compression ratio achieved during the collision. 28 references

  10. Manipulating time and space: Collision prediction in peripersonal and extrapersonal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachini, Tina; Ruotolo, Francesco; Vinciguerra, Michela; Ruggiero, Gennaro

    2017-09-01

    Being able to predict potential collisions is a necessary survival prerequisite for all moving species. Temporal and spatial information is fundamental for this purpose. However, it is not clear yet if the peripersonal (i.e. near) and extrapersonal (i.e. far) distance between our body and the moving objects affects the way in which we can predict possible collisions. In order to assess this, we manipulated independently velocity and path of two balls moving one towards the other in such a way as to collide or not in peripersonal and extrapersonal space. In two experiments, participants had to judge if these balls were to collide or not. The results consistently showed a lower discrimination capacity and a more liberal tendency to predict collisions when the moving balls were in peripersonal space and their velocity was different rather than equal. This did not happen in extrapersonal space. Therefore, peripersonal space was particularly affected by temporal information. The possible link between the motor and anticipatory adaptive function of peripersonal space and collision prediction mechanisms is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Accuracy of the ''decoupled l-dominant'' approximation for atom--molecule scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, S.

    1976-01-01

    Cross sections for rotational excitation and spectral pressure broadening of HD, HCl, CO, and HCN due to collisions with low energy He atoms have been computed within the ''decoupled l-dominant'' (DLD) approximation recently suggested by DePristo and Alexander. These are compared with accurate close coupling results and also with two similar approximations, the effective potential of Rabitz and the coupled states of McGuire and Kouri. These collision systems are all dominated by short-range repulsive interactions although they have varying degrees of anisotropy and inelasticity. The coupled states method is expected to be valid for such systems, but they should be a severe test to the DLD approximation which is expected to be better for long-range interactions. Nonetheless, DLD predictions of state-to-state cross sections are rather good, being only slightly less accurate than coupled states results. DLD is far superior to either the coupled states or effective potential methods for pressure broadening calculations, although it may not be uniformly of the quantitative accuracy desirable for obtaining intermolecular potentials from experimental data

  12. Comparison of universal potentials for atomic collisions in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.; Ventura, A.

    1984-01-01

    Elastic collisions in solid of ions having kinetic energy greater than about ten eV are fairly well described by the binary collision approximation, where screened coulomb potentials are often used. The aim of the present work is to compare calculations based on the Moliere potential and on the more realistic Biersack-Ziegler potential for atomic collisions in solids having an atomic number between Z=6 and Z=79 with experimental data. A reasonable agreement with data can be obtained, in general, by means of both potentials provided that the screening lenght is suitably modified in the Moliere case, while no parameter adjustment is needed in the Biersack-Ziegler potential

  13. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field; Korrelierte Elektron-Ion-Stoesse in starken Laserfeldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-12-17

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  14. Correlations in Many-Body systems from two-time Greens functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morawetz, K.; Kohler, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    The Kadanoff-Baym (KB) equations are solved numerically for infinite nuclear matter. In particular we calculate correlation energies and correlation times. Approximating the Green's functions in the KB collision kernel by the free Green's functions the Levinson equation is obtained. This approximation is valid for weak interactions and/or low densities. It relates to the extended quasi-particle approximation for the spectral function. The Levinson correlation energy reduces for large times to a second order Born approximation for the energy. Comparing the Levinson, Born and KB calculations allows for an estimate of higher order spectral corrections to the correlations. (authors)

  15. Molecular dynamics and binary collision modeling of the primary damage state of collision cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects......, the fractions of them that are mobile, and the sizes of immobile clusters compare favorably, especially when the termination conditions of the two simulations are taken into account. A strategy is laid out for integrating the details of the cascade quenching phase determined by MD into a BCA-based model...... that is practical for simulating much higher energies and longer times than MD alone can achieve. The extraction of collisional phase information from MD simulations and the correspondence of MD and BCA versions of the collisional phase is demonstrated at low energy....

  16. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-05

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold.

  17. Electron collision effects on the bremsstrahlung emission in Lorentzian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Young-Dae; Kato, Daiji

    2009-06-01

    The electron-electron collision effects on the electron-ion bemsstranhlung process are investigated in warm Lorentzian plasmas. The effective electron-ion interaction potential is obtained by including the far-field terms caused by the electron-electron collisions with the effective Debye length in Lorentzian plasmas. The bremsstranhlung radiation cross section is obtained as a function of the electron energy, photon energy, collision frequency, spectral index, and Debye length using the Born approximation for the initial and final states of the projectile electron. It is shown that the non-Maxwellian character suppresses the bremsstrahlung radiation cross section. It is also shown that the electron-electron collision effect enhances the bremsstrahlung emission spectrum. In addition, the bremsstrahlung radiation cross section decreases with an increase of the plasma temperature. (author)

  18. Vacancy-rearrangement theory in the first Magnus approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    In the present paper we employ the first Magnus approximation (M1A), a unitarized Born approximation, in semiclassical collision theory. We have found previously that the M1A gives a substantial improvement over the first Born approximation (B1A) and can give a good approximation to a full coupled channels calculation of the mean L-shell vacancy probability per electron, p/sub L/, when the L-vacancies are accompanied by a K-shell vacancy (p/sub L/ is obtained experimentally from measurements of K/sub α/-satellite intensities). For sufficiently strong projectile-electron interactions (sufficiently large Z/sub p/ or small v) the M1A ceases to reproduce the coupled channels results, but it is accurate over a much wider range of Z/sub p/ and v than the B1A. 27 references

  19. Relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation theory and applications to atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.Z.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent linear-response theory appropriate to the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA) to quantum electrodynamics (QED) is developed. The resulting theory, the relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation (RTDLDA) is specialized to the treatment of electric excitations in closed-shell atoms. This formalism is applied to the calculation of atomic photoionization parameters in the dipole approximation. The static-field limit of the RTDLDA is applied to the calculation of dipole polarizabilities. Extensive numerical calculations of the photoionization parameters for the rare gases neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, and for mercury from the RTDLDA are presented and compared in detail with the results of other theories, in particular the relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA), and with experimental measurements. The predictions of the RTDLDA are comparable with the RRPA calculations made to date. This is remarkable in that the RTDLDA entails appreciably less computational effort. Finally, the dipole polarizabilities predicted by the static-field RTDLDA are compared with other determinations of these quantities. In view of its simplicity, the static-field RTDLDA demonstrates itself to be one of the most powerful theories available for the calculation of dipole polarizabilities

  20. Modeling collisions in circumstellar debris disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvold, Erika

    2015-10-01

    resonances near the chaotic zone. I investigate the effects of the initial eccentricity distribution of the disk particles and find a negligible effect on the gap size at Jovian planet masses, since collisions tend to erase memory of the initial particle eccentricity distributions. I also find that the presence of Trojan analogs is a potentially powerful diagnostic of planets in the mass range ˜1--10MJup. I apply my model to place new upper limits on planets around Fomalhaut, HR 4796 A, HD 202628, HD 181327, and beta Pictoris. Finally, to show how SMACK can be used to analyze a single debris disk in detail, I present a new model of the beta Pictoris disk and planet system that, for the first time, combines simulations of the colliding planetesimals and the dynamics of the dust grains, allowing me to model features and asymmetries in both submillimeter and scattered light images of the disk. I combine a 100,000 superparticle SMACK simulation with N-body integrations of the dust produced by the simulated collisions. I find that secular perturbations of the planet's measured inclination and eccentricity can explain the observed warp and planetesimal ring, while collisions between planetesimals shape the disk by eroding close-in material. The complex 3D structure of the disk due to the perturbations from the planet creates an azimuthally asymmetric spatial distribution of collisions, which could contribute to the observed azimuthal clump of CO gas seen with ALMA. My simulations of the small dust grains produced by collisions demonstrate that the "birth ring" approximation for beta Pictoris fails to account for the ˜54% of dust mass produced outside of the planetesimal ring. I also reproduce the gross morphology of high-resolution scattered light images of the disk, including the two-disk "x"-pattern seen in scattered light, which has not been replicated by previous dust dynamics models.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, J; Paul E. Johns, P

    2007-05-23

    Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.

  2. Solution of the non-stationary electron Boltzmann equation for a weakly ionized collision dominated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, R.; Wilhelm, J.

    A detailed description is presented of calculating the nonstationary electron distribution function in a weakly ionized collision-dominated plasma from the Boltzmann kinetic equation respecting the effects of the time-dependent electric field, collision processes and the electron formation and loss. The finite difference approximation was used for numerical solution. Using the Crank-Nicolson method and parabolic interpolation between the grid points the Boltzmann equation was transformed to a system of linear equations which was then solved by iterations at a preset accuracy. Using the calculated distribution function values, the macroscopic plasma parameters were determined and the balance of electron density and energy checked in each time step. The mathematical procedure is illustrated using a neon plasma perturbed by a rectangular electric pulse. The time development shown of the distribution function at moments when the pulse was switched on and off demonstrates the great stability of the numerical solution. (J.U.)

  3. Iterative Multiparameter Elastic Waveform Inversion Using Prestack Time Imaging and Kirchhoff approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaniani, Hassan

    This thesis proposes a "standard strategy" for iterative inversion of elastic properties from the seismic reflection data. The term "standard" refers to the current hands-on commercial techniques that are used for the seismic imaging and inverse problem. The method is established to reduce the computation time associated with elastic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) methods. It makes use of AVO analysis, prestack time migration and corresponding forward modeling in an iterative scheme. The main objective is to describe the iterative inversion procedure used in seismic reflection data using simplified mathematical expression and their numerical applications. The frame work of the inversion is similar to (FWI) method but with less computational costs. The reduction of computational costs depends on the data conditioning (with or without multiple data), the level of the complexity of geological model and acquisition condition such as Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). Many processing methods consider multiple events as noise and remove it from the data. This is the motivation for reducing the computational cost associated with Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) forward modeling and Reverse Time Migration (RTM)-based techniques. Therefore, a one-way solution of the wave equation for inversion is implemented. While less computationally intensive depth imaging methods are available by iterative coupling of ray theory and the Born approximation, it is shown that we can further reduce the cost of inversion by dropping the cost of ray tracing for traveltime estimation in a way similar to standard Prestack Time Migration (PSTM) and the corresponding forward modeling. This requires the model to have smooth lateral variations in elastic properties, so that the traveltime of the scatterpoints can be approximated by a Double Square Root (DSR) equation. To represent a more realistic and stable solution of the inverse problem, while considering the phase of supercritical angles, the

  4. Collision Risk and Damage after Collision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Hansen, Peter Friis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a new and complete procedure for calculation of ship-ship collision rates on specific routes and the hull damage caused by such collisions.The procedure is applied to analysis of collision risks for Ro-Ro pasenger vessels. Given a collision the spatial probability distribution ...

  5. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  6. Proton-proton intensity interferometry: Space-time structure of the emitting zone in Ni+Ni collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolija, M.; Cindro, N.; Shapira, D.

    1995-01-01

    A brief description is given of the Hanbury-Brown-Twiss effect method for determining the space-time structure of the proton-emitting source in a nucleus-nucleus collision. In this context a measurement of exclusive p-p correlations from 58 Ni+ 58 Ni at 850 MeV is analyzed. The data served to study the directional dependence of the p-p correlation function and, for the first time, extract separately the source size and the particle-emission time

  7. High energy hadron-nucleus collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Fujio

    1983-02-01

    This is a lecture note concerning high energy hadron-nucleus collision. The lecture gives the inelastic total cross section and the Glanber approximate multiple scattering formula at first. The mechanism of nuclear spallation is described in a cylindrical image. The multiplicity, the one particle distribution and the time-space structure of particle production are discussed. Various models are presented. The attenuation of forward particles and the structure of hadrons are discussed for each model. The atomic number (A) dependence of the production of large transverse momentum particles and jet, and the A dependence of charged multiplicity are presented. The backward production of particles and many body correlation are discussed. Lepton pair production and the initial interaction of constituents, collective interaction, multi quark state and phase transition are described. (Kato, T.)

  8. Toy model for pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanhart, C.; Miller, G. A.; Myhrer, F.; Sato, T.; Kolck, U. van

    2001-01-01

    We develop a toy model for pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions that reproduces some of the features of the chiral Lagrangian calculations. We calculate the production amplitude and examine some common approximations

  9. Jets in high energy nucleon-nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1982-01-01

    From the experimental studies of high-energy hardon-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon collisions, by means of nuclear targets applied as detectors, it follows that particles are produced via intermediate objects created first in a 2 → 2 type endoergic reaction. These objects, called generons, decay in flight into finally observed particles and resonances after their lifetime tausub(g) > or approximately 10 - 22 s. The jet structure of the outcome in nucleon-nucleon collisions is a simple and indispensable consequence of this particle production mechanism. The picture of the jet structure in the collision outcome observed in the CMS of the colliding nucleons depends on the energy of these nUcleons. New particle production scheme is proposed, which can be tested experimentally; corresponding simple relations between characteristics of colliding nucleons and of produced jets are proposed for a testing

  10. A Collective Collision Operator for DSMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A new scheme to simulate elastic collisions in particle simulation codes is presented. The new scheme aims at simulating the collisions in the highly collisional regime, in which particle simulation techniques typically become computationally expensive.The new scheme is based on the concept of a grid-based collision field. According to this scheme, the particles perform a single collision with the background grid during a time step. The properties of the background field are calculated from the moments of the distribution function accumulated on the grid. The collision operator is based on the Langevin equation. Based on comparisons with other methods, it is found that the Langevin method overestimates the collision frequency for dilute gases

  11. Electron detachment by H- + H- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chibisov, M.I.; Yavlinskii, Yu.N.

    1994-01-01

    The autoionization channels for electrons detachment in collisions of two negative hydrogen ions in the energy range 300 - 500 eV and > 500 eV are investigated. In small energy range at large inter-ion distances the asymptotic approximation is used; at high energies - perturbation theory and classical motion are used. 18 refs., 3 figs

  12. Development of an in-vehicle intersection collision countermeasure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierowicz, John A.

    1997-02-01

    Intersection collisions constitute approximately twenty-six percent of all accidents in the United States. Because of their complexity, and demands on the perceptual and decision making abilities of the driver, intersections present an increased risk of collisions between automobiles. This situation provides an opportunity to apply advanced sensor and processing capabilities to prevent these collisions. A program to determine the characteristics of intersection collisions and identify potential countermeasures will be described. This program, sponsored by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, utilized accident data to develop a taxonomy of intersection crashes. This taxonomy was used to develop a concept for an intersection collision avoidance countermeasure. The concept utilizes in-vehicle position, dynamic status, and millimeter wave radar system and an in-vehicle computer system to provide inputs to an intersection collision avoidance algorithm. Detection of potential violation of traffic control device, or proceeding into the intersection with inadequate gap will lead to the presentation of a warning to the driver. These warnings are presented to the driver primarily via a head-up display and haptic feedback. Roadside to vehicle communication provides information regarding phased traffic signal information. Active control of the vehicle's brake and steering systems are described. Progress in the development of the systems will be presented along with the schedule of future activities.

  13. An accurate approximate solution of optimal sequential age replacement policy for a finite-time horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, R.

    2009-01-01

    It is difficult to find the optimal solution of the sequential age replacement policy for a finite-time horizon. This paper presents an accurate approximation to find an approximate optimal solution of the sequential replacement policy. The proposed approximation is computationally simple and suitable for any failure distribution. Their accuracy is illustrated by two examples. Based on the approximate solution, an approximate estimate for the total cost is derived.

  14. Time evolution of the mass exchange in grazing heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastrukov, S.I.; Deak, F.; Kiss, A.; Seres, Z.

    1989-10-01

    On the basis of a macroscopical approach to the description of two interpenetrating quantum objects, the equations of two-fluid hydrodynamics for the cohesion stage of deeply inelastic heavy-ion collisions are formulated. The elasticity of the ions is analyzed in peripheral mass exchange reactions at intermediate energies. The system of closed equations of Newtonian mechanics, which simultaneously describes the motion of the ions along classical trajectories as well as the mass time evolution during the interaction period are derived and solved. The role of mass exchange in the friction force is discussed. (author) 22 refs.; 2 figs

  15. PROCOPE, Collision Probability in Pin Clusters and Infinite Rod Lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyot, L.; Daolio, C.; Benoist, P.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: Calculation of directional collision probabilities in pin clusters and infinite rod lattices. 2 - Method of solution: a) Gauss integration of analytical expressions for collision probabilities. b) alternately, an approximate closed expression (not involving integrals) may be used for pin-to-pin interactions. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: number of fuel pins must be smaller than 62; maximum number of groups of symmetry is 300

  16. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  17. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Christof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p_T from 0.25 to 5GeV/c is studied as a function of collision centrality over a range from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p_T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  18. Mean-field approximations of fixation time distributions of evolutionary game dynamics on graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Li-Min; Zhou, Jie; Tang, Ming; Guan, Shu-Guang; Zou, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The mean fixation time is often not accurate for describing the timescales of fixation probabilities of evolutionary games taking place on complex networks. We simulate the game dynamics on top of complex network topologies and approximate the fixation time distributions using a mean-field approach. We assume that there are two absorbing states. Numerically, we show that the mean fixation time is sufficient in characterizing the evolutionary timescales when network structures are close to the well-mixing condition. In contrast, the mean fixation time shows large inaccuracies when networks become sparse. The approximation accuracy is determined by the network structure, and hence by the suitability of the mean-field approach. The numerical results show good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  19. Electron collisions in noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, H.G. P.L. de.

    1973-12-01

    Calculations for excitation cross section for some states of He and Ne by electron impact have been carried out. A parametrization of total and differential cross section in the Born-Ochkur approximation has been proposed. Using this parametrization and appropriated wave functions for the states involved in the collisions processes, the possibility of inversion of population in the He-Ne laser has been studied

  20. A perspective on relativistic nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.; Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay

    1979-01-01

    A quasi-dynamical model for the disassembly of a high energy hadronic fireball has been developed. It is fund that some signals from the early high density stage are expected to survive the expansion stage. Indeed cetain signals, the π /N and K / N ratio at high kinetic energy, are so qualitatively unique in their dependance on target projectile mass, that we believe they will survive a refinement of the collision dynamics. Therefore a determination of the assymptotic form of the hadron spectrum can be made by studying nuclear collisions. The required energies are high (approximately 10 GeV/ nucleon in C.M.), but they are within the reach of present technology

  1. Dihadron Azimuthal Correlations in p-p Collisions at sNN=7 TeV and p-Pb Collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dihadron azimuthal correlations in p-p collisions at sNN=7 TeV and p-Pb collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV are investigated in the framework of a multisource thermal model. The model can approximately describe the experimental results measured in the Large Hadron Collider. We find the px amplitude of the source is magnified and the source translates along the direction.

  2. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  3. Charge exchange and ionization of atoms in collisions with multicharged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presnyakov, L.P.; Uskov, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Single-electron transition in continuous and discrete spectra, induced by A atom and B +2 multicharged ion collision with the charge Z>3 are investigated. A theory of quantum transitions in multilevel systems with ion-atom collisions is considered. Main results on charge exchange in slow (v 0 Z 1/2 ) collisions are presented. For analysis of charge exchange analytical method, being generalization of decay model and of approximation of nonadiabatic coupling of two states, that are included into a developed approach as limiting cases, is developed. The calculation results are compared with the available experimental data

  4. Second-order symmetric eikonal approximation for electron capture at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deco, G R; Rivarola, R D [Rosario Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica

    1985-06-14

    A symmetric eikonal approximation for electron capture in ion-atom collisions at high energies has been developed within the Dodd and Greider (1966, Phys. Rev. 146 675) formalism. Implicit intermediate states are included through the choice of distorted initial and final wavefunctions. Explicit intermediate state are considered by the introduction of a free-particle Green's function G/sup +//sub 0/. The model is applied for the resonant charge exchange in H/sup +/+H(1s) collisions. Also, the characteristic dip of the continuum distorted-wave model is analysed when higher orders are included at 'realistic' high energies.

  5. Electron-electron collision effects on the bremsstrahlung emission in Lorentzian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Young-Dae; Kato, Daiji

    2009-01-01

    Electron-electron collision effects on the electron-ion bremsstrahlung process are investigated in Lorentzian plasmas. The effective electron-ion interaction potential is obtained by including the far-field terms caused by electron-electron collisions with an effective Debye length in Lorentzian plasmas. The bremsstrahlung radiation cross section is obtained as a function of the electron energy, photon energy, collision frequency, spectral index and Debye length using the Born approximation for the initial and final states of the projectile electron. It is shown that the non-Maxwellian character suppresses the bremsstrahlung radiation cross section. It is also shown that the electron-electron collision effect enhances the bremsstrahlung emission spectrum. In addition, the bremsstrahlung radiation cross section decreases with an increase in the plasma temperature.

  6. On the impact parameter probability distribution in atomic collisions for Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katardjiev, I.V.; Berg, S.; Nender, C.; Miteva, V.

    1992-01-01

    The collision statistics of ion-solid interactions in Monte Carlo simulations is discussed. The models for structureless targets are shown to be inadequate at low energies and a model for amorphous targets based on the short range ordering in amorphous solids is presented. This model clearly shows the correlation between successive collisions due to the amorphous target structure. It is shown that the new model approximates to a certain extent the collision statistics of the MARLOWE type of programs in the ''amorphous'' mode

  7. Interferometry of high energy nuclear collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padula, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    The interferometry is used for determining large space time dimensions of the Quark Gluon Plasma formed in high energy nuclear collisions or in high multiplicity fluctuations in p-barp collisions. (M.C.K.)

  8. An open-chain imaginary-time path-integral sampling approach to the calculation of approximate symmetrized quantum time correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendagorta, Joseph R.; Bačić, Zlatko; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2018-03-01

    We introduce a scheme for approximating quantum time correlation functions numerically within the Feynman path integral formulation. Starting with the symmetrized version of the correlation function expressed as a discretized path integral, we introduce a change of integration variables often used in the derivation of trajectory-based semiclassical methods. In particular, we transform to sum and difference variables between forward and backward complex-time propagation paths. Once the transformation is performed, the potential energy is expanded in powers of the difference variables, which allows us to perform the integrals over these variables analytically. The manner in which this procedure is carried out results in an open-chain path integral (in the remaining sum variables) with a modified potential that is evaluated using imaginary-time path-integral sampling rather than requiring the generation of a large ensemble of trajectories. Consequently, any number of path integral sampling schemes can be employed to compute the remaining path integral, including Monte Carlo, path-integral molecular dynamics, or enhanced path-integral molecular dynamics. We believe that this approach constitutes a different perspective in semiclassical-type approximations to quantum time correlation functions. Importantly, we argue that our approximation can be systematically improved within a cumulant expansion formalism. We test this approximation on a set of one-dimensional problems that are commonly used to benchmark approximate quantum dynamical schemes. We show that the method is at least as accurate as the popular ring-polymer molecular dynamics technique and linearized semiclassical initial value representation for correlation functions of linear operators in most of these examples and improves the accuracy of correlation functions of nonlinear operators.

  9. An open-chain imaginary-time path-integral sampling approach to the calculation of approximate symmetrized quantum time correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendagorta, Joseph R; Bačić, Zlatko; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2018-03-14

    We introduce a scheme for approximating quantum time correlation functions numerically within the Feynman path integral formulation. Starting with the symmetrized version of the correlation function expressed as a discretized path integral, we introduce a change of integration variables often used in the derivation of trajectory-based semiclassical methods. In particular, we transform to sum and difference variables between forward and backward complex-time propagation paths. Once the transformation is performed, the potential energy is expanded in powers of the difference variables, which allows us to perform the integrals over these variables analytically. The manner in which this procedure is carried out results in an open-chain path integral (in the remaining sum variables) with a modified potential that is evaluated using imaginary-time path-integral sampling rather than requiring the generation of a large ensemble of trajectories. Consequently, any number of path integral sampling schemes can be employed to compute the remaining path integral, including Monte Carlo, path-integral molecular dynamics, or enhanced path-integral molecular dynamics. We believe that this approach constitutes a different perspective in semiclassical-type approximations to quantum time correlation functions. Importantly, we argue that our approximation can be systematically improved within a cumulant expansion formalism. We test this approximation on a set of one-dimensional problems that are commonly used to benchmark approximate quantum dynamical schemes. We show that the method is at least as accurate as the popular ring-polymer molecular dynamics technique and linearized semiclassical initial value representation for correlation functions of linear operators in most of these examples and improves the accuracy of correlation functions of nonlinear operators.

  10. Improvement of Tone's method with two-term rational approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Endo, Tomohiro; Chiba, Go

    2011-01-01

    An improvement of Tone's method, which is a resonance calculation method based on the equivalence theory, is proposed. In order to increase calculation accuracy, the two-term rational approximation is incorporated for the representation of neutron flux. Furthermore, some theoretical aspects of Tone's method, i.e., its inherent approximation and choice of adequate multigroup cross section for collision probability estimation, are also discussed. The validity of improved Tone's method is confirmed through a verification calculation in an irregular lattice geometry, which represents part of an LWR fuel assembly. The calculation result clarifies the validity of the present method. (author)

  11. Time-dependent integral transport equation kernels, leakage rates and collision rates for plane and spherical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Time-dependent integral transport equation flux and current kernels for plane and spherical geometry are derived for homogeneous media. Using the multiple collision formalism, isotropic sources that are delta distributions in time are considered for four different problems. The plane geometry flux kernel is applied to a uniformly distributed source within an infinite medium and to a surface source in a semi-infinite medium. The spherical flux kernel is applied to a point source in an infinite medium and to a point source at the origin of a finite sphere. The time-dependent first-flight leakage rates corresponding to the existing steady state first-flight escape probabilities are computed by the Laplace transform technique assuming a delta distribution source in time. The case of a constant source emitting neutrons over a time interval, Δt, for a spatially uniform source is obtained for a slab and a sphere. Time-dependent first-flight leakage rates are also determined for the general two region spherical medium problem for isotropic sources with a delta distribution in time uniformly distributed throughout both the inner and outer regions. The time-dependent collision rates due to the uncollided neutrons are computed for a slab and a sphere using the time-dependent first-flight leakage rates and the time-dependent continuity equation. The case of a constant source emitting neutrons over a time interval, Δt, is also considered

  12. A particle-in-cell method for modeling small angle Coulomb collisions in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    We propose a computational method to self-consistently model small angle collisional effects. This method may be added to standard Particle-In-Cell (PIC) plasma simulations to include collisions, or as an alternative to solving the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation using finite difference methods. The distribution function is represented by a large number of particles. The particle velocities change due to the drag force, and the diffusion in velocity is represented by a random process. This is similar to previous Monte-Carlo methods except we calculate the drag force and diffusion tensor self- consistently. The particles are weighted to a grid in velocity space and associated ''Poisson equations'' are solved for the Rosenbluth potentials. The motivation is to avoid the very time consuming method of Coulomb scattering pair by pair. First the approximation for small angle Coulomb collisions is discussed. Next, the FP-PIC collision method is outlined. Then we show a test of the particle advance modeling an electron beam scattering off a fixed ion background. 4 refs

  13. An approximate analysis of expected cycle time in business process execution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ha, B.H.; Reijers, H.A.; Bae, J.; Bae, H.; Eder, J.; Dustdar, S

    2006-01-01

    The accurate prediction of business process performance during its design phase can facilitate the assessment of existing processes and the generation of alternatives. In this paper, an approximation method to estimate the cycle time of a business process is introduced. First, we propose a process

  14. Coorbital Collision as the Energy Source for Enceladus' Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peale, Stanton J.; Greenberg, R.

    2009-09-01

    A collision of a coorbiting satellite with Enceladus is proposed as the source of energy to power the observed plumes emanating from the south pole of the satellite. A coorbital would have impacted at a velocity only slightly above the escape velocity of Enceladus, which would likely be necessary to keep the collision gentle enough not to disrupt the old cratered terrain nearby. If the mass were 1% of Enceladus', the energy deposited can sustain the plumes for approximately 80,000 to 200,000 years at the estimated observed power of 6 to 15 GW, so the impact would have been quite recent. The collision at an arbitrary point would leave Enceladus with non-synchronous, non-principal-axis rotation and a significant obliquity. After subsuming the impactor's volume, the region around the impact point will have expanded in a manner consistent with the observed tectonic pattern. The ring-like expansion implied by the radial cracks suggests that the new principal axis of maximum moment of inertia could have passed through the impact point. Internal dissipation from precession of the spin axis about the axis of maximum moment of inertia in the body frame of reference and from tides raised on Enceladus cause the axes of spin and of maximum moment to converge as the spin is brought to a zero obliquity and synchronous rotation on a time scale that is extremely short compared to the lifetime of the plumes. Hence, the region of collision, which is hot, ends up at one of the poles where we find the plumes.

  15. Free-parameterless model of high energy particle collisions with atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1982-01-01

    In result of studies, it has been discovered that: a) Intensive emission of fast nucleons of kinetic energy from 20 to 400 MeV proceeds independently of the pion production process; b) The particle production in hadron-nucleon collisions is mediated by intermediate objects produced first in a 2 → 2 type endoergic reaction and decaying after lifetime tausub(g) > or approximately 10 - 22 s into commonly known resonances and particles; c) Inside of massive enough atomic nuclei quasi-onedimensional cascades of the intermediate objects can develop; d) A definite simple connection exists between the characteristics of the secondaries appearing in hadron-nucleus collision events and corresponding hadron-nucleon collision events, the target-nucleus size and the nucleon density distribution in it. The yield of the hadron-nucleus collisions is described in a convincing manner in terms of the hadron-nucleon collision data by means of simple formulas

  16. A new theory of collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, B.G.

    1989-01-01

    Instead of diagonalizing the many-body Hamiltonian H, we invert E-H, where E is a complex energy, eventually real. All the traditional approximations to diagonalization can be adjusted to inversion. We specially investigate mean-field methods. This lecture gives a scheme for the detailed proofs of our arguments, already published, and lists several numerically soluble cases where our new method has been successfully tested for the calculation of collision amplitudes

  17. Linear Time Local Approximation Algorithm for Maximum Stable Marriage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Király

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider a two-sided market under incomplete preference lists with ties, where the goal is to find a maximum size stable matching. The problem is APX-hard, and a 3/2-approximation was given by McDermid [1]. This algorithm has a non-linear running time, and, more importantly needs global knowledge of all preference lists. We present a very natural, economically reasonable, local, linear time algorithm with the same ratio, using some ideas of Paluch [2]. In this algorithm every person make decisions using only their own list, and some information asked from members of these lists (as in the case of the famous algorithm of Gale and Shapley. Some consequences to the Hospitals/Residents problem are also discussed.

  18. Universal pion freeze-out in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamova, D; Appelshäuser, H; Belaga, V; Braun-Munzinger, P; Castillo, A; Cherlin, A; Damjanovic, S; Dietel, T; Dietrich, L; Drees, A; Esumi, S I; Filimonov, K; Fomenko, K; Fraenkel, Zeev; Garabatos, C; Glässel, P; Hering, G; Holeczek, J; Kushpil, V; Lenkeit, B C; Ludolphs, W; Maas, A; Marin, A; Milosevic, J; Milov, A; Miskowiec, D; Panebratsev, Yu A; Petchenova, O Yu; Petracek, V; Pfeiffer, A; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Rehak, P; Sako, H; Schükraft, Jürgen; Sedykh, S; Shimansky, S S; Slivova, J; Specht, H J; Stachel, J; Sumbera, M; Tilsner, H; Tserruya, Itzhak; Wessels, J P; Wienold, T; Windelband, B; Wurm, J P; Xie, W; Yurevich, S; Yurevich, V; Schmitz, W

    2003-01-01

    Based on an evaluation of recent systematic data on two-pion interferometry and on measured particle yields at mid-rapidity, we propose a universal condition for thermal freeze-out of pions in heavy-ion collisions. We show that freeze-out occurs when the mean free path of pions lambda_f reaches a value of approximately 2.5 fm, which is much smaller than the spatial extent of the system at freeze-out. This critical mean free path is independent of the centrality of the collision and its value is constant at all currently available beam energies from AGS to RHIC.

  19. Diffractive ''semioptical'' model for nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barashenkov, V.S.; Musulmanbekov, Zh.Zh.

    1979-01-01

    Diffraction Glauber theory for nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered in approximation when the initial nucleus interacts as a whole with nucleons of the target nucleus. Such an approach, being intermediate between precise Glauber theory and its optical limit, essentially simplifies numerical calculations and gives a good agreement with experiments as well. (author)

  20. Electron-ion collision rates in atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, M; Hilse, P; Schlanges, M; Bornath, Th; Krainov, V P

    2010-01-01

    In atomic clusters irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses, plasmas with high density and high temperature are created. The heating is mainly caused by inverse bremsstrahlung, i.e. determined by electron-ion collisions. In the description of the scattering of electrons on noble gas ions in such plasmas, it is important to account for the inner structure of the ions and the screening by the surrounding plasma medium which can be accomplished by using suitable model potentials. In the wide parameter range met in experiments, the Born approximation is not applicable. Instead, the electron-ion collision frequency is calculated on the basis of classical momentum transport cross sections. Results are presented for xenon, krypton and argon ions in different charge states. A comparison of these results to those for the scattering on Coulomb particles with the same charge shows an enhancement of the collision frequency. The Born approximation, however, leads to an overestimation.

  1. Thermal disadvantage factor calculation by the multiregion collision probability method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozgener, B.; Ozgener, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-region collision probability formulation that is capable of applying white boundary condition directly is presented and applied to thermal neutron transport problems. The disadvantage factors computed are compared with their counterparts calculated by S N methods with both direct and indirect application of white boundary condition. The results of the ABH and collision probability method with indirect application of white boundary condition are also considered and comparisons with benchmark Monte Carlo results are carried out. The studies show that the proposed formulation is capable of calculating thermal disadvantage factor with sufficient accuracy without resorting to the fictitious scattering outer shell approximation associated with the indirect application of the white boundary condition in collision probability solutions

  2. Determination of the event collision time with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; An, Mangmang; Andrei, Cristian; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-luc Fernand; 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Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Mishra, Tribeni; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; 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Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann

    2017-02-24

    Particle identification is an important feature of the ALICE detector at the LHC. In particular, for particle identification via the time-of-flight technique, the precise determination of the event collision time represents an important ingredient of the quality of the measurement. In this paper, the different methods used for such a measurement in ALICE by means of the T0 and the TOF detectors are reviewed. Efficiencies, resolution and the improvement of the particle identification separation power of the methods used are presented for the different LHC colliding systems (pp , p-Pb and Pb-Pb) during the first period of data taking of LHC (Run 1).

  3. Non-Equilibrium Liouville and Wigner Equations: Moment Methods and Long-Time Approximations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon F. Álvarez-Estrada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We treat the non-equilibrium evolution of an open one-particle statistical system, subject to a potential and to an external “heat bath” (hb with negligible dissipation. For the classical equilibrium Boltzmann distribution, Wc,eq, a non-equilibrium three-term hierarchy for moments fulfills Hermiticity, which allows one to justify an approximate long-time thermalization. That gives partial dynamical support to Boltzmann’s Wc,eq, out of the set of classical stationary distributions, Wc;st, also investigated here, for which neither Hermiticity nor that thermalization hold, in general. For closed classical many-particle systems without hb (by using Wc,eq, the long-time approximate thermalization for three-term hierarchies is justified and yields an approximate Lyapunov function and an arrow of time. The largest part of the work treats an open quantum one-particle system through the non-equilibrium Wigner function, W. Weq for a repulsive finite square well is reported. W’s (< 0 in various cases are assumed to be quasi-definite functionals regarding their dependences on momentum (q. That yields orthogonal polynomials, HQ,n(q, for Weq (and for stationary Wst, non-equilibrium moments, Wn, of W and hierarchies. For the first excited state of the harmonic oscillator, its stationary Wst is a quasi-definite functional, and the orthogonal polynomials and three-term hierarchy are studied. In general, the non-equilibrium quantum hierarchies (associated with Weq for the Wn’s are not three-term ones. As an illustration, we outline a non-equilibrium four-term hierarchy and its solution in terms of generalized operator continued fractions. Such structures also allow one to formulate long-time approximations, but make it more difficult to justify thermalization. For large thermal and de Broglie wavelengths, the dominant Weq and a non-equilibrium equation for W are reported: the non-equilibrium hierarchy could plausibly be a three-term one and possibly not

  4. Strangeness production in AA and pp collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorina, Paolo [Universita di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Catania (Italy); INFN, Catania (Italy); Satz, Helmut [Universitaet Bielefeld, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Boost-invariant hadron production in high-energy collisions occurs in causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) are conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. Their size is determined by two time scales: the equilibration time specifying the formation of a quark-gluon plasma, and the hadronization time, specifying the onset of confinement. The expected values for these scales provide the theoretical basis for the suppression observed for strangeness production in elementary interactions (pp, e{sup +}e{sup -}) below LHC energies. In contrast, the space-time superposition of individual collisions in high-energy heavy-ion interactions leads to higher energy densities, resulting in much later hadronization and hence much larger hadronization volumes. This largely removes the causality constraints and results in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full chemical equilibrium. In the present paper, we determine the collision energies needed for that; we also estimate when pp collisions reach comparable hadronization volumes and thus determine when strangeness suppression should disappear there as well. (orig.)

  5. Leaky-box approximation to the fractional diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchaikin, V V; Sibatov, R T; Saenko, V V

    2013-01-01

    Two models based on fractional differential equations for galactic cosmic ray diffusion are applied to the leaky-box approximation. One of them (Lagutin-Uchaikin, 2000) assumes a finite mean free path of cosmic ray particles, another one (Lagutin-Tyumentsev, 2004) uses distribution with infinite mean distance between collision with magnetic clouds, when the trajectories have form close to ballistic. Calculations demonstrate that involving boundary conditions is incompatible with spatial distributions given by the second model.

  6. Electromagnetic lepton-pair production in relativistic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, C.J.; Ernst, D.J.; Strayer, M.R.; Bottcher, C.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic lepton-pair production in relativistic collisions is studied in an ab initio approach with no free parameters. After a semi-classical approximation to the relative motion of the two incident particles is made, the resulting second-order diagram is calculated using a Monte Carlo technique to evaluate the resulting seven-dimensional integral. We examine the case of electron-positron pair production in π - p collisions at p pi = 17 GeV. We find that a significant fraction of the measured pairs in this reaction are produced via the magnetic spin-flip current of the proton. Approaches, such as the equivalent photon approximation, which neglect this part of the current predict much too small a cross section. This feature is traced to the cuts imposed in taking the experimental data. Lepton-pair production in the scattering of 3 He, 4 He and 4 He, 4 He is proposed as a clean way of experimentally separating the spin-flip and non-flip processes; predictions are made for these systems

  7. Chosen-Prefix Collisions for MD5 and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.J. Stevens (Marc); A.K. Lenstra (Arjen); B. de Weger (Benne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe present a novel, automated way to find differential paths for MD5. Its main application is in the construction of \\emph{chosen-prefix collisions}. We have shown how, at an approximate expected cost of $2^{39}$ calls to the MD5 compression function, for any two chosen

  8. The scattering matrix element of the three body reactive collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, M.W.; Hilal, A.A.; El-Sabagh, M.A.

    1980-08-01

    The optical model approximation has been applied to a previously derived set of coupled equations representing the dynamics of the three-body reactive scattering. The Schroedinger equation obtained describing the scattering problem has then been solved by inserting the effective mass approximation. The asymptotic requirements for both the entrance and exit channels, respectively, have been supplied to give the scattering matrix element of the reactive collision. (author)

  9. Effect of collisions on photoelectron sheath in a gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Mishra, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the collision of electrons with atoms/molecules on the structure of a photoelectron sheath. Considering the half Fermi-Dirac distribution of photo-emitted electrons, an expression for the electron density in the sheath has been derived in terms of the electric potential and the structure of the sheath has been investigated by incorporating Poisson's equation in the analysis. The method of successive approximations has been used to solve Poisson's equation with the solution for the electric potential in the case of vacuum, obtained earlier [Sodha and Mishra, Phys. Plasmas 21, 093704 (2014)], being used as the zeroth order solution for the present analysis. The inclusion of collisions influences the photoelectron sheath structure significantly; a reduction in the sheath width with increasing collisions is obtained.

  10. Boltzmann equation analysis of electron-molecule collision cross sections in water vapor and ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousfi, M.; Benabdessadok, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    Sets of electron-molecule collision cross sections for H 2 O and NH 3 have been determined from a classical technique of electron swarm parameter unfolding. This deconvolution method is based on a simplex algorithm using a powerful multiterm Boltzmann equation analysis established in the framework of the classical hydrodynamic approximation. It is well adapted for the simulation of the different classes of swarm experiments (i.e., time resolved, time of flight, and steady state experiments). The sets of collision cross sections that exist in the literature are reviewed and analyzed. Fitted sets of cross sections are determined for H 2 O and NH 3 which exhibit features characteristic of polar molecules such as high rotational excitation collision cross sections. The hydrodynamic swarm parameters (i.e., drift velocity, longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients, ionization and attachment coefficients) calculated from the fitted sets are in excellent agreement with the measured ones. These sets are finally used to calculate the transport and reaction coefficients needed for discharge modeling in two cases of typical gas mixtures for which experimental swarm data are very sparse or nonexistent (i.e., flue gas mixtures and gas mixtures for rf plasma surface treatment). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Coupled states approximation for scattering of two diatoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heil, T.G.; Green, S.; Kouri, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    The coupled states (CS) approximation is developed in detail for the general case of two colliding diatomic molecules. The high energy limit of the exact Lippmann-Schwinger equation is used to obtain the CS equations so that the sufficiency conditions of Kouri, Heil, and Shimoni apply. In addition, care is taken to ensure correct treatment of parity in the CS, as well as correct labeling of the CS by an effective orbital angular momentum. The analysis follows that given by Shimoni and Kouri for atom-diatom collisions where the coupled rotor angular momentum j 12 and projection lambda 12 replace the single diatom angular momentum j and projection lambda. The result is an expression for the differential scattering amplitude which is a generalization of the highly successful McGuire-Kouri differential scattering amplitude for atom-diatom collisions. Also, the opacity function is found to be a generalization of the Clebsch-Gordon weight atom-diatom expression of Shimoni and Kouri. The diatom-diatom CS body frame T matrix T/sup J/(j 1 'j 2 'j 12 'lambda 12 'vertical-bar j 1 j 2 j 12 lambda 12 ) is also found to be nondiagonal in lambda' 12 ,lambda 12 , just as in the atom-diatom case. The parity and identical molecule interchange symmetries are also considered in detail in both the exact close coupling and CS approximations. Symmetrized expressions for all relevant quantities are obtained, along with the symmetrized coupled equations one must solve. The properly labeled and symmetrized CS equations have not been derived before this present work. The present correctly labeled CS theory is tested computationally by applications to three different diatom-diatom potentials. First we carry out calculations for para-para, ortho-ortho, and ortho-para H 2 -H 2 collisions using the experimental potential of Farrar and Lee

  12. Time adaptivity in the diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan; Radwan, Hany; Dalcí n, Lisandro D.; Calo, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the use of time adaptivity applied to the one dimensional diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations. A simple and computationally economical error estimator is discussed which enables time-step size adaptivity. This robust adaptive time discretization corrects the initial time step size to achieve a user specified bound on the discretization error and allows time step size variations of several orders of magnitude. In particular, the one dimensional results presented in this work feature a change of four orders of magnitudes for the time step over the entire simulation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Time adaptivity in the diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2013-05-01

    We discuss the use of time adaptivity applied to the one dimensional diffusive wave approximation to the shallow water equations. A simple and computationally economical error estimator is discussed which enables time-step size adaptivity. This robust adaptive time discretization corrects the initial time step size to achieve a user specified bound on the discretization error and allows time step size variations of several orders of magnitude. In particular, the one dimensional results presented in this work feature a change of four orders of magnitudes for the time step over the entire simulation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. On the Two-Moment Approximation of the Discrete-Time GI/G/1 Queue with a Single Vacation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo Ho Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a discrete-time GI/G/1 queue in which the server takes exactly one vacation each time the system becomes empty. The interarrival times of arriving customers, the service times, and the vacation times are all generic discrete random variables. Under our study, we derive an exact transform-free expression for the stationary system size distribution through the modified supplementary variable technique. Utilizing obtained results, we introduce a simple two-moment approximation for the system size distribution. From this, approximations for the mean system size along with the system size distribution could be obtained. Finally, some numerical examples are given to validate the proposed approximation method.

  15. Probing early-time correlations in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, Sean; Moschelli, George

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the common influence of correlations arising from initial state parton density fluctuations on measured multiplicity and momentum fluctuations as well as flow fluctuations. We calculate both a universal correlation scale in an initial stage Glasma flux tube picture and the modification to these correlations from later stage hydrodynamic flow. We find quantitative agreement with measurements over a range of collision systems and energies.

  16. Time-dependent Hartree--Fock method: description of heavy-ion collisions and allowance for correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maedler, P.

    1984-01-01

    The review describes the application of the time-dependent Hartree--Fock method to the description of heavy-ion interactions at energies of order 10 MeV/nucleon. The fundamentals of the method are presented and qualitative properties of its results are discussed. Realistic calculations of fusion reactions, deep inelastic collisions, and particle emission are presented and compared with the corresponding experimental data. Various approaches that generalize the method by taking into account correlations are considered

  17. Long range forward-backward rapidity correlations in proton-proton collisions at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogueira, P.; Dias de Deus, J.; Pajares, C.

    2009-01-01

    We argue that string percolation is in the origin of (i) an approximately flat rapidity distribution and of (ii) an approximately constant forward-backward correlation parameter b over a substantial fraction of the available rapidity. Predictions are given for pp collisions at LHC, √(s)=14 TeV and √(s)=5.5 TeV.

  18. Collision Detection for Underwater ROV Manipulator Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satja Sivčev

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Work-class ROVs equipped with robotic manipulators are extensively used for subsea intervention operations. Manipulators are teleoperated by human pilots relying on visual feedback from the worksite. Operating in a remote environment, with limited pilot perception and poor visibility, manipulator collisions which may cause significant damage are likely to happen. This paper presents a real-time collision detection algorithm for marine robotic manipulation. The proposed collision detection mechanism is developed, integrated into a commercial ROV manipulator control system, and successfully evaluated in simulations and experimental setup using a real industry standard underwater manipulator. The presented collision sensing solution has a potential to be a useful pilot assisting tool that can reduce the task load, operational time, and costs of subsea inspection, repair, and maintenance operations.

  19. Charmonium production in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei at CERN and comparison with Brookhaven data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topilskaya, N. S.

    2013-01-01

    A review of experimental data on charmoniumproduction that were obtained in fixed-target experiments at the SPS synchrotron and in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei in beams of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Switzerland) is presented. A comparison with data obtained at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) from experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is performed. Measurement of the suppression of J/ψ-meson production as a possible signal of the production of quark-gluon plasmawas proposed back in 1986 by T. Matsui and H. Satz. An anomalous suppression of J/ψ-meson production was discovered by the NA50 Collaboration at SPS (CERN) in central collisions of lead nuclei at the c.m. collision energy of 158 GeV per nucleon. Data obtained at the c.m. energy of 200 GeV per nucleon in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC indicate that, depending on multiplicity, the suppression of J/ψ-meson production at this energy approximately corresponds to the suppression of J/ψ-meson production in collisions of lead nuclei at the SPS accelerator. Theoretical models that take into account the regeneration of J/ψ mesons describe better RHIC experimental data. The measurement of charmonium production in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei in LHC beams revealed the importance of taking into account the regeneration process. At the LHC energies, it is also necessary to take into account the contribution of B-meson decays. Future measurements of charmonium production at the LHC to a higher statistical precision and over an extended energy region would be of importance for obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of charmonium production and for studying the properties of matter at high energy density and temperature

  20. Arrival-time picking method based on approximate negentropy for microseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Ni, Zhuo; Tian, Yanan

    2018-05-01

    Accurate and dependable picking of the first arrival time for microseismic data is an important part in microseismic monitoring, which directly affects analysis results of post-processing. This paper presents a new method based on approximate negentropy (AN) theory for microseismic arrival time picking in condition of much lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). According to the differences in information characteristics between microseismic data and random noise, an appropriate approximation of negentropy function is selected to minimize the effect of SNR. At the same time, a weighted function of the differences between maximum and minimum value of AN spectrum curve is designed to obtain a proper threshold function. In this way, the region of signal and noise is distinguished to pick the first arrival time accurately. To demonstrate the effectiveness of AN method, we make many experiments on a series of synthetic data with different SNR from -1 dB to -12 dB and compare it with previously published Akaike information criterion (AIC) and short/long time average ratio (STA/LTA) methods. Experimental results indicate that these three methods can achieve well picking effect when SNR is from -1 dB to -8 dB. However, when SNR is as low as -8 dB to -12 dB, the proposed AN method yields more accurate and stable picking result than AIC and STA/LTA methods. Furthermore, the application results of real three-component microseismic data also show that the new method is superior to the other two methods in accuracy and stability.

  1. Solution of the transport equation with account for inelastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, N.P.; Remizovich, V.S.; Ryazanov, M.I.

    1980-01-01

    The theory of charged particle scattering in a matter with account for inelastic collisions is considered. In ''directly-forward'' approximation the transport equation at the absence of elastic collisions is obtained. The solution of the transport equation is made without and with account for fluctuation of energy losses. Formulas for path-energy relation are given. Energy spectrum and distribution of fast charged particles with respect to paths are studied. The problem of quantum mechanical approach to the theory of multiple scattering of fast charged particles in a matter is discussed briefly

  2. Excited-state positronium formation from positron--atomic-hydrogen collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, C.R.; Mandal, M.; Mukherjee, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Positronium formation into ground and n=2 levels has been studied in collisions of positrons with atomic hydrogen in the framework of an approximation called the boundary-corrected continuum-intermediate-state (BCCIS) approximation in the energy range of 0.08--2 keV. The conventional continuum-intermediate-state approximation does not satisfy the correct boundary condition. It has been shown that, with a suitable choice of the distorting potential, the boundary condition may be satisfied with a proper account of the intermediate continuum states. It has also been shown that the BCCIS approximation leads to the same transition amplitude as may be derived using the Vainshtein-Presnyakov-Sobelman approximation. The results obtained here are found to be in good agreement when compared with other theoretical results

  3. Molecular dynamics and binary collisions modeling of the primary damage state of collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the spectral dependence of defect production and microstructure evolution for the development of fission-fusion correlations. Quantitative information on defect production in cascades in copper obtained from recent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is compared to defect production information determined earlier with a model based on the binary collision approximation (BCA). The total numbers of residual defects, the fractions of them that are mobile, and the sizes of immobile clusters compare favorably, especially when the termination conditions of the two simulations are taken into account. A strategy is laid out for integrating the details of the cascade quenching phase determined by MD into a BCA-based model that is practical for simulating much higher energies and longer times than MD alone can achieve. The extraction of collisional phase information from MD simulations and the correspondence of MD and BCA versions of the collisional phase demonstrated at low energy

  4. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Lee, J. W.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The spectra were measured for transverse momenta pT from 0.25 to 4.5 GeV/c in a pseudorapidity range of 0.2<η<1.4. The evolution of the spectra is studied as a function of collision centrality, from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. The results are compared to data from proton-antiproton collisions and Au+Au collisions at lower RHIC energies. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing semi-peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at high pT exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  5. Pomarning-eddington approximation for time-dependent radiation transfer in finite slab media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Wakil, S.A.; Degheidy, A.R.; Sallah, M.

    2005-01-01

    The time-dependent monoenergetic radiation transfer equation with linear anisotropic scattering is proposed. Pomraning-Eddington approximation is used to calculate the radiation intensity in finite plane-parallel media. Numerical results are done for the isotropic media. Shielding calculations are shown for reflectivity and transmissivity at different times. The medium is assumed to have specular-reflecting boundaries. Two different weight functions are introduced to force the boundary conditions to be fulfilled

  6. An investigation of collision propagation in energetic ion initiated cascades in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakarov, I.R.; Webb, R.P.; Smith, R.; Beardmore, K.

    1995-01-01

    Using simple Binary Collision simulations of energetic ion initiated collision cascades, particles are considered to undergo a series of binary collisions with their surroundings. In Molecular Dynamics simulation it is difficult to even define what is meant by a collision as the interaction potentials are infinite in nature and consequently all particles are considered to interact with all other particles. By making a suitable definition of a collision for Molecular Dynamics we are able to compare the temporal behaviour of the number of collisions occurring during the propagation of a collision cascade between the two different calculation schemes. An investigation is made of the number of collisions as a function of time occurring in collision cascades. We compare these results to the time ordered version of MARLOWE. By making further definitions about what makes a many body collision, we further investigate the numbers of many body collisions occurring during a number of collision cascades. (orig.)

  7. Effective collision frequency method in the theory of the conductivity of Coulomb systems. II. Strong interion interaction and plasma structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrov, V.B.; Triger, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The effective collision frequency method developed earlier by the authors for Coulomb systems characterized by strong interion interaction is developed further. An explicit expression is obtained for the effective electron collision frequency on the basis of the exact diagram representation obtained in Part I and the use of the model of a one-component plasma as initial approximation. The description of plasma structure in the corresponding approximation is considered. 25 refs

  8. Interactive collision detection for deformable models using streaming AABBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Kim, Young J

    2007-01-01

    We present an interactive and accurate collision detection algorithm for deformable, polygonal objects based on the streaming computational model. Our algorithm can detect all possible pairwise primitive-level intersections between two severely deforming models at highly interactive rates. In our streaming computational model, we consider a set of axis aligned bounding boxes (AABBs) that bound each of the given deformable objects as an input stream and perform massively-parallel pairwise, overlapping tests onto the incoming streams. As a result, we are able to prevent performance stalls in the streaming pipeline that can be caused by expensive indexing mechanism required by bounding volume hierarchy-based streaming algorithms. At runtime, as the underlying models deform over time, we employ a novel, streaming algorithm to update the geometric changes in the AABB streams. Moreover, in order to get only the computed result (i.e., collision results between AABBs) without reading back the entire output streams, we propose a streaming en/decoding strategy that can be performed in a hierarchical fashion. After determining overlapped AABBs, we perform a primitive-level (e.g., triangle) intersection checking on a serial computational model such as CPUs. We implemented the entire pipeline of our algorithm using off-the-shelf graphics processors (GPUs), such as nVIDIA GeForce 7800 GTX, for streaming computations, and Intel Dual Core 3.4G processors for serial computations. We benchmarked our algorithm with different models of varying complexities, ranging from 15K up to 50K triangles, under various deformation motions, and the timings were obtained as 30 approximately 100 FPS depending on the complexity of models and their relative configurations. Finally, we made comparisons with a well-known GPU-based collision detection algorithm, CULLIDE [4] and observed about three times performance improvement over the earlier approach. We also made comparisons with a SW-based AABB

  9. Approximating the Value of a Concurrent Reachability Game in the Polynomial Time Hierarchy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Søren Kristoffer Stiil; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2013-01-01

    We show that the value of a finite-state concurrent reachability game can be approximated to arbitrary precision in TFNP[NP], that is, in the polynomial time hierarchy. Previously, no better bound than PSPACE was known for this problem. The proof is based on formulating a variant of the state red...... reduction algorithm for Markov chains using arbitrary precision floating point arithmetic and giving a rigorous error analysis of the algorithm.......We show that the value of a finite-state concurrent reachability game can be approximated to arbitrary precision in TFNP[NP], that is, in the polynomial time hierarchy. Previously, no better bound than PSPACE was known for this problem. The proof is based on formulating a variant of the state...

  10. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The current status, both theoretical and experimental, of two photon collision physics is reviewed with special emphasis on recent experimental results from e + e - storage rings. After a complete presentation of the helicity amplitude formalism for the general process e + e - → Xe + e - , various approximations (transverse photon, Weisaecker Williams) are discussed. Beam polarisation effects and radiative corrections are also briefly considered. A number of specific processes, for which experimental results are now available, are then described. In each case existing theoretical prediction are confronted with experimental results. The processes described include single resonance production, lepton and hadron pair production, the structure functions of the photon, the production of high Psub(T) jets and the total photon photon cross section. In the last part of the review the current status of the subject is summarised and some comments are made on future prospects. These include both extrapolations of current research to higher energy machines (LEP, HERA) as well as a brief mention of both the technical realisation and the physics interest of the real γγ and eγ collisions which may be possible using linear electron colliders in the 1 TeV energy range

  11. Initial angular momentum and flow in high energy nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Rainer J.; Chen, Guangyao; Somanathan, Sidharth

    2018-03-01

    We study the transfer of angular momentum in high energy nuclear collisions from the colliding nuclei to the region around midrapidity, using the classical approximation of the color glass condensate (CGC) picture. We find that the angular momentum shortly after the collision (up to times ˜1 /Qs , where Qs is the saturation scale) is carried by the "β -type" flow of the initial classical gluon field, introduced by some of us earlier. βi˜μ1∇iμ2-μ2∇iμ1 (i =1 ,2 ) describes the rapidity-odd transverse energy flow and emerges from Gauss's law for gluon fields. Here μ1 and μ2 are the averaged color charge fluctuation densities in the two nuclei, respectively. Interestingly, strong coupling calculations using anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT) techniques also find an energy flow term featuring this particular combination of nuclear densities. In classical CGC the order of magnitude of the initial angular momentum per rapidity in the reaction plane, at a time 1 /Qs , is |d L2/d η |≈ RAQs-3ɛ¯0/2 at midrapidity, where RA is the nuclear radius, and ɛ¯0 is the average initial energy density. This result emerges as a cancellation between a vortex of energy flow in the reaction plane aligned with the total angular momentum, and energy shear flow opposed to it. We discuss in detail the process of matching classical Yang-Mills results to fluid dynamics. We will argue that dissipative corrections should not be discarded to ensure that macroscopic conservation laws, e.g., for angular momentum, hold. Viscous fluid dynamics tends to dissipate the shear flow contribution that carries angular momentum in boost-invariant fluid systems. This leads to small residual angular momentum around midrapidity at late times for collisions at high energies.

  12. Comparison of approximate methods for multiple scattering in high-energy collisions. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, A.M.; Tobocman, W.; Werby, M.F.

    1976-01-01

    The scattering in one dimension of a particle by a target of N like particles in a bound state has been studied. The exact result for the transmission probability has been compared with the predictions of the Glauber theory, the Watson optical potential model, and the adiabatic (or fixed scatterer) approximation. The approximate methods optical potential model is second best. The Watson method is found to work better when the kinematics suggested by Foldy and Walecka are used rather than that suggested by Watson, that is to say, when the two-body of the nucleon-nucleon reduced mass

  13. Approximation-Based Discrete-Time Adaptive Position Tracking Control for Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinpeng; Shi, Peng; Yu, Haisheng; Chen, Bing; Lin, Chong

    2015-07-01

    This paper considers the problem of discrete-time adaptive position tracking control for a interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) based on fuzzy-approximation. Fuzzy logic systems are used to approximate the nonlinearities of the discrete-time IPMSM drive system which is derived by direct discretization using Euler method, and a discrete-time fuzzy position tracking controller is designed via backstepping approach. In contrast to existing results, the advantage of the scheme is that the number of the adjustable parameters is reduced to two only and the problem of coupling nonlinearity can be overcome. It is shown that the proposed discrete-time fuzzy controller can guarantee the tracking error converges to a small neighborhood of the origin and all the signals are bounded. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness and the potentials of the theoretic results obtained.

  14. Time resolved laser induced fluorescence on argon intermediate pressure microwave discharges: Measuring the depopulation rates of the 4p and 5p excited levels as induced by electron and atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares, J.M., E-mail: j.m.palomares-linares@tue.nl; Graef, W.A.A.D.; Hübner, S.; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der, E-mail: jjamvandermullen@gmail.com

    2013-10-01

    The reaction kinetics in the excitation space of Ar is explored by means of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) experiments using the combination of high rep-rate YAG–Dye laser systems with a well defined and easily controllable surfatron induced plasma setup. The high rep-rate favors the photon statistics while the low energy per pulse avoids intrusive plasma laser interactions. An analysis shows that, despite the low energy per pulse, saturation can still be achieved even when the geometrical overlap and spectral overlap are optimal. Out of the various studies that can be performed with this setup we confine the current paper to the study of the direct responses to the laser pump action of three 4p and one 5p levels of the Ar system. By changing the plasma in a controlled way one gets for these levels the rates of electron and atom quenching and therewith the total destruction rates of electron and atom collisions. Comparison with literature shows that the classical hard sphere collision rate derived for hydrogen gives a good description for the observed electron quenching (e-quenching) in Ar whereas for heavy particle quenching (a-quenching) this agreement was only found for the 5p level. An important parameter in the study of electron excitation kinetics is the location of the boundary in the atomic system for which the number of electron collisions per radiative life time equals unity. It is observed that for the Ar system this boundary is positioned lower than what is expected on grounds of H-like formulas. - Highlights: • Time resolved laser induced fluorescence at high repetition rate • Decay times as function of pressure, electron density and temperature • Measurement of total electron atom depopulation rates • Reasonable agreement of electron total rates with hard sphere approximations.

  15. K-Vacancy Production in the Collision of Highly Charged Relativistic Ions With Heavy Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    KHABIBULLAEV, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    A general expression for the cross section of the inelastic collision of relativistic highly charged ion with heavy (relativistic) atoms is obtained using the generalized eikonal approximation. In the ultrarelativistic limit, the obtained formula coincides with a known exact one. As an application of the obtained result, probability and cross section of the K-vacany production in the U92+ - U91+ collision are calculated.

  16. Exotic phenomena in collisions of heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, G.; Schramm, S.; Reus, T. de; Mehler, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.; Mueller, U.

    1985-08-01

    To exemplify current theoretical investigations we discuss three different topics. After a presentation of the underlying theoretical framework for ionization processes we will sketch the possibility to employ delta-electron emission as a clock to measure nuclear reaction times in intermediate energy collisions of very heavy ions. Besides the phenomenon of vacuum decay into a new twofold negatively charged stable vacuum ground state, electron excitation in heavy ion collisions may be employed for the determination of delay and deceleration times on the nuclear time scale, i.e. offering an atomic clock, operating in the range 10 -21 -10 -24 s. In deep-inelastic heavy ion collisions this provides a test for classical nuclear reaction models. In collisions at intermediate energies an independent measurement of the deceleration time is of interest for comparison, e.g., with the results of the pion bremsstrahlung model. After that we investigate the influence of one or more pockets in the ion scattering potential on the energy distribution of emitted positrons within a quantum mechanical framework. Finally we very briefly consider some phenomenological corrections to the Dirac equation and its consequences on electron binding energies in heavy and superheavy atoms. (orig./HSI)

  17. Paths to equilibrium in non-conformal collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attems Maximilian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since fast hydrodynamization has been observed in heavy ion collisions the understanding of the hot early out-of-equilibrium stage of such collisions has been a topic of intense research. We use the gauge/gravity duality to model the creation of a strongly coupled Quark-Gluon plasma in a non-conformal gauge theory. This numerical relativity study is the first non-conformal holographic simulation of a heavy ion collision and reveals the existence of new relaxation channels due to the presence of non-vanishing bulk viscosity. We study shock wave collisions at different energies in gauge theories with different degrees of non-conformality and compare three relaxation times which can occur in different orderings: the hydrodynamization time (when hydrodynamics becomes applicable, the EoSization time (when the average pressure approaches its equilibrium value and the condensate relaxation time (when the expectation value of a scalar operator approaches its equilibrium value. We find that these processes can occur in several different orderings. In particular, the condensate can remain far from equilibrium even long after the plasma has hydrodynamized and EoSized.

  18. Semiclassical study of the collision of a highly excited Rydberg atom with the molecules HF and HCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, M.; Lane, N.F.

    1990-01-01

    The semiclassical impact-parameter method is applied to the processes of state changing and energy transfer in the collision of a highly excited Rydberg atom (n≥20) with the polar molecules HF and HCl. The relative motion of the molecule and atomic nucleus is taken to be rectilinear; the electron-molecule and ion core-molecule interactions are represented by cutoff dipole forms. Cross sections for transitions involving quantum numbers n and l of the atom and rotational quantum number j of the molecule are obtained for a range of collision energies and initial atomic and molecular states. Comparisons are made with the results of earlier classical studies and with the quantum-mechanical impulse approximation. Collision rates are calculated and compared with experimental values for l mixing and n and j changing. The agreement between experiment and theory is shown to be satisfactory, within the uncertainties of both the measurements and the theory. Cases of agreement and disagreement between various theories are examined. One finding of the present work is that the quantum-mechanical impulse approximation appears to significantly overestimate the values of various state-changing cross sections when the internal energy defect is small. The validity of the impulse approximation for collisions of Rydberg atoms with polar molecules is discussed

  19. Binary encounter electron production in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabbe, S.; Bhalla, C.P.; Shingal, R.

    1993-01-01

    The binary encounter electrons are produced by hard collisions between the target electrons and the energetic projectiles. Richard et al. found the measured double differential cross section for BEe production at zero degree laboratory scattering angle, in collisions of F q+ with H 2 and He targets, to increase as the charge state of the projectile was decreased. The binary encounter electron production has recently been a subject of detailed investigations. We have calculated the differential elastic scattering cross sections of electrons from several ions incorporating the exchange contribution of the continuum and the bound orbitals in addition to the static potential. The double differential binary encounter electron production cross sections are presented using the impulse approximation

  20. Open charm yields in d+Au collisions at squareroot[sNN]=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; de Moura, M M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fomenko, K; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Urkinbaev, A; Van Buren, G; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N

    2005-02-18

    Midrapidity open charm spectra from direct reconstruction of D0(D0)-->K-/+pi+/- in d+Au collisions and indirect electron-positron measurements via charm semileptonic decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at squareroot[sNN]=200 GeV are reported. The D0(D0) spectrum covers a transverse momentum (pT) range of 0.1approximate binary collision scaling between p+p and d+Au collisions. From these two independent analyses, the differential cross section per nucleon-nucleon binary interaction at midrapidity for open charm production from d+Au collisions at BNL RHIC is dsigma(NN)cc/dy=0.30+/-0.04(stat)+/-0.09(syst) mb. The results are compared to theoretical calculations. Implications for charmonium results in A+A collisions are discussed.

  1. Finite element approximation for time-dependent diffusion with measure-valued source

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seidman, T.; Gobbert, M.; Trott, D.; Kružík, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 4 (2012), s. 709-723 ISSN 0029-599X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100750802 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : measure-valued source * diffusion equation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.329, year: 2012 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/MTR/kruzik-finite element approximation for time - dependent diffusion with measure-valued source.pdf

  2. Discovery of hydrodynamic behavior in high energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamagaki, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    The objective of high energy heavy ion collision experiments is creating high temperature and high density states to investigate hadron matter properties in such extreme conditions. Since the start of heavy ion collision experiments with BEVALAC, knowledge of the space-time evolution of collision has become indispensable for understanding the hadronic matter properties. This problem is reviewed here from the hydrodynamics view point. Although its importance has been generally recognized since the time of BEVALAC, the hydrodynamic description has not been successful because the hydrodynamic model assuming non-viscous or small fluid had not been considered to be enough to properly describe the space-time evolution of hadron-hadron collisions until the RHIC experiments. Items of the following titles are picked up and reviewed here: Development of heavy ion accelerations; Space-time evolution of hadron collision process and hydrodynamic model; Chemical freezing and kinematical freezing, including transverse momentum spectra at proton-proton collisions and particle spectra in heavy ion collisions; Elliptical azimuthal angle anisotropy; Discovery of hydrodynamic flow at BEVALAC; Problems of incident beam dependence of v2; Elliptic azimuthal angle anisotropy at RHIC; What is it that carries the elliptic anisotropy? Discussion of attainment of thermodynamical equilibrium state at RHIC; and finally investigations of fluid properties other than azimuthal anisotropy, such as, Fluid properties probed by heavy quarks and Observing QCD fluid responses. (S. Funahashi)

  3. A metastable helium trap for atomic collision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colla, M.; Gulley, R.; Uhlmann, L.; Hoogerland, M.D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Metastable helium in the 2 3 S state is an important species for atom optics and atomic collision physics. Because of its large internal energy (20eV), long lifetime (∼8000s) and large collision cross section for a range of processes, metastable helium plays an important role in atmospheric physics, plasma discharges and gas laser physics. We have embarked on a program of studies on atom-atom and electron-atom collision processes involving cold metastable helium. We confine metastable helium atoms in a magneto-optic trap (MOT), which is loaded by a transversely collimated, slowed and 2-D focussed atomic beam. We employ diode laser tuned to the 1083 nm (2 3 S 1 - 2 3 P2 1 ) transition to generate laser cooling forces in both the loading beam and the trap. Approximately 10 million helium atoms are trapped at temperatures of ∼ 1mK. We use phase modulation spectroscopy to measure the trapped atomic density. The cold, trapped atoms can collide to produce either atomic He + or molecular He 2 + ions by Penning Ionisation (PI) or Associative Ionisation (AI). The rate of formation of these ions is dependant upon the detuning of the trapping laser from resonance. A further laser can be used to connect the 2 3 S 1 state to another higher lying excited state, and variation of the probe laser detuning used to measure interatomic collision potential. Electron-atom collision processes are studied using a monochromatic electron beam with a well defined spatial current distribution. The total trap loss due to electron collisions is measured as a function of electron energy. Results will be presented for these atomic collision physics measurements involving cold, trapped metastable helium atoms. Copyright (1999) Australian Optical Society

  4. Reduced linear noise approximation for biochemical reaction networks with time-scale separation: The stochastic tQSSA+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Narmada; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2018-03-01

    Biochemical reaction networks often involve reactions that take place on different time scales, giving rise to "slow" and "fast" system variables. This property is widely used in the analysis of systems to obtain dynamical models with reduced dimensions. In this paper, we consider stochastic dynamics of biochemical reaction networks modeled using the Linear Noise Approximation (LNA). Under time-scale separation conditions, we obtain a reduced-order LNA that approximates both the slow and fast variables in the system. We mathematically prove that the first and second moments of this reduced-order model converge to those of the full system as the time-scale separation becomes large. These mathematical results, in particular, provide a rigorous justification to the accuracy of LNA models derived using the stochastic total quasi-steady state approximation (tQSSA). Since, in contrast to the stochastic tQSSA, our reduced-order model also provides approximations for the fast variable stochastic properties, we term our method the "stochastic tQSSA+". Finally, we demonstrate the application of our approach on two biochemical network motifs found in gene-regulatory and signal transduction networks.

  5. Collisions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulamov, K.G.

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that interactions of high energy particles with nuclei, owing to possible intranuclear rescatterings, may provide information about the space-time behaviour of the production process. Therefore the main goals of these investigations are related with the attempts to study the space-time process of hadronization of coloured quarks and gluons produced at the initial stage of an interaction to white final state particles and to clarify the influence of composite quark-gluon structure of both the projectile and target on features of the production mechanisms. Since in both the initial and final states of these reactions the authors have strongly interacting multiparticle systems, it is of importance to study the collective properties of these systems. The questions to the point are: what is the degree of collectivization of particles newly produced in collisions with nuclei and what is the influence of the collective nature of a nucleus itself on the production mechanisms, in particular, what are the manifestations of possible multinucleon (multiquark) configurations in nuclei? It is obvious that the reductability of, say, hadron-nucleus (hA) interaction to hadron-nucleon (hN) collisions is directly related to the above problems. Due to time limitations the author discusses here only a few aspects of low p/sub t/ hA interactions which in his opinion are of importance for better understanding of general regularities of collisions with nuclei and for further investigations of the above problems

  6. The CRF-method for semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels: I – the 2D case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Barone

    1992-05-01

    Full Text Available If the collisions are redefined as a flux a kinetic conservation law can be written in divergence form. This can be handled numerically, in the framework of Finite Particle Approximation, using the CRF-method. In the present paper the relevant quantities needed for computer implementation of the CRF-method are derived in the case of a 2D momentum space for the semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels.

  7. The CRF-method for semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels: II – The 3D case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Barone

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available If the collisions are redefined as a flux a kinetic conservation law can be written in divergence form. This can be handled numerically, in the framework of Finite Particle Approximation, using the CRF-method. In this paper we use the CRF-method for semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels. We extend the results obtained in a previous paper to the case of a 3D momentum space.

  8. Semi-autonomous Intersection Collision Avoidance through Job-shop Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Heejin; Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we design a supervisor to prevent vehicle collisions at intersections. An intersection is modeled as an area containing multiple conflict points where vehicle paths cross in the future. At every time step, the supervisor determines whether there will be more than one vehicle in the vicinity of a conflict point at the same time. If there is, then an impending collision is detected, and the supervisor overrides the drivers to avoid collision. A major challenge in the design of a ...

  9. Dilepton production in nucleon–nucleon collisions around 1 GeV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a fully relativistic and gauge invariant framework for calculating the cross-sections of dilepton production in nucleon–nucleon ( ) collisions which is based on the meson-exchange approximation for the scattering amplitudes. Predictions of our model are compared with those of other covariant models that ...

  10. Electron-hydrogen atom collisions in the presence of a laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandi, H.S.; Koiller, B.; Barros, H.G.P.L. de

    1978-01-01

    The collision of an electron and a hydrogen atom in the presence of a laser field is studied within a previously proposed approximation (based on the space translation approximation) for the bound states of the hydrogen atom. Fhe Green's function formalism is applied to derive an expression for the scattering amplitude associated to multiphoton processes. The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is obtained and numerical calculations are performed for the ls→2s inelastic excitation. It is shown as expected that exchange effects are important only for scattering processes involving low energy electrons [pt

  11. A rigorous test for a new conceptual model for collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, E.M.A.; Mu-Tao, L.

    1979-01-01

    A rigorous theoretical foundation for the previously proposed model is formulated and applied to electron scattering by H 2 in the gas phase. An rigorous treatment of the interaction potential between the incident electron and the Hydrogen molecule is carried out to calculate Differential Cross Sections for 1 KeV electrons, using Glauber's approximation Wang's molecular wave function for the ground electronic state of H 2 . Moreover, it is shown for the first time that, when adequately done, the omission of two center terms does not adversely influence the results of molecular calculations. It is shown that the new model is far superior to the Independent Atom Model (or Independent Particle Model). The accuracy and simplicity of the new model suggest that it may be fruitfully applied to the description of other collision phenomena (e.g., in molecular beam experiments and nuclear physics). A new techniques is presented for calculations involving two center integrals within the frame work of the Glauber's approximation for scattering. (Author) [pt

  12. Collective flow in central Ca + Ca and Nb + Nb collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fai, G.; Csernai, L.P.; Kapusta, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    Questions related to the entropy, equation of state and collective flow of nuclear matter are important to the authors understanding of high energy nuclear collisions. Completion of the analysis of exclusive measurements on central Ca + Ca and Nb + Nb collisions triggered renewed interest in these problems. In order to address the results of exclusive measurements, however, the complex multifragment final states of high energy nuclear collisions need to be incorporated in a theoretical description. The microcanonical event generator model provides statistically generated complete events that can be compared to the exclusive data on an event-by-event basis. To describe the disassembly of hot nuclear matter the model uses an approximate scheme in which the available final states are populated according to their microcanonical weight in phase space. This statistical description is front-ended with simple geometric ideas to divide the collision system into subsystems and with a prescription to share energy and momentum among the subsystems. Any physical quantity of interest is in principle calculable in the model if sufficient statistics is accumulated

  13. Collision dynamics and particle production in relativistic nucleus- nucleus collisions at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.W.

    1990-03-01

    The possibility of forming a quark-gluon plasma is the primary motivation for studying nucleus-nucleus collisions at very high energies. Various ''signatures'' for the existence of a quark-gluon plasma in these collisions have been proposed. These include an enhancement in the production of strange particles, suppression of J/Ψ production, observation of direct photons from the plasma, event-by-event fluctuations in the rapidity distributions of produced particles, and various other observables. However, the system will evolve dynamically from a pure plasma or mixed phase through expansion, cooling, hadronization and freezeout into the final state particles. Therefore, to be able to determine that a new, transient state of matter has been formed it will be necessary to understand the space-time evolution of the collision process and the microscopic structure of hadronic interactions, at the level of quarks and gluons, at high temperatures and densities. In this talk I will review briefly the present state of our understanding of the dynamics of these collisions and, in addition, present a few recent results on particle production from the NA35 experiment at CERN. 21 refs., 5 figs

  14. Further Study of Λ-Related Quantum Interference of Π-State Diatomic on Collision-Induced Rotational Energy Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongqing; Song Peng; Chen Yuehui; Wang Weili; Ma Fengcai

    2005-01-01

    In our previous theoretical studies [Meng-Tao Sun, Yong-Qing Lee, and Feng-Cai Ma, Chem. Phys. Lett. 371 (2003) 342], we have reported the quantum interference on collision-induced rotational energy transfer on CO (A 1 Π, v = 3) with inert gases, which originates from the difference between the two Λ-related collision potential energy surfaces. The interference angle, which measures the degree of coherence, is presented in this paper. Based on the time-dependent first order Born approximation, taking into account the anisotropic Lennard-Jones interaction potentials, the relation of the interference angle with the factors, including experimental temperature, partner, and rotational quantum number, are obtained. The changing tendencies with them are discussed. This theoretical model is important to understanding and performing this kind of experiment.

  15. Deconfinement signature, mass dependence of transverse flow and time evolution in antiproton-proton collisions at √s=1.8 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Erwin, A.; Findeisen, C.; Nelson, K.; Thompson, M.; Banerjee, S.; Beery, P.D.; Biswas, N.N.; Kenney, V.P.; LoSecco, J.M.; McManus, A.P.; Piekarz, J.; Stampke, S.R.; Carter, T.; Goshaw, A.T.; Oh, S.H.; Walker, W.D.; Wesson, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    The yields and the transverse momentum distributions of pions, kaons, and antiprotons produced in the central region of anti pp collisions at √s=1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider have been measured up to a charged particle pseudo-rapidity density of approximately 20. The average transverse momentum t > as a function of c /dη> for all three types of particles is presented. We find that transverse flow does not explain the t > separation. The most plausible interpretation is that the t > vs. N c spectra represent in isobar in the two phase region. (orig.)

  16. Approximate solution to neutron transport equation with linear anisotropic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppa, G.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1983-01-01

    A method to obtain an approximate solution to the transport equation, when both sources and collisions show a linearly anisotropic behavior, is outlined and the possible implications for numerical calculations in applied neutronics as well as shielding evaluations are investigated. The form of the differential system of equations taken by the method is quite handy and looks simpler and more manageable than any other today available technique. To go deeper into the efficiency of the method, some typical calculations concerning critical dimension of multiplying systems are then performed and the results are compared with the ones coming from the classical Ssub(N) approximations. The outcome of such calculations leads us to think of interesting developments of the method which could be quite useful in alternative to other today widespread approximate procedures, for any geometry, but especially for curved ones. (author)

  17. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1992-01-01

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described

  18. Electromagnetic processes in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C.A.; Rio de Janeiro Univ.

    1987-05-01

    A study of the processes generated by the electromagnetic interaction in relativistic nuclear, and atomic collisions is presented. Very strong electromagnetic fields for a very short time are present in distant collisions with no nuclear contact. Such fields can also lead to interesting effects, which are discussed here. (orig.)

  19. A Modified Groundwater Flow Model Using the Space Time Riemann-Liouville Fractional Derivatives Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdon Atangana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The notion of uncertainty in groundwater hydrology is of great importance as it is known to result in misleading output when neglected or not properly accounted for. In this paper we examine this effect in groundwater flow models. To achieve this, we first introduce the uncertainties functions u as function of time and space. The function u accounts for the lack of knowledge or variability of the geological formations in which flow occur (aquifer in time and space. We next make use of Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives that were introduced by Kobelev and Romano in 2000 and its approximation to modify the standard version of groundwater flow equation. Some properties of the modified Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative approximation are presented. The classical model for groundwater flow, in the case of density-independent flow in a uniform homogeneous aquifer is reformulated by replacing the classical derivative by the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives approximations. The modified equation is solved via the technique of green function and the variational iteration method.

  20. Population distributions of time to collision at brake application during car following from naturalistic driving data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Kristofer D; Chen, Rong; Montgomery, Jade; Gabler, Hampton C

    2015-09-01

    Forward collision warning (FCW) systems are designed to mitigate the effects of rear-end collisions. Driver acceptance of these systems is crucial to their success, as perceived "nuisance" alarms may cause drivers to disable the systems. In order to make customizable FCW thresholds, system designers need to quantify the variation in braking behavior in the driving population. The objective of this study was to quantify the time to collision (TTC) that drivers applied the brakes during car following scenarios from a large scale naturalistic driving study (NDS). Because of the large amount of data generated by NDS, an automated algorithm was developed to identify lead vehicles using radar data recorded as part of the study. Using the search algorithm, all trips from 64 drivers from the 100-Car NDS were analyzed. A comparison of the algorithm to 7135 brake applications where the presence of a lead vehicle was manually identified found that the algorithm agreed with the human review 90.6% of the time. This study examined 72,123 trips that resulted in 2.6 million brake applications. Population distributions of the minimum, 1st, and 10th percentiles were computed for each driver in speed ranges between 3 and 60 mph in 10 mph increments. As speed increased, so did the minimum TTC experience by drivers as well as variance in TTC. Younger drivers (18-30) had lower TTC at brake application compared to older drivers (30-51+), especially at speeds between 40 mph and 60 mph. This is one of the first studies to use large scale NDS data to quantify braking behavior during car following. The results of this study can be used to design and evaluate FCW systems and calibrate traffic simulation models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  1. All orders Boltzmann collision term from the multiple scattering expansion of the self-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillion-Gourdeau, F.; Gagnon, J.-S.; Jeon, S.

    2007-01-01

    We summarize our main findings in deriving the Boltzmann collision term from the Kadanoff-Baym relativistic transport equation and the multiple scattering expansion of the self-energy within a quasi-particle approximation. Our collision term is valid to all orders in perturbation theory and contains processes with any number of participating particles. This work completes a program initiated by Carrington and Mrowczynski and developed further by present authors and Weinstock in recent literature

  2. Approximate series solution of multi-dimensional, time fractional-order (heat-like) diffusion equations using FRDTM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Brajesh K; Srivastava, Vineet K

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of this paper is to present a new approximate series solution of the multi-dimensional (heat-like) diffusion equation with time-fractional derivative in Caputo form using a semi-analytical approach: fractional-order reduced differential transform method (FRDTM). The efficiency of FRDTM is confirmed by considering four test problems of the multi-dimensional time fractional-order diffusion equation. FRDTM is a very efficient, effective and powerful mathematical tool which provides exact or very close approximate solutions for a wide range of real-world problems arising in engineering and natural sciences, modelled in terms of differential equations.

  3. Collision risk investigation for an operational spacecraft caused by space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binbin; Wang, Zhaokui; Zhang, Yulin

    2017-04-01

    The collision probability between an operational spacecraft and a population of space debris is investigated. By dividing the 3-dimensional operational space of the spacecraft into several space volume cells (SVC) and proposing a boundary selection method to calculate the collision probability in each SVC, the distribution of the collision risk, as functions of the time, the orbital height, the declination, the impact elevation, the collision velocity, etc., can be obtained. Thus, the collision risk could be carefully evaluated over a time span for the general orbital configurations of the spacecraft and the space debris. As an application, the collision risk for the Tiangong-2 space laboratory caused by the cataloged space debris is discussed and evaluated. Results show that most of the collision threat comes from the front left and front right in Tiangong-2's local, quasi-horizontal plane. And the collision probability will also accumulate when Tiangong-2 moves to the largest declinations (about {±} 42°). As a result, the manned space activities should be avoided at those declinations.

  4. Collision risk in white-tailed eagles. Modelling kernel-based collision risk using satellite telemetry data in Smoela wind-power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Roel; Nygaard, Torgeir; Dahl, Espen Lie; Reitan, Ole; Bevanger, Kjetil

    2011-05-15

    Large soaring birds of prey, such as the white-tailed eagle, are recognized to be perhaps the most vulnerable bird group regarding risk of collisions with turbines in wind-power plants. Their mortalities have called for methods capable of modelling collision risks in connection with the planning of new wind-power developments. The so-called 'Band model' estimates collision risk based on the number of birds flying through the rotor swept zone and the probability of being hit by the passing rotor blades. In the calculations for the expected collision mortality a correction factor for avoidance behaviour is included. The overarching objective of this study was to use satellite telemetry data and recorded mortality to back-calculate the correction factor for white-tailed eagles. The Smoela wind-power plant consists of 68 turbines, over an area of approximately 18 km2. Since autumn 2006 the number of collisions has been recorded on a weekly basis. The analyses were based on satellite telemetry data from 28 white-tailed eagles equipped with backpack transmitters since 2005. The correction factor (i.e. 'avoidance rate') including uncertainty levels used within the Band collision risk model for white-tailed eagles was 99% (94-100%) for spring and 100% for the other seasons. The year-round estimate, irrespective of season, was 98% (95-99%). Although the year-round estimate was similar, the correction factor for spring was higher than the correction factor of 95% derived earlier from vantage point data. The satellite telemetry data may provide an alternative way to provide insight into relative risk among seasons, and help identify periods or areas with increased risk either in a pre- or post construction situation. (Author)

  5. Multi-actuators vehicle collision avoidance system - Experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Umar Zakir Abdul; Zakuan, Fakhrul Razi Ahmad; Akmal Zulkepli, Khairul; Zulfaqar Azmi, Muhammad; Zamzuri, Hairi; Rahman, Mohd Azizi Abdul; Aizzat Zakaria, Muhammad

    2018-04-01

    The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) of the United States of America in their reports has mentioned that a significant amount of the road mishaps would be preventable if more automated active safety applications are adopted into the vehicle. This includes the incorporation of collision avoidance system. The autonomous intervention by the active steering and braking systems in the hazardous scenario can aid the driver in mitigating the collisions. In this work, a real-time platform of a multi-actuators vehicle collision avoidance system is developed. It is a continuous research scheme to develop a fully autonomous vehicle in Malaysia. The vehicle is a modular platform which can be utilized for different research purposes and is denominated as Intelligent Drive Project (iDrive). The vehicle collision avoidance proposed design is validated in a controlled environment, where the coupled longitudinal and lateral motion control system is expected to provide desired braking and steering actuation in the occurrence of a frontal static obstacle. Results indicate the ability of the platform to yield multi-actuators collision avoidance navigation in the hazardous scenario, thus avoiding the obstacle. The findings of this work are beneficial for the development of a more complex and nonlinear real-time collision avoidance work in the future.

  6. Automatic Generation of Cycle-Approximate TLMs with Timed RTOS Model Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yonghyun; Schirner, Gunar; Abdi, Samar

    This paper presents a technique for automatically generating cycle-approximate transaction level models (TLMs) for multi-process applications mapped to embedded platforms. It incorporates three key features: (a) basic block level timing annotation, (b) RTOS model integration, and (c) RTOS overhead delay modeling. The inputs to TLM generation are application C processes and their mapping to processors in the platform. A processor data model, including pipelined datapath, memory hierarchy and branch delay model is used to estimate basic block execution delays. The delays are annotated to the C code, which is then integrated with a generated SystemC RTOS model. Our abstract RTOS provides dynamic scheduling and inter-process communication (IPC) with processor- and RTOS-specific pre-characterized timing. Our experiments using a MP3 decoder and a JPEG encoder show that timed TLMs, with integrated RTOS models, can be automatically generated in less than a minute. Our generated TLMs simulated three times faster than real-time and showed less than 10% timing error compared to board measurements.

  7. Rho0 production and possible modification in Au+Au and p+p collisions at square root [sNN] = 200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; De Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Yuting, B; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zhaomin, Z P; Zizong, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2004-03-05

    We report results on rho(770)(0)-->pi(+)pi(-) production at midrapidity in p+p and peripheral Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. This is the first direct measurement of rho(770)(0)-->pi(+)pi(-) in heavy-ion collisions. The measured rho(0) peak in the invariant mass distribution is shifted by approximately 40 MeV/c(2) in minimum bias p+p interactions and approximately 70 MeV/c(2) in peripheral Au+Au collisions. The rho(0) mass shift is dependent on transverse momentum and multiplicity. The modification of the rho(0) meson mass, width, and shape due to phase space and dynamical effects are discussed.

  8. Charge transfer in H2+-H(1s) collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Macias, A.; Mendez, L.; Rabadan, I.; Riera, A.

    2005-01-01

    We present an ab initio study of H 2 + +H(1s) collisions at H 2 + impact energies between 0.4 and 50keV. Cross sections are obtained within the sudden approximation for rotation and vibration of the diatomic molecule. We have found that anisotropy effects are crucial to correctly describe this system in this energy range

  9. Effects of target electron collisions on energy loss straggling in plasmas of all degeneracies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga Carrasco, Manuel D. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universisdad de Castilla La Mancha, Ciudad Real E13071 (Spain)]. E-mail: ManuelD.Barriga@uclm.es

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to describe the effects of target electron collisions on the energy loss straggling in plasmas of any degeneracy. We focus our analysis on targets that are in the limit of weakly coupled electron gases, where the random phase approximation can be applied. This type of plasmas targets has not been studied extensively, though they are very important for inertial confinement fusion. The energy loss straggling is obtained from an exact quantum mechanical evaluation, which takes into account the degeneracy of the target plasma, and later it is compared with common classical and degenerate approximations. Also we consider electron collisions in the exact quantum mechanical straggling calculation. Now the maximum straggling occurs at velocities smaller than for the calculations without considering collisions for all kinds of plasmas analyzed. The straggling remains equal or enhances for velocities less than or equal to the velocity at maximum while is slightly decreases for higher velocities. Differences are significant in all cases, that can let large errors creep on in further energy deposition and projectile range studies.

  10. Effects of target electron collisions on energy loss straggling in plasmas of all degeneracies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga Carrasco, Manuel D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to describe the effects of target electron collisions on the energy loss straggling in plasmas of any degeneracy. We focus our analysis on targets that are in the limit of weakly coupled electron gases, where the random phase approximation can be applied. This type of plasmas targets has not been studied extensively, though they are very important for inertial confinement fusion. The energy loss straggling is obtained from an exact quantum mechanical evaluation, which takes into account the degeneracy of the target plasma, and later it is compared with common classical and degenerate approximations. Also we consider electron collisions in the exact quantum mechanical straggling calculation. Now the maximum straggling occurs at velocities smaller than for the calculations without considering collisions for all kinds of plasmas analyzed. The straggling remains equal or enhances for velocities less than or equal to the velocity at maximum while is slightly decreases for higher velocities. Differences are significant in all cases, that can let large errors creep on in further energy deposition and projectile range studies

  11. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections

  12. A polynomial time biclustering algorithm for finding approximate expression patterns in gene expression time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeira Sara C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to monitor the change in expression patterns over time, and to observe the emergence of coherent temporal responses using gene expression time series, obtained from microarray experiments, is critical to advance our understanding of complex biological processes. In this context, biclustering algorithms have been recognized as an important tool for the discovery of local expression patterns, which are crucial to unravel potential regulatory mechanisms. Although most formulations of the biclustering problem are NP-hard, when working with time series expression data the interesting biclusters can be restricted to those with contiguous columns. This restriction leads to a tractable problem and enables the design of efficient biclustering algorithms able to identify all maximal contiguous column coherent biclusters. Methods In this work, we propose e-CCC-Biclustering, a biclustering algorithm that finds and reports all maximal contiguous column coherent biclusters with approximate expression patterns in time polynomial in the size of the time series gene expression matrix. This polynomial time complexity is achieved by manipulating a discretized version of the original matrix using efficient string processing techniques. We also propose extensions to deal with missing values, discover anticorrelated and scaled expression patterns, and different ways to compute the errors allowed in the expression patterns. We propose a scoring criterion combining the statistical significance of expression patterns with a similarity measure between overlapping biclusters. Results We present results in real data showing the effectiveness of e-CCC-Biclustering and its relevance in the discovery of regulatory modules describing the transcriptomic expression patterns occurring in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to heat stress. In particular, the results show the advantage of considering approximate patterns when compared to state of

  13. Implementation of dipolar direct current (DDC) collision-induced dissociation in storage and transmission modes on a quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Ian K; Londry, Frank A; McLuckey, Scott A

    2011-09-15

    Means for effecting dipolar direct current collision-induced dissociation (DDC CID) on a quadrupole/time-of-flight in a mass spectrometer have been implemented for the broadband dissociation of a wide range of analyte ions. The DDC fragmentation method in electrodynamic storage and transmission devices provides a means for inducing fragmentation of ions over a large mass-to-charge range simultaneously. It can be effected within an ion storage step in a quadrupole collision cell that is operated as a linear ion trap or as ions are continuously transmitted through the collision cell. A DDC potential is applied across one pair of rods in the quadrupole collision cell of a QqTOF hybrid mass spectrometer to effect fragmentation. In this study, ions derived from a small drug molecule, a model peptide, a small protein, and an oligonucleotide were subjected to the DDC CID method in either an ion trapping or an ion transmission mode (or both). Several key experimental parameters that affect DDC CID results, such as time, voltage, low mass cutoff, and bath gas pressure, are illustrated with protonated leucine enkephalin. The DDC CID dissociation method gives a readily tunable, broadband tool for probing the primary structures of a wide range of analyte ions. The method provides an alternative to the narrow resonance conditions of conventional ion trap CID and it can access more extensive sequential fragmentation, depending upon conditions. The DDC CID approach constitutes a collision analog to infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Quantum Theory of (H,H{Sub 2}) Scattering: Approximate Treatments of Reactive Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K. T.; Karplus, M.

    1970-10-01

    A quantum mechanical study is made of reactive scattering in the (H, H{sub 2}) system. The problem is formulated in terms of a form of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) suitable for collisions in which all particles have finite mass. For certain incident energies, differential and total cross sections, as well as other attributes of the reactive collisions, (e.g. reaction configuration), are determined. Two limiting models in the DWBA formulation are compared; in one, the molecule is unperturbed by the incoming atom and in the other, the molecule adiabatically follows the incoming atom. For thermal incident energies and semi-empirical interaction potential employed, the adiabatic model seems to be more appropriate. Since the DWBA method is too complicated for a general study of the (H, H{sub 2}) reaction, a much simpler approximation method, the “linear model” is developed. This model is very different in concept from treatments in which the three atoms are constrained to move on a line throughout the collision. The present model includes the full three-dimensional aspect of the collision and it is only the evaluation of the transition matrix element itself that is simplified. It is found that the linear model, when appropriately normalized, gives results in good agreement with that of the DWBA method. By application of this model, the energy dependence, rotational state of dependence and other properties of the total and differential reactions cross sections are determined. These results of the quantum mechanical treatment are compared with the classical calculation for the same potential surface. The most important result is that, in agreement with the classical treatment, the differential cross sections are strongly backward peaked at low energies and shifts in the forward direction as the energy increases. Finally, the implications of the present calculations for a theory of chemical kinetics are discussed.

  15. Single electron capture differential cross section in H+ + He collisions at intermediate and high collision energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abufager, P N; Fainstein, P D; MartInez, A E; Rivarola, R D

    2005-01-01

    The generalized continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS II) approximation is employed to study differential cross sections (DCS) for single electron capture in H + + He collisions at intermediate and high energies. Present results are compared with theoretical calculations obtained using the previous CDW-EIS formulation in order to show the importance of the description of the bound and continuum target states in the entrance and exit channels, respectively. Both DCS are also shown together with other theoretical results and with experimental data

  16. Statistical significance approximation in local trend analysis of high-throughput time-series data using the theory of Markov chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li C; Ai, Dongmei; Cram, Jacob A; Liang, Xiaoyi; Fuhrman, Jed A; Sun, Fengzhu

    2015-09-21

    Local trend (i.e. shape) analysis of time series data reveals co-changing patterns in dynamics of biological systems. However, slow permutation procedures to evaluate the statistical significance of local trend scores have limited its applications to high-throughput time series data analysis, e.g., data from the next generation sequencing technology based studies. By extending the theories for the tail probability of the range of sum of Markovian random variables, we propose formulae for approximating the statistical significance of local trend scores. Using simulations and real data, we show that the approximate p-value is close to that obtained using a large number of permutations (starting at time points >20 with no delay and >30 with delay of at most three time steps) in that the non-zero decimals of the p-values obtained by the approximation and the permutations are mostly the same when the approximate p-value is less than 0.05. In addition, the approximate p-value is slightly larger than that based on permutations making hypothesis testing based on the approximate p-value conservative. The approximation enables efficient calculation of p-values for pairwise local trend analysis, making large scale all-versus-all comparisons possible. We also propose a hybrid approach by integrating the approximation and permutations to obtain accurate p-values for significantly associated pairs. We further demonstrate its use with the analysis of the Polymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) microbial community time series from high-throughput sequencing data and found interesting organism co-occurrence dynamic patterns. The software tool is integrated into the eLSA software package that now provides accelerated local trend and similarity analysis pipelines for time series data. The package is freely available from the eLSA website: http://bitbucket.org/charade/elsa.

  17. Nucleation theory - Is replacement free energy needed?. [error analysis of capillary approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    It has been suggested that the classical theory of nucleation of liquid from its vapor as developed by Volmer and Weber (1926) needs modification with a factor referred to as the replacement free energy and that the capillary approximation underlying the classical theory is in error. Here, the classical nucleation equation is derived from fluctuation theory, Gibb's result for the reversible work to form a critical nucleus, and the rate of collision of gas molecules with a surface. The capillary approximation is not used in the derivation. The chemical potential of small drops is then considered, and it is shown that the capillary approximation can be derived from thermodynamic equations. The results show that no corrections to Volmer's equation are needed.

  18. Primary damage in tungsten using the binary collision approximation, molecular dynamic simulations and the density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Backer, A; Sand, A; Ortiz, C J; Domain, C; Olsson, P; Berthod, E; Becquart, C S

    2016-01-01

    The damage produced by primary knock-on atoms (PKA) in W has been investigated from the threshold displacement energy (TDE) where it produces one self interstitial atom–vacancy pair to larger energies, up to 100 keV, where a large molten volume is formed. The TDE has been determined in different crystal directions using the Born–Oppenheimer density functional molecular dynamics (DFT-MD). A significant difference has been observed without and with the semi-core electrons. Classical MD has been used with two different empirical potentials characterized as ‘soft’ and ‘hard’ to obtain statistics on TDEs. Cascades of larger energy have been calculated, with these potentials, using a model that accounts for electronic losses (Sand et al 2013 Europhys. Lett. 103 46003). Two other sets of cascades have been produced using the binary collision approximation (BCA): a Monte Carlo BCA using SDTrimSP (Eckstein et al 2011 SDTrimSP: Version 5.00. Report IPP 12/8) (similar to SRIM www.srim.org) and MARLOWE (RSICC Home Page. (https://rsicc.ornl.gov/codes/psr/psr1/psr-137.html) (accessed May, 2014)). The comparison of these sets of cascades gave a recombination distance equal to 12 Å which is significantly larger from the one we reported in Hou et al (2010 J. Nucl. Mater. 403 89) because, here, we used bulk cascades rather than surface cascades which produce more defects (Stoller 2002 J. Nucl. Mater. 307 935, Nordlund et al 1999 Nature 398 49). Investigations on the defect clustering aspect showed that the difference between BCA and MD cascades is considerably reduced after the annealing of the cascade debris at 473 K using our Object Kinetic Monte Carlo model, LAKIMOCA (Domain et al 2004 J. Nucl. Mater. 335 121). (paper)

  19. Positron production in heavy-ion collisions. II. Application of the formalism to the case of the U+U collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoda, T.

    1982-01-01

    The method developed in the preceding paper is applied to the calculation of the spectra of positrons produced in the U + U collision. Matrix elements of the radial derivative operator between adiabatic basis states are calculated in the monopole approximation, with the finite nuclear size taken into account. These matrix elements are then modified for the supercritical case with the use of the analytical method presented in paper I of this series. The coupled differential equations for the occupation amplitudes of the basis states are solved and the positron spectra are obtained for the U + U collision. It is shown that the decomposition of the production probability into a spontaneous and an induced part depends on the definition of the resonance state and cannot be given unambiguously. The results are compared with those obtained by Reinhardt et al

  20. Coupled kinetic equations for fermions and bosons in the relaxation-time approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Maksymiuk, Ewa; Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2018-02-01

    Kinetic equations for fermions and bosons are solved numerically in the relaxation-time approximation for the case of one-dimensional boost-invariant geometry. Fermions are massive and carry baryon number, while bosons are massless. The conservation laws for the baryon number, energy, and momentum lead to two Landau matching conditions, which specify the coupling between the fermionic and bosonic sectors and determine the proper-time dependence of the effective temperature and baryon chemical potential of the system. The numerical results illustrate how a nonequilibrium mixture of fermions and bosons approaches hydrodynamic regime described by the Navier-Stokes equations with appropriate forms of the kinetic coefficients. The shear viscosity of a mixture is the sum of the shear viscosities of fermion and boson components, while the bulk viscosity is given by the formula known for a gas of fermions, however, with the thermodynamic variables characterising the mixture. Thus, we find that massless bosons contribute in a nontrivial way to the bulk viscosity of a mixture, provided fermions are massive. We further observe the hydrodynamization effect, which takes place earlier in the shear sector than in the bulk one. The numerical studies of the ratio of the longitudinal and transverse pressures show, to a good approximation, that it depends on the ratio of the relaxation and proper times only. This behavior is connected with the existence of an attractor solution for conformal systems.

  1. Multiconfiguration time-dependent self-consistent field approximations in the numerical solution of quantum dynamical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotler, Z.; Neria, E.; Nitzan, A.

    1991-01-01

    The use of the time-dependent self-consistent field approximation (TDSCF) in the numerical solution of quantum curve crossing and tunneling dynamical problems is investigated. Particular emphasis is given to multiconfiguration TDSCF (MCTDSCF) approximations, which are shown to perform considerably better with only a small increase in computational effort. We investigate a number of simple models in which a 'system' characterized by two electronic potential surfaces evolves while interacting with a 'bath' mode described by an harmonic oscillator, and compare exact numerical solutions to one- and two-configuration TDSCF approximations. We also introduce and investigate a semiclassical approximation in which the 'bath' mode is described by semiclassical wavepackets (one for each electronic state) and show that for all models investigated this scheme works very well in comparison with the fully quantum MCTDSCF approximation. This provides a potentially very useful method to simulate strongly quantum systems coupled to an essentially classical environment. (orig.)

  2. Multiconfiguration time-dependent self-consistent field approximations in the numerical solution of quantum dynamical problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotler, Z.; Neria, E.; Nitzan, A. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). School of Chemistry)

    1991-02-01

    The use of the time-dependent self-consistent field approximation (TDSCF) in the numerical solution of quantum curve crossing and tunneling dynamical problems is investigated. Particular emphasis is given to multiconfiguration TDSCF (MCTDSCF) approximations, which are shown to perform considerably better with only a small increase in computational effort. We investigate a number of simple models in which a 'system' characterized by two electronic potential surfaces evolves while interacting with a 'bath' mode described by an harmonic oscillator, and compare exact numerical solutions to one- and two-configuration TDSCF approximations. We also introduce and investigate a semiclassical approximation in which the 'bath' mode is described by semiclassical wavepackets (one for each electronic state) and show that for all models investigated this scheme works very well in comparison with the fully quantum MCTDSCF approximation. This provides a potentially very useful method to simulate strongly quantum systems coupled to an essentially classical environment. (orig.).

  3. High baryon density from relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Y.; Kahana, S.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Schlagel, T.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1993-10-01

    A quantitative model, based on hadronic physics, is developed and applied to heavy ion collisions at BNL-AGS energies. This model is in excellent agreement with observed particle spectra in heavy ion collisions using Si beams, where baryon densities of three and four times the normal nuclear matter density ({rho}{sub 0}) are reached. For Au on Au collisions, the authors predict the formation of matter at very high densities (up to 10 {rho}{sub 0}).

  4. Fragments detection of the Ar+ collision in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaparro V, F. J.; Fuentes M, B. E.; Yousif, F. B.; Roa N, J. A. E.

    2012-10-01

    The different components of a lineal accelerator of particles to low energy that will be used in experiments of atomic and molecular collisions are described. By means of the technique of flight time the fragments of the collision of positive ions were identified in gases. In this work values of some parameters are presented guided to optimize the operation of the accelerator, as well as preliminary data of the collision of argon ions in air. (Author)

  5. Measurement of long-range azimuthal correlations in $Z$-boson tagged $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$~TeV

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This analysis is the first to study long-range hadron correlations in $pp$ collisions with a constraint on collision geometry. The constraint is implemented by requiring events in which a $Z$ boson is produced, which is a high-Q$^{2}$ hard scattering process related to the impact parameter of the $pp$ collision. The analysis is performed using 19.4~$fb^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}=8$~TeV $pp$ data obtained by the ATLAS detector during the physics Run-1 of the LHC. The sample contains approximately $6.2\\times10^{6}$ selected $Z$-boson candidate events. The correlations between the charged-particle pairs in relative azimuthal angle over the transverse momentum range from 0.5~GeV to 5~GeV are studied as a function of the charged particle multiplicity of the event. The average number of interactions per bunch crossing in the data sampleis about 20, therefore the number of charged particle tracks and the correlation functions are corrected to account for the significant pileup contribution present in the events. The correla...

  6. Collision group and renormalization of the Boltzmann collision integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, V. L.; Nanbu, K.

    2002-05-01

    On the basis of a recently discovered collision group [V. L. Saveliev, in Rarefied Gas Dynamics: 22nd International Symposium, edited by T. J. Bartel and M. Gallis, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 585 (AIP, Melville, NY, 2001), p. 101], the Boltzmann collision integral is exactly rewritten in two parts. The first part describes the scattering of particles with small angles. In this part the infinity due to the infinite cross sections is extracted from the Boltzmann collision integral. Moreover, the Boltzmann collision integral is represented as a divergence of the flow in velocity space. Owing to this, the role of collisions in the kinetic equation can be interpreted in terms of the nonlocal friction force that depends on the distribution function.

  7. Cross section formulae on single W and Z boson productions in electron-positron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katuya, Mituaki

    1987-01-01

    The formulae are given for the transverse momentum distributions and total cross sections for the single W boson and Z boson productions in electron-positron collisions by using the equivalent photon approximation. (author)

  8. Memory effects in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, C.; Wagner, K.; Reinhard, P.

    1994-01-01

    We consider equilibration in relativistic nuclear dynamics starting from a nonequilibrium Green's-functions approach. The widely used Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck equation is obtained only as the Markovian limit (i.e., negligible memory time). The actual memory time in energetic nuclear collisions turns out to be ∼2--3 fm/c, which interferes substantially with the time scale of the relaxation process. The memory kernels of the collision process will be presented. Because of their more involved structure, depending sensitively on the kinematical regime, both less and more stopping power is observed in the reaction compared to the Markovian description

  9. Double differential distributions of electron emission in ion-atom and electron-atom collisions using an electron spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, Deepankar; Thulasiram, K.V.; Fernandes, W.; Kelkar, Aditya H.; Kadhane, U.; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Yeshpal; Gulyas, L.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2009-01-01

    We study electron emission from atoms and molecules in collisions with fast electrons and heavy ions (C 6+ ). The soft collision electrons (SE), two center electron emission (TCEE), the binary encounter (BE) events and the KLL Auger lines along with the elastically scattered peaks (in electron collisions) are studied using a hemispherical electrostatic electron analyzer. The details of the measurements along with description of the spectrometer and data acquisition system are given. The angular distributions of the low energy (few eV) electrons in soft collisions and the binary encounter electrons at keV energies are compared with quantum mechanical models based on the first Born (B1) and the continuum distorted wave-Eikonal initial state approximation (CDW-EIS).

  10. Spin Interaction under the Collision of Two Kerr-(Anti-de Sitter Black Holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogeun Gwak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate herein the spin interaction during collisions between Kerr-(anti-de Sitter black holes. The spin interaction potential depends on the relative rotation directions of the black holes, and this potential can be released as gravitational radiation upon collision. The energy of the radiation depends on the cosmological constant and corresponds to the spin interaction potential in the limit that one of the black holes has negligibly small mass and angular momentum. We then determine the approximate overall behaviors of the upper bounds on the radiation using thermodynamics. The results indicate that the spin interaction can consistently contribute to the radiation. In addition, the radiation depends on the stability of the black hole produced by the collision.

  11. On the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final states of $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, F; Liu, L

    1999-01-01

    The scaling property of factorial moments in the multiparticle final- states of e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions is studied in both the laboratory and the thrust-axis coordinate systems by using the Jetset generator. It turns out that in both of the two cases, the 3- dimensional lnF/sub 2/~lnM are approximately straight lines when the phase space are divided isotropically in different directions, showing that the dynamical fluctuations in the multiparticle final- state of e/sup +/e/sup $/collisions are approximately isotropic. In the lab system, the three gamma parameters obtained by fitting F/sub 2/~M of p/sub x/, p/sub y/, p/sub z/ to Ochs formula respectively are approximately equal. In the thrust system, the three gamma values obtained by fitting F/sub 2/(y)~M, F/sub 2/(p/sub t/)~M and F/sub 2/( phi )~M are also close to each other provided the starting point in fitting F/sub 2/( phi )~M is chosen appropriately. All of these provide further evidence for the above assertion. Our results show that the essential ...

  12. Measurement of the centrality dependence of open heavy flavour production in lead-lead collisions at sqrts = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of heavy quark production and suppression in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions probe the interactions of heavy quarks with the hot, dense medium created in the collisions. ATLAS has measured heavy quark production in sqrts = 2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collisions via semi-leptonic decays of open heavy flavour hadrons to muons. Results obtained from an integrated luminosity of approximately 7/mub collected in 2010 are presented for the per-event muon yield as a function of muon transverse momentum, pT, over the range of 4 collisions. Muon production is suppressed by approximately a factor of 2.5 in central collisions relative to...

  13. Electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, I.; Takayanagi, K.

    1984-01-01

    The study of collision processes plays an important research role in modern physics. Many significant discoveries have been made by means of collision experiments. Based on theoretical, experimental, and computational studies, this volume presents an overview detailing the basic processes of electron-molecule collisions. The editors have collected papers-written by a group of international experts-that consider a diverse range of phenomena occurring in electronmolecule collisions. The volume discusses first the basic formulation for scattering problems and then gives an outline of the physics of electron-molecule collisions. The main topics covered are rotational transitions, vibrational transitions, dissociation of molecules in slow collisions, the electron-molecule collision as a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular electronic structures, and experimental and computational techniques for determining the cross sections. These well-referenced chapters are self-contained and can be read independently or consecutively. Authoritative and up-to-date, Electron-Molecule Collisions is a useful addition to the libraries of students and researchers in the fields of atomic, molecular, and chemical physics, and physical chemistry

  14. Arc-continent collision of the Coastal Range in Taiwan: Geochronological constraints from U-Pb ages of zircons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Wei; Zhang, Xun-Hua; Huang, Long

    2018-04-01

    The oblique arc-continent collision between the Luzon arc and the southeastern margin of the Eurasian continent caused the uplift of Taiwan. The Coastal Range in eastern Taiwan is the northern section of the Luzon arc in the collision zone and thus records important information about the arc-continent collision. In this paper, we determine and analyze the U-Pb ages of magmatic zircons from the volcanic arc and clastic zircons from the fore-arc basin in the Coastal Range. For the volcanic arc in the Coastal Range, the eruption ages range from 16.8-5 Ma. Given that the initial subduction of the South China Sea oceanic crust (17 Ma) occurred before the Luzon arc formed, we conclude that the volcanic activity of the Coastal Range began at 16.8 ± 1.3 Ma; it was most active from 14 to 8 Ma and continued until approximately 5 Ma. The U-Pb chronology also indicates that the initial stage of arc-continent collision of the Coastal Range started at approximately 5 Ma, when the northern section of the Luzon arc moved away from the magmatic chamber because of the kinematics of the Philippine Sea Plate.

  15. Modeling rainfall infiltration on hillslopes using Flux-concentration relation and time compression approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Chen, Li; Yu, Zhongbo

    2018-02-01

    Rainfall infiltration on hillslopes is an important issue in hydrology, which is related to many environmental problems, such as flood, soil erosion, and nutrient and contaminant transport. This study aimed to improve the quantification of infiltration on hillslopes under both steady and unsteady rainfalls. Starting from Darcy's law, an analytical integral infiltrability equation was derived for hillslope infiltration by use of the flux-concentration relation. Based on this equation, a simple scaling relation linking the infiltration times on hillslopes and horizontal planes was obtained which is applicable for both small and large times and can be used to simplify the solution procedure of hillslope infiltration. The infiltrability equation also improved the estimation of ponding time for infiltration under rainfall conditions. For infiltration after ponding, the time compression approximation (TCA) was applied together with the infiltrability equation. To improve the computational efficiency, the analytical integral infiltrability equation was approximated with a two-term power-like function by nonlinear regression. Procedures of applying this approach to both steady and unsteady rainfall conditions were proposed. To evaluate the performance of the new approach, it was compared with the Green-Ampt model for sloping surfaces by Chen and Young (2006) and Richards' equation. The proposed model outperformed the sloping Green-Ampt, and both ponding time and infiltration predictions agreed well with the solutions of Richards' equation for various soil textures, slope angles, initial water contents, and rainfall intensities for both steady and unsteady rainfalls.

  16. Covariant computation of e+e- production in nucleon-nucleon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haglin, K.; Kapusta, J.; Gale, C.

    1989-01-01

    Electron-positron production differential cross sections in nucleon-nucleon collisions are calculated analytically via meson exchange with a realistic pseudovector coupling including strong interaction form factors. These results are compared with newly obtained data from the DLS at the BEVALAC of proton on beryllium. A comparison with the soft photon approximation is also made. (orig.)

  17. A rear-end collision risk assessment model based on drivers' collision avoidance process under influences of cell phone use and gender-A driving simulator based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng; Yan, Xuedong; Wu, Jiawei; Radwan, Essam; Zhang, Yuting

    2016-12-01

    Driver's collision avoidance performance has a direct link to the collision risk and crash severity. Previous studies demonstrated that the distracted driving, such as using a cell phone while driving, disrupted the driver's performance on road. This study aimed to investigate the manner and extent to which cell phone use and driver's gender affected driving performance and collision risk in a rear-end collision avoidance process. Forty-two licensed drivers completed the driving simulation experiment in three phone use conditions: no phone use, hands-free, and hand-held, in which the drivers drove in a car-following situation with potential rear-end collision risks caused by the leading vehicle's sudden deceleration. Based on the experiment data, a rear-end collision risk assessment model was developed to assess the influence of cell phone use and driver's gender. The cell phone use and driver's gender were found to be significant factors that affected the braking performances in the rear-end collision avoidance process, including the brake reaction time, the deceleration adjusting time and the maximum deceleration rate. The minimum headway distance between the leading vehicle and the simulator during the rear-end collision avoidance process was the final output variable, which could be used to measure the rear-end collision risk and judge whether a collision occurred. The results showed that although cell phone use drivers took some compensatory behaviors in the collision avoidance process to reduce the mental workload, the collision risk in cell phone use conditions was still higher than that without the phone use. More importantly, the results proved that the hands-free condition did not eliminate the safety problem associated with distracted driving because it impaired the driving performance in the same way as much as the use of hand-held phones. In addition, the gender effect indicated that although female drivers had longer reaction time than male drivers in

  18. Probing quantum entanglement in the Schwarzschild space-time beyond the single-mode approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Juan; Ding, Zhi-Yong; Ye, Liu

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we deduce the vacuum structure for Dirac fields in the background of Schwarzschild space-time beyond the single-mode approximation and discuss the performance of quantum entanglement between particle and antiparticle modes of a Dirac field with Hawking effect. It is shown that Hawking radiation does not always destroy the physically accessible entanglement, and entanglement amplification may happen in some cases. This striking result is different from that of the single-mode approximation, which holds that the Hawking radiation can only destroy entanglement. Lastly, we analyze the physically accessible entanglement relation outside the event horizon and demonstrate that the monogamy inequality is constantly established regardless of the choice of given parameters.

  19. Transplanckian collisions in TeV scale gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Rattazzi, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    Collisions at transplanckian energies offer model independent tests of TeV scale gravity. One spectacular signal is given by black-hole production, though a full calculation of the corresponding cross- section is not yet available. Another signal is given by gravitational elastic scattering, which may be less spectacular but which can be nicely computed in the forward region using the eikonal approximation. In this talk I discuss the distinctive signatures of eikonalized scattering at future accelerators.

  20. Angular momentum coupling in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosser, J.

    1986-01-01

    The coupling between the electronic angular momentum and the rotating atom-atom axis in the initial or the final phase of an atom-atom collision is discussed, making use of the concepts of radial and rotational (Coriolis) coupling between different molecular states. The description is based on a limited number of well-understood approximations, and it allows an illustrative geometric representation of the transition from the body fixed to the space fixed motion of the electrons. (orig.)

  1. Approximate solution of space and time fractional higher order phase field equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseldeen, S.

    2018-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a class of space and time fractional partial differential equation (STFDE) with Riesz derivative in space and Caputo in time. The proposed STFDE is considered as a generalization of a sixth-order partial phase field equation. We describe the application of the optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) to obtain an approximate solution for the suggested fractional initial value problem. An averaged-squared residual error function is defined and used to determine the optimal convergence control parameter. Two numerical examples are studied, considering periodic and non-periodic initial conditions, to justify the efficiency and the accuracy of the adopted iterative approach. The dependence of the solution on the order of the fractional derivative in space and time and model parameters is investigated.

  2. Effectiveness of Wildlife Underpasses and Fencing to Reduce Wildlife–Vehicle Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; McCollister, Matthew F.

    2010-01-01

    Transportation planners are increasingly incorporating roadway design features to mitigate impacts of highways on wildlife and to increase driver safety. We used camera and track surveys to evaluate wildlife use before and after construction of 3 wildlife underpasses and associated fencing on a new section of United States Highway 64 in Washington County, North Carolina, USA. We recorded 242 occasions of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) use of underpass areas before highway construction began. Following completion of the highway, we collected 2,433 photographs of 9 species with deer representing 93% of all crossings. Adjusting for differences in number of monitoring days, white-tailed deer use of underpass areas averaged 6.7 times greater after the new highway and underpasses were completed. We recorded 3,614 wildlife crossings of ≥20 species based on track counts, representing most medium and large mammals known to occur in the area and several reptiles and birds. After completion of the highway, we documented wildlife mortality due to vehicle collisions during a 13-month period and recorded 128 incidences representing ≥24 species. Within fenced highway segments, mortalities were lowest near underpasses and increased with distance from the underpasses. However, we also documented more mortalities in fenced areas compared with unfenced areas. With greater distance from an underpass, animals with smaller home ranges seemed less likely to reach the underpass and instead attempted to climb over or crawl under fencing. Based on collision reports from adjacent highway sections, the new section of United States Highway 64 experienced approximately 58% fewer wildlife mortalities (primarily white-tailed deer), suggesting underpasses and fencing reduced the number of deer–vehicle collisions. Continuous fencing between underpasses may further reduce the number of vehicle collisions for deer but additional design features (e.g., buried fencing) should be

  3. Nucleus-Nucleus Collision as Superposition of Nucleon-Nucleus Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlova, G.I.; Adamovich, M.I.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Alexandrov, Y.A.; Andreeva, N.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Basova, E.S.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhasin, A.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bradnova, V.; Bubnov, V.I.; Cai, X.; Chasnikov, I.Y.; Chen, G.M.; Chernova, L.P.; Chernyavsky, M.M.; Dhamija, S.; Chenawi, K.El; Felea, D.; Feng, S.Q.; Gaitinov, A.S.; Ganssauge, E.R.; Garpman, S.; Gerassimov, S.G.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Grote, J.; Gulamov, K.G.; Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, V.K.; Henjes, U.; Jakobsson, B.; Kanygina, E.K.; Karabova, M.; Kharlamov, S.P.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Krasnov, S.A.; Kumar, V.; Larionova, V.G.; Li, Y.X.; Liu, L.S.; Lokanathan, S.; Lord, J.J.; Lukicheva, N.S.; Lu, Y.; Luo, S.B.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manhas, I.; Mittra, I.S.; Musaeva, A.K.; Nasyrov, S.Z.; Navotny, V.S.; Nystrand, J.; Otterlund, I.; Peresadko, N.G.; Qian, W.Y.; Qin, Y.M.; Raniwala, R.; Rao, N.K.; Roeper, M.; Rusakova, V.V.; Saidkhanov, N.; Salmanova, N.A.; Seitimbetov, A.M.; Sethi, R.; Singh, B.; Skelding, D.; Soderstrem, K.; Stenlund, E.; Svechnikova, L.N.; Svensson, T.; Tawfik, A.M.; Tothova, M.; Tretyakova, M.I.; Trofimova, T.P.; Tuleeva, U.I.; Vashisht, Vani; Vokal, S.; Vrlakova, J.; Wang, H.Q.; Wang, X.R.; Weng, Z.Q.; Wilkes, R.J.; Yang, C.B.; Yin, Z.B.; Yu, L.Z.; Zhang, D.H.; Zheng, P.Y.; Zhokhova, S.I.; Zhou, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    Angular distributions of charged particles produced in 16 O and 32 S collisions with nuclear track emulsion were studied at momenta 4.5 and 200 A GeV/c. Comparison with the angular distributions of charged particles produced in proton-nucleus collisions at the same momentum allows to draw the conclusion, that the angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be seen as superposition of the angular distributions in nucleon-nucleus collisions taken at the same impact parameter b NA , that is mean impact parameter between the participating projectile nucleons and the center of the target nucleus

  4. Nucleus-Nucleus Collision as Superposition of Nucleon-Nucleus Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlova, G I; Adamovich, M I; Aggarwal, M M; Alexandrov, Y A; Andreeva, N P; Badyal, S K; Basova, E S; Bhalla, K B; Bhasin, A; Bhatia, V S; Bradnova, V; Bubnov, V I; Cai, X; Chasnikov, I Y; Chen, G M; Chernova, L P; Chernyavsky, M M; Dhamija, S; Chenawi, K El; Felea, D; Feng, S Q; Gaitinov, A S; Ganssauge, E R; Garpman, S; Gerassimov, S G; Gheata, A; Gheata, M; Grote, J; Gulamov, K G; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Henjes, U; Jakobsson, B; Kanygina, E K; Karabova, M; Kharlamov, S P; Kovalenko, A D; Krasnov, S A; Kumar, V; Larionova, V G; Li, Y X; Liu, L S; Lokanathan, S; Lord, J J; Lukicheva, N S; Lu, Y; Luo, S B; Mangotra, L K; Manhas, I; Mittra, I S; Musaeva, A K; Nasyrov, S Z; Navotny, V S; Nystrand, J; Otterlund, I; Peresadko, N G; Qian, W Y; Qin, Y M; Raniwala, R; Rao, N K; Roeper, M; Rusakova, V V; Saidkhanov, N; Salmanova, N A; Seitimbetov, A M; Sethi, R; Singh, B; Skelding, D; Soderstrem, K; Stenlund, E; Svechnikova, L N; Svensson, T; Tawfik, A M; Tothova, M; Tretyakova, M I; Trofimova, T P; Tuleeva, U I; Vashisht, Vani; Vokal, S; Vrlakova, J; Wang, H Q; Wang, X R; Weng, Z Q; Wilkes, R J; Yang, C B; Yin, Z B; Yu, L Z; Zhang, D H; Zheng, P Y; Zhokhova, S I; Zhou, D C

    1999-03-01

    Angular distributions of charged particles produced in {sup 16}O and {sup 32}S collisions with nuclear track emulsion were studied at momenta 4.5 and 200 A GeV/c. Comparison with the angular distributions of charged particles produced in proton-nucleus collisions at the same momentum allows to draw the conclusion, that the angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be seen as superposition of the angular distributions in nucleon-nucleus collisions taken at the same impact parameter b{sub NA}, that is mean impact parameter between the participating projectile nucleons and the center of the target nucleus.

  5. Nucleus-nucleus collision as superposition of nucleon-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlova, G.I.; Adamovich, M.I.; Aggarwal, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Angular distributions of charged particles produced in 16 O and 32 S collisions with nuclear track emulsion were studied at momenta 4.5 and 200 A GeV/c. Comparison with the angular distributions of charged particles produced in proton-nucleus collisions at the same momentum allows to draw the conclusion, that the angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions can be seen as superposition of the angular distributions in nucleon-nucleus collisions taken at the same impact parameter b NA , that is mean impact parameter between the participating projectile nucleons and the center of the target nucleus. (orig.)

  6. Approximate method for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales by chemical Langevin equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Fuke; Tian, Tianhai; Rawlings, James B.; Yin, George

    2016-01-01

    The frequently used reduction technique is based on the chemical master equation for stochastic chemical kinetics with two-time scales, which yields the modified stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA). For the chemical reaction processes involving a large number of molecular species and reactions, the collection of slow reactions may still include a large number of molecular species and reactions. Consequently, the SSA is still computationally expensive. Because the chemical Langevin equations (CLEs) can effectively work for a large number of molecular species and reactions, this paper develops a reduction method based on the CLE by the stochastic averaging principle developed in the work of Khasminskii and Yin [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 56, 1766–1793 (1996); ibid. 56, 1794–1819 (1996)] to average out the fast-reacting variables. This reduction method leads to a limit averaging system, which is an approximation of the slow reactions. Because in the stochastic chemical kinetics, the CLE is seen as the approximation of the SSA, the limit averaging system can be treated as the approximation of the slow reactions. As an application, we examine the reduction of computation complexity for the gene regulatory networks with two-time scales driven by intrinsic noise. For linear and nonlinear protein production functions, the simulations show that the sample average (expectation) of the limit averaging system is close to that of the slow-reaction process based on the SSA. It demonstrates that the limit averaging system is an efficient approximation of the slow-reaction process in the sense of the weak convergence.

  7. Hyperthermal (10-500 eV) collisions of noble gases with Ni(100) surface. Comparison between light and heavy atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.

    1995-01-01

    Collisional events between 10-500 eV atomic beams (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) and a Ni(100) surface are investigated by the classical trajectory method. The calculation employs a molecular dynamics approach combined with a Langevin method for treating energy dissipation to infinite solid. We find that low energy collisions of heavy atoms (Xe and Kr) are characterized by extensive many-body interactions with top layer surface atoms. On the other hand, light atom (Ne and He) collisions can be approximated as a sequence of binary collisions even at these energies. Such a difference in the collisional nature gives rise to the following consequences. Low energy heavy atoms transfer energy mostly to the surface atoms during 45 angle collision. They scatter from the surface with a narrow angular distribution centered in a supraspecular direction. The ratio of the scattered to incident particle energy rapidly decreases with increasing beam energy of heavy atoms. The sputtering yield for Ni atoms by heavy atom bombardment increases quite linearly with beam energy, which is attributed to a linear proportionality between the beam energy and the energy transfered to a surface. Near the threshold energy sputtering can occur more efficiently by light atom bombardment. The energy transfer ratio to solid continuously increases with beam energy for light atoms. For heavy projectiles, on the other hand, this ratio reaches a maximum at the energy of ca, 100 eV, above which it stays nearly constant but slightly decreases. ((orig.))

  8. How does a collision warning system shape driver's brake response time? The influence of expectancy and automation complacency on real-life emergency braking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscio, Daniele; Ciceri, Maria Rita; Biassoni, Federica

    2015-04-01

    Brake Reaction Time (BRT) is an important parameter for road safety. Previous research has shown that drivers' expectations can impact RT when facing hazardous situations, but driving with advanced driver assistance systems, can change the way BRT are considered. The interaction with a collision warning system can help faster more efficient responses, but at the same time can require a monitoring task and evaluation process that may lead to automation complacency. The aims of the present study are to test in a real-life setting whether automation compliancy can be generated by a collision warning system and what component of expectancy can impact the different tasks involved in an assisted BRT process. More specifically four component of expectancy were investigated: presence/absence of anticipatory information, previous direct experience, reliability of the device, and predictability of the hazard determined by repeated use of the warning system. Results supply indication on perception time and mental elaboration of the collision warning system alerts. In particular reliable warning quickened the decision making process, misleading warnings generated automation complacency slowing visual search for hazard detection, lack of directed experienced slowed the overall response while unexpected failure of the device lead to inattentional blindness and potential pseudo-accidents with surprise obstacle intrusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Saddlepoint approximation to the distribution of the total distance of the continuous time random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Riccardo

    2017-12-01

    This article considers the random walk over Rp, with p ≥ 2, where a given particle starts at the origin and moves stepwise with uniformly distributed step directions and step lengths following a common distribution. Step directions and step lengths are independent. The case where the number of steps of the particle is fixed and the more general case where it follows an independent continuous time inhomogeneous counting process are considered. Saddlepoint approximations to the distribution of the distance from the position of the particle to the origin are provided. Despite the p-dimensional nature of the random walk, the computations of the saddlepoint approximations are one-dimensional and thus simple. Explicit formulae are derived with dimension p = 3: for uniformly and exponentially distributed step lengths, for fixed and for Poisson distributed number of steps. In these situations, the high accuracy of the saddlepoint approximations is illustrated by numerical comparisons with Monte Carlo simulation. Contribution to the "Topical Issue: Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  10. Improved elastic collision modeling in DEGAS 2 for low-temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzleiter, Randall J.; Stotler, Daren P.; Karney, Charles F. F.; Steiner, Don

    2000-01-01

    Recent emphasis on low-temperature divertor operations has focused attention on proper treatment of neutral-elastic collisions in low-temperature environments. For like species collisions, as in D + +D, quantum mechanical indistinguishability precludes differentiation of small-angle elastic scattering from resonant charge exchange for collision energies + +D 2 are included for the first time. An integration technique is utilized that reduces the total collision cross section while keeping the other transport cross sections invariant. The inclusion of ion-molecular elastic collisions results in significant increases in energy exchange between background ions and neutral test species

  11. Collective flow in 2.76 and 5.02 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Wenbin; Xu, Hao-jie [Peking University, Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Song, Huichao [Peking University, Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-09-15

    In this paper, we study and predict flow observables in 2.76 and 5.02 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions, using the iEBE-VISHNU hybrid model with TRENTo and AMPT initial conditions and with different forms of the QGP transport coefficients. With properly chosen and tuned parameter sets, our model calculations can nicely describe various flow observables in 2.76 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions, as well as the measured flow harmonics of all charged hadrons in 5.02 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions. We also predict other flow observables, including v{sub n}(p{sub T}) of identified particles, event-by-event v{sub n} distributions, event-plane correlations, (normalized) symmetric cumulants, non-linear response coefficients and p{sub T}-dependent factorization ratios, in 5.02 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions. We find many of these observables to remain approximately the same values as the ones in 2.76 A TeV Pb + Pb collisions. Our theoretical studies and predictions could shed light to the experimental investigations in the near future. (orig.)

  12. Towards relativistic heavy ion collisions 'by small steps towards the stars'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Current attempts to search for the exotic processes occurring in relativistic heavy ion collisions are reviewed under the headings; peripheral collisions (peripheral collisions as a function of energy, new features at intermediate energies, ground state correlations, microscopic aspects), central collisions (low energy perspective, time scales in heavy ion collisions, spatial, temporal localization and the onset of the nuclear fireball, models of particle emission in central relativistic collisions, the heart of the matter, multiplicity selection, the emission of composite particles), a search for the exotic (the limits of temperature and pressure, temporal and spatial limits, the limits of nuclear matter and nuclei,). 229 references. (U.K.)

  13. A comparative study of the second-order Born and Faddeev-Watson approximations for electron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fargher, H.E.; Roberts, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Simplified versions of the second-order Born and Faddeev-Watson approximations are applied to the excitation of the n=2 levels of atomic hydrogen by the impact of 54.4 eV electrons. The theories are compared with the measurements of differential cross sections and angular correlation parameters. The results indicate that the Born approximation is better at low angles of scattering but that the Faddeev-Watson approximation is better at high angles. The importance of the phases of the two-body T matrices in the Faddeev-Watson approximation is illustrated. (author)

  14. Exotic phenomena in collisions of very heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soff, G.; Mueller, U.; Schramm, S.; de Reus, T.; Mehler, G.; Reinhardt, J.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.

    1987-01-01

    Over the last decade their knowledge on atomic structure of superheavy quasimolecules in the range 110 ≤ Z/sub tot/ ≤ 188 has increased considerably. Heavy ion collisions, in which superheavy quasimolecules are formed for a short period of time, offer them a unique tool to investigate the electronic structure of ultra-high Z-systems, which are not otherwise accessible to experiment. Comparison of K-vacancy formation, δ-electron and positron emission with available experimental data suggests the validity of the quasimolecular picture, which will be taken as the theoretical framework of these calculations. To exemplify current theoretical investigations three different topics will be discussed. After a presentation of the underlying theoretical framework for ionization processes the possibility to employ δ-electron emission as a clock to measure nuclear reaction times in intermediate energy collisions of very heavy ions will be sketched. Besides the phenomenon of vacuum decay into a new twofold negatively charged stable vacuum ground state, electron excitation in heavy ion collisions may be employed for the determination of delay and deceleration times on the nuclear time scale, i.e. offering an atomic clock, operating in the range 10 -21 - 10 -24 s. In deep-inelastic heavy ion collisions this provides a test for classical nuclear reaction models. In collisions at intermediate energies an independent measurement of the deceleration time is of interest for comparison, e.g., with the results of the pion bremsstrahlung model. After that the influence of one or more pockets in the ion scattering potential on the energy distribution of emitted positrons within a quantum mechanical framework is investigated. Finally phenomenological corrections to the Dirac equation and its consequences on electron binding energies in heavy and superheavy atoms is briefly considered. 42 references, 5 figures

  15. Estimation of error in using born scaling for collision cross sections involving muonic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stodden, C.D.; Monkhorst, H.J.; Szalewicz, K.

    1988-01-01

    A quantitative estimate is obtained for the error involved in using Born scaling to calcuated excitation and ionization cross sections for collisions between muonic ions. The impact parameter version of the Born Approximation is used to calculate cross sections and Coulomb corrections for the 1s→2s excitation of αμ in collisions with d. An error of about 50% is found around the peak of the cross section curve. The error falls to less than 5% for velocities above 2 a.u

  16. Design study of general aviation collision avoidance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, M. R.; Moore, L. D.; Scott, W. V.

    1972-01-01

    The selection and design of a time/frequency collision avoidance system for use in general aviation aircraft is discussed. The modifications to airline transport collision avoidance equipment which were made to produce the simpler general aviation system are described. The threat determination capabilities and operating principles of the general aviation system are illustrated.

  17. Fine-structure resolved rotational transitions and database for CN+H2 collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Hannah; Mysliwiec, Ryan; Forrey, Robert C.; Yang, B. H.; Stancil, P. C.; Balakrishnan, N.

    2018-06-01

    Cross sections and rate coefficients for CN+H2 collisions are calculated using the coupled states (CS) approximation. The calculations are benchmarked against more accurate close-coupling (CC) calculations for transitions between low-lying rotational states. Comparisons are made between the two formulations for collision energies greater than 10 cm-1. The CS approximation is used to construct a database which includes highly excited rotational states that are beyond the practical limitations of the CC method. The database includes fine-structure resolved rotational quenching transitions for v = 0 and j ≤ 40, where v and j are the vibrational and rotational quantum numbers of the initial state of the CN molecule. Rate coefficients are computed for both para-H2 and ortho-H2 colliders. The results are shown to be in good agreement with previous calculations, however, the rates are substantially different from mass-scaled CN+He rates that are often used in astrophysical models.

  18. CDW (continuum distorted wave) type approximation for electron capture at large angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fojon, O.A.; Maidagan, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    A calculation is made for the probability of electron capture in shell K at great angles using a second order symmetrical model used related to the continuum distorted wave (CDW) approximation. The influence of Coulomb distortion of nuclei is studied and compared with OBK and CIS type calculations. Numerical results are compared with experimental results of the collision of H + on C at intermediate energies. (Author). 19 refs., 2 figs

  19. Quantum mechanical theory of positron production in heavy ion collisions with nuclear contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, U.

    1986-01-01

    The interplay between atomic and nuclear interactions in heavy ion collisions with nuclear contact is studied. The general theoretical description is outlined and analyzed in a number of different limits (semiclassical approximation, DWBA, fully quantal description). The two most important physical mechanisms for generating atomic-nuclear interference, i.e., energy conservation and the introduction of additional phase shifts by nuclear reactions, are extracted. The resulting typical coupling matrix elements are analyzed for their relative importance in atomic and nuclear excitations. The description of nuclear influence on atomic excitations in terms of a classical time delay caused by nuclear reactions is reviewed, and its relationship to the underlying quantal character of the nuclear reaction is discussed. The theory is applied to spontaneous positron emission in supercritical heavy-ion collisions (Z/sub tot/ ≥ 173). It is shown that nuclear contact can lead to line structures in the positron energy spectra if the probability distribution for nuclear delay times caused by the contact has contributions for T ≥ 10 -19 sec. We explicitly evaluate a model where a pocket in the internuclear potential near the touching configuration leads to formation of nuclear molecules, and predict a resonance-like excitation function for the positron peak. 25 refs., 7 figs

  20. Population of Rydberg states by electron capture in fast-ion--atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgdoerfer, J.; Dube, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The l,m-substate distribution in low-lying Rydberg manifolds (nroughly-equal10) following electron capture H + +H(1s)→H(n)+H + is calculated at high velocities (v>1 a.u.) in the continuum-distorted-wave (CDW) approximation. The standard CDW approximation is modified to account for final-state Stark mixing of the Rydberg manifold in the exit channel using the post-collision-interaction model. The influence of multiple-scattering contributions is analyzed and comparison is made with sigma/sub l/m predicted by the Born approximation. We find that the double-scattering contribution, closely connected with the classical Thomas process, becomes visible in the CDW approximation at surprisingly low nonasymptotic velocities

  1. Hadron-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Qualitative picture of high energy hadron-nucleus collision process, emerging from the analysis of experimental data, is presented. Appropriate description procedure giving a possibility of reproducing various characteristics of this process in terms of the data on elementary hadron-nucleon interaction is proposed. Formula reproducing hadron-nucleus collision cross sections is derived. Inelastic collision cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus reactions at wide energy interval are calculated for Pb, Ag, and Al targets. A-dependence of cross sections for pion-nucleus and proton-nucleus collisions at nearly 50 GeV/c momentum were calculated and compared with existing experimental data. Energy dependence of cross sections for hadron-nucleus collisions is determined simply by energy dependence of corresponding cross sections for hadron-nucleon collisions; A-dependence is determined simply by nuclear sizes and nucleon density distributions in nuclei

  2. Centrality and energy dependence of charged-particle multiplicities in heavy ion collisions in the context of elementary reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. Van; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2006-08-01

    The PHOBOS experiment at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured the total multiplicity of primary charged particles as a function of collision centrality in Au+Au collisions at sNN= 19.6, 130, and 200 GeV. An approximate independence of / on the number of participating nucleons is observed, reminiscent of “wounded nucleon” scaling (Nch∝Npart) observed in proton-nucleus collisions. Unlike p+A, the constant of proportionality does not seem to be set by the pp/p¯p data at the same energy. Rather, there seems to be a surprising correspondence with the total multiplicity measured in e+e- annihilations, as well as the rapidity shape measured over a large range. The energy dependence of the integrated multiplicity per participant pair shows that e+e- and A+A data agree over a large range of center-of-mass energies (s>20 GeV), and pp/p¯p data can be brought to agree approximately with the e+e- data by correcting for the typical energy taken away by leading particles. This is suggestive of a mechanism for soft particle production that depends mainly on the amount of available energy. It is conjectured that the dominant distinction between A+A and p+p collisions is the multiple collisions per participant, which appears to be sufficient to substantially reduce the energy taken away by leading particles.

  3. On non-binary nature of the collisions of heavy hyperthermal particles with solid surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferleger, V.Kh. E-mail: root@ariel.tashkent.su; Wojciechowski, I.A

    2000-04-01

    The limits of applicability of the binary collision approximation for a description of scattering of atomic particles by a solid surface are discussed. The experimental data of energy losses of atoms of hyperthermal energies (HT) scattered by a solid surface were found to bring in evidence for the non-binary nature of collisions in the hyperthermal energy region (1-30 eV). The dependence of the energy losses on the initial energy of the particles and their angles of incidence was shown to be well described by the following model: the particle is being single-scattered by certain complex of surface atoms forming an effective mass. A contribution of the non-binary collisions to the processes of atomic and cluster sputtering is also discussed.

  4. Collision Statistics of Driven Polydisperse Granular Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhiyuan; Zhang Duanming; Yang Fengxia; Guo Xinping; Li Zhongming

    2008-01-01

    We present a dynamical model of two-dimensional polydisperse granular gases with fractal size distribution, in which the disks are subject to inelastic mutual collisions and driven by standard white noise. The inhomogeneity of the disk size distribution can be measured by a fractal dimension d f . By Monte Carlo simulations, we have mainly investigated the effect of the inhomogeneity on the statistical properties of the system in the same inelasticity case. Some novel results are found that the average energy of the system decays exponentially with a tendency to achieve a stable asymptotic value, and the system finally reaches a nonequilibrium steady state after a long evolution time. Furthermore, the inhomogeneity has great influence on the steady-state statistical properties. With the increase of the fractal dimension d f , the distributions of path lengths and free times between collisions deviate more obviously from expected theoretical forms for elastic spheres and have an overpopulation of short distances and time bins. The collision rate increases with d f , but it is independent of time. Meanwhile, the velocity distribution deviates more strongly from the Gaussian one, but does not demonstrate any apparent universal behavior

  5. Neutron multiplicity in deep inelastic collisions: 400 MeV Cu + Au system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamain, B.; Chechik, R.; Ruchs, H.; Hanappe, F.; Morjean, M.; Ngo, C.; Peter, J.; Dakowski, M.; Lucas, B.; Mazur, C.; Ribrag, M.; Signarbieux, C.

    1979-01-01

    The authors have detected in nine different positions of space the neutrons associated with the collision of 63 Cu on 197 Au at 400 MeV bombarding energy. The deep inelastic products were detected at two different angles: close to the gazing angle and 30 0 forwards of it. Their measses were measured using a time-of-flight technique. The neutrons were detected in coincidence with the fragments - the efficiency of the neutron detectors was measured relatively to a 252 Cf source during beam time. The neutron threshold was set at 300 keV. Within an accuracy of 10% all the emitted neutrons are evaporated by the fully accelerated deep inelastic fragments. It is shown that the excitation energy is shared between the fragments in proportion to their masses and that the relaxation time for internal equilibration of the composite system is very short (approximately 10 -22 s). (Auth.)

  6. Offsetting the difficulties of the molecular model of atomic collisions in the intermediate velocity range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1991-01-01

    To offset the defective behavior of the molecular method of atomic collisions at intermediate energies, we propose a method to approximate the probability flux towards continuum and discrete states not included in the molecular basis. We check the degree of accuracy and limitations of the method for a model case where transition probabilities can be calculated exactly. An application to the benchmark case of He + +H + collisions is also presented, and yields complementary information on the properties of this approach

  7. Application of a distorted wave model to electron capture in atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deco, G.R.; Martinez, A.E.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, it is presented the CDW-EIS approximation applied to the description of processes of electron capture in ion-atom collisions. Differential and total cross sections are compared to results obtained by other theoretical models, as well as, to experimental data. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  8. High baryon and energy densities achievable in heavy-ion collisions at √{sN N}=39 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yu. B.; Soldatov, A. A.

    2018-02-01

    Baryon and energy densities, which are reached in central Au+Au collisions at collision energy of √{sN N}= 39 GeV, are estimated within the model of three-fluid dynamics. It is shown that the initial thermalized mean proper baryon and energy densities in a sizable central region approximately are nB/n0≈ 10 and ɛ ≈ 40 GeV/fm3, respectively. The study indicates that the deconfinement transition at the stage of interpenetration of colliding nuclei makes the system quite opaque. The final fragmentation regions in these collisions are formed not only by primordial fragmentation fireballs, i.e., the baryon-rich matter passed through the interaction region (containing approximately 30% of the total baryon charge), but also by the baryon-rich regions of the central fireball pushed out to peripheral rapidities by the subsequent almost one-dimensional expansion of the central fireball along the beam direction.

  9. Black hole production in particle collisions and higher curvature gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rychkov, Vyacheslav S.

    2004-01-01

    The problem of black hole production in trans-Planckian particle collisions is revisited, in the context of large extra dimensions scenarios of TeV-scale gravity. The validity of the standard description of this process (two colliding Aichelburg-Sexl shock waves in classical Einstein gravity) is questioned. It is observed that the classical spacetime has large curvature along the transverse collision plane, as signaled by the curvature invariant (R μνλσ ) 2 . Thus quantum gravity effects, and in particular higher curvature corrections to the Einstein gravity, cannot be ignored. To give a specific example of what may happen, the collision is reanalyzed in the Einstein-Lanczos-Lovelock gravity theory, which modifies the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian by adding a particular 'Gauss-Bonnet' combination of curvature squared terms. The analysis uses a series of approximations, which reduce the field equations to a tractable second order nonlinear PDE of the Monge-Ampere type. It is found that the resulting spacetime is significantly different from the pure Einstein case in the future of the transverse collision plane. These considerations cast serious doubts on the geometric cross section estimate, which is based on the classical Einstein gravity description of the black hole production process

  10. Centrality and collision system dependence of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions at AGS energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, H.; Ahle, L.; Akiba, Y.

    1997-12-01

    Antiproton production in heavy ion collisions reflects subtle interplay between initial production and absorption by nucleons. Because the AGS energies (10--20 A·GeV/c) are close to the antiproton production threshold, antiproton may be sensitive to cooperative processes such as QGP and hadronic multi-step processes. On the other hand, antiproton has been proposed as a probe of baryon density due to large N anti N annihilation cross sections. Cascade models predict the maximum baryon density reaches about 10 times the normal nucleus density in central Au+Au collisions, where the strong antiproton absorption is expected. In this paper, the authors show systematic studies of antiproton production from p+A to Au+Au collisions

  11. Dispatch of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services Via Advanced Automatic Collision Notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hisashi; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Hara, Yoshiaki; Yagi, Takanori; Hayashida, Kazuyuki; Mashiko, Kazuki; Saito, Nobuyuki; Iida, Hiroaki; Motomura, Tomokazu; Yasumatsu, Hiroshi; Kameyama, Daisuke; Hirabayashi, Atsushi; Yokota, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Hirotoshi; Kunimatsu, Takaji

    2016-03-01

    Advanced automatic collision notification (AACN) is a system for predicting occupant injury from collision information. If the helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) physician can be alerted by AACN, it may be possible to reduce the time to patient contact. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of early HEMS dispatch via AACN. A full-scale validation study was conducted. A car equipped with AACN was made to collide with a wall. Immediately after the collision, the HEMS was alerted directly by the operation center, which received the information from AACN. Elapsed times were recorded and compared with those inferred from the normal, real-world HEMS emergency request process. AACN information was sent to the operation center only 7 s after the collision; the HEMS was dispatched after 3 min. The helicopter landed at the temporary helipad 18 min later. Finally, medical intervention was started 21 min after the collision. Without AACN, it was estimated that the HEMS would be requested 14 min after the collision by fire department personnel. The start of treatment was estimated to be at 32 min, which was 11 min later than that associated with the use of AACN. The dispatch of the HEMS using the AACN can shorten the start time of treatment for patients in motor vehicle collisions. This study demonstrated that it is feasible to automatically alert and activate the HEMS via AACN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Photon propagators and the definition and approximation of renormalized stress tensors in curved space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.R.; Ottewill, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    We present the symmetric Hadamard representation for scalar and photon Feynman Green's functions. We use these representations to give a simple definition for their associated renormalized stress tensors. We investigate the connection between the accuracy of the WKB approximation and the vanishing of the trace anomaly for these fields. We show that, although for scalars there is a direct connection, this is not true for photons, and we discuss the relevance of these results to the approximation of renormalized stress tensors in static Einstein space-times

  13. Matter-wave entanglement and teleportation by molecular dissociation and collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Opatrny, T.; Kurizki, G.

    2000-01-01

    We propose dissociation of cold diatomic molecules as a source of atom pairs with highly correlated (entangled) positions and momenta, approximating the original quantum state introduced by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)]. Wavepacket teleportation is shown to be achievable by its collision with one of the EPR correlated atoms and manipulation of the other atom in the pair.

  14. A quantal toy model for heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassing, W.

    1987-01-01

    A one-dimensional toy model of moving finite boxes is analysed with respect to quantal phenomena associated with heavy-ion dynamics at low and intermediate energies. Special attention is payed to the relation between energy and momentum of the nucleons inside and outside the time-dependent mean field. A Wigner transformation of the one-body density matrix in space and time allows for a unique comparison with classical phase-space dynamics. It is found that high momentum components of the nuclear groundstate wave function approximately become on-shell during the heavy-ion reaction. This leads to the emission of energetic nucleons which do not appear classically. It is furthermore shown, that the low lying eigenstates of the dinuclear system for fixed time are only partly occupied throughout the reaction at intermediate energies. This opens up final phase space for nucleons after producing e.g. a pion or energetic photon. Through the present model does not allow for a reliable calculation of double differential nucleon spectra, pion or photon cross sections, it transparently shows the peculiar features of quantum dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. (orig.)

  15. Manifestation of transient effects in fission induced by relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurado, B.; Schmitt, C.; Schmidt, K.H.; Benlliure, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Junghans, A.R. [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR), Dresden (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    We examine the manifestation of transient effects in fission by analysing experimental data where fission is induced by peripheral heavy-ion collisions at relativistic energies. Available total nuclear fission cross sections of {sup 238}U at1.A GeV on gold and uranium targets are compared with a nuclear-reaction code, where transient effects in fission are modelled using different approximations to the numerical time-dependent fission-decay width: a new analytical description based on the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation and two widely used but less realistic descriptions, a step function and an exponential-like function. The experimental data are only reproduced when transient effects are considered. The deduced value of the dissipation strength {beta} depends strongly on the approximation applied for the time-dependent fission-decay width and is estimated to be of the order of 2 x 10{sup 21} s{sup -1}. A careful analysis sheds severe doubts on the use of the exponential-like in-growth function largely used in the past. Finally, we discuss which should be the characteristics of experimental observables to be most sensitive to transient effects in fission. (orig.)

  16. Independent center, independent electron approximation for dynamics of molecules and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.H.; Straton, J.C.; Wang, J.; Wang, Y.D.; Weaver, O.L.; Corchs, S.E.; Rivarola, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    A formalism is developed for evaluating probabilities and cross sections for multiple-electron transitions in scattering of molecules and clusters by charged collision partners. First, the molecule is divided into subclusters each made up of identical centers (atoms). Within each subcluster coherent scattering from identical centers may lead to observable phase terms and a geometrical structure factor. Then, using a mean field approximation to describe the interactions between centers we obtain A I ∼ summation k product ke iδ k I A Ik . Second, the independent electron approximation for each center may be obtained by neglecting the correlation between electrons in each center. The probability amplitude for each center is then a product of single electron transition probability amplitudes, a Ik i , i.e. A Ik ≅ product iaik i . Finally, the independent subcluster approximation is introduced by neglecting the interactions between different subclusters in the molecule or cluster. The total probability amplitude then reduces to a simple product of amplitudes for each subcluster, A≅ product IAI . Limitations of this simple approximation are discussed. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. On spinless null propagation in five-dimensional space-times with approximate space-like Killing symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breban, Romulus [Institut Pasteur, Paris Cedex 15 (France)

    2016-09-15

    Five-dimensional (5D) space-time symmetry greatly facilitates how a 4D observer perceives the propagation of a single spinless particle in a 5D space-time. In particular, if the 5D geometry is independent of the fifth coordinate then the 5D physics may be interpreted as 4D quantum mechanics. In this work we address the case where the symmetry is approximate, focusing on the case where the 5D geometry depends weakly on the fifth coordinate. We show that concepts developed for the case of exact symmetry approximately hold when other concepts such as decaying quantum states, resonant quantum scattering, and Stokes drag are adopted, as well. We briefly comment on the optical model of the nuclear interactions and Millikan's oil drop experiment. (orig.)

  18. Hipse: an event generator for nuclear collisions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, D.; Van Lauwe, A.; Durand, D.

    2003-11-01

    An event generator, HIPSE (Heavy-Ion Phase-Space Exploration), dedicated to the description of nuclear collisions in the intermediate energy range is presented. Based on the sudden approximation and on geometrical hypothesis, it can conveniently simulate heavy-ion interactions at all impact parameters and thus can constitute a valuable tool for the understanding of processes such as neck emission or multifragmentation in peripheral or/and central collisions. After a detailed description of the ingredients of the model, first comparisons with experimental data collected by the INDRA collaboration are shown. Special emphasis is put on the kinematical characteristics of fragments and light particles observed at all impact parameters for Xe+Sn reactions at 25 and 50 MeV/u and Ni + Ni at 82 MeV/u. (authors)

  19. The time-dependent relativistic mean-field theory and the random phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, P.; Ma, Zhong-yu; Van Giai, Nguyen; Vretenar, D.; Wandelt, A.; Cao, Li-gang

    2001-01-01

    The Relativistic Random Phase Approximation (RRPA) is derived from the Time-Dependent Relativistic Mean-Field (TD RMF) theory in the limit of small amplitude oscillations. In the no-sea approximation of the RMF theory, the RRPA configuration space includes not only the usual particle-hole ph-states, but also αh-configurations, i.e. pairs formed from occupied states in the Fermi sea and empty negative-energy states in the Dirac sea. The contribution of the negative-energy states to the RRPA matrices is examined in a schematic model, and the large effect of Dirac-sea states on isoscalar strength distributions is illustrated for the giant monopole resonance in 116 Sn. It is shown that, because the matrix elements of the time-like component of the vector-meson fields which couple the αh-configurations with the ph-configurations are strongly reduced with respect to the corresponding matrix elements of the isoscalar scalar meson field, the inclusion of states with unperturbed energies more than 1.2 GeV below the Fermi energy has a pronounced effect on giant resonances with excitation energies in the MeV region. The influence of nuclear magnetism, i.e. the effect of the spatial components of the vector fields is examined, and the difference between the nonrelativistic and relativistic RPA predictions for the nuclear matter compression modulus is explained

  20. Approximations of time-dependent phenomena in quantum mechanics: adiabatic versus sudden processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnichuk, S V; Dijk, W van; Nogami, Y

    2005-01-01

    By means of a one-dimensional model of a particle in an infinite square-well potential with one wall moving at a constant speed, we examine aspects of time-dependent phenomena in quantum mechanics such as adiabatic and sudden processes. The particle is assumed to be initially in the ground state of the potential with its initial width. The time dependence of the wavefunction of the particle in the well is generally more complicated when the potential well is compressed than when it is expanded. We are particularly interested in the case in which the potential well is suddenly compressed. The so-called sudden approximation is not applicable in this case. We also study the energy of the particle in the changing well as a function of time for expansion and contraction as well as for expansion followed by contraction and vice versa

  1. Ion-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salzborn, Erhard; Melchert, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Collisions between ions belong to the elementary processes occurring in all types of plasmas. In this article we give a short overview about collisions involving one-electron systems. For collisions involving multiply-charged ions we limit the discussion to one specific quasi-one-electron system. (author)

  2. Quasi-binary incident electron–centre of mass collision in (e, 3e ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These two geometrical modes are such that the quasi-binary collision between the incident electron and centre of mass of the ejected electrons is in the scattering plane. The theoretical formalism has been developed using plane waves,. Le Sech wave function and approximated BBK-type wave function respectively for the.

  3. Quasi-binary incident electron–centre of mass collision in (e, 3e ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These two geometrical modes are such that the quasi-binary collision between the incident electron and centre of mass of the ejected electrons is in the scattering plane. The theoretical formalism has been developed using plane waves, Le Sech wave function and approximated BBK-type wave function respectively for the ...

  4. Angular distributions of elastic and quasi elastic heavy-ion collisions. Pattern analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silveira, R.

    1980-06-01

    The emergence, as well as the evolution, of the most typical patterns observed in the angular distributions of elastic scattering and surface transfer between heavy-nuclei, is discussed. Starting from the semi-classical approximation, Thom's classification theorem is evoked to further illuminate the connection between these patterns and the collision parameters

  5. Collision strengths for the excitation of lithium- and boron-like ions by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goett, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    The theory of collision strengths of highly charged ions is presented in terms of the R-matrix formalism by utilizing time-dependent perturbation theory. This theory is then applied to the general case of an ion with three valence electrons. The theory is general enough to admit the possiblity of three equivalent electrons. The effects of configuration interaction and intermediate coupling are incorporated through the mixing coefficients calculated by diagonalizing the perturbation matrix. This matrix is formed by taking into account the electron-electron electrostatic interaction as well as all first order relativistic corrections. The dipole radiative line strengths are also calculated using these mix coefficients. The line strengths are needed for the Coulomb-Bethe approximation which estimates the contributions to the collision strengths from large values of the impact electron's orbital angular momentum. All the above quantities are calculated in both the LS and jj coupling schemes. This dual calculation provides useful information about the mixing of the states present, as well as serving as a valuable check on the development of the theory and the coding of the computer programs. An application is made to the calculation of transition energies, line strengths and collision strengths of transitions from all lower states with a configuration of 1s 2 2I to all upper states with a configuraiton of 1s2I/sub a/'2I/sub b/'

  6. Hidden crossing theory of charge exchange in H+ + He+(1 s) collisions in vicinity of maximum of cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdanov, Tasko P.; Solov'ev, Evgeni A.

    2018-04-01

    Within the framework of dynamical adiabatic approach the hidden crossing theory of inelastic transitions is applied to charge exchange in H+ + He+(1 s) collisions in the wide range of center of mass collision energies E cm = (1.6 -70) keV. The good agreement with experiment and molecular close coupling calculations is obtained. At low energies our 4-state results are closest to the experiment and correctly reproduce the shoulder in energy dependence of the cross section around E cm = 6 keV. The 2-state results correctly predict the position of the maximum of the cross section at E cm ≈ 40 keV, whereas 4-state results fail to correctly describe the region around the maximum. The reason for this is the fact that adiabatic approximation for a given two-state hidden crossing is applicable for values of the Schtueckelberg parameter >1. But with increase of principal quantum number N the Schtueckelberg parameter decreases as N -3. That is why the 4-state approach involving higher excited states fails at smaller collision energies E cm ≈ 15 keV, while the 2-state approximation which involves low lying states can be extended to higher collision energies.

  7. Soft electromagnetic bremsstrahlung in inelastic hadronic collisions at high and intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueckl, R.

    1978-01-01

    Electromagnetic bremsstrahlung in hadronic collisions was studied extensively at low and intermediate energies. It was found that the infrared divergent term of the cross section describes the data well up to surprisingly large photon energies. Using essentially the same soft photon approximation, production of low mass-low energy electron pairs via internal conversion of soft virtual bremsstrahlung accompanying the production of charged hadrons in hadron-hadron collisions at very high and intermediate energies. The resulting electron yields explain, at least in part, the direct electrons with small transverse momenta seen at the ISR, and are in no contradiction to the rates observed at LAMPF

  8. Evolution of collision numbers for a chaotic gas dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidgop, Alexander Jonathan; Fouxon, Itzhak

    2011-11-01

    We put forward a conjecture of recurrence for a gas of hard spheres that collide elastically in a finite volume. The dynamics consists of a sequence of instantaneous binary collisions. We study how the numbers of collisions of different pairs of particles grow as functions of time. We observe that these numbers can be represented as a time integral of a function on the phase space. Assuming the results of the ergodic theory apply, we describe the evolution of the numbers by an effective Langevin dynamics. We use the facts that hold for these dynamics with probability one, in order to establish properties of a single trajectory of the system. We find that for any triplet of particles there will be an infinite sequence of moments of time, when the numbers of collisions of all three different pairs of the triplet will be equal. Moreover, any value of difference of collision numbers of pairs in the triplet will repeat indefinitely. On the other hand, for larger numbers of pairs there is but a finite number of repetitions. Thus the ergodic theory produces a limitation on the dynamics.

  9. Determination of kinetic coefficients for proton-nucleus collisions at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzato, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    From the effective proton dynamics, the approximations in the context of high energy collisions which lead to the Boltzmann equation, are established. From this equation, general expressions for the kinetic coefficients are deduced. Using a simple model, analytical expressions for kinetic coefficients are obtained. The importance of the effect of Pauli blocking is also shown. (author) [pt

  10. Holographic collisions in non-conformal theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attems, Maximilian; Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; Santos-Oliván, Daniel; Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Triana, Miquel; Zilhão, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    We numerically simulate gravitational shock wave collisions in a holographic model dual to a non-conformal four-dimensional gauge theory. We find two novel effects associated to the non-zero bulk viscosity of the resulting plasma. First, the hydrodynamization time increases. Second, if the bulk viscosity is large enough then the plasma becomes well described by hydrodynamics before the energy density and the average pressure begin to obey the equilibrium equation of state. We discuss implications for the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy ion collision experiments.

  11. Identified baryon and meson distributions at large transverse momenta from Au + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lapointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nepali, N S; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Subba, N L; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Vander Molen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-10-13

    Transverse momentum spectra of pi+/-, p, and p up to 12 GeV/c at midrapidity in centrality selected Au + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV are presented. In central Au + Au collisions, both pi +/- and p(p) show significant suppression with respect to binary scaling at pT approximately >4 GeV/c. Protons and antiprotons are less suppressed than pi+/-, in the range 1.5 approximately 5 GeV/c. The results at high pT indicate that the partonic sources of pi+/-, p, and p have similar energy loss when traversing the nuclear medium.

  12. Studies of Fluctuation Processes in Nuclear Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayik, Sakir [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-04-14

    The standard one-body transport approaches have been extensively applied to investigate heavy-ion collision dynamics at low and intermediate energies. At low energies the approach is the mean-field description of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory. At intermediate energies the approach is extended by including a collision term, and its application has been carried out mostly in the semi-classical framework of the Boltzmann-Uhling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model. The standard transport models provide a good understanding of the average properties of the collision dynamics in terms of the effective interactions in both low and intermediate energies. However, the standard models are inadequate for describing the fluctuation dynamics of collective motion at low energies and disassembling of the nuclear system into fragments at intermediate energies resulting from the growth of density fluctuations in the spinodal region. Our tasks have been to improve the standard transport approaches by incorporating fluctuation mechanisms into the description. There are mainly two different mechanisms for fluctuations: (i) Collisional fluctuations generated by binary nucleon collisions, which provide the dominant mechanism at intermediate energies, and (ii) One-body mechanism or mean-field fluctuations, which is the dominant mechanism at low energies. In the first part of our project, the PI extended the standard transport model at intermediate energies by incorporating collisional mechanism according to the “Generalized Langevin Description” of Mori formalism. The PI and his collaborators carried out a number of applications for describing dynamical mechanism of nuclear multi fragmentations, and nuclear collective response in the semi-classical framework of the approach, which is known as the Boltzmann-Langevin model. In the second part of the project, we considered dynamical description at low energies. Because of the effective Pauli blocking, the collisional dissipation and

  13. Transitions between the fine structure components of C+ in collision with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazet, J.F.; Harel, C.; McCarroll, R.; Riera, A.

    1975-01-01

    The cross section for excitation of the 2 Psub(1/2)- 2 Psub(3/2) transition in thermal C + ( 2 P)-H( 2 S) collisions is calculated in the framework of the semiclassical approximation using the potential energy curves of the 1 Σ, 1 π, 3 π, 3 Σ states of CH + , determined by an exchange perturbation method. Full account is taken of the exchange interaction and of the trajectory effects induced by the long range polarization potential. For low energies E, such that E/k 350 K, sigma depends on the exchange interaction. The cross section, which presents a maximum of 130a 2 0 for E/k approximately equal to 180 K, is lower by about 50% than that calculated by Weisheit and Lane. The cooling function due to C + -H collisions in the interstellar clouds is computed as a function of the kinetic temperature of the medium. (orig.) [de

  14. Electron-positron pair creation in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kienle, P.

    1987-08-01

    We review here the status of experiments to study the electron positron pair creation in heavy ion atom collisions at bombarding energies close to the Coulomb barrier. The disentanglement and characterisation of various sources of positrons observed in such collisions are described with a focus on the monoenergetic electron positron pairs observed. They seem to originate from the two-body decay of a family of neutral particles with masses of about 3 m e and life times in the range of 6x10 -14 s -10 s, produced by high Coulomb fields. First attempts were made to create these particles by resonant Bhabha scattering. First we present some experimental methods for high efficiency positron spectroscopy in heavy ion collisions. Then we describe the discovery of positron creation induced by strong time changing Coulomb fields. (orig./HSI)

  15. Kinematics of 3-body in Ionization Collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Picca, Renata

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we study three body problems in the frame of the collision theory. First, we deal with the process of autoionization by ion impact where the line profile of the electron emitted is strongly affected by the post-collision interaction with the Coulomb field of the outgoing projectile.Here we analyze how these effects are modified when the projectile velocity is in the close vicinity of the resonant electron velocity.In this energy range, the analysis of the resonance contribution is hindered by the characteristic 'electron capture to the continuum' divergence in the direct term.Here we present a detailed theoretical study of the interplay between both contributions, based on a generalization of the Final-State Interaction model.Finally we propose a modified parameterization of the autoionization line shape in the vicinity of the ECC cusp.Secondly, we study the direct ionization of an atomic target by the impact of a charge projectile, through analysis of the quintuple differential cross section (QDCS) which gives the most complete information about a ionization collision.Its study, without any approximation on the mass ratios can unveil new, not previously observed, structures.In particular, in this work the ionization of Hydrogen molecules by the impact of positrons and muons was studied and a new structure that has not been identified until now was found. Its main characteristics and a possible explanation are presented

  16. Semiclassical theory of resonance inelastic electron-molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskij, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    Semiclassical approach to the theory of resonance electron-molecule collisions, unlocal with respect to interatomic distance was developed. Two problems were considered: modified adiabatic approach for sigle-pole approximation of R-matrix and Fano-Feshbach-Bardsley theory. It is shown that these problems are similar in semiclassical approximation. A simple equation system with coefficients expressed in quadratures was obtained. It enables to determine amplitudes of all processes (including dissociation adhesion, association ejection, free-free and free-bound transitions) in energetic representation with respect to nucleus vibrations in molecule with allowance for both descrete and continuous spectra of nucleus motion in molecule. Quantitative investigation of the system results to the notion of dynamic energy curve of intermediate state, generalizing the motion of such curve in boomerang theory

  17. Convergence acceleration for time-independent first-order PDE using optimal PNB-approximations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmgren, S.; Branden, H. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    We consider solving time-independent (steady-state) flow problems in 2D or 3D governed by hyperbolic or {open_quotes}almost hyperbolic{close_quotes} systems of partial differential equations (PDE). Examples of such PDE are the Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations. The PDE is discretized using a finite difference or finite volume scheme with arbitrary order of accuracy. If the matrix B describes the discretized differential operator and u denotes the approximate solution, the discrete problem is given by a large system of equations.

  18. Matter-Wave Entanglement and Teleportation by Molecular Dissociation and Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrný, T.; Kurizki, G.

    2001-04-01

    We propose dissociation of cold diatomic molecules as a source of atom pairs with highly correlated (entangled) positions and momenta, approximating the original quantum state introduced by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)]. Wave packet teleportation is shown to be achievable by its collision with one of the EPR correlated atoms and manipulation of the other atom in the pair.

  19. Matter-wave entanglement and teleportation by molecular dissociation and collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatrný, T; Kurizki, G

    2001-04-02

    We propose dissociation of cold diatomic molecules as a source of atom pairs with highly correlated (entangled) positions and momenta, approximating the original quantum state introduced by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) [Phys. Rev. 47, 777 (1935)]. Wave packet teleportation is shown to be achievable by its collision with one of the EPR correlated atoms and manipulation of the other atom in the pair.

  20. Charge exchange and ionization in atom-multiply-charged ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presnyakov, L.P.; Uskov, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    This study investigates one-electron transitions to the continuous and discrete spectra induced by a collision of atom A and multiply-charged ion B +Z with nuclear charge Z > 3. An analytical method is developed the charge-exchange reaction; this method is a generalization of the decay model and the approximation of nonadiabatic coupling of two states that are used as limiting cases in the proposed approach

  1. Traffic simulation based ship collision probability modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerlandt, Floris, E-mail: floris.goerlandt@tkk.f [Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics, Marine Technology, P.O. Box 15300, FI-00076 AALTO, Espoo (Finland); Kujala, Pentti [Aalto University, School of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Mechanics, Marine Technology, P.O. Box 15300, FI-00076 AALTO, Espoo (Finland)

    2011-01-15

    Maritime traffic poses various risks in terms of human, environmental and economic loss. In a risk analysis of ship collisions, it is important to get a reasonable estimate for the probability of such accidents and the consequences they lead to. In this paper, a method is proposed to assess the probability of vessels colliding with each other. The method is capable of determining the expected number of accidents, the locations where and the time when they are most likely to occur, while providing input for models concerned with the expected consequences. At the basis of the collision detection algorithm lays an extensive time domain micro-simulation of vessel traffic in the given area. The Monte Carlo simulation technique is applied to obtain a meaningful prediction of the relevant factors of the collision events. Data obtained through the Automatic Identification System is analyzed in detail to obtain realistic input data for the traffic simulation: traffic routes, the number of vessels on each route, the ship departure times, main dimensions and sailing speed. The results obtained by the proposed method for the studied case of the Gulf of Finland are presented, showing reasonable agreement with registered accident and near-miss data.

  2. Total Probability of Collision as a Metric for Finite Conjunction Assessment and Collision Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigm, Ryan C.; Hejduk, Matthew D.; Johnson, Lauren C.; Plakalovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    On-orbit collision risk is becoming an increasing mission risk to all operational satellites in Earth orbit. Managing this risk can be disruptive to mission and operations, present challenges for decision-makers, and is time-consuming for all parties involved. With the planned capability improvements to detecting and tracking smaller orbital debris and capacity improvements to routinely predict on-orbit conjunctions, this mission risk will continue to grow in terms of likelihood and effort. It is very real possibility that the future space environment will not allow collision risk management and mission operations to be conducted in the same manner as it is today. This paper presents the concept of a finite conjunction assessment-one where each discrete conjunction is not treated separately but, rather, as a continuous event that must be managed concurrently. The paper also introduces the Total Probability of Collision as an analogous metric for finite conjunction assessment operations and provides several options for its usage in a Concept of Operations.

  3. Radar-based collision avoidance for unmanned surface vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jia-yuan; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Shi-qi; Cao, Jian; Wang, Bo; Sun, Han-bing

    2016-12-01

    Unmanned surface vehicles (USVs) have become a focus of research because of their extensive applications. To ensure safety and reliability and to perform complex tasks autonomously, USVs are required to possess accurate perception of the environment and effective collision avoidance capabilities. To achieve these, investigation into realtime marine radar target detection and autonomous collision avoidance technologies is required, aiming at solving the problems of noise jamming, uneven brightness, target loss, and blind areas in marine radar images. These technologies should also satisfy the requirements of real-time and reliability related to high navigation speeds of USVs. Therefore, this study developed an embedded collision avoidance system based on the marine radar, investigated a highly real-time target detection method which contains adaptive smoothing algorithm and robust segmentation algorithm, developed a stable and reliable dynamic local environment model to ensure the safety of USV navigation, and constructed a collision avoidance algorithm based on velocity obstacle (V-obstacle) which adjusts the USV's heading and speed in real-time. Sea trials results in multi-obstacle avoidance firstly demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed avoidance system, and then verify its great adaptability and relative stability when a USV sailing in a real and complex marine environment. The obtained results will improve the intelligent level of USV and guarantee the safety of USV independent sailing.

  4. Approximation for the adjoint neutron spectrum; Aproximacao para o espectro adjunto de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suster, Luis Carlos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    The proposal of this work is the determination of an analytical approximation which is capable to reproduce the adjoint neutron flux for the energy range of the narrow resonances (NR). In a previous work we developed a method for the calculation of the adjoint spectrum which was calculated from the adjoint neutron balance equations, that were obtained by the collision probabilities method, this method involved a considerable quantity of numerical calculation. In the analytical method some approximations were done, like the multiplication of the escape probability in the fuel by the adjoint flux in the moderator, and after these approximations, taking into account the case of the narrow resonances, were substituted in the adjoint neutron balance equation for the fuel, resulting in an analytical approximation for the adjoint flux. The results obtained in this work were compared to the results generated with the reference method, which demonstrated a good and precise results for the adjoint neutron flux for the narrow resonances. (author)

  5. Collision risks at sea: species composition and altitude distributions of birds in Danish offshore wind farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blew, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Nehls, G. [BioConsult SH (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    This study investigates the collision risks of birds in operating offshore wind farms, focussing on all bird species present in the direct vicinity of the wind farms, their altitude distribution and reactions. The project was conducted jointly by BioConsult SH and the University of Hamburg in the two Danish offshore wind farms Horns Rev (North Sea) and Nysted (Baltic Sea) in the framework of a Danish-German cooperation and financed by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU). Data were collected between March 2005 and November 2006, using a ship anchored at the edge of the offshore wind farms. In this way, bird species of all sizes could be considered. Daytime observations yielded data on species composition, flight routes and potential reactions of the birds. Radar observations provided altitude distributions inside and outside the wind farm area and also reactions. The results shall help to further describe and assess the collision risk of different species groups. Since data analysis is still running, exemplary results will be presented here. 114 species have been recorded in Nysted and 99 in Horns Rev, approximately 65% of which have been observed inside the wind farm areas. Migrating birds seem to avoid flying into the wind farms, whereas individuals present in the areas for extended time periods utilize areas within the wind farms. While a barrier effect exists for species on migration, resident species probably have a higher collision risk. Raptors migrating during daylight frequently enter the wind farm area on their flight routes, correcting their flight paths in order to avoid collisions. Radar results show that during times of intensive migration, the proportion of birds flying at high altitudes and thus above windmill height is higher than in times of low migration intensity. Consequently, there is a lower proportion of migrating birds flying within the risk area. Data will be further analysed to

  6. Long-time analytic approximation of large stochastic oscillators: Simulation, analysis and inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos Minas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyse large complex stochastic dynamical models such as those studied in systems biology there is currently a great need for both analytical tools and also algorithms for accurate and fast simulation and estimation. We present a new stochastic approximation of biological oscillators that addresses these needs. Our method, called phase-corrected LNA (pcLNA overcomes the main limitations of the standard Linear Noise Approximation (LNA to remain uniformly accurate for long times, still maintaining the speed and analytically tractability of the LNA. As part of this, we develop analytical expressions for key probability distributions and associated quantities, such as the Fisher Information Matrix and Kullback-Leibler divergence and we introduce a new approach to system-global sensitivity analysis. We also present algorithms for statistical inference and for long-term simulation of oscillating systems that are shown to be as accurate but much faster than leaping algorithms and algorithms for integration of diffusion equations. Stochastic versions of published models of the circadian clock and NF-κB system are used to illustrate our results.

  7. The Random Walk of Cars and Their Collision Probabilities with Planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanno Rein

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available On 6 February 2018, SpaceX launched a Tesla Roadster on a Mars-crossing orbit. We perform N-body simulations to determine the fate of the object over the next 15 Myr. The orbital evolution is initially dominated by close encounters with the Earth. While a precise orbit can not be predicted beyond the next several centuries due to these repeated chaotic scatterings, one can reliably predict the long-term outcomes by statistically analyzing a large suite of possible trajectories with slightly perturbed initial conditions. Repeated gravitational scatterings with Earth lead to a random walk. Collisions with the Earth, Venus and the Sun represent primary sinks for the Roadster’s orbital evolution. Collisions with Mercury and Mars, or ejections from the Solar System by Jupiter, are highly unlikely. We calculate a dynamical half-life of the Tesla of approximately 15 Myr, with some 22%, 12% and 12% of Roadster orbit realizations impacting the Earth, Venus, and the Sun within one half-life, respectively. Because the eccentricities and inclinations in our ensemble increase over time due to mean-motion and secular resonances, the impact rates with the terrestrial planets decrease beyond a few million years, whereas the impact rate on the Sun remains roughly constant.

  8. Probability of satellite collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for computing the probability of a collision between a particular artificial earth satellite and any one of the total population of earth satellites. The collision hazard incurred by the proposed modular Space Station is assessed using the technique presented. The results of a parametric study to determine what type of satellite orbits produce the greatest contribution to the total collision probability are presented. Collision probability for the Space Station is given as a function of Space Station altitude and inclination. Collision probability was also parameterized over miss distance and mission duration.

  9. High energy nuclear collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review some basic concepts of relativistic heavy-ion physics and discuss our understanding of some key results from the experimental program at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC). We focus in particular on the early time dynamics of nuclear collisions, some result from lattice QCD, hard probes and photons.

  10. Approximate analytical solution of diffusion equation with fractional time derivative using optimal homotopy analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Das

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, optimal homotopy-analysis method is used to obtain approximate analytic solution of the time-fractional diffusion equation with a given initial condition. The fractional derivatives are considered in the Caputo sense. Unlike usual Homotopy analysis method, this method contains at the most three convergence control parameters which describe the faster convergence of the solution. Effects of parameters on the convergence of the approximate series solution by minimizing the averaged residual error with the proper choices of parameters are calculated numerically and presented through graphs and tables for different particular cases.

  11. Time line cell tracking for the approximation of lagrangian coherent structures with subgrid accuracy

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Alexander

    2013-12-05

    Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) have become a widespread and powerful method to describe dynamic motion patterns in time-dependent flow fields. The standard way to extract LCS is to compute height ridges in the finite-time Lyapunov exponent field. In this work, we present an alternative method to approximate Lagrangian features for 2D unsteady flow fields that achieve subgrid accuracy without additional particle sampling. We obtain this by a geometric reconstruction of the flow map using additional material constraints for the available samples. In comparison to the standard method, this allows for a more accurate global approximation of LCS on sparse grids and for long integration intervals. The proposed algorithm works directly on a set of given particle trajectories and without additional flow map derivatives. We demonstrate its application for a set of computational fluid dynamic examples, as well as trajectories acquired by Lagrangian methods, and discuss its benefits and limitations. © 2013 The Authors Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Understanding safety climate in small automobile collision repair shops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David L; Brosseau, Lisa M; Bejan, Anca; Skan, Maryellen; Xi, Min

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, approximately 236,000 people work in 37,600 auto collision-repair businesses. Workers in the collision-repair industry may be exposed to a wide range of physical and chemical hazards. This manuscript examines the relationship of safety climate as reported by collision repair shop workers and owners to: (1) an independent business safety assessment, and (2) employee self-reported work practices. The study was conducted in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. A total of 199 workers from 49 collision shops completed a survey of self-reported work practices and safety climate. Surveys were completed by an owner or manager in all but three shops. In general, self-reported work practices were poor. Workers' scores on safety climate were uniformly lower than those of owners. For workers, there was no correlation between how well the business scored on an independent audit of business safety practices and the safety climate measures they reported. For owners, however, there was a positive correlation between safety climate scores and the business safety assessment. For workers, safety rules and procedures were associated with improved work practices for those engaged in both painting-related and body technician-related activities. The enforcement of safety rules and procedures emerged as a strong factor positively affecting self-reported work practices. These findings identify a simple, cost effective path to reducing hazards in small workplaces. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Giant molecular cloud collisions as triggers of star formation. VI. Collision-induced turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Christie, Duncan; Li, Qi

    2018-05-01

    We investigate collisions between giant molecular clouds (GMCs) as potential generators of their internal turbulence. Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of self-gravitating, magnetized, turbulent GMCs, we compare kinematic and dynamic properties of dense gas structures formed when such clouds collide compared to those that form in non-colliding clouds as self-gravity overwhelms decaying turbulence. We explore the nature of turbulence in these structures via distribution functions of density, velocity dispersions, virial parameters, and momentum injection. We find that the dense clumps formed from GMC collisions have higher effective Mach number, greater overall velocity dispersions, sustain near-virial equilibrium states for longer times, and are the conduit for the injection of turbulent momentum into high density gas at high rates.

  14. Eternal inflation, bubble collisions, and the persistence of memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garriga, Jaume; Guth, Alan H.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    A 'bubble universe' nucleating in an eternally inflating false vacuum will experience, in the course of its expansion, collisions with an infinite number of other bubbles. In an idealized model, we calculate the rate of collisions around an observer inside a given reference bubble. We show that the collision rate violates both the homogeneity and the isotropy of the bubble universe. Each bubble has a center which can be related to 'the beginning of inflation' in the parent false vacuum, and any observer not at the center will see an anisotropic bubble collision rate that peaks in the outward direction. Surprisingly, this memory of the onset of inflation persists no matter how much time elapses before the nucleation of the reference bubble

  15. On the quantum dynamical foundations of collision terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemes, M.C.; Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de

    1981-08-01

    Collision terms are non-unitary corrections usually added to mean field descriptions in order to describe dissipative effects. Derivations of collision terms usually include assumptions which lack an explicit connection with a fully quantum dynamical description. Quantum dynamical foundations of collision terms are examined: they are shown to reflect the dynamics of quantum correlations. A careful study of the non-unitary aspects of the evolution of quantum correlations leads naturally to an unambiguous definition of a collision term. This collision term is shown to obey a non-linear pre-master equation, whose derivation is fully quantum-mechanical. Moreover, it is shown that quantum correlations also yield an unitary correction to the mean field description, which could be absorbed in a suitable redefinition of the mean field. Formal expressions for these corrections are derived and their connection with memory effects exhibited explicitely. The typical time of evaluation of quantum correlations allows for an analytical expression for the 'lifetime of mean field descriptions'. Finally, a quantum mechanical point of view for 'irreversibility' in deep inelastic is discussed. (Author) [pt

  16. Game Strategies of Ship in the Collision Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Lisowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduced the basic model of process of safe ship control in a collision situation using a game model with j objects, which includes non-linear state equations and non-linear, time varying constraints of the state variables as well as the quality game control index in the forms of the game integral payment and the final payment. Approximated model of the process control as the model of multi-step matrix game in the form of dual linear programming problem has been adopted here. The Game Ship Control GSC computer program has been designed in the Matlab/Simulink software in order to determine the own ship's safe trajectory. These considerations have been illustrated with examples of a computer simulation using an GSC program for determining the safe ship's trajectory in real navigational situation. Simulation research were passed for five sets of strategies of the own ship and met ships.

  17. SU-F-BRB-05: Collision Avoidance Mapping Using Consumer 3D Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardan, R; Popple, R [Univ Alabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a fast and economical method of scanning a patient’s full body contour for use in collision avoidance mapping without the use of ionizing radiation. Methods: Two consumer level 3D cameras used in electronic gaming were placed in a CT simulator room to scan a phantom patient set up in a high collision probability position. A registration pattern and computer vision algorithms were used to transform the scan into the appropriate coordinate systems. The cameras were then used to scan the surface of a gantry in the treatment vault. Each scan was converted into a polygon mesh for collision testing in a general purpose polygon interference algorithm. All clinically relevant transforms were applied to the gantry and patient support to create a map of all possible collisions. The map was then tested for accuracy by physically testing the collisions with the phantom in the vault. Results: The scanning fidelity of both the gantry and patient was sufficient to produce a collision prediction accuracy of 97.1% with 64620 geometry states tested in 11.5 s. The total scanning time including computation, transformation, and generation was 22.3 seconds. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate an economical system to generate collision avoidance maps. Future work includes testing the speed of the framework in real-time collision avoidance scenarios. Research partially supported by a grant from Varian Medical Systems.

  18. An electrostatic charge measurement of blowing snow particles focusing on collision frequency to the snow surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omiya, S.; Sato, A.

    2010-12-01

    Blowing snow particles are known to have an electrostatic charge. This charge may be a contributing factor in the formation of snow drifts and snow cornices and changing of the trajectory of blowing snow particles. These formations and phenomena can cause natural disaster such as an avalanche and a visibility deterioration, and obstruct transportation during winter season. Therefore, charging phenomenon of the blowing snow particles is an important issue in terms of not only precise understanding of the particle motion but disaster prevention. The primary factor of charge accumulation to the blowing snow particles is thought to be due to “saltation” of them. The “saltation” is one of movement forms of blowing snow: when the snow particles are transported by the wind, they repeat frictional collisions with the snow surface. In previous studies, charge-to-mass ratios measured in the field were approximately -50 to -10 μC/kg, and in the wind tunnel were approximately -0.8 to -0.1 μC/kg. While there were qualitatively consistent in sign, negative, there were huge gaps quantitatively between them. One reason of those gaps is speculated to be due to differences in fetch. In other words, the difference of the collision frequency of snow particles to the snow surface has caused the gaps. But it is merely a suggestion and that has not been confirmed. The purpose of this experiment is to measure the charge of blowing snow particles focusing on the collision frequency and clarify the relationship between them. Experiments were carried out in the cryogenic wind tunnel of Snow and Ice Research Center (NIED, JAPAN). A Faraday cage and an electrometer were used to measure the charge of snow particles. These experiments were conducted over the hard snow surface condition to prevent the erosion of the snow surface and the generation of new snow particles from the surface. The collision frequency of particle was controlled by changing the wind velocity (4.5 to 7 m/s) under

  19. NASA Lewis Launch Collision Probability Model Developed and Analyzed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D

    1999-01-01

    There are nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the earth. These objects encompass manned objects, active and decommissioned satellites, spent rocket bodies, and debris. They range from a few centimeters across to the size of the MIR space station. Anytime a new satellite is launched, the launch vehicle with its payload attached passes through an area of space in which these objects orbit. Although the population density of these objects is low, there always is a small but finite probability of collision between the launch vehicle and one or more of these space objects. Even though the probability of collision is very low, for some payloads even this small risk is unacceptable. To mitigate the small risk of collision associated with launching at an arbitrary time within the daily launch window, NASA performs a prelaunch mission assurance Collision Avoidance Analysis (or COLA). For the COLA of the Cassini spacecraft, the NASA Lewis Research Center conducted an in-house development and analysis of a model for launch collision probability. The model allows a minimum clearance criteria to be used with the COLA analysis to ensure an acceptably low probability of collision. If, for any given liftoff time, the nominal launch vehicle trajectory would pass a space object with less than the minimum required clearance, launch would not be attempted at that time. The model assumes that the nominal positions of the orbiting objects and of the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time, and therefore, that any tracked object that comes within close proximity of the launch vehicle can be identified. For any such pair, these nominal positions can be used to calculate a nominal miss distance. The actual miss distances may differ substantially from the nominal miss distance, due, in part, to the statistical uncertainty of the knowledge of the objects positions. The model further assumes that these position uncertainties can be described with position covariance matrices

  20. Systematic study of low-mass electron pair production in p-Be and p-Au collisions at 450 GeV/c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agakichiev, G; Appenheimer, M; Averbeck, R; Ballester, F; Baur, R; Brenschede, A; Diaz, J; Drees, A; Faschingbauer, U; Ferrero, JL; Fraenkel, Z; Franke, M; Fuchs, C; Gatti, E; Glassel, P; Gunzel, T; de los Heros, CP; Hess, F; Holzmann, R; Iourevitch, [No Value; Irmscher, D; Jacob, C; Kuhn, W; Lenkeit, B; Löhner, H.; Marin, A; Marques, FM; Martinez, G; Metag, [No Value; Notheisen, M; Novotny, R; Olsen, LH; Ostendorf, R; Panebrattsev, Y; Pfeiffer, A; Ravinovich, [No Value; Rehak, P; Sampietro, M; Schon, A; Schukraft, J; Schutz, Y; Shimansky, S; Shor, A; Simon, RS; Specht, HJ; Steiner, [No Value; Tapprogge, S; Tel-Zur, G; Tserruya, [No Value; Ullrich, T; Wilschut, H.; Wurm, JP

    In a joint effort the CERES/NA45 and TAPS collaborations have measured low-mass electron pairs in p-Be and p-Au collisions at 450 GeV/c at the CERN SPS. In the range covered up to approximate to 1.5 GeV/c(2) the mass spectra from p-Be and p-Au collisions are well explained by electron pairs from

  1. Modeling defect production in high energy collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.; Singh, B.N.

    1993-01-01

    A multi-model approach roach (MMA) to simulating defect production processes at the atomic scale is described that incorporates molecular dynamics (MD), binary collision approximation (BCA) calculations and stochastic annealing simulations. The central hypothesis of the MMA is that the simple, fast computer codes capable of simulating large numbers of high energy cascades (e.g., BCA codes) can be made to yield the correct defect configurations when their parameters are calibrated using the results of the more physically realistic MD simulations. The calibration procedure is investigated using results of MD simulations of 25 keV cascades in copper. The configurations of point defects are extracted from the MD cascade simulations at the end of the collisional phase, similar to the information obtained with a binary collision model. The MD collisional phase defect configurations are used as input to the ALSOME annealing simulation code, and values of the ALSOME quenching parameters are determined that yield the best fit to the post-quenching defect configurations of the MD simulations

  2. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine [Institute of Nuclear Theory, University of Washington,Seattle, WA 98195-1550 (United States); Tywoniuk, Konrad [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2017-04-21

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the “soft drop declustering” procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  3. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine

    2017-04-21

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the "soft drop declustering" procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  4. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2017-04-01

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the "soft drop declustering" procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  5. Groomed jets in heavy-ion collisions: sensitivity to medium-induced bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehtar-Tani, Yacine; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    We argue that contemporary jet substructure techniques might facilitate a more direct measurement of hard medium-induced gluon bremsstrahlung in heavy-ion collisions, and focus specifically on the “soft drop declustering” procedure that singles out the two leading jet substructures. Assuming coherent jet energy loss, we find an enhancement of the distribution of the energy fractions shared by the two substructures at small subjet energy caused by hard medium-induced gluon radiation. Departures from this approximation are discussed, in particular, the effects of colour decoherence and the contamination of the grooming procedure by soft background. Finally, we propose a complementary observable, that is the ratio of the two-pronged probability in Pb-Pb to proton-proton collisions and discuss its sensitivity to various energy loss mechanisms.

  6. The modified connection formulae for the rotational transition cross sections in diatomic molecules for slow collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrovsky, V.N.; Ustimov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The formulae connecting the cross sections for various rotational transitions in diatomic molecules colliding with atomic particles are valid in the framework of the sudden approximation. In order to extend the applicability domain of these formulae to the slow-collision region a semi-empirical correction factor is introduced with an exponential dependence on the translation rotation energy transfer and on the inverse collision velocity. The modified connection formulae are applied to the rotational transitions in an HD molecule colliding with an H 2 molecule. (author)

  7. Computer simulations of atomic collisions in solids with special emphasis on sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    Computer simulations of atomic collisions in solids are traditionally divided into fully interacting or molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the one side and simulations based on the binary collision approximation (BCA) on the other. The historical development of both branches is followed and other dichotomies viz. between static and dynamic target models and between models using crystalline and amorphous targets are introduced. The influence of the main input parameters, viz. interatomic potentials, surface- and bulk-binding energies and inelasticity is discussed before selected results are treated. Here, results for non-linear effects, clusters, fluctuations and for angular distributions are presented. The review is concluded with a discussion of the influence of computer developments on future simulations. With 392 refs

  8. No-recoil approximation to the knock-on exchange potential in the double folding model for heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagino, K.; Takehi, T.; Takigawa, N.

    2006-01-01

    We propose the no-recoil approximation, which is valid for heavy systems, for a double folding nucleus-nucleus potential. With this approximation, the nonlocal knock-on exchange contribution becomes a local form. We discuss the applicability of this approximation for elastic scattering of the 6 Li + 40 Ca system. We find that, for this and heavier systems , the no-recoil approximation works as good as another widely used local approximation that employs a local plane wave for the relative motion between the colliding nuclei. We also compare the results of the no-recoil calculations with those of the zero-range approximation often used to handle the knock-on exchange effect

  9. Heavy quark physics in ep collisions at LEP+LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.; Barreiro, F.; Troconiz, J.F. de; Schuler, G.A.; Bij, J.J. van der

    1990-12-01

    We study electroweak production of heavy quarks - charm, beauty, and top - in deep inelastic electron-proton collisions at the proposed LEP+LHC collider at CERN. The assumed energy for the collisions is E e =50 GeV, E p =8000 GeV, providing an ep center of mass energy, √s≅1.26 TeV. We invoke the boson-gluon fusion model to estimate theoretical cross sections and distributions for the heavy quarks. Higher order QCD corrections are only approximately taken into account, by assuming a (normalization) K-factor of 2 for the charm and beauty quark production rates and incorporating the parton shower cascades. With these assumptions and the parameterization of Eichten et al. for the structure functions (EHLQ, set 1), we find the following cross sections: σ(ep→c+X)≅O(3 μb), σ(ep→b+X)≅O(40 nb), and σ(ep→t+X)≅4 pb for m t =120 GeV, decreasing to 0.5 pb for m t =250 GeV. These cross sections would provide O(6x10 9 ) charmed hadrons, O(8x10 7 ) beauty hadrons, and O(10 3 ) top hadrons, for an integrated ep luminosity of 1000 pb -1 . The heavy quark rates in ep collisions are considerably smaller than the corresponding rates in pp collisions at LHC, with √s=16 TeV. This gives a clear advantage to pp collisions for top searches. However, for the charmed and beauty quarks only a tiny fraction of the cross sections in p+p→Q+X can be triggered in comparison to the corresponding cross sections in e+p→Q+X, resulting in comparable number of measured heavy quark events in the ep and pp mode. We sketch the energy-momentum profile of heavy quark events in ep collisions and illustrate the kind of analyses that experiments at the LEP+LHC collider would undertake to quantitatively study heavy quark physics. In particular, prospects of measuring the particle-antiparticle mixing parameter x s =ΔM/Γ for the B s 0 -anti B s 0 meson system are evaluated, and search strategies for the top quark in ep collisions are presented. (orig.)

  10. Jets and Jet-like Correlations in Heavy Ion and p+p Collisions at PHENIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Jets from heavy ion collisions provide a measurement of the medium-induced parton energy loss and the in-medium fragmentation properties. The medium modification effects are determined by comparing to a p+p baseline measurement, but the high multiplicity background in a heavy ion collision inhibits the direct application of traditional jet reconstruction techniques and novel approaches are needed to deal with this environment. Alternatively, angular correlations between the hadronic fragments of energetic partons can be used to understand the hot dense matter produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. The yield and shape modifications of the away side peaks as function of transverse momentum compared to p+p has been interpreted as a medium response to parton energy loss. Direct photon-hadron correlations are another excellent channel to study jets from heavy ion collisions. Photons do not interact strongly with the medium and thus the photon approximately balances the momentum of the opposing jet, allowing the measurement of the effective modification to the fragmentation function through jet energy loss in the medium.

  11. Radiative-emission analysis in charge-exchange collisions of O6 + with argon, water, and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2017-04-01

    Processes of electron capture followed by Auger and radiative decay were investigated in slow ion-atom and -molecule collisions. A quantum-mechanical analysis which utilizes the basis generator method within an independent electron model was carried out for collisions of O 6 + with Ar, H2O , and CH4 at impact energies of 1.17 and 2.33 keV/amu. At these impact energies, a closure approximation in the spectral representation of the Hamiltonian for molecules was found to be necessary to yield reliable results. Total single-, double-, and triple-electron-capture cross sections obtained show good agreement with previous measurements and calculations using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The corresponding emission spectra from single capture for each collision system are in satisfactory agreement with previous calculations.

  12. Collision Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Servis, D.P.; Zhang, Shengming

    1999-01-01

    The first section of the present report describes the procedures that are being programmed at DTU for evaluation of the external collision dynamics. Then follows a detailed description of a comprehensive finite element analysis of one collision scenario for MS Dextra carried out at NTUA. The last...

  13. Space Object Collision Probability via Monte Carlo on the Graphics Processing Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittaldev, Vivek; Russell, Ryan P.

    2017-09-01

    Fast and accurate collision probability computations are essential for protecting space assets. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is the most accurate but computationally intensive method. A Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) is used to parallelize the computation and reduce the overall runtime. Using MC techniques to compute the collision probability is common in literature as the benchmark. An optimized implementation on the GPU, however, is a challenging problem and is the main focus of the current work. The MC simulation takes samples from the uncertainty distributions of the Resident Space Objects (RSOs) at any time during a time window of interest and outputs the separations at closest approach. Therefore, any uncertainty propagation method may be used and the collision probability is automatically computed as a function of RSO collision radii. Integration using a fixed time step and a quartic interpolation after every Runge Kutta step ensures that no close approaches are missed. Two orders of magnitude speedups over a serial CPU implementation are shown, and speedups improve moderately with higher fidelity dynamics. The tool makes the MC approach tractable on a single workstation, and can be used as a final product, or for verifying surrogate and analytical collision probability methods.

  14. Fast computation of vanilla prices in time-changed models and implied volatilities using rational approximations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pistorius, M.; Stolte, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new numerical method to price vanilla options quickly in time-changed Brownian motion models. The method is based on rational function approximations of the Black-Scholes formula. Detailed numerical results are given for a number of widely used models. In particular, we use the

  15. Hard photons a probe of the heavy ion collision dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Heavy-ion collisions have proven to be a unique tool to study the nucleus in extreme states, with values of energy, spin and isospin far away from those encountered in the nucleus in its ground state. Heavy-ion collisions provide also the only mean to form and study in the laboratory nuclear matter under conditions of density and temperature which could otherwise only be found in stellar objects like neutron stars and super-novae. the goal of such studies is to establish the equation of state of nuclear matter and the method consist in searching the collective behaviour in which heavy-ion collisions differ from a superposition of many nucleon-nucleon collisions. Among the various probes of collective effects, like flow, multifragmentation, or subthreshold particles, we have selected hard photons because they provide, together with dileptons, the only unperturbed probe of a phase of the collision well localized in space and time. The origin of hard photons, defined as the photons building up the spectrum beyond the energy of the giant dipole resonance (E γ > 30∼MeV), is attributed predominantly to the bremsstrahlung radiation emitted incoherently in individual neutron-proton collisions. Their energy reflects the combination of the beam momentum and the momenta induced by the Fermi motion of the nucleons within the collision zone. Therefore, at intermediate energies, hard photons probe the dynamical phase space distribution of participant nucleons and they convey information on the densities reached in heavy-ion collisions, the size and life time of the dense photon source and the compressibility of nuclear matter. The techniques we have developed include intensity interferometry and exclusive measurements scanning with high resolution the whole range of impact parameters. The interpretation of our data is guided by dynamical phase space calculations of the BUU type

  16. The form of electron-atom excitation amplitudes at high momentum transfers in the Faddeev-Watson approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalan, G.; Roberts, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    A form of the off-shell Coulomb T matrix, which has a well defined on-shell limit, is used in the Faddeev-Watson multiple-scattering expansion for a direct three-body collision process. Using the excitation of atomic hydrogen by electron impact as an example, approximations to the second-order terms, which are valid for high momentum transfers of the incident electron, are derived. It is shown how the resulting asymptotic behaviour of the second-order Faddeev-Watson approximation is related to the high momentum transfer limit of the second Born approximation. The results are generalised to the excitation of more complex atoms. The asymptotic forms of the Faddeev-Watson and Born approximations are compared with other theories and with measurements of differential cross sections and angular correlation parameters for the excitation of H(2p) and He(2 1 P). The results indicate that the Faddeev-Watson approximation converges more rapidly at high momentum transfers than does the Born approximation. (author)

  17. Threshold collision-induced dissociation of diatomic molecules: a case study of the energetics and dynamics of O2- collisions with Ar and Xe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahu Akin, F; Ree, Jongbaik; Ervin, Kent M; Kyu Shin, Hyung

    2005-08-08

    The energetics and dynamics of collision-induced dissociation of O2- with Ar and Xe targets are studied experimentally using guided ion-beam tandem mass spectrometry. The cross sections and the collision dynamics are modeled theoretically by classical trajectory calculations. Experimental apparent threshold energies are 2.1 and 1.1 eV in excess of the thermochemical O2- bond dissociation energy for argon and xenon, respectively. Classical trajectory calculations confirm the observed threshold behavior and the dependence of cross sections on the relative kinetic energy. Representative trajectories reveal that the bond dissociation takes place on a short time scale of about 50 fs in strong direct collisions. Collision-induced dissociation is found to be remarkably restricted to the perpendicular approach of ArXe to the molecular axis of O2-, while collinear collisions do not result in dissociation. The higher collisional energy-transfer efficiency of xenon compared with argon is attributed to both mass and polarizability effects.

  18. Threshold collision-induced dissociation of diatomic molecules: A case study of the energetics and dynamics of O2- collisions with Ar and Xe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahu Akin, F.; Ree, Jongbaik; Ervin, Kent M.; Hyung, Kyu Shin

    2005-01-01

    The energetics and dynamics of collision-induced dissociation of O 2 - with Ar and Xe targets are studied experimentally using guided ion-beam tandem mass spectrometry. The cross sections and the collision dynamics are modeled theoretically by classical trajectory calculations. Experimental apparent threshold energies are 2.1 and 1.1 eV in excess of the thermochemical O 2 - bond dissociation energy for argon and xenon, respectively. Classical trajectory calculations confirm the observed threshold behavior and the dependence of cross sections on the relative kinetic energy. Representative trajectories reveal that the bond dissociation takes place on a short time scale of about 50 fs in strong direct collisions. Collision-induced dissociation is found to be remarkably restricted to the perpendicular approach of Ar/Xe to the molecular axis of O 2 - , while collinear collisions do not result in dissociation. The higher collisional energy-transfer efficiency of xenon compared with argon is attributed to both mass and polarizability effects

  19. Numerical solution of the ekpyrotic scenario in the moduli space approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, Torquil MacDonald

    2005-01-01

    A numerical solution to the equations of motion for the ekpyrotic bulk brane scenario in the moduli space approximation is presented. The visible universe brane has positive tension, and we use a potential that goes to zero exponentially at large distance, and also goes to zero at small distance. In the case considered, no bulk brane, visible brane collision occurs in the solution. This property and the general behavior of the solution is qualitatively the same when the visible brane tension is negative, and for many different parameter choices

  20. A conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann equation with anisotropic scattering and the grazing collisions limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the formulation of a conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann collision operator with anisotropic scattering cross-sections. The method is an extension of the conservative spectral method of Gamba and Tharkabhushanam [17,18], which uses the weak form of the collision operator to represent the collisional term as a weighted convolution in Fourier space. The method is tested by computing the collision operator with a suitably cut-off angular cross section and comparing the results with the solution of the Landau equation. We analytically study the convergence rate of the Fourier transformed Boltzmann collision operator in the grazing collisions limit to the Fourier transformed Landau collision operator under the assumption of some regularity and decay conditions of the solution to the Boltzmann equation. Our results show that the angular singularity which corresponds to the Rutherford scattering cross section is the critical singularity for which a grazing collision limit exists for the Boltzmann operator. Additionally, we numerically study the differences between homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation with the Rutherford scattering cross section and an artificial cross section, which give convergence to solutions of the Landau equation at different asymptotic rates. We numerically show the rate of the approximation as well as the consequences for the rate of entropy decay for homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation and Landau equation

  1. Charmed hadron production in pp collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Umananda Dev

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the production of charmed hadrons ( D+, D-, D0, D, Λc+, Λ¯c-) in pp collisions as a function of √{s}, xF, p⊥2 and p⊥ in the framework of the QGSJET model. The study of charmed hadron production characteristics in pp collision is particularly important for cosmic ray physics in the context of atmospheric prompt lepton fluxes. Here our aim is to check the reliability of the QGSJET model to be used to study the production of charmed hadrons in cosmic ray hadronic interactions with air nuclei. Charmed hadroproduction cross sections or the charmed hadron average multiplicities in pp collisions are relatively very small. The maximum production of all charmed hadrons takes place with low values of xF, p⊥2, and p⊥ within a small range for all values of √{s} under study. Charmed hadroproduction cross sections as a function of xF and p⊥2 are compared with the LEBC-EHS and LEBC-MPS experiment data for D-meson production. The agreement is quite satisfactory for smaller values of p⊥2 (⩽2 (GeV/c) 2). There is an asymmetry in charmed hadroproduction in pp collision. For all xF, asymmetry is prominent in the low value of √{s}. There is a strong preference for producing Λc+ rather than Λ¯c-baryons, while that for producing D¯ rather than D-mesons for this range of √{s}. Asymmetry increases from zero to ±1 around xF = 0.3 for all values of √{s} and for all charmed hardron groups. The patterns of asymmetric production of different charmed hadrons with xF are approximately the same as that with √{s}. We compare our calculation with the data from Fermilab experiment E781 (SELEX) for Λc-baryon production. The agreement is quite good. The asymmetry of charmed hadroproduction with p⊥ does not follow any well defined pattern.

  2. Including collisions in gyrokinetic tokamak and stellarator simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, Karla

    2012-01-01

    TEMs in a tokamak configuration. The results show that collisions reduce the growth rate of slab ITGs in cylinder geometry, whereas they do not affect ITGs in a tokamak, which are mainly curvature-driven. However it is important to note that the pitch-angle scattering operator does not conserve momentum, which is most critical in the parallel direction. Therefore, the damping found in a cylinder could be the consequence of this missing feature and not a physical result [Dimits and Cohen 1994]. Nonetheless, the results are useful to determine whether the instability is mainly being driven by a slab or toroidal ITG mode. EUTERPE also has the feature of including kinetic electrons, which made simulations of TEMs with collisions possible. The combination of collisions and kinetic electrons made the numerical calculations extremely time-consuming, since the time step had to be small enough to resolve the fast electron motion. In contrast to the ITG results, it was observed that collisions are extremely important for TEMs in a tokamak, and in some special cases, depending on whether they were mainly driven by density or temperature gradients, collisions could even suppress the mode (in agreement with [Angioni et al. 2005, Connor et al. 2006]). In the case of stellarators it was found that ITGs are highly dependent on the device configuration. For LHD it was shown that collisions slightly reduce the growth rate of the instability, but for Wendelstein 7-X they do not affect it and the growth rate showed a similar trend with collisionality to that of the tokamak case. Collisions also tend to make the ballooning structure of the modes less pronounced.

  3. Including collisions in gyrokinetic tokamak and stellarator simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffmann, Karla

    2012-04-10

    ITGs and TEMs in a tokamak configuration. The results show that collisions reduce the growth rate of slab ITGs in cylinder geometry, whereas they do not affect ITGs in a tokamak, which are mainly curvature-driven. However it is important to note that the pitch-angle scattering operator does not conserve momentum, which is most critical in the parallel direction. Therefore, the damping found in a cylinder could be the consequence of this missing feature and not a physical result [Dimits and Cohen 1994]. Nonetheless, the results are useful to determine whether the instability is mainly being driven by a slab or toroidal ITG mode. EUTERPE also has the feature of including kinetic electrons, which made simulations of TEMs with collisions possible. The combination of collisions and kinetic electrons made the numerical calculations extremely time-consuming, since the time step had to be small enough to resolve the fast electron motion. In contrast to the ITG results, it was observed that collisions are extremely important for TEMs in a tokamak, and in some special cases, depending on whether they were mainly driven by density or temperature gradients, collisions could even suppress the mode (in agreement with [Angioni et al. 2005, Connor et al. 2006]). In the case of stellarators it was found that ITGs are highly dependent on the device configuration. For LHD it was shown that collisions slightly reduce the growth rate of the instability, but for Wendelstein 7-X they do not affect it and the growth rate showed a similar trend with collisionality to that of the tokamak case. Collisions also tend to make the ballooning structure of the modes less pronounced.

  4. Spin effects in intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jun; Li Baoan; Xia Yin; Shen Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report and extend our recent work where the nucleon spin-orbit interaction and its spin degree of freedom were introduced explicitly for the first time in the isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model for heavy-ion reactions. Despite of the significant cancellation of the time-even and time-odd spin-related mean-field potentials from the spin-orbit interaction,an appreciable local spin polarization is observed in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies because of the dominating role of the time-odd terms. It is also found that the spin up-down differential transverse flow in heavy-ion collisions is a useful probe of the strength, density dependence, and isospin dependence of the in-medium spin-orbit interaction, and its magnitude is still considerable even at smaller systems. (authors)

  5. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quijada, M.; Borisov, A.G.; Muino, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Atomic collision experiments using pulsed synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arikawa, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Tsutomu.

    1982-01-01

    High intensity and continuous nature of the synchrotron radiation are the properties that are fundamentally important for studies of some atomic collision experiments, and many processes have been investigated by using these characteristics. However, so far the property that the radiation is highly polarized and pulsed in time has not been exploited significantly in atomic physics. As an example of the atomic processes relevant to such polarized and pulsed features of the synchrotron radiation, collisions involving optically-allowed excited atoms and molecules will be presented. (author)

  7. Dynamics in ion-molecule collisions at high velocities: One- and two-electron processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yudong.

    1992-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the dynamic interactions in ion-molecule collisions. Theoretical methods are developed for single and multiple electron transitions in fast collisions with diatomic molecules by heavy-ion projectiles. Various theories and models are developed to treat the three basic inelastic processes (excitation, ionization and charge transfer) involving one and more electrons. The development, incorporating the understanding of ion-atom collision theories with some unique characteristics for molecular targets, provides new insights into phenomena that are absent from collisions with atomic targets. The influence from the multiple scattering centers on collision dynamics is assessed. For diatomic molecules, effects due to a fixed molecular orientation or alignment are calculated and compared with available experimental observations. Compared with excitation and ionization, electron capture, which probes deeper into the target, presents significant two-center interference and strong orientation dependence. Attention has been given in this dissertation to exploring mechanisms for two-and multiple electron transitions. Application of independent electron approximation to transfer excitation from molecular hydrogen is studied. Electron-electron interaction originated from projectile and target nuclear centers is studied in conjunction with the molecular nature of target. Limitations of the present theories and models as well as possible new areas for future theoretical and experimental applications are also discussed. This is the first attempt to describe multi-electron processes in molecular dynamics involving fast highly charged ions

  8. Forward neutral pion production in p + p and d + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bharadwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhatia, V S; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, H A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; Dephillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Mazumdar, M R Dutta; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fornazier, K S F; Fox, B D; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamb, R; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Q J; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J N; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Reinnarth, J; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Savin, I; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zborovsky, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-10-13

    Measurements of the production of forward pi0 mesons from p + p and d + Au collisions at square root sNN=200 GeV are reported. The p + p yield generally agrees with next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations. The d + Au yield per binary collision is suppressed as eta increases, decreasing to approximately 30% of the p + p yield at eta =4.00, well below shadowing expectations. Exploratory measurements of azimuthal correlations of the forward pi0 with charged hadrons at eta approximately 0 show a recoil peak in p + p that is suppressed in d + Au at low pion energy. These observations are qualitatively consistent with a saturation picture of the low-x gluon structure of heavy nuclei.

  9. Measurement of forward-backward multiplicity correlations in lead-lead, proton-lead and proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaboud, Morad; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abraham, Nicola; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Ali, Babar; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alstaty, Mahmoud; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antel, Claire; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Armitage, Lewis James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisits, Martin-Stefan; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Andrew Stuart; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Belyaev, Nikita; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez, Jose; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Beringer, Jürg; Berlendis, Simon; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertram, Iain Alexander; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethani, Agni; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bielski, Rafal; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Billoud, Thomas Remy Victor; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bisanz, Tobias; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bokan, Petar; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Bossio Sola, Jonathan David; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Broughton, James; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burka, Klaudia; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Burr, Jonathan Thomas Peter; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Callea, Giuseppe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvente Lopez, Sergio; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Camplani, Alessandra; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Ina; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelijn, Remco; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavallaro, Emanuele; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chan, Stephen Kam-wah; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Huajie; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chomont, Arthur Rene; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Michael; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cueto, Ana; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'amen, Gabriele; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dado, Tomas; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dann, Nicholas Stuart; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Maria, Antonio; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Dehghanian, Nooshin; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Gaudio, Michela; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Clemente, William Kennedy; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudder, Andreas Christian; Duffield, Emily Marie; Duflot, Laurent; Dührssen, Michael; Dumancic, Mirta; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Federica; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farina, Edoardo Maria; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fawcett, William James; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Foster, Andrew Geoffrey; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gasnikova, Ksenia; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; Gentsos, Christos; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Ruchi; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanisch, Stefanie; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayakawa, Daiki; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Herget, Verena; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Shuyang; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishijima, Naoki; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Jivan, Harshna; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kaji, Toshiaki; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kentaro, Kawade; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khader, Mazin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kilby, Callum; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koehler, Nicolas Maximilian; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lanfermann, Marie Christine; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Benoit; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Changqiao; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Pacheco Rodriguez, Laura; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Raine, John Andrew; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Ratti, Maria Giulia; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Ravinovich, Ilia; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Reale, Marilea; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rimoldi, Marco; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Rizzi, Chiara; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosien, Nils-Arne; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryu, Soo; Ryzhov, Andrey; Rzehorz, Gerhard Ferdinand; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Savic, Natascha; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schachtner, Balthasar Maria; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Leigh; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schier, Sheena; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian Ralf; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schott, Matthias; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schulte, Alexandra; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Slovak, Radim; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smiesko, Juraj; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Son, Hyungsuk; Song, Hong Ye; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Stärz, Steffen; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tu, Yanjun; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tyndel, Mike; Ucchielli, Giulia; Ueda, Ikuo; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vasquez, Jared Gregory; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigani, Luigi; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vittori, Camilla; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Wenxiao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Michael David; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Whallon, Nikola Lazar; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilk, Fabian; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winston, Oliver James; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wolf, Tim Michael Heinz; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Worm, Steven D; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2017-06-28

    Two-particle pseudorapidity correlations are measured in $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}$ = 2.76 TeV Pb+Pb, $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm{NN}}}$ = 5.02 TeV $p$+Pb, and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13 TeV $pp$ collisions at the LHC, with total integrated luminosities of approximately 7 $\\mu\\mathrm{b}^{-1}$, 28 $\\mathrm{nb}^{-1}$, and 65 $\\mathrm{nb}^{-1}$, respectively. The correlation function $C_{\\rm N}(\\eta_1,\\eta_2)$ is measured as a function of event multiplicity using charged particles in the pseudorapidity range $|\\eta|<2.4$. The correlation function contains a significant short-range component, which is estimated and subtracted. After removal of the short-range component, the shape of the correlation function is described approximately by $1+\\langle{a_1^2}\\rangle \\eta_1\\eta_2$ in all collision systems over the full multiplicity range. The values of $\\sqrt{\\langle{a_1^2}\\rangle}$ are consistent between the opposite-charge pairs and same-charge pairs, and for the three collision systems at similar multiplicity. The values of $\\sqrt{\\langle{a_1^...

  10. Reaction mechanism in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanihata, Isao.

    1982-04-01

    The reaction mechanism in high energy heavy-ion collision is discussed. The discussion is mainly based on the experimental data. Empirical equations have been given for the total cross-sections of nucleus-nucleus reactions and the reaction cross-sections. These cross-sections are well described by the geometrical size of the colliding nuclei. The cross-sections are also understood by microscopic calculation. The charged particle multiplicity gives additional information about the geometrical aspect of heavy ion collision. The data suggested that the total energy, independent of projectile size, is most important for determining the multiplicity. The inclusive proton spectrum in a heavy ion collision showed two distinct regions. The one is the fragment region, and the other the participant region. The spectral shapes of inclusive pion spectra are reasonably well explained by the Coulomb interaction of pions with nuclear fragments. The high energy heavy ion reaction occurs in the overlap region of the projectile and target. This has been tested by measuring the number of participants for various reactions. The space and the time structure of the collision are also discussed in this paper as well as the dynamical aspects of the collision. (Kato, T.)

  11. VNI version 4.1. Simulation of high-energy particle collisions in QCD: Space-time evolution of e+e-... A + B collisions with parton-cascades, cluster-hadronization, final-state hadron cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, K.; Longacre, R.

    1999-01-01

    VNI is a general-purpose Monte-Carlo event-generator, which includes the simulation of lepton-lepton, lepton-hadron, lepton-nucleus, hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions. It uses the real-time evolution of parton cascades in conjunction with a self-consistent hadronization scheme, as well as the development of hadron cascades after hadronization. The causal evolution from a specific initial state (determined by the colliding beam particles) is followed by the time-development of the phase-space densities of partons, pre-hadronic parton clusters, and final-state hadrons, in position-space, momentum-space and color-space. The parton-evolution is described in terms of a space-time generalization of the familiar momentum-space description of multiple (semi)hard interactions in QCD, involving 2 → 2 parton collisions, 2 → 1 parton fusion processes, and 1 → 2 radiation processes. The formation of color-singlet pre-hadronic clusters and their decays into hadrons, on the other hand, is treated by using a spatial criterion motivated by confinement and a non-perturbative model for hadronization. Finally, the cascading of produced prehadronic clusters and of hadrons includes a multitude of 2 → n processes, and is modeled in parallel to the parton cascade description. This paper gives a brief review of the physics underlying VNI, as well as a detailed description of the program itself. The latter program description emphasizes easy-to-use pragmatism and explains how to use the program (including simple examples), annotates input and control parameters, and discusses output data provided by it

  12. Comparison of particle trajectories and collision operators for collisional transport in nonaxisymmetric plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreman, M., E-mail: mattland@umd.edu [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Smith, H. M.; Helander, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Mollén, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg (Sweden)

    2014-04-15

    In this work, we examine the validity of several common simplifying assumptions used in numerical neoclassical calculations for nonaxisymmetric plasmas, both by using a new continuum drift-kinetic code and by considering analytic properties of the kinetic equation. First, neoclassical phenomena are computed for the LHD and W7-X stellarators using several versions of the drift-kinetic equation, including the commonly used incompressible-E × B-drift approximation and two other variants, corresponding to different effective particle trajectories. It is found that for electric fields below roughly one third of the resonant value, the different formulations give nearly identical results, demonstrating the incompressible E × B-drift approximation is quite accurate in this regime. However, near the electric field resonance, the models yield substantially different results. We also compare results for various collision operators, including the full linearized Fokker-Planck operator. At low collisionality, the radial transport driven by radial gradients is nearly identical for the different operators; while in other cases, it is found to be important that collisions conserve momentum.

  13. Collisions involving antiprotons and antihydrogen: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsell, S.

    2018-03-01

    I give an overview of experimental and theoretical results for antiproton and antihydrogen scattering with atoms and molecules (in particular H, He). At low energies (>1 keV) there are practically no experimental data available. Instead I compare the results from different theoretical calculations, of various degrees of sophistication. At energies up to a few tens of eV, I focus on simple approximations that give reasonably accurate results, as these allow quick estimates of collision rates without embarking on a research project. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  14. Electron-impact excitation of Fe II: Effective collision strengths for optically allowed fine-structure transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsbottom, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the electron-impact excitation of Fe II. We consider specifically the optically allowed lines for transitions from the 3d 6 4s and 3d 7 even parity configuration states to the 3d 6 4p odd parity configuration levels. The parallel suite of Breit-Pauli codes are utilized to compute the collision cross-sections where relativistic effects are included explicitly in both the target and the scattering approximation. A total of 100 LS or 262-jj levels formed from the basis configurations 3d 6 4s, 3d 7 and 3d 6 4p were included in the wavefunction representation of the target, including all doublet, quartet and sextet terms. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths are computed across a wide range of electron temperatures from 100 to 100,000 K, temperatures of importance in astrophysical and plasma applications. A detailed comparison is made with previous works and significant differences were found to occur for some of the transitions considered. We conclude that in order to obtain converged collision strengths and effective collision strengths for these allowed transitions it is necessary to include contributions from partial waves up to L = 50 explicitly in the calculation, and in addition, account for contributions from even higher partial waves through a 'top up' procedure.

  15. Discussion of electron capture theories for ion-atom collisions at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, J E [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Piacentini, R D [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rivarola, R D [Rosario Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Dept. de Fisica; Salin, A [Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 - Talence (France)

    1981-03-14

    Different theories of charge exchange processes in ion-atom collisions at high energies for the H/sup +/-H system are considered. Large discrepancies are found in the differential cross sections obtained from the various models. The validity of Dettmann's peaking approximation is analysed by comparison with exact values for the first- and second-order Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers (OBK 1 and OBK 2) theories. It is also shown that for energies up to a few MeV the OBK 2 differential cross sections are higher than the corresponding OBK 1 ones. Total cross sections in the OBK 2 approximation are given.

  16. Ionization of H2O molecules through second order collisions in an argon-filled flow ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.

    1976-01-01

    In an argon-filled ionization chamber with a constant radionuclide radiation source, the ionization of H 2 O through second order collisions with 3sub(p) 2 states of argon excited by field-accelerated electrons is considered within the range of discharge caused by external potentials under atmospheric pressure. It is found that the logarithm of the change of ionization current is proportional to power 3/2 of the electric field strength. Possible formation mechanisms are discussed. Most probable is the ionization of H 2 O through collision with Ar 2 argon dimers originating from excited metastable atoms as a result of triple collision. The production cross section for H 2 O + has been estimated to be sigmasub(H 2 O) approximately 5x10 -15 . (author)

  17. Classical gluon production amplitude for nucleus-nucleus collisions:First saturation correction in the projectile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirilli, Giovanni A.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Wertepny, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the classical single-gluon production amplitude in nucleus-nucleus collisions including the first saturation correction in one of the nuclei (the projectile) while keeping multiple-rescattering (saturation) corrections to all orders in the other nucleus (the target). In our approximation only two nucleons interact in the projectile nucleus: the single-gluon production amplitude we calculate is order-g"3 and is leading-order in the atomic number of the projectile, while resumming all order-one saturation corrections in the target nucleus. Our result is the first step towards obtaining an analytic expression for the first projectile saturation correction to the gluon production cross section in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  18. Isotropization and hydrodynamization in weakly coupled heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkela, Aleksi

    2015-01-01

    We numerically solve 2+1D effective kinetic theory of weak coupling QCD under longitudinal expansion relevant for early stages of heavy-ion collisions. We find agreement with viscous hydrodynamics and classical Yang-Mills simulations in the regimes where they are applicable. By choosing initial conditions that are motivated by color-glass-condensate framework we find that for Q=2GeV and $\\alpha_s$=0.3 the system is approximately described by viscous hydrodynamics well before $\\tau \\lesssim 1.0$ fm/c.

  19. The production of collimated beams of o-Ps atoms using charge exchange in positron-gas collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laricchia, G.; Charlton, M.; Davies, S.A.; Beling, C.D.; Griffith, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    Using positron-gas collisions in a short scattering cell it is demonstrated that, at certain impact energies, approximately 4% of the scattered positrons can be detected as o-Ps atoms collimated in a 6 0 cone about the incident positron direction. (author)

  20. Laser-assisted atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, F.

    1984-01-01

    The basic layer-assisted atom-atom collision processes are reviewed in order to get a simpler picture of the main physical facts. The processes can be separated into two groups: optical collisions where only one atom is changing state during the collision, the other acting as a spectator atom, and radiative collisions where the states of the two atoms are changing during the collision. All the processes can be interpreted in terms of photoexcitation of the quasimolecule formed during the collisional process. (author)

  1. Thermalization in high energy proton-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedemann, R.S.

    1988-03-01

    A relativistic proton-nucleus collision using the intranuclear cascade model is studied. The purpose is to verify the equilibration hypothesis at fragmentation time made by many nuclear fragmentation models. (author)

  2. Topological regularizations of the triple collision singularity in the 3-vortex problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Yasuaki

    2008-01-01

    The triple collision singularity in the 3-vortex problem is studied in this paper. Under the necessary condition k 1 -1 +k 2 -1 +k 3 -1 =0 for vorticities to have the triple collision, the main results are summarized as follows: (i) For k 1 = k 2 , the triple collision singularity is topologically regularizable. (ii) For 0 1 − k 2 | < ε with a sufficiently small ε, the triple collision singularity is not topologically regularizable. First of all, in order to prove these statements, all singularities in the 3-vortex problem are classified. Then, we introduce a dynamical system by blowing up the triple collision singularity with an appropriate time scaling. Roughly speaking, it corresponds to pasting an invariant manifold at the triple collision singularity on the original phase space. This technique is well known as McGehee's collision manifold (1974 Inventions Math. 27 191–227) in the N-body problem of celestial mechanics. Finally, by adopting the viewpoint of Easton (1971 J. Diff. Eqns 10 92–9), topological regularizations of the triple collision singularity are studied in detail

  3. Hard probes in heavy ion collisions at the LHC: PDFs, shadowing and $pA$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, Alberto; Botje, M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Cole, B.; Eskola, K.J.; Fai, George I.; Frankfurt, L.; Fries, R.J.; Geist, Walter M.; Guzey, V.; Honkanen, H.; Kolhinen, V.J.; Kovchegov, Yu.V.; McDermott, M.; Morsch, A.; Qiu, Jian-wei; Salgado, C.A.; Strikman, M.; Takai, H.; Tapprogge, S.; Vogt, R.; Zhang, X.f.

    2003-01-01

    This manuscript is the outcome of the subgroup ``PDFs, shadowing and $pA$ collisions'' from the CERN workshop ``Hard Probes in Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC''. In addition to the experimental parameters for $pA$ collisions at the LHC, the issues discussed are factorization in nuclear collisions, nuclear parton distributions (nPDFs), hard probes as the benchmark tests of factorization in $pA$ collisions at the LHC, and semi-hard probes as observables with potentially large nuclear effects. Also, novel QCD phenomena in $pA$ collisions at the LHC are considered. The importance of the $pA$ program at the LHC is emphasized.

  4. Cern collisions light up Copenhagen

    CERN Multimedia

    Banks, Michael

    2010-01-01

    "Anyone passing by the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, might be startled by some strange moving lights on the facade of the institute's main building. In fact, the dancing beams show, almost in real time, collisions form the Atlas experiment at Cern's Large Hadron Collider (LHC)" (1 paragraph)

  5. Coupled-channels calculations of excitation and ionization in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martir, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    A numerical method has been used to compute excitation and ionization cross sections for ion-atom collisions. The projectile is treated classically and follows a straight line, constant velocity path (unless indicated otherwise). The wave function that describes the atom is expanded about the target in a truncated Hilbert space. The interaction between the projectile and the target atom is treated as a time dependent perturbation. A unitary time development operator, U, propagates the wave function from a time prior to the collision to a time after the collision in small time steps. Contrary to first-order theories, coupling between states is allowed. This method has been improved so that any number of partial waves can be included in the wave function expansion. This method has been applied to study negatively charged projectiles. Cross sections are obtained for collisions of antiprotons on atomic hydrogen (30 keV to 372 keV) and compared with cross sections of protons on atomic hydrogen to explore the Z/sub P/ dependence. The antiproton-hydrogen results were converted into electron-hydrogen values with E/sub e/ = E/sub P/(m/sub e//m/sub P/) (15 eV to 200 eV) and compared to experimental values. The method is then applied to study vacancy production from the L-shell. The partial wave convergence of the cross sections was carefully studied for s through g waves. Collisions between protons (and alpha-particles) and argon are studied to explore the Z/sub P/ dependence of the cross sections. The cross section ratio sigma(α)/(4sigma(p)) is compared to experiment

  6. An accurate nonlinear Monte Carlo collision operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.X.; Okamoto, M.; Nakajima, N.; Murakami, S.

    1995-03-01

    A three dimensional nonlinear Monte Carlo collision model is developed based on Coulomb binary collisions with the emphasis both on the accuracy and implementation efficiency. The operator of simple form fulfills particle number, momentum and energy conservation laws, and is equivalent to exact Fokker-Planck operator by correctly reproducing the friction coefficient and diffusion tensor, in addition, can effectively assure small-angle collisions with a binary scattering angle distributed in a limited range near zero. Two highly vectorizable algorithms are designed for its fast implementation. Various test simulations regarding relaxation processes, electrical conductivity, etc. are carried out in velocity space. The test results, which is in good agreement with theory, and timing results on vector computers show that it is practically applicable. The operator may be used for accurately simulating collisional transport problems in magnetized and unmagnetized plasmas. (author)

  7. Extracting $p\\Lambda$ scattering lengths from heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Shapoval, V M; Lednicky, R; Sinyukov, Yu M

    2015-01-01

    The $p-\\Lambda \\oplus \\bar{p}-\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\bar{p}-\\Lambda \\oplus p-\\bar{\\Lambda}$ correlation functions for 10% most central Au+Au collisions at top RHIC energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV are modeled with Lednicky and Lyuboshitz analytical formula using the source radii extracted from the hydrokinetic model (HKM) simulations. For the baryon-antibaryon case the corresponding spin-averaged strong interaction scattering length is obtained by fitting the STAR correlation function. In contrast to the experimental results, where extracted $p\\bar{\\Lambda}$ source radius value was found $\\sim 2$ times smaller than the corresponding $p\\Lambda$ one, the calculations in HKM show both $p\\Lambda$ and $p\\bar{\\Lambda}$ effective source radii to be quite close, as expected from theoretical considerations. To obtain the satisfactory fit to the measured baryon-antibaryon correlation function at this large source radius value, the modified analytical approximation to the correlation function, effectively accounting for the...

  8. Fast collision resolution for real time services in SDMA based wireless ATM networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vornefeld, U.; Schieimer, D.; Walke, B.

    1999-01-01

    protocol, the influence of SDMA on a contention based access protocol is investigated under collision resolution schemes derived from classical splitting algorithms. Although this work is embedded in the framework of wireless ATM and HIPERLAN/2 systems, the ideas are generally applicable....

  9. Measurement of forward-backward multiplicity correlations in lead-lead, proton-lead, and proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. 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V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Dell' Acqua, A.; Dell' Asta, L.; Dell' Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. 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C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Savic, N.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schachtner, B. M.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, L.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schier, S.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K. R.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schott, M.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schulte, A.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sickles, A. M.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Slovak, R.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smiesko, J.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Son, H.; Song, H. Y.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stärz, S.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C. -L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tyndel, M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-06-28

    Two-particle pseudorapidity correlations are measured in √sNN = 2.76TeV Pb + Pb, √sNN = 5.02TeV p + Pb, and √s = 13 TeV pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), with total integrated luminosities of approximately 7μb–1, 28 nb–1, and 65 nb–1, respectively. The correlation function CN12) is measured as a function of event multiplicity using charged particles in the pseudorapidity range |η| < 2.4. The correlation function contains a significant short-range component, which is estimated and subtracted. After removal of the short-range component, the shape of the correlation function is described approximately by 1 + < a21 > 1/2η1η2 in all collision systems over the full multiplicity range. The values of < a21 >1/2 are consistent for the opposite-charge pairs and same-charge pairs, and for the three collision systems at similar multiplicity. The values of < a21 >1/2 and the magnitude of the short-range component both follow a power-law dependence on the event multiplicity. Here, the short-range component in p + Pb collisions, after symmetrizing the proton and lead directions, is found to be smaller at a given η than in pp collisions with comparable multiplicity.

  10. Forward electron production in heavy ion-atom and ion-solid collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    A sharp cusp in the velocity spectrum of electrons, ejected in ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is observed when the ejected electron velocity vector v/sub e/ matches that of the emergent ion vector v/sub p/ in both speed and direction. In ion-atom collisions, the electrons originate from capture to low-lying, projectile-centered continuum states (ECC) for fast bare or nearly bare projectiles, and from loss to those low-lying continuum states (ELC) when loosely bound projectile electrons are available. Most investigators now agree that ECC cusps are strongly skewed toward lower velocities, and exhibit full widths half maxima roughly proportional to v/sub p/ (neglecting target-shell effects, which are sometimes strong). A close examination of recent ELC data shows that ELC cusps are instead nearly symmetric, with widths nearly independent on v/sub p/ in the velocity range 6 to 18 a.u., a result only recently predicted by theory. Convoy electron cusps produced in heavy ion-solid collisions at MeV/u energies exhibit approximately velocity-independent widths very similar to ELC cusp widths. While the shape of the convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, velocity, and of target material, it is found that the yields in polycrystalline targets exhibit a strong dependence on projectile Z and velocity. While attempts have been made to link convoy electron production to binary ECC or ELC processes, sometimes at the last layer, or alternatively to a solid-state wake-riding model, our measured dependences of cusp shape and yield on projectile charge state and energy are inconsistent with the predictions of available theories. 10 references, 8 figures, 1 table

  11. Bubble Collision in Curved Spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han

    2014-01-01

    We study vacuum bubble collisions in curved spacetime, in which vacuum bubbles were nucleated in the initial metastable vacuum state by quantum tunneling. The bubbles materialize randomly at different times and then start to grow. It is known that the percolation by true vacuum bubbles is not possible due to the exponential expansion of the space among the bubbles. In this paper, we consider two bubbles of the same size with a preferred axis and assume that two bubbles form very near each other to collide. The two bubbles have the same field value. When the bubbles collide, the collided region oscillates back-and-forth and then the collided region eventually decays and disappears. We discuss radiation and gravitational wave resulting from the collision of two bubbles

  12. Nonrelativistic theory of heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, G.

    1984-01-01

    A wide range of phenomena is observed in heavy-ion collisions, calling for a comprehensive theory based on fundamental principles of many-particle quantum mechanics. At low energies, the nuclear dynamics is controlled by the mean field, as we know from spectroscopic nuclear physics. We therefore expect the comprehensive theory of collisions to contain mean-field theory at low energies. The mean-field theory is the subject of the first lectures in this chapter. This theory can be studied quantum mechanically, in which form it is called TDHF (time-dependent Hartree-Fock), or classically, where the equation is called the Vlasov equation. 25 references, 14 figures

  13. Properties of atomic pairs produced in the collision of Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziń, Paweł; Wasak, Tomasz

    2018-04-01

    During a collision of Bose-Einstein condensates correlated pairs of atoms are emitted. The scattered massive particles, in analogy to photon pairs in quantum optics, might be used in the violation of Bell's inequalities, demonstration of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations, or sub-shot-noise atomic interferometry. Usually, a theoretical description of the collision relies either on stochastic numerical methods or on analytical treatments involving various approximations. Here, we investigate elastic scattering of atoms from colliding elongated Bose-Einstein condensates within the Bogoliubov method, carefully controlling performed approximations at every stage of the analysis. We derive expressions for the one- and two-particle correlation functions. The obtained formulas, which relate the correlation functions to the condensate wave function, are convenient for numerical calculations. We employ the variational approach for condensate wave functions to obtain analytical expressions for the correlation functions, whose properties we analyze in detail. We also present a useful semiclassical model of the process and compare its results with the quantum one. The results are relevant for recent experiments with excited helium atoms, as well as for planned experiments aimed at investigating the nonclassicality of the system.

  14. Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, K. H.; Adams, N.; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Allgower, C.; Amsbaugh, J.; Anderson, M.; Anderssen, E.; Arnesen, H.; Arnold, L.; Averichev, G. S.; Baldwin, A.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Beddo, M.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Berger, J.; Betts, W.; Bichsel, H.; Bieser, F.; Bland, L. C.; Bloomer, M.; Blyth, C. O.; Boehm, J.; Bonner, B. E.; Bonnet, D.; Bossingham, R.; Botlo, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouillo, N.; Bouvier, S.; Bradley, K.; Brady, F. P.; Braithwaite, E. S.; Braithwaite, W.; Brandin, A.; Brown, R. L.; Brugalette, G.; Byrd, C.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carr, L.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Caylor, B.; Cebra, D.; Chatopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, W.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Chrin, J.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Conin, L.; Consiglio, C.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Danilov, V. I.; Dayton, D.; Demello, M.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, H.; Deyoung, P. A.; Didenko, L.; Dimassimo, D.; Dioguardi, J.; Dominik, W.; Drancourt, C.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Eggert, T.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Etkin, A.; Fachini, P.; Feliciano, C.; Ferenc, D.; Ferguson, M. I.; Fessler, H.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Flores, I.; Foley, K. J.; Fritz, D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gojak, C.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grau, M.; Greiner, D.; Greiner, L.; Grigoriev, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gross, J.; Guilloux, G.; Gushin, E.; Hall, J.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harper, G.; Harris, J. W.; He, P.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hill, D.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Howe, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Hunt, W.; Hunter, J.; Igo, G. J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jacobson, S.; Jared, R.; Jensen, P.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kenney, V. P.; Khodinov, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Koehler, G.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kormilitsyne, V.; Kotchenda, L.; Kotov, I.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krupien, T.; Kuczewski, P.; Kuhn, C.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamas-Valverde, J.; Lamont, M. A.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lecompte, T.; Leonhardt, W. J.; Leontiev, V. M.; Leszczynski, P.; Levine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Z.; Liaw, C.-J.; Lin, J.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Locurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Lopiano, D.; Love, W. A.; Lutz, J. R.; Lynn, D.; Madansky, L.; Maier, R.; Majka, R.; Maliszewski, A.; Margetis, S.; Marks, K.; Marstaller, R.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; Matyushevski, E. A.; McParland, C.; McShane, T. S.; Meier, J.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Middlekamp, P.; Mikhalin, N.; Miller, B.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Minor, B.; Mitchell, J.; Mogavero, E.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moltz, D.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; Morse, R.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mutchler, G. S.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Ngo, T.; Nguyen, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Noggle, T.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Nussbaum, T.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Olchanski, K.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Ososkov, G. A.; Ott, G.; Padrazo, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Pentia, M.; Perevotchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pinganaud, W.; Pirogov, S.; Platner, E.; Pluta, J.; Polk, I.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Puskar-Pasewicz, J.; Rai, G.; Rasson, J.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J.; Renfordt, R. E.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Riso, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Roehrich, D.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Russ, D.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sanchez, R.; Sandler, Z.; Sandweiss, J.; Sappenfield, P.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Scheblien, J.; Scheetz, R.; Schlueter, R.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schulz, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Sedlmeir, J.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, J.; Seyboth, P.; Seymour, R.; Shakaliev, E. I.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shi, Y.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shuman, D.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L. P.; Snellings, R.; Solberg, K.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Stone, N.; Stone, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Stroebele, H.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Symons, T. J.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarchini, A.; Tarzian, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Tikhomirov, V.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tonse, S.; Trainor, T.; Trentalange, S.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Turner, K.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Vakula, I.; van Buren, G.; Vandermolen, A. M.; Vanyashin, A.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Visser, G.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vu, C.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Weerasundara, D.; Weidenbach, R.; Wells, R.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitfield, J. P.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wilson, K.; Wirth, J.; Wisdom, J.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wolf, J.; Wood, L.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yokosawa, A.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhu, J.; Zimmerman, D.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.

    2001-01-01

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  15. Comparing Collision Avoidance Systems of Different Type of Transportation Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan ÖZDEMİR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Different modes of transportation are often used in our daily lives. Therefore, how safe these modes are commonly researched by researchers. Many models and methods are developed to avoid collision with the development of technology. This development is aimed to improving the safety of life and property. The technological developments also aim to reduce the minimum level of the human error. Technological devices developed to prevent collision are applied in systematic way according to type of transportation mode. When comparatively examined, it is similar to each other technology used in different modes. In this respect, proposed model and methods are similar in general. These approaches are generally based on position of vehicles relative to each other and also rules have been developed taking into consideration the possibilities that may occur. Real-time sensors used to avoid collision in vehicles reduce risk of collision and provide significant achievements on behalf of avoiding collision. Besides this, it has been considered important a communication network between vehicles. As a result, the importance of the technological devices developed to ensure collision avoidance is increasing in our life. Thus, the study aims to explain and compare the methods, models and techniques used in the different transportation modes so as to avoid collision.

  16. Internal differential collision attacks on the reduced-round Grøstl-0 hash function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ideguchi, Kota; Tischhauser, Elmar Wolfgang; Preneel, Bart

    2014-01-01

    . This results in collision attacks and semi-free-start collision attacks on the Grøstl-0 hash function and compression function with reduced rounds. Specifically, we show collision attacks on the Grøstl-0-256 hash function reduced to 5 and 6 out of 10 rounds with time complexities 248 and 2112 and on the Grøstl......-0-512 hash function reduced to 6 out of 14 rounds with time complexity 2183. Furthermore, we demonstrate semi-free-start collision attacks on the Grøstl-0-256 compression function reduced to 8 rounds and the Grøstl-0-512 compression function reduced to 9 rounds. Finally, we show improved...

  17. Toward prethreshold gate-based quantum simulation of chemical dynamics: using potential energy surfaces to simulate few-channel molecular collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornborger, Andrew T.; Stancil, Phillip; Geller, Michael R.

    2018-05-01

    One of the most promising applications of an error-corrected universal quantum computer is the efficient simulation of complex quantum systems such as large molecular systems. In this application, one is interested in both the electronic structure such as the ground state energy and dynamical properties such as the scattering cross section and chemical reaction rates. However, most theoretical work and experimental demonstrations have focused on the quantum computation of energies and energy surfaces. In this work, we attempt to make the prethreshold (not error-corrected) quantum simulation of dynamical properties practical as well. We show that the use of precomputed potential energy surfaces and couplings enables the gate-based simulation of few-channel but otherwise realistic molecular collisions. Our approach is based on the widely used Born-Oppenheimer approximation for the structure problem coupled with a semiclassical method for the dynamics. In the latter the electrons are treated quantum mechanically but the nuclei are classical, which restricts the collisions to high energy or temperature (typically above ≈ 10 eV). By using operator splitting techniques optimized for the resulting time-dependent Hamiltonian simulation problem, we give several physically realistic collision examples, with 3-8 channels and circuit depths < 1000.

  18. Three-dimensional computer simulation at vehicle collision using dynamic model. Application to various collision types; Rikigaku model ni yoru jidosha shototsuji no sanjigen kyodo simulation. Shushu no shototsu keitai eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M; Morisawa, M [Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, T [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, K [Molex-Japan Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The past study of safety at vehicle collision pays attention to phenomena within the short time from starting collision, and the behavior of rollover is studied separating from that at collision. Most simulations of traffic accident are two-dimensional simulations. Therefore, it is indispensable for vehicle design to the analyze three-dimensional and continuous behavior from crash till stopping. Accordingly, in this study, the three-dimensional behavior of two vehicles at collision was simulated by computer using dynamic models. Then, by comparison of the calculated results with real vehicles` collision test data, it was confirmed that dynamic model of this study was reliable. 10 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Research on the FDTD method of scattering effects of obliquely incident electromagnetic waves in time-varying plasma sheath on collision and plasma frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Guo, Li-xin; Li, Jiang-ting

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzes the scattering characteristics of obliquely incident electromagnetic (EM) waves in a time-varying plasma sheath. The finite-difference time-domain algorithm is applied. According to the empirical formula of the collision frequency in a plasma sheath, the plasma frequency, temperature, and pressure are assumed to vary with time in the form of exponential rise. Some scattering problems of EM waves are discussed by calculating the radar cross section (RCS) of the time-varying plasma. The laws of the RCS varying with time are summarized at the L and S wave bands.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of structural changes during the collision of copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas T, Justo; Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima; Copa, Betty

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with embedded-atom potential (EAM) have been performed to study the energetic and structural changes during the collision and coalescence of two Cu n nanoparticles. We simulated collision of nanoparticles at several temperatures below the melting point and with different impact energy. Analyzing the potential energy change during the collision we identify three clearly defined stages. The pair correlation function and the pair analysis technique are used to reveal the structural changes in the collision process. The variation in the time of the population of different pairs has been quantified, being observed diverse structural transformations. During the collision of two equal icosahedral nanoparticles ( Cu 55 ) has been observed different behavior of 1551 pairs depending on the impact velocity. (author).

  1. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  2. Transition and Electron Impact Excitation Collision Rates for O III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayal, S. S.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2017-12-01

    Transition probabilities, electron excitation collision strengths, and rate coefficients for a large number of O III lines over a broad wavelength range, from the infrared to ultraviolet, have been reported. The collision strengths have been calculated in the close-coupling approximation using the B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. The multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock method in combination with B-spline expansions is employed for an accurate representation of the target wave functions. The close-coupling expansion contains 202 O2+ fine-structure levels of the 2{s}22{p}2,2s2{p}3, 2{p}4,2{s}22p3s,3p,3d, 4s,4p,4d,4f,5s, and 2s2{p}33s,3p,3d configurations. The effective collision strengths are obtained by averaging electron excitation collision strengths over a Maxwellian distribution of velocities at electron temperatures ranging from 100 to 100,000 K. The calculated effective collision strengths have been reported for the 20,302 transitions between all 202 fine-structure levels. There is an overall good agreement with the recent R-matrix calculations by Storey et al. for the transitions between all levels of the ground 2{s}22{p}2 configuration, but significant discrepancies have been found with Palay et al. for transitions to the 2{s}22{p}2 1 S 0 level. Line intensity ratios between the optical lines arising from the 2{s}22{p}2{}3{P}{0,1,2} - 1 D 2 transitions have been compared with other calculations and observations from the photoionized gaseous nebulae, and good agreement is found. The present calculations provide the most complete and accurate data sets, which should allow a more detailed treatment of the available measured spectra from different ground and space observatories.

  3. Dark-Bright Soliton Dynamics Beyond the Mean-Field Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsimiga, Garyfallia; Koutentakis, Georgios; Mistakidis, Simeon; Kevrekidis, Panagiotis; Schmelcher, Peter; Theory Group of Fundamental Processes in Quantum Physics Team

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of dark bright solitons beyond the mean-field approximation is investigated. We first examine the case of a single dark-bright soliton and its oscillations within a parabolic trap. Subsequently, we move to the setting of collisions, comparing the mean-field approximation to that involving multiple orbitals in both the dark and the bright component. Fragmentation is present and significantly affects the dynamics, especially in the case of slower solitons and in that of lower atom numbers. It is shown that the presence of fragmentation allows for bipartite entanglement between the distinguishable species. Most importantly the interplay between fragmentation and entanglement leads to the decay of each of the initial mean-field dark-bright solitons into fast and slow fragmented dark-bright structures. A variety of excitations including dark-bright solitons in multiple (concurrently populated) orbitals is observed. Dark-antidark states and domain-wall-bright soliton complexes can also be observed to arise spontaneously in the beyond mean-field dynamics. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) in the framework of the SFB 925 ``Light induced dynamics and control of correlated quantum systems''.

  4. Critique of the Brownian approximation to the generalized Langevin equation in lattice dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diestler, D.J.; Riley, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    We consider the classical motion of a harmonic lattice in which only those atoms in a certain subset of the lattice (primary zone) may interact with an external force. The formally exact generalized Langevin equation (GLE) for the primary zone is an appropriate description of the dynamics. We examine a previously proposed Brownian, or frictional damping, approximation that reduces the GLE to a set of coupled ordinary Langevin equations for the primary atoms. It is shown that the solution of these equations can contain undamped motion if there is more than one atom in the primary zone. Such motion is explicitly demonstrated for a model that has been used to describe energy transfer in atom--surface collisions. The inability of the standard Brownian approximation to yield an acceptable, physically meaningful result for primary zones comprising more than one atom suggests that the Brownian approximation may introduce other spurious dynamical effects. Further work on damping of correlated motion in lattices is needed

  5. Two-body loss rates for reactive collisions of cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cop, C.; Walser, R.

    2018-01-01

    We present an effective two-channel model for reactive collisions of cold atoms. It augments elastic molecular channels with an irreversible, inelastic loss channel. Scattering is studied with the distorted-wave Born approximation and yields general expressions for angular momentum resolved cross sections as well as two-body loss rates. Explicit expressions are obtained for piecewise constant potentials. A pole expansion reveals simple universal shape functions for cross sections and two-body loss rates in agreement with the Wigner threshold laws. This is applied to collisions of metastable 20Ne and 21Ne atoms, which decay primarily through exothermic Penning or associative ionization processes. From a numerical solution of the multichannel Schrödinger equation using the best currently available molecular potentials, we have obtained synthetic scattering data. Using the two-body loss shape functions derived in this paper, we can match these scattering data very well.

  6. Analysis and manipulation of atomic and molecular collisions using laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimpe, A.

    2006-01-01

    Optical collisions in a crossed beam experiment are examined for the atomic collision pairs LiHe, LiNe, NaNe. Differential cross sections are measured in order to probe the quality of quantum chemical calculated and spectroscopical determined molecular potentials. The linear polarization of the excitation laser is used to manipulate the contrast of the differential cross sections for NaNe. Using elliptical polarized light total control over the angular position and the contrast of the interference pattern is demonstrated. Differential cross sections for the collision pairs LiH 2 and LiD 2 show a pronounced oscillatory structure, which for the first time is observed for atom-molecule optical collisions. (orig.)

  7. Fast approximate convex decomposition using relative concavity

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Mukulika; Amato, Nancy M.; Lu, Yanyan; Lien, Jyh-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Approximate convex decomposition (ACD) is a technique that partitions an input object into approximately convex components. Decomposition into approximately convex pieces is both more efficient to compute than exact convex decomposition and can also generate a more manageable number of components. It can be used as a basis of divide-and-conquer algorithms for applications such as collision detection, skeleton extraction and mesh generation. In this paper, we propose a new method called Fast Approximate Convex Decomposition (FACD) that improves the quality of the decomposition and reduces the cost of computing it for both 2D and 3D models. In particular, we propose a new strategy for evaluating potential cuts that aims to reduce the relative concavity, rather than absolute concavity. As shown in our results, this leads to more natural and smaller decompositions that include components for small but important features such as toes or fingers while not decomposing larger components, such as the torso, that may have concavities due to surface texture. Second, instead of decomposing a component into two pieces at each step, as in the original ACD, we propose a new strategy that uses a dynamic programming approach to select a set of n c non-crossing (independent) cuts that can be simultaneously applied to decompose the component into n c+1 components. This reduces the depth of recursion and, together with a more efficient method for computing the concavity measure, leads to significant gains in efficiency. We provide comparative results for 2D and 3D models illustrating the improvements obtained by FACD over ACD and we compare with the segmentation methods in the Princeton Shape Benchmark by Chen et al. (2009) [31]. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fast approximate convex decomposition using relative concavity

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Mukulika

    2013-02-01