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Sample records for colliding-wind pinwheel wr

  1. Pinwheel Nebula around WR 98a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier; Tuthill; Danchi

    1999-11-10

    We present the first near-infrared images of the dusty Wolf-Rayet star WR 98a. Aperture-masking interferometry has been utilized to recover images at the diffraction limit of the Keck I telescope, less, similar50 mas at 2.2 µm. Multiepoch observations spanning about 1 yr have resolved the dust shell into a "pinwheel" nebula, the second example of a new class of dust shell first discovered around WR 104 by Tuthill, Monnier, & Danchi. Interpreting the collimated dust outflow in terms of an interacting winds model, the binary orbital parameters and apparent wind speed are derived: a period of 565+/-50 days, a viewing angle of 35&j0;+/-6 degrees from the pole, and a wind speed of 99+/-23 mas yr-1. This period is consistent with a possible approximately 588 day periodicity in the infrared light curve, linking the photometric variation to the binary orbit. Important implications for binary stellar evolution are discussed by identifying WR 104 and WR 98a as members of a class of massive, short-period binaries whose orbits were circularized during a previous red supergiant phase. The current component separation in each system is similar to the diameter of a red supergiant, which indicates that the supergiant phase was likely terminated by Roche lobe overflow, leading to the present Wolf-Rayet stage.

  2. X-ray observations of the colliding wind binary WR 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Bharti; Pandey, Jeewan Chandra

    2018-04-01

    Using the archival data obtained from Chandra and Suzaku spanning over '8 years, we present an analysis of a WN6h+O4f Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. The X-ray light curves folded over a period of '208 d in the 0.3 - 10.0 keV energy band showed phase-locked variability where the count rates were found to be maximum near the periastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were well explained by a two-temperature plasma model with temperatures of 0.64 ± 0.01 and 2.96 ± 0.05 keV and are consistent with previous results. The orbital phase dependent local hydrogen column density was found to be maximum just after the periastron passage, when the WN type star is in front of the O star. The hard (2.0 - 10.0 keV) X-ray luminosity was linearly dependent on the inverse of binary separation which confirms that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary.

  3. DUST FORMATION BY COLLIDING-WIND BINARIES

    OpenAIRE

    P. M. Williams

    2008-01-01

    Imágenes infrarrojas de alta resolución recientes de las enigmáticas estrellas cocoon en el cúmulo del Quintuplete, muestran comas tipo "pinwheel". La inferencia de que las estrellas son binarias Wolf-Rayet con vientos en colisión evidencia cuán lejos ha llegado el estudio de la formación de polvo en los vientos, desde el primer descubrimiento de polvo de carbono calentado, alrededor de la clásica estrella WC9 Ve2-45 (WR 104). La formación de polvo atribuida a vientos en colisión es el proces...

  4. Fractions in Origami Pinwheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, R. Alan

    2017-01-01

    Paper folding is an easy and inexpensive way to engage students artistically, culturally, and mathematically. The pinwheel base is the source for many origami playthings, from a pinwheel to a boat to a butterfly. This article explores a fourth grade activity that repurposes the pinwheel base into a rich and inexpensive manipulative for the review…

  5. Fermi-LAT upper limits on gamma-ray emission from colliding wind binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Michael; Reimer, O.; Reimer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Here, colliding wind binaries (CWBs) are thought to give rise to a plethora of physical processes including acceleration and interaction of relativistic particles. Observation of synchrotron radiation in the radio band confirms there is a relativistic electron population in CWBs. Accordingly, CWBs have been suspected sources of high-energy γ-ray emission since the COS-B era. Theoretical models exist that characterize the underlying physical processes leading to particle acceleration and quantitatively predict the non-thermal energy emission observable at Earth. Furthermore, we strive to find evidence of γ-ray emission from a sample of seven CWB systems: WR 11, WR 70, WR 125, WR 137, WR 140, WR 146, and WR 147. Theoretical modelling identified these systems as the most favourable candidates for emitting γ-rays. We make a comparison with existing γ-ray flux predictions and investigate possible constraints. We used 24 months of data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope to perform a dedicated likelihood analysis of CWBs in the LAT energy range. As a result, we find no evidence of γ-ray emission from any of the studied CWB systems and determine corresponding flux upper limits. For some CWBs the interplay of orbital and stellar parameters renders the Fermi-LAT data not sensitive enough to constrain the parameter space of the emission models. In the cases of WR140 and WR147, the Fermi-LAT upper limits appear to rule out some model predictions entirely and constrain theoretical models over a significant parameter space. A comparison of our findings to the CWB η Car is made.

  6. 21 CFR 882.1750 - Pinwheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Diagnostic Devices § 882.1750 Pinwheel. (a) Identification. A pinwheel is a device with sharp points on a rotating wheel used for testing pain sensation. (b) Classification. Class I...

  7. Massive stars in colliding wind systems: the GLAST perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimer, Anita; Reimer, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    Colliding winds of massive stars in binary systems arc considered as candidate sites of high-energy non-thermal photon emission. They are already among the suggested counterparts for a few individual unidentified EGRET sources, but may constitute a detectable source population for the GLAST observatory.The present work investigates such population study of massive colliding wind systems at high-energy gamma-rays. Based on the recent detailed model (Reimer et al. 2006) for non-thermal photon production in prime candidate systems, we unveil the expected characteristics of this source class in the observables accessible at LAT energies. Combining the broadband emission model with the presently cataloged distribution of such systems and their individual parameters allows us to conclude on the expected maximum number of LAT-detections among massive stars in colliding wind binary systems

  8. A 3D dynamical model of the colliding winds in binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, E. R.; Pittard, J. M.

    2008-08-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) dynamical model of the orbital-induced curvature of the wind-wind collision region in binary star systems. Momentum balance equations are used to determine the position and shape of the contact discontinuity between the stars, while further downstream the gas is assumed to behave ballistically. An Archimedean spiral structure is formed by the motion of the stars, with clear resemblance to high-resolution images of the so-called `pinwheel nebulae'. A key advantage of this approach over grid or smoothed particle hydrodynamic models is its significantly reduced computational cost, while it also allows the study of the structure obtained in an eccentric orbit. The model is relevant to symbiotic systems and γ-ray binaries, as well as systems with O-type and Wolf-Rayet stars. As an example application, we simulate the X-ray emission from hypothetical O+O and WR+O star binaries, and describe a method of ray tracing through the 3D spiral structure to account for absorption by the circumstellar material in the system. Such calculations may be easily adapted to study observations at wavelengths ranging from the radio to γ-ray.

  9. Some comments on pinwheel tilings and their diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, Uwe [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Deng Xinghua, E-mail: u.g.grimm@open.ac.uk [University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-03-01

    The pinwheel tiling is the paradigm for a substitution tiling with circular symmetry, in the sense that the corresponding autocorrelation is circularly symmetric. As a consequence, its diffraction measure is also circularly symmetric, so the pinwheel diffraction consists of sharp rings and, possibly, a continuous component with circular symmetry. We consider some combinatorial properties of the tiles and their orientations, and a numerical approach to the diffraction of weighted pinwheel point sets.

  10. On the Binary Nature of Massive Blue Hypergiants: High-resolution X-Ray Spectroscopy Suggests That Cyg OB2 12 is a Colliding Wind Binary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Shenar, T.; Sander, A. A. C.; Todt, H.; Hainich, R. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Huenemoerder, D. P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ignace, R., E-mail: lida@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37663 (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The blue hypergiant Cyg OB2 12 (B3Ia{sup +}) is a representative member of the class of very massive stars in a poorly understood evolutionary stage. We obtained its high-resolution X-ray spectrum using the Chandra observatory. PoWR model atmospheres were calculated to provide realistic wind opacities and to establish the wind density structure. We find that collisional de-excitation is the dominant mechanism depopulating the metastable upper levels of the forbidden lines of the He-like ions Si xiv and Mg xii. Comparison between the model and observations reveals that X-ray emission is produced in a dense plasma, which could reside only at the photosphere or in a colliding wind zone between binary components. The observed X-ray spectra are well-fitted by thermal plasma models, with average temperatures in excess of 10 MK. The wind speed in Cyg OB2 12 is not high enough to power such high temperatures, but the collision of two winds in a binary system can be sufficient. We used archival data to investigate the X-ray properties of other blue hypergiants. In general, stars of this class are not detected as X-ray sources. We suggest that our new Chandra observations of Cyg OB2 12 can be best explained if Cyg OB2 12 is a colliding wind binary possessing a late O-type companion. This makes Cyg OB2 12 only the second binary system among the 16 known Galactic hypergiants. This low binary fraction indicates that the blue hypergiants are likely products of massive binary evolution during which they either accreted a significant amount of mass or already merged with their companions.

  11. Variable millimetre radiation from the colliding-wind binary Cygnus OB2 #8A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomme, R.; Fenech, D. M.; Prinja, R. K.; Pittard, J. M.; Morford, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Context. Massive binaries have stellar winds that collide. In the colliding-wind region, various physically interesting processes occur, leading to enhanced X-ray emission, non-thermal radio emission, as well as non-thermal X-rays and gamma-rays. Non-thermal radio emission (due to synchrotron radiation) has so far been observed at centimetre wavelengths. At millimetre wavelengths, the stellar winds and the colliding-wind region emit more thermal free-free radiation, and it is expected that any non-thermal contribution will be difficult or impossible to detect. Aims: We aim to determine if the material in the colliding-wind region contributes substantially to the observed millimetre fluxes of a colliding-wind binary. We also try to distinguish the synchrotron emission from the free-free emission. Methods: We monitored the massive binary Cyg OB2 #8A at 3 mm with the NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array (NOEMA) interferometer of the Institut de Radioastronomie Millimétrique (IRAM). The data were collected in 14 separate observing runs (in 2014 and 2016), and provide good coverage of the orbital period. Results: The observed millimetre fluxes range between 1.1 and 2.3 mJy, and show phase-locked variability, clearly indicating that a large part of the emission is due to the colliding-wind region. A simple synchrotron model gives fluxes with the correct order of magnitude, but with a maximum that is phase-shifted with respect to the observations. Qualitatively this phase shift can be explained by our neglect of orbital motion on the shape of the colliding-wind region. A model using only free-free emission results in only a slightly worse explanation of the observations. Additionally, on the map of our observations we also detect the O6.5 III star Cyg OB2 #8B, for which we determine a 3 mm flux of 0.21 ± 0.033 mJy. Conclusions: The question of whether synchrotron radiation or free-free emission dominates the millimetre fluxes of Cyg OB2 #8A remains open. More detailed

  12. Role of ionization fronts in the colliding wind model of planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, J.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A similarity transformation is used to study the expansion of a planetary nebula which is driven by a fast stellar wind as well as an expanding H II region. The undisturbed gas is taken to be the remnant of a slow, red giant wind. The present analysis improves upon Kwok, Purton, and FitzGerald's colliding wind model for the formation of planetary nebulae since it includes the dynamical influence of ionization fronts, and calculates the variation of velocity and density within the flow

  13. Non-thermal Processes in Colliding-wind Massive Binaries: the Contribution of Simbol-X to a Multiwavelength Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Becker, Michaël; Blomme, Ronny; Micela, Giusi; Pittard, Julian M.; Rauw, Gregor; Romero, Gustavo E.; Sana, Hugues; Stevens, Ian R.

    2009-05-01

    Several colliding-wind massive binaries are known to be non-thermal emitters in the radio domain. This constitutes strong evidence for the fact that an efficient particle acceleration process is at work in these objects. The acceleration mechanism is most probably the Diffusive Shock Acceleration (DSA) process in the presence of strong hydrodynamic shocks due to the colliding-winds. In order to investigate the physics of this particle acceleration, we initiated a multiwavelength campaign covering a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this context, the detailed study of the hard X-ray emission from these sources in the SIMBOL-X bandpass constitutes a crucial element in order to probe this still poorly known topic of astrophysics. It should be noted that colliding-wind massive binaries should be considered as very valuable targets for the investigation of particle acceleration in a similar way as supernova remnants, but in a different region of the parameter space.

  14. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Carnes, B.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-05-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL {times} BALB/c F{sub 1} female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a {sup 60}Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  15. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Carnes, B.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL [times] BALB/c F[sub 1] female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a [sup 60]Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  16. Observations and numerical studies of gamma-ray emission in colliding-wind binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitberger, K.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy gamma rays. The emission is thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide, thereby producing accelerated particles which subsequently emit gamma rays.This scenario is supported by observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope presented in this thesis. To address the underlying emission mechanisms in a quantitative way, numerical simulations that incorporate hydrodynamics, the acceleration of charged particles as well as the subsequent gamma-ray emission were found to be needed.This thesis presents the analysis of a high-energy gamma-ray source and its identification with the particle-accelerating colliding-wind binary system Eta Carinae. In order to go beyond the present understanding of such objects, this work provides detailed description of a new 3D-hydrodynamical model, which incorporates the line-driven acceleration of the winds, gravity, orbital motion and the radiative cooling of the shocked plasma, as well as the diffusive shock acceleration of charged particles in the wind collision region. In a subsequent step we simulate and study the resulting gamma-ray emission via relativistic bremsstrahlung, anisotropic inverse Compton radiation and neutral pion decay. (author) [de

  17. Measurement of WR-2721, WR-1065, and WR-33278 in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahey, R.C.; Newton, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase was used in developing two new assays for WR-2721; one involved simple spectrophotometric titration with Ellman's reagent and the other was based upon HPLC analysis of a monobromobimane derivative. Both methods have acceptable results when applied to whole plasma. Assays for WR-1065 and disulfide forms of the drug were also developed but were found to give unreliable results with whole plasma owing to apparent rapid reaction of these drug forms with plasma constituents. The methods were applied to the analysis of blood samples in rat 0-70 min after i.v. injection of WR-2721

  18. WR stars with ring nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tutukov, A.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown that most of usually apparently single nitrogen WR stars with ring emission nebulae around them (WN + Neb) are a probable product of the evolution of a massive close binary with initial masses of components exceeding approximately 20 solar masses. (Auth.)

  19. Time and Energy Efficient DVS Scheduling for Real-Time Pinwheel Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Da-Ren, Chen; Young-Long, Chen; You-Shyang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic voltage/frequency scaling (DVFS) is one of the most effective techniques for reducing energy use. In this paper, we focus on the pinwheel task model to develop a variable voltage processor with d discrete voltage/speed levels. Depending on the granularity of execution unit to which voltage scaling is applied, DVFS scheduling can be defined in two categories: (i) inter-task DVFS and (ii) intra-task DVFS. In the periodic pinwheel task model, we modified the definitions of both intra- an...

  20. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton and swift observations of WR 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, J. C.; Pandey, S. B.; Karmakar, Subhajeet, E-mail: jeewan@aries.res.in [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Nainital 263 002 (India)

    2014-06-10

    We present an analysis of long-term X-ray and optical observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. Using archival data from observations with the XMM-Newton and the Swift observatories, spanning over ∼10 yr, we show that WR 25 is a periodic variable in X-rays with a period of 208 ± 3 days. X-ray light curves in the 0.5-10.0 keV energy band show phase-locked variability, where the flux increased by a factor of ∼2 from minimum to maximum, being maximum near periastron passage. The light curve in the soft energy band (0.5-2.0 keV) shows two minima indicating the presence of two eclipses. However, the light curve in the hard energy band (2.0-10.0 keV) shows only one minimum during the apastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were explained by a two-temperature plasma model. Both the cool and the hot plasmas were constant at 0.628 ± 0.008 and 2.75 ± 0.06 keV throughout an orbital cycle, where the cooler plasma could be due to small scale shocks in a radiation-driven outflow and the high temperature plasma could be due to the collision of winds. The column density varied with the orbital phase and was found to be maximum after the periastron passage, when the WN star is in front of the O star. The abundances of WR 25 were found to be non-solar. Optical V-band data of WR 25 also show the phase-locked variability, being at maximum near periastron passage. The results based on the present analysis indicate that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary where the presence of soft X-rays is attributed to individual components; however, hard X-rays are due to the collision of winds.

  1. Adverse effects of the radioprotector WR2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairnie, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    S-2-(3-Aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) has radioprotective properties, but it is also toxic - in man it causes nausea and vomiting. Since radiation also causes nausea and vomiting it is important to know whether WR2721 would increase or decrease the likelihood of nausea and vomiting after radiation. This question was investigated in rats using the phenomenon of aversion to the taste of saccharin, which is readily inducible and is understood to be controlled in rats by the same pathways that control nausea and vomiting in man. The taste aversion was induced by giving 0.2 Gy 60 Co γ radiation 30 min after drinking 0.1% saccharin, or WR2721 immediately after the saccharin, or giving both radiation and WR2721. There were appropriate controls. In sham-irradiated rats, WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg, but not 8 mg/kg) produced a significant taste aversion. When WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg) was given immediately after the saccharin to irradiated rats it increased the taste aversion significantly, but it did not have any effect at 8 mg/kg. It was concluded that at doses which were optimal for radioprotection (approx.200 mg/kg) or lower, WR2721 increased in rats the taste aversion induced by radiation. By inference if conditioned taste aversion is an appropriate paradigm, WR2721 would increase nausea and vomiting in man induced by radiation

  2. Coalescence of 3-phenyl-propynenitrile on Cu(111) into interlocking pinwheel chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Miaomiao; Lu, Wenhao; Kim, Daeho; Chu, Eric; Wyrick, Jon; Holzke, Connor; Salib, Daniel; Cohen, Kamelia D.; Cheng, Zhihai; Sun, Dezheng; Zhu, Yeming; Einstein, T. L.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2011-10-01

    3-phenyl-propynenitrile (PPN) adsorbs on Cu(111) in a hexagonal network of molecular trimers formed through intermolecular interaction of the cyano group of one molecule with the aromatic ring of its neighbor. Heptamers of trimers coalesce into interlocking pinwheel-shaped structures that, by percolating across islands of the original trimer coverage, create the appearance of gear chains. Density functional theory aids in identifying substrate stress associated with the chemisorption of PPN's acetylene group as the cause of this transition.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of WR-1065 in mouse tissue following treatment with WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utley, J.F.; Seaver, N.; Newton, G.L.; Fahey, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065) were measured in tissues of Balb/c mouse bearing EMT 6 tumors at time intervals ranging from 5 min to 48 hr after i.v. injection of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate (WR-2721) at 500 mg per kg. In all tissues examined (liver, kidney, lung, heart, muscle, brain, tumor, spleen, and salivary gland), maximal WR-1065 levels occurred 5-15 min after injection, with levels in liver, kidney, lung, and salivary gland exceeding one μmole per gm. The post-maximum decline in WR-1065 varied markedly with tissue, lung exhibiting a 6-fold drop by 30 min and salivary gland falling only 15% after 3 hr. In a mouse treated with carbon-14 labeled WR-2721 it was found after 15 min that WR-1065 accounted for over half of the total drug in all tissues except tumor, where it accounted for a third of the total drug. There was no evidence that GSH levels were substantially altered by WR-2721 treatment. The results provide the first direct evidence supporting the widely held view that WR-2721 treatment results in intracellular WR-1065 and they demonstrate that high levels of WR-1065 occur very soon after i.v. injection

  4. Applying dynamic priority scheduling scheme to static systems of pinwheel task model in power-aware scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Ye-In; Kim, Young-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    Power-aware scheduling reduces CPU energy consumption in hard real-time systems through dynamic voltage scaling (DVS). In this paper, we deal with pinwheel task model which is known as static and predictable task model and could be applied to various embedded or ubiquitous systems. In pinwheel task model, each task's priority is static and its execution sequence could be predetermined. There have been many static approaches to power-aware scheduling in pinwheel task model. But, in this paper, we will show that the dynamic priority scheduling results in power-aware scheduling could be applied to pinwheel task model. This method is more effective than adopting the previous static priority scheduling methods in saving energy consumption and, for the system being still static, it is more tractable and applicable to small sized embedded or ubiquitous computing. Also, we introduce a novel power-aware scheduling algorithm which exploits all slacks under preemptive earliest-deadline first scheduling which is optimal in uniprocessor system. The dynamic priority method presented in this paper could be applied directly to static systems of pinwheel task model. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm with the algorithmic complexity of O(n) reduces the energy consumption by 10-80% over the existing algorithms.

  5. Chemical protection against gastrointestinal radiation injury in mice by WR 2822, WR 2823, or WR 109342 after 4 MeV x ray or fission neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, A.M.; Sigdestad, C.P.

    1982-01-01

    Three compounds were tested for their radioprotective properties against the effects of 4 MeV X rays or fission neutron irradiation. The endpoints tested were lethality, intestinal crypt survival, and DNA synthesizing cellularity. Two of the compounds tested; S-2(4-aminobutylamino) ethylphosphorothioc acid (WR 2822) and the aminopentylamino derivative (WR 109342). All drugs were administered via intraperitoneal injections at their approximately maximum tolerated dose. WR 2822 was shown to have a slight protective effect against X rays and neutrons. The dose modification factor (DMF) for gastrointestinal death (LD/sub 50(6)/) was 1.23 for X rays and 1.51 for neutrons. The assay for intestinal crypt survival produced DMF's of 1.44 (X rays) and 1.4 (neutrons). WR 2823 also showed a protective action in these assays. The DMF for LD/sub 50(6)/ was 1.32 (X rays) and 1.42 (neutrons). WR 109342 was found to be extremely toxic and had no significant protective effects. All three drugs were more toxic and demonstrated less protection in most of these assays than the benchmark radioprotective agent WR 2721, although WR 2822 protected against lethal effects of fission neutrons almost as well as WR 2721. Both WR 2822 and WR 2823 produced greater protection in the crypt survival assays for fission neutron irradiation than WR 2721

  6. Comparative study of the radioprotective effects of cysteamine, WR-2721, and WR-1065 in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The compounds, 2-mercaptoethylamine (cysteamine), S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721), and N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065) were tested for toxicity and radioprotective effect in cultured human cells using viability (reproductive death) as an indicator. WR-2721 and WR-1065 had no harmful effect at concentrations of 4 and 10 mM for periods up to 3 hr whereas cysteamine was toxic if left in contact with the cells for more than 30 min. The response of the cells to radiation was measured after a 30-min treatment with 4 mM of each protective agent. Survival curves were constructed and the following dose reduction factors (DRFs) were calculated: WR-2721, 1.3; cysteamine, 2.3; WR-1065, 2.9. Increasing the concentration of protective agent did not increase the DRF under these conditions except in the case of cysteamine. Extending the period of treatment with drug before irradiation increased the DRF for WR-2721 and WR-1065; values up to 1.8 and 3.4 were obtained with 10 mM WR-2721 and WR-1065, respectively. With these two compounds, the rate of development of protection with time is almost independent of concentration until the maximum is attained; it is probably controlled by the rate of transport across the cell membrane, in the case of WR-1065, and by the rate of hydrolysis of WR-2721

  7. Regiones H II alrededor de estrellas WR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez Benitez, S.; Niemela, V.

    En base a observaciones espectroscópicas en el rango óptico, obtenidas en el CASLEO, se estudian las condiciones físicas de tres regiones H II alrededor de estrellas WR: N76 en el entorno de Ab7, en la Nube Menor de Magallanes, N79 alrededor de Br 2, en la Nube Mayor de Magallanes y G2.4+1.4 alrededor de WR 102, en nuestra Galaxia. Estas regiones presentan una alta ionización. Se observa la línea nebular de HeII en 4686 Å . Utilizando líneas nebulares de diagnóstico, se derivan los valores de la densidad y la temperatura electrónica, así como también las abundancias de algunos de los elementos químicos nebulares.

  8. Phase I clinical studies with WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Shaw, M.T.; Slavik, M.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Toxicity studies of S-2-(3 aminopropylamino)-ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) access patients in remission following radiation therapy. The dose has been escalated from 25 to 250 mg/m2 without significant symptoms. Inconsistent variation in the systolic blood pressure in some patients has been observed over an 8-10-point range without producing any symptoms. Combining WR-2721 with conventional radiotherapy is contemplated by intravenous injection the drug 20 to 30 minutes before irradiation. This will start as weekly injections, and the number of weekly injections will be increased progessively. Animal studies suggest that the level already safely reached could give significant protection to the normal tissues without protecting tumor

  9. Opposite effects of WR-2721 and WR-1065 on radiation-induced hypothermia: possible correlation with oxygen uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Kumar, K.S.; Hunt, W.A.; Weiss, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces hypothermia in guinea pigs. While systemic injection of the radioprotectant S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) did not block hyperthermia induced by exposure to 10 Gy of gamma radiation, central administration did attenuate it. The dephosphorylated metabolite of WR-2721, N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065), accentuated radiation-induced hypothermia by both routes of administration. In brain homogenates, oxygen uptake was inhibited by WR-2721 but elevated by WR-1065. These results suggest that the antagonism of radiation-induced hypothermia found only after central administration of WR-2721 is due to its direct actions and not to its dephosphorylated metabolite and that this effect may be correlated with the inhibition by WR-2721 of oxygen uptake

  10. The pinwheel pupil discovery: exoplanet science & improved processing with segmented telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, James Bernard

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we show that by using a “pinwheel” architecture for the segmented primary mirror and curved supports for the secondary mirror, we can achieve a near uniform diffraction background in ground and space large telescope systems needed for high SNR exoplanet science. Also, the point spread function will be nearly rotationally symmetric, enabling improved digital image reconstruction. Large (>4-m) aperture space telescopes are needed to characterize terrestrial exoplanets by direct imaging coronagraphy. Launch vehicle volume constrains these apertures are segmented and deployed in space to form a large mirror aperture that is masked by the gaps between the hexagonal segments and the shadows of the secondary support system. These gaps and shadows over the pupil result in an image plane point spread function that has bright spikes, which may mask or obscure exoplanets.These telescope artifact mask faint exoplanets, making it necessary for the spacecraft to make a roll about the boresight and integrate again to make sure no planets are missed. This increases integration time, and requires expensive space-craft resources to do bore-sight roll.Currently the LUVOIR and HabEx studies have several significant efforts to develop special purpose A/O technology and to place complex absorbing apodizers over their Hex pupils to shape the unwanted diffracted light. These strong apodizers absorb light, decreasing system transmittance and reducing SNR. Implementing curved pupil obscurations will eliminate the need for the highly absorbing apodizers and thus result in higher SNR.Quantitative analysis of diffraction patterns that use the pinwheel architecture are compared to straight hex-segment edges with a straight-line secondary shadow mask to show a gain of over a factor of 100 by reducing the background. For the first-time astronomers are able to control and minimize image plane diffraction background “noise”. This technology will enable 10-m segmented

  11. WR 143: A Wolf-Rayet Binary

    OpenAIRE

    Varricatt, Watson P.; Ashok, Nagarhalli M.

    2005-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy and photometry of the Wolf-Rayet Star WR 143 (HD 195177) were obtained in the $JHK$ photometric bands. High resolution spectra observed in the J and H bands exhibit narrow 1.083-micron He I line and the H I Pa Beta and the Brackett series lines in emission superposed on the broad emission line spectrum of the Wolf-Rayet star, giving strong indications of the presence of a companion. From the narrow emission lines observed, the companion is identified to be an early-...

  12. The WR-1 corrosion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, E.V.; Simmons, G.R.

    1978-07-01

    This report describes a new Corrosion Test Facility which has recently been installed in the WR-1 organic-cooled research reactor. The irradiation facility is a single insert, installed in a reactor site, which can deliver a fast neutron flux density of 2.65 x 10 17 neutrons/(m 2 .s) to specimens under irradiation. A self-contained controlled-chemistry cooling water circuit removes the gamma- and neutron-heat generated in the insert and specimens. Specimen temperatures typically vary from 245 deg C to 280 deg C across the insert core region. (author)

  13. WR 120bb and WR 120bc: a pair of WN9h stars with possibly interacting circumstellar shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgemeister, S.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Todt, H.; Hamann, W.-R.

    2013-03-01

    Two optically obscured Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars have been recently discovered by means of their infrared (IR) circumstellar shells, which show signatures of interaction with each other. Following the systematics of the WR star catalogues, these stars obtain the names WR 120bb and WR 120bc. In this paper, we present and analyse new near-IR, J-, H- and K-band spectra using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmosphere code. For that purpose, the atomic data base of the code has been extended in order to include all significant lines in the near-IR bands. The spectra of both stars are classified as WN9h. As their spectra are very similar the parameters that we obtained by the spectral analyses hardly differ. Despite their late spectral subtype, we found relatively high stellar temperatures of 63 kK. The wind composition is dominated by helium, while hydrogen is depleted to 25 per cent by mass. Because of their location in the Scutum-Centaurus Arm, WR 120bb and WR 120bc appear highly reddened, A_{K_s} ≈ 2 mag. We adopt a common distance of 5.8 kpc to both stars, which complies with the typical absolute K-band magnitude for the WN9h subtype of -6.5 mag, is consistent with their observed extinction based on comparison with other massive stars in the region, and allows for the possibility that their shells are interacting with each other. This leads to luminosities of log ({textit {L}/L}_{odot }) = 5.66 and 5.54 for WR 120bb and WR 120bc, with large uncertainties due to the adopted distance. The values of the luminosities of WR 120bb and WR 120bc imply that the immediate precursors of both stars were red supergiants (RSG). This implies in turn that the circumstellar shells associated with WR 120bb and WR 120bc were formed by interaction between the WR wind and the dense material shed during the preceding RSG phase.

  14. Creating an enabling environment for WR&R implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathatou, P-M; Kampragou, E; Grigoropoulou, H; Assimacopoulos, D; Karavitis, C; Gironás, J

    2017-09-01

    Reclaimed water is receiving growing attention worldwide as an effective solution for alleviating the growing water scarcity in many areas. Despite the various benefits associated with reclaimed water, water recycling and reuse (WR&R) practices are not widely applied around the world. This is mostly due to complex and inadequate local legal and institutional frameworks and socio-economic structures, which pose barriers to wider WR&R implementation. An integrated approach is therefore needed while planning the implementation of WR&R schemes, considering all the potential barriers, and aiming to develop favourable conditions for enhancing reclaimed water use. This paper proposes a comprehensive methodology supporting the development of an enabling environment for WR&R implementation. The political, economic, social, technical, legal and institutional factors that may influence positively (drivers) or negatively (barriers) WR&R implementation in the regional water systems are identified, through the mapping of local stakeholder perceptions. The identified barriers are further analysed, following a Cross-Impact/System analysis, to recognize the most significant barriers inhibiting system transition, and to prioritize the enabling instruments and arrangements that are needed to boost WR&R implementation. The proposed methodology was applied in the Copiapó River Basin in Chile, which faces severe water scarcity. Through the analysis, it was observed that barriers outweigh drivers for the implementation of WR&R schemes in the Copiapó River Basin, while the key barriers which could be useful for policy formulation towards an enabling environment in the area concern the unclear legal framework regarding the ownership of treated wastewater, the lack of environmental policies focusing on pollution control, the limited integration of reclaimed water use in current land use and development policies, the limited public awareness on WR&R, and the limited availability of

  15. A dust shell around the early-type Wolf-Ryate star WR 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.M.; Hucht, K.A. van der; Bouchet, P.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared photometry of the WC4-type Wolf-Rayet star WR 19 (LS 3) in 1988-90 shows evidence for an expanding dust shell in its wind, similar to those observed from late-type WR stars like WR 48a (WC8), WR 140 (WC7+04) and WR 137 (WC7+). This demonstrates that dust formation by Wolf-Rayet stars is not restricted to later WC subtypes and is more common than hitherto supposed. (author)

  16. Prolonged radioprotective activity of WR-2721 linked to dextran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moenig, H.; Konermann, G.; Oehlert, W.

    1990-01-01

    The radioprotective agent WR-2721 was linked to dextran and poly(glutamic acid) respectively, to obtain a prolonged radioprotective ability. Male mice were administered these water soluble polymer conjugates one to 72 hours prior to a whole body irradiation with X-rays. A prolongation of radioprotective efficiency was achieved with two dextran-(WR-2721)-conjugates. For a period of 24 hours between administration, and irradiation dose reduction factors of 1.14±0.04 and 1.10±0.03 respectively were found. After 72 hours, no protective effect was observed. Histopathological investigations of the liver for formation of tumors 200 to 600 days after irradiation seems to indicate that a protective effect is not produced by the dextran-(WR-2721)-conjugats. (orig.) [de

  17. Interaction of cultured mammalian cells with WR-2721 and its thiol, WR-1065: implications for mechanisms of radioprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purdie, J.W.; Inhaber, E.R.; Schneider, H.; Labelle, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    An isothermal microcalorimeter was used to measure changes in heat flow when radioprotective drugs were added to cultured mammalian cells. The heat produced when WR-2721 was added continued for at least 90 min. WR-2721 was dephosphorylated by the cells to thiol (WR-1065) which oxidizes to disulphide. In the microcalorimeter, thiols give an immediate burst of heat due to this oxidation. A biological oxygen monitor revealed that WR-1065 and cysteamine rapidly consumed all the oxygen in culture medium. (10mM WR-1065 deoxygenated medium in 2 min.). Rapid consumption of oxygen by radioprotective thiols indicates that they will not co-exist with oxygen for long in cells. This has two important implications with respect to mechanisms of radioprotection: (1) oxygen in tissues will be consumed rapidly and could results in local hypoxia; and, (2) at modest doses of protective agents the thiol will be consumed in oxic cells and hence very little will be available for reactions such as hydrogen donation. The results indicate that anoxia is probably the principle mechanism of protection by aminothiols in mammals and aerated cells. (author)

  18. Influence of WR-2721 on metastatic tumor spread after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Jernigan, M.C.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The Line 1 alveolar cell carcinoma is a transplantable murine tumor which, unlike most others, kills the host by means of metastatic spread. Attempts to cure this tumor with localized radiation therapy often fail, in spite of local tumor control, because the metastases evade the treatment. These facts suggest that host-tumor interactions may play a particularly important role in determining the ultimate survival of the tumor bearing animal. In order to initially evaluate the possible importance of normal regional tissues in host-tumor interactions the influence of WR-2721, a radioprotective drug, was examined for local tumor control and subsequent survival of the tumor bearing animal after localized radiation. Results indicated that WR-2721 can decrease metastasis. (U.S.)

  19. Protective effect of WR-2823 in irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanovicj, A.; Tanasijevicj, D.; Cvetkovicj, M.; Cjosicj, M.; Chizmicj, Z.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical compound named WR-2823 has been synthetised. The acute toxicity after IP application has been investigated and LD 50 estimated. The protective ability of the radioprotector has been investigated in mice with gamma rays of 60 Co, or at the origin of 252 Cf. High protective potency in mice, treated with lethal doses of gamma rays and neutrons have been estimated. (author) 8 refs.; 1 tab

  20. Chemoprotection against fractionated radiation exposures with WR-2721: skin injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echols, F.S.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    These studies extend the analysis of the potential application of WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] to radiation therapy by determining the ability of the drug to protect mice against hair loss induced by multiple exposures to radiation. In the two mouse strains tested, RFM and BALB/c, the relatively low drug dose used (200 mg/kg) protected the mice against hair loss from single exposures by factors of 1.67 and 1.73. The dose necessary to produce a given level of hair loss (ED 50 ) increases with increasing number of fractions. The ED 50 increases as N/sup 0.52/ and N/sup 0.59/ in the two strains of mice when they are not drug-treated, but as N/sup 0.39/ and N/sup 0.50/ in mice that are drug-treated. Thus, the protective effectiveness of WR-2721 decreases with increasing numbers of fractions, but the drug is still able to give a dose-modifying factor of about 1.25 when the total exposure is given as a series of 9 or 10 fractions. WR-2721 appears to offer the possibility of improving the efficiency of radiotherapy under clinical conditions

  1. Cisplatin neuropathy. Risk factors, prognosis, and protection by WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollman, J.E.; Glover, D.J.; Hogan, W.M.; Furman, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    A prospective study of patients receiving cis-diaminedichloroplatin II (DDP) was carried out to determine if risk factors could be identified related to the patient's living habits or past medical history that would predict in which patients DDP neuropathy might develop. Sixty-nine patients receiving six different combinations of chemotherapeutic agents, including DDP were examined. Twenty-eight of these patients received DDP in combination with the radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethylphosporothioic acid (WR 2721). No risk factors were identified relating to personal habits or past medical history of the patients. However, patients receiving DDP (40 mg/m2) on 5 consecutive days had a significantly higher incidence of neuropathy. Patients receiving DDP in combination with WR 2721 had a significantly lower incidence of neuropathy, and the mean dose at onset was significantly higher than the mean dose at onset of neuropathy for all other groups. In addition, five of six patients who were available for long-term follow-up demonstrated nearly complete reversal of the signs and symptoms of neuropathy

  2. Retention of 241Am and 239Pu in the rat as influenced by Triton WR 1339

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, R.; Siedel, A.

    1976-01-01

    A lysosomotropic agent, the non-ionic detergent Triton WR 1339 (a poly-oxyethylene ether of formaldehyde polymers of octylphenol) is known to be stored in rat liver lysosomes. The results of a study made to determine whether Triton WR 1339 exerts an influence on the metabolic fate of monomeric 239 Pu and 241 Am in the rat as well as on the removal of these nuclides by DTPA, since Triton WR 1339 and transuranic elements share the same deposition site, are reported. The influence of Triton WR 1339 on the 241 Am content (per cent of 241 Am dose) of rat organs (skeleton, liver, kidneys) at different times after Triton WR 1339 injection, the influence of the time of Triton WR 1339 injection on the 241 Am content (per cent of 241 Am dose) of the same rat organs, and the influence of Triton WR 1339 Zn-DTPA and the combination of them on the retention of monomeric 239 Pu in the same rat organs (per cent of 239 Pu dose), are shown in tabular form. The mechanism whereby Triton WR 1339 appears to shorten the biological half-life of 239 Pu and 241 Am in rat liver is discussed. (U.K.)

  3. A Numerical Procedure for Analysis of W/R Contact Using Explicit Finite Element Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.; Markine, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    Since no effective experimental approaches have been proposed to assess wheel and rail (W/R) contact performance till now, numerical computational analysis is known as an alternative to approximately simulate the W/R interaction. In this paper, one numerical procedure is proposed on the basis of

  4. The various scenarios leading to WR stars: Their relative importance and the role of mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, A.

    1982-01-01

    Over the last 40 years WR stars have been associated with almost all possible evolutionary stages. The author lists 7 scenarios which may be considered as most relevant in view of recent surface abundance determinations. He then considers the importance of mass loss in WR formation and discusses properties of binary WR which suggest that formation is dependent on metallicity and thus galactic location. The role of internal mixing in WR formation is also considered. Mass loss on the MS is shown only to be able to explain a minute fraction of the observed WR stars, whereas internal mixing by shear instability has, for all stellar masses, a larger effect on MS evolution than mass loss. (Auth./C.F.)

  5. Chirality and Pinwheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    By using cardboard models that resemble propellers, the students of inorganic courses can easily visualizing the distinct rotation of optical isomers. These propellers rotate clockwise or counterclockwise when they are dropped from a certain height or in the presence of wind. (Contains 1 figure.)

  6. WR-1065 and radioprotection of vascular endothelial cells. I. Cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Kang, H.J.; Baumann, F.E.; Blazek, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity limits radiation therapy and could depend on the extent of damage to the vascular endothelium. Aminothiols such as WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] provide radioprotection for normal tissues, but little is known about how the aminothiols specifically affect the endothelium. Bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture were exposed to WR-1065 for 2 h before irradiation ( 137 Cs γ rays, 1 Gy/min). Alone, WR-1065 demonstrated an antiproliferative effect that was related to dose (0.5-4 mM) and was evident by lowered counts of adherent cells 48 h after exposure. WR-1065 was clearly radioprotective when assessed by colony formation and incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine. However, when the number of adherent cells was evaluated, radioprotection appeared to be slight and evident only in logarithmically growing cells. WR-1065 at 2 mM suppressed single-strand DNA breaks after 3 Gy by 22% and double-strand breaks after 9 Gy by 47%. Also in the irradiated cells, WR-1065 more than doubled the rate of progression of cells from G 1 to S phase. WR-1065 pretreatment elevated cellular glutathione (GSH) content more than twofold. Although pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine inhibited the elevation of GSH, the radioprotective impact of WR-1065 on total DNA strand breaks and colony formation was unaffected. These results suggest that WR-1065 may enable tissue recovery from irradiation by promoting the replication of endothelial cells, possibly by mechanisms independent of GSH. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Effects of daily treatment with a radioprotector WR-2721 on Ehrlich's ascites tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebuchi, Makoto; Shinohara, Shigeo; Kimura, Hiroshi; Morimoto, Kunio; Shima, Akihiro

    1981-01-01

    Mice were injected daily with a radioprotector WR-2721 (S-2-[3-aminopropyl-amino]ethylphosphorothioic acid) after inoculation with Ehrlich's ascites tumor cells. Increases in weight of mice, volume of ascitic fluid and number of ascitic cells per mouse were reduced by the daily administration of 5 mg/mouse of the drug, indicating a suppressive effect of WR-2721 on growth of ascitic cells. But daily treatment with 5 mg/mouse of WR-2721 caused earlier death of tumor-bearing mice. (author)

  8. Reduction of radiation effects by chemical protector (WR-2721)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Yun, T.K.; Koh, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    As a part studies on effect of radiation, the present report was carried out to evaluate the changes of leukocytes, lymphocytes percent of leukocytes and several organs in swiss webster (NIH-GP) mice by radiation protective agents prior to γ-ray exposure. The whole body irradiation after administration of a radiation protective agents was done in dose level of 25,50,100 and 300 rads by a single exposure of γ-ray delivered from 60 Co, source tele-irradiation unit at a dose rate of 100 rad/min. Mice of each experimental group were whole body γ-irradiated in plastic cage with special producted rotating machine. The radiation protective agent was employed WR-2721 and the amounts injected intraperitoneally were 400mg/kg of body weight. The leukocytes were counted with hemocytometer. Differential count of leukocytes was done with 200 cells every smear and lymphocyte percent of leukocyte were determined in relative proportion only. All major organ were examined grossly and weighted. After fixation with formalin solution, histo-pathological preparations were made for microscopical study. (Author)

  9. HPLC assay for 2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanethiol (WR-1065) in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGovern, E.P.; Swynnerton, N.F.; Steele, P.D.; Mangold, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    A high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) plasma assay for WR-1065 is described which is both precise and accurate throughout the concentration range from 1 to 500 μg/mL of plasma. The analyte is separated by HPLC and detected with a thiol specific electrochemical transducer cell. The detector response is linear over the ranges 1 to 10 μg/mL, 10 to 100 μg/mL, and 100 to 500 μg/mL. The absolute retention times for WR-1065 and WT-1729 are 9 and 12 minutes, respectively. The assay uses 100 μL of plasma and requires a total chromatography cycle time of 40 minutes. The method has been found suitable for the determination of WR-1065 in plasma from a beagle dog after i.v. administration of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate (WR-2721)

  10. Circumvention of the tumor membrane barrier to WR-2721 absorption by reduction of drug hydrophilicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuhas, J.M.; Davis, M.E.; Glover, D.; Brown, D.Q.; Ritter, M.

    1982-01-01

    In attempting to account for the ability of most solid tumors to restrict the absorption of WR-2721, aminopropyl-aminoethylphosphorothioate, we examined a number of drug characteristics which might allow for this restriction, and observed that drug hypdrophilicity was a major contributing factor. When the highly hydrophilic WR-2721 was dephosphorylated, the drug became less hydrophilic and could readily cross tumor cell membranes. In addition, conventional radioprotectants, such as cysteine and mercaptoethylamine, were shown to be less hydrophilic than WR-2721 and also to cross tumor membranes readily. Therefore, drug hydrophilicity would appear to be the factor underlying the ability of WR-2721 to selectively protect normal tissues while most other protectors alter the radiation resistance of normal and tumor tissue alike. A red blood cell model for studying this problem in greater detail is described

  11. Local changes after intramuscular administration of gammaphos (WR-2721) in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resl, M.; Kuna, P.

    1985-01-01

    Local changes were investigated after i.m. injection of WR-2721, dissolved in saline or in aqua pro injectionem (ApI), and of ApI or saline alone. First muscle changes were found in the all the experimental groups after 6 h. Their development was most intensive after i.m. injection of ApI alone (granular degeneration up to complete necrosis of muscle fibers). The local changes after i.m. injection of WR-2721 in saline did not reach the intensity of changes of WR-2721 in ApI. The first reparative or regenerative changes were observed 72 hours after application. In the late phase (14th to 21st day) the normal tissue state was reached. The i.m. injection of WR-2721 in saline may be one of the possible routes of administration of this radioprotective substance. (author)

  12. Interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of WR-2721, a radioprotective drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, L.C.; Rafter, J.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Pre-irradiation intravenous administration of the radioprotective drug S-2-[3-aminopropylamino]ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) has potential value in radiotherapy because it doubles the radiation resistance of normal mouse tissues while affording only minimal protection to tumors. Deficient deposition of WR- 2721 in tumor tissue has recently been demonstrated and this is thought to be a major reason for the preferential protection of normal tissues by the drug. Data originally obtained in studies using the mouse and rat indicated that the tissue distribution of WR-2721 was possibly more closely related to dose per unit surface area than to dose per unit weight. To test this hypothesis an interspecies comparison of the tissue distribution of 35 S-labeled WR-2721 was carried out in normal mice, rats, rabbits, and dogs at 15 and 30 minutes after intravenous administration. Results suggest that the surface area and body weight exert equal effects on the tissue concentration of WR-2721. The results further suggest that lower absolute doses of WR-2721 in the human, possibly as low as 20 mg/kg, may provide a radioprotective effect equivalent to that produced from 100 mg/kg in the mouse, i.e., a 50 to 80 percent increase in radiation resistance (CH)

  13. Reduced protection of stem spermatogonia by WR-2721 at low doses of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meistrich, M.; Finch, M.; Hunter, N.; Milas, L.

    1984-01-01

    The radioprotection of normal cells with WR-2721 at low doses of radiation (about 2 Gy per fraction) was investigated using testicular stem cells. Survival of stem spermatogonia to single doses of irradiation, measured using sperm head counts at 56 days postirradiation, indicated no protection factor (PF = 1.00) at 2 GY by 400 mg/kg WR-2721, but a significant PF = 1.44 at 12 Gy. Stem cell survival was also measured after 5 fractions. When daily fractionation was used with 300 mg/kg WR-2721, given prior to each irradiation, little or no protection was observed at 2 Gy using the sperm head assay (PF = 0.98) or at 2.4 Gy using counts of repopulating tubules at 35 days postirradiation (PF = 1.12). In contrast, there was more significant protection (PF's = 1.22 and 1.27) for these two assays when 300 mg/kg WR-2721 was used with single high doses of radiation. When 4-hour fractionation was used with 300 mg/kg WR-2721, given prior to the first dose and 150 mg/kg prior to subsequent doses, minimal protection was observed at 2 Gy/fraction using the sperm head assay (PF = 0.98) and the repopulating tubule assay (PF = 1.09). Thus, protection of these cells in the clinical dose range is much lower than that observed at doses above 10 Gy. These results may be explained by a decrease in the intrinsic ability of WR-2721 to protect at lower radiation doses plus a cytotoxic effect of WR-2721

  14. Corolla chirality does not contribute to directed pollen movement in Hypericum perforatum (Hypericaceae): mirror image pinwheel flowers function as radially symmetric flowers in pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, Carolina; Fenster, Charles B

    2016-07-01

    Corolla chirality, the pinwheel arrangement of petals within a flower, is found throughout the core eudicots. In 15 families, different chiral type flowers (i.e., right or left rotated corolla) exist on the same plant, and this condition is referred to as unfixed/enantiomorphic corolla chirality. There are no investigations on the significance of unfixed floral chirality on directed pollen movement even though analogous mirror image floral designs, for example, enantiostyly, has evolved in response to selection to direct pollinator and pollen movement. Here, we examine the role of corolla chirality on directing pollen transfer, pollinator behavior, and its potential influence on disassortative mating. We quantified pollen transfer and pollinator behavior and movement for both right and left rotated flowers in two populations of Hypericum perforatum. In addition, we quantified the number of right and left rotated flowers at the individual level. Pollinators were indifferent to corolla chirality resulting in no difference in pollen deposition between right and left flowers. Corolla chirality had no effect on pollinator and pollen movement between and within chiral morphs. Unlike other mirror image floral designs, corolla chirality appears to play no role in promoting disassortative mating in this species.

  15. Depletion of glutathione by the radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioic acid (WR2721)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schor, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    S-2-(3-Aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioic acid (WR2721) is a free radical scavenger currently in limited clinical use as an adjunct in cancer radio- and chemotherapy. We have previously determined the pharmacokinetics and protein binding characteristics of WR2721 in rabbits and in humans. We have also shown that WR2721 is an effective mucolytic agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. In vivo, WR2721 is converted to its free thiol analogue, N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane (MDP), and, as such, reacts with disulfide bonds in the mucin molecule, altering its rheology. In the course of experiments designed to examine the spectrum of its activity as a free radical scavenger, we have observed that WR2721 exacerbates the toxicity of those free radical-generating agents, such as acetaminophen and 6-hydroxydopamine, which depend upon glutathione for their detoxication. For this reason, we examined the glutathione content of the livers of mice treated with WR2721. (author)

  16. WR 110: A SINGLE WOLF-RAYET STAR WITH COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS IN ITS WIND?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chene, A.-N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Fahed, R.; St-louis, N.; Muntean, V.; Chevrotiere, A. De La; Cameron, C.; Matthews, J. M.; Gamen, R. C.; Lefevre, L.; Rowe, J. F.; Guenther, D. B.; Kuschnig, R.; Weiss, W. W.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.

    2011-01-01

    A 30 day contiguous photometric run with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite on the WN5-6b star WR 110 (HD 165688) reveals a fundamental periodicity of P = 4.08 ± 0.55 days along with a number of harmonics at periods P/n, with n ∼ 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and a few other possible stray periodicities and/or stochastic variability on timescales longer than about a day. Spectroscopic radial velocity studies fail to reveal any plausible companion with a period in this range. Therefore, we conjecture that the observed light-curve cusps of amplitude ∼0.01 mag that recur at a 4.08 day timescale may arise in the inner parts, or at the base, of a corotating interaction region (CIR) seen in emission as it rotates around with the star at constant angular velocity. The hard X-ray component seen in WR 110 could then be a result of a high velocity component of the CIR shock interacting with the ambient wind at several stellar radii. Given that most hot, luminous stars showing CIRs have two CIR arms, it is possible that either the fundamental period is 8.2 days or, more likely in the case of WR 110, there is indeed a second weaker CIR arm for P = 4.08 days, that occurs ∼two-thirds of a rotation period after the main CIR. If this interpretation is correct, WR 110 therefore joins the ranks with three other single WR stars, all WN, with confirmed CIR rotation periods (WR 1, WR 6, and WR 134), albeit with WR 110 having by far the lowest amplitude photometric modulation. This illustrates the power of being able to secure intense, continuous high-precision photometry from space-based platforms such as MOST. It also opens the door to revealing low-amplitude photometric variations in other WN stars, where previous attempts have failed. If all WN stars have CIRs at some level, this could be important for revealing sources of magnetism or pulsation in addition to rotation periods.

  17. A Chandra grating observation of the dusty Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhekov, Svetozar A. [Space Research and Technology Institute, Akad. G. Bonchev Str., bl.1, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Gagné, Marc [Department of Geology and Astronomy, West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States); Skinner, Stephen L., E-mail: szhekov@space.bas.bg, E-mail: mgagne@wcupa.edu, E-mail: stephen.skinner@colorado.edu [CASA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We present results of a Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 48a. These are the first high-resolution spectra of this object in X-ray. Blueshifted centroids of the spectral lines of ∼ – 360 km s{sup –1} and line widths of 1000-1500 km s{sup –1} (FWHM) were deduced from the analysis of the line profiles of strong emission lines. The forbidden line of Si XIII is strong and not suppressed, indicating that the rarified 10-30 MK plasma forms far from strong sources of far-ultraviolet emission, most likely in a wind collision zone. Global spectral modeling showed that the X-ray spectrum of WR 48a suffered higher absorption in the 2012 October Chandra observation compared with a previous 2008 January XMM-Newton observation. The emission measure of the hot plasma in WR 48a decreased by a factor ∼3 over the same period of time. The most likely physical picture that emerges from the analysis of the available X-ray data is that of colliding stellar winds in a wide binary system with an elliptical orbit. We propose that the unseen secondary star in the system is another WR star or perhaps a luminous blue variable.

  18. Effect of radioprotectant WR 2721 on cyclic nucleotides, prostaglandins, and lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocha, P.J.; Catravas, G.N.

    1983-01-01

    Within 1 hr after ip injection of the radioprotectant WR 2721 into rats, splenic cGMP levels dropped and remained suppressed for 6 hr before returning to normal. However, if rats were exposed to ionizing radiation 30-40 min after WR 2721 treatment, they had higher cGMP levels at 3 hr postirradiation than the nonirradiUted, drug-treated controls, but the cGMP content was still found to be lower than that of the irradiated nondrug-treated controls. Radiation exposure of animals pretreated with WR 2721 also resulted in higher liver and spleen levels of cAMP and additional elevations in spleen prostaglandin content, compared with irradiated controls at 3-6 hr after radiation treatment. The secondary fluctuations of lysosomal enzyme activities, prostaglandin content, and cyclic nucleotide levels were also altered in irradiated rats pretreated with WR 2721 when compared with irradiated controls. Liver and spleen lysosomal β-glucuronidase activities, spleen cAMP and cGMP levels, and spleen prostaglandin concentrations were closer to physiological levels at 3 days postirradiation in rats given WR 2721 before the radiation treatment

  19. Acute cardiovascular and autonomic effects of WR-2721: a radioprotective compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, R.W.; Heiffer, M.H.

    1975-01-01

    WR-2721 is a chemical which has shown much promise as a protective agent in animals exposed to ionizing radiation. Our experiments on anesthetized dogs and cats indicate that WR-2721 has little acute cardiovascular action in these animals when given intravenously in doses of 50 to 200 mg/kg. A total cumulative dose of 600 mg/kg within 2 hr was not lethal and, indeed, was well tolerated. Arterial blood pressure was not markedly lowered in dogs and cats given these doses. In dogs, a slight vasodilation was noted in the femoral vascular bed after intra-arterial injection. Mydriasis and watery salivation were observed in all animals. In the dog, WR-2721 (100 mg/kg) was observed to produce blockade of the bilateral carotid artery-occlusion pressor response, the pressor response to the ganglionic stimulant DMPP, and the bradycardia to vagus nerve stimulation. In the cat, WR-2721 (100 mg/kg) also blocked the contraction of the cat nictitating membrane due to stimulation of the preganglionic fibers of the superior cervical ganglion, but not the contraction seen with postganglionic fiber stimulation. Our experiments indicate that WR-2721 is a ganglionic blocking agent. It does not share this property with closely related structural congeners. (U.S.)

  20. Improved HPLC assay for S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate (WR-2721) in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swynnerton, N.F.; McGovern, E.P.; Nino, J.A.; Mangold, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    An HPLC assay is presented for the detection and quantitation of the radioprotective drug S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioate (WR-2721, ethiofos) present in plasma. Improved selectivity and a 40-fold increase in sensitivity have been demonstrated over the method previously reported by this laboratory. Using precolumn derivatization with fluorescamine and S-3-(4-aminobutylamino)propyl phosphorothioate (WR-80855, a homolog of WR-2721) as the internal standard, drug levels of 0.05 to 1000 μg/mL were determined with excellent precision. Detector response was linear over the entire range. The assay uses 150 μL of plasma and requires a total chromatography time of about 50 minutes. The method was found suitable for pharmacokinetic studies in a preliminary experiment with a beagle dog in which no interferences due to plasma constituents or drug metabolites were observed

  1. Topical or systemic 16,16 dm prostaglandin E2 or WR-2721 (WR-1065) protects mice from alopecia after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, L.; Malkinson, F.D.; Hanson, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies in mice demonstrated that systemic or topical 16,16 dm PGE 2 protected against single dose radiation-induced hair loss. The authors have now investigated prostaglandin, or WR-2721, protection against murine alopecia produced by varying doses and schedules of fractionated radiation. In some studies with the radioprotectors given systematically, WR-2721 afforded slightly greater radioprotection than 16,16 dm PGE 2 . The two compounds were essentially equally radioprotective in the topical application studies. Since both systemic and topical applications of the agents tested enhanced hair regrowth following radiation, the authors conclude that clinical use of these compounds may provide some protection of hair follicles, and perhaps other tissues, lying within a radiation therapy field. (author)

  2. Topical or systemic 16,16 dm prostaglandin E sub 2 or WR-2721 (WR-1065) protects mice from alopecia after fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, L.; Malkinson, F.D. (Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke' s Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)); Hanson, W.R. (Hines VA Medical Center, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Previous studies in mice demonstrated that systemic or topical 16,16 dm PGE{sub 2} protected against single dose radiation-induced hair loss. The authors have now investigated prostaglandin, or WR-2721, protection against murine alopecia produced by varying doses and schedules of fractionated radiation. In some studies with the radioprotectors given systematically, WR-2721 afforded slightly greater radioprotection than 16,16 dm PGE{sub 2}. The two compounds were essentially equally radioprotective in the topical application studies. Since both systemic and topical applications of the agents tested enhanced hair regrowth following radiation, the authors conclude that clinical use of these compounds may provide some protection of hair follicles, and perhaps other tissues, lying within a radiation therapy field. (author).

  3. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278). WR-33278 and spermine protect against mutation induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Shigematsu, N.; Schwartz, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). Because of their reported structural and functional similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of WR-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents (at concentrations of 0.01 mM and 0.001 mM) were electroporated into cells. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction, with the sequence of irradiation followed 3 h later by electroporation being the more toxic protocol. Enhanced cell survival was observed following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278 30 min prior to irradiation; protection factors (PF) of 1.3 and 1.8, respectively. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested. These data suggest that the properties of radioprotection and chemoprevention exhibited by the phosphorothioate (WR-2721) and associated aminothiol (WR-1065) and disulfide (WR-33278) metabolites may be mediated via endogenous spermine-like polyamine processes. Such a mechanism would have important implications with respect to the design and development of new generation drugs for use in radioprotection and chemoprevention

  4. Further studies on selective radioprotection by organic zinc salts and synergism of zinc aspartate with WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floersheim, G.L.; Bieri, A.

    1990-01-01

    Protection of the haematocrit and thrombocytes by small doses of the aminothiol radioprotector WR 2721 was markedly improved by the concomitant administration of small doses of zinc aspartate. Zinc aspartate was the only one of the tested zinc salts not inhibiting the regression induced by radiotherapy of human tumours grown as xenografts in immunosuppressed mice. This also applied to zinc aspartate with WR 2721. A dose of zinc aspartate which afforded synergistic haematological protection did not enhance the toxicity of WR 2721. The synergism of zinc aspartate with WR 2721 and the differential radioprotection of the combined protocol may make it possible in clinical cancer radiotherapy to obtain selective radioprotection at a lower toxicity giving an improved therapeutic ratio compared with WR 2721 alone. (author)

  5. The infrared emission features in the spectrum of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiar, JE; Peeters, E; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first detection of unidentified infrared (UIR) emission features at similar to6.4 and 7.9 mum in the spectrum of the dusty WC8 Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a. Based on the H-deficient nature of WC stars, we attribute the emission features to large carbonaceous molecules or amorphous carbon

  6. Draft genome sequence of the intestinal parasite Blastocystis subtype 4-isolate WR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Wawrzyniak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal protistan parasite Blastocystis is characterized by an extensive genetic variability with 17 subtypes (ST1–ST17 described to date. Only the whole genome of a human ST7 isolate was previously sequenced. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Blastocystis ST4-WR1 isolated from a laboratory rodent at Singapore.

  7. Draft genome sequence of the intestinal parasite Blastocystis subtype 4-isolate WR1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Courtine, Damien; Osman, Marwan; Hubans-Pierlot, Christine; Cian, Amandine; Nourrisson, Céline; Chabe, Magali; Poirier, Philippe; Bart, Aldert; Polonais, Valérie; Delgado-Viscogliosi, Pilar; El Alaoui, Hicham; Belkorchia, Abdel; van Gool, Tom; Tan, Kevin S. W.; Ferreira, Stéphanie; Viscogliosi, Eric; Delbac, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    (ST1-ST17) described to date. Only the whole genome of a human ST7 isolate was previously sequenced. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Blastocystis ST4-WR1 isolated from a laboratory rodent at Singapore. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc

  8. WR 148: identifying the companion of an extreme runaway massive binary*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Melissa; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Hill, Grant M.; Shenar, Tomer; Richardson, Noel D.; Pablo, Herbert; St-Louis, Nicole; Ramiaramanantsoa, Tahina

    2017-05-01

    WR 148 (HD 197406) is an extreme runaway system considered to be a potential candidate for a short-period (4.3173 d) rare WR + compact object binary. Provided with new high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra from the Keck observatory, we determine the orbital parameters for both the primary WR and the secondary, yielding respective projected orbital velocity amplitudes of 88.1 ± 3.8 km s-1 and 79.2 ± 3.1 km s-1 and implying a mass ratio of 1.1 ± 0.1. We then apply the shift-and-add technique to disentangle the spectra and obtain spectra compatible with a WN7ha and an O4-6 star. Considering an orbital inclination of ˜67°, derived from previous polarimetry observations, the system's total mass would be a mere 2-3M_{⊙}, an unprecedented result for a putative massive binary system. However, a system comprising a 37 M_{⊙} secondary (typical mass of an O5V star) and a 33 M_{⊙} primary (given the mass ratio) would infer an inclination of ˜18°. We therefore reconsider the previous methods of deriving the orbital inclination based on time-dependent polarimetry and photometry. While the polarimetric results are inconclusive requiring better data, the photometric results favour low inclinations. Finally, we compute WR 148's space velocity and retrace the runaway's trajectory back to the Galactic plane (GP). With an ejection velocity of 198 ± 27 km s-1 and a travel time of 4.7 ± 0.8 Myr to reach its current location, WR 148 was most likely ejected via dynamical interactions in a young cluster.

  9. Effect of the radioprotector WR 2721 on the response of metastatic Lewis lung carcinoma colonies to alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wist, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    WR 2721 protected ''artificial'' lung metastases of Lewis lung carcinoma against the cytotoxic effects of cyclophosphamide and melphalan. When mice were pretreated with WR 2721 30 min before exposure to the alkylating agents a significant increase in the number of lung metastases could be observed. This protection of micrometastases had a significant impact on survival in the case of cyclophosphamide treatment, but not in the case of melphalan treatment. The degree of protection at a standard dose of WR 2721 was dose dependent. (orig.)

  10. PROBING WOLF–RAYET WINDS: CHANDRA/HETG X-RAY SPECTRA OF WR 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Schulz, N. S. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.; Shenar, T. [Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Nichols, J. S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., MS 34, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pollock, A. M. T., E-mail: dph@space.mit.edu, E-mail: ken.gayley@gmail.com, E-mail: wrh@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de, E-mail: lida@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de, E-mail: shtomer@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de, E-mail: ignace@mail.etsu.edu, E-mail: jnichols@cfa.harvard.edu [European Space Agency, ESAC, Apartado 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada (Spain)

    2015-12-10

    With a deep Chandra/HETGS exposure of WR 6, we have resolved emission lines whose profiles show that the X-rays originate from a uniformly expanding spherical wind of high X-ray-continuum optical depth. The presence of strong helium-like forbidden lines places the source of X-ray emission at tens to hundreds of stellar radii from the photosphere. Variability was present in X-rays and simultaneous optical photometry, but neither were correlated with the known period of the system or with each other. An enhanced abundance of sodium revealed nuclear-processed material, a quantity related to the evolutionary state of the star. The characterization of the extent and nature of the hot plasma in WR 6 will help to pave the way to a more fundamental theoretical understanding of the winds and evolution of massive stars.

  11. Protection against the clastogenic effect of CIS-PLATINUM by WR-2721, ATP and Vitamin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupova, I.; Yagova, A.

    1993-01-01

    The mutagenic effect of antineoplastic drug Cis-Platinum has been assessed by the frequency of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes (PE) in the mouse bone marrow at time intervals of 24, 48 and 73 h. The maximal clastogenic effect of 2 mg/kg of Cis-Platinum has been found at 24 h interval after treatment (3.6%). The protection against mutagenic activity of Cis-Platinum has been studied by pretreatment of the mice with the thiophosphate compound WR-2721, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Vitamin C alone or in combinations at the time of maximal response. The radioprotector WR-2721 exerts a high anti-mutagenic activity when applied prior to Cis-Platinum (2.2%; p 0.05). (author)

  12. Radioprotection of mouse skin by WR-2721: the critical influence of oxygen tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.; Michael, B.D.; Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    The epidermal clone assay has been used to study the radioprotective effect of WR-2721 on mouse skin under different conditions of oxygenation and under anoxia. The skin has shown a progressive decrease in sensitivity as the inspired gas has changed from 100% oxygen towards 0% oxygen. Compared with mice breathning 100% oxygen, those breathing air are partially protected. The inspired oxygen concentration to give half the full oxygen effect is 10-12%. The radioprotecton observed with 400 mg/kg WR-2721 is markedly dependent on the ambient oxygen concentration. The protection factor is 1.1 or less in mice breathing 5%, 1% or 0% oxygen. Protection is maximal (1.95) in air and in 50% oxygen and diminishes to 1.6 at higher oxygen tensions

  13. Survival of bone marrow-engrafted mice subsequent to protection from lethal radiation by WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnamon, K.E.; Ketterling, L.L.; Ledney, G.D.; Lorenz, G.B.; Mioduszewski, R.J.; Stampfli, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    For the first time data are presented for animals treated with bone marrow cells after lethal radiation exposure while protected with WR 2721 (the single radioprotective chemical compound with the highest known dose reduction factor). The LD 50 30 (lethal dose to 50% in 30 days) for mice exposed to whole-body 60 Co radiation was elevated from 824 +- 8 rad in unprotected and untreated mice to (a) 1181 +- 33 rad in animals which received syngeneic bone marrow cells after exposure; (b) 1342 +- 27 rad in animals which received WR 2721 before radiation exposure; and (c) 1608 +- 33 rad in animals receiving both the radioprotective agent before exposure and bone marrow engraftment after exposure

  14. Spectral Identification of New Galactic cLBV and WR Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, G. S.; Gvaramadze, V. V.; Beletsky, Y.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have undertaken a near-IR spectral survey of stars associated with compact nebulae recently revealed by the Spitzer and WISE imaging surveys. These circumstellar nebulae, produced by massive evolved stars, display a variety of symmetries and shapes and are often only evident at mid-IR wavelengths. Stars associated with ˜50 of these nebulae have been observed. We also obtained recent spectra of previously confirmed (known) luminous blue variables (LBVs) and candidate LBVs (cLBVs). The spectral similarity of the stars observed when compared directly to known LBVs and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars indicate many are newly identified cLBVs, with a few being newly discovered WR stars, mostly of WN8-9h spectral type. These results suggest that a large population of previously unidentified cLBVs and related transitional stars reside in the Galaxy and confirm that circumstellar nebulae are inherent to most (c)LBVs.

  15. Dose and time relationships of the radioprotector WR-2721 on locomotor activity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landauer, M.R.; Davis, H.D.; Dominitz, J.A.; Weiss, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on locomotor activity were evaluated in CD2F1 male mice. Separate groups of animals (N = 10/group) received an IP injection of vehicle, 25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg of WR-2721 immediately before testing. Horizontal and vertical activity were measured using a Digiscan automated animal activity monitor. The latency to onset and duration of action of each dose of the radioprotector were recorded. For both behavioral measures, a significant reduction was observed in activity at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg. A dose of 200 mg/kg had a 12- to 14-min latency to onset and significantly reduced behavioral activity for 3 hr. Mice injected with 400 mg/kg exhibited locomotor deficits within 8-10 min and were affected for up to 9 hr. The ED50 for horizontal and vertical activities at 1 hr postinjection were determined to be 271 and 105 mg/kg, respectively. The results demonstrate that significant reductions in locomotor activity are exhibited at doses of 200 mg/kg or more and that vertical activity was more sensitive to the disruptive effects of WR-2721 than was horizontal activity

  16. Enhancement of protective action of radioprotector; Mogucnosti potenciranja zastitnog dejstva radioprotektora WR-2721

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobric, S; Milovanovic, S [Vojnotehnicki Institut, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1996-12-31

    The efficacy of radioprotector WR-2721 (300 mg/kg ip, 20 min before irradiation), alone or in combination with an extract of Ginkgo biloba (Tebonin{sup R}) (17.5 mg/kg ip, 20 min before, and then 1 hr and 24 hr after irradiation), an extract of thymus (Thymolip{sup R}) (10 mg/kg sc, 24 hr before and 15 min after irradiation), herbal mitogen agrostemin (0.1 mg/kg ip. 24 before and immediately after irradiation) and calcium antagonist verapamil (1 mg/kg ip, immediately before irradiation), was studied in adult male Wistar rats irradiated by 9 Gy and 12 Gy of X-rays. It was established that above mentioned compounds, except wr-2721, failed to protect irradiated animals. Given in combination with WR-2721 only agrostemin and verapamil enhanced the efficacy of the protector. The combination with verapamil was more effective providing protection even in supralethal irradiated rats. (author) 7 refs. 2 tabs.

  17. LEW.1WR1 RATS DEVELOP AUTOIMMUNE DIABETES SPONTANEOUSLY AND IN RESPONSE TO ENVIRONMENTAL PERTURBATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordes, John P.; Leif, Jean H.; Woda, Bruce A.; Flanagan, Joan F.; Greiner, Dale L.; Kislauskis, Edward H.; Tirabassi, Rebecca S.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a new rat model of autoimmune diabetes that arose in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) congenic LEW rat. Spontaneous diabetes in LEW.1WR1 rats (RT1u/u/a) occurs with a cumulative frequency of ∼2% at a median age of 59 days. The disease is characterized by hyperglycemia, glycosuria, ketonuria and polyuria. Both sexes are affected, and islets of acutely diabetic rats are devoid of beta cells whereas alpha and delta cell populations are spared. The peripheral lymphoid phenotype is normal, including the fraction of ART2+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). We tested the hypothesis that the expression of diabetes would be increased by immunological perturbation of innate or adaptive immunity. Treatment of young rats with depleting anti-ART2.1 mAb increased the frequency of diabetes to 50%. Treatment with the toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid increased the frequency of diabetes to 100%. All diabetic rats exhibited end-stage islets. The LEW.1WR1 rat is also susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis but is free of spontaneous thyroiditis. The LEW.1WR1 rat provides a new model for studying autoimmune diabetes and arthritis in an animal with a genetic predisposition to both disorders that can be amplified by environmental perturbation. PMID:16123363

  18. Inhibition of topoisomerase IIα activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis

  19. Inhibition of topoisomerase II{alpha} activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Constantinou, A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Specialized Cancer Center; Shigematsu, N.; Murley, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis.

  20. Toxicity studies on the radioprotective agent WR-2721 in CDF1 mice and beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, T.E.; Glaza, S.M.; Dickie, B.C.; Weltman, R.H.; Greenspun, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    WR-2721, S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid, is used extensively to protect normal cells during the irradiation of neoplastic cells. Dose levels for human radiotherapy are based on results obtained from laboratory animal lethality and toxicity studies. WR-2721 was administered intravenously to CDF1 mice and beagle dogs. Single dose lethality studies in mice showed the average 1/10 of the lethal dose, the median lethal dose and 9/10 the lethal dose to be 508 (1523 mg/m2), 589 (1766 mg/m2), and 682 mg/kg (2047 mg/m2), respectively. The lethal dose for female mice was lower than that for males. The 1/10 lethal dose in mice was slightly toxic to dogs; 1/10 of that dose was nontoxic. The lethal dose for dogs (6000 mg/m2) was higher than that for mice (2000 mg/m2). Clinical signs of toxicosis in the single-dose mouse toxicity study were evident in the 1st week following treatment and declined during the recovery period; signs of toxicosis were transient in dogs. Acute drug-induced pathologic changes included elevated BUN and SGOT levels, lymphoid necrosis, and renal tubular degeneration in mice. These changes were evident in the 1st week following treatment, but had dissipated by study termination. Generalized vascular changes (congestion, hemorrhage, and edema) and renal tubular degeneration occurred in treated dogs that had died or were killed moribund 7 days postinjection. These findings indicate sex-dependent and interspecies variation in the toxicity of WR-2721 with acute, but reversible, pathologic changes

  1. LM1-64: a Newly Reported Lmc-Pn with WR Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, M.; Olguin, L.; Ruiz, M. T.; Torres-Peimbert, S.

    1993-05-01

    The object LM1-64 was reported by Lindsay & Mullan (1963, Irish Astron. J., 5, 51) as a probable PN in the LMC. Optical and UV spectra taken by us confirm that suggestion. LM1-64 is a high excitation planetary nebulae which shows evidence of having a WC central star. Broad stellar emission at lambda 4650 is detected in the optical spectrum obtained with the CTIO 4m telescope, in 1989. A UV spectrum in the range from 1200 Angstroms to 2000 Angstroms was obtained with IUE in 1990. We have measured all the emission line fluxes available and determined values for the physical conditions and chemical abundances of the nebular ionized gas. The derived values are T(OIII) = 14000K, log He/H = 11.05, log C/H = 9.48, log O/H = 8.55 and log Ne/H = 7.94. LM1-64 shows a large C enhancement in the envelope as result of the central star activity, while He, O and Ne are comparable to the average values reported for the LMC-PNe (Monk, Barlow & Clegg, 1988, MNRAS, 234, 583). We have estimated the He II Zanstra temperature of the central star to be ~ 80,000 K. This temperature is much higher than the values reported for the known LMC-PNe with WR nucleus that Monk et al. have classified as W4 to W8. The only other high temperature WR nucleus in a LMC-PN is N66 which recently showed evidence of undergoing a WR episode (Torres-Peimbert, Ruiz, Peimbert & Pe\\ na, 1993, IAU Symp. 155, eds. A. Acker & R. Weinberger, in press).

  2. Searching for WR stars in I Zw 18 -- The origin of HeII emission

    OpenAIRE

    de Mello, Duilia; Schaerer, Daniel; Heldmann, Jennifer; Leitherer, Claus

    1998-01-01

    I Zw 18 is the most metal poor star-forming galaxy known and is an ideal laboratory to probe stellar evolution theory at low metallicities. Using archival HST WFPC2 imaging and FOS spectroscopy we were able to improve previous studies. We constructed a continuum free HeII map, which was used to identify Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars recently found by ground-based spectroscopy and to locate diffuse nebular emission. Most of the HeII emission is associated with the NW stellar cluster, clearly displaced...

  3. Investigations with beagles about toxicity and radioprotective effect of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Sedlmeier, H.; Wustrow, T.; Messerschmidt, O.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of the chemical radioprotection substance WR 2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl-thiophosphate) was examined in 25 beagles. The study showed that the toxicity of the substance increases as the dose gets higher. Between the doses 200 and 250 mg/kg of body weight, the increase of toxicity was significantly greater than could be expected on the basis of the dose difference. Until a dose of 200 mg/kg, the authors found no side effects which would have disturbed vital functions, but higher doses led to marked symptoms of intoxication. (orig.) [de

  4. Effects of WR1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced motor imbalance: Possible involvement of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza M; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Khalifeh, Solmaz; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-08-03

    Over production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is postulated to be the main contributor in degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. In this study we investigated the effects of WR1065, a free radical scavenger, on motor imbalance, oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory cytokines in CSF and brain of hemi-parkinsonian rats. Lesion of dopaminergic neurons was done by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine into the central region of the substentia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to induce hemi-parkinsonism and motor imbalance in rats. WR1065 (20, 40 and 80μg/2μl/rat) was administered three days before 6-OHDA administration. After three weeks behavioral study was performed and then brain and CSF samples were collected to assess tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), interlukin (IL-1β), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA). WR1065 pre-treatment in rats before receiving 6-OHDA, improved significantly motor impairment and caused reduction of MDA and inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β levels, while GSH level significantly increased when compared with lesioned rats. Our study indicated that WR1065 could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance. Furthermore, it decreased lipid peroxidation and inflammatory cytokines and restored the level of GSH up to normal range. We suggest that WR1065 can be proposed as a potential neuroprotective agent in motor impairments of PD. However to prove this hypothesis more clinical trial studies should be done. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hypolipidemic action of chrysin on Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in female C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheli Stéfani Zarzecki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone is a flavonoid, natural component of traditional medicinal herbs, present in honey, propolis and many plant extracts. The objective of this study was to investigate the hypolipidemic properties of chrysin on Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in female C57BL/6 mice. Triton WR-1339 was administered intraperitoneally (400 mg/kg to overnight-fasted mice to develop acute hyperlipidemia. Chrysin was administered orally (10 mg/kg 30 min before Triton WR-1339. At 24 h after Triton WR-1339 injection, blood samples were collected to measure plasma lipid levels. The hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, carbonyl content, non-protein sulfhydryl (NPSH and ascorbic acid (AA levels, as well as catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD activity were recorded. Chrysin administration significantly decreased total cholesterol levels. In addition, it partially decreased non-high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and triglycerides levels in plasma of hyperlipidaemic mice. In addition chrysin administration prevented the increase on TBARS levels and prevented the decrease in SOD activity induced by Triton WR-1339. These findings indicated that chrysin was able to decrease plasma lipids concentration and that its antioxidant properties was, at least in part, involved in the hypolipidaemic action of chrysin.

  6. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-01-01

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds

  7. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37663 (United States); Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52245 (United States); Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Huenemoerder, D. P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pollock, A. M. T. [European Space Agency XMM-Newton Science Operations Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Apartado 78, Villanueva de la Cañada, E-28691 Madrid (Spain); McFall, M., E-mail: ignace@etsu.edu [Department of Physics, 191 W. Woodruff Avenue, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds.

  8. Survival of irradiated mice treated with WR-151327, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate, or ofloxacin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledney, G. D.; Elliott, T. B.; Landauer, M. R.; Vigneulle, R. M.; Henderson, P. L.; Harding, R. A.; Tom, S. P.

    1994-10-01

    Spaceflight personnel need treatment options that would enhance survival from radiation and would not disrupt task performance. Doses of prophylactic or therapeutic agents known to induce significant short-term (30-day) survival with minimal behavioral (locomotor) changes were used for 180-day survival studies. In protection studies, groups of mice were treated with the phosphorothioate WR-151327 (200 mg/kg, 25% of the LD10) or the immunomodulator, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM; 8 mg/kg), before lethal irradiation with reactor-generated fission neutrons and γ-rays (n/γ = 1) or 60Co γ-rays. In therapy studies, groups of mice received either S-TDCM, the antimicrobial ofloxacin, or S-TDCM plus ofloxacin after irradiation. For WR-151327 treated-mice, survival at 180 days for n/γ = 1 and γ-irradiated mice was 90% and 92%, respectively; for S-TDCM (protection), 57% and 78%, respectively; for S-TDCM (therapy), 20% and 25%, respectively; for ofloxacin, 38% and 5%, respectively; for S-TDCM combined with ofloxacin, 30% and 30%, respectively; and for saline, 8% and 5%, respectively. Ofloxacin or combined ofloxacin and S-TDCM increased survival from the gram-negative bacterial sepsis that predominated in n/γ = 1) irradiated mice. The efficacies of the treatments depended on radiation quality, treatment agent and its mode of use, and microflora of the host.

  9. Clinical experiences with a chemical radioprotector in tumor radiotherapy: WR-2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Since cysteine was found to protect lethally irradiated rats, sulfhydryl compounds that provide protection of laboratory animals against lethal doses of ionizing radiations have also been given much attention. The SH compounds have been the most extensively investigated, and β-aminoethylisothiouronium (AET) and cysteamine have been selected as being representative of those drugs that are highly protective. However, clinical application is limited, as the toxicity of these compounds is high. In a series of experiments to reevaluate radioprotective agents with low toxicity, the authors found that 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (MPG) and adrenochrome monoguangylhydrazone methanesulfonate (AMM) have a potent radioprotector effect in a dose far below their toxic doses in both mice and humans. Recently, the development of effective thiophosphate derivatives of cysteamine, namely WR-2721 [S-2-(3-amino-propylaminoethyl)phosphorothioate] by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Commands, led to a reevaluation of these compounds and their potential in radiotherapy. Initial investigations indicated that WR-2721 provided a considerable degree of radioprotection to normal tissues. This compound provided excellent protection for normal tissues (DMF = 2-2.5) but little protection for the transplanted tumor. Thus this drug may have a differential protection in vivo and may be useful for improving the therapeutic ratio in cancer radiotherapy. The results of animal and chemical experiments in Japan are summarized herein

  10. Analysis of S-35 labeled WR-2721 and its metabolites in biological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, K.W.; Krohn, K.A.; Grunbaum, Z.; Phillips, R.B.; Mahler, P.A.; Menard, T.W.; Spence, A.M.; Rasey, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Studies with WR-2721 and related compounds have been hindered by the lack of a suitable assay for the drug and its major metabolites. A chromatographic method which requires no derivation for the separation and detection of WR-2721, the free thiol, its symmetrical disulfide and other mixed disulfides has been developed. The procedure involves ion-pairing for separation of ionizable compounds by causing polar molecules to become more lipophilic and hence separable using reverse phase HPLC. Detection is based upon liquid scintillation counting of S-35 incorporated during the synthesis of the parent compound. This method requires no pre-column preparation of samples and, by detecting the S-35 label, eliminates the chance that a coeluting species could interfere with detection, as might occur with post-column derivatization. This analytical technique employing radiotracers can be used to study radioprotective mechanisms by time dependent measurements of the tissue distribution and chemical form of labeled drug. Such chemical information can then be correlated with biological measures of radiation protection

  11. REVEALING THE ASYMMETRY OF THE WIND OF THE VARIABLE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR1 (HD 4004) THROUGH SPECTROPOLARIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Louis, N., E-mail: stlouis@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de physique and Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Québec (CRAQ), Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, high quality spectropolarimetric observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR1 (HD 4004) obtained with ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are presented. All major emission lines present in the spectrum show depolarization in the relative Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I. From the behavior of the amount of line depolarization as a function of line strength, the intrinsic continuum light polarization of WR1 is estimated to be P/I = 0.443% ± 0.028% with an angle of θ = –26.°2. Although such a level of polarization could in principle be caused by a wind flattened by fast rotation, the scenario in which it is a consequence of the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind is preferred. This is supported by previous photometric and spectroscopic observations showing periodic variations with a period of 16.9 days. This is now the third WR star thought to exhibit CIRs in its wind that is found to have line depolarization. Previous authors have found a strong correlation between line depolarization and the presence of an ejected nebula, which they interpret as a sign that the star has relatively recently reached the WR phase since the nebula are thought to dissipate very fast. In cases where the presence of CIRs in the wind is favored to explain the depolarization across spectral lines, the above-mentioned correlation may indicate that those massive stars have only very recently transited from the previous evolutionary phase to the WR phase.

  12. [Sensitivity of BALB/c and WR strain mice to the immunodepressive action of cyclophosphamide and thiophosphamide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ir, K N; Telegin, L Iu; Pevnitskiĭ, L A; Malashenko, A M

    1984-05-01

    Experiments were made on BALB/cJ YSto and WR/Y mice to study the immunosuppressant action of cyclophosphamide (CP) and thiophosphamide (thiotepa) in vivo. WR mice were found to be significantly more sensitive to the immunosuppressant action of thiotepa than BALB/c mice and to have similar sensitivity to the action of CP. BALB/c mice appeared highly resistant to the action of both the drugs. Based on the data obtained and those reported in the literature a possible parallelism is suggested between the mutagenic and immunosuppressant action of CP and thiotepa.

  13. 76 FR 10899 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the W.R. Grace and Company...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Employees From the W.R. Grace and Company in Curtis, MD, To Be Included in the Special Exposure Cohort... evaluate a petition to designate a class of employees from the W.R. Grace and Company in Curtis, Maryland... Compensation Program Act of 2000. The initial proposed definition for the class being evaluated, subject to...

  14. A BINARY ORBIT FOR THE MASSIVE, EVOLVED STAR HDE 326823, A WR+O SYSTEM PROGENITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Williams, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    The hot star HDE 326823 is a candidate transition-phase object that is evolving into a nitrogen-enriched Wolf-Rayet star. It is also a known low-amplitude, photometric variable with a 6.123 day period. We present new, high- and moderate-resolution spectroscopy of HDE 326823, and we show that the absorption lines show coherent Doppler shifts with this period while the emission lines display little or no velocity variation. We interpret the absorption line shifts as the orbital motion of the apparently brighter star in a close, interacting binary. We argue that this star is losing mass to a mass gainer star hidden in a thick accretion torus and to a circumbinary disk that is the source of the emission lines. HDE 326823 probably belongs to a class of objects that produce short-period WR+O binaries.

  15. Coupling hydrodynamics with comoving frame radiative transfer. I. A unified approach for OB and WR stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, A. A. C.; Hamann, W.-R.; Todt, H.; Hainich, R.; Shenar, T.

    2017-07-01

    Context. For more than two decades, stellar atmosphere codes have been used to derive the stellar and wind parameters of massive stars. Although they have become a powerful tool and sufficiently reproduce the observed spectral appearance, they can hardly be used for more than measuring parameters. One major obstacle is their inconsistency between the calculated radiation field and the wind stratification due to the usage of prescribed mass-loss rates and wind-velocity fields. Aims: We present the concepts for a new generation of hydrodynamically consistent non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (non-LTE) stellar atmosphere models that allow for detailed studies of radiation-driven stellar winds. As a first demonstration, this new kind of model is applied to a massive O star. Methods: Based on earlier works, the PoWR code has been extended with the option to consistently solve the hydrodynamic equation together with the statistical equations and the radiative transfer in order to obtain a hydrodynamically consistent atmosphere stratification. In these models, the whole velocity field is iteratively updated together with an adjustment of the mass-loss rate. Results: The concepts for obtaining hydrodynamically consistent models using a comoving-frame radiative transfer are outlined. To provide a useful benchmark, we present a demonstration model, which was motivated to describe the well-studied O4 supergiant ζPup. The obtained stellar and wind parameters are within the current range of literature values. Conclusions: For the first time, the PoWR code has been used to obtain a hydrodynamically consistent model for a massive O star. This has been achieved by a profound revision of earlier concepts used for Wolf-Rayet stars. The velocity field is shaped by various elements contributing to the radiative acceleration, especially in the outer wind. The results further indicate that for more dense winds deviations from a standard β-law occur.

  16. Detached dust shell around Wolf-Rayet star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borissova, J.; Amigo, P.; Kurtev, R. [Departamento de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030 (Chile); Kumar, M. S. N. [Centro de Astrofísica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Chené, A.-N. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North A' ohoku Place Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Minniti, D., E-mail: jura.borissova@uv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Facultad de Física, Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a detached dust shell around the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036 is reported. This shell is uncovered through the Spitzer-MIPS 24 μm image, where it appears brightest, and it is invisible at shorter wavelengths. Using new APEX observations and other data available from the literature, we have estimated some of the shell parameters: the inner and outer radii of 0.15 and 0.90 pc, respectively; the overall systemic velocity of the molecular {sup 12}CO(3 → 2) emission of –45.7 ± 2.3 km s{sup –1}; an expansion velocity of the gas of 16.3 ± 1 km s{sup –1}; the dust temperature and opacity of 122 ± 12 K and 1.04, respectively; and an age of 2.8 × 10{sup 4} yr. The WR star displays some cyclic variability. The mass computed for the WR60-6 nebula indicates that the material was probably ejected during its previous stages of evolution. In addition, we have identified a bright spot very close to the shell, which can be associated with the Midcourse Space Experiment source G312.13+00.20.

  17. Effects of area postrema lesions on taste aversions produced by treatment with WR-2721 in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1986-01-01

    The conditioned taste aversion procedure was used to further assess some behavioral effects of treatment with the putative radioprotectant WR-2721 and the role of the area postrema in mediating the behavioral effects of treatment. Treatment with 40, 150 or 300 mg/kg WR-2721 produced dose-dependent changes in sucrose intake in both control rats and rats with area postrema lesions. The effectiveness of the lesion in disrupting the acquisition of an aversion varied as a function of the dose administered, with the lesions producing the greatest disruption of aversion learning at the lowest dose and little disruption at the highest dose tested. At all dose levels, sucrose intake was greater for the rats with area postrema lesions than for the sham-operated control rats. Treatment with WR-2721 also produced significant decreases in total fluid intake, particularly at the higher dose levels. The results are discussed as indicating that treatment with WR-2721 produces highly toxic effects on behavior and that the use of the compound as a radioprotectant for radiotherapy requires additional assessment of its effects on brain function and behavior

  18. Protein binding of N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane via mixed disulfide formation after oral administration of WR 2721

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabachnik, N.F.; Blackburn, P.; Peterson, C.M.; Cerami, A.

    1982-02-01

    Earlier studies have shown that WR 2721 (H2N-(CH2)3-NH(CH2)2SPO3H2) is converted to its free thiol form, N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane (MDP), at the acidic pH of the stomach. MDP is a radioprotective compound and a mucolytic agent capable of decreasing sputum viscosity in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Conversion of WR 2721 and MDP to the corresponding sulfonic acid (MDP-SO3H) permits quantitative determination of these compounds in physiological fluids by use of an automatic amino acid analyzer. After oral administration of WR 2721 to human patients and rabbits it is converted to MDP and the free thiol form of the drug associates with plasma proteins by mixed disulfide linkage. The plasma proteins serve as a depot and reservoir of MDP for potential exchange at the tissues. When incubated with whole sputum or with purified mucin solutions in vitro, MDP decreased the viscosity of these solutions by reduction of the accessible disulfide bonds of the mucin molecule and was subsequently found in mixed disulfide association with the mucin molecule. The association of MDP with proteins via mixed disulfide linkage has important implications for the development of optimal dose regimens for administration of WR 2721 to patients.

  19. Protein binding of N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane via mixed disulfide formation after oral administration of WR 2721

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabachnik, N.F.; Blackburn, P.; Peterson, C.M.; Cerami, A.

    1982-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that WR 2721 [H2N-(CH2)3-NH(CH2)2SPO3H2] is converted to its free thiol form, N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane (MDP), at the acidic pH of the stomach. MDP is a radioprotective compound and a mucolytic agent capable of decreasing sputum viscosity in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Conversion of WR 2721 and MDP to the corresponding sulfonic acid (MDP-SO3H) permits quantitative determination of these compounds in physiological fluids by use of an automatic amino acid analyzer. After oral administration of WR 2721 to human patients and rabbits it is converted to MDP and the free thiol form of the drug associates with plasma proteins by mixed disulfide linkage. The plasma proteins serve as a depot and reservoir of MDP for potential exchange at the tissues. When incubated with whole sputum or with purified mucin solutions in vitro, MDP decreased the viscosity of these solutions by reduction of the accessible disulfide bonds of the mucin molecule and was subsequently found in mixed disulfide association with the mucin molecule. The association of MDP with proteins via mixed disulfide linkage has important implications for the development of optimal dose regimens for administration of WR 2721 to patients

  20. [Clinical case of the month. Mild hemolytic disease of the newborn due to an anti-Wr(a) antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutgens, A; Monfort, M; Wagemans, D; Van Cauwenberge, J-R; Gérard, C

    2012-01-01

    A Caucasian woman, with a A+ CCD.ee K neg erythrocyte phenotype and no history of blood transfusion, delivered a first child who developed mild anemia. The direct antiglobulin test performed on the newborn red blood cells belonging to the A+ CCD.ee K neg group, was strongly positive for IgG. During the pregnancy and after the delivery, the woman had a negative irregular antibody screening test, using standard red blood cells. However, at birth, using a collection of thawed red blood cells with rare phenotypes (private antigens), the lab showed an antibody anti-Wr(a) in the maternal serum. The activity of the maternal antibody, with a titer of 16, was completely inhibited by dithiothreitol, indicating the nature IgM of the circulating antibody. The presence of the antigen Wr(a) on the surface of the newborn and its biological father red blood cells was confirmed. The concentration of IgG anti-Wr(a) on baby erythrocytes was demonstrated by the presence of the antibody anti-Wr(a) in the eluate. This case illustrates the difficulties to detect antibodies against private antigens on baby erythrocytes, responsible of hemolytic diseases of newborn. Indeed, standard red blood cell panels used for irregular antibodies screening test do not express generally those private antigens.

  1. Colliding winds: Interaction regions with strong heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, J.N.; Chevalier, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of fast stellar wind with a slower wind from previous mass loss gives rise to a region of hot, shocked gas. We obtain self-similar solutions for the interaction region under the assumptions of constant mass loss rate and wind velocity for the two winds, conversion of energy in the shock region, and either isothermal electrons and adiabatic ions or isothermal electrons ad ions in the shocked region. The isothermal assumption is intended to show the effects of strog heat conduction. The solutions have no heat conduction through the shock waves and assume that the electron and ion temperatures are equilibriated in the shock waves. The one-temperature isothermal solutions have nearly constant density through the shocked region, while the two-temperature solutions are intermediate between the one-temperature adiabatic and isothermal solutions. In the two-temperature solutions, the ion temperature goes to zero at the point where the gas comoves with the shocked region and the density peaks at this point. The solution may qualitatively describe the effects of heat conduction on interaction regions in the solar wind. It will be important to determine whether the assumption of no thermal waves outside the shocked region applies to shock waves in the solar wind

  2. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. I. METHODS AND FIRST RESULTS: 41 NEW WR STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Gerke, Jill; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene; Villar-Sbaffi, Alfredo; Stanonik, Kathryn; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of new Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in our Galaxy via large-scale narrowband optical surveys has been severely limited by dust extinction. Recent improvements in infrared technology have made narrowband-broadband imaging surveys viable again. We report a new J, K, and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg 2 of the plane of the Galaxy, spanning 150 degrees in Galactic longitude and reaching 1 degree above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 173 WR star candidates we have discovered 41 new WR stars, 15 of type WN and 26 of type WC. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with K-band spectra, and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. A few of the new WR stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new WR stars is seen to follow that of previously known WR stars along the spiral arms of the Galaxy. Tentative radial velocities were also measured for most of the new WR stars.

  3. Hypolipidemic activity of Phellinus rimosus against triton WR-1339 and high cholesterol diet induced hyperlipidemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rony, K A; Ajith, T A; Nima, N; Janardhanan, K K

    2014-03-01

    Patients with the risk for atherosclerotic disease will be targeted to reduce the existing hyperlipidemia. The hypolipidemic activity of Phellinus rimosus was studied using triton WR-1339 and high cholesterol diet (HCD) induced models. The triton induced elevated lipid profile was attenuated by P. rimosus or standard drug atorvastatin. Similarly, administration of P. rimosus along with HCD significantly decline serum triglyceride, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, with elevating the high-density lipoprotein. Thiobarbituric acid reacting substances in heart and liver significantly decreased; where as activity of enzymatic antioxidants and level of reduced glutathione were significantly increased. In both models, P. rimosus extract showed a significant ameliorative effect on the elevated atherogenic index as well as LDL/HDL-C ratio. The hypolipidemic activity of P. rimosus can be ascribed to its inhibitory effect on the liver HMG CoA reductase activity. The results suggest the possible therapeutic potential of this fungus as hypolipidemic agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of a radioprotector WR-638 on the lymphoid compartment of the irradiated rat thymus: a flow cytometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragojevic-Simic, V.; Colic, M.; Gasic, S.

    1994-01-01

    The T cell composition of the thymus of X-ray irradiated (3.5 Gy) Wistar rat protected with WR-638 was analyzed by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies directed to the Thy 1.1, CD43, CD2, CD5, CD4, CD8 and class I and II MHC antigens. It was shown that this dose of X-rays caused cyclic changes in thymic cellularity manifested as: primary involution (until day 2), primary regeneration (from days 2 to 14), secondary involution (from days 14 to 21) and secondary regeneration (from days 21 to 30). WR-638 reduced the magnitude of thymocyte depletion in the primary involutive phase of the irradiated thymi. (author)

  5. Validation of KENO V.a for criticality safety calculations involving WR-1 fast-neutron fuel arrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I. C.

    1991-07-15

    The KENO V.a criticality safety code, used with the SCALE 27-energy-group ENDF/B-IV-based cross-section library, has been validated for low-enriched uranium carbide (UC) WR-1 fast-neutron (FN) fuel arrangements. Because of a lack of relevant experimental data for UC fuel in the published literature, the validation is based primarily on calculational comparisons with critical experiments for fuel types with a range of enrichments and densities that cover those of the FN UC fuel. The ability of KENO V.a to handle the unique annular pin arrangement of the WR-1 FN fuel bundle was established using a comparison with the MCNP3B code used with a continuous-energy ENDF/B-V-based cross-section library. This report is part of the AECL--10146 report series documenting the validation of the KENO V.a criticality safety code.

  6. Radioprotective action of WR-1065 on radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.; VanAnkeren, S.C.; Milas, L.; Meyn, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the radioprotective effect of WR-1065 on cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. The effects of the drug on the induction and rejoining of gamma-ray-induced DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) were measured using alkaline (pH 12.1) and neutral (pH 7.0) elution, respectively. Molecular protection factors (PFs) calculated from these data allowed us to determine whether the degree of modification of strand breakage accurately predicted the PFs measured using the biological end point of cell survival. The drug did protect against the induction of both SSBs and DSBs, although to an extent that did not appear to fully account for the degree of radioprotection in terms of cell killing measured under identical conditions. It is therefore unlikely that radioprotection by WR-1065 occurs simply as a consequence of a general lowering of all types of gamma-ray-induced DNA lesions, and it is possible that the drug could differentially protect against the induction of subsets of these DNA lesions. The rate of SSB rejoining was retarded following preirradiation treatment of cells with WR-1065, but there was no effect on DSB rejoining. Postirradiation treatment with WR-1065 also appeared to retard SSB rejoining but without an accompanying effect on either DSB rejoining or cell survival; however, this effect was largely reversed by the addition of catalase and was, therefore, probably a result of H 2 O 2 generated by autoxidation of the drug. Based on these observations, it would appear that the molecular actions of aminothiol radioprotective compounds that lead to reduced cell killing are much more complex than previously thought

  7. Aminoquinolone WR6026 as a feasible substitute for gentian violet in Chagas' disease prophylaxis in preserved blood for transfusional purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moraes-Souza Helio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for a colorless, nontoxic and efficient drug to prevent transfusion-associated Chagas' disease (TACD has been underway unsuccessfully since 1953 when gentian violet was preconized and to date is still being used as the only in vitro trypanocidal agent. The recent findings of aminoquinolone "WR6026" as a trypanocidal agent, led the authors to study the metabolism of red cells stored with this compound, the main objective of which was to define its applicability in TACD control. Ten units of human whole blood collected in CPDA-1 were divided into two equal satellite bags. One had "WR6026" (final concentration 62.5µg/mL added and the other was used as a control, both were stored at 4ºC. At baseline, day 7, 14, 21 and 28, samples were taken for the following measurements: adenosine triphosphate (ATP, hemoglobin, electrolytes (sodium and potassium, gases (pO2 and pCO2 and osmotic fragility. The results of tests and control were analyzed through parametric t-student test. The results were similar in both groups throughout the experiment except for the level of ATP on day 14, which presented significantly higher values in the tests when compared with the controls (p = 0.012. It was concluded that WR6026 does not interfere in the preservation and probably the viability of the erythrocytes also until day 28 of storage. Consequently the authors suggest that WR6026 could emerge as a colorless substitute for gentian violet in the control of TACD in endemic areas.

  8. Neutrino jets from high-mass WR gauge bosons in TeV-scale left-right symmetric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Manimala; Ruiz, Richard; Scott, Darren J.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We reexamine the discovery potential at hadron colliders of high-mass right-handed (RH) gauge bosons WR—an inherent ingredient of left-right symmetric models (LRSM). We focus on the regime where the WR is very heavy compared to the heavy Majorana neutrino N , and we investigate an alternative signature for WR→N decays. The produced neutrinos are highly boosted in this mass regime. Subsequently, their decays via off-shell WR bosons to jets, i.e., N →ℓ±jj, are highly collimated, forming a single neutrino jet (jN). The final-state collider signature is then ℓ±jN, instead of the widely studied ℓ±ℓ±j j . Present search strategies are not sensitive to this hierarchical mass regime due to the breakdown of the collider signature definition. We take into account QCD corrections beyond next-to-leading order (NLO) that are important for high-mass Drell-Yan processes at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For the first time, we evaluate WR production at NLO with threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithm (NNLL) matched to the threshold-improved parton distributions. With these improvements, we find that a WR of mass MWR=3 (4 )[5 ] TeV and mass ratio of (mN/MWR)discovered with a 5 - 6 σ statistical significance at 13 TeV after 10 (100 )[2000 ] fb-1 of data. Extending the analysis to the hypothetical 100 TeV Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), 5 σ can be obtained for WR masses up to MW R=15 (30 ) with approximately 100 fb-1 (10 ab-1 ). Conversely, with 0.9 (10 )[150 ] fb-1 of 13 TeV data, MWR<3 (4 )[5 ] TeV and (mN/MWR)<0.1 can be excluded at 95% C.L.; with 100 fb-1 (2.5 ab-1 ) of 100 TeV data, MW R<22 (33 ) TeV can be excluded.

  9. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. GOING FAINTER: 71 MORE NEW W-R STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David [American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street and Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, Succ. C-V, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Gerke, Jill [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1173 (United States); Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent, E-mail: mshara@amnh.org, E-mail: jfaherty@amnh.org, E-mail: dzurek@amnh.org, E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: gerke@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: artigau@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.ca [Departement de Physique, Universite Laval, Pavillon Vachon, Quebec City, QC, G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2012-06-15

    We are continuing a J, K and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg{sup 2} of the plane of the Galaxy, searching for new Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our survey spans 150 Degree-Sign in Galactic longitude and reaches 1 Degree-Sign above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 (due to severe crowding) within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission-line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 146 relatively bright W-R star candidates, we have re-examined 11 previously known WC and WN stars and discovered 71 new W-R stars, 17 of type WN and 54 of type WC. Our latest image analysis pipeline now picks out W-R stars with a 57% success rate. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with the K-band spectra and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Some of the new W-R stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new W-R stars is beginning to trace the locations of massive stars along the distant spiral arms of the Milky Way.

  10. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. GOING FAINTER: 71 MORE NEW W-R STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, René; Gerke, Jill; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    We are continuing a J, K and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg 2 of the plane of the Galaxy, searching for new Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our survey spans 150° in Galactic longitude and reaches 1° above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 (due to severe crowding) within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission-line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 146 relatively bright W-R star candidates, we have re-examined 11 previously known WC and WN stars and discovered 71 new W-R stars, 17 of type WN and 54 of type WC. Our latest image analysis pipeline now picks out W-R stars with a 57% success rate. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with the K-band spectra and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Some of the new W-R stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new W-R stars is beginning to trace the locations of massive stars along the distant spiral arms of the Milky Way.

  11. The hypolipidemic activity of Ayurvedic medicine, Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemic rats: A comparison with fenofibrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gajendra; Srivastava, Amita; Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor of coronary heart disease. Currently available hypolipidemic drugs have been associated with number of side effects. Arogyavardhini vati, an Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation has been used for liver disorders. Therefore, present study was designed to evaluate the effect of Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Anti-hyperlipidemic activity evaluation of Arogyavardhini vati against Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Overnight fasted male Wistar rats (150-200 g) were randomly divided into normal control group [4% Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO), i.p.], positive control group (Triton WR-1339 in 4% DMSO, 400 mg/kg, i.p.), standard drug treated (fenofibrate 65 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia) and Arogyavardhini vati treated (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia). Rat doses were calculated by extrapolating the equivalent human dose (therapeutic dose, sub-maximum, and maximum dose). Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein HDL, liver malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were estimated at end of experiments. Arogyavardhini vati significantly decreased serum cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and significantly increased serum HDL in a dose-dependent manner. Decreased MDA and increased GSH levels in liver were observed at all doses of Arogyavardhini vati (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and fenofibrate-treated groups when compared with Triton-treated group. Atherogenic Index (AI) level was significantly decreased in fenofibrate and Arogyavardhini vati (200 mg/kg) treated rats when compared with normal control. Arogyavardhini vati, a traditionally used Ayurvedic medicine may be a useful therapy for hypercholesterolemia through reducing oxidative stress (decreasing MDA and increasing GSH) and lipid levels.

  12. Radioprotection by WR-151327 against the late normal tissue damage in mouse hind legs from gamma ray radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Satoru; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of WR-151327 on late radiation-induced damaged to normal tissues in mice, the right hind legs of mice with or without WR-151327 administration (400 mg/kg) were irradiated with 137 Cs gamma rays. Leg contracture and skin shrinkage assays were performed at 380 days after irradiation. The mice were killed on day 400 postirradiation and histological sections of the legs were made. The thickness of the dermis, epidermis, and skin (dermis plus epidermis) was measured. The muscular area of the legs and the posterior knee angle between the femur and tibia were also measured. The left hind legs were similarly assessed as nonirradiated controls. Group means and standard deviations were calculated and dose-response curves were drawn for every endpoint. Then, the dose modifying factor (DMF) for each endpoint and the correlations among endpoints were determined. Latae damage assayed by leg contracture and skin shrinkage progressed with increasing radiation dose. However, it was reduced by drug treatment. The significant effect was indicated for skin shrinkage by a DMF of 1.8 at 35%. The DMF for leg contracture was 1.3 at 6 mm. In the irradiated legs, epidermal hyperplasia and dermal fibrosis in the skin, muscular atrophy, and extension disturbance of the knee joint were observed. These changes progressed with increasing radiation dose. Skin damage assayed by the present endpoints was also reduced by drug treatment by DMFs of 1.4 to 1.7. However, DMFs for damage to the muscle and knee were not determined because no isoeffect was observed. There were good correlations between leg contracture or skin shrinkage and the other endpoints in both untreated and drug-treated mice. WR-151327 has the potential to protect against radiation-induced late normal tissue damage. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  13. CD8 Knockout Mice Are Protected from Challenge by Vaccination with WR201, a Live Attenuated Mutant of Brucella melitensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel L. Yingst

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells have been reported to play an important role in defense against B. abortus infection in mouse models. In the present report, we use CD8 knockout mice to further elucidate the role of these cells in protection from B. melitensis infection. Mice were immunized orally by administration of B. melitensis WR201, a purine auxotrophic attenuated vaccine strain, then challenged intranasally with B. melitensis 16M. In some experiments, persistence of WR201 in the spleens of CD8 knockout mice was slightly longer than that in the spleens of normal mice. However, development of anti-LPS serum antibody, antigen-induced production of γ-interferon (IFN-γ by immune splenic lymphocytes, protection against intranasal challenge, and recovery of nonimmunized animals from intranasal challenge were similar between normal and knockout animals. Further, primary Brucella infection was not exacerbated in perforin knockout and Fas-deficient mice and these animals’ anti-Brucella immune responses were indistinguishable from those of normal mice. These results indicate that CD8+ T cells do not play an essential role as either cytotoxic cells or IFN-γ producers, yet they do participate in a specific immune response to immunization and challenge in this murine model of B. melitensis infection.

  14. Influence of starvation, triton WR-1339 and [131I]-human serum albumin on rat liver lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harikumar, P.; Ninjoor, V.

    1986-01-01

    The response of rat liver lysosomes to starvation and administration of lysosomotropic agents viz. Triton WR-1339 and [ 131 I]-human serum albumin, was assessed in terms of their distribution pattern after isopycnic sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Starvation induced changes in lysosomes appeared to be similar to that produced by the detergent uptake. Both the treatments caused a distinct decline in the equilibration densities of the organelles. On the other hand, injected labelled protein failed to comigrate with the lysosomal markers in starved as well as Triton treated rats and conspicuously remained in a region of high specific gravity in the gradient. These findings indicate retarded fusion between secondary lysosomes and [ 131 I]-human serum albumin containing phagosomes in the livers of rats subjected to starvation or detergent treatment. (author)

  15. Results of the indoor radiological survey at the W.R. Grace Co., Curtis Bay site, Baltimore, Maryland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

    1989-07-01

    The W.R. Grace Company, Davison Chemical Division, conducted developmental research and extraction of thorium from monazite ore at its Curtis Bay facility in Baltimore, Maryland, during the 1950s under contract to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Only one of the numerous buildings on the site was used for these operations. A 1979 aerial survey of the site for the Department of Energy (DOE) indicated that a comprehensive ground survey was required to determine whether or not any contamination remained from the AEC activities in that building. A radiological scoping survey performed later that year for DOE by a team from the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), disclosed surface contamination (alpha) levels in excess of DOE criteria on all five levels of the building. As a result of this finding, two additional surveys were performed in 1986 by ORNL at the request of DOE to evaluate any present or potential health risk. They are detailed in this report. The results of the 1986 surveys revealed several areas having elevated levels of radiation as a result of significant quantities of thorium on some building surfaces such as floors and ceiling beams. Most areas were small spots and in locations of low occupancy; thus, the possibility for significant exposure to workers was judged to be low. To confirm this evaluation, annual radiation exposure estimates for workers frequenting the few, larger contaminated areas on the site were derived using ORNL survey data and occupancy factors provided by the W.R. Grace Company. Estimates ranged from 27 to 41 mrem/yr or a maximum of 41% of the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr for members of the general public. 2 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  16. 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR1065) is anti-neoplastic and anti-mutagenic when given during 60Coγ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.K.; Nagy, B.; Peraino, C.; Grdina, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 2[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR1065) has been studied on the induction of neoplastic transformation using 10T1/2 cells and on mutation of the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus using Chinese hamster V79 cells. The first observations that treatment of 10T1/2 cells with 1 mM WR1065 for a total of 35 min during irradiation with 60 C γ-rays significantly reduces the incidence of neoplastic transformation while having no effect on cell viability are reported. In a similar experiment with V79 cells in which 4mM WR1065 was used, a significant reduction in mutation frequency at the HGPRT locus and significant protection against cell killing was found. These results suggest that WR1965 acts to modulate both acute damage and sub-lethal processes that lead to mutation and neoplastic transformation. Beyond the purely mechanistic approach of these studies, the potential application of these agents to minimizing the long-term neoplastic effects of radiation or chemotherapeutic agents currently in use for treating potentially curable cancer patients should be further investigated. (author)

  17. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair and cell progression in V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Nagy, B.

    1986-01-01

    The radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) was investigated with respect to its ability to affect radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 cells. At a concentration of 4mM, WR 1065 protected against the formation of single strand breaks (SSB), when present during irradiation. The protector appeared, however, to inhibit the subsequent postirradiation repair or rejoining of SSB. While repair was complete within 24h, the protector reduced the rate of repair by a factor of 3. This inhibitory effect on the rate of repair did not correlate with either measured differences in cell survival or mutagenesis. WR 1065 present in the growth medium inhibited the progression of cells through S-phase, and cell-doubling time following a 3h exposure to the protector was increased from 11 to 18h. These data are consistent with the property of thiols to inhibit DNA polymerase activity. It was concluded that, while the presence of WR 1065 during irradiation reduced SSB-DNA damage, its effect on the subsequent rejoining of these breaks could not be correlated with its observed effect on protecting against radiation-induced mutagenesis. (author)

  18. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit

  19. Understanding the Unusual X-Ray Emission Properties of the Massive, Close Binary WR 20a: A High Energy Window into the Stellar Wind Initiation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  20. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  1. Protective effect of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on irradiation-induced inhibition of intestinal transport function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.S.; Ando, M.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on whole-body irradiation-induced inhibition of intestinal transport function. The jejunal transport of fluid and sugars was studied in male Swiss-Webster mice before and 3 days after whole-body irradiation (1000 rads). The rates of glucose and water transport were decreased by 86 and 70%, respectively, in irradiated animals. However, the rate of transport of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3MG) was not affected. In mice receiving WR-2721 (500 mg/kg, ip) 15 to 30 min prior to whole-body irradiation, net water flux was unaffected and the rate of D-glucose transport was decreased only 8%. WR-2721 administered alone (500 mg/kg, ip) had no effect on either D-glucose transport or net water flux across the jejunal mucosa. The results suggest that WR-2721 protects against irradiation-induced inhibition of some intestinal transport functions

  2. Effect of an aminothiol (WR-1065) on radiation-induced mutagenesis and cytotoxicity in two repair-deficient mammalian cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Nagy, B.; Meechan, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    WR-2721 and its free thiol WR-1065 have been found to effectively protect against radiation- and/or chemotherapy-induced mutagenesis, transformation and carcinogenesis. With respect to the antimutagenic effect, WR-1065 significantly reduced the frequency of HGPRT mutants even when it was administered up to three hours following exposure of cells to radiation. The mechanisms of action most often attributed to these agents include their ability to scavenge free radicals, enter into chemical repair processes through the donation of hydrogen atoms, and induce intracellular hypoxia by means of auto-oxidative processes. Although evidence exists for each of these processes, none is sufficiently satisfactory to account for the post-irradiation protection of WR-1065 against mutation induction in mammalian cells. The most elegant work describing the role of aminothiols on cellular enzymatic repair processes has focused on well-characterized repair-proficient and -deficient bacterial and yeast cell systems. Protection against radiation-induced cytotoxicity by the aminothiol cysteamine was absent in E. coli cell lines that were characterized as having genetically defective repair systems. Until recently, such studies could not be effectively performed with mammalian cells. However, with the isolation and characterization of rodent cell lines deficient in their ability to repair DNA damage, it is now possible to investigate the role of cell-mediated repair systems on aminothiol radioprotection. Specifically, the authors have investigated the effects of WR-1065 on radiation-induced mutagenesis and cytotoxicity in cell lines EM9 and xrs-5, which are defective in DNA single-strand break (SSB) and double-strand break (DSB) rejoining, respectively. Corresponding parental repair-proficient cell lines, AA8 and K1, were also studied for comparative purposes. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Inhibition of topoisomerase II activity in repair-proficient CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.

    1992-09-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector under in vitro conditions when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure at a concentration of 4 mM to repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.4). In contrast, the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary xrs-5 cell line is not protected under these conditions (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.0). Topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and protein contents were measured in both Kl and xrs-5 cell lines and were found to be similar in magnitude. Neither exposure to radiation, to WR-1065, or to both affected these variables in xrs-5 cells. WR 1065 was effective, however, in reducing topo 11 activity by a factor of 2 in the repair-proficient Kl cell line. Topo II protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds has been their ability to affect enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on a specific nuclear enzyme (i.e., type H topoisomerase), which is involved in DNA synthesis. These results also suggest that differences do exist between the topo 11 enzymes isolated from the parent repair-proficient Kl and the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient xrs-5 mutant cell lines

  4. Inhibition of topoisomerase II activity in repair-proficient CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grdina, D.J.; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.

    1992-09-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector under in vitro conditions when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure at a concentration of 4 mM to repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.4). In contrast, the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary xrs-5 cell line is not protected under these conditions (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.0). Topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and protein contents were measured in both Kl and xrs-5 cell lines and were found to be similar in magnitude. Neither exposure to radiation, to WR-1065, or to both affected these variables in xrs-5 cells. WR 1065 was effective, however, in reducing topo 11 activity by a factor of 2 in the repair-proficient Kl cell line. Topo II protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds has been their ability to affect enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on a specific nuclear enzyme (i.e., type H topoisomerase), which is involved in DNA synthesis. These results also suggest that differences do exist between the topo 11 enzymes isolated from the parent repair-proficient Kl and the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient xrs-5 mutant cell lines.

  5. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Schwartz, J.L.; Shigematsu, N.

    1993-06-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide NN double-prime-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent (WR-2721). Because of their structural similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of VM-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents were electroporated into cells. Electroporation alone reduced cell survival to 75% but had no effect on hprt mutation frequency. The electroporation of either spermine or WR-33278 at concentrations greater than 0.01 mM was extremely toxic. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction. Cell survival values at a radiation dose of 750 cGy were enhanced by factors of 1.3 and 1.8 following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278, respectively, 30 min prior to irradiation. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested

  6. Performance of highly rated UO2 fuel in the WR-1 organic-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schankula, M. H.; Hastings, I. J.

    1977-07-15

    Information on oxide fuel behaviour in organic coolant was required as part of the organic-cooled power reactor (OCR) study. Of major interest were data on the release of fission gases from fuel operating at high fuel surface temperatures and low external restraint; features which are peculiar to the OCR. To provide these and other data, UO2 fuel with cold-worked Zr-2.5wt%Nb sheathing was irradiated in the WR-1 organic-cooled reactor to burnups of 135-154 MWh/kgU at a time-averaged linear power of 60-63 kW/m. Elements with 0.38 and 0.69 mm thick sheathing showed maximum diametral increases averaging 3.7 and 1.7% respectively at pellet mid-planes. Reduced fuel/sheath heat transfer resulting from a difference between internal gas pressure and coolant pressure produced high operating temperatures, and there was evidence of central melting in some elements. Fission gas releases were 30-60%. In the heat affected zone adjacent to brazed appendages, the diametral increases were lower, averaging 0.9 and 0.5% for 0.38 and 0.69 mm thick sheathing respectively. Heat treatment during the brazing process produced a local improvement in sheath creep strength. Highly rated oxide fuel irradiated in organic coolant will require sheathing with improved high temperature creep properties; heat-treated Zr-2.5 wt% Nb may provide this improvement.

  7. The WR/LBV system HD 5980 in the Small Magellanic Cloud: What is its evolutionary status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigsberger, Gloria; Morrell, Nidia; Hillier, D. John; Barba, Rodolfo; Gamen, Roberto

    2013-06-01

    HD 5980 is located in the Small Magellanic Cloud and consists of two binary systems which, if physically associated, are very widely separated. Their orbital periods are 19.3d and 97d and each of these systems contains very luminous massive stars. The P=19.3d binary is peculiar in that it consists of two WR stars, one of which underwent an LBV eruption in 1994. Because this binary is eclipsing and because it has been monitored since the 1950s, we now have a good grasp on the fundamental parameters of the LBV component. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that its bolometric luminosity increased during the 1994 eruption. In this poster we will summarize our current knowledge of HD 5980, including recent results derived from observations at Las Campanas Observatory which yield an improved orbital solution for the two binary systems and strong limits on the mass of the LBV. With these data, it should now be possible to constrain the evolutionary path that has been followed by the LBV and speculate on its properties as it approaches the supernova stage.

  8. Classification of ISO SWS 01 spectra of proto-planetary nebulae: a search for precursors of planetary nebulae with [WR] central stars

    OpenAIRE

    Szczerba, R.; Stasi{ń}ska, G.; Siódmiak, N.; Górny, S. K.

    2002-01-01

    We have analyzed ISO SWS 01 observations for 61 proto-planetary nebulae candidates and classified their spectra according to their dominant chemistry. On the basis of our classification and the more general classification of SWS 01 spectra by Kraemer et al. (2002) we discuss the connection between proto-planetary nebulae candidates and planetary nebulae, with emphasis on possible precursors of planetary nebulae with [WR] central stars.

  9. The radioprotector WR-2721 reduces neutron-induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in mouse splenocytes when administered prior to or following irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grdina, D.J.; Basic, I.

    1992-01-01

    An in vitro T-lymphocyte cloning technique has been applied to study the effects of JANUS fission-spectrum neutron irradiation and the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) on the subsequent development of somatic mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in hybrid B6CF1 male mice. In control studies performed to establish an in vitro cloning technique, the mutant frequencies of splenic T-lymphocytes, as a result of exposure to a 100 cGy dose of neutrons, increased with time from a control level of 9 x 10 -7 to a maximum value of 1.7 x 10 -5 at 56 days following irradiation. Between 56 and 150 days after irradiation, mutant frequencies were observed to plateau and remain stable. All subsequent determinations were performed at 56 days following the experimental treatment of animals. WR-2721 at a dose of 400 mg/kg was effective in protecting against the induction of hprt mutants (i.e. a mutant frequency reduction factor, MFRF) following the largest dose of neutrons used (i.e. 150 cGy). The antimutagenic effectiveness of WR-2721 administered 30 min prior to irradiation was unaffected, even when the dose was reduced to 200 mg/kg. These findings confirm our earlier report using the radioprotector N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,2-diaminopropane (WR-1065) under in vitro conditions, and demonstrate that these agents can be used as effective antimutagens even when they are administered up to 3 h following radiation exposure. (Author)

  10. Radioprotective effects of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide combined with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on radiation-injured mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shuqi; Shen Xianrong; Liu Yuming; He Ying; Jiang Dingwen; Chen Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the radioprotective effect of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide (SNP) in combination with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on irradiated mice. A total of 70 Imprinting Control Region (ICR) mice were divided into seven groups: the control group, the model group and five administration groups. All groups, except the control group, were exposed to a 5 Gy 60 Co γ-ray beam. Blood parameters [including white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC) and platelet counts and hemoglobin level] were assessed three days before irradiation, and the on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after irradiation. Spleen, thymus and testicular indices, DNA contents of bone marrow cells, bone marrow nucleated cells, sperm counts, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), testosterone and estradiol levels in the serum were assessed on the 14th day after irradiation. The combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF exerted synergistic recovery effects on peripheral blood WBC, RBC and platelet counts and hemoglobin levels in irradiated mice, and synergistic promotion effects on spleen, thymus, testicle, bone marrow nucleated cells and sperm counts in irradiated mice. The synergistic administration increased the serum SOD activities and serum testosterone content of irradiated mice, but synergy decreased the content of serum MDA and estradiol in irradiated mice. These results suggest that the combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF should increase the efficacy of these drugs for acute radiation sickness, protect immunity, hematopoiesis and the reproductive organs of irradiated-damaged mice, and improve oxidation resistance in the body. (author)

  11. Phase I trials of WR2721 in combination with radiation therapy and with the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and cis-platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Blumberg, A.L.; Glick, J.H.; Nelson, D.F.; Glover, D.; Yuhas, J.M.; Amols, H.I.; Goodman, R.L.

    Three phase I trials of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) have accessed 60 patients. Study 1 is devised to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a single dose of the protector 15 to 30 minutes before a single radiation treatment of a size used routinely in palliative management. Study 2 plans to determine the MTD for up to 15 daily doses of the drug over 3 weeks during palliative radiotherapy. Also, the multipe-dose study will establish the MTD before palliative irradiation for fewer than five fractions a week. Study 3 uses the existing single-dose MTD determined in Study 1 as pretreatment 15 to 30 minutes before cyclophosphamide or cis-platinum. Toxic symptoms include emesis, hypotension, hypertension, somnolence, and sneezing. Only one serious episode of hypotension, considered idiosyncratic, and one instance of moderate to severe vomiting have occurred. Forty-one patients have been entered in Study 1 and a dose of 600 mg/m2 has been reached. The next step is to proceed to the planned highest level of 740 mg/m2. Of five patients in the multiple-dose study, one has been given, without toxicity, WR2721 at the level of 100 mg/m2 for 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Fourteen patients are accessed to the alkylating agent study. Using protector doses of 450 mg/m2, a cyclophosphamide level of 1500 mg/m2 has been accomplished. However, two of three patients who received 450 mg/m2 of WR2721 before 120 mg/m2 of cis-platinum have shown moderate elevation of the serum creatinine, both of which returned to normal.

  12. Phase I trials of WR2721 in combination with radiation therapy and with the alkylating agents cyclophosphamide and cis-platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, M.M.; Blumberg, A.L.; Glick, J.H.; Nelson, D.F.; Glover, D.; Yuhas, J.M.; Amols, H.I.; Goodman, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Three phase I trials of the radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) have accessed 60 patients. Study 1 is devised to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a single dose of the protector 15 to 30 minutes before a single radiation treatment of a size used routinely in palliative management. Study 2 plans to determine the MTD for up to 15 daily doses of the drug over 3 weeks during palliative radiotherapy. Also, the multipe-dose study will establish the MTD before palliative irradiation for fewer than five fractions a week. Study 3 uses the existing single-dose MTD determined in Study 1 as pretreatment 15 to 30 minutes before cyclophosphamide or cis-platinum. Toxic symptoms include emesis, hypotension, hypertension, somnolence, and sneezing. Only one serious episode of hypotension, considered idiosyncratic, and one instance of moderate to severe vomiting have occurred. Forty-one patients have been entered in Study 1 and a dose of 600 mg/m2 has been reached. The next step is to proceed to the planned highest level of 740 mg/m2. Of five patients in the multiple-dose study, one has been given, without toxicity, WR2721 at the level of 100 mg/m2 for 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Fourteen patients are accessed to the alkylating agent study. Using protector doses of 450 mg/m2, a cyclophosphamide level of 1500 mg/m2 has been accomplished. However, two of three patients who received 450 mg/m2 of WR2721 before 120 mg/m2 of cis-platinum have shown moderate elevation of the serum creatinine, both of which returned to normal

  13. XMM-Newton Detection of Hard X-Ray Emission in the Nitrogen-Type Wolf-Rayet Star WR 110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Güdel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner

    2002-06-01

    We have used the excellent sensitivity of XMM-Newton to obtain the first high-quality X-ray spectrum of a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star that is not known to be a member of a binary system. Our target, the nitrogen-type star WR 110 (HD 165688), was also observed and detected with the Very Large Array at four different frequencies. The radio flux density increases with frequency according to a power law Sν~ν+0.64+/-0.10, in very good agreement with the behavior expected for free-free wind emission. The radio data give an ionized mass-loss rate M=4.9×10-5 Msolar yr-1 for an assumed spherical constant-velocity wind. The undispersed CCD X-ray spectra reveal strong emission lines from He-like ions of Mg, Si, and S. The emission measure distribution shows a dominant contribution from cool plasma with a characteristic temperature kTcool~0.5 keV (~6 MK). Little or no excess absorption of this cool component above the value expected from the visual extinction is present. We conclude that the bulk of the cool plasma detected by XMM-Newton lies at hundreds of stellar radii or more if the wind is approximately spherical and homogeneous, but it could lie closer to the star if the wind is clumped. If the cool plasma is due to instability-driven wind shocks, then typical shock velocities are vs~340-550 km s-1 and the average filling factor of X-ray-emitting gas in the wind is no larger than f~10-6. A surprising result is the unambiguous detection of a hard X-ray component that is clearly seen in the hard-band images and the spectra. This hard component accounts for about half of the observed flux and can be acceptably fitted by a hot, optically thin thermal plasma or a power-law model. If the emission is thermal, then a temperature kThot>=3 keV is derived. Such high temperatures are not predicted by current instability-driven wind shock models, and a different mechanism is thus required to explain the hard X-rays. We examine several possible mechanisms and show that the hard emission

  14. Insights into Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Study Sites GC955 and WR313 from New Multicomponent and High-Resolution 2D Seismic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, acquiring multicomponent data and high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313). Based on previously collected logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data, these gas hydrate study sites are known to include high concentrations of gas hydrate within sand layers. At GC955 our new 2D data reveal at least three features that appear to be fluid-flow pathways (chimneys) responsible for gas migration and thus account for some aspects of the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. Our new data also show that the main gas hydrate target, a Pleistocene channel/levee complex, has an areal extent of approximately 5.5 square kilometers and that a volume of approximately 3 x 107 cubic meters of this body lies within the gas hydrate stability zone. Based on LWD-inferred values and reasonable assumptions for net sand, sand porosity, and gas hydrate saturation, we estimate a total equivalent gas-in-place volume of approximately 8 x 108 cubic meters for the inferred gas hydrate within the channel/levee deposits. At WR313 we are able to map the thin hydrate-bearing sand layers in considerably greater detail than that provided by previous data. We also can map the evolving and migrating channel feature that persists in this area. Together these data and the emerging results provide valuable new insights into the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  15. Simulating three-dimensional nonthermal high-energy photon emission in colliding-wind binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitberger, K.; Kissmann, R.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O., E-mail: klaus.reitberger@uibk.ac.at [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Massive stars in binary systems have long been regarded as potential sources of high-energy γ rays. The emission is principally thought to arise in the region where the stellar winds collide and accelerate relativistic particles which subsequently emit γ rays. On the basis of a three-dimensional distribution function of high-energy particles in the wind collision region—as obtained by a numerical hydrodynamics and particle transport model—we present the computation of the three-dimensional nonthermal photon emission for a given line of sight. Anisotropic inverse Compton emission is modeled using the target radiation field of both stars. Photons from relativistic bremsstrahlung and neutral pion decay are computed on the basis of local wind plasma densities. We also consider photon-photon opacity effects due to the dense radiation fields of the stars. Results are shown for different stellar separations of a given binary system comprising of a B star and a Wolf-Rayet star. The influence of orbital orientation with respect to the line of sight is also studied by using different orbital viewing angles. For the chosen electron-proton injection ratio of 10{sup –2}, we present the ensuing photon emission in terms of two-dimensional projections maps, spectral energy distributions, and integrated photon flux values in various energy bands. Here, we find a transition from hadron-dominated to lepton-dominated high-energy emission with increasing stellar separations. In addition, we confirm findings from previous analytic modeling that the spectral energy distribution varies significantly with orbital orientation.

  16. 3D printing meets computational astrophysics: deciphering the structure of η Carinae's inner colliding winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, T. I.; Clementel, N.; Gull, T. R.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first 3D prints of output from a supercomputer simulation of a complex astrophysical system, the colliding stellar winds in the massive (≳120 M⊙), highly eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary star system η Carinae. We demonstrate the methodology used to incorporate 3D interactive figures into a PDF (Portable Document Format) journal publication and the benefits of using 3D visualization and 3D printing as tools to analyse data from multidimensional numerical simulations. Using a consumer-grade 3D printer (MakerBot Replicator 2X), we successfully printed 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of η Carinae's inner (r ˜ 110 au) wind-wind collision interface at multiple orbital phases. The 3D prints and visualizations reveal important, previously unknown `finger-like' structures at orbital phases shortly after periastron (φ ˜ 1.045) that protrude radially outwards from the spiral wind-wind collision region. We speculate that these fingers are related to instabilities (e.g. thin-shell, Rayleigh-Taylor) that arise at the interface between the radiatively cooled layer of dense post-shock primary-star wind and the fast (3000 km s-1), adiabatic post-shock companion-star wind. The success of our work and easy identification of previously unrecognized physical features highlight the important role 3D printing and interactive graphics can play in the visualization and understanding of complex 3D time-dependent numerical simulations of astrophysical phenomena.

  17. Spiraling Out of Control: Three-dimensional Hydrodynamical Modeling of the Colliding Winds in η Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, E. R.; Pittard, J. M.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-wind collision between the enigmatic supermassive star η Car and its mysterious companion star are presented which include radiative driving of the stellar winds, gravity, optically thin radiative cooling, and orbital motion. Simulations with static stars with a periastron passage separation reveal that the preshock companion star's wind speed is sufficiently reduced so that radiative cooling in the postshock gas becomes important, permitting the runaway growth of nonlinear thin-shell instabilities (NTSIs) which massively distort the wind-wind collision region (WCR). However, large-scale simulations, which include the orbital motion of the stars, show that orbital motion reduces the impact of radiative inhibition and thus increases the acquired preshock velocities. As such, the postshock gas temperature and cooling time see a commensurate increase, and sufficient gas pressure is preserved to stabilize the WCR against catastrophic instability growth. We then compute synthetic X-ray spectra and light curves and find that, compared to previous models, the X-ray spectra agree much better with XMM-Newton observations just prior to periastron. The narrow width of the 2009 X-ray minimum can also be reproduced. However, the models fail to reproduce the extended X-ray minimum from previous cycles. We conclude that the key to explaining the extended X-ray minimum is the rate of cooling of the companion star's postshock wind. If cooling is rapid then powerful NTSIs will heavily disrupt the WCR. Radiative inhibition of the companion star's preshock wind, albeit with a stronger radiation-wind coupling than explored in this work, could be an effective trigger.

  18. SPIRALING OUT OF CONTROL: THREE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMICAL MODELING OF THE COLLIDING WINDS IN η CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, E. R.; Pittard, J. M.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamical simulations of the wind-wind collision between the enigmatic supermassive star η Car and its mysterious companion star are presented which include radiative driving of the stellar winds, gravity, optically thin radiative cooling, and orbital motion. Simulations with static stars with a periastron passage separation reveal that the preshock companion star's wind speed is sufficiently reduced so that radiative cooling in the postshock gas becomes important, permitting the runaway growth of nonlinear thin-shell instabilities (NTSIs) which massively distort the wind-wind collision region (WCR). However, large-scale simulations, which include the orbital motion of the stars, show that orbital motion reduces the impact of radiative inhibition and thus increases the acquired preshock velocities. As such, the postshock gas temperature and cooling time see a commensurate increase, and sufficient gas pressure is preserved to stabilize the WCR against catastrophic instability growth. We then compute synthetic X-ray spectra and light curves and find that, compared to previous models, the X-ray spectra agree much better with XMM-Newton observations just prior to periastron. The narrow width of the 2009 X-ray minimum can also be reproduced. However, the models fail to reproduce the extended X-ray minimum from previous cycles. We conclude that the key to explaining the extended X-ray minimum is the rate of cooling of the companion star's postshock wind. If cooling is rapid then powerful NTSIs will heavily disrupt the WCR. Radiative inhibition of the companion star's preshock wind, albeit with a stronger radiation-wind coupling than explored in this work, could be an effective trigger.

  19. Antihypercholesterolemic and Antioxidative Potential of an Extract of the Plant, Piper betle, and Its Active Constituent, Eugenol, in Triton WR-1339-Induced Hypercholesterolemia in Experimental Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karuppasamy Venkadeswaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia is a dominant risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, the putative antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidative properties of an ethanolic extract of Piper betle and of its active constituent, eugenol, were evaluated in experimental hypercholesterolemia induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of Triton WR-1339 (300 mg/kg b.wt in Wistar rats. Saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats revealed significantly higher mean blood/serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and of serum hepatic marker enzymes; in addition, significantly lower mean serum levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and significantly lower mean activities of enzymatic antioxidants and nonenzymatic antioxidants were noted in hepatic tissue samples from saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats, compared to controls. However, in hypercholesterolemic rats receiving the Piper betle extract (500 mg/kg b.wt or eugenol (5 mg/kg b.wt for seven days orally, all these parameters were significantly better than those in saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats. The hypercholesterolemia-ameliorating effect was better defined in eugenol-treated than in Piper betle extract-treated rats, being as effective as that of the standard lipid-lowering drug, lovastatin (10 mg/kg b.wt. These results suggest that eugenol, an active constituent of the Piper betle extract, possesses antihypercholesterolemic and other activities in experimental hypercholesterolemic Wistar rats.

  20. Antihypercholesterolemic and Antioxidative Potential of an Extract of the Plant, Piper betle, and Its Active Constituent, Eugenol, in Triton WR-1339-Induced Hypercholesterolemia in Experimental Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkadeswaran, Karuppasamy; Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Annadurai, Thangaraj; Ruban, Vasanthakumar Vasantha; Sundararajan, Mahalingam; Anandhi, Ramalingam; Thomas, Philip A; Geraldine, Pitchairaj

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a dominant risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, the putative antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidative properties of an ethanolic extract of Piper betle and of its active constituent, eugenol, were evaluated in experimental hypercholesterolemia induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of Triton WR-1339 (300 mg/kg b.wt) in Wistar rats. Saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats revealed significantly higher mean blood/serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and of serum hepatic marker enzymes; in addition, significantly lower mean serum levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and significantly lower mean activities of enzymatic antioxidants and nonenzymatic antioxidants were noted in hepatic tissue samples from saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats, compared to controls. However, in hypercholesterolemic rats receiving the Piper betle extract (500 mg/kg b.wt) or eugenol (5 mg/kg b.wt) for seven days orally, all these parameters were significantly better than those in saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats. The hypercholesterolemia-ameliorating effect was better defined in eugenol-treated than in Piper betle extract-treated rats, being as effective as that of the standard lipid-lowering drug, lovastatin (10 mg/kg b.wt). These results suggest that eugenol, an active constituent of the Piper betle extract, possesses antihypercholesterolemic and other activities in experimental hypercholesterolemic Wistar rats.

  1. Prestack Waveform Inversion and Well Log Examination at GC955 and WR313 in the Gulf of Mexico for Estimation of Methane Hydrate Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, W.; Goldberg, D.; Kucuk, H. M.

    2017-12-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring compounds, which, at a molecular scale, are lattice structures of ice embedded with various gas molecules in the lattice voids. Volumetric estimates of associated hydrocarbons vary greatly due to the difficulty in remotely estimating hydrate concentrations in marine sediments but embedded hydrocarbon stores are thought to represent a significant portion of global deposits. Inherent hydrate instabilities obscure our understanding of and complicates processes related to resource extraction and hydrate response to disturbances in the local environment. Understanding the spatial extent and variability of hydrate deposits have important implications for potential economic production, climate change, and assessing natural hazards risks. Seismic reflection techniques are capable of determining the extent of gas hydrate deposits, often through the observation of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). However, BSRs are not present everywhere gas hydrates exist. Using high resolution prestack time migrated seismic data and prestack waveform inversion (PWI) we produce highly resolved velocity models and compare them to co-located well logs. Coupling our PWI results with velocity-porosity relationships and nearby well control, we map hydrate properties at GC955 and WR313. Integrating small scale heterogeneities and variations along the velocity model with in-situ measurements, we develop a workflow aimed to quantify hydrate concentrations observed in seismic data over large areas in great detail regardless of the existence of a BSR.

  2. ALARA Principle Application for Loading Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies from Nuclear Research Reactor WR-S Mergal-Bucharest Romania into Transportation Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, M.

    2009-01-01

    Safety implementation of Spent Nuclear Fuels Assemblies (SNFA) handling procedures at the WR-S reactor site is ensured by technical perfection and reliability of equipment, monitoring of its condition, qualification and discipline of personnel as well as organization and execution of work complied with requirements of regulatory documents, process procedures, guidance and manuals. The personnel training for execution loading of SNF FAs is other important aspect for radiation protection and safely activities. Estimations carried out using Micro Shield software show that maximal dose rate upon working site when loading four FAs into basket of cask will not exceed 1.7 and 956;Sv/h, excluding natural radiation. Radiation Safety Analyses estimates for loading 70 SNFA in 18 transportation casks are: maximal individual dose: 4274.7 and 956;Sv, maximal expected collective dose persons: 17 031.2 man and 956;Sv. By application ALARA principle with technical and administrative measures the loading process developed in the following conditions: maximal individual dose: 68 and 956;Sv, the collective dose persons: 732 man and 956;Sv. The work will presented the technical measures and procedures applied in loading process.

  3. Phenolic extract from Ocimum basilicum restores lipid metabolism in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemic mice and prevents lipoprotein-rich plasma oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilham Touiss

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the hypolipidemic and anti-lipoprotein-oxidation activities of phenolic extract from sweet basil a popular culinary herb. The hypolipidemic activity was studied in mice model injected intraperitoneally with Triton WR-1339 at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. The animals were grouped as follows: normolipidemic control group (n = 8, hyperlipidemic control group (n = 8 and phenolic extract-treated group (n = 8 at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. After 7 h and 24 h treatment, the oral administration of the phenolic extract exerts a significant reduction of plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol concentrations (P < 0.001. On the other hand, we demonstrated that the phenolic extract prevents plasma lipid oxidation by 16% (P < 0.001, 20% (P < 0.001, 32% (P < 0.001 and 44% (P < 0.001 at a doses of 10, 25, 50 and 100 μg/mL, respectively. The results were compared with ascorbic acid used as standard synthetic antioxidant. HPLC analysis shows that the extract contains 4 major phenolics and is especially rich in rosmarinic acid. This finding indicates that the phenolic extract might be beneficial in lowering hyperlipidemia and preventing atherosclerosis.

  4. Transfection of Babesia bovis by Double Selection with WR99210 and Blasticidin-S and Its Application for Functional Analysis of Thioredoxin Peroxidase-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Asada

    Full Text Available Genetic manipulation is an essential technique to analyze gene function; however, limited methods are available for Babesia bovis, a causative pathogen of the globally important cattle disease, bovine babesiosis. To date, two stable transfection systems have been developed for B. bovis, using selectable markers blasticidin-S deaminase (bsd or human dihydrofolate reductase (hdhfr. In this work, we combine these two selectable markers in a sequential transfection system. Specifically, a parent transgenic B. bovis line which episomally expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP and human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR, was transfected with a plasmid encoding a fusion protein consisting of red fluorescent protein (RFP and blasticidin-S deaminase (BSD. Selection with WR99210 and blasticidin-S resulted in the emergence of parasites double positive for GFP and RFP. We then applied this method to complement gene function in a parasite line in which thioredoxin peroxidase-1 (Bbtpx-1 gene was knocked out using hDHFR as a selectable marker. A plasmid was constructed harboring both RFP-BSD and Bbtpx-1 expression cassettes, and transfected into a Bbtpx-1 knockout (KO parasite. Transfectants were independently obtained by two transfection methods, episomal transfection and genome integration. Complementation of Bbtpx-1 resulted in full recovery of resistance to nitrosative stress, via the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, which was impaired in the Bbtpx-1 KO parasites. In conclusion, we developed a sequential transfection method in B. bovis and subsequently applied this technique in a gene complementation study. This method will enable broader genetic manipulation of Babesia toward enhancing our understanding of the biology of this parasite.

  5. Eclipses and dust formation by WC9 type Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Visual photometry of 16 WC8-9 dust-making Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars during 2001-2009 was extracted from the All-Sky Automated Survey All Star Catalogue (ASAS-3) to search for eclipses attributable to extinction by dust formed in clumps in our line of sight. Data for a comparable number of dust-free WC6-9 stars were also examined to help characterize the data set. Frequent eclipses were observed from WR 104, and several from WR 106, extending the 1994-2001 studies by Kato et al., but not supporting their phasing the variations in WR 104 with its `pinwheel' rotation period. Only four other stars showed eclipses, WR 50 (one of the dust-free stars), WR 69, WR 95 and WR 117, and there may have been an eclipse by WR 121, which had shown two eclipses in the past. No dust eclipses were shown by the `historic' eclipsers WR 103 and WR 113. The atmospheric eclipses of the latter were observed but the suggestion by David-Uraz et al. that dust may be partly responsible for these is not supported. Despite its frequent eclipses, there is no evidence in the infrared images of WR 104 for dust made in its eclipses, demonstrating that any dust formed in this process is not a significant contributor to its circumstellar dust cloud and suggesting that the same applies to the other stars showing fewer eclipses.

  6. Expanding the "Active Layer": Discussion of Church and Haschenburger (2017) What is the "Active Layer"? Water Resources Research 53, 5-10, Doi:10.1002/2016WR019675

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Peter; Peirce, Sarah; Leduc, Pauline

    2018-03-01

    Church and Haschenburger (2017, https://doi.org/10.1002/2016WR019675) make helpful distinctions around the issue of defining the active layer, with which we agree. We propose expanding discussion and definition of the "active layer" in fluvial bedload transport to include the concept of the "morphological active layer." This is particularly applicable to laterally unstable rivers (such as braided rivers) in which progressive morphological change over short time periods is the process by which much of the bedload transport occurs. The morphological active layer is also distinguished by variable lateral and longitudinal extent continuity over a range of flows and transport intensity. We suggest that the issue of forms of active layer raised by Church and Haschenburger opens up an important discussion on the nature of bedload transport in relation to river morpho-dynamics over the range of river types.

  7. Wr u txting b4 u crashed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Laura; Avtgis, Theodore; Gray, Dana; Channel, Jane; Wilson, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Texting has become popular, particularly among young adults. Texting while driving has been identified as a factor in accidents. Literature is lacking about the overall attitudes and utilization of texting. Understand attitudes and behaviors surrounding texting. A survey to evaluate attitudes and behaviors concerning texting was developed in conjunction with a social scientist. The survey (2009) was administered to university freshmen via an anonymous, web based program. The study was approved by the IRB. 426 university freshmen completed the survey. 67% reported texting was more useful than speaking by phone. 53% report they text more than 50 times per day. 24% report they text more than 100 times per day. 73% report they text while driving, though only 9% responded they do so frequently. 92% believe texting affects their concentration while driving. 84% reported they are passengers when the driver texts and 75% report they do not feel safe in the car when the driver is texting. 77% disagreed with the statement "It is no big deal to text while driving." 53% reported they can not safely text and drive and 60% agreed texting while driving should be illegal. 92% reported texting was less safe then talking on the cell phone while driving. Texting is commonly used by young adults, though many believe texting while driving decreases concentration and is unsafe. A majority report to texting while driving. Injury prevention and awareness programs are needed to decrease this behavior.

  8. Leptogenesis with TeV Scale WR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Pei-Hong; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2018-04-01

    Successful leptogenesis within the conventional TeV-scale left-right implementation of type-I seesaw has been shown to require that the mass of the right-handed WR± boson should have a lower bound much above the reach of the Large Hadron Collider. This bound arises from the necessity to suppress the washout of lepton asymmetry due to WR±-mediated Δ L ≠0 processes. We show that in an alternative quark seesaw realization of left-right symmetry, the above bound can be avoided. Lepton asymmetry in this model is generated not via the usual right-handed neutrino decay but rather via the decay of new heavy scalars producing an asymmetry in the B -L carrying Higgs triplets responsible for type-II seesaw, whose decay leads to the lepton asymmetry.

  9. 3D Radiative Transfer in Eta Carinae: Application of the SimpleX Algorithm to 3D SPH Simulations of Binary Colliding Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Icke, V.; Gull, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Eta Carinae is an ideal astrophysical laboratory for studying massive binary interactions and evolution, and stellar wind-wind collisions. Recent three-dimensional (3D) simulations set the stage for understanding the highly complex 3D flows in Eta Car. Observations of different broad high- and low-ionization forbidden emission lines provide an excellent tool to constrain the orientation of the system, the primary's mass-loss rate, and the ionizing flux of the hot secondary. In this work we present the first steps towards generating synthetic observations to compare with available and future HST/STIS data. We present initial results from full 3D radiative transfer simulations of the interacting winds in Eta Car. We use the SimpleX algorithm to post-process the output from 3D SPH simulations and obtain the ionization fractions of hydrogen and helium assuming three different mass-loss rates for the primary star. The resultant ionization maps of both species constrain the regions where the observed forbidden emission lines can form. Including collisional ionization is necessary to achieve a better description of the ionization states, especially in the areas shielded from the secondary's radiation. We find that reducing the primary's mass-loss rate increases the volume of ionized gas, creating larger areas where the forbidden emission lines can form. We conclude that post processing 3D SPH data with SimpleX is a viable tool to create ionization maps for Eta Car.

  10. A CHANDRA OBSERVATION OF THE ECLIPSING WOLF-RAYET BINARY CQ Cep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Stephen L. [CASA, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Zhekov, Svetozar A. [Space Research and Technology Institute, Akad. G. Bonchev Str., Sofia, 1113 (Bulgaria); Güdel, Manuel [Dept. of Astrophysics, Univ. of Vienna, Türkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Schmutz, Werner, E-mail: stephen.skinner@colorado.edu, E-mail: szhekov@space.bas.bg, E-mail: manuel.guedel@univie.ac.at, E-mail: werner.schmutz@pmodwrc.ch [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos and World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC), Dorfstrasse 33, CH-7260 Davos Dorf (Switzerland)

    2015-02-01

    The short-period (1.64 d) near-contact eclipsing WN6+O9 binary system CQ Cep provides an ideal laboratory for testing the predictions of X-ray colliding wind shock theory at close separation where the winds may not have reached terminal speeds before colliding. We present results of a Chandra X-ray observation of CQ Cep spanning ∼1 day during which a simultaneous Chandra optical light curve was acquired. Our primary objective was to compare the observed X-ray properties with colliding wind shock theory, which predicts that the hottest shock plasma (T ≳ 20 MK) will form on or near the line-of-centers between the stars. The X-ray spectrum is strikingly similar to apparently single WN6 stars such as WR 134 and spectral lines reveal plasma over a broad range of temperatures T ∼ 4-40 MK. A deep optical eclipse was seen as the O star passed in front of the Wolf-Rayet star and we determine an orbital period P {sub orb} = 1.6412400 d. Somewhat surprisingly, no significant X-ray variability was detected. This implies that the hottest X-ray plasma is not confined to the region between the stars, at odds with the colliding wind picture and suggesting that other X-ray production mechanisms may be at work. Hydrodynamic simulations that account for such effects as radiative cooling and orbital motion will be needed to determine if the new Chandra results can be reconciled with the colliding wind picture.

  11. nduced hyperlipidemic rats. Methods: Column chromatographic fractionation of butanol fraction of total methanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. yields four sub-fractions (sub-fraction A-D. All sub-fractions tested for their anti-hyperlipidemic activity. Sub-fractions administered at a dose of 65 mg/kg (oral to the Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats and total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and VLDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect and evaluation of Anti-hyperlipidemic activity guided subfraction isolated from total methanolic extract of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. leaves on Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats. Methods: Column chromatographic fractionation of butanol fraction of total methanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. yields four subfractions (sub-fraction A-D. All sub-fractions tested for their anti-hyperlipidemic activity. Subfractions administered at a dose of 65 mg/kg (oral to the Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats and total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and VLDL level in the blood were checked. Results: Sub-fraction D showed significant reduction (P<0.05 among four sub-fraction in comparison with standard drug fenofibrate. Conclusions: From the above study it could be concluded that butanol sub-fraction D of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. not only have resulted in significant reduction in cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, VLDL level but also increases the HDL level at a reduced dose level.

  12. $Q RSHQ WRS FKDPEHU VWXG\\ WR HYDOXDWH WKH LPSDFW ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    yakoub@AHMED

    . Province ... In contrast, research into the impact oř air pollution on crops in developing countries like Egypt is extremely limited; in many cases only limited reliable ... one side and a wall on another side, protecting the chambers řrom the wind.

  13. Emission Lines in the Near-infrared Spectra of the Infrared Quintuplet Stars in the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najarro, F. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Ctra. Torrejón a Ajalvir km 4, E-28850 Torrejón de Ardoz (Spain); Geballe, T. R. [Gemini Observatory, 670 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Figer, D. F. [Center for Detectors, Rochester Institute of Technology, 74 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Fuente, D. de la [Instituto de Astronomía, Unidad Académica en Ensenada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ensenada 22860, México (Mexico)

    2017-08-20

    We report the detection of a number of emission lines in the 1.0–2.4 μ m spectra of four of the five bright-infrared dust-embedded stars at the center of the Galactic center’s (GC) Quintuplet Cluster. Spectroscopy of the central stars of these objects is hampered not only by the large interstellar extinction that obscures all of the objects in the GC, but also by the large amounts of warm circumstellar dust surrounding each of the five stars. The pinwheel morphologies of the dust observed previously around two of them are indicative of Wolf–Rayet colliding wind binaries; however, infrared spectra of each of the five have until now revealed only dust continua steeply rising to long wavelengths and absorption lines and bands from interstellar gas and dust. The emission lines detected, from ionized carbon and from helium, are broad and confirm that the objects are dusty late-type carbon Wolf–Rayet stars.

  14. Chandra Observations of the Eclipsing Wolf-Rayet Binary CQ CepOver a Full Orbital Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Steve L.; Guedel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner; Zhekov, Svetozar

    2018-06-01

    We present results of Chandra X-ray observations and simultaneous optical light curves of the short-period (1.64 d) eclipsing WN6+O9 binary system CQ Cep obtained in 2013 and 2017 covering a full binary orbit. Our primary objective was to compare the observed X-ray properties with colliding wind shock theory, which predicts that the hottest shock plasma (T > 20 MK) will form on or near the line-of-centers between the stars. Thus, X-ray variability is expected during eclipses when the hottest plasma is occulted. The X-ray spectrum is strikingly similar to apparently single WN6 stars such as WR 134 and spectral lines reveal plasma over a broad range of temperatures T ~ 4 - 40 MK. Both primary and secondary optical eclipses were clearly detected and provide an accurate orbital period determination (P = 1.6412 d). The X-ray emission remained remarkably steady throughout the orbit and statistical tests give a low probability of variability. The lack of significant X-ray variabililty during eclipses indicates that the X-ray emission is not confined along the line-of-centers but is extended on larger spatial scales, contrary to colliding wind predictions.

  15. Astronomy in Denver: Spectropolarimetric Observations of 5 Wolf-Rayet Binary Stars with SALT/RSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullard, Andrew; Ansary, Zyed; Azancot Luchtan, Daniel; Gallegos, Hunter; Luepker, Martin; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Nordsieck, Kenneth H.; SALT observation team

    2018-06-01

    Mass loss from massive stars is an important yet poorly understood factor in shaping their evolution. Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are of particular interest due to their stellar winds, which create large regions of circumstellar material (CSM). They are also supernova and possible gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors. Like other massive stars, WR stars often occur in binaries, where interaction can affect their mass loss rates and provide the rapid rotation thought to be required for GRB production. The diagnostic tool of spectropolarimetry, along with the potentially eclipsing nature of a binary system, helps us to better characterize the CSM created by the stars’ colliding winds. Thus, we can determine mass loss rates and infer rapid rotation. We present spectropolarimetric results for five WR+O eclipsing binary systems, obtained with the Robert Stobie Spectrograph at the South African Large Telescope, between April 2017 and April 2018. The data allow us to map both continuum and emission line polarization variations with phase, which constrains where different CSM components scatter light in the systems. We discuss our initial findings and interpretations of the polarimetric variability in each binary system, and compare the systems.

  16. Interaction of gold with a pinwheel TiO similar to .sub.1,2./sub. film formed on Rh(111) facet: STM and DFT studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mutombo, Pingo; Gubo, R.; Berkó, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 23 (2016), s. 12917-12923 ISSN 1932-7447 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : DFT * wheel-TiO ~1.2 ultrathin film * template * TiO 2 (110) * Rh(111) * Au * STM Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016

  17. On the Baldwin effect of He II emission lines in WR (WN) stars

    OpenAIRE

    van Gent, J. I.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.; de Koter, A.; Morris, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the equivalent width of He ii emission lines and the monochromatic continuum luminosity at the line wavelength in the spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars. Model stellar atmospheres and spectra are used to show that the equivalent width inversely correlates with the monochromatic continuum luminosity. We find the effect in Wolf-Rayet star models over a large range of stellar parameters. The effect is shown to be connected to density differences among Wolf-Rayet star...

  18. IOE~OF W~R(1915.1918)i)AR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1977-03-11

    Mar 11, 1977 ... Ever since early boyhood I had hankered for farm life. .... the tall mimosa trees with the moon in the. Scientia .... summer heat with at first little cover and short of food and ...... record making flight from England to South Africa.

  19. Metabolic Studies on WR-158,122 in Bile Duct Cannulated Rats and Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-15

    procaine HCl, 8.8 mg sodium citrate, 10 mg lecithin (with 2% tricalcium phosphate) 1.5 mg methyl paraben and 0.5 mg propyl paraben as preservative...calcium carbonate " *" precipitated, potassium phosphate monobasic, lecithin , calcium hydroxide, choline chloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium...food (monkey chow with some fruit supplements) and water. The antibiotic therapy for six days did not appear to complicate the second study. Bile

  20. Perbedaan Stres Akademik antara Kelompok Siswa Minoritas dengan Mayoritas di SMP WR.Supratman 2 Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Fachrosi, Erlyani

    2013-01-01

    Stress is an important topic in academic setting. Stress is a gap condition between psychological and physiological demands of the situation with the source of the biological, psychological, and social. Academic stress is a stress-related aspects of learning, especially learning experience. The one of academic stress phenomenon can be seen in the context of integration in schools. School as a melting pot for assimilation of minority groups into the dominant group. An interis...

  1. Probing the WL'WH and WR'WH interactions at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shoushan; Li Honglei; Si Zongguo; Zhou Yufeng

    2011-01-01

    Many new physics models predict the existence of TeV-scale charged gauge boson W ' together with Higgs-boson(s). We study the W ' WH interaction and explore the angular distribution of charged leptons to distinguish W R ' WH from W L ' WH in the pp→HW→bblν process at the LHC. It is found that a new type forward-backward asymmetry (A FB ) relating to the angle between the direction of the charged lepton in the W rest frame and that of the reconstructed W ' in the laboratory frame is useful to investigate the properties of W ' WH interaction. We analyze the standard model backgrounds and develop a set of cuts to highlight the signal and suppress the backgrounds at LHC. We find that A FB can reach 0.03(-0.07) for W R ' (W L ' ) production at √(S)=14 TeV.

  2. Gas ionizado alrededor de la estrella WR AB7 en la Nube Menor de Magallanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez Benitez, S.; Niemela, V. S.

    En base a observaciones espectroscópicas en el rango óptico, obtenidas en el CASLEO, se estudian las condiciones físicas de la región HII N76 alrededor de la estrella AB7, en la Nube Menor de Magallanes. En esta región se observa la línea nebular de HeII 4686 Å. Utilizando líneas nebulares de diagnóstico, se derivan los valores de la densidad y la temperatura electrónica, así como también las abundancias de los elementos químicos nebulares.

  3. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR242511 in Rats. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-14

    hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia seen in high dose females, as previously discussed. Heptatobiliary changes were suggested by significant elevations in...lung (alveolar histiocytosis) lesions. Severe thymic lymphocyte depletion was also observed in these animals where the thymus could be identified...this animal, but it was attributed to the severe and diffuse chronic-active inflammation. As indicated above, treatment-related histopathologic

  4. Developmental Toxicity (Segments II) Study of WR238605 Succinate in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-08

    HHHHHH HHHHHH V U O U U U M M M H M M HHHHHH M M H M M M a a...a a a a CQ CO CO CO CQ CO M • H M M M HHHHHH HHHHHH HHHHHH J J J J J J ooobbb 2 Z 2 2 2 2 • a to n o CQ o o o o o o 222222 >< < a O...M H M H M M M O D Q D Q Q D a S S| o o 2 2 TO TO CO TO CO TO QTOTOCOCOTOCOCOCQTOCO HMHHHHnHHMHMHHHHH MMMMHM HHMHMMMMMH HHHHHH

  5. On the Nature of the LBV/WR Eclipsing Binary System HD 5980

    OpenAIRE

    G. Koenigsberger

    2004-01-01

    Se presenta un análisis del sistema múltiple HD 5980 situado en la Nube Menor de Magallanes y de los efectos de la colisión entre los vientos, y se discute su posible ubicación en el diagrama H-R. Los datos analizados comprenden el período 1979-2002 y son consistentes con la clasificación original WNE de la estrella B, la compañera cercana de la estrella A que en 1993-1994 tuvo una erupción. La evolución del sistema probablemente se pueda describir utilizando trazas evolutivas ...

  6. Researching the black box of wrItIng processes in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedegaard Ernst Bengtsen, Søren; Jensen, Gry Sandholm

    Paper Presenter/author: Søren S.E. Bengtsen Title/position: PhD, Research assistant, Centre for Teaching Development and Digital Media, Aarhus University Postal Address: Paludan Müllers-Vej 48, 8200 Aarhus N. E-mail: ssbe@dpu.dk Co-author: Gry S. Jensen (co-author and co-presenter) Supervisory......, we wish to render visible such student thinking and writing processes. Drawing on phenomenological and linguistic research methods (Manen 2002; Manen 1997; Johnstone 1996) we argue that a new vocabulary for supervision on student texts must be developed for supervisors to more fully grasp...

  7. The Effects of Employing HVM on C-130 Aircraft at WR-ALC to Aircraft Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    processes of numerous commercial companies such as American Airlines, TIMCO, the Royal Canadian Air Force, and Hon Furniture to determine how and why...commercial industry best practices that best achieve higher labor burn rates and the challenges of implementing these practices into the traditional...Challenges According to Jerry Mobley, the HVM team in 2007 initiated the study and industrial analysis of the Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul (MRO

  8. Recurrent dust formation by WR 48a on a 30-year time-scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, P.M.; van der Hucht, K.A.; van Wyk, F.; Marang, F.; Whitelock, P.A.; Bouchet, P.; Setia Gunawan, D.Y.A.

    2012-01-01

    We present infrared photometry of the WC8 Wolf-Rayet system WR 48a observed with telescopes at the European Southern Observatory, the South African Astronomical Observatory and the Anglo Australian Telescope between 1982 and 2011, which show a slow decline in dust emission from the previously

  9. One Year Oral Toxicity Study of WR238605 Succinate in Dogs. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-18

    coccidia in their fecal samples will only be treated if they concurrently exhibit diarrhea. All dogs will have been vaccinated against canine distemper...Fine Granular TRANS = Transitional CG = Course Granular NA = Not Applicable HY = Hyaline TP = Triple Phosphate GR = Granular QNS = Quantity Not...infectious canine hepatitis, leptospirosis, parainfluenza, parvo, oral papilloma, and rabies by the animal supplier. In addition, the animal supplier

  10. Personalized Learning Instructional Staff Survey Results (Spring 2014). Working Paper WR-1062-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler-Evans, Kyle; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Pane, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to descriptively summarize instructional staff responses to a survey administered by RAND in 23 personalized learning (PL) schools in Spring 2014. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  11. Methods Used to Estimate Achievement Effects in Personalized Learning Schools. Working Paper WR-1061-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, John F.; Baird, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the methods RAND used to analyze achievement for 23 personalized learning (PL) schools for the 2012-13 through 2013-14 academic years. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  12. ISOLATED WOLF-RAYET STARS AND O SUPERGIANTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER REGION IDENTIFIED VIA PASCHEN-α EXCESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauerhan, J. C.; Stolovy, S. R.; Cotera, A.; Dong, H.; Wang, Q. D.; Morris, M. R.; Lang, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of 19 hot, evolved, massive stars near the Galactic center region (GCR). These objects were selected for spectroscopy owing to their detection as strong sources of Paschen-α (Pα) emission-line excess, following a narrowband imaging survey of the central 0. 0 65 x 0. 0 25 (l, b) around Sgr A* with the Hubble Space Telescope. Discoveries include six carbon-type (WC) and five nitrogen-type (WN) Wolf-Rayet stars, six O supergiants, and two B supergiants. Two of the O supergiants have X-ray counterparts having properties consistent with solitary O stars and colliding-wind binaries. The infrared photometry of 17 stars is consistent with the Galactic center distance, but 2 of them are located in the foreground. Several WC stars exhibit a relatively large infrared excess, which is possibly thermal emission from hot dust. Most of the stars appear scattered throughout the GCR, with no relation to the three known massive young clusters; several others lie near the Arches and Quintuplet clusters and may have originated within one of these systems. The results of this work bring the total sample of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the GCR to 88. All sources of strong Pα excess have been identified in the area surveyed with HST, which implies that the sample of WN stars in this region is near completion, and is dominated by late (WNL) types. The current WC sample, although probably not complete, is almost exclusively dominated by late (WCL) types. The observed WR subtype distribution in the GCR is a reflection of the intrinsic rarity of early subtypes (WNE and WCE) in the inner Galaxy, an effect that is driven by metallicity.

  13. Overexpression of transcription factor OsWR2 1 regulates wax/cutin biosynthesis and enhances drought tolerance in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drought is the major abiotic stress limiting crop production. Plant cuticle represents the outer-most layer of the epidermis and previous studies demonstrate its association with plant response to climatological drought. We report here the functional characterization of the rice ((Oryza sativa L.) W...

  14. Southwestern Federal Power System 1995 Financial Statement audit under the Chief Financial Officers Act (WR-FC-96-02)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-22

    The Southwestern Federal Power System encompasses the operation of 24 hydroelectric power plants by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the marketing of power and energy from those plants by the Southwestern Power Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy. To integrate the operation of these hydroelectric generating plants and to transmit power from the dams to its customers, Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern) maintains 2,220 kilometers (1,380 miles) of high-voltage transmission lines, 24 substations, and 46 microwave and VHF radio sites. Southwestern`s headquarters are in Tulsa, Oklahoma; its dispatch center is in Springfield, Missouri; and its maintenance crews are based in Jonesboro, Arkansas, in Gore and Tupelo, Oklahoma, and in Springfield, Missouri. Three offices - Power Marketing and Delivery, Maintenance, and Administration and Rates - are responsible for meeting Southwestern`s mission. Twelve of the 24 generating plants are scheduled directly by Southwestern, and a total of 19 contribute to the interconnected system operations. Generation at the five remaining projects (Denison, Narrows, Sam Rayburn, Whitney, and Willis) is used to serve specific customer loads. At the end of fiscal year 1995, Southwestern marketed power and energy to 10 generation and transmission cooperatives, one distribution cooperative, three military installations, 44 municipal utilities, and three municipal utility joint-action agencies. One of the joint-action agencies has its own allocation of power from Southwestern; the other two serve 33 municipal utilities to whom Southwestern has allocated power. The total number of power allocation customers is 92. Additionally, excess energy is occasionally sold to non-allocation utilities.

  15. Effect of seasonal variations on the phytoconstituents of Aśvagandhā w.r. to lunar cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavhare, Swagata Dilip; Nishteswar, Karra; Shukla, Vinay J

    2016-01-01

    Suśruta, Caraka and other ācāryas advocate the collection of medicinal plants keeping in view the part used, season, soil in which the herb grows and the desired pharmacological actions or therapeutic benefits. The logic behind such recommendations is being validated by modern scientific research. To assess the effect of seasonal variations on the phytoconstituents of Aśvagandhā (Withania somnifera L. Dunal) w.s.r. to lunar cycles. The plant specimens were collected from Jamnagar identified pharmacognostically and cultivated under a defined habitat in a herbal garden of IPGT and RA on 7 Oct 2013. The root samples were collected on every paurṇimā (full moon) and amāvāsyā (new moon) days in śiśira and grīṣṃa ṛtu (as per classics) of the year 2013-14. The physicochemical parameters such as pH, ash values, extractive value, total alkaloid content, total flavonoids content (UV spectrometer with AlCl3 reagent), total phenolic content (Singleton and Rossi method), total carbohydrate content (UV spectroscopy with glucose as standard), UV-VIS-NIR and HPTLC were determined. The results of the analytical studies clearly validate the logic of the recommendations of Suśruta and Cakrapāṇi. According to these recommendations, uṣṇa vīrya drugs must be collected during āgneya ṛtu i.e. grīṣṃa ṛtu. In present study, total phenolic, flavonide and carbohydrate content were found more in pournima samples. GAP samples showed maximum differentiation from rest of the samples with regards to TCA, TCW, TFW, MEx, WEX, pH etc. parameters. The Grīṣṃa Jyeṣṭha Paurṇimā (GJP) and Āṣāḍha Paurṇimā (GAP) samples were found to be superior than amāvāsyā samples w.r.t. functional groups and withanoloid content respectively on HPTLC. The observations of experimental studies validate the concept of seasonal as well as lunar collection of herb Ashwagandha to yield a drug of superior quality of active principles.

  16. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR238605 with a Thirteen Week Recovery Period in Dogs. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-11

    dogs will have been vaccinated against canine distemper, infectious canine hepatitis, leptospirosis, parainfluenza, parvo, oral papilloma, and...Leukocytes NIT = Nitrite EPI = Epithelial SQ = Squamous TRANS z Transitional NA z Not Applicable TP z Triple Phosphate QNS = Quantity Not...documented on the Clinical Veterinarian Log by the veterinarian prior to study initiation. Food: Purina Certified Canine Diet No. 5007 (Ralston

  17. Effect of parenterally administered cystamine and gammaphos (WR-2721) on some biochemical parameters in dog blood serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsa, J.; Tichy, M.; Podzimek, F.; Spelda, S.; Resl, M.; Kuna, P.

    1987-01-01

    The effects were studied of intravenous and intramuscular administration of radioprotectives cystamine and gammaphos in dogs on the biochemical parameters of the blood serum. The activities were studied of enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine kinase, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, sorbitol dehydrogenase and alpha-amylase. The contents were determined of total protein, albumin, bilirubin, urea nitrogen, creatinine, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, lipids, calcium, sodium and potassium. Cystamine was shown to be hepatotoxic. The intramuscular administration of gammaphos was found to be more advantageous than of cystamine. Only slight increase was observed in the activities of lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and alpha-amylase. With cystamine, the changes in all biochemical parameters were most marked. (M.D.). 17 figs., 18 refs

  18. Introduction to the Evaluation of the Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching (IP). Working Paper WR-1034-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecher, Brian M.; Garet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    On November 19, 2009, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation announced that it would invest $290 million to support effective teaching as a means to ensure all students receive the education they need to succeed in high school and beyond. The foundation made six-year grants to support four Intensive Partnership for Effective Teaching (IP) sites…

  19. Effect of seasonal variations on the phytoconstituents of Aśvagandhā w.r. to lunar cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swagata Dilip Tavhare

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the effect of seasonal variations on the phytoconstituents of Aśvagandhā (Withania somnifera L. Dunal w.s.r. to lunar cycles. Material and Methods: The plant specimens were collected from Jamnagar identified pharmacognostically and cultivated under a defined habitat in a herbal garden of IPGT and RA on 7 Oct 2013. The root samples were collected on every paurṃimā (full moon and amāvāsyā (new moon days in śiśira and grīşṃa ṃṛtu (as per classics of the year 2013-14. The physicochemical parameters such as pH, ash values, extractive value, total alkaloid content, total flavonoids content (UV spectrometer with AlCl3 reagent, total phenolic content (Singleton and Rossi method, total carbohydrate content (UV spectroscopy with glucose as standard, UV-VIS-NIR and HPTLC were determined. Result: The results of the analytical studies clearly validate the logic of the recommendations of Suśruta and Cakrapāṃi. According to these recommendations, uşṃa vīrya drugs must be collected during āgneya ṃṛtu i.e. grīşṃa ṃṛtu. In present study, total phenolic, flavonide and carbohydrate content were found more in pournima samples. GAP samples showed maximum differentiation from rest of the samples with regards to TCA, TCW, TFW, MEx, WEX, pH etc. parameters. The Grīşṃa Jyeşṃha Paurṃimā (GJP and Āşāḍha Paurṃimā (GAP samples were found to be superior than amāvāsyā samples w.r.t. functional groups and withanoloid content respectively on HPTLC. Conclusion: The observations of experimental studies validate the concept of seasonal as well as lunar collection of herb Ashwagandha to yield a drug of superior quality of active principles.

  20. Evaluation of a combined laser-radio frequency device (Polaris WR) for the nonablative treatment of facial wrinkles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulick, Michael

    2005-06-01

    Nonablative wrinkle reduction or skin tightening is desired by individuals who, ideally, hope to have the skin improvement associated with chemical or laser ablative techniques but without the undesirable recovery process. Electro-optical synergy (ELOS) technology that combines radio frequency (RF) and diode laser energy (900 nm) was used to treat 15 patients in this IRB sanctioned study. Energy settings were based on the depth of wrinkles (the greater the depth and concentration of wrinkles, the higher the RF setting) and ranged from 50-100 J/cm2 RF and 15 J/cm2 for the optical, laser component. Patients received three full-face treatments, and results were evaluated by comparison of standardized photographs and patient questionnaire given prior to each treatment and one month after the third treatment. The primary investigator and three other "blinded" physicians evaluated these photographs using Fitzpatrick's wrinkle classification to assess the improvement, if any, between the initial and final visit. Eight patients completed the study. Explanation for the exclusion of the remaining six patients were: one decided to have surgery, two felt the treatment was too painful, and three moved out of the area. Following treatment, all patients had mild swelling (resolved skin hyperemia (resolved skin wrinkles (range 14%-32%). There were no adverse side effects. The major concern of the patients was the discomfort associated with the treatment. As part of an FDA investigation to assess efficacy, long-term follow-up was not a part of this study protocol.

  1. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey IV. WR 62-2, a new very massive star in the core of the VVV CL041 cluster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chene, A.-N.; Alegria, S.R.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Hervé, Anthony; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 584, December (2015), A31/1-A31/8 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-02385S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : open clusters and associations * VVV CL041 * massive star s Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  2. Radioprotection of Intestinal Stem Cells and Whole Body Radiation Lethality from Photons and Neutrons by Prostaglandins along or in Combination with WR-2721

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-01

    asthma, calcium metabolic defects, angina pectoris and peptic ulcer . As a result of the array and sometimes antagonistic biologic effects of the family of...Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget. Paperwork Reduction Project (0704-0188). Washington. OC 20503 1, AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave... perforated plastic tubes that, in turn, were placed between two A-150 tissue equivalent disks for build-up and backscatter. The disks holding the mice were

  3. Amifostine (WR-2721, a cytoprotective agent during high-dose cyclophosphamide treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. De Souza

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials indicate that amifostine may confer protection on various normal tissues without attenuating anti-tumor response. When administered prior to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, it may provide a broad spectrum of cytoprotection including against alkylating drugs. The mechanism of protection resides in the metabolism at normal tissue site by membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase. Toxicity of this drug is moderate with hypotension, nausea and vomiting, and hypocalcemia being observed. We report a phase II study using amifostine as a protective drug against high-dose cyclophosphamide (HDCY (7 g/m2, used to mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC and to reduce tumor burden. We enrolled 29 patients, 22 (75.9% affected by aggressive and 7 (24.1% by indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, who were submitted to 58 infusions of amifostine and compared them with a historical group (33 patients affected by aggressive NHL and treated with VACOP-B followed by HDCY. The most important results in favor of amifostine were the reduction of intensity of cardiac, pulmonary and hepatic toxicity, and a significant reduction of frequency and severity of mucositis (P = 0.04. None of the 29 patients died in the protected group, while in the historical group 2/33 patients died because of cardiac or pulmonary toxicity and 2 patients stopped therapy due to toxicity. Amifostine did not prevent the aplastic phase following HDCY. PBPC collection and hematological recovery were adequate in both groups. The number of CFU-GM (colony-forming units-granulocyte/macrophage colonies and mononuclear cells in the apheresis products was significantly higher in the amifostine group (P = 0.02 and 0.01, respectively. Side effects were mild and easily controlled. We conclude that amifostine protection should be useful in HDCY to protect normal tissues, with acceptable side effects.

  4. Hypolipidemic activity of P-methoxycinnamic diester (PCO-C) isolated from Copernicia prunífera against Triton WR-1339 and hyperlipidemic diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, A C V A; Rodrigues, P A S; Benjamin, S R; Paim, R T T; Holanda, M O; Silva, J Y G; Milo, T S; Vieira, I G P; Queiroz, M G R; Guedes, M I F

    2017-12-01

    Carnauba wax is extracted from the leaves of the Copernicia prunífera and contains approximately 80% of esters in its composition. The purpose of the present study was evaluate the hypolipidemic effect of p-methoxycinnamic diesters (PCO-C) extracted from Copernicia prunífera in a model of acute and chronic dyslipidemia in mice. The levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly reduced plasma levels in PCO-C at the dose of 100mg/kg in a model of acute and chronic dyslipidemia. Histological studies showed that PCO-C has no hepatotoxic effect and reduces hepatic steatosis in animals that consumed hyperlipidemic ration. Thus, it was concluded that PCO-C isolated from Copernicia Prunifera was effective in reducing total cholesterol and triglyceride levels in both dyslipidemia induction models. The finding indicates that PCO-C might be beneficial in treatment of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Trends in the Distribution of Teacher Effectiveness in the Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching: Progress Report. Working Paper WR-1036-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jennifer L.; Baird, Matthew; Engberg, John; Hunter, Gerald Paul

    2014-01-01

    As part of its effective teaching initiative, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation partnered with three urban school districts across the U.S. and a group of four charter management organizations to undertake a strategic set of human capital reforms. A key objective of the "Intensive Partnerships for Effective Teaching" program was to…

  6. GeV gamma-rays and TeV neutrinos from very massive compact binary systems: The case of WR 20a

    OpenAIRE

    Bednarek, W.

    2005-01-01

    Massive Wolf-Rayet stars in a compact binary systems are characterised by very strong winds which collide creating a shock wave. If the wind nuclei accelerated at the shock can reach large enough energies, they suffer disintegration in collisions with soft thermal radiation from the massive stars injecting relativistic protons and neutrons. Protons collide with the matter of the wind and a fraction of neutrons colide with the massive stars producing gamma-rays and neutrinos. We calculate the ...

  7. W.R. Grace: Plant Uses Six Sigma Methodology and Traditional Heat Balance Analysis to Identify Energy Conservation Opportunities at Curtis Bay Works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-12-01

    The plant-wide energy assessment at W. R. Grace's Curtis Bay Works helped identify four projects with combined potential savings of $840,000 per year. A separate, unique project that would partner W. R. Grace with the City of Baltimore to recover and use landfill gas (methane) to cogenerate steam and electricity was also identified during the assessment. If implemented, the project would recover gas from the landfill to replace 40% of the electricity and 65% of the fuel currently required to produce steam at Curtis Bay Works. Annual savings are estimated at $900,000 to $1.2 million.

  8. An extensive spectroscopic time series of three Wolf-Rayet stars - I. The lifetime of large-scale structures in the wind of WR 134

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aldoretta, E.J.; St-Louis, N.; Richardson, N.; Moffat, A.F.J.; Eversberg, T.; Hill, G.M.; Shenar, T.; Artigau, E.; Gauza, B.; Knapen, J.H.; Kubát, Jiří; Kubátová, Brankica; Maltais-Tariant, R.; Munoz, M.; Pablo, H.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Richard-Laferriere, A.; Sablowski, D.P.; Simon-Diaz, S.; St-Jean, L.; Bolduan, F.; Dias, F.M.; Dubreuil, P.; Fuchs, D.; Garrel, T.; Grutzeck, G.; Hunger, T.; Kuesters, D.; Langenbrink, M.; Leadbeater, R.; Li, D.; Lopez, A.; Mauclaire, B.; Moldenhawer, T.; Potter, M.; dos Santos, E.M.; Schanne, L.; Schmidt, J.; Sieske, H.; Strachan, J.; Stinner, E.; Stinner, P.; Stober, B.; Strandbaek, K.; Syder, T.; Verilhac, D.; Waldschlaeger, U.; Weiss, D.; Wendt, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 460, č. 3 (2016), s. 3407-3417 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-10589S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : instabilities * data analysis * spectroscopic techniques Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.961, year: 2016

  9. Use of triton-WR-1339 (TWR) for a quantitative determination of the lysosomal binding of transuranium elements in the rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The subcellular localisation of 239 Pu and 241 Am in the rat liver was investigated. A biochemical separation method with modified lysosomes was applied for the first time; the method permitted unique statements on the mitochondrial or lysosomal association of transuranium elements. Lysosomal association of 239 Pu and 241 Am between days 4 and 6 after radionuclide injection was most easily detected by follow-up treatment with TWR, i.e. the nonionic detergent was applied 2 days after injection of the radionuclide and 4 days before the onset of the analytical procedure. Extracellular transuranium depots could not be proved to exist neither by comparing absolute retention figures in perfused and nonperfused livers nor by subcellular distribution studies. A quantitative relation between the DTPA mobilisation efficiency in the total liver and the subcellular distribution patterns obtained for americium could be estimated for the period between the first and 18th day after radionuclide injection. It suggests on intracellular effect of DTPA. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Weather regimes in the South American sector and neighbouring oceans during winter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solman, S.A.; Menendez, C.G. [Centro de Investigaciones del Mar y la Atmosfera (CIMA-CONICET/UBA), Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2003-07-01

    We classified 34 years of winter daily 500 hPa geopotential height patterns over the eastern South Pacific-South America-South Atlantic region using the K-means clustering method. We found a significant classification into five weather regimes (WRs) defined as the most frequent large-scale circulation anomalies: WR1 (trough centred downstream of the Drake Passage), WR2 (trough over the SW Pacific and ridge downstream), WR3 (ridge over the SE Pacific and NW-SE trough downstream), WR4 (trough over the SE Pacific and NW-SE ridge downstream) and WR5 (weak ridge to the west of southern South America). We also analysed their persistence and temporal evolution, including transitions between them and development around onsets and breaks of each regime. The preferred transitions, WR1{yields}WR3{yields}WR2{yields}WR4{yields}WR1 and also WR1{yields}WR3{yields}WR2{yields}WR1, suggest the progression of a Rossby wave-like pattern in which each of the regimes resemble the Pacific-South America modes. Significant influence of the WRs on local climate over Argentina was found. The preferred transitions WR1{yields}WR3 and WR3{yields}WR2 induce sustained cold conditions over Patagonia and over northern Argentina, respectively. The most significant change in precipitation frequency is found for WR3, with wetter conditions over all the analysed regions. Finally, the interannual to interdecadal significant variations in the occurrence of these regimes were discussed. WR1 and WR3 are more frequent and WR2 is less frequent during El Nino, and WR2 and WR5 are more frequent and WR1 is less frequent during La Nina. A significant decrease in WR2 and increase of WR4 and WR5 during the 1970s and early 1980s were found. (orig.)

  11. A Vote for Open Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Northwest High School in Wichita (Kansas) is arranged pinwheel fashion around a central commons that serves as space for eating, lockers, informal gatherings, and the foyer of a 804-seat theater. (Author/MLF)

  12. Prevent Child Abuse America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Week Parenting Tip of the Week – Preventing Child Sexual Abuse Parenting Tip of the Week Parenting Tip of the Week – Talking to Teens about Healthy Relationships ... of child abuse prevention through our Pinwheels for Prevention campaign. ...

  13. Walk-Rally Support System Using Two-Dimensional Codes and Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Tetsuya; Yamagishi, Yoshio; Mizuno, Shun

    2013-01-01

    "Walk Rally" (WR), an orienteering-like recreation game, is common, especially in Japan. Numerous trials to combine WR with educational activities are being carried out by some educators. However, participants are always at the risk of straying and subjected to various accidents during the WR. We developed a WR support system based on…

  14. Estrellas Wolf-Rayet y el medio interestelar: huellas de una fuerte interacción

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichowolski, S.; Arnal, E. M.

    Se presentan resultados observacionales de un estudio de la distribución de hidrógeno neutro en los alrededores de estrellas Wolf-Rayet (WR) galácticas. Los datos de la línea de 21 cm provienen de observaciones de resolución angular intermedia (9') tomadas con el radiotelescopio de Effelsberg. La muestra está compuesta por cuatro WR de la serie del nitrógeno (WN): WR130, WR131, WR155, WR156 y tres WR de la serie del carbono (WC): WR154, WR117 y WR126. Este análisis ha permitido detectar cavidades y envolturas de HI en expansión presumiblemente vinculadas a dichas estrellas.

  15. Cruise Missile Engine Program Contract Data Requirements List Sequence Number 95. Qualification Test Report. Volume XXXIX. Vibration and Mission Simulation Testing on Engine 828. XF-107-WR-400 Cruise Missile Engine,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    Illinois Page 7 REV. E ACC"T iJ’ , T.-T AUDIT 4 tii~~fs~actor ~ L~~ 4~4’~NDate S "n M. I. M EC RORDRE -MARK 1 95 oh -- Pum Capacity iA 11994 12054 0...2 S.Z 14-. -l_ S. Z.11500 0 60(60-1851 500 515 5.3. At. el 170’f 8061-056 OnY) 1438 1-448 1; 45a ~~:1 462____ 5.4 Acca ? -6S5F 5.4.116400 40 .4595

  16. High Energy Phenomena in Eta Carinae Roberto F. Viotti , Lucio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    High Energy Phenomena in Eta Carinae ... Colliding winds model—non-thermal emission—stars: η ... very massive wind. Its unseen compan- ion should be a less evolved early-type star. It was found that the two last spectroscopic minima of June 1992 and December 1997 coincided with two X-ray eclipses detected.

  17. A new survey of nebulae around Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars in the northern sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Grant J.; Chu, You-Hua

    1993-01-01

    Interference filter CCD images have been obtained in H-alpha and forbidden O III 5007 A for 62 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars, representing a complete survey of nebulae around Galactic W-R stars in the northern sky. We find probable new ring nebulae around W-R stars number 113, 116 and 132, and possible new ring nebulae around W-R stars number 133 and 153. All survey images showing nebulosities around W-R stars are presented in this paper. New physical information is derived from the improved images of known ring nebulae. The absence of ring nebulae around most W-R stars is discussed.

  18. Mass loss from Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Recent results relating to the stellar winds and mass loss rates of the WR stars are reviewed, emphasising new data and their interpretation acquired at UV, IR and Radio wavelengths. The subject is discussed under the headings: physical and chemical properties of WR stars (effective temperatures and radiative luminosities; masses; chemical abundances); velocity, ionisation and excitation structure of WR winds; mass loss rates of WR stars; mass loss properties of WR stars in the LMC; comparisons with theoretical models of mass loss; ring nebulae around WR stars; conclusions. (author)

  19. Application of composition modulated thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Film produced by evaporating two components through a rotating pinwheel shutter which cuts off the vapor first from one source and then the other are evaluated. These films have a modulated composition rather than a layered structure. Mechanical properties were determined using a bulge tester

  20. 4300-eurone maja peab maavärinale vastu / Kaarel Kressa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kressa, Kaarel, 1983-

    2011-01-01

    Maailma vaeste majutustingimuste parandamiseks püütakse Massachusettsi Tehnoloogiainstituudi arhitektuuriteaduskonnas välja töötada tuhandedollarise maja projekti. Hiinlasest tudengi Ying-chee Chui leiutatud Tuulerattamajast ("Pinwheel House"). Saviplokkidest ja bambusest moodulmaja peab vastu maavärinale

  1. 3D topology of orientation columns in visual cortex revealed by functional optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Yu; Kalatsky, Valery A; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Sato, Takayuki; Rajagopalan, Uma Maheswari; Tanifuji, Manabu

    2018-04-01

    Orientation tuning is a canonical neuronal response property of six-layer visual cortex that is encoded in pinwheel structures with center orientation singularities. Optical imaging of intrinsic signals enables us to map these surface two-dimensional (2D) structures, whereas lack of appropriate techniques has not allowed us to visualize depth structures of orientation coding. In the present study, we performed functional optical coherence tomography (fOCT), a technique capable of acquiring a 3D map of the intrinsic signals, to study the topology of orientation coding inside the cat visual cortex. With this technique, for the first time, we visualized columnar assemblies in orientation coding that had been predicted from electrophysiological recordings. In addition, we found that the columnar structures were largely distorted around pinwheel centers: center singularities were not rigid straight lines running perpendicularly to the cortical surface but formed twisted string-like structures inside the cortex that turned and extended horizontally through the cortex. Looping singularities were observed with their respective termini accessing the same cortical surface via clockwise and counterclockwise orientation pinwheels. These results suggest that a 3D topology of orientation coding cannot be fully anticipated from 2D surface measurements. Moreover, the findings demonstrate the utility of fOCT as an in vivo mesoscale imaging method for mapping functional response properties of cortex in the depth axis. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We used functional optical coherence tomography (fOCT) to visualize three-dimensional structure of the orientation columns with millimeter range and micrometer spatial resolution. We validated vertically elongated columnar structure in iso-orientation domains. The columnar structure was distorted around pinwheel centers. An orientation singularity formed a string with tortuous trajectories inside the cortex and connected clockwise and counterclockwise

  2. The origin of Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doom, C.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reviews the origin of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, with emphasis on the so-called Population I WR stars which are associated with the young and luminous stellar population. A description is given of the observational characteristics i.e. classification, luminosities composition, etc. of WR stars. The origin and evolution of WR stars is described, including the single, binary, subtypes and ratio WR/O. The interaction of the WR stars with their environment is discussed with respect to the energy deposition and composition anomalies. A brief account of the discovery of WR stars in other galaxies is given. Finally, some of the main issues in the research into the structure and evolution of WR stars are outlined. (U.K.)

  3. Observations and the Wolf-Rayet evolutionary scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmani, C.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a statistical analysis of massive stars and of WR stars show general agreement with the scenario that identifies the majority of the WR stars with the He-burning evolutionary phases. The duplicity, the morphological properties and the galactic distribution of the WR stars are valuable pieces of evidence that suggest correlations between the different WR types and the ''channels'' defined in the scenario. A rough analysis of the ''traffic through each channel'' is attempted. (Auth.)

  4. Behavioral and neural responses of toads to salt solutions correlate with basolateral membrane potential of epidermal cells of the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Baula, Victor; Tuttle, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    Dehydrated toads initiated water absorption response (WR) behavior and absorbed water from dilute NaCl solutions. With 200-250 mM NaCl, WR behavior and water absorption were both suppressed. With 200-250 mM Na-gluconate, WR initiation was significantly greater than with NaCl but water loss was gr...

  5. Two extremely luminous WN stars in the Galactic center with circumstellar emission from dust and gas

    OpenAIRE

    Barniske, A.; Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W. -R.

    2008-01-01

    We study relatively isolated massive WN-type stars in the Galactic center. The K-band spectra of WR102ka and WR102c are exploited to infer the stellar parameters and to compute synthetic stellar spectra using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code. These models are combined with dust-shell models for analyzing the Spitzer IRS spectra of these objects. Archival IR images complement the interpretation. We report that WR102ka and WR102c are among the most luminous stars in the Milky...

  6. Water repellency of clay, sand and organic soils in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. RASA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Water repellency (WR delays soil wetting process, increases preferential flow and may give rise to surface runoff and consequent erosion. WR is commonly recognized in the soils of warm and temperate climates. To explore the occurrence of WR in soils in Finland, soil R index was studied on 12 sites of different soil types. The effects of soil management practice, vegetation age, soil moisture and drying temperature on WR were studied by a mini-infiltrometer with samples from depths of 0-5 and 5-10 cm. All studied sites exhibited WR (R index >1.95 at the time of sampling. WR increased as follows: sand (R = 1.8-5.0 < clay (R = 2.4-10.3 < organic (R = 7.9-undefined. At clay and sand, WR was generally higher at the soil surface and at the older sites (14 yr., where organic matter is accumulated. Below 41 vol. % water content these mineral soils were water repellent whereas organic soil exhibited WR even at saturation. These results show that soil WR also reduces water infiltration at the prevalent field moisture regime in the soils of boreal climate. The ageing of vegetation increases WR and on the other hand, cultivation reduces or hinders the development of WR.;

  7. Wolf-Rayet stars in open clusters and associations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundstroem, I.; Stenholm, B.

    1982-01-01

    The authors have made a search for line-of-sight coincidences between WR stars and open clusters using the new catalogue of galactic WR stars (van der Hucht et al., 1981, called the HCLS catalogue) and the catalogue of open cluster data (Lyngaa and Lundstroem, 1980). As a measure of the separation they used the angular distance between the WR star and the cluster centre expressed with the cluster angular radius, r', as unit. By comparing the results found from the real angular distributions of WR stars and open clusters with those found if the WR stars were redistributed by changing signs in their latitudes, it is concluded that the majority of WR stars with separations less than 3r' are true cluster members. For larger separations only a few stars can be expected to be members. The authors have therefore limited their investigation to those WR stars that were found within 5r' from an open cluster. (Auth.)

  8. THE PREVALENCE AND IMPACT OF WOLF–RAYET STARS IN EMERGING MASSIVE STAR CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Massey, Philip, E-mail: krs9tb@virginia.edu [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.{sup 4} We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ∼50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.

  9. MICROORGANISMS IN CONFECTIONERY PRODUCTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ľubomíra Juhaniaková; Miroslava Kačániová

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine microbiological quality of confectionery products. In confectionery products microbiological parameters: coliforms bacteria, microscopic filamentous fungi and yeasts, Salmonella sp. and staphylococci were observed. The confectionery products were evaluated: Kremes - honey cube, roll Arabica, roll Rona, roll stuffed with apricot cream, honey cube, pinwheel caramel, Sachovnica cut, Zora cut and curd cake. For microbiological tests 18 samples of confectioner...

  10. The first optical spectra of Wolf-Rayet stars in M101 revealed with Gemini/GMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pledger, J. L.; Shara, M. M.; Wilde, M.; Crowther, P. A.; Long, K. S.; Zurek, D.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    2018-01-01

    Deep narrow-band Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the iconic spiral galaxy M101 has revealed over a thousand new Wolf-Rayet (WR) candidates. We report spectrographic confirmation of 10 He II-emission line sources hosting 15 WR stars. We find WR stars present at both sub- and super-solar metallicities with WC stars favouring more metal-rich regions compared to WN stars. We investigate the association of WR stars with H II regions using archival HST imaging and conclude that the majority of WR stars are in or associated with H II regions. Of the 10 emission lines sources, only one appears to be unassociated with a star-forming region. Our spectroscopic survey provides confidence that our narrow-band photometric candidates are in fact bona fide WR stars, which will allow us to characterize the progenitors of any core-collapse supernovae that erupt in the future in M101.

  11. Wolf-Rayet stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahade, J

    1981-12-01

    Aspects of the problems of the Wolf-Rayet stars related to their chemical composition, their evolutionary status, and their apparent dichotomy in two spectral sequences are discussed. Dogmas concerning WR stars are critically discussed, including the belief that WR stars lack hydrogen, that they are helium stars evolved from massive close binaries, and the existence of a second WR stage in which the star is a short-period single-lined binary. The relationship of WR stars with planetary nebulae is addressed, as is the membership of these stars in clusters and associations. The division of WR stars into WN and WC sequences is considered, questioning the reasonability of accounting for WR line formation in terms of abundance differences.

  12. On Surface Losses in Direct Metal Laser Sintering Printed Millimeter and Submillimeter Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Max; Dancila, Dragos; Rydberg, Anders; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin; Jansson, Ulf; Marattukalam, Jithin James; Johansson, Niklas; Andersson, Joakim

    2018-06-01

    Different lengths of WR3 (220-330 GHz) and WR10 (75-110 GHz) waveguides are fabricated through direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). The losses in these waveguides are measured and modelled using the Huray surface roughness model. The losses in WR3 are around 0.3 dB/mm and in WR10 0.05 dB/mm. The Huray equation model is accounting relatively good for the attenuation in the WR10 waveguide but deviates more in the WR3 waveguide. The model is compared to finite element simulations of the losses assuming an approximate surface structure similar to the resulting one from the DMLS process.

  13. The Wolf-Rayet stars in 30 Doradus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnick, J.

    1982-01-01

    The second brightest giant HII region in the sky is the 30 Doradus nebula in the LMC. This cluster contains many WR stars and may be one of the best objects where general ideas about the origin and evolution of WR stars can be tested. The author briefly describes observations of WR stars in 30 Doradus and discusses the implications for Wolf-Rayet evolutionary theories. (Auth.)

  14. ISO-SWS spectrophotometry of galactic Wolf-Rayet stars: preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hucht, K. A.; Morris, P. W.; Williams, P. M.; Setia Gunawan, D. Y. A.; Beintema, D. A.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; de Graauw, T.; Heras, A.; Kester, D. J. M.; Lahuis, F.; Leech, K. J.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Salama, A.; Valentijn, E. A.; Vandenbussche, B.

    1996-01-01

    ISO-SWS spectra of seven late-type galactic Wolf-Rayet stars are discussed. A high resolution spectrum (2.3-29.6μm, λ/{DELTA}λ=~820-1700) of the WC8 star WR11 (γ^2^ Vel) is shown and its Ne abundance is discussed. Medium resolution spectra (λ/{DELTA}λ=~250-600) of the WC8-9 stars WR48a, WR98a,

  15. 75 FR 63434 - Kootenai National Forest, Lincoln County, Montana; Grizzly Vegetation and Transportation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Troy, Montana. The Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS for this project was published in the... analysis is Cami Winslow, Acting District Ranger, Three Rivers Ranger District, 12385 U.S. Hwy 2, Troy, MT... northeast of Troy, Montana, within all or portions of T34N, R32W-R33W, T35N, R32W-R33W, and T36N, R32W-R33W...

  16. Suboptimal Weight Loss and Weight Regain after Gastric Bypass Surgery?Postoperative Status of Energy Intake, Eating Behavior, Physical Activity, and Psychometrics

    OpenAIRE

    Amundsen, Tina; Str?mmen, Magnus; Martins, Catia

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Suboptimal weight loss (SWL) and weight regain (WR) after gastric bypass surgery (GB) remains poorly understood. OBJECTIVES: This study aims to compare GB patients experiencing SWL or significant WR (SigWR) with successful controls, regarding postoperative food intake, eating behavior, physical activity (PA), and psychometrics. METHODS: Forty-nine patients with >1 year post-surgery were classified as either experiencing SWL (excess body weight loss, EWL,

  17. Dicty_cDB: CHH368 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Acid sequence (All Frames) Frame A: ---**xxvx*xixxixxxxxixxxqxyxhxxlxklnrfsxxxxxxnqnxryxnnqnhnhn hkynnnqtiqq...lnsqkvtilmmq*wr**mvlqiqlkxxxrexkv Frame B: ---nxxxxxnxsxxxxxxxxxxixxfxftxxsxs*tgsaxxxxxxirixdtxttkittti tntt

  18. Shoulder MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder replacement - discharge Shoulder surgery - discharge Using your shoulder after replacement surgery References Hanypsiak B, DeLong JM, Lowe WR. Scapulothoracic ...

  19. Survey of selected pathogens and blood parameters of northern yellowstone elk: Wolf sanitation effect implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber-Meyer, S. M.; White, P.J.; Mech, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    The restoration or conservation of predators could reduce seroprevalences of certain diseases in prey if predation selectively removes animals exhibiting clinical signs. We assessed disease seroprevalences and blood parameters of 115 adult female elk (Cervus elaphus) wintering on the northern range of Yellowstone National Park [YNP] during 2000-2005 and compared them to data collected prior to wolf (Canis lupus) restoration (WR) in 1995 and to two other herds in Montana to assess this prediction. Blood parameters were generally within two standard deviations of the means observed in other Montana herds (Gravelly-Snowcrest [GS] and Garnet Mountain [GM]), but Yellowstone elk had higher seroprevalences of parainfluenza-3 virus (95% CI YNP = 61.1-78.6, GS = 30.3-46.5) and bovine-virus-diarrhea virus type 1 (95% CI YNP = 15.9-31.9, GM = 0). In comparisons between pre-wolf restoration [pre-WR] (i.e., prior to 1995) seroprevalences with those post-wolf restoration [post-WR] in Yellowstone, we found lower seroprevalences for some disease-causing agents post-wolf restoration (e.g., bovine-virus-diarrhea virus type-1 [95% CI pre-WR = 73.1-86.3, post-WR = 15.9-31.9] and bovine-respiratory syncytial virus [95% CI pre-WR = 70.0-83.8, post-WR = 0]), but similar (e.g., Brucella abortus [95% CI pre-WR = 0-4.45, post-WR = 0-4.74] and epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus [95% CI pre-WR = 0, post-WR = 0]) or higher for others (e.g., Anaplasma marginale [95% CI pre-WR = 0, post-WR = 18.5-38.7] and Leptospira spp. [95% CI pre-WR = 0.5-6.5, post-WR = 9.5-23.5]). Though we did not detect an overall strong predation effect through reduced disease seroprevalence using retrospective comparisons with sparse data, our reference values will facilitate future assessments of this issue.

  20. Infrared Photometric Study of Wolf–Rayet Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. S.; Yang, X. H.; Liu, J. Y.; Shan, H. G.

    2018-01-01

    We collected observational data on 781 Wolf–Rayet (WR) galaxies from the literature to photometrically study their infrared properties measured by the 2MASS, WISE, IRAS, AKARI, and Herschel missions. It is found that in the 1–5 μm range the radiations of WR galaxies are dominated by the free–free emissions from the stellar winds and the circumstellar dust from the late-type stars in the host galaxy. In the 5–22 μm range, the radiation of WR galaxies is dominated by the free–free emissions and the synchrotron radiation from the central active galactic nucleus (AGN; but not always present). In the 22–140 μm range, the radiations of WR galaxies are dominated by the free–free emissions and the star formation/starburst activities. In the 250–500 μm range, the radiation of WR galaxies is dominated by the free–free emissions. In addition, the comparison with the non-WR galaxies is made. It is shown that some star formation WR galaxies have redder near-infrared colors than non-WR star-forming galaxies probably due to the gas emission in the near-infrared. In the 2–5 μm region WR galaxies have redder colors due to the thermal emission from circumstellar dust of late-type stars and the enhanced gas emission. In the 5–22 μm region, both WR galaxies and non-WR galaxies have similar behavior, indicative of having similar free–free emission as the dominant radiation. In the 25–140 μm region, both types of galaxies also have similar behavior, indicative of having free–free emission from the stellar winds or the thermal radiation from the starburst/star formation as the dominant radiation.

  1. In vitro evaluation of some latent radioprotective compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, O.; Grant, G.A.; Budke, L.

    1976-08-01

    Protection against X-irradiation by a number of cysteamine derivatives was studied in tissue culture and the results were compared with data obtained in mice. Compounds with a covered SH group like WR 638, cysteamine phosphate, WR 2721 and AE 48527, showed practically no protection when dissolved in tissue culture medium, but developed a protective activity when dissolved in rat blood. Thiol measurements demonstrated that in rat blood the compounds were partly hydrolysed to thiols. C511 was also hydrolysed in culture medium and was slightly less effective than cysteamine in culture medium. Cysteamine phosphate was hydrolysed more easily than cysteamine sulphate and concordantly the protective activity in rat blood was better. WR 2721 was also partly hydrolysed in rat blood. The in vitro protection of this compound was disappointing when compared with results in vivo. Its SH form (WR 1065) also showed less protection than expected from in vivo experiments. Thus the little protection by WR 2721 in vitro in rat blood is not only due to its incomplete conversion into its thiol. Longer incubation times and the use of rat blood as a solvent brought the protective activity of WR 1065 up to almost the level of cysteamine. This may indicate that WR 1065 is poorly penetrating into the cells. WR 1065 was the only compound studied whose protective activity in vitro was improved appreciably by dissolving it in rat plasma

  2. White Rabbit Precision Time Protocol on Long-Distance Fiber Links

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierikx, E.F.; Dierikx, A.E.; Fordell, T.; Myyry, J.; Koponen, P.; Merimaa, M.; Pinkert, T.J.; Koelemeij, J.C.J.; Peek, H.Z.; Smets, R.

    2016-01-01

    The application of White Rabbit precision time protocol (WR-PTP) in long-distance optical fiber links has been investigated. WR-PTP is an implementation of PTP in synchronous Ethernet optical fiber networks, originally intended for synchronization of equipment within a range of 10 km. This paper

  3. Genetic bases of fungal white rot wood decay predicted by phylogenomic analysis of correlated gene-phenotype evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    László G. Nagy; Robert Riley; Philip J. Bergmann; Krisztina Krizsán; Francis M. Martin; Igor V. Grigoriev; Dan Cullen; David S. Hibbett

    2016-01-01

    Fungal decomposition of plant cell walls (PCW) is a complex process that has diverse industrial applications and huge impacts on the carbon cycle. White rot (WR) is a powerful mode of PCW decay in which lignin and carbohydrates are both degraded. Mechanistic studies of decay coupled with comparative genomic analyses have provided clues to the enzymatic components of WR...

  4. Soil recovery across a chronosequence of restored wetlands in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qibing; Li, Yuncong; Zhang, Min

    2015-12-01

    The restoration project in the Hole-in-the-Donut of Everglades National Park in Florida, USA is to reestablish native wetlands by complete removal of the invasive plants and the associated soil. However, there is little information available about changes in properties of the newly formed Marl soils in restored wetlands. In this study, we measured soil physicochemical properties, soil enzymatic activities, and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) in plants and soil organic carbon (SOC) in an undisturbed natural wetland (UNW) and three wetlands restored respectively in 1989, 1996 and 1999 (WR89, WR96 and WR99). The older restored wetlands (WR89 and WR96) are characterized by greater SOC and mineral nitrogen. The values of soil dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities in the four wetlands follow the order: UNW > WR89 > WR96 > WR99, and are consistent with changes in vegetation coverage. The principal component analysis shows that dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities are the vital variables contributing to the soil of UNW. The similar δ13C values of SOC and plants in the restored wetlands suggest the formation of SOC during restoration is mainly derived from the associated plants. These results indicate that the newly restored soils develop toward the soil in the UNW with time since restoration.

  5. In vitro evaluation of some latent radioprotective compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, O.; Budke, L.; Grant, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    In tissue culture, protection against X-irradiation by a number of cysteamine derivatives was studied and the results were compared with data obtained in mice. Compounds with a covered SH group, like WR 638, cysteamine phosphate, WR 2721, and AE 48527, showed practically no protection when dissolved in tissue-culture medium, but developed a protective activity when dissolved in rat blood. Thiol measurements demonstrated that in rat blood the compounds were partly hydrolysed to thiols. C511 was also hydrolysed in culture medium and was slightly less effective than cysteamine in culture medium. Cysteamine phosphate was hydrolysed more easily than cysteamine sulphate and the protective activity in rat blood was better. WR 2721 was also partly hydrolysed in rat blood. The in vitro protection of this compound was disappointing when compared with results in vivo. Its SH form (WR 1065) also showed less protection than expected from in vivo experiments. Thus, the little protection by WR 2721 in vitro in rat blood was not only due to its incomplete conversion into its thiol. Longer incubation times and the use of rat blood as a solvent brought the protective activity of WR 1065 almost up to the level of cysteamine. This may indicate that WR 1065 penetrates the cells poorly. WR 1065 was the only compound which was studied whose protective activity in vitro was improved appreciably by dissolving it in rat plasma. (author)

  6. Stabilization of glucocorticoid receptors in isolated rat hepatocytes by radioprotectants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karle, J.M.; Ridder, W.E.; Wright, N.; Olmeda, R.; Nielsen, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Previous work has shown that glucocorticoid receptors in rat liver homogenate can be stabilized by the addition of MoO 4 plus the sulfhydryl-containing compounds dithiothreitol and WR 1065. The latter is the dephosphorylated, principal metabolite of the radioprotectant WR 2721 (or S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanesphosphorothioic acid). The current work results from applying this knowledge to intact rat hepatocytes. Cells were isolated by collagenase perfusion and incubated in supplemented minimum essential medium at 37 0 C with various concentrations of WR 2721, WR 1065, or vehicle. Samples of these cell suspensions were analyzed at various times for steroid binding capacity by incubating homogenates (27,000 x g supernates) with 50 nM 3 H-triamcinolone acetonide in the presence or absence of excess unlabelled dexamethasone. Concentrations of 10 mM WR 2721 provided marked preservation of the binding capacity (>85% of the initial value at 5 hours) compared to control at 60% of the binding capacity. WR 1065 at 10 mM provided no such protection. This is consistent with the observation that WR 1065 does not pass cell membranes. The authors propose that supplying reducing equivalents to intracellular components such as the glucocorticoid receptor may be one mechanism of the radioprotection afforded by WR 2721

  7. Evolutionary Pattern of Improved 1-Mile Running Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foster, C.S.; de Koning, J.J.; Thiel, C.

    2014-01-01

    The official world records (WR) for the 1-mile run for men (3: 43.13) and for women (4: 12.58) have improved 12.2% and 32.3%, respectively, since the first WR recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations. Previous observations have suggested that the pacing pattern for

  8. Robust Control of Welding Robot for Tracking a Rectangular Welding Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manh Dung Ngo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights a welding robot (WR for its end effector to track a rectangular welding line (RWL. The WR includes five actuators which use a DC motor as a power source. Two controllers are proposed to control the WR's end effector: a main controller and a servo controller. Firstly, based on WR's kinematic equations and its feedback errors using backstepping method the main controller is proposed to design the reference-inputs for the WR's actuators in order that the WR's end effector tracks the RWL. Secondly, based on the dynamic equation of WR's actuator, the servo controller is designed using an active disturbance rejection control method. Finally, a control system incorporated with the main controller and the servo controllers make the WR's end effector robustly track a RWL in the presence of the modeling uncertainty and disturbances during the welding process. In experiment, the main controller which has a function as a master of the control system links to the five servo controllers which have a function as a slave via I2C communication. The effectiveness of the proposed control system is proven through the simulation and experimental results.

  9. Robust Control of Welding Robot for Tracking a Rectangular Welding Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manh Dung Ngo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights a welding robot (WR for its end effector to track a rectangular welding line (RWL. The WR includes five actuators which use a DC motor as a power source. Two controllers are proposed to control the WR's end effector: a main controller and a servo controller. Firstly, based on WR's kinematic equations and its feedback errors using backstepping method the main controller is proposed to design the reference-inputs for the WR's actuators in order that the WR's end effector tracks the RWL. Secondly, based on the dynamic equation of WR's actuator, the servo controller is designed using an active disturbance rejection control method. Finally, a control system incorporated with the main controller and the servo controllers make the WR's end effector robustly track a RWL in the presence of the modeling uncertainty and disturbances during the welding process. In experiment, the main controller which has a function as a master of the control system links to the five servo controllers which have a function as a slave via I2C communication. The effectiveness of the proposed control system is proven through the simulation and experimental results.

  10. Savanna grass nitrogen to phosphorus ratio estimation using field spectroscopy and the potential for estimation with imaging spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramoelo, Abel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available difference derivative (FD) and log transformation (Log(1/R)). The results showed that CR and WR spectra in combination with PLSR predicted foliar N: P ratio with higher accuracy as compared to FD and R spectra. The performance of CR and WR spectra were...

  11. A comparison of data sources for the surveillance of work-related carpal tunnel syndrome in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Letitia; Wellman, Helen; Hart, James; Cleary, Robert; Gardstein, Betsey M; Sciuchetti, Paul

    2004-09-01

    This study examined whether a state surveillance system for work-related carpal tunnel syndrome (WR-CTS) based on workers' compensation claims (Sentinel Event Notification System for Occupational Risks, SENSOR) and the Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII) identified the same industries, occupations, sources of injury, and populations for intervention. Trends in counts, rates, and female/male ratios of WR-CTS during 1994-1997, and age distributions were compared across three data sources: SENSOR, Massachusetts SOII, and National SOII. SENSOR and National SOII data on WR-CTS were compared by industry, occupation, and injury source. Due to small sample size and subsequent gaps in available information, state SOII data on WR-CTS were of little use in identifying specific industries and occupations for intervention. SENSOR and National SOII data on the frequency of WR-CTS cases identified many similar occupations and industries, and both surveillance systems pointed to computer use as a risk factor for WR-CTS. Some high rate industries identified by SENSOR were not identified using National SOII rates even when national findings were restricted to take into account the distribution of the Massachusetts workforce. Use of national SOII data on rates of WR-CTS for identifying state industry priorities for WR-CTS prevention should be undertaken with caution. Options for improving state SOII data and use of other state data systems should be pursued.

  12. "World Religions" in Introductory Sociology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    A section on "world religions" (WRs) is now routinely included in the religion chapters of introductory sociology textbooks. Looking carefully at these WR sections, however, two things seem puzzling. The first is that the criteria for defining a WR varies considerably from textbook to textbook; the second is that these WRs sections…

  13. Subluminous Wolf-Rayet stars: Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heap, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    The author has used the fact that some central stars are WR stars and others are say, O stars, as a focal point for his presentation. In attempting to answer this question he has considered how the properties of WR-type central stars differ from those of O-type stars. The study begins with the classification and calibration of WR spectra, then goes on to the physical properties of WR-type central stars, and at the end returns to the question of what distinguishes a Wolf-Rayet star. The observational data for central stars are neither complete nor precise. Nevertheless, they suggest that what distinguishes a WR central star is not so much its present physical properties (e.g. temperature, gravity), but rather, its fundamental properties (initial and evolutionary history). (Auth.)

  14. Effects of Treatment Materials on the Physical Properties of Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Bardak

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine effects on retention and shrink levels of Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn. which treated with some commercial preservative types, borates, polyethylene glycol, and water repellents. In this study, four type impregnation chemicals were chosen: 1. Commercial preservative types, [Ammonium sulphate, Vacsol-WR WR and Immersol-WR (WR], 2. Borates chemicals, [Boric acid, Borax, Boric acid+ Borax] 3. Polyethylene glycol such as Polyethylene glycol (PEG-400 4. Water repellents [Styrene, Methylmetacrylate.]. As a result, retention % and shrink levels of Eucalyptus wood was lower treated with commercial preservative types and borates preservatives compare to other treatment chemicals. However, retention % levels of Eucalyptus wood treated with WR chemicals were highly significant levels. According to their leachability period although PEG 400 showed antishrink effectiveness other treatments didnt showed antishrink efficiency.

  15. Real-time detection of root zone-CO2 and its potential for irrigation scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Spohrer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Als Basis für die Bewässerungsplanung wurde die Eignung von CO2-Messungen im Wurzelraum (WR-CO2 untersucht und evaluiert. Die grundlegende Annahme war, dass Pflanzen als Reaktion auf eine defizitäre Wasserversorgung die Wurzelatmung reduzieren. Die Untersuchungen an Apfelbäumen konnten zeigen, dass das WR-CO2 zu großen Teilen (56–72 % seinen Ursprung in der pflanzenspezifischen CO2-Produktion (v. a. Wurzelatmung hat. Darüber hinaus reagierte das WR-CO2 deutlich auf Bewässerung und korrelierte bei der Austrocknung mit dem Bodenwassergehalt. Da Veränderungen beim WR-CO2 sich auch in Veränderungen beim Pflanzenwasserstatus widerspiegelten, besitzt das WR-CO2 Potenzial zur Ermittlung des Bewässerungsbedarfs der untersuchten Apfelbäume. Die Übertragbarkeit auf weitere Nutzpflanzen wird untersucht.

  16. Chronic wheel running reduces maladaptive patterns of methamphetamine intake: regulation by attenuation of methamphetamine-induced neuronal nitric oxide synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Alexander J.; Aparicio, Mark B.; Kim, Airee; Sobieraj, Jeffery C.; Yuan, Clara J.; Grant, Yanabel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether prior exposure to chronic wheel running (WR) alters maladaptive patterns of excessive and escalating methamphetamine intake under extended access conditions, and intravenous methamphetamine self-administration-induced neurotoxicity. Adult rats were given access to WR or no wheel (sedentary) in their home cage for 6 weeks. A set of WR rats were injected with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to determine WR-induced changes in proliferation (2-h old) and survival (28-day old) of hippocampal progenitors. Another set of WR rats were withdrawn (WRw) or continued (WRc) to have access to running wheels in their home cages during self-administration days. Following self-administration [6 h/day], rats were tested on the progressive ratio (PR) schedule. Following PR, BrdU was injected to determine levels of proliferating progenitors (2-h old). WRc rats self-administered significantly less methamphetamine than sedentary rats during acquisition and escalation sessions, and demonstrated reduced motivation for methamphetamine seeking. Methamphetamine reduced daily running activity of WRc rats compared with that of pre-methamphetamine days. WRw rats self-administered significantly more methamphetamine than sedentary rats during acquisition, an effect that was not observed during escalation and PR sessions. WR-induced beneficial effects on methamphetamine self-administration were not attributable to neuroplasticity effects in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, but were attributable to WR-induced inhibition of methamphetamine-induced increases in the number of neuronal nitric oxide synthase expressing neurons and apoptosis in the nucleus accumbens shell. Our results demonstrate that WR prevents methamphetamine-induced damage to forebrain neurons to provide a beneficial effect on drug-taking behavior. Importantly, WR-induced neuroprotective effects are transient and continued WR activity is necessary to prevent compulsive methamphetamine intake

  17. Whole Rye Consumption Improves Blood and Liver n-3 Fatty Acid Profile and Gut Microbiota Composition in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounnas, Fayçal; Privé, Florence; Salen, Patricia; Gaci, Nadia; Tottey, William; Calani, Luca; Bresciani, Letizia; López-Gutiérrez, Noelia; Hazane-Puch, Florence; Laporte, François; Brugère, Jean-François; Del Rio, Daniele; Demeilliers, Christine; de Lorgeril, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Whole rye (WR) consumption seems to be associated with beneficial health effects. Although rye fiber and polyphenols are thought to be bioactive, the mechanisms behind the health effects of WR have yet to be fully identified. This study in rats was designed to investigate whether WR can influence the metabolism of n-3 and n-6 long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) and gut microbiota composition. For 12 weeks, rats were fed a diet containing either 50% WR or 50% refined rye (RR). The WR diet provided more fiber (+21%) and polyphenols (+29%) than the RR diet. Fat intake was the same in both diets and particularly involved similar amounts of essential (18-carbon) n-3 and n-6 LCFAs. The WR diet significantly increased the 24-hour urinary excretion of polyphenol metabolites-including enterolactone-compared with the RR diet. The WR rats had significantly more n-3 LCFA-in particular, eicosapentanoic (EPA) and docosahexanoic (DHA) acids-in their plasma and liver. Compared with the RR diet, the WR diet brought significant changes in gut microbiota composition, with increased diversity in the feces (Shannon and Simpson indices), decreased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and decreased proportions of uncultured Clostridiales cluster IA and Clostridium cluster IV in the feces. In contrast, no difference was found between groups with regards to cecum microbiota. The WR rats had lower concentrations of total short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in cecum and feces (pconsumption results in major biological modifications-increased plasma and liver n-3 EPA and DHA levels and improved gut microbiota profile, notably with increased diversity-known to provide health benefits. Unexpectedly, WR decreased SCFA levels in both cecum and feces. More studies are needed to understand the interactions between whole rye (fiber and polyphenols) and gut microbiota and also the mechanisms of action responsible for stimulating n-3 fatty acid metabolism.

  18. DETECTION OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSION FROM THE ETA-CARINAE REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavani, M.; Viotti, R. F.; Argan, A.; Cocco, V.; D'Ammando, F.; Costa, E.; Sabatini, S.; Pian, E.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Giuliani, A.; Vercellone, S.; Mereghetti, S.; Chen, A. W.; Corcoran, M. F.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Boffelli, F.; Cattaneo, P. W.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of extensive observations by the gamma-ray AGILE satellite of the Galactic region hosting the Carina nebula and the remarkable colliding wind binary Eta Carinae (η Car) during the period 2007 July-2009 January. We detect a gamma-ray source (1AGL J1043-5931) consistent with the position of η Car. If 1AGL J1043-5931 is associated with the Car system, our data provide the long sought first detection above 100 MeV of a colliding wind binary. The average gamma-ray flux above 100 MeV and integrated over the preperiastron period 2007 July-2008 October is F γ = (37 ± 5) x 10 -8 ph cm -2 s -1 corresponding to an average gamma-ray luminosity of L γ = 3.4 x 10 34 erg s -1 for a distance of 2.3 kpc. We also report a two-day gamma-ray flaring episode of 1AGL J1043-5931 on 2008 October 11-13 possibly related to a transient acceleration and radiation episode of the strongly variable shock in the system.

  19. Inhibition of the electron cyclotron maser instability in the dense magnetosphere of a hot Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley-Yates, S.; Stevens, I. R.

    2018-06-01

    Hot Jupiter (HJ) type exoplanets are expected to produce strong radio emission in the MHz range via the Electron Cyclotron Maser Instability (ECMI). To date, no repeatable detections have been made. To explain the absence of observational results, we conduct 3D adaptive mess refinement (AMR) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the magnetic interactions between a solar type star and HJ using the publicly available code PLUTO. The results are used to calculate the efficiency of the ECMI at producing detectable radio emission from the planets magnetosphere. We also calculate the frequency of the ECMI emission, providing an upper and lower bounds, placing it at the limits of detectability due to Earth's ionospheric cutoff of ˜10 MHz. The incident kinetic and magnetic power available to the ECMI is also determined and a flux of 0.075 mJy for an observer at 10 pc is calculated. The magnetosphere is also characterized and an analysis of the bow shock which forms upstream of the planet is conducted. This shock corresponds to the thin shell model for a colliding wind system. A result consistent with a colliding wind system. The simulation results show that the ECMI process is completely inhibited by the planets expanding atmosphere, due to absorption of UV radiation form the host star. The density, velocity, temperature and magnetic field of the planetary wind are found to result in a magnetosphere where the plasma frequency is raised above that due to the ECMI process making the planet undetectable at radio MHz frequencies.

  20. Seafloor Tectonic Fault Fabric and the Evolution of the Walvis Ridge-Rio Grande Rise Hot Spot Twins in the South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, W. W.; Engfer, D.; Thoram, S.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Class, C.

    2015-12-01

    Walvis Ridge (WR) and Rio Grande Rise (RGR) are Cretaceous-Cenozoic large igneous provinces (LIPs) formed by the Tristan-Gough hot spot interacting with the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Although hot spot-ridge interaction has long been considered a primary factor controlling WR-RGR morphology, details are fuzzy owing to sparse geophysical data. We examined tectonic fabric revealed in satellite altimetry-derived gravity data to infer details about RGR-WR evolution. Plate tectonic reconstructions indicate that the main RGR plateau and large N-S plateau in the eastern WR erupted at the same point at ~90 Ma. Over the next ~8 Myr, these conjunct LIPs formed a "V" shape with a basin in between. Curved fracture zones within the basin imply the two LIPs formed around a microplate. The prominent rift in the middle of RGR formed nearly perpendicular to the RGR-WR intersection, suggesting an extensional microplate boundary. Hot spot eruptions continued at the MAR, emplacing the eastern WR and two main RGR plateaus until ~60 Ma. During this period, the N-S trending Eastern Rio Grande Rise (ERGR) was erupted along the MAR. Both the ERGR and WR formed bathymetric lineaments parallel to seafloor fault fabric and were likely connected. This resulted in WR seamounts with a "tadpole" shape, the head being small to medium seamounts on the WR track and the tails being low, spreading-fabric-parallel ridges extending up to ~150 km northward. Similar, small seamounts are found in the contemporaneous ERGR. Another critical observation is that the WR-RGR formed at a large crustal discontinuity (~700 km at anomaly C33, ~84 Ma) at one or more fracture zone offsets. By late Cenozoic time (anomaly C5, ~10 Ma), the offset was reduced by half while several new fracture zones formed at the junction between RGR and WR. This implies a connection between ridge reorganization and RGR-WR volcanism that may have resulted from the fracture zones becoming oblique to the spreading direction as Euler poles

  1. The Magma Chamber Simulator: Modeling the Impact of Wall Rock Composition on Mafic Magmas during Assimilation-Fractional Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, J. B.; Spera, F. J.; Bohrson, W. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Although stoichiometric titration is often used to model the process of concurrent Assimilation and Fractional Crystallization (AFC) within a compositionally evolving magma body, a more complete treatment of the problem involves simultaneous and self-consistent determination of stable phase relationships and separately evolving temperatures of both Magma (M) and Wall Rock (WR) that interact as a composite M-WR system. Here we present results of M-WR systems undergoing AFC forward modeled with the Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS), which uses the phase modeling capabilities of MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack 1995) as the thermodynamic basis. Simulations begin with one of a variety of mafic magmas (e.g. HAB, MORB, AOB) intruding a set mass of Wall Rock (e.g. lherzolite, gabbro, diorite, granite, metapelite), and heat is exchanged as the M-WR system proceeds towards thermal equilibrium. Depending on initial conditions, the early part of the evolution can involve closed system FC while the WR heats up. The WR behaves as a closed system until it is heated beyond the solidus to critical limit for melt fraction extraction (fc), ranging between 0.08 and 0.12 depending on WR characteristics including composition and, rheology and stress field. Once fc is exceeded, a portion of the anatectic liquid is assimilated into the Magma. The MCS simultaneously calculates mass and composition of the mineral assemblage (Magma cumulates and WR residue) and melt (anatectic and Magma) at each T along the equilibration trajectory. Sensible and latent heat lost or gained plus mass gained by the Magma are accounted for by the MCS via governing Energy Constrained- Recharge Assimilation Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAFC) equations. In a comparison of two representative MCS results, consider a granitic WR intruded by HAB melt (51 wt. % SiO2) at liquidus T in shallow crust (0.1 GPa) with a WR/M ratio of 1.25, fc of 0.1 and a QFM oxygen buffer. In the first example, the WR begins at a temperature of 100o

  2. Exposure to Leadership WalkRounds in neonatal intensive care units is associated with a better patient safety culture and less caregiver burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, J Bryan; Sharek, Paul J; Thomas, Eric J; Gould, Jeffrey B; Nisbet, Courtney C; Amspoker, Amber B; Kowalkowski, Mark A; Schwendimann, René; Profit, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Background Leadership WalkRounds (WR) are widely used in healthcare organisations to improve patient safety. The relationship between WR and caregiver assessments of patient safety culture, and healthcare worker burnout is unknown. Methods This cross-sectional survey study evaluated the association between receiving feedback about actions taken as a result of WR and healthcare worker assessments of patient safety culture and burnout across 44 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) actively participating in a structured delivery room management quality improvement initiative. Results Of 3294 administered surveys, 2073 were returned for an overall response rate of 62.9%. More WR feedback was associated with better safety culture results and lower burnout rates in the NICUs. Participation in WR and receiving feedback about WR were less common in NICUs than in a benchmarking comparison of adult clinical areas. Conclusions WR are linked to patient safety and burnout. In NICUs, where they occurred more often, the workplace appears to be a better place to deliver and to receive care. PMID:24825895

  3. Wolf-Rayet nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, You-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of nebulae around Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the 1960s, it has been established that WR stars are massive stars at advanced evolutionary stages and that their surrounding nebulae result from the interactions between the stellar mass loss and the ambient interstellar medium. Surveys of WR nebulae have been made in the Galaxy, Magellanic Clouds, and other nearby galaxies in the Local Group. Some WR nebulae exhibit He II λ4686 line emission, indicating stellar effective temperatures of 90 — 100 x 10 3 K. The shocked fast stellar winds from WR nebulae have been detected in soft X-rays, but theoretical models have not been able to reproduce the observed X-ray spectral properties. Elemental abundances of WR nebulae consisting of synthesized stellar material can constrain stellar evolution models, but high-dispersion spectra are needed to kinematically separate the expanding shell of a WR nebula and the background interstellar medium for accurate abundance analyses. (paper)

  4. Radio-modification by caffeine alone and in combination with phosphorothioates: in vivo and cell-free studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenberg, C.E.; Landauer, M.R.; Weiss, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Caffeine is generally considered to result in radiosensitization by affecting the cell cycle. Data from in vivo studies, however, do not suggest sensitization; caffeine administration did not adversely affect survival of mice irradiated at doses causing hematopoietic injury, or gastrointestinal injury, or when administered in combination with phosphorothioates. For example, caffeine administration (20 mg/kg IP) in combination with the radioprotector WR-151327, S-2-(3-methyl-amino-propyl-amino)propyl-phosphoro-thioic acid. (200 mg/kg IP) resulted in a dose modification factor of 1.54 in comparison to 1.51 for WR-151327 treatment alone. In a cell-free system, the active metabolites of phosphorothiotates, i.e. free thiols and disulfides, appear to mimic polyamines and modulate enzymes involves in DNA structure and synthesis. The free thiol of WR-151327 (WR-151326) actively enhanced topoisomerase I-mediated unwinding of supercoiled plB130 DNA and super-coiling of DNA mediated by DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II). Caffeine, in general, had opposite effects on potoisomerase activities compared to WR-151326. When caffeine was added to the cell-free system together with WR-151326, the stimulatory effects of WR-151326 were suppressed. Further studies are needed in cell-free systems, cells, and animals to elucidate the potential utility of caffeine administration in combination with radiation and other therapeutic agents. (authors)

  5. Radio-modification by caffeine alone and in combination with phosphorothioates: in vivo and cell-free studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenberg, C.E.; Landauer, M.R. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda (United States); Weiss, J.F. [Office of International Health Programs, Department of Energy, Germantown (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Caffeine is generally considered to result in radiosensitization by affecting the cell cycle. Data from in vivo studies, however, do not suggest sensitization; caffeine administration did not adversely affect survival of mice irradiated at doses causing hematopoietic injury, or gastrointestinal injury, or when administered in combination with phosphorothioates. For example, caffeine administration (20 mg/kg IP) in combination with the radioprotector WR-151327, S-2-(3-methyl-amino-propyl-amino)propyl-phosphoro-thioic acid. (200 mg/kg IP) resulted in a dose modification factor of 1.54 in comparison to 1.51 for WR-151327 treatment alone. In a cell-free system, the active metabolites of phosphorothiotates, i.e. free thiols and disulfides, appear to mimic polyamines and modulate enzymes involves in DNA structure and synthesis. The free thiol of WR-151327 (WR-151326) actively enhanced topoisomerase I-mediated unwinding of supercoiled plB130 DNA and super-coiling of DNA mediated by DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II). Caffeine, in general, had opposite effects on potoisomerase activities compared to WR-151326. When caffeine was added to the cell-free system together with WR-151326, the stimulatory effects of WR-151326 were suppressed. Further studies are needed in cell-free systems, cells, and animals to elucidate the potential utility of caffeine administration in combination with radiation and other therapeutic agents. (authors)

  6. Discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star and its ring nebula in Cygnus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Fabrika, S.; Hamann, W.-R.; Sholukhova, O.; Valeev, A. F.; Goranskij, V. P.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.; Bomans, D. J.; Oskinova, L. M.

    2009-11-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a ring nebula around a candidate Wolf-Rayet (WR) star, HBHA4202-22, in Cygnus using the Spitzer Space Telescope archival data. Our spectroscopic follow-up observations confirmed the WR nature of this star (we named it WR138a) and showed that it belongs to the WN8-9h subtype. We thereby add a new example to the known sample of late WN stars with circumstellar nebulae. We analysed the spectrum of WR138a by using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmospheres, obtaining a stellar temperature of 40kK. The stellar wind composition is dominated by helium with 20 per cent of hydrogen. The stellar spectrum is highly reddened and absorbed (EB- V = 2.4mag, AV = 7.4mag). Adopting a stellar luminosity of logL/Lsolar = 5.3, the star has a mass-loss rate of 10-4.7Msolaryr-1, and resides in a distance of 4.2 kpc. We measured the proper motion for WR138a and found that it is a runaway star with a peculiar velocity of ~=50kms-1. Implications of the runaway nature of WR138a for constraining the mass of its progenitor star and understanding the origin of its ring nebula are discussed.

  7. Providing feedback following Leadership WalkRounds is associated with better patient safety culture, higher employee engagement and lower burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, J Bryan; Adair, Kathryn C; Leonard, Michael W; Frankel, Terri Christensen; Proulx, Joshua; Watson, Sam R; Magnus, Brooke; Bogan, Brittany; Jamal, Maleek; Schwendimann, Rene; Frankel, Allan S

    2018-01-01

    Background There is a poorly understood relationship between Leadership WalkRounds (WR) and domains such as safety culture, employee engagement, burnout and work-life balance. Methods This cross-sectional survey study evaluated associations between receiving feedback about actions taken as a result of WR and healthcare worker assessments of patient safety culture, employee engagement, burnout and work-life balance, across 829 work settings. Results 16 797 of 23 853 administered surveys were returned (70.4%). 5497 (32.7% of total) reported that they had participated in WR, and 4074 (24.3%) reported that they participated in WR with feedback. Work settings reporting more WR with feedback had substantially higher safety culture domain scores (first vs fourth quartile Cohen’s d range: 0.34–0.84; % increase range: 15–27) and significantly higher engagement scores for four of its six domains (first vs fourth quartile Cohen’s d range: 0.02–0.76; % increase range: 0.48–0.70). Conclusion This WR study of patient safety and organisational outcomes tested relationships with a comprehensive set of safety culture and engagement metrics in the largest sample of hospitals and respondents to date. Beyond measuring simply whether WRs occur, we examine WR with feedback, as WR being done well. We suggest that when WRs are conducted, acted on, and the results are fed back to those involved, the work setting is a better place to deliver and receive care as assessed across a broad range of metrics, including teamwork, safety, leadership, growth opportunities, participation in decision-making and the emotional exhaustion component of burnout. Whether WR with feedback is a manifestation of better norms, or a cause of these norms, is unknown, but the link is demonstrably potent. PMID:28993441

  8. Providing feedback following Leadership WalkRounds is associated with better patient safety culture, higher employee engagement and lower burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, J Bryan; Adair, Kathryn C; Leonard, Michael W; Frankel, Terri Christensen; Proulx, Joshua; Watson, Sam R; Magnus, Brooke; Bogan, Brittany; Jamal, Maleek; Schwendimann, Rene; Frankel, Allan S

    2018-04-01

    There is a poorly understood relationship between Leadership WalkRounds (WR) and domains such as safety culture, employee engagement, burnout and work-life balance. This cross-sectional survey study evaluated associations between receiving feedback about actions taken as a result of WR and healthcare worker assessments of patient safety culture, employee engagement, burnout and work-life balance, across 829 work settings. 16 797 of 23 853 administered surveys were returned (70.4%). 5497 (32.7% of total) reported that they had participated in WR, and 4074 (24.3%) reported that they participated in WR with feedback. Work settings reporting more WR with feedback had substantially higher safety culture domain scores (first vs fourth quartile Cohen's d range: 0.34-0.84; % increase range: 15-27) and significantly higher engagement scores for four of its six domains (first vs fourth quartile Cohen's d range: 0.02-0.76; % increase range: 0.48-0.70). This WR study of patient safety and organisational outcomes tested relationships with a comprehensive set of safety culture and engagement metrics in the largest sample of hospitals and respondents to date. Beyond measuring simply whether WRs occur, we examine WR with feedback, as WR being done well . We suggest that when WRs are conducted, acted on, and the results are fed back to those involved, the work setting is a better place to deliver and receive care as assessed across a broad range of metrics, including teamwork, safety, leadership, growth opportunities, participation in decision-making and the emotional exhaustion component of burnout. Whether WR with feedback is a manifestation of better norms, or a cause of these norms, is unknown, but the link is demonstrably potent. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. An IRAS-Based Search for New Dusty Late-Type WC Wolf-Rayet Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Martin

    1995-01-01

    I have examined all Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data relevant to the 173 Galactic Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars in an updated catalog, including the 13 stars newly discovered by Shara and coworkers. Using the W-R coordinates in these lists, I have examined the IRAS Point Source Catalog (PSC), the Faint Source Catalog, and the Faint Source Reject Catalog, and have generated one-dimensional spatial profiles, 'ADDSCANs', and two-dimensional full-resolution images, 'FRESCOS'. The goal was to assemble the best set of observed IRAS color indices for different W-R types, in particular for known dusty late-type WC Wolf-Rayet (WCL) objects. I have also unsuccessfully sought differences in IRAS colors and absolute magnitudes between single and binary W-R stars. The color indices for the entire ensemble of W-R stars define zones in the IRAS color-color ([12] - [25], [25] - [60])-plane. By searching the PSC for otherwise unassociated sources that satisfy these colors, I have identified potential new W-R candidates, perhaps too faint to have been recognized in previous optical searches. I have extracted these candidates' IRAS low-resolution spectrometer (LRS) data and compared the spectra with the highly characteristic LRS shape for known dusty WCL stars. The 13 surviving candidates must now be ex amined by optical spectroscopy. This work represents a much more rigorous and exhaustive version of the LRS study that identified IRAS 17380 - 3031 (WR98a) as the first new W-R (WC9) star discovered by IPAS. This search should have detected dusty WCL stars to a distance of 7.0 kpc from the Sun, for l is greater than 30 degrees, and to 2.9 kpc even in the innermost galaxy. For free-free-dominated W-R stars the corresponding distances are 2.5 and 1.0 kpc, respectively.

  10. Bone and parathyroid inhibitory effects of S-2(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid. Studies in experimental animals and cultured bone cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attie, M.F.; Fallon, M.D.; Spar, B.; Wolf, J.S.; Slatopolsky, E.; Goldfarb, S.

    1985-01-01

    S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR 2721) is a radio- and chemoprotective agent which produces hypocalcemia in humans. Intravenous injection of 30 mg/kg WR 2721 in rats and 15 mg/kg in dogs lowers serum calcium by 19 and 25%, respectively. Hypocalcemia in dogs is associated with a fall in serum immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (PTH), which suggests that the mechanism of its hypocalcemic effect is acute hypoparathyroidism. Despite this effect on PTH, in eight chronically parathyroidectomized rats on a low phosphate diet, WR 2721 reduced serum calcium from 9.4 to 7.7 mg/dl at 3 h. Furthermore, in dogs rendered hypercalcemic by continuous infusion of PTH, WR 2721 reduced serum calcium from 11.0 to 10.6 mg/dl. To determine whether WR 2721 causes hypocalcemia by enhancing the exit of calcium from the circulation or inhibiting its entry, the drug was infused 3 h after administration of 45 Ca to rats. WR 2721 did not significantly increase the rate of disappearance of 45 Ca from the circulation even though serum calcium fell by 19%. In incubations with fetal rat long bone labeled in utero with 45 Ca, 10(-3) M WR 2721 inhibited PTH-stimulated, but not base-line release of 45 Ca. Bone resorption by primary culture of chick osteoclasts was inhibited by WR 2721 at concentrations as low as 10(-4) M in the absence of hormonal stimulation. These studies suggest that WR 2721 lowers serum calcium predominantly by blocking calcium release from bone. This acute hypocalcemic effect is at least in part independent of its effect on the parathyroid glands, and is most likely a direct effect of the agent on bone resorption

  11. Wolf-Rayet stars associated to giant regions of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Odorico, S.; Rosa, M.

    1982-01-01

    Data on Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in extragalactic H II regions and emission line galaxies are presented and discussed. The sample is still limited and inhomogeneous but two important points appear to be already established: a) The WR stars are more numerous than the blue supergiants at least in same phase of the evolution of the stellar clusters which ionize the giant H II regions, b) When the WR stars are detected, two cases are apparently observed, one in which only WN, the other in which both WN and WC, are present. (Auth.)

  12. Model analysis of the relationship between intracellular Po2 and energy demand in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Spires, Jessica; Gladden, L. Bruce; Grassi, Bruno; Saidel, Gerald M.; Lai, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of experimental studies, the intracellular O2 (iPo2)-work rate (WR) relationship in skeletal muscle is not unique. One study found that iPo2 reached a plateau at 60% of maximal WR, while another found that iPo2 decreased linearly at higher WR, inferring capillary permeability-surface area (PS) and blood-tissue O2 gradient, respectively, as alternative dominant factors for determining O2 diffusion changes during exercise. This relationship is affected by several factors, including...

  13. Fabrication, Quality Assurance, and Quality Control for PROSPECT Detector Component Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Ian; Prospect (The Precision Reactor Oscillation; Spectrum Experiment) Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Precision Reactor Oscillation and Spectrum Experiment (PROSPECT) is an electron antineutrino (νe) detector intended to make a precision measurement of the 235U neutrino spectrum and to search for the possible existence of sterile neutrinos with a mass splitting of Δm2 on the order of 1 eV2 . As a short baseline detector, PROSPECT will be located less than 10 meters from the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As PROSPECT intends to search for baseline-dependent oscillations, physical segmentation is needed to better measure the interaction position. PROSPECT will therefore be a segmented detector in two dimensions, thereby improving position measurements. PROSPECT will be segmented into 154 (11×14) 1.2-meter long rectangular tubes, using optical separators. Each separator will consist of a carbon fiber core, laminated with optical reflector (to increase light collection) and Teflon (to ensure compatibility with the scintillator). These optical separators will be held in place via strings of 3D printed PLA rods called `pinwheels.' This poster discusses the fabrication and quality assurance (QA) procedures used in the production of both the PROSPECT optical separators and pinwheels. For the PROSPECT collaboration.

  14. Solvothermal Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Magnetic Properties of [Co3(SDA)3(DMF)2]: 2-D Layered Metal-organic Framework Derived from 4,4'-Stilbenedicarboxylic Acid (H2SDA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gyung Se; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kim, Ki Moon; Lee, Gang Ho; Park, Sang Kyu

    2006-01-01

    A new 2-D coordination polymer has been synthesized and characterized by using a novel 4,4'-stilbene dicarboxylic acid and Co(ClO 4 ) 2 ·6H 2 O. The title complex has an unique Co 3 pin-wheel cluster in which central Co has octahedral geometry and two surrounding Co have tetrahedral geometry. The Co 3 pin-wheel clusters, the building unit, are linked through carboxylate oxygens to generate a 2-D layered coordination polymer in ABCABC packing mode. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility data of the title compound confirms the high spin splitting of Co with S=3/2. Syntheses of MOF by using SDA and other transition metal ions, Zn, Cd, and Mn, are on progress in this lab. Metal-organic frameworks (MOF) have attracted much more attention in the past decade owing to their various intriguing framework topologies and potential applications as functional materials in gas storage, separation, and catalysis. Because high framework stability is fundamental and essential property for many practical applications, multi-dentate linkers such as carboxylates have been extensively investigated for the formation of more rigid frameworks due to their ability to aggregate metal ions into M-O-C clusters called secondary building units (SBUs) rather than N-bound organic linkers such as 4,4-bipyridine (bipy)

  15. Congenital broncho-oesophageal fistula

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-09

    Apr 9, 1983 ... Rigid bronchoscopy performed under general anaesthesia .... Blackburn WR, Armour)' RA. Congenital esophago-pulmonary fistulas without esophageal atresia: an analysis of 260 fistulas in infants, children and adults.

  16. Effect of abscisic acid and blue radiation on photosynthesis and growth of pea plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siedlecka, M.; Romanowska, E.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on the net photosynthetic rate (PN), the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC) and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) activities, the chlorophyll (Chl) content and growth of pea plants (Pisum sativum) grown under ''white'' (WR) or blue radiation (BR), were investigated. BR as compared to WR enhanced PN, the activities of examined enzymes, and Chl content. In spite of higher PN of the plants grown under BR, dry matter of their shoots was lower in comparison with WR. ABA-treated plants grown under both WR and BR showed reduction in PN. ABA had no effect on the activities of both RuBPC and PEPC and the Chl content. Independent on the radiation quality, ABA reduced stem elongation, but did not affect the biomass of whole shoots

  17. Factors responsible for the patchy distribution of natural soil water repellency in Mediterranean semiarid forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, E.; Jiménez-Pinilla, P.; Mataix-Solera, J.; González-Pérez, J. A.; García-Orenes, F.; Torres, M. P.; Arcenegui, V.; Mataix-Beneyto, J.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) is commonly observed in forest areas showing wettable and water repellent patches with high spatial variability. This has important hydrological implications; in semiarid areas where water supply is limited, even slight WR may play an important role in infiltration patterns and distribution of water into the soil (Mataix-Solera et al., 2007). It has been proposed that the origin of WR is the release of organic compounds from different plants species and sources (due to waxes and other organic substances in their tissues; Doerr et al., 1998). However, the relationship between WR and plants may not always be a direct one: a group of fungi (mainly mycorrhizal fungi) and microorganisms could be also responsible for WR. The aim of this research is to study the relationships between WR in soils under different plant cover with selected soil properties and the quantity of fungi and their exudates. The study area is located in Southeast Spain, "Sierra de la Taja" near Pinoso (Alicante)), with a semiarid Mediterranean climate (Pm=260mm). Samples were taken in September 2011, when WR is normally strongest after summer drought. Soil samples were collected from the first 2.5cm of the mineral A horizon at microsites beneath each of the four most representative species (Pinus halepensis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Quercus. rotundifolia and Cistus albidus; n=15 per specie) and 5 samples from bare soil with no influence of any species. Different soil parameters were analyzed; water content, soil organic mater content (SOM), pH, WR, easily extractable glomalin (EEG), total mycelium and extractable lipids. The occurrence of WR was higher under P. halepensis (87% of samples) and Q. rotundifolia (60% of samples). Positive significant correlations were found between WR and SOM content for all species, with the best correlations for Pinus and Quercus (r=0.855**, r= 0.934** respectively). In addition, negative significant correlations were found between WR and p

  18. Plankton community respiration, net ecosystem metabolism, and oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf: implications for hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a multi-year study of the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) to better understand the linkages between water column metabolism and the formation of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen respiration rates (WR) were measured on 10 cr...

  19. Ketolide agents HMR 3004 and HMR 3647 (telithromycin) inhibit the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Medical Sciences, Public Health, Health Promotion, Faculty of. Health Sciences ... the development of new antiparasitic drugs effective at low concentrations. Ketolides ..... WR, Boothroyd JC, Khosla C. Chemistry and biology.

  20. Interaction between synthetic lecithin and various sulfur-containing radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rix-Montel, M.A.; Kranck, H.; Vasilescu, D.

    1981-01-01

    Interaction of the synthetic lecithin dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) smectic mesophases with sulfur-containing radioprotectors was investigated by means of spectrophotometric and dielectric measurements. Electrical conductivity behavior indicated in all cases that an electrostatic interaction occurs between DPPC and the antiradiation drugs. This interaction is very strong in the case of the WR 2721 molecule. Thermal transitions of DPPC studied by spectrophotometry and conductivity Arrhenius diagrams showed that although the radio-protectors investigated (except WR 2721) delete the pretransition of the lipid phase, the principal transition is not modified. The observed electrostatic interactions are discussed with regard to ionized sites of the phosphatidylcholine lipid head and those of the radioprotectors. The special cases of WR 2721 and its metabolite, WR 1065, are examined

  1. Identification of functional SNPs in human LGALS3 gene by in silico ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tarnjeet Kaur

    2017-02-24

    Feb 24, 2017 ... Material and methods: Both sequence based and structure based .... structure prediction (http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/MUS- ..... [43] Miwa HE, Koba WR, Fine EJ, Giricz O, Kenny PA, Stanley P. Bisected, complex N-.

  2. Investigation of radiation enhanced reactivation of cytoplasmic replicating human virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockstahler, L.E.; Haynes, K.F.; Stafford, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    When monolayers of CV-1 monkey kidney cells were exposed to ultraviolet (uv) radiation (0 to 200 erg/nm 2 ) or x rays (0 to 10 krads) before infection with uv-irradiated herpes simplex virus, an increase in the infectivity of this nuclear replicating virus occurred as measured by plaque formation. These phenomena are known as uv (Weigle) reactivation (WR) and x-ray reactivation (x-ray R). In this study the presence of WR and x-ray R was examined in CV-1 cells infected with uv-irradiated vaccinia virus or poliovirus, both cytoplasmic replicating viruses. Little or no WR or x-ray R was observed for either of these viruses. These results suggest that WR and x-ray R in mammalian cells may be restricted to viruses which are synthesized in the cell nucleus

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neidich JA, Wilcox WR. Subtle radiographic findings of achondroplasia in patients with Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis nigricans ... of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 disorders: the achondroplasia family of skeletal dysplasias, Muenke craniosynostosis, and Crouzon ...

  4. Behavioral toxicity of selected radioprotectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landauer, M. R.; Davis, H. D.; Kumar, K. S.; Weiss, J. F.

    1992-10-01

    Effective radioprotection with minimal behavioral disruption is essential for the selection of protective agents to be used in manned spaceflight. This overview summarizes the studies on the behavioral toxicity of selected radioprotectors classified as phosphorothioates (WR-2721, WR-3689), bioactive lipids (16, 16 dimethylprostaglandin E2(DiPGE2), platelet activating factor (PAF), leukotriene C4), and immunomodulators (glucan, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate, and interleukin-1). Behavioral toxicity was examined in laboratory mice using a locomotor activity test. For all compounds tested, there was a dose-dependent decrease in locomotor behavior that paralleled the dose-dependent increase in radioprotection. While combinations of radioprotective compounds (DiPGE2 plus WR-2721) increased radioprotection, they also decreased locomotor activity. The central nervous system stimulant, caffeine, was able to mitigate the locomotor decrement produced by WR-3689 or PAF.

  5. Getting your home ready - knee or hip surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip or knee surgery - getting your home ready; Osteoarthritis - knee ... Cabrera JA, Cabrera AL. Total hip replacement. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  6. Biochemical and Histological effects of Aqueous extract of Cyperus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Biochemical and Histological effects of Triton Wr-1339 and Aqueous extract. 674. INNIH, SO; UBHENIN, AE; ... fatty liver, chronic hepatitis, and cirrhosis is not giving much ..... Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Southern Iran: A Population Based ...

  7. An overview of cyanobacterial research and management in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-10

    Feb 10, 2009 ... provision of a research and management infrastructure that ensures that South African water .... utilities in preparing for potentially toxic events remains ..... HARDING WR (2005) Motivation to the Water Research Commission.

  8. Cellular thiol levels and aerobic radiosensitization by BSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnes, M.E.; Biaglow, J.E.; Roizin-Towle, L.; Hall, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    It has been previously shown that pretreatment of A549 human lung carcinoma cells and V79 cells with BSO results in enhancement of the aerobic radiation response. The authors and others have found that addition of either N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or the radioprotector WR-2721 to BSO-treated cells, just prior to irradiation, results in a return to control levels of aerobic sensitivity. NAC and WR-2721 have no effect on the aerobic response of control cells. Reversal of the BSO effect appears unrelated to intracellular thiol levels, since neither NAC nor WR-2721 replenish NPSH within the time that the reversal of the radiation effect is observed. In addition, NAC and WR-2721 must be present during irradiation in order to reverse the BSO sensitization. The authors are continuing to investigate the phenomenon of BSO-induced aerobic sensitization and its reversal, with particular emphasis on the role of membrane thiols and pyridine nucleotide reducing species in radiation response

  9. Hypolipidemic, Hypoglycemic and Antioxidant Activities of Flower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    models, viz, triton WR-1339 - induced hyperlipimea in rats as well as fructose-rich high fat diet. To .... Waters HPLC system, equipped with Waters ... analysis of total cholesterol (Tc), triglycerides ... determined at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after.

  10. Characterization of water repellency for hydrophobized grains with different geometries and sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijewardana, N S; Kawamoto, K.; Møldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    _wet” (areas under the αi–HA content and αi–θg curves, respectively), “HA_zica” and “θg_zica” (maximum HA content and θg at which WR disappears, respectively), and “αi,peak” and “HA_αi,peak” (peak αi in the αi–HA content curve and corresponding HA content to αi,peak, respectively). Pearson correlation analysis...... was performed to identify correlations between proposed WR indices and basic grain properties. Results showed that WR indices correlated well to d50 and coefficient of uniformity (Cu) and regression equations for WR indices were obtained as functions of d50 and Cu (r2 > 0.7)....

  11. Coccidioidomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... WS. Coccidioidomycosis. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann WR, Berth-Jones J, Coulson I, eds. Treatment of Skin Disease: ... 28, 2016. www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/coccidioidomycosis/index.html . Accessed August 26, 2016. Review Date 7/ ...

  12. Advances in radioprotection through the use of combined agent regimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J F; Kumar, K S; Walden, T L; Neta, R; Landauer, M R; Clark, E P [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1990-04-01

    Improved radioprotection and reduced lethal toxicity of the phosphorothioate WR 2721 was observed after administration with metals (selenium, zinc or copper). A number of receptor-mediated protectors and other biological compounds, including endotoxin, eicosanoids and cytokines, have at least an additive effect when administered with thiol protectors. Eicosanoids and other bioactive lipids must be administered before exposure, whereas some immunomodulators have activity when administered either before or after exposure, e.g. interleukin administered simultaneously with WR 2721 before or after irradiation enhances the efficacy of WR 2721. The most effective single or combinations of protectors result in a decrement in locomotor activity (index of behavioural toxicity). Recent evidence indicates that caffeine mitigates toxicity of an effective dose of phosphorothioate WR 3689 without altering its efficacy. (UK).

  13. Assessing the impact of non-native freshwater fishes on native species using relative weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannetto D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to test relative weight (Wr, a condition index which allows evaluation of fish well-being, as a tool to investigate the impact of the presence of non native species (NNS on the condition of the key native species (NS of the Tiber River basin (Italy: Barbustyberinus Bonaparte, Leuciscus cephalus (Linnaeus, Leuciscus lucumonis Bianco, Rutilus rubilio (Bonaparte and Telestes muticellus (Bonaparte. By means of Canonical Correlation Analysis, data from 130 sampling sites, distributed throughout Tiber River basin, were examined. Wr of NS was related to densities of NNS and to environmental variables. Moreover, the correlation between Wr of NS and density of NNS was investigated through linear regression analysis and covariance analysis. Preliminary results encourage the use of Wr as a tool to assess the relationship between NS and ecological factors (such as the presence of NNS and to explain the changes that occur along the longitudinal gradient of a river.

  14. Wolf-Rayet phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, P.S.

    1982-01-01

    The author reviews in broad terms the concept of Wolf-Rayet (W-R) phenomena, outlines what we currently know about the properties of stars showing such phenomena and indicates the directions in which future work is leading. He begins by listing the characteristics of W-R spectra and then considers the following specific problems: the absolute visual magnitudes; the heterogeneity of WN spectra; the existence of transition type spectra and compositions; the mass loss rates; the existence of very luminous and possibly very massive W-R stars. He discusses briefly our current understanding of the theoretical aspects of stellar evolution and stellar winds and the various scenarios that have been proposed to understand W-R stars. (Auth.)

  15. Measuring spatial variability of land use associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-07

    Jun 7, 2011 ... hydrological impact in urbanised quaternary catchments using entropy ..... For any hydraulic system (e.g., a dam) located in these. QCs, sound ..... water resources assessment (WR2005) as well as the updated national land ...

  16. Experimental Investigation of Polyurethane Camouflage Coating Using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crawford, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    .... The current polyurethane solvent-based (SOL) formulation, used as a chemical-agent-resistant camouflage top coat on all military tactical vehicles, was investigated, along with newly developed water-reducible (WR...

  17. An overview on geochemistry of Proterozoic massif-type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A critical study of 311 published WR chemical analyses, isotopic and mineral chemistry of ... Keywords. Massif anorthosite complexes; overview; geochemistry; high-Al gabbro. J. Earth ...... (123–2920 ppm) unlike the experimental results of.

  18. Clinical value of lung uptake of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a myocardial sympathetic nerve imaging agent, in patients with chronic heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Xiuli; Hasegawa, Shinji; Yoshioka, Jun [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine] (and others)

    2001-10-01

    This study investigated the clinical value of I-123 MIBG pulmonary accumulation and washout in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Nineteen patients with CHF and 15 normal volunteers (NL) were included. The uptake ratio of heart to mediastinum (H/M), that of lung fields to mediastinum (L/M), and washout rate (WR) of the heart and lung fields were calculated in anterior planar images and compared with results of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. In the CHF group, the lung uptake in delayed images increased and lung WR was decreased, suggesting pulmonary endothelial lesions. Furthermore, there was a negative correlation between right and left lung WR and pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure (PA(D)) and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PA(S)) in the CHF group. Since the WR of MIBG reflected PA, it may be used as an index of severity of cardiac dysfunction. (author)

  19. Germinated Brown Rice Attenuates Atherosclerosis and Vascular Inflammation in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruozhi; Ghazzawi, Nora; Wu, Jiansu; Le, Khuong; Li, Chunyang; Moghadasian, Mohammed H; Siow, Yaw L; Apea-Bah, Franklin B; Beta, Trust; Yin, Zhengfeng; Shen, Garry X

    2018-05-02

    The present study investigates the impact of germinated brown rice (GBR) on atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism in low-density lipoprotein receptor-knockout (LDLr-KO) mice. The intensity of atherosclerosis in aortas of LDLr-KO mice receiving diet supplemented with 60% GBR (weight/weight) was significantly less than that in mice fed with 60% white rice (WR) or control diet ( p mice fed with WR diet was significantly more than that from mice receiving the control diet ( p mice in comparison to the WR diet ( p mice compared to WR. The anti-atherosclerotic effect of GBR in LDLr-KO mice at least in part results from its anti-inflammatory activity.

  20. The role of rotation in the evolution of massive stars losing mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasan, S.R.; Wilson, W.J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The role of differential and solid body rotation in the evolution of massive stars undergoing mass loss is discussed. The implications for Of, WR, β Cephei stars and shell stars are brought out. (Auth.)

  1. Photometric and polarimetric variability and mass-loss rate of the massive binary Wolf-Rayet star HDE 311884 (WN6 + 05: V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, A.F.J.; Drissen, L.; Robert, C.; Lamontagne, R.; Coziol, R.

    1990-01-01

    Photometric and polarimetric monitoring of the Wolf-Rayet (W-R) + O-type binary system HDE 311884 = WR 47 over many orbital cycles shows the clear effects of phase-dependent electron scattering of O-star light as the orbiting O companion shines through varying column density of W-R stellar wind material. In contrast to this wind-type eclipse, the stars themselves do not quite eclipse. Both photometry and polarimetry give a consistent estimate of the mass-loss rate of the W-R component: at about 0.00003 solar mass/yr. The orbital inclination, i = 70 deg, along with the previously published velocity orbit, yields high masses: M(WN6) = 48 solar masses and M(O5:V) = 57 solar masses. 33 refs

  2. Handbook of human-computer interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helander, Martin; Landauer, Thomas K; Prabhu, Prasad V

    1997-01-01

    ... of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior wr...

  3. Development and validation of a direct-comparison method for cardiac {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine washout rates derived from late 3-hour and 4-hour imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Koichi; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa [Kanazawa Medical University, Department of Physics, Kahoku, Ishikawa (Japan); Nakajima, Kenichi; Matsuo, Shinro; Taki, Junichi; Kinuya, Seigo [Kanazawa University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan); Sugino, Shuichi [Okayama Kyokuto Hospital, Department of Radiology, Okayama, Okayama (Japan); Kirihara, Yumiko [FUJIFILM RI Pharma Co., Ltd., Chuo-Ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    The washout rate (WR) has been used in {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging to evaluate cardiac sympathetic innervation. However, WR varies depending on the time between the early and late MIBG scans. Late scans are performed at either 3 or 4 hours after injection of MIBG. The aim of this study was to directly compare the WR at 3 hours (WR{sub 3h}) with the WR at 4 hours (WR{sub 4h}). We hypothesized that the cardiac count would reduce linearly between the 3-hour and 4-hour scans. A linear regression model for cardiac counts at two time-points was generated. We enrolled a total of 96 patients who underwent planar {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy early (15 min) and during the late phase at both 3 and 4 hours. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: a model-creation group (group 1) and a clinical validation group (group 2). Cardiac counts at 15 minutes (count{sub early}), 3 hours (count{sub 3h}) and 4 hours (count{sub 4h}) were measured. Cardiac count{sub 4h} was mathematically estimated using the linear regression model from count{sub early} and count{sub 3h}. In group 1, the actual cardiac count{sub 4h}/count{sub early} was highly significantly correlated with count{sub 3h}/count{sub early} (r = 0.979). In group 2, the average estimated count{sub 4h} was 92.8 ± 31.9, and there was no significant difference between this value and the actual count{sub 4h} (91.9 ± 31.9). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a small bias of -0.9 with 95 % limits of agreement of -6.2 and +4.3. WR{sub 4h} calculated using the estimated cardiac count{sub 4h} was comparable to the actual WR{sub 4h} (24.3 ± 9.6 % vs. 25.1 ± 9.7 %, p = ns). Bland-Altman analysis and the intraclass correlation coefficient showed that there was excellent agreement between the estimated and actual WR{sub 4h}. The linear regression model that we used accurately estimated cardiac count{sub 4h} using count{sub early} and count{sub 3h}. Moreover, WR{sub 4h} that was mathematically calculated using

  4. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS IN APPARENTLY SINGLE GALACTIC WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. A GLOBAL VIEW OF THE WIND VARIABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chene, A.-N.; St-Louis, N.

    2011-01-01

    This study is the second part of a survey searching for large-scale spectroscopic variability in apparently single Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. In a previous paper (Paper I), we described and characterized the spectroscopic variability level of 25 WR stars observable from the northern hemisphere and found 3 new candidates presenting large-scale wind variability, potentially originating from large-scale structures named corotating interaction regions (CIRs). In this second paper, we discuss an additional 39 stars observable from the southern hemisphere. For each star in our sample, we obtained 4-5 high-resolution spectra with a signal-to-noise ratio of ∼100 and determined its variability level using the approach described in Paper I. In total, 10 new stars are found to show large-scale spectral variability of which 7 present CIR-type changes (WR 8, WR 44, WR55, WR 58, WR 61, WR 63, WR 100). Of the remaining stars, 20 were found to show small-amplitude changes and 9 were found to show no spectral variability as far as can be concluded from the data on hand. Also, we discuss the spectroscopic variability level of all single galactic WR stars that are brighter than v ∼ 12.5, and some WR stars with 12.5 < v ≤ 13.5, i.e., all the stars presented in our two papers and four more stars for which spectra have already been published in the literature. We find that 23/68 stars (33.8%) present large-scale variability, but only 12/54 stars (∼22.1%) are potentially of CIR type. Also, we find that 31/68 stars (45.6%) only show small-scale variability, most likely due to clumping in the wind. Finally, no spectral variability is detected based on the data on hand for 14/68 (20.6%) stars. Interestingly, the variability with the highest amplitude also has the widest mean velocity dispersion.

  5. Further Wolf-Rayet stars in the starburst cluster Westerlund 1

    OpenAIRE

    Negueruela, I.; Clark, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    We present new low and intermediate-resolution spectroscopic observations of the Wolf Rayet (WR) star population in the massive starburst cluster Westerlund 1. Finding charts are presented for five new WRs - four WNL and one WCL - raising the current total of known WRs in the cluster to 19. We also present new spectra and correct identifications for the majority of the 14 WR stars previously known, notably confirming the presence of two WNVL stars. Finally we briefly discuss the massive star ...

  6. How massive the Wolf-Rayet stars are

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemela, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    If the Wolf-Rayet stars are produced by the evolution of massive stars with mass loss (Paczynski 1967, Conti 1976) from O stars to WN stars and thereafter to WC stars, then we may expect to observe a correlation of decreasing mean masses in the same sense as the evolution. Information about the masses of WR stars are obtained from studies of binary systems with WR components. (Auth.)

  7. CYG X-3: A GALACTIC DOUBLE BLACK HOLE OR BLACK-HOLE-NEUTRON-STAR PROGENITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Bulik, Tomasz [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland); Mandel, Ilya [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Sathyaprakash, B. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3YB (United Kingdom); Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Mikolajewska, Joanna [Centrum Astronomiczne im. M. Kopernika, Bartycka 18, PL-00-716 Warszawa (Poland)

    2013-02-10

    There are no known stellar-origin double black hole (BH-BH) or black-hole-neutron-star (BH-NS) systems. We argue that Cyg X-3 is a very likely BH-BH or BH-NS progenitor. This Galactic X-ray binary consists of a compact object, wind-fed by a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) type companion. Based on a comprehensive analysis of observational data, it was recently argued that Cyg X-3 harbors a 2-4.5 M {sub Sun} black hole (BH) and a 7.5-14.2 M {sub Sun} W-R companion. We find that the fate of such a binary leads to the prompt ({approx}< 1 Myr) formation of a close BH-BH system for the high end of the allowed W-R mass (M {sub W-R} {approx}> 13 M {sub Sun }). For the low- to mid-mass range of the W-R star (M {sub W-R} {approx} 7-10 M {sub Sun }) Cyg X-3 is most likely (probability 70%) disrupted when W-R ends up as a supernova. However, with smaller probability, it may form a wide (15%) or a close (15%) BH-NS system. The advanced LIGO/VIRGO detection rate for mergers of BH-BH systems from the Cyg X-3 formation channel is {approx}10 yr{sup -1}, while it drops down to {approx}0.1 yr{sup -1} for BH-NS systems. If Cyg X-3 in fact hosts a low-mass black hole and massive W-R star, it lends additional support for the existence of BH-BH/BH-NS systems.

  8. A case of "order insensitivity"? Natural and artificial language processing in a man with primary progressive aphasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerer, V. C.; Varley, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of linear word order (linear configuration) is important for virtually all languages and essential to languages such as English which have little functional morphology. Damage to systems underpinning configurational processing may specifically affect word-order reliant sentence structures. We explore order processing in WR, a man with primary progressive aphasia (PPA). In a previous report, we showed how WR showed impaired processing of actives, which rely strongly on word order, b...

  9. Radioprotective effect of low doses of 2-(1-naphthylmethyl)-2-imidazoline alone or associated with phosphorothioates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, J.D.; Roman, V.; Fatome, M.; Laduranty, J.; Miginiac, L.; Lion, C.; Sentenac-Roumanou, H.

    1993-01-01

    In the mouse, the intraperitoneal injection of 2-(1-naphthylmethyl)-2-imidazoline has a radioprotective effect even at low doses. Its association with S-[2-(3-aminopropyl)aminoethyl] phosphorothioate (WR 2721) or S-[3-(3-methylaminopropyl)-aminopropyl]phosphorothioate (WR 151327) at low doses led to an enhancement of their respective radioprotective activities without any apparent side effects. These results strengthen the interest of this non-sulphur compound as a radioprotector

  10. Usefulness of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy for predicting the effectiveness of {beta}-blockers in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy from the standpoint of long-term prognosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Inoue, Aritomo; Hisatake, Shinji; Yamashina, Shohei; Yamashina, Hisayo; Nakano, Hajime; Yamazaki, Junichi [Toho University School of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Ohmori Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-10-01

    The usefulness of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy in predicting the effectiveness of {beta}-blocker therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) was investigated from the standpoint of long-term prognosis. The subjects were 53 DCM patients in whom {beta}-blockers had been successfully introduced and used for 6 months or longer. When symptoms were stable before the introduction of {beta}-blockers and for up to 1 year thereafter, MIBG myocardial single-photon emission computed tomography was performed and the images analysed to obtain the extent score (EXT), severity score (SEV) and washout rate (WR). At the same time, echocardiography was performed to measure left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Thereafter, patients were placed under observation for an average of 1,314{+-}986 days, with the occurrence of cardiac events as the endpoint. The degree of improvement in WR after introduction of {beta}-blockers was a significant predictor of cardiac events. In fact, none of the patients whose improvement in WR was valued at 10 or higher had cardiac events. Accordingly, using improvement in WR of 10 as the cut-off value, the patients were divided into two groups, ''improved'' and ''unimproved''. There were significant differences between the groups in respect of early EXT, early SEV and WR before the introduction of {beta}-blockers. As regards predictors of WR improvement, multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that early EXT, WR and LVEF were significant predictors. This study shows that, from the standpoint of long-term prognosis, DCM patients who would benefit the most from {beta}-blocker therapy are those with low early EXT and early SEV and high WR before {beta}-blocker introduction regardless of LVEF values. (orig.)

  11. Potential Application of Shallow Bed Wetland Roof systems for green urban cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, X. T.

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the growth, nutrient uptake, domestic wastewater treatment, green (leaf) area and heat reduction of four shallow subsurface flow wetland roof (WR) systems with four different new local plants. Selected species included Cyperus Javanicus Hot (WR1), Eleusine Indica (L.) Gaertn (WR2), Struchium Sparganophorum (L.) Kuntze (WR3) and Kyllinga Brevifolia Rottb (WR4). These systems were operated during 61 days at hydraulic loading rates of 353 - 403 m3/ha.day. The biomass growth of 4.9-73.7g fresh weight/day, and 0.8-11.4 g dry weight/day were observed. The nutrient accumulation according to dry biomass achieved 0.25-2.14% of total nitrogen (TN) and 0.13-1.07% of total phosphorus (TP). The average COD, TN and TP removal was 61-79%; 54-81% and 62-83%, which corresponding to 27-33 kg COD/ha.day, 10-14 kg TN/ha.day and 0.4-0.5 kg TP/ha.day, respectively. The WR4 system achieved the highest COD and TN removal among the WRs. The TP removal efficiency showed an insignificant difference for the systems. Consequently, the treated water quality complied with the Vietnam standard limits (QCVN 14:2008, level B). The green area of the four plants varied between 63-92 m2 green leaf/m2 WR. The WR4 was the highest green area. Moreover, the results also showed the temperature under the flat roof was 1-3°C lower than that of the ambient air. In summary, wetland roof is a promising technology, which not only owns the effective domestic wastewater treatment capacity, but also contributes to green urban with several above benefits.

  12. A Literature Review on the Mechanism of Action of Sulphur and Nitrogen Mustard

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    for years is also poeqible (Aasted et al, 1987; Colardyn et al, 1986). Severely poisoned individuals exhibit bone marrow depression and may die from...MMS does not produce the enhanced depression of DNA synthesis in sensitive cells, compared to resistant cells, produced by sulphur mustard and...Compound MATD 1 Protection (mg/mouse) index 2 WR-3689 15 159 WR-2721 15 44 Aminoethylcysteine 80 27 N- acetylcysteine 8 26 Glutathione 60 22 Cysteine 8

  13. Success in developing regions: world records evolution through a geopolitical prism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Marion; Helou, Nour El; Nassif, Hala; Berthelot, Geoffroy; Len, Stéphane; Thibault, Valérie; Tafflet, Muriel; Quinquis, Laurent; Desgorces, François; Hermine, Olivier; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2009-10-28

    A previous analysis of World Records (WR) has revealed the potential limits of human physiology through athletes' personal commitment. The impact of political factors on sports has only been studied through Olympic medals and results. Here we studied 2876 WR from 63 nations in four summer disciplines. We propose three new indicators and show the impact of historical, geographical and economical factors on the regional WR evolution. The south-eastward path of weighted annual barycenter (i.e. the average of country coordinates weighting by the WR number) shows the emergence of East Africa and China in WR archives. Home WR ratio decreased from 79.9% before the second World War to 23.3% in 2008, underlining sports globalization. Annual Cumulative Proportions (ACP, i.e. the cumulative sum of the WR annual rate) highlight the regional rates of progression. For all regions, the mean slope of ACP during the Olympic era is 0.0101, with a maximum between 1950 and 1989 (0.0156). For European countries, this indicator reflects major historical events (slowdown for western countries after 1945, slowdown for eastern countries after 1990). Mean North-American ACP slope is 0.0029 over the century with an acceleration between 1950 and 1989 at 0.0046. Russia takes off in 1935 and slows down in 1988 (0.0038). For Eastern Europe, maximal progression is seen between 1970 and 1989 (0.0045). China starts in 1979 with a maximum between 1990 and 2008 (0.0021), while other regions have largely declined (mean ACP slope for all other countries = 0.0011). A similar trend is observed for the evolution of the 10 best performers. The national analysis of WR reveals a precise and quantifiable link between the sport performances of a country, its historical or geopolitical context, and its steps of development.

  14. Success in developing regions: world records evolution through a geopolitical prism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Guillaume

    Full Text Available A previous analysis of World Records (WR has revealed the potential limits of human physiology through athletes' personal commitment. The impact of political factors on sports has only been studied through Olympic medals and results. Here we studied 2876 WR from 63 nations in four summer disciplines. We propose three new indicators and show the impact of historical, geographical and economical factors on the regional WR evolution. The south-eastward path of weighted annual barycenter (i.e. the average of country coordinates weighting by the WR number shows the emergence of East Africa and China in WR archives. Home WR ratio decreased from 79.9% before the second World War to 23.3% in 2008, underlining sports globalization. Annual Cumulative Proportions (ACP, i.e. the cumulative sum of the WR annual rate highlight the regional rates of progression. For all regions, the mean slope of ACP during the Olympic era is 0.0101, with a maximum between 1950 and 1989 (0.0156. For European countries, this indicator reflects major historical events (slowdown for western countries after 1945, slowdown for eastern countries after 1990. Mean North-American ACP slope is 0.0029 over the century with an acceleration between 1950 and 1989 at 0.0046. Russia takes off in 1935 and slows down in 1988 (0.0038. For Eastern Europe, maximal progression is seen between 1970 and 1989 (0.0045. China starts in 1979 with a maximum between 1990 and 2008 (0.0021, while other regions have largely declined (mean ACP slope for all other countries = 0.0011. A similar trend is observed for the evolution of the 10 best performers. The national analysis of WR reveals a precise and quantifiable link between the sport performances of a country, its historical or geopolitical context, and its steps of development.

  15. Soil carbon and nitrogen pools in mid- to late-successional forest stands of the northwestern United States: Potential impact of fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Martin F. Jurgensen

    2006-01-01

    When sampling woody residue (WR) and organic matter (OM) present in forest floor, soil wood, and surface mineral soil (0­30 cm) in 14 mid- to late-successional stands across a wide variety of soil types and climatic regimes in the northwestern USA, we found that 44%-84% of carbon (C) was in WR and surface OM, whereas >80% of nitrogen (N) was in the mineral soil. In...

  16. The extent to which the public health 'war on obesity' reflects the ethical values and principles of critical health promotion: a multimedia critical discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Lily; Taylor, Jane; Barnes, Margaret

    2015-12-01

    The discipline of health promotion is responsible for implementing strategies within weight-related public health initiatives (WR-PHI). It is imperative that such initiatives be subjected to critical analysis through a health promotion ethics lens to help ensure ethical health promotion practice. Multimedia critical discourse analysis was used to examine the claims, values, assumptions, power relationships and ideologies within Australian WR-PHI. The Health Promotion Values and Principles Continuum was used as a heuristic to evaluate the extent to which the WR-PHI reflected the ethical values of critical health promotion: active participation of people in the initiative; respect for personal autonomy; beneficence; non-maleficence; and strong evidential and theoretical basis for practice. Ten initiatives were analysed. There was some discourse about the need for participation of people in the WR-PHI, but people were routinely labelled as 'target groups' requiring 'intervention'. Strong evidence of a coercive and paternalistic discourse about choice was identified, with minimal attention to respect for personal autonomy. There was significant emphasis on the beneficiaries of the WR-PHI but minimal attention to the health benefits, and nothing about the potential for harm. Discourse about the evidence of need was objectivist, and there was no discussion about the theoretical foundations of the WR-PHI. The WR-PHI were not reflective of the ethical values and principles of critical health promotion. So what? Health promotion researchers and practitioners engaged in WR-PHI should critically reflect on the extent to which they are consistent with the ethical aspects of critical health promotion practice.

  17. Bearing the brunt: co-workers' experiences of work reintegration processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Debra A; MacEachen, Ellen

    2013-03-01

    Work disability research has found co-worker support to be a significant but under-recognised aspect of work reintegration (WR) processes. Although co-workers work alongside returning workers, their practical contribution to WR success or failure is often invisible to others. This study aimed to gain further insight into the role and contribution of co-workers in WR interventions. An exploratory qualitative pilot study was conducted in Toronto, Canada in 2011. Three focus groups were conducted with 13 co-workers, recruited for their direct experience of 'working alongside' a returning worker. An iterative data gathering and analysis process occurred. Themes were generated from categories in open-ended interview questions and new issues arising from the data. The findings detail co-workers' practical experiences of WR processes and their reflections on social and work conditions that impacted their participation. Co-workers' capacity to support returning workers was related to the quality of the WR arrangements, the relationship with the returning worker, work culture, and the duration of the required support. Workplace privacy and confidentiality requirements were identified as a key challenge for co-worker participation. The effects on co-workers of WR processes ranged from the opportunity to learn new skills to disillusionment and withdrawal from the workplace. In worst case scenarios, 'ripple effects' including emotional distress, physical injury and termination of co-workers' employment had occurred. Co-workers are not a neutral party in WR procedures. Formalizing the co-worker role to include communication, consideration and recognition might improve co-workers' WR experiences.

  18. The vast population of Wolf-Rayet and red supergiant stars in M101. I. Motivation and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shara, Michael M.; Bibby, Joanne L.; Zurek, David [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Crowther, Paul A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Moffat, Anthony F. J. [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, CP 6128 Succ. C-V, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Drissen, Laurent [Département de Physique, Université Laval, Pavillon Vachon, Quebec City, QC G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2013-12-01

    Assembling a catalog of at least 10,000 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars is an essential step in proving (or disproving) that these stars are the progenitors of Type Ib and Type Ic supernovae. To this end, we have used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to carry out a deep, He II optical narrowband imaging survey of the ScI spiral galaxy M101. Almost the entire galaxy was imaged with the unprecedented depth and resolution that only the HST affords. Differenced with archival broadband images, the narrowband images allow us to detect much of the W-R star population of M101. We describe the extent of the survey and our images, as well as our data reduction procedures. A detailed broadband-narrowband imaging study of a field east of the center of M101, containing the giant star-forming region NGC 5462, demonstrates our completeness limits, how we find W-R candidates, their properties and spatial distribution, and how we rule out most contaminants. We use the broadband images to locate luminous red supergiant (RSG) candidates. The spatial distributions of the W-R and RSG stars near NGC 5462 are strikingly different. W-R stars dominate the complex core, while RSGs dominate the complex halo. Future papers in this series will describe and catalog more than a thousand W-R and RSG candidates that are detectable in our images, as well as spectra of many of those candidates.

  19. White Rabbit Precision Time Protocol on Long-Distance Fiber Links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierikx, Erik F; Wallin, Anders E; Fordell, Thomas; Myyry, Jani; Koponen, Petri; Merimaa, Mikko; Pinkert, Tjeerd J; Koelemeij, Jeroen C J; Peek, Henk Z; Smets, Rob

    2016-07-01

    The application of White Rabbit precision time protocol (WR-PTP) in long-distance optical fiber links has been investigated. WR-PTP is an implementation of PTP in synchronous Ethernet optical fiber networks, originally intended for synchronization of equipment within a range of 10 km. This paper discusses the results and limitations of two implementations of WR-PTP in the existing communication fiber networks. A 950-km WR-PTP link was realized using unidirectional paths in a fiber pair between Espoo and Kajaani, Finland. The time transfer on this link was compared (after initial calibration) against a clock comparison by GPS precise point positioning (PPP). The agreement between the two methods remained within [Formula: see text] over three months of measurements. Another WR-PTP implementation was realized between Delft and Amsterdam, the Netherlands, by cascading two links of 137 km each. In this case, the WR links were realized as bidirectional paths in single fibers. The measured time offset between the starting and end points of the link was within 5 ns with an uncertainty of 8 ns, mainly due to the estimated delay asymmetry caused by chromatic dispersion.

  20. Clinical evaluation of exercise thallium-201 whole body scintigraphy in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kenzo; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Kondo, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate whole body distribution and kinetics of Thallium-201 at exercise and redistribution, whole body scintigraphy (WB-S) was performed on 12 normal subjects (N), 19 patients with angina pectoris (AP) and 18 patients with old myocardial infarction (MI). WB-S was obtained using a gamma camera OMEGA 500 and analized by ADAC System IV. We estimated the following parameters from WB-S; 1) %Distribution (%D): the ratio of whole body counts to organ counts 2) washout rate (WR) in each organ. %D of the heart in N, AP and MI was similar at rest and exercise. At exercise, %D of the lung and the liver decreased and %D of thighs increased remarkably than at rest. At supine exercise, the lung indicated high %D and thinghs indicated low %D compared with at upright exercise. WR of the heart in AP and MI was significantly lower than in N (p<0.005, p<0.01) and further decreased proportionally to the number of stenotic coronary arteries and related to the ischemic ST depression of exercise ECG. WR of the heart was not correlation with pressure rate product and this finding suggested that WR of the heart was not prescribed by the tolerance of exercise but related to coronary flow at exercise a certain degree. WR of the lung in MI was significantly higher (p<0.025) and WR of thighs in AP and MI was significantly lower (p<0.025, p<0.05) compared with N. (author)

  1. A deep near-infrared spectroscopic survey of the Scutum-Crux arm for Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslowe, C. K.; Crowther, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a New Technology Telescope/Son-of-Isaac spectroscopic survey of infrared selected Wolf-Rayet (WR) candidates in the Scutum-Crux spiral arm (298° ≤ l ≤ 340°, |b| ≤ 0.5°. We obtained near-IR spectra of 127 candidates, revealing 17 WR stars - a ∼13 per cent success rate - of which 16 are newly identified here. The majority of the new WR stars are classified as narrow-lined WN5-7 stars, with two broad-lined WN4-6 stars and three WC6-8 stars. The new stars, with distances estimated from previous absolute magnitude calibrations, have no obvious association with the Scutum-Crux arm. Refined near-infrared (YHJK) classification criteria based on over a hundred Galactic and Magellanic Cloud WR stars, providing diagnostics for hydrogen in WN stars, plus the identification of WO stars and intermediate WN/C stars. Finally, we find that only a quarter of WR stars in the survey region are associated with star clusters and/or H II regions, with similar statistics found for luminous blue variables (LBVs) in the Milky Way. The relative isolation of evolved massive stars is discussed, together with the significance of the co-location of LBVs and WR stars in young star clusters.

  2. Effects of Repetitive Shoulder Activity on the Subacromial Space in Manual Wheelchair Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Sheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated (1 the effect of repetitive weight-relief raises (WR and shoulder external rotation (ER on the acromiohumeral distance (AHD among manual wheelchair users (MWUs and (2 the relationship between shoulder pain, subject characteristics, and AHD changes. Twenty-three MWUs underwent ultrasound imaging of the nondominant shoulder in an unloaded baseline position and while holding a WR position before and after the WR/ER tasks. Paired t-tests and Spearman correlational analysis were used to assess differences in the AHD before and after each task and the relationships between pain, subject characteristics, and the AHD measures. A significant reduction in the subacromial space (P<0.01 occurred when subjects performed a WR position compared to baseline. Individuals with increased years of disability had greater AHD percentage narrowing after WR (P=0.008. Increased shoulder pain was associated with AHD percentage narrowing after ER (P≤0.007. The results support clinical practice guidelines that recommend MWUs limit WR to preserve shoulder function. The isolated repetitive shoulder activity did not contribute to the changes of subacromial space in MWUs. The ultrasonographic measurement of the AHD may be a target for identifying future interventions that prevent pain.

  3. PS-15: a potent, orally active antimalarial from a new class of folic acid antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, C J; Milhous, W K; Ager, A L; Rossan, R N; Sweeney, T R; Lewis, N J; Jacobus, D P

    1993-07-01

    A new, orally-active inhibitor of dihydrofolic acid reductase (DHFR), PS-15 (N-(3-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)propyloxy)-N'-(1-methylethyl)- imidocarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride), has significant activity against drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum. It is not cross-resistant with other inhibitors of DHFR (e.g., pyrimethamine and cycloguanil). Although it bears similarities to proguanil, PS-15 represents a new antifolate class of drugs that we have named oxyguanils or hydroxylamine-derived biguanides. This compound displays intrinsic antimalarial activity and also is metabolized in vivo to WR99210, an extremely active triazine inhibitor of DHFR. When tested in vitro against drug-resistant clones of P. falciparum, PS-15 was more active than proguanil, and the putative metabolite, WR99210, was more active than the proguanil metabolite cycloguanil. The drug is also more active as well as less toxic than proguanil when administered orally to mice infected with P. berghei. When administered orally to Aotus monkeys infected with multidrug-resistant P. falciparum, PS-15 was more active than either proguanil or WR99210. In 1973, WR99210 underwent clinical trials for safety and tolerance in volunteers. The trials showed gastrointestinal intolerance and limited bioavailability; further development of the drug was abandoned. Because PS-15 has intrinsic antimalarial activity, is not cross-resistant with other DHFR inhibitors, and can be metabolized to WR99210 in vivo, oral administration of this new drug should circumvent the shortcomings and retain the advantages found with both proguanil and WR99210.

  4. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol on fission-neutron-induced DNA damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grdina, D. J.; Sigdestad, C. P.; Dale, P. J.; Perrin, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect(s) of the radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR 1065) on fission-neutron-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 Chinese hamster cells was determined by using a neutral filter elution procedure (pH 7.2). When required, WR1065, at a final working concentration of 4 mM, was added to the culture medium, either 30 min before and during irradiation with fission spectrum neutrons (beam energy of 0.85 MeV) from the JANUS research reactor, or for selected intervals of time following exposure. The frequency of neutron-induced DNA strand breaks as measured by neutral elution as a function of dose equalled that observed for 60Co gamma-ray-induced damage (relative biological effectiveness of one). In contrast to the protective effect exhibited by WR1065 in reducing 60Co-induced DNA damage, WR1065 was ineffective in reducing or protecting against induction of DNA strand breaks by JANUS neutrons. The kinetics of DNA double-strand rejoining were measured following neutron irradiation. In the absence of WR1065, considerable DNA degradation by cellular enzymes was observed. This process was inhibited when WR1065 was present. These results indicate that, under the conditions used, the quality (i.e. nature), rather than quantity, of DNA lesions (measured by neutral elution) formed by neutrons was significantly different from that formed by gamma-rays. PMID:2667608

  5. Cardiac Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) scintigraphy parameter predicts cardiac and cerebrovascular events in type 2 diabetic patients without structural heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yufu, Kunio; Takahashi, Naohiko; Okada, Norihiro; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Hara, Masahide; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Saikawa, Tetsunori

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) scintigraphy is an established method of assessment of cardiovascular sympathetic function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the long-term cardiovascular predictive value of cardiac 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy parameters in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients without structural heart disease. Cardiac 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy in 108 patients with type 2 diabetes who did not have structural heart disease, was evaluated. The washout rate (WR) was considered enhanced if it was ≥40%. Accurate follow-up information for 4.6 years was obtained in 54 enhanced WR patients (27 male; mean age, 61±11 years) and in 54 sex- and age-matched preserved WR patients (27 male; mean age, 61±10 years). Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) were investigated. During follow-up, 10 enhanced WR patients developed MACCE including cardiac death, coronary revascularization, stroke, and congestive heart failure, while MACCE occurred in only 3 male patients. The Kaplan-Meier curves indicated that enhanced WR patients had higher incidence of MACCE than those with preserved WR (P 123 I-MIBG scintigraphy at baseline has long-term cardiovascular predictive value in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes without structural heart disease. (author)

  6. Highly reliable wind-rolling triboelectric nanogenerator operating in a wide wind speed range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hyungseok; Chung, Jihoon; Choi, Dukhyun; Jung, Daewoong; Cho, Minhaeng; Lee, Sangmin

    2016-01-01

    Triboelectric nanogenerators are aspiring energy harvesting methods that generate electricity from the triboelectric effect and electrostatic induction. This study demonstrates the harvesting of wind energy by a wind-rolling triboelectric nanogenerator (WR-TENG). The WR-TENG generates electricity from wind as a lightweight dielectric sphere rotates along the vortex whistle substrate. Increasing the kinetic energy of a dielectric converted from the wind energy is a key factor in fabricating an efficient WR-TENG. Computation fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is introduced to estimate the precise movements of wind flow and to create a vortex flow by adjusting the parameters of the vortex whistle shape to optimize the design parameters to increase the kinetic energy conversion rate. WR-TENG can be utilized as both a self-powered wind velocity sensor and a wind energy harvester. A single unit of WR-TENG produces open-circuit voltage of 11.2 V and closed-circuit current of 1.86 μA. Additionally, findings reveal that the electrical power is enhanced through multiple electrode patterns in a single device and by increasing the number of dielectric spheres inside WR-TENG. The wind-rolling TENG is a novel approach for a sustainable wind-driven TENG that is sensitive and reliable to wind flows to harvest wasted wind energy in the near future. PMID:27653976

  7. Thermochronometrically constrained anatomy and evolution of a Miocene extensional accommodation zone and tilt domain boundary: The southern Wassuk Range, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorynski, Kyle E.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Douglas Walker, J.

    2013-06-01

    (AHe) and Zircon (ZHe) (U-Th)/He thermochronometric data from the southern Wassuk Range (WR) coupled with 40Ar/39Ar age data from the overlying tilted Tertiary section are used to constrain the thermal evolution of an extensional accommodation zone and tilt-domain boundary. AHe and ZHe data record two episodes of rapid cooling related to the tectonic exhumation of the WR fault block beginning at ~15 and ~4 Ma. Extension was accommodated through fault-block rotation and variably tilted the southern WR to the west from ~60°-70° in the central WR to ~15°-35° in the southernmost WR and Pine Grove Hills, and minimal tilting in the Anchorite Hills and along the Mina Deflection to the south. Middle Miocene geothermal gradient estimates record heating immediately prior to large-magnitude extension that was likely coeval with the extrusion of the Lincoln Flat andesite at ~14.8 Ma. Geothermal gradients increase from ~19° ± 4°C/km to ≥ 65° ± 20°C/km toward the Mina Deflection, suggesting that it was the focus of Middle Miocene arc magmatism in the upper crust. The decreasing thickness of tilt blocks toward the south resulted from a shallowing brittle/ductile transition zone. Postmagmatic Middle Miocene extension and fault-block advection were focused in the northern and central WR and coincidentally moderated the large lateral thermal gradient within the uppermost crust.

  8. The citius end: world records progression announces the completion of a brief ultra-physiological quest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffroy Berthelot

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available World records (WR in sports illustrate the ultimate expression of human integrated muscle biology, through speed or strength performances. Analysis and prediction of man's physiological boundaries in sports and impact of external (historical or environmental conditions on WR occurrence are subject to scientific controversy. Based on the analysis of 3263 WR established for all quantifiable official contests since the first Olympic Games, we show here that WR progression rate follows a piecewise exponential decaying pattern with very high accuracy (mean adjusted r(2 values = 0.91+/-0.08 (s.d.. Starting at 75% of their estimated asymptotic values in 1896, WR have now reached 99%, and, present conditions prevailing, half of all WR will not be improved by more than 0,05% in 2027. Our model, which may be used to compare future athletic performances or assess the impact of international antidoping policies, forecasts that human species' physiological frontiers will be reached in one generation. This will have an impact on the future conditions of athlete training and on the organization of competitions. It may also alter the Olympic motto and spirit.

  9. Color excesses, intrinsic colors, and absolute magnitudes of Galactic and Large Magellanic Cloud Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacca, W.D.; Torres-Dodgen, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of determining the color excesses of WR stars in the Galaxy and the LMC has been developed and is used to determine the excesses for 44 Galactic and 32 LMC WR stars. The excesses are combined with line-free, narrow-band spectrophotometry to derive intrinsic colors of the WR stars of nearly all spectral subtypes. No correlation of UV spectral index or intrinsic colors with spectral subtype is found for the samples of single WN or WC stars. There is evidence that early WN stars in the LMC have flatter UV continua and redder intrinsic colors than early WN stars in the Galaxy. No separation is found between the values derived for Galactic WC stars and those obtained for LMC WC stars. The intrinsic colors are compared with those calculated from model atmospheres of WR stars and generally good agreement is found. Absolute magnitudes are derived for WR stars in the LMC and for those Galactic WR stars located in clusters and associations for which there are reliable distance estimates. 78 refs

  10. Vectorization in an oncolytic vaccinia virus of an antibody, a Fab and a scFv against programmed cell death -1 (PD-1) allows their intratumoral delivery and an improved tumor-growth inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpeter, Patricia; Fend, Laetitia; Thioudellet, Christine; Geist, Michel; Sfrontato, Nathalie; Koerper, Véronique; Fahrner, Catherine; Schmitt, Doris; Gantzer, Murielle; Remy-Ziller, Christelle; Brandely, Renée; Villeval, Dominique; Rittner, Karola; Silvestre, Nathalie; Erbs, Philippe; Zitvogel, Laurence; Quéméneur, Eric; Préville, Xavier; Marchand, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    We report here the successful vectorization of a hamster monoclonal IgG (namely J43) recognizing the murine Programmed cell death-1 (mPD-1) in Western Reserve (WR) oncolytic vaccinia virus. Three forms of mPD-1 binders have been inserted into the virus: whole antibody (mAb), Fragment antigen-binding (Fab) or single-chain variable fragment (scFv). MAb, Fab and scFv were produced and assembled with the expected patterns in supernatants of cells infected by the recombinant viruses. The three purified mPD-1 binders were able to block the binding of mPD-1 ligand to mPD-1 in vitro . Moreover, mAb was detected in tumor and in serum of C57BL/6 mice when the recombinant WR-mAb was injected intratumorally (IT) in B16F10 and MCA 205 tumors. The concentration of circulating mAb detected after IT injection was up to 1,900-fold higher than the level obtained after a subcutaneous (SC) injection (i.e., without tumor) confirming the virus tropism for tumoral cells and/or microenvironment. Moreover, the overall tumoral accumulation of the mAb was higher and lasted longer after IT injection of WR-mAb1, than after IT administration of 10 µg of J43. The IT injection of viruses induced a massive infiltration of immune cells including activated lymphocytes (CD8 + and CD4 + ). Interestingly, in the MCA 205 tumor model, WR-mAb1 and WR-scFv induced a therapeutic control of tumor growth similar to unarmed WR combined to systemically administered J43 and superior to that obtained with an unarmed WR. These results pave the way for next generation of oncolytic vaccinia armed with immunomodulatory therapeutic proteins such as mAbs.

  11. Suboptimal Weight Loss and Weight Regain after Gastric Bypass Surgery-Postoperative Status of Energy Intake, Eating Behavior, Physical Activity, and Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Tina; Strømmen, Magnus; Martins, Catia

    2017-05-01

    Suboptimal weight loss (SWL) and weight regain (WR) after gastric bypass surgery (GB) remains poorly understood. This study aims to compare GB patients experiencing SWL or significant WR (SigWR) with successful controls, regarding postoperative food intake, eating behavior, physical activity (PA), and psychometrics. Forty-nine patients with >1 year post-surgery were classified as either experiencing SWL (excess body weight loss, EWL, <50%, n = 22) or SigWR (total weight regain ≥15%, n = 38), with respective control groups. Energy intake (EI) was measured with a Food Frequency Questionnaire, eating behavior using the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire and the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, and PA using both SenseWear Armbands and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Eating disorders, depression, and quality of life (QoL) were measured using the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory II, and Impact of Weight on Quality of Life, respectively. EI, macronutrient distribution, and meal frequency were similar among groups. However, disinhibited eating behavior score was higher, while most subcategories from IWQOL were significantly lower in both SWL and SigWR groups compared with their respective controls. PA was significantly lower in the SWL and SigWR groups compared with the respective controls. There were no differences between groups regarding depression. Lower PA levels, disordered eating behavior and lower QoL are associated with unsuccessful weigh loss outcome after GB surgery. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the potential causal relationship between the previously described variables and SWL/SigWR after GB.

  12. Work reintegration after long-term sick leave: domains of influence on co-workers' ability to be supportive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Labriola, Merete; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Larsen, Eva Ladekjær

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify domains of influence on co-workers' ability to be supportive of returning worker during the work reintegration (WR) process. An ethnographic study design was chosen involving fieldwork at four different workplaces, at an emergency care service, a waste disposal company and at two nursing homes. Qualitative methods for inquiry were used including participant observation, individual- and group interviews of 30 participants. Data were coded and analysed according to a grounded theory approach. Four themes were identified related to domains of influence on co-workers' ability to be supportive of returning worker during the WR process: (1) organisation of work and level of interaction; (2) disruption of work routines, (3) relationship with returning worker and (4) attitudes towards sick leave. The WR process after long-term sick leave is not only influenced by the WR's arrangements made, but also by the co-workers' responses to the process. Work arrangements not only affect the returning worker's ability to return-to-work (RTW) successfully, but also the co-workers' ability to be supportive and their ability to take active part in the process. Implications for Rehabilitation The process of WR after long-term sick leave involves interaction with co-workers. Domains of influence is in the co-workers' perspective influencing their ability to be supportive during reintegration of a returning worker. Future WR management could benefit from integrating the conditions for co-worker support. We encourage co-workers to be involved in the RTW planning, monitoring and evaluation with particular focus on how the WR arrangements are influencing their work and their ability to be supportive.

  13. XMM-Newton X-ray Observatory Guest Observer program (AO-1) at CASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    2003-01-01

    In this research program, we obtained and analyzed X-ray observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 110 (HD 165688) using the XMM-Newton space-based observatory. Radio observations were also obtained using the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope located in New Mexico and operated by the Natl. Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). This star was targeted for observations primarily because it is believed to be a single WR star without a companion. Single WR stars are thought to emit X-rays from cool plasma in shocks distributed throughout their powerful stellar winds. However, there has been little observational work done to test this idea since single WR stars are relatively weak X-ray sources and have been difficult to detect with previous generation telescopes. The launch of XMM-Newton provides a new telescope that is much more sensitive than its predecessors, allowing single WR stars to be studied in detail for the first time. X-ray emission was clearly detected from WR 110. Analysis of its spectrum yields a surprising result. Its X-ray emitting plasma is distributed over a range of temperatures and is dominated by relatively cool plasma with a characteristic temperature T is approximately 6 million K. Such plasma can be explained by existing theoretical wind shock models. However, the spectrum also shows hotter plasma whose temperature is uncertain but is thought to be in excess of T approximately 30 million K. The origin of this hotter plasma is yet unknown, but possible mechanisms are identified

  14. EMG and oxygen uptake responses during slow and fast ramp exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Barry W; Tripse McConnell, Joyce H; Barstow, Thomas J

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between muscle recruitment patterns using surface electromyography (EMG) and the excess O(2) uptake (Ex.V(O(2))) that accompanies slow (SR, 8 W min(-1)) but not fast (FR, 64 W min(-1)) ramp increases in work rate (WR) during exercise on a cycle ergometer. Nine subjects (2 females) participated in this study (25 +/- 2 years, +/- S.E.M.). EMG was obtained from the vastus lateralis and medialis and analysed in the time (root mean square, RMS) and frequency (median power frequency, MDPF) domain. Results for each muscle were averaged to provide an overall response and expressed relative to a maximal voluntary contraction (%MVC). Delta.V(O(2))/DeltaWR was calculated for exercise below (S(1)) and above (S(2)) the lactate threshold (LT) using linear regression. The increase in RMS relative to the increase in WR for exercise below the LT (DeltaRMS/DeltaWR-S(1)) was determined using linear regression. Due to non-linearities in RMS above the LT, DeltaRMS/DeltaWR-S(2) is reported as the difference in RMS (DeltaRMS) and the difference in WR (DeltaWR) at end-exercise and the LT. SR was associated with a higher (P exercise is not associated with the recruitment of additional motor units since Ex.V(O(2)) was observed during SR only. Compared to the progressive decrease in MDPF observed during FR, the MDPF remained relatively constant during SR suggesting that either (i) there was no appreciable recruitment of the less efficient type II muscle fibres, at least in addition to those recruited initially at the onset of exercise, or (ii) the decrease in MDPF associated with fatigue was offset by the addition of a higher frequency of type II fibres recruited to replace the fatigued motor units.

  15. Relationship between work rate and oxygen uptake in mitochondrial myopathy during ramp-incremental exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Gimenes

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We determined the response characteristics and functional correlates of the dynamic relationship between the rate (Δ of oxygen consumption ( O2 and the applied power output (work rate = WR during ramp-incremental exercise in patients with mitochondrial myopathy (MM. Fourteen patients (7 males, age 35.4 ± 10.8 years with biopsy-proven MM and 10 sedentary controls (6 males, age 29.0 ± 7.8 years took a ramp-incremental cycle ergometer test for the determination of the O2 on-exercise mean response time (MRT and the gas exchange threshold (GET. The ΔO2/ΔWR slope was calculated up to GET (S1, above GET (S2 and over the entire linear portion of the response (S T. Knee muscle endurance was measured by isokinetic dynamometry. As expected, peak O2 and muscle performance were lower in patients than controls (P O2/ΔWR than controls, especially the S2 component (6.8 ± 1.5 vs 10.3 ± 0.6 mL·min-1·W-1, respectively; P O2/ΔWR (S T and muscle endurance, MRT-O2, GET and peak O2 in MM patients (P O2/ΔWR below 8 mL·min-1·W-1 had severely reduced peak O2 values (O2 had lower ΔO2/ΔWR (P O2/ΔWR is typically reduced in patients with MM, being related to increased functional impairment and higher cardiopulmonary stress.

  16. Drifting on Alien Winds Exploring the Skies and Weather of Other Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Drifting on Alien Winds explores the bizarre weather of alien worlds, from the blistering hurricane-force winds of Venus to the gentle methane rain showers of Saturn's giant moon Titan. Blinding bolts of lightning sizzle through Jupiter's skies, ammonia blizzards swirl through Saturnian clouds, and Earth-sized cyclones pinwheel across Uranus and Neptune. Late-breaking scientific discoveries from spacecraft, observatories, and laboratories reveal the mysteries of weather across the Solar System. Our knowledge of weather on other worlds has not come easily. Drifting on Alien Winds introduces the inventors, engineers, and scientists who struggled to launch the first probes that would help us to understand the atmospheres of other worlds. The untold stories of early engineering feats and failures, from small Soviet Venus balloons to advanced studies of blimps and airplanes for Mars and Titan, are showcased here, along with what we’ve learned and are still trying to learn about alien skies. Some of today’s mos...

  17. Sensory experience modifies feature map relationships in visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloherty, Shaun L; Hughes, Nicholas J; Hietanen, Markus A; Bhagavatula, Partha S

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which brain structure is influenced by sensory input during development is a critical but controversial question. A paradigmatic system for studying this is the mammalian visual cortex. Maps of orientation preference (OP) and ocular dominance (OD) in the primary visual cortex of ferrets, cats and monkeys can be individually changed by altered visual input. However, the spatial relationship between OP and OD maps has appeared immutable. Using a computational model we predicted that biasing the visual input to orthogonal orientation in the two eyes should cause a shift of OP pinwheels towards the border of OD columns. We then confirmed this prediction by rearing cats wearing orthogonally oriented cylindrical lenses over each eye. Thus, the spatial relationship between OP and OD maps can be modified by visual experience, revealing a previously unknown degree of brain plasticity in response to sensory input. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13911.001 PMID:27310531

  18. Application of the Speed-Duration Relationship to Normalize the Intensity of High-Intensity Interval Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Carrie; Wilson, John; Birch, Karen M.; Kemi, Ole J.

    2013-01-01

    The tolerable duration of continuous high-intensity exercise is determined by the hyperbolic Speed-tolerable duration (S-tLIM) relationship. However, application of the S-tLIM relationship to normalize the intensity of High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) has yet to be considered, with this the aim of present study. Subjects completed a ramp-incremental test, and series of 4 constant-speed tests to determine the S-tLIM relationship. A sub-group of subjects (n = 8) then repeated 4 min bouts of exercise at the speeds predicted to induce intolerance at 4 min (WR4), 6 min (WR6) and 8 min (WR8), interspersed with bouts of 4 min recovery, to the point of exercise intolerance (fixed WR HIIT) on different days, with the aim of establishing the work rate that could be sustained for 960 s (i.e. 4×4 min). A sub-group of subjects (n = 6) also completed 4 bouts of exercise interspersed with 4 min recovery, with each bout continued to the point of exercise intolerance (maximal HIIT) to determine the appropriate protocol for maximizing the amount of high-intensity work that can be completed during 4×4 min HIIT. For fixed WR HIIT tLIM of HIIT sessions was 399±81 s for WR4, 892±181 s for WR6 and 1517±346 s for WR8, with total exercise durations all significantly different from each other (PHIIT, there was no difference in tLIM of each of the 4 bouts (Bout 1: 229±27 s; Bout 2: 262±37 s; Bout 3: 235±49 s; Bout 4: 235±53 s; P>0.050). However, there was significantly less high-intensity work completed during bouts 2 (153.5±40. 9 m), 3 (136.9±38.9 m), and 4 (136.7±39.3 m), compared with bout 1 (264.9±58.7 m; P>0.050). These data establish that WR6 provides the appropriate work rate to normalize the intensity of HIIT between subjects. Maximal HIIT provides a protocol which allows the relative contribution of the work rate profile to physiological adaptations to be considered during alternative intensity-matched HIIT protocols. PMID:24244266

  19. Clinical usefulness of {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy as a marker of the severity and prognosis of congestive heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiga, Koji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in patients with congestive heart failure. Myocardial dynamic imaging was performed immediately after {sup 123}I-MIBG administration at 1 frame/sec for 500 sec in 52 patients with or without congestive heart failure. The %uptake/ROI, dynamic heart to mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) and dynamic washout rate (WR) were calculated from their time activity curves to assess the relationship between the NYHA functional class and these values. In 52 other patients with heart failure, the initial and delayed MIBG anterior planar images were obtained, and H/M in delayed images and WR between initial and delayed images were measured. The patients were followed up for 31.8{+-}16.8 months, and their survival rates were compared among three groups, H/M<1.5, 1.5{<=}H/M<2.0 and H/M{>=}2.0, or WR<45, 45{<=}WR<60 and WR{>=}60[%], respectively. The parameter, such as H/M, WR, age, X-ray cardiothoracic ratio (CTR), echocardiographic end-diastolic diameter (Dd), fractional shortening (%FS) or radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), which was the most important prognostic predictor was analyzed. MIBG showed that the dynamic kinetics immediately after administration which reflected the severity of congestive heart failure, %uptake/ROI and dynamic H/M were significantly lower and dynamic WR was significantly higher in the advanced NYHA functional class. During the follow-up period, 13 patients died of heart failure. The survival rate in the group of H/M<1.5 or WR{>=}60[%] was significantly poorer than the other groups, and the most important predictive indicator for the prognosis was found to be H/M or WR exceeding age, CTR, Dd, %FS and LVEF {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy is very useful to diagnose the severity and prognosis in patients with congestive heart failure. (K.H.)

  20. Plasma and brain angiotensin concentrations associated with water response behavior in the desert anuran, Scaphiopus couchii under natural conditions in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William E; Hillyard, Stanley D; Propper, Catherine R

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial amphibians obtain water by absorption across a specialized region of the ventral skin and exhibit a behavior, the water absorption response (WR) to place that region in contact with moist surfaces. Spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus couchii) spend dry months of the year in burrows, then emerge during brief periods of summer rainfall and seek water sources for rehydration and reproduction. We tested the hypothesis that these toads have changes in plasma and/or central angiotensin concentrations that are associated with seasonal emergence and WR behavior. Immunoreactive concentrations of combined angiotensin II and III (ir-ANG) were measured in plasma samples and microdissected regions of brain tissue taken from toads moving across the road or toads showing WR behavior in shallow puddles on the road. Plasma ir-ANG concentrations were not significantly different between these groups, but were significantly higher in the periventricular region of the hypothalamus in toads showing WR behavior. Concentrations in other brain regions, while highly variable among individuals, were not different between groups. Within the context of the natural history of a specialized desert toad, these results support the hypothesis that ir-ANG is associated with WR behavior in spadefoot toads in a manner analogous to oral drinking exhibited by other vertebrate clades. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Wolf-Rayet stars and galactic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenholm, B.

    1975-01-01

    A 15 0 wide strip along the galactic equator between longitudes 250 0 and 360 0 has been searched for Wolf-Rayet stars. Six new WR stars and four new planetary nebulae have been found. Seven stars earlier listed as WR stars have been rejected as such. The new WR stars in the 'Luminous Stars in the Southern Milky Way' are discussed. A sample of 154 WR stars has been treated statistically. For the distribution in longitude, comparisons are made with OB stars and classical cepheids. The differences in distribution are thought to be an age effect. An effort to explain the empty interval towards the anticentre is made. The distribution in latitude is compared with young clusters and long-period cepheids. The physical plane formed by these objects is tilted about one degree to the galactic plane and the tilt is upwards in the Cygnus direction. This result is also received by a least squares solution of the objects when given in rectangular coordinates. The WR star sample is regarded as fairly complete up to a distance of 5 kpc. (orig.) [de

  2. NEW X-RAY DETECTIONS OF WNL STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Stephen L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA), University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Zhekov, Svetozar A. [Space and Solar-Terrestrial Research Institute, Moskovska str. 6, Sofia-1000 (Bulgaria); Guedel, Manuel [Department of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Schmutz, Werner [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD), Dorfstrasse 33, CH-7260 Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Sokal, Kimberly R., E-mail: Stephen.Skinner@colorado.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that putatively single nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet stars (WN stars) without known companions are X-ray sources. However, almost all WN star X-ray detections so far have been of earlier WN2-WN6 spectral subtypes. Later WN7-WN9 subtypes (also known as WNL stars) have proved more difficult to detect, an important exception being WR 79a (WN9ha). We present here new X-ray detections of the WNL stars WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). These new results, when combined with previous detections, demonstrate that X-ray emission is present in WN stars across the full range of spectral types, including later WNL stars. The two WN8 stars observed to date (WR 16 and WR 40) show unusually low X-ray luminosities (L{sub x} ) compared to other WN stars, and it is noteworthy that they also have the lowest terminal wind speeds (v{sub {infinity}}). Existing X-ray detections of about a dozen WN stars reveal a trend of increasing L{sub x} with wind luminosity L{sub wind} = (1/2)M-dot v{sup 2}{sub {infinity}}, suggesting that wind kinetic energy may play a key role in establishing X-ray luminosity levels in WN stars.

  3. Search for a heavy right-handed W boson and a heavy neutrino in events with two same-flavor leptons and two jets at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Pieters, Maxim; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Marchesini, Ivan; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Bilin, Bugra; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Seva, Tomislav; Starling, Elizabeth; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Trocino, Daniele; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Vermassen, Basile; Vit, Martina; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; Caudron, Adrien; David, Pieter; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correia Silva, Gilson; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Medina Jaime, Miguel; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Calligaris, Luigi; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Jing; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Wang, Yi; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Segura Delgado, Manuel Alejandro; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Khalil, Shaaban; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Kirschenmann, Henning; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Havukainen, Joona; Heikkilä, Jaana Kristiina; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Laurila, Santeri; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Siikonen, Hannu; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Kucher, Inna; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lattaud, Hugues; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Zhang, Sijing; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Rauch, Max Philip; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Teroerde, Marius; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Danilov, Vladyslav; De Wit, Adinda; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Damiani, Daniela; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Elwood, Adam; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Knolle, Joscha; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Meyer, Mareike; Missiroli, Marino; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Tholen, Heiner; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Aggleton, Robin; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Kutzner, Viktor; Lange, Johannes; Marconi, Daniele; Multhaup, Jens; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Reimers, Arne; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baselga, Marta; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Faltermann, Nils; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Papakrivopoulos, Ioannis; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Gianneios, Paraskevas; Katsoulis, Panagiotis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Tsitsonis, Dimitrios; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Vámi, Tamás Álmos; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chauhan, Sushil; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Rajat; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Lohan, Manisha; Mehta, Ankita; Sharma, Sandeep; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Bhowmik, Debabrata; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Rout, Prasant Kumar; Roy, Ashim; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Singh, Bipen; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Di Florio, Adriano; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Gelmi, Andrea; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Latino, Giuseppe; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Beschi, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Galati, Giuliana; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Voevodina, Elena; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Tiko, Andres; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Eysermans, Jan; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Bheesette, Srinidhi; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Traczyk, Piotr; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sosnov, Dmitry; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chadeeva, Marina; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Popova, Elena; Rusinov, Vladimir; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Blinov, Vladimir; Shtol, Dmitry; Skovpen, Yuri; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Godizov, Anton; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Babaev, Anton; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Bachiller, Irene; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Triossi, Andrea; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Fernández Manteca, Pedro José; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; García Alonso, Andrea; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Prieels, Cédric; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bendavid, Joshua; Bianco, Michele; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pantaleo, Felice; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pitters, Florian Michael; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Verweij, Marta; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Backhaus, Malte; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Casal, Bruno; Chernyavskaya, Nadezda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dorfer, Christian; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Reichmann, Michael; Ruini, Daniele; Sanz Becerra, Diego Alejandro; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Brzhechko, Danyyl; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Del Burgo, Riccardo; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Neutelings, Izaak; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Schweiger, Korbinian; Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Cheng, Kai-yu; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Bat, Ayse; Boran, Fatma; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tok, Ufuk Guney; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Atakisi, Ismail Okan; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Agaras, Merve Nazlim; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Komurcu, Yildiray; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Linacre, Jacob; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Bloch, Philippe; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Komm, Matthias; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Strebler, Thomas; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Morton, Alexander; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Zahid, Sema; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Breedon, Richard; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Stolp, Dustin; Taylor, Devin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Citron, Matthew; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Gouskos, Loukas; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; MacDonald, Emily; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Cheng, Yangyang; Chu, Jennifer; Datta, Abhisek; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Wu, Weimin; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Santra, Arka; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Dittmer, Susan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Hung, Wai Ting; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Rogan, Christopher; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Modak, Atanu; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bauer, Gerry; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Harris, Philip; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Zhaozhong, Shi; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Golf, Frank; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Freer, Chad; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Wamorkar, Tanvi; Wang, Bingran; Wisecarver, Andrew; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Bucci, Rachael; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Li, Wenzhao; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Siddireddy, Prasanna; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wightman, Andrew; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Gutay, Laszlo; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xiao, Rui; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Dolen, James; Parashar, Neeti; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Rekovic, Vladimir; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Woods, Nathaniel

    2018-01-01

    A search for a heavy right-handed W boson ($ \\mathrm{ W_R } $) decaying to a heavy right-handed neutrino and a charged lepton in events with two same-flavor leptons (e or $ \\mu $) and two jets, is presented. The analysis is based on proton-proton collision data, collected by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC in 2016 and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$. No significant excess above the standard model expectation is seen in the invariant mass distribution of the dilepton plus dijet system. Assuming that couplings are identical to those of the standard model, and that only one heavy neutrino flavor ${\\mathrm {N_R}}$ contributes significantly to the $ \\mathrm{ W_R } $ decay width, the region in the two-dimensional ($ {m_{ \\mathrm{ W_R } }} $, $ {m_{{\\mathrm {N_R}} }} $) mass plane excluded at 95% confidence level extends to approximately ${m_{ \\mathrm{ W_R } }} = $ 4.4 TeV and covers a large range of right-handed neutrino masses below the $ \\mathrm{ W_R } $ boson mass. This analysis prov...

  4. NEW X-RAY DETECTIONS OF WNL STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Güdel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner; Sokal, Kimberly R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that putatively single nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet stars (WN stars) without known companions are X-ray sources. However, almost all WN star X-ray detections so far have been of earlier WN2-WN6 spectral subtypes. Later WN7-WN9 subtypes (also known as WNL stars) have proved more difficult to detect, an important exception being WR 79a (WN9ha). We present here new X-ray detections of the WNL stars WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). These new results, when combined with previous detections, demonstrate that X-ray emission is present in WN stars across the full range of spectral types, including later WNL stars. The two WN8 stars observed to date (WR 16 and WR 40) show unusually low X-ray luminosities (L x ) compared to other WN stars, and it is noteworthy that they also have the lowest terminal wind speeds (v ∞ ). Existing X-ray detections of about a dozen WN stars reveal a trend of increasing L x with wind luminosity L wind = (1/2)M-dot v 2 ∞ , suggesting that wind kinetic energy may play a key role in establishing X-ray luminosity levels in WN stars.

  5. Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine cardiac scintigraphy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Therapeutic effects of aldose reductase inhibitor and vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Keita

    1997-01-01

    Twenty normal volunteers (C group) and 56 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) who did not have ischemic heart diseases (DM group), were evaluated by means of iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The uptake ratio between the cardiac muscle and the upper mediastinum was calculated. The ratio determined from the initial I-123-MIBG scintigraphy image was expressed as HMi, and that determined from the delayed image was expressed as HMd. The washout rate percentage (%WR) was calculated. At least one instance of either the HMi, the HMd, or %WR was outside the mean±1 standard deviation of C group in 34 DM group patients. Aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) was administered to 17 of the 34 patients and Vitamin B 12 (VB 12 ) to the remaining 17 patients, for 3 to 5 months. Before and after treatment, scintigraphic studies with I-123-MIBG were carried out, and the HMi, HMd, and %WR were calculated. There were no significant differences found in FBG, HbA1c, or 1.5-AG levels after treatment with either drug, when compared to the pretreatment values. Both HMi and HMd in the DM group were significantly lower, and %WR was significantly higher than in the C group. The changes in HMi, HMd, and %WR after treatment with ARI were not significant. After treatment with VB 12 , the HMi and HMd levels were significantly increased (p 12 was shown to be effective for improvement of HMi and HMd in NIDDM. (author)

  6. Effects of dual combinations of antifolates with atovaquone or dapsone on nucleotide levels in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, A E; Seymour, K K; Rieckmann, K H; Christopherson, R I

    1997-04-04

    The triazine antifolates, cycloguanil and 4,6-diamino-1,2-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-1-[(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)propy loxy]-1,3,5-triazine hydrobromide (WR99210), and their parent biguanide compounds, proguanil and N-[3-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy)propyloxy]-n-(1-methylethyl)-imido dicarbonimidic-diamine hydrochloride (PS-15), were tested in combination with a series of antimalarial drugs for synergism against Plasmodium falciparum growing in erythrocytic culture. Four synergistic combinations were found: cycloguanil dapsone, WR99210-dapsone, proguanil-atovaquone, and PS-15-atovaquone. Cycloguanil-dapsone or WR99210-dapsone had a profound suppressive effect on the concentration of dTTP in parasites while that of dATP increased. Depletion of dTTP is consistent with cycloguanil or WR99210 inhibiting dihydrofolate reductase and dapsone inhibiting dihydropteroate synthase. For the combinations proguanil-atovaquone and PS-15-atovaquone, the levels of nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) and dNTPs were generally suppressed, suggesting that inhibition is not through nucleotide pathways but probably through another metabolic mechanism(s). Combinations of two synergistic pairs of antimalarial drugs, (proguanil-atovaquone)-(cycloguanil-dapsone) and (PS-15-atovaquone)-(WR99210-dapsone), were tested, and it was found that NTPs and dNTPs decreased much more than for a single synergistic combination. Dual synergistic combinations could play an important role in the therapy of multidrug-resistant malaria, just as combination chemotherapy is used to treat cancer.

  7. Wetting properties of fungi mycelium alter soil infiltration and soil water repellency in a γ-sterilized wettable and repellent soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Henry Wai; Goh, Yit Kheng; Vujanovic, Vladimir; Si, Bing Cheng

    2012-12-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) has a drastic impact on soil quality resulting in reduced infiltration, increased runoff, increased leaching, reduced plant growth, and increased soil erosion. One of the causes of SWR is hydrophobic fungal structures and exudates that change the soil-water relationship. The objective of this study was to determine whether SWR and infiltration could be manipulated through inoculation with fungi. The effect of fungi on SWR was investigated through inoculation of three fungal strains (hydrophilic -Fusarium proliferatum, chrono-amphiphilic -Trichoderma harzianum, and hydrophobic -Alternaria sp.) on a water repellent soil (WR-soil) and a wettable soil (W-soil). The change in SWR and infiltration was assessed by the water repellency index and cumulative infiltration respectively. F. proliferatum decreased the SWR on WR-soil and slightly increased SWR in W-soil, while Alternaria sp. increased SWR in both the W-soil and the WR-soil. Conversely T. harzianum increased the SWR in the W-soil and decreased the SWR in the WR-soil. All strains showed a decrease in infiltration in W-soil, while only the F. proliferatum and T. harzianum strain showed improvement in infiltration in the WR-soil. The ability of fungi to alter the SWR and enmesh soil particles results in changes to the infiltration dynamics in soil. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. PGC-1α mRNA Level and Oxidative Capacity of the Plantaris Muscle in Rats with Metabolic Syndrome, Hypertension, and Type 2 Diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatomo, Fumiko; Fujino, Hidemi; Kondo, Hiroyo; Gu, Ning; Takeda, Isao; Ishioka, Noriaki; Tsuda, Kinsuke; Ishihara, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We examined the fiber profiles and the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα and PPARδ/β) and of the PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) in the plantaris muscles of 15-week-old control (WR), metabolic syndrome (CP), hypertensive (SHR), and type 2 diabetic (GK) rats. The deep regions in the muscles of SHR and GK rats exhibited lower percentages of high-oxidative type I and IIA fibers and higher percentages of low-oxidative type IIB fibers compared with WR and CP rats. The surface regions in the muscles of CP, SHR, and GK rats exhibited lower percentages of high-oxidative type IIA fibers and higher percentages of low-oxidative type IIB fibers compared with WR rats. The muscles of SHR and GK rats had lower oxidative enzyme activity compared with WR rats. The muscles of SHR rats had the lowest PPARδ/β mRNA level. In addition, the muscles of SHR and GK rats had lower PGC-1α mRNA level compared with WR and CP rats. We concluded that the plantaris muscles of rats with hypertension and type 2 diabetes have lower oxidative capacity, which is associated with the decreased level of PGC-1α mRNA

  9. Long Working Hours and Work-related Cerebro-cardiovascular Disease in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHUNG, Yun Kyung; KWON, Young-jun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a good discriminatory cutoff for long working hours as a surrogate of chronic overload at work, which is associated with the approval of workers’ compensation claims for work-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease (WR-CVD) in Korea. We evaluated weekly working hours for four weeks prior to the onset of disease for all manufacturing industry claimants (N=319) of WR-CVD in 2010. The discrimination of long working hours in predicting approval of worker’s compensation pertaining to WR-CVD was compared across cases. The cutoff was calculated with sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the curve with 95% CI using the receiver operating curve (ROC) method. The cutoff point was thus calculated to be 60.75 h (AUC=0.89, 95% CI [0.84–0.93]), showing a sensitivity value of 65% and specificity of 94%. This is the first study to report that long working hours could be a predictor with good discrimination and high specificity of approval of WR-CVD cases. In Korea, long working hours and widespread chronic overload at work are recognized as a social problem. Our study results suggest an appropriate cutoff for working hours as an indicator of chronic overload for the purpose of approving claims of WR-CVD. Furthermore, these results could contribute to improving the consistency of evaluation. PMID:23892901

  10. Effects of water restriction following feeding on nutrient digestibilities, milk yield and composition and blood hormones in lactating Holstein cows under heat stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Ghassemi Nejad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of water restriction following feeding under heat stress conditions on nutrient digestibilities, milk yield and composition and some blood hormones in lactating Holstein cows were evaluated. The design was completely randomized with 30 high producing lactating Holstein cows (80.8±40.5 DIM which were assigned to two treatment groups (15 cows per treatment. Treatments were free access to water (FAW and 2 h water restriction (2hWR following feeding. Average temperature-humidity index (THI in the farm was over 80 throughout the experiment which defines heat stress conditions. Neutral detergent fibre, organic matter and ether extract digestibilities increased by water restriction (P0.05. Water intake was recorded daily during the digestibility period and was not different between FAW and 2hWR group (P>0.05. Fat corrected milk was higher in 2hWR group than FAW group (P0.05. Somatic cell counts were greater in 2hWR than FAW group (P0.05. Blood prolactin and growth hormone were higher in 2hWR group than the FAW group (P<0.05. It is concluded that water restriction for 2 hours following feeding improved nutrient digestibility of some dietary components and increased milk fat percentage in lactating Holstein cows under heat stress conditions.

  11. Assessing soil water repellency of a sandy field with visible near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Masis Melendez, Federico; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2016-01-01

    . A lower prediction error of the WR model for soils dried at 105°C (1.93 mN m–1) than at 60°C (2.52 mN m–1) can be explained by a lower range of WR values for the soils dried at 105°C. Moreover, a higher temperature reduced the number of absorption bands related to OM, indicating a degradation......Soil water repellency (WR) is a widespread phenomenon caused by aggregated organic matter (OM) and layers of hydrophobic organic substances coating the surface of soil particles. These substances have a very low surface free energy, reducing a soil’s water attraction. There is focus on WR due...... to its effects on germination, root growth, liquid–vapour dynamics, surface erosion and leaching of chemicals through fingered flow paths. However, common techniques for measuring WR are time-consuming and expensive. Meanwhile, it is well established that visible near infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy...

  12. Effects of sprint interval training and body weight reduction on power to weight ratio in experienced cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, William R; Finn, Joan A; Axtell, Robert S

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of supramaximal sprint interval training (SIT), body weight reduction, and a combination of both treatments on peak and average anaerobic power to weight ratio (PPOan:Wt, APOan:Wt) by manipulating peak and average anaerobic power output (PPOan, APOan) and body weight (BW) in experienced cyclists. Participants (N = 34, age = 38.0 +/- 7.1 years) were assigned to 4 groups for a 10-week study. One group performed twice-weekly SIT sessions on a cycle ergometer while maintaining body weight (SIT). A second group did not perform SIT but intentionally reduced body weight (WR). A third group simultaneously performed SIT sessions and reduced body weight (SIT+WR). A control group cycled in their normal routine and maintained body weight (CON). The 30-second Wingate Test assessed pretest and posttest POan:Wt scores. There was a significant mean increase (p weight (kg) decreased significantly in WR and SIT + WR (80.3 +/- 13.7 to 75.3 +/- 11.9 and 78.9 +/- 10.8 to 73.4 +/- 10.8, respectively). The results demonstrate that cyclists can use SIT sessions and body weight reduction as singular training interventions to effect significant increases in anaerobic power to weight ratio, which has been correlated to enhanced aerobic cycling performance. However, the treatments were not effective as combined interventions, as there was no significant change in either PPOan:Wt or APOan:Wt in SIT + WR.

  13. Chemical protection from high LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Matsushita, Satoru; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohara, Hiroshi

    1992-01-01

    Radioprotection by WR151327 from high LET fast neutrons was investigated and compared with that from low LET radiation. Radiation damage in bone marrow, intestine, skin and leg length were all protected by a pretreatment with 400 mg/kg WR151327. Most prominent protection was observed for bone marrow, which gave a Dose Modifying Factor (DMF) of 2.2 against γ rays. Identical protection was observed between early and late radiation damage. WR151327 protected fast neutrons less efficiently than γ rays; 40% for bone marrow and 80% for skin leg. Pathological findings indicated that hyperplastic change in both dermis and epidermis associated with late skin shrinkage. Laser doppler flow-metry showed a good relationship between reduction of blood flow and late skin shrinkage. Irradiation of skin by heavy particle Carbon-12 indicated that skin shrinkage was modified by unirradiated surrounding normal tissues, which proposed a significant role of 'Volume Effect' in radiation damage. Tumor tissues were less protected by WR151327 than normal tissues. Dependence of radioprotection by WR151327 on tissue oxygen concentration is a probable reason to explain the difference between normal and tumor tissues. (author)

  14. Long working hours and work-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yun Kyung; Kwon, Young-jun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine a good discriminatory cutoff for long working hours as a surrogate of chronic overload at work, which is associated with the approval of workers' compensation claims for work-related cerebro-cardiovascular disease (WR-CVD) in Korea. We evaluated weekly working hours for four weeks prior to the onset of disease for all manufacturing industry claimants (N=319) of WR-CVD in 2010. The discrimination of long working hours in predicting approval of worker's compensation pertaining to WR-CVD was compared across cases. The cutoff was calculated with sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the curve with 95% CI using the receiver operating curve (ROC) method. The cutoff point was thus calculated to be 60.75 h (AUC=0.89, 95% CI [0.84-0.93]), showing a sensitivity value of 65% and specificity of 94%. This is the first study to report that long working hours could be a predictor with good discrimination and high specificity of approval of WR-CVD cases. In Korea, long working hours and widespread chronic overload at work are recognized as a social problem. Our study results suggest an appropriate cutoff for working hours as an indicator of chronic overload for the purpose of approving claims of WR-CVD. Furthermore, these results could contribute to improving the consistency of evaluation.

  15. Isotopic anomalies in cosmic rays and winds from Wolf-Rayet stars - a new model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, A.

    1984-01-01

    The insufficiency of the metal-rich supernovae model and of the Wolf-Rayet star model for explaining the isotopic anomalies in the galactic cosmic ray source (GCRS) is examined, and a new model for attacking the anomaly problem is proposed. The main properties of WR stars relevant to the study of GCRS are recalled, with particular emphasis on their chemical excesses and the steep galactic gradient in their distribution. The proposed model assumes that GCRs originate from two main sources of different composition and galactic distribution, probably SN's and WR stars. Their properties may change with galactocentric distance. The relevant physical physicochemical relationships are derived, and some approximations which account for the contributions of WR and SN sources in GCRS are worked out for comparison with observations. The model is found to account very well for the observed anomalies. 33 references

  16. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Magellanic Clouds: Spectroscopic binaries and masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, A.F.J.

    1982-01-01

    Repeated spectra to V-mag 13.0 (13.5) have been obtained since 1978 for the 25 (5) brightest WR stars in the LMC (SMC). More than half of these are orbiting spectroscopic binaries, mainly SB1 for the luminous subclasses WN6-9, and SB2 for the rest. Together with galactic data, the Cloud SB2's lead to a correlation between mass ratio WR/OB and WR spectral subclass for each of the WN and WC sequences. This correlation is interpreted as an evolutionary sequence in which the peeling-off process of the strong stellar wind exposes successively hotter regions and eventually converts WN to WC at a point in time which appears to depend on the ambient metal abundance. (Auth.)

  17. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Andromeda Galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, A.F.J.; Shara, M.M.; Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD)

    1987-01-01

    A survey of M31 for strong-line Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars has been completed, confirming the trends found previously, that (1) M31 is at present about an order of magnitude less active in star formation than the Galaxy, as reflected in the total number of W-R stars, assumed to have evolved from massive progenitors; (2) the number ratio of late to early WC stars, WCL/WCE, varies systematically with galactocentric radius as in the Galaxy, possibly a consequence of the metallicity gradient in the disk; and (3) most W-R stars lie in the prominent ring of active star formation at R = 7-12 kpc from the center of M31. 19 references

  18. DISCOVERY OF A WOLF-RAYET STAR THROUGH DETECTION OF ITS PHOTOMETRIC VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littlefield, Colin [Law School, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Garnavich, Peter; McClelland, Colin; Rettig, Terrence [Physics Department, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Marion, G. H. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Vinko, Jozsef [Department of Optics, University of Szeged (Hungary); Wheeler, J. Craig [Astronomy Department, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a heavily reddened Wolf-Rayet star that we name WR 142b. While photometrically monitoring a cataclysmic variable, we detected weak variability in a nearby field star. Low-resolution spectroscopy revealed a strong emission line at 7100 A, suggesting an unusual object and prompting further study. A spectrum taken with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope confirms strong He II emission and an N IV 7112 A line consistent with a nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet star of spectral class WN6. Analysis of the He II line strengths reveals no detectable hydrogen in WR 142b. A blue-sensitive spectrum obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope shows no evidence for a hot companion star. The continuum shape and emission line ratios imply a reddening of E(B - V) = 2.2-2.6 mag. We estimate that the distance to WR 142b is 1.4 {+-} 0.3 kpc.

  19. Inheritance patterns of new genetic markers and occurrence of spontaneous mosaicism in the monogenic blowfly Chrysomya rufifacies (Diptera:Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullerich, F H

    1996-11-27

    Four new genetic markers for Chrysomya rufifacies, a fly with maternal sex determination, were characterized. The markers include one body colour mutant, black body (bl), and three eye colour mutants, brown eye (br), apricot eye (ap), and red eye (wr). Two of the latter, br and wr, turn out to be sex linked, the others behave as autosomal genes belonging to different linkage groups. wr is a hypomorphic and w an apomorphic mutation of the white gene, w/w is epistatic to br/br and to ap/ap. A preliminary genetic linkage map with the sex realizer F'/f and the loci br and w residing in homomorphic sex chromosomes is established. Evidence is presented that crossing over is absent in the male sex. The possible causes of the spontaneous appearance of mosaics for eye colour observed among individuals heterozygous for recessive genes are discussed.

  20. The recommended Threshold Limit Values for heat exposure fail to maintain body core temperature within safe limits in older working adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Dallon T; Meade, Robert D; D'Souza, Andrew W; Flouris, Andreas D; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Sigal, Ronald J; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P

    2017-09-01

    The American Conference of Governmental and Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) Threshold Limit Values (TLV® guidelines) for work in the heat consist of work-rest (WR) allocations designed to ensure a stable core temperature that does not exceed 38°C. However, the TLV® guidelines have not been validated in older workers. This is an important shortcoming given that adults as young as 40 years demonstrate impairments in their ability to dissipate heat. We therefore evaluated body temperature responses in older adults during work performed in accordance to the TLV® recommended guidelines. On three occasions, 9 healthy older (58 ± 5 years) males performed a 120-min work-simulated protocol in accordance with the TLV® guidelines for moderate-to-heavy intensity work (360 W fixed rate of heat production) in different wet-bulb globe temperatures (WBGT). The first was 120 min of continuous (CON) cycling at 28.0°C WBGT (CON[28°C]). The other two protocols were 15-min intermittent work bouts performed with different WR cycles and WBGT: (i) WR of 3:1 at 29.0°C (WR3:1[29°C]) and (ii) WR of 1:1 at 30.0°C (WR1:1[30°C]). Rectal temperature was measured continuously. The rate of change in mean body temperature was determined via thermometry (weighting coefficients: rectal, 0.9; mean skin temperature, 0.1) and direct calorimetry. Rectal temperature exceeded 38°C in all participants in CON[28°C] and WR3:1[29°C] whereas a statistically similar proportion of workers exceeded 38°C in WR1:1[30°C] (χ 2 ; P = 0.32). The average time for rectal temperature to reach 38°C was: CON[28°C], 53 ± 7; WR3:1[29°C], 79 ± 11; and WR1:1[30°C], 100 ± 29 min. Finally, while a stable mean body temperature was not achieved in any work condition as measured by thermometry (i.e., >0°C·min -1 ; all Pheat balance as determined by direct calorimetry was achieved in WR3:1[29°C] and WR1:1[30°C] (both P ≥ 0.08). Our findings indicate that the TLV® guidelines do not prevent body core

  1. "Diamond" over-coated Microstrip Gas Chambers for high rate operation

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, A J; Bouclier, Roger; Capéans-Garrido, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Hoch, M; Manzin, G; Million, Gilbert; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1997-01-01

    We describe the recent developments on the diamond-like carbon (DLC) over-coated Microstrip Gas Chambers made on drawn glass substrates. MSGC surface coating with thin DLC layer of stable and controlled resistivity was proposed to overcome the limitation of detector operation due to surface charging-up under avalanches. This brings also advantages for the detector manufacturing technology. The thin layer, deposited on top of a manufactured MSGC (over-coating), demonstrates excellent mechanical properties and very good stability. We report on recent measurements with DLC over-coated MSGCs of various surface resistivities (ranging from 1013W/r to 1016W/r) on D-263 and AF45 glass substrates. Over-coated MSGCs exhibit good rate capability for the resistivity of the surface around 1015W/r. Stable operation up to 50 mC/cm of accumulated charge from avalanches has been demonstrated.

  2. Discovery of a New Wolf-Rayet Star Using SAGE-LMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Chené, A.-N.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Schnurr, O.

    2012-12-01

    We report the first-ever discovery of an extragalactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) star with Spitzer. A new WR star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) was revealed via detection of its circumstellar shell using 24 μm images obtained in the framework of the Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC). Subsequent spectroscopic observations with the Gemini South resolved the central star in two components, one of which is a WN3b+abs star, while the second one is a B0 V star. We consider the lopsided brightness distribution over the circumstellar shell as an indication that the WR star is a runaway and use this interpretation to identify a possible parent cluster of the star.

  3. On the rarity of X-ray binaries with Wolf-Rayet donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, T. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Valsecchi, F. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Kalogera, V. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2012-03-14

    The paucity of High mass X-Ray binaries (HMXB) consisting of a neutron star (NS) accretor and Wolf-Rayet (WR) donor has long been at odds with expectations from population synthesis studies indicating that these systems should survive as the evolved offspring of the observed HMXB population. This tension is particularly troubling in light of recent observations uncovering a preponderance of HMXBs containing loosely bound Be donors which would be expected to naturally evolve into WR-HMXBs. Reconciling the unexpectedly large population of Be-HMXBs with the lack of observed WR-HMXB sources thus serves to isolate the dynamics of CE physics from other binary evolution parameters. We find that binary mergers during CE events must be common in order to resolve tension between these observed populations. Furthermore, future observations which better constrain the background population of loosely bound O/B-NS binaries are likely to place significant constraints on the efficiency of CE removal.

  4. Formation of methemoglobin and metmyoglobin using 8-aminoquinoline derivatives or sodium nitrite and subsequent reaction with cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, R K; Baskin, S I; Clark, J H; Kirby, S D

    1990-10-01

    The kinetics of the oxidation of hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) by sodium nitrite, 8-[(4-amino-1-methylbutyl)amino]-6-methoxy-quinoline diphosphate (primaquine), 6-methoxy-8-(6-diethylaminohexylamino)-4-methyl-quinoline dihydrochloride (WR6026) and 8-[(4-amino-1-methylbutyl)amino]-2,6-dimethoxy-4-methyl- 5-[(3-trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]quinoline succinate (WR238,605) were studied at pH values ranging from 7.4 to 7.6 and at 37 +/- 1 degrees C. The reaction between Hb and primaquine, WR6026 and WR238,605 resulted in precipitation, as did the reaction between Mb and WR238,605. The reaction between nitrite ion (NO2-) and Hb showed a lag period followed by an autocatalytic phase. The data in this study are consistent with and substantiate the proposed mechanism for the Hb-NO2- oxidation reaction. The reaction between Mb and NO2- at higher NO2- concentrations also showed a lag period followed by an autocatalytic period, while at lower NO2- concentrations no lag period was seen. The data suggest a shift in rate constant at these lower NO2- concentrations. The reaction between Mb and both WR6026 and primaquine followed a two-term rate law with oxidant-dependent and -independent terms. Concentration-effect curve data, along with these results, suggest the presence of a catalytic pathway. The rates of formation of cyanomethemoglobin and cyanometmyoglobin complexes from cyanide ion and methemoglobin (MHb) and metmyoglobin (MMb), respectively, were followed in the presence of the heme oxidants. The rate constants were all within a narrow range and suggest that complexation of cyanide by MHb and MMb is not affected by the presence of oxidants.

  5. Searching for magnetic fields in 11 Wolf-Rayet stars: Analysis of circular polarization measurements from ESPaDOnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Chevrotière, A.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J. [Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Québec (CRAQ), Département de physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Collaboration: MiMeS Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    With recent detections of magnetic fields in some of their progenitor O stars, combined with known strong fields in their possible descendant neutron stars, it is natural to search for magnetic fields in Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, despite the problems associated with the presence of winds enhanced by an order of magnitude over those of O stars. We continue our search among a sample of 11 bright WR stars following our introductory study in a previous paper of WR6 = EZ CMa using the spectropolarimeter ESPaDOnS at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, most of them in all four Stokes parameters. This sample includes six WN stars and five WC stars encompassing a range of spectral subclasses. Six are medium/long-period binaries and three show corotating interaction regions. We report no definite detections of a magnetic field in the winds in which the lines form (which is about the same distance from the center of the star as it is from the surface of the progenitor O star) for any of the eleven stars. Possible reasons and their implications are discussed. Nonetheless, the data show evidence supporting marginal detections for WR134, WR137, and WR138. According to the Bayesian analysis, the most probable field intensities are B {sub wind} ∼ 200, 130, and 80 G, respectively, with a 95.4% probability that the magnetic fields present in the observable parts of their stellar wind, if stronger, does not exceed B{sub wind}{sup max}∼1900 G, ∼1500 G, and ∼1500 G, respectively. In the case of non-detections, we report an average field strength upper limit of B{sub wind}{sup max}∼500 G.

  6. Diet choice patterns in rodents depend on novelty of the diet, exercise, species, and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiffany; Xu, Wei-Jie; York, Haley; Liang, Nu-Chu

    2017-07-01

    Prolonged consumption of a palatable, high fat (HF) diet paired with a lack of physical activity can exacerbate the development of obesity. Exercise can facilitate the maintenance of a healthy body weight, possibly though mediating changes in diet preference. Using a two-diet choice and wheel running (WR) paradigm, our laboratory previously demonstrated that WR induces HF diet avoidance with different persistency in male and female rats when HF diet and WR are introduced simultaneously. The aims of this study were to examine whether this behavior is species dependent and to what extent the novelty of the diet affects WR induced HF diet avoidance. Experiment 1 utilized male C57BL6 mice in a two-diet choice and WR paradigm. Results show that all mice preferred HF to chow diet regardless of exercise and the order in which exercise and HF diet were presented. Experiment 2A (diet novelty) utilized Sprague-Dawley rats that were first habituated to a 45% HF diet prior to the simultaneous introduction of WR and a novel high-carbohydrate, low-fat (DK) diet. All rats avoided the novel high-carbohydrate diet and neither male nor female wheel running rats exhibited reduction in HF diet intake or HF diet avoidance. After all rats were returned to a sedentary condition, female rats consumed significantly more of the DK diet than the male rats. In Experiment 2B (diet familiarity), rats remained sedentary and were re-habituated to the DK diet until intake stabilized. Subsequently, a 60% HF diet was introduced for all rats and for running rats, access to the running wheels were provided simultaneously. Consistent with our previous findings, HF diet intake and preference was significantly reduced in all wheel running rats. These data suggest that exercise induced HF diet avoidance is affected by species and the novelty of the diet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Conversion of Sleeve Gastrectomy to Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass is Effective for Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease but not for Further Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Chetan D; Mahawar, Kamal K; Boyle, Maureen; Schroeder, Norbert; Balupuri, Shlok; Small, Peter K

    2017-07-01

    Inadequate weight loss (IWL)/weight regain (WR) and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), unresponsive to medical management, are two most common indications for conversion of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This study reports detailed outcomes of conversion of SG to RYGB for these two indications separately. We interrogated our prospectively maintained database to identify patients who underwent a conversion of their SG to RYGB in our unit. Outcomes in patients converted for IWL/WR and those converted for GERD were evaluated separately. We carried out 22 SG to RYGB in our unit between Aug 2012 and April 2015 with a mean follow-up of 16 months. Indication for conversion was GERD in 10/22 (45.5%) patients and IWL/WR in 11/22 (50.0%) patients. Patients undergoing conversion for GERD were significantly lighter (BMI 30.5) than those converted for IWL/WR (BMI 43.3) at the time of conversion. The conversion was very effective for GERD with 100% patients reporting improvement in symptoms, and 80% patients were able to stop their antacid medications. IWL/WR group achieved a further BMI drop of 2.5 points 2 years after surgery (final BMI 40.8) in comparison with 2.0 points BMI drop achieved by the GERD group (final BMI 28.5). This study demonstrates that conversion of SG to RYGB is effective for GERD symptoms but not for further weight loss, which was modest in both groups. Future studies need to examine the best revisional procedure for IWL/WR after SG.

  8. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. II. Discovery of six clusters with Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chené, A.-N.; Borissova, J.; Bonatto, C.; Majaess, D. J.; Baume, G.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Kurtev, R.; Schnurr, O.; Bouret, J.-C.; Catelan, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Feinstein, C.; Geisler, D.; de Grijs, R.; Hervé, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lucas, P.; Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Mauro, F.; Minniti, D.; Moni Bidin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: This is the second in a series of papers about young, massive open clusters observed using the VVV survey. We present the first study of six recently discovered clusters. These clusters contain at least one newly discovered Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: We find that the six studied stellar groups are real young (2-7 Myr) and massive (between 0.8 and 2.2 × 103 M⊙) clusters. They are highly obscured (AV ~ 5-24 mag) and compact (1-2 pc). In addition to WR stars, two of the six clusters also contain at least one red supergiant star, and one of these two clusters also contains a blue supergiant. We claim the discovery of 8 new WR stars, and 3 stars showing WR-like emission lines which could be classified WR or OIf. Preliminary analysis provides initial masses of ~30-50 M⊙ for the WR stars. Finally, we discuss the spiral structure of the Galaxy using the six new clusters as tracers, together with the previously studied VVV clusters. Based on observations with ISAAC, VLT, ESO (programme 087.D-0341A), New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (programme 087.D-0490A) and with the Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory (programme CN2011A-086). Also based on data from the VVV survey (programme 172.B-2002).

  9. Prognostic value of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in patients with various heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamatsu, Hitoshi; Momose, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Hideki; Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Kasanuki, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy can predict the poor prognosis in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). However, the prognostic significance of MIBG is still unknown in patients with other heart diseases. In this study, we compared the prognosis and MIBG findings in various heart diseases. Consecutive 565 patients undergoing MIBG scintigraphy were enrolled (392 men, 52±16 years). Indications were that 127 had ischemic heart disease (IHD), 120 DCM, 101 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 21 hypertensive heart disease (HHD), 58 volume-load valvular disease (VVD), 38 pressure-load valvular disease (PVD), and 101 ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VTF). Heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M) and washout rate (WR) of MIBG were evaluated. Cardiac events were defined as sudden cardiac death, heart failure, and acute ischemic event (follow-up, 22.7±17.0 months). A total of 106 cardiac events including 40 cardiac deaths occurred. Cox hazard model analysis showed that in the IHD, HCM, and DCM groups, H/M and WR were associated with cardiac death, but not in the HHD, PVD, VVD, or VTF groups. Only death and congestive heart failure (CHF) episodes were related to H/M and WR. On the other hand, fatal arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, or angina pectoris were not related to H/M and WR. The data indicated that WR or H/M may predict death and CHF but does not predict fatal arrhythmia or acute ischemic event. MIBG WR and H/M were associated with heart failure, sudden death, and cardiac death events, and were useful to predict the prognosis in DCM, HCM, and IHD. In contrast, fatal arrhythmia events were not associated with MIBG indices, and thus it does not appear to be useful in predicting cardiac events in patients with VTF. (author)

  10. The East Atlantic - West Russia Teleconnection in the North Atlantic: Climate Impact and Relation to Rossby Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale winter teleconnection of the East Atlantic - West Russia (EA-WR) over the Atlantic and surrounding regions is examined in order to quantify its impacts on temperature and precipitation and identify the physical mechanisms responsible for its existence. A rotated empirical orthogonal function (REOF) analysis of the upper-tropospheric monthly height field captures successfully the EA-WR pattern and its interannual variation, with the North Atlantic Oscillation as the first mode. EA-WRs climate impact extends from eastern North America to Eurasia. The positive (negative) EA-WR produces positive (negative) temperature anomalies over the eastern US, western Europe and Russia east of Caspian Sea, with negative (positive) anomalies over eastern Canada, eastern Europe including Ural Mountains and the Middle East. These anomalies are largely explained by lower-tropospheric temperature advections. Positive (negative) precipitation anomalies are found over the mid-latitude Atlantic and central Russia around 60E, where lower-level cyclonic (anticyclonic) circulation anomaly is dominant. The eastern Canada and the western Europe are characterized by negative (positive) precipitation anomalies.The EA-WR is found to be closely associated with Rossby wave propagation. Wave activity fluxes show that it is strongly tied to large-scale stationary waves. Furthermore, a stationary wave model (SWM) forced with vorticity transients in the mid-latitude Atlantic (approximately 40N) or diabatic heat source over the subtropical Atlantic near the Caribbean Sea produces well-organized EA-WR-like wave patterns, respectively. Sensitivity tests with the SWM indicate improvement in the simulation of the EA-WR when the mean state is modified to have a positive NAO component that enhances upper-level westerlies between 40-60N.

  11. Effects of white rice, brown rice and germinated brown rice on antioxidant status of type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Mustapha Umar; Musa, Siti Nor Asma; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-10-10

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, and can be increased by diet like white rice (WR). Though brown rice (BR) and germinated brown rice (GBR) have high antioxidant potentials as a result of their bioactive compounds, reports of their effects on oxidative stress-related conditions such as type 2 diabetes are lacking. We hypothesized therefore that if BR and GBR were to improve antioxidant status, they would be better for rice consuming populations instead of the commonly consumed WR that is known to promote oxidative stress. This will then provide further reasons why less consumption of WR should be encouraged. We studied the effects of GBR on antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic rats, induced using a high-fat diet and streptozotocin injection, and also evaluated the effects of WR, BR and GBR on catalase and superoxide dismutase genes. As dietary components, BR and GBR improved glycemia and kidney hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, and prevented the deterioration of total antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic rats. Similarly, GBR preserved liver enzymes, as well as serum creatinine. There seem to be evidence that upregulation of superoxide dismutase gene may likely be an underlying mechanism for antioxidant effects of BR and GBR. Our results provide insight into the effects of different rice types on antioxidant status in type 2 diabetes. The results also suggest that WR consumption, contrary to BR and GBR, may worsen antioxidant status that may lead to more damage by free radicals. From the data so far, the antioxidant effects of BR and GBR are worth studying further especially on a long term to determine their effects on development of oxidative stress-related problems, which WR consumption predisposes to.

  12. Effects of White Rice, Brown Rice and Germinated Brown Rice on Antioxidant Status of Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maznah Ismail

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications, and can be increased by diet like white rice (WR. Though brown rice (BR and germinated brown rice (GBR have high antioxidant potentials as a result of their bioactive compounds, reports of their effects on oxidative stress-related conditions such as type 2 diabetes are lacking. We hypothesized therefore that if BR and GBR were to improve antioxidant status, they would be better for rice consuming populations instead of the commonly consumed WR that is known to promote oxidative stress. This will then provide further reasons why less consumption of WR should be encouraged. We studied the effects of GBR on antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic rats, induced using a high-fat diet and streptozotocin injection, and also evaluated the effects of WR, BR and GBR on catalase and superoxide dismutase genes. As dietary components, BR and GBR improved glycemia and kidney hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, and prevented the deterioration of total antioxidant status in type 2 diabetic rats. Similarly, GBR preserved liver enzymes, as well as serum creatinine. There seem to be evidence that upregulation of superoxide dismutase gene may likely be an underlying mechanism for antioxidant effects of BR and GBR. Our results provide insight into the effects of different rice types on antioxidant status in type 2 diabetes. The results also suggest that WR consumption, contrary to BR and GBR, may worsen antioxidant status that may lead to more damage by free radicals. From the data so far, the antioxidant effects of BR and GBR are worth studying further especially on a long term to determine their effects on development of oxidative stress-related problems, which WR consumption predisposes to.

  13. Three strategic water quality challenges that decision-makers need to know about and how the CSIR should respond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Turton, A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available steep gradient from north to south and from east to west. A more subtle feature is the global average of 860 mm/yr, shown as a thick red line on Map 1. Significantly, CSIR Report No. CSIR/NRE/WR/EXP/2008/0160/A 1 three of the most economically...,050) D. R. C. (1,534) TANZANIA (937) MOZAMBIQUE (969) SWAZILAND (788) LESOTHO (760) MALAWI (1,014) N 500 km © P.J. Ashton CSIR Report No. CSIR/NRE/WR/EXP/2008/0160/A 1 higher standards before being discharged into communal waters...

  14. The White Rabbit project

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano, J; Gousiou, E; van der Bij, E; Wlostowski, T; Daniluk, G; Lipinski, M

    2013-01-01

    White Rabbit (WR) is a multi-laboratory, multi- company collaboration for the development of a new Ethernet-based technology which ensures sub-nanosecond synchronisation and deterministic data transfer. The project uses an open source paradigm for the development of its hardware, gateware and software components. This article provides an introduction to the technical choices and an explanation of the basic principles underlying WR. It then describes some possible applications and the current status of the project. Finally, it provides insight on current developments and future plans.

  15. A Simple Beta-Function Model for Soil-Water Repellency as a Function of Water and Organic Carbon Contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunarathna, Anurudda Kumara; Kawamoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per

    2010-01-01

    Soil-water content (θ) and soil organic carbon (SOC) are key factors controlling the occurrence and magnitude of soil-water repellency (WR). Although expressions have recently been proposed to describe the nonlinear variation of WR with θ, the inclusion of easily measurable parameters in predictive...... conditions for 19 soils were used to test the model. The beta function successfully reproduced all the measured soil-water repellency characteristic, α(θ), curves. Significant correlations were found between model parameters and SOC content (1%-14%). The model was independently tested against data...

  16. RF radiation measurement for the Advanced Photon Source (AS) personnel safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J.J.; Kim, J.; Otocki, R.; Zhou, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) booster and storage ring RF system consists of five 1-MW klystrons, four 5-cell cavities, and sixteen single-cell cavities. The RF power is distributed through many hundreds of feet of WR2300 waveguide with H-hybrids and circulators. In order to protect personnel from the danger of RF radiation due to loose flanges or other openings in the waveguide system, three detector systems were implemented: an RF radiation detector, a waveguide pressure switch, and a Radiax aperture detector (RAD). This paper describes RF radiation measurements on the WR 2300 waveguide system

  17. The Automated Aircraft Rework System (AARS): A system integration approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    The Mercer Engineering Research Center (MERC), under contract to the United States Air Force (USAF) since 1989, has been actively involved in providing the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center (WR-ALC) with a robotic workcell designed to perform rework automated defastening and hole location/transfer operations on F-15 wings. This paper describes the activities required to develop and implement this workcell, known as the Automated Aircraft Rework System (AARS). AARS is scheduled to be completely installed and in operation at WR-ALC by September 1994.

  18. COMBUSTION PROPERTIES OF EUCALYPTUS WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın ÖRS

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the combustion properties of some impregnation materials (abiotic and biotic factors used for eucalyptus wood in interior or exterior environments were investigated. The experimental samples were prepared from Eucalyptus wood based on ASTM-D-1413-76 Tanalith-CBC, boric acid, borax, vacsol-WR, immersol-WR, polyethylen glycole-400 and ammonium sulphate were used as an impregnation material. The results indicated that, vacuum treatment on Eucalyptus gave the lowest retention value of salts. Compounds containing boron+salt increased fire resistance however water repellents decreased the wood flammability.

  19. The extraordinary mass-loss bubble G2.4 + 1.4 and its central star

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopita, M.A.; Mcgregor, P.J.; Rawlings, S.J.; Lozinskaia, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Data are presented on the WR 102 star and the surrounding nebula (G2.4 + 1.4). It is shown that WR 102 and the nebula are associated, the nebula being a mass-loss bubble powered by the central star. From a photoionization analysis of the surrounding nebula, the star was determined to have the following parameters: log T(ion) = 5.20 + or - 0.05; log (R/solar R) = about 0.05; and log (L/solar L) = 5.85 + or - 0.20. 42 refs

  20. Stability of parameters in repeated TVA measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Alrik

    Several recent studies have explored the limitations of human visual short-term memory or VSTM (e.g. Luck & Vogel, 1997; Wheeler & Treisman, 2002; Alvarez & Cavanagh, 2004). Usually researchers agree that VSTM is limited to a capacity of about 3 to 4 objects at any given moment (Cowan, 2001......). Capacity of short-term memory is measured in a range of studies often using the change detection paradigm (CD). However, the whole report paradigm (WR) may be a more reliable paradigm (Cusack, Lehmann, Veldsman, & Mitchell, 2009). Moreover, each individual WR trial yield more information compared to a CD...

  1. Bursting star formation and the overabundance of Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodigfee, G.; Deloore, C.

    1985-01-01

    The ratio of the number of WR-stars to their OB progenitors appears to be significantly higher in some extragalactic systems than in our Galaxy. This overabundance of Wolf-Rayet-stars can be explained as a consequence of a recent burst of star formation. It is suggested that this burst is the manifestation of a long period nonlinear oscillation in the star formation process, produced by positive feedback effects between young stars and the interstellar medium. Star burst galaxies with large numbers of WR-stars must generate gamma fluxes but due to the distance, all of them are beyond the reach of present-day detectors, except probably 30 Dor

  2. RED EYES ON WOLF-RAYET STARS: 60 NEW DISCOVERIES VIA INFRARED COLOR SELECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauerhan, Jon C.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Morris, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    We have spectroscopically identified 60 Galactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, including 38 nitrogen types (WN) and 22 carbon types (WC). Using photometry from the Spitzer/GLIMPSE and Two Micron All Sky Survey databases, the new WRs were selected via a method we have established that exploits their unique infrared colors, which is mainly the result of excess radiation generated by free-free scattering within their dense ionized winds. The selection criterion has been refined since the last report, resulting in a WR detection rate of ∼20% in spectroscopic follow-up of candidates that comprise a broad color space defined by the color distribution of all known WRs having B > 14 mag. However, there are smaller regions within this color space that yield WRs at a rate of >50% in spectroscopic follow-up. Candidates that are not WRs are mainly Be stars, which is possibly attributable to the physical similarities between the free-free emission parameters of Be disks and WR winds. As an additional selection experiment, the list of WR candidates was cross-correlated with archival X-ray point-source catalogs, which increases the WR detection rate of the broad color space to ∼40%; 10 new WR X-ray sources have been found in addition to a previously unrecognized X-ray counterpart to a known WR. The extinction values, distances, and Galactocentric radii of all new WRs are calculated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Although the majority of the new WRs have no obvious association with stellar clusters, two WC8 stars reside in a previously unknown massive-star cluster, in which five OB supergiants were also identified. The new system lies at an estimated distance of ∼6.1 kpc, near the intersection of the Scutum-Centaurus Arm with the Galaxy's bar. In addition, two WC and four WN stars, all but one of which are X-ray sources, were identified in association with the stellar clusters Danks 1 and 2. A WN9 star has also been associated with the cluster [DBS2003] 179. This work

  3. Discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star using SAGE-LMC

    OpenAIRE

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Chené, A. -N.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Schnurr, O.

    2011-01-01

    We report the first-ever discovery of an extragalactic Wolf-Rayet (WR)star with Spitzer. A new WR star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) was revealed via detection of its circumstellar shell using 24 {\\mu}m images obtained in the framework of the Spitzer Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (SAGE-LMC). Subsequent spectroscopic bservations with the Gemini South resolved the central star in two components, one of which is a WN3b+abs star, while the second one is a B0V star. We consider the lo...

  4. Protection by S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid against radiation- and cyclophosphamide-induced attenuation in antitumor resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milas, L.; McBride, W.H.; Hunter, N.; Ito, H.

    1984-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate whether S-2-(3-amino-propylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) can protect antitumor immune rejection responses against the damaging effects of whole-body irradiation (WBI) and cyclophosphamide (CY). The ability of WR-2721 to protect against WBI -induced decreased radioresponse of solitary tumors was also investigated. All experiments were performed with an immunogenic fibrosarcoma syngeneic to C3Hf/ Kam mice. WR-2721 was given i.p. at a dose of 400 mg/kg 30 min before WBI with gamma-rays or CY injection. WBI with 650 rads reduced the number of tumor cells needed for tumor take in 50% of animals from 5.1 X 10(4) cells in normal mice to 2.0 X 10(2). WR-2721 given before WBI almost entirely abolished the effect of WBI : the number of tumor cells needed for tumor take in 50% of animals was 1.4 X 10(4). Treatment of mice with WBI or CY increased the number of tumor nodules in the lung generated by fibrosarcoma cells injected i.v. 5 days later, in a linear dose response. WR-2721 greatly reduced this metastasis enhancement effect of WBI and CY with protection factors of 2.5 for WBI and 1.8 for CY. Fibrosarcomas of 8 mm in diameter exhibited a decreased radiocurability when growing in WBI mice: the dose of irradiation yielding local tumor control in 50% of animals in these mice was 5950 compared to a dose of irradiation yielding local tumor control in 50% of animals of 4160 rads in normal mice. WR-2721 given before WBI inhibited this effect of WBI : the dose of irradiation yielding local tumor control in 50% of animals was 5210 rads. The proportion of macrophages in tumors growing in WBI mice was significantly reduced, but not when WR-2721 was first given. WR-2721 greatly reduced the damaging effects of WBI and CY on natural killer cell activity

  5. Magnetic rotational hysteresis study on spherical 85-160 nm Fe3O4 particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidbauer, E.

    1988-05-01

    Rotational hysteresis losses Wr were determined as a function of magnetic field H for dispensed spherical Fe3O4 particles of mean grain sizes 85 nm, 127 nm and 162 nm between 78 K and 294 K. The observed Wr-H curves are compared with theoretical curves for single domain particles. The analysed particles reveal centers of high magnetic anisotropy. Such centers can be of importance during the generation of a thermoremanent magnetization, as they may be the origin of enhanced magnetic stability.

  6. Native-language phonetic and phonological influences on perception of American English approximants by Danish and German listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohn, Ocke-Schwen; Best, Catherine T.

    2012-01-01

    / but lack /w/, thus employing /r/-/l/ but lacking /w/-/j/ and /w/-/r/ as phonological contrasts. However, while the three languages realize /j/ identically, Danish/German “light” alveolar [l] differ modestly from English “velarized” [ɫ], Danish pharyngeal and labiodental approximant realizations of /r, v......, but discrimination was poorer than English and Danish listeners for /w/-/r/ and /r/-/l/, and intermediate for /w/-/j/. Thus, cross-language phonetic relationships among “the same” (or neighboring) phonemes strongly influence perception. These findings, together with systemic consideration of English, Danish...

  7. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  8. Chemical inhibition of host toxicity as a means of overcoming tumor resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuhas, J.M.; Pardini, M.C.; Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA)

    1983-01-01

    Largely because we have accumulated so much information on WR-2721 in the past decade, we know that this drug is not a universal panacea which will solve all the problems which confront us. However, in those instances where it would appear applicable, clinical testing would appear appropriate. Thanks largely to the efforts of M.M. Kligerman, these studies have been initiated. In those instances where WR-2721 would appear inappropriate or not of sufficient activity, the information we have already accumulated should point the way to the development of qualitatively and/or quantitatively superior drugs which selectively inhibit host toxicity

  9. New Galactic Candidate Luminous Blue Variables and Wolf-Rayet Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringfellow, Guy S.; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Beletsky, Yuri; Kniazev, Alexei Y.

    2012-04-01

    We have undertaken a near-infrared spectral survey of stars associated with compact mid-IR shells recently revealed by the MIPSGAL (24 μm) and GLIMPSE (8 μm) Spitzer surveys, whose morphologies are typical of circumstellar shells produced by massive evolved stars. Through spectral similarity with known Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, a large population of candidate LBVs (cLBVs) and a smaller number of new WR stars are being discovered. This significantly increases the Galactic cLBV population and confirms that nebulae are inherent to most (if not all) objects of this class.

  10. Diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for submucosal palatal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Hara, Marina; Katase, Naoki; Hisatomi, Miki; Unetsubo, Teruhisa; Konouchi, Hironobu; Takenobu, Toshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) for differentiating between benign and malignant tumors in the palate. Materials and methods: 26 patients with submucosal palatal tumors were preoperatively examined using DCE-MRI. Their maximum contrast index (CImax), time of CImax (Tmax), and washout ratios (WR300 and WR600) were determined from contrast index curves. The submucosal palatal tumors were divided into two groups according to their Tmax values: the early enhancement group (Tmax 2 = 0.92, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Tmax is a useful parameter for distinguishing between benign and malignant submucosal palatal tumors.

  11. A comparison of the recognition of overwork-related cardiovascular disease in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungsun; Kim, Yangho; Cheng, Yawen; Horie, Seichi

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, Korea, and Taiwan, cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) caused by overwork are recognized by government as work-related. These three countries are the only countries in the world that officially recognize CVDs caused by psychosocial factors (e.g., overwork) as work-related cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases (WR-CVDs), and compensate employees accordingly. The present study compared the similarities and differences among the recognition of overwork-related CVDs in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. The criteria by which WR-CVDs are identified are very similar in the three countries. However, in the interval surveyed (1996-2009), Korea had a remarkably larger number of recognized WR-CVD patients than did Japan or Taiwan. Recognition of occupational diseases is influenced by various factors, including socio-cultural values, the nature of occupational health care schemes, the extent of the social security umbrella, national health insurance policy, and scientific evidence. Our results show that social factors may be very different among the three countries studied, although the recognition criteria for WR-CVDs are quite similar.

  12. Analysis of heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics studied by two different pseudo-random binary sequence work rate amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, U; Koschate, J; Schiffer, T; Schneider, S; Hoffmann, U

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the kinetics responses of heart rate (HR), pulmonary (V˙O 2 pulm) and predicted muscular (V˙O 2 musc) oxygen uptake between two different pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) work rate (WR) amplitudes both below anaerobic threshold. Eight healthy individuals performed two PRBS WR protocols implying changes between 30W and 80W and between 30W and 110W. HR and V˙O 2 pulm were measured beat-to-beat and breath-by-breath, respectively. V˙O 2 musc was estimated applying the approach of Hoffmann et al. (Eur J Appl Physiol 113: 1745-1754, 2013) considering a circulatory model for venous return and cross-correlation functions (CCF) for the kinetics analysis. HR and V˙O 2 musc kinetics seem to be independent of WR intensity (p>0.05). V˙O 2 pulm kinetics show prominent differences in the lag of the CCF maximum (39±9s; 31±4s; p<0.05). A mean difference of 14W between the PRBS WR amplitudes impacts venous return significantly, while HR and V˙O 2 musc kinetics remain unchanged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Voluntary resistance running induces increased hippocampal neurogenesis in rats comparable to load-free running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Chul; Inoue, Koshiro; Okamoto, Masahiro; Liu, Yu Fan; Matsui, Takashi; Yook, Jang Soo; Soya, Hideaki

    2013-03-14

    Recently, we reported that voluntary resistance wheel running with a resistance of 30% of body weight (RWR), which produces shorter distances but higher work levels, enhances spatial memory associated with hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling compared to wheel running without a load (WR) [17]. We thus hypothesized that RWR promotes adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN) as a neuronal substrate underlying this memory improvement. Here we used 10-week-old male Wistar rats divided randomly into sedentary (Sed), WR, and RWR groups. All rats were injected intraperitoneally with the thymidine analogue 5-Bromo-2'-deoxuridine (BrdU) for 3 consecutive days before wheel running. We found that even when the average running distance decreased by about half, the average work levels significantly increased in the RWR group, which caused muscular adaptation (oxidative capacity) for fast-twitch plantaris muscle without causing any negative stress effects. Additionally, immunohistochemistry revealed that the total BrdU-positive cells and newborn mature cells (BrdU/NeuN double-positive) in the dentate gyrus increased in both the WR and RWR groups. These results provide new evidence that RWR has beneficial effects on AHN comparable to WR, even with short running distances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of Aviation Career Pay Incentives Among the Naval Aviation Enterprise Utilizing Auction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING NIA AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES TI1e views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do...Thinking Deeply about Diversity in the U.S. Armed Forces (pp. 505 –540). Maxwell Air Force B ace, AL: Air University Press. Coughlan, P.J., Gates, W.R

  15. Plumage and ecology of cormorants | Siegfried | African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plumage and ecology of cormorants. W.R. Siegfried, A.J. Williams, P.G.H. Frost, J.B. Kinahan. Abstract. The paper draws on data attending the etho-ecology of four species of cormorants (Phalacrocoracidae) in support of an hypothesis for the adaptive significance of the predominantly dark plumage of these birds.

  16. Novel Formulation Strategy to Improve the Feasibility of Amifostine Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Kavitha; Simon, Eric; Lynn, Jeremy; Snider, Alicia; Zhang, Yu; Nelson, Noah; Donneys, Alexis; Rodriguez, Jose; Buchman, Lauren; Reyna, Dawn; Lipka, Elke; Buchman, Steven R

    2018-03-19

    Amifostine (AMF), a radioprotectant, is FDA-approved for intravenous administration in cancer patients receiving radiation therapy (XRT). Unfortunately, it remains clinically underutilized due to adverse side effects. The purpose of this study is to define the pharmacokinetic profile of an oral AMF formulation potentially capable of reducing side effects and increasing clinical feasibility. Calvarial osteoblasts were radiated under three conditions: no drug, AMF, and WR-1065 (active metabolite). Osteogenic potential of cells was measured using alkaline phosphatase staining. Next, rats were given AMF intravenously or directly into the jejunum, and pharmacokinetic profiles were evaluated. Finally, rats were given AMF orally or subcutaneously, and blood samples were analyzed for pharmacokinetics. WR-1065 preserved osteogenic potential of calvarial osteoblasts after XRT to a greater degree than AMF. Direct jejunal AMF administration incurred a systemic bioavailability of 61.5%. Subcutaneously administrated AMF yielded higher systemic levels, a more rapid peak exposure (0.438 vs. 0.875 h), and greater total systemic exposure of WR-1065 (116,756 vs. 16,874 ng*hr/ml) compared to orally administered AMF. Orally administered AMF achieves a similar systemic bioavailability and decreased peak plasma level of WR-1065 compared to intravenously administered AMF, suggesting oral AMF formulations maintain radioprotective efficacy without causing onerous side effects, and are clinically feasible.

  17. Polarization Orientation Dependence of the Far Infrared Spectra of Oriented Single Crystals of 1,3,5-trinitro-S-triazine (RDX) using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    BE, Hogbin MR, Kemp MC (2007) Proc IEEE 95:1559 14. Laman N, Sree Harsha S, Grischkowsky D, Melinger JS (2008) Opt Express 16:4094 15. Melinger JS... Laman N, Grischkowsky D (2008) Appl Phy Lett 93:011102 16. Tribe WR, Newnham DA, Taday PF, Kemp MC (2004) Proc SPIE 5354:168 17. Watters DG, Falconer DG

  18. Detection of Heavy Majorana Neutrinos and Right-Handed Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Gninenko, Sergei; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    The SU_C(3) otimes SU_L(2) otimes SU_R(2) otimes U(1) left-right (LR) symmetric model explains the origin of the parity violation in weak interactions and predicts the existence of additional W_R and Z' gauge bosons. In addition, heavy right-handed Majorana neutrino states N arise naturally within LR symmetric model. The N s could be partners of light neutrino states, related to their non-zero masses through the see-saw mechanism. This makes the searches of W_R, Z' and N interesting and important. This note describes the study of the potential of the CMS experiment to observe signals from the N and W_R production at the LHC. It is shown that their decay signals can be identified with a small background. For the integral LHC luminosity of L_t = 30 fb^ -1, the 5 sigma discovery of W_R - boson and heavy Majorana neutrinos N_e with masses up to 3.5 TeV and 2.3 TeV, respectively is found possible.

  19. The White Rabbit Project

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano, J; Cattin, M; Garcia Cota, E; Lewis, J; Moreira, P; Wlostowski, T; Gaderer, G; Loschmidt, P; Dedic, J; Bär, R; Fleck, T; Kreider, M; Prados, C; Rauch, S

    2009-01-01

    Reliable, fast and deterministic transmission of control information in a network is a need formany distributed systems. One example is timing systems, where a reference frequency is used to accurately schedule time-critical messages. TheWhite Rabbit (WR) project is a multi-laboratory and multi-company effort to bring together the best of the data transfer and timing worlds in a completely open design. It takes advantage of the latest developments for improving timing over Ethernet, such as IEEE 1588 (Precision Time Protocol) and Synchronous Ethernet. The presented approach aims for a general purpose, fieldbus-like transmission system, which provides deterministic data and timing (sub-ns accuracy and ps jitter) to around 1000 stations. It automatically compensates for fiber lengths in the order of 10 km. This paper describes the WR design goals and the specification used for the project. It goes on to describe the central component of the WR system structure - the WR switch - with theoretical considerations a...

  20. Attention networks in adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbach, Noam; Sher, Helene; Lock, James D; Henik, Avishai

    2018-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) usually develops during adolescence when considerable structural and functional brain changes are taking place. Neurocognitive inefficiencies have been consistently found in adults with enduring AN and were suggested to play a role in maintaining the disorder. However, such findings are inconsistent in children and adolescents with AN. The current study conducted a comprehensive assessment of attention networks in adolescents with AN who were not severely underweight during the study using an approach that permits disentangling independent components of attention. Twenty partially weight-restored adolescents with AN (AN-WR) and 24 healthy adolescents performed the Attention Network Test which assesses the efficiency of three main attention networks-executive control, orienting, and alerting. The results revealed abnormal function in the executive control network among adolescents with AN-WR. Specifically, adolescents with AN-WR demonstrated superior ability to suppress attention to task-irrelevant information while focusing on a central task. Moreover, the alerting network modulated this ability. No difference was found between the groups in the speed of orienting attention, but reorienting attention to a target resulted in higher error rates in the AN-WR group. The findings suggest that adolescents with AN have attentional abnormalities that cannot be explained by a state of starvation. These attentional dysregulations may underlie clinical phenotypes of the disorder such as increased attention of details.

  1. Categorization of fractal plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Munesh; Rani, Mamta

    2009-01-01

    Fractals in nature are always a result of some growth process. The language of fractals which has been created specifically for the description of natural growth process is called L-systems. Recently, superior iterations (essentially, investigated by Mann [Mann WR. Mean value methods in iteration. Proc Am Math Soc 1953;4:506-10 [MR0054846 (14,988f)

  2. Assessment of the Acute Psychiatric Patient in the Emergency Department: Legal Cases and Caveats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    paranoid behavior. Notable in his evaluation were a blood alcohol level (BAL) of 0.203% and a positive urine screen for marijuana . The EP and social worker...1994; 24(4):672–677. 7. Dubin WR, Weiss KJ, Zeccardi JA. Organic brain syndrome: The psychiatric imposter. JAMA. 1993;249(1):60–62. 8. Tintinalli JE

  3. The sixth catalogue of galactic Wolf-Rayet stars, their past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hucht, K.A. van der; Conti, P.S.; Lundstroem, I.; Stenholm, B.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the Sixth Catalogue of galactic Wolf-Rayet stars (Pop I), a short history on the five earlier WR catalogues, improved spectral classification, finding charts, a discussion on related objects, and a review of the current statur of Wolf-Rayet star research. The appendix presents a bibliography on most of the Wolf-Rayet literature published since 1867. (orig.)

  4. The Baldwin-effect in Wolf-Rayet stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gent, Jeroen Ivar van

    2000-01-01

    This thesis investigates the Baldwin-effect in Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars. The Baldwin-effect is a correlation with negative slope between the equivalent width of spectral emission lines and the monochromatic luminosity of the underlying continuum at the line wavelength. This effect has been known to

  5. The Wolf-Rayet hydrogen puzzle -- an observational point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Foellmi, C.; Marchenko, S. V.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    2005-01-01

    Significant amounts of hydrogen were found in very hot early-type single WN stars in the SMC and the LMC. Recently, we found similar evidence in the Wolf-Rayet star of a short-period LMC binary. We discuss here the relevance of hydrogen for WR star classification, models, the relation to metallicity, and the GRB progenitors.

  6. Contribution of stellar winds to the composition of cosmic rays - exotic Ne and Fe from Wolf-Rayet stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, J.B.; Dearborn, D.S.P.

    1984-01-01

    The results of previous calculations of the production of Al-26 and the enhancement of heavy isotopes of Fe by Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are discussed. Mass fractions of Al-26 in WR ejects and in WR H-rich envelopes are given as a function of stellar mass. It is concluded that the predicted mass of Al-26 in the ISM and its galactic distribution are such that WR stars are expected to be a significant if not the major source of the Al-26. The results suggest that He-22 enhancement must be accompanied by 4-8X enhancement of Fe-57, 20-45X enhancement of Fe-58, and 5-10X enhancement of Co-59. The isotopes of Fe are found to be affected before an appreciable enhancement of Ne-22 occurs. The size of the Ne-22 enhancement depends on the details of the mass-loss history whereas the Fe enhancement does not. 11 references

  7. Neon Abundances from a Spitzer/IRS Survey of Wolf-Rayet Stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ignace, R.; Cassinelli, J.P.; Tracy, G.; Churchwell, E.B.; Lamers, H.J.G.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    We report on neon abundances derived from Spitzer high resolution spectral data of eight Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars using the forbidden line of [Ne III] 15.56 μm. Our targets include four WN stars of subtypes 4-7, and four WC stars of subtypes 4-7. We derive ion fraction abundances γ of Ne2+ for the

  8. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WOLF-RAYET BUBBLE S 308

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Arthur, S. J. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Smith, R. C. [NOAO/CTIO, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Snowden, S. L., E-mail: toala@iaa.es [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its northwest quadrant, map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a central cavity {approx}22' in size and a shell thickness of {approx}8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at 0.43 keV and O VII at 0.57 keV, and declines toward high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T{sub 1} {approx} 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K, T{sub 2} {approx} 13 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K), with a total X-ray luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1} at the assumed distance of 1.5 kpc.

  9. Development of KU-band waveguide break for ECR-3 ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, Anuraag; Prasad, R.K.; Nabhiraj, P.Y.; Mallik, C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the analytical design, simulation results, engineering design and testing of WR-62 waveguide break for ECR-3 ion source and it also emphasizes on the estimation of far-field radiation with the use of advanced 3D codes. (author)

  10. Search for right-handed Majorana neutrinos at LHC in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Collot, J

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we briefly recall the main characteristics of the minimal Left-Right Symmetric Model, a gauge theory which suggests that parity gets restored at high energy and which may also allow neutrinos to be massive. If neutrinos turn out to be Majorana particles, the See-Saw mechanism implies that the light left-handed neutrinos should have heavy right-handed partners. In this theoret ical framework, one may expect the discovery of three new gauge bosons ($W_{R}^{+}$, $W_{R}^{-}$ and $Z'$) as well as heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos ($N_{l}$) at the future LHC. Two possibl e signals have been simulated in the ATLAS detector~: $pp \\rightarrow W_{R} \\rightarrow eN_{e} \\rightarrow eejj$ and $pp \\rightarrow Z' \\rightarrow N_{e}N_{e} \\rightarrow eejjjj$. After three ye ars of data-taking at nominal luminosity and an appropriate reduction of the background, the first channel may allow us to discover $W_{R}$ and $N_{e}$ up to masses of 6.4 and 3.3 TeV respective ly, while the second process may lead to th...

  11. VeriML: A Dependently-Typed, User-Extensible and Language-Centric Approach to Proof Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    newly-arrived members of the FLINT group, especially Xinyu Feng, Alex Vaynberg, Rodrigo Ferreira, David Costanzo, Shu-Chun Weng, Jan Hoffmann and Mike...Constable, S.F. Allen, H.M. Bromley, W.R. Cleaveland, J.F. Cremer , R.W. Harper, D.J. Howe, T.B. Knoblock, N.P. Mendler, P. Panangaden, et al. Implementing

  12. Tafenoquine: A New 8- Aminoquinoline

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    malarial drug discovery: Technologies for in vitro -hematin formation assay. Combinatorial. Chemistry & High Throughput Screening 2005;. 8: 63-79. 7. Ponsa N, Sattabongkot J, Kittayapong P,. Eikarat N, Coleman RE. Transmission- blocking activity of tafenoquine (WR-238605) and artelinic acid against naturally circulating.

  13. Reliability In A White Rabbit Network

    CERN Document Server

    Lipiński, M; Wlostowski, T; Prados, C

    2011-01-01

    White Rabbit (WR) is a time-deterministic, low-latency Ethernet-based network which enables transparent, subns accuracy timing distribution. It is being developed to replace the General Machine Timing (GMT) system currently used at CERN and will become the foundation for the control system of the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI. High reliability is an important issue inWR’s design, since unavailability of the accelerator’s control system will directly translate into expensive downtime of the machine. A typical WR network is required to lose not more than a single message per year. Due toWR’s complexity, the translation of this real-world-requirement into a reliability-requirement constitutes an interesting issue on its own – a WR network is considered functional only if it provides all its services to all its clients at any time. This paper defines reliability in WR and describes how it was addressed by dividing it into sub-domains: deterministic packet delivery, data resilience...

  14. Spatial and temporal variation in proportional stock density and relative weight of smallmouth bass in a reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Duke, S.D.; Ward, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Population data for smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui in 20,235 ha John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River were used to (1) determine whether Proportional Stock Density (PSD) and Relative Weight (Wr) varied spatially and temporally in two areas of the reservoir with established smallmouth bass fisheries; (2) explore possible causes of any observed variation; and (3) discuss some management implications and recommendations. Both PSD and Wr varied spatially and monthly in all years examined. On an annual basis, PSD varied at one area but not at the other, whereas Wr showed little variation. Possible explanations for the variation in PSD and Wr are differences in growth, mortality, recruitment, and exploitation. Our data suggested that regulations established or changed on a reservoir-wide basis may have different effects on the fishery, depending on location in the reservoir. Also, pooling data from various areas within a reservoir to yield point estimates of structural indices may not represent the variation present in the population as a whole. The significant temporal variability reflects the importance of determining the proper time to sample fish to yield representative estimates of the variable of interest. In areas with valuable fisheries or markedly different population structures, we suggest that an area-specific approach be made to reservoir fishery management, and that efforts be made toward effecting consistent harvest regulations in interstate waters.

  15. Plattsburgh, AFB, New York. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-24

    GLOCAL CLIMATOLOGY 3RANCH LSAFETAC SURFACE WINDS 410 wrATHER SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND...oeux1I, . .p 4. A i € * GLOcAL CLIMATCLOGY RANCH L’AFETAC CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY AIP ’-EATHFR SRVlCE/MAC 72(7Z_ PLATTSBURSH AFS NV 74-97 *A

  16. Testing Experimental Compounds against Leishmaniansis in Laboratory Animal Model Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    consulted in five human and two canine cases of suspected leishmaniasis. Two of the 5 human cases were isoenzyme typed as L. b. braziliensis ( Peru ...animal. The latter may be of use in controlling some of the complications of diabetes . %’Wr WF ’ 56 PU BLICAT I ONS_ Griffith, O.W., "Mechanism of

  17. State of the art of nuclear facilities with organic cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brede, O.

    1984-01-01

    USA, Canadian, and USSR activities aimed at developing nuclear facilities with organic cooled reactors are summarized. The facilities OMRE, PNPF, WR-1, and ARBUS are described, discussing in particular the problems of the chemistry of organic coolants. Finally, problems of further development and prospects of the application of organic cooled reactors are briefly outlined. (author)

  18. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science. Bhushan R Lamsoge. Articles written in Journal of Earth System Science. Volume 123 Issue 7 October 2014 pp 1541-1566. Impact of over-exploitation on groundwater quality: A case study from WR-2Watershed, India · Anil M Pophare Bhushan R Lamsoge Yashwant B ...

  19. NESG_EPR_April, June_2017

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wilson Erumebor

    8]R (JEXFKH. 6FDOLQJ 2II *ULG 3RZHU ,Q 1LJHULD. 'U 8]R (JEXFKH. &RQVXOWDQW 1(6* 6XVWDLQDELOLW\\ 3ROLF\\ &RPPLVVLRQ. SURGXFWLYH MREV LV RQH RI WKH PRVW LPSRUWDQW .... WKDW SRVW ²SURGXFWLRQ PLON FDQ EH LPSURYHG. WKUHHIROG IURP OLWUHV GDLO\\ WR P OLWHUV.

  20. Evolution of Air Quality Model at the US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    At the US EPA, we have developed an air quality model, CMAQ, in the past 20+ years. Throughout the years, the model has been upgraded with respect to advancement of science. We have extended the model from regional to hemispheric. We have coupled it with meteorological model, WR...

  1. Energy-Focused Fusion Information System Integration, A NISE funded Capability Investment Project. Year 1 FY 2013 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    source: CloudSim and GreenCloud [35,36]. CloudSim was developed by the University of Melbourne. It is a Java based API that simulates data centers...characterized as: PD = K2 ω2 /R + Dr wr Pread (Eq.12) where velocity PD the power of the drive is dependent on the angular velocity ω, the motor

  2. Role of water repellency in aggregate stability of cultivated soils under simulated raindrop impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kořenková, Lucia; Matúš, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Soil aggregate stability (AS) is an important indicator of soil physical quality. For the purpose of this research it was hypothesized that particular properties such as water repellency (WR) influence soil aggregation and AS. Directly after sampling, WR was detected for three soils, after a week of air-drying two of these soils still showed some resistance to penetration by a water drop placed on the surface (WDPT test). The study examines AS of air-dried texturally different aggregates of size 0.25-0.5 mm taken from surface layers (5-15 cm depth) of six agriculturally used soils. The procedure involves exposure of soil aggregates to direct impact of water drops. Results showed that soil AS increases in order: cutanic Luvisol (siltic) Chernozem < calcic mollic Fluvisol < mollic grumic Vertisol (pellic) < mollic Fluvisol (calcaric) < gleyic Fluvisol (eutric). Gradual increase in AS can be explained by the increase in soil organic matter content and its hydrophobic properties. Although WR has been most commonly observed in soils under forests and grass cover, the results confirmed that cultivated soils may also create water-stable aggregates, especially in the case when their organic matter induces WR under particular moisture conditions.

  3. Author Index

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user1

    Han, J. L. see Wu, Xue-Bing,. 209. Hardcastle, M. J. see Konar, C.,. 477. Harko, T. see Leung, C. S.,. 189 ... Kang, Hyesung see Ma, Renyi,. 301 ... Stochastic Differential Equation 189. Li, J. see Shen, Z. Q.,. 13. Li, M.-S. see Huang, W.-R.,. 277.

  4. Applications of machine-learning algorithms for infrared colour selection of Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Giuseppe; Morris, P. W.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Marston, A. P.; Mauerhan, J. C.

    2018-01-01

    We have investigated and applied machine-learning algorithms for infrared colour selection of Galactic Wolf-Rayet (WR) candidates. Objects taken from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) catalogue of the infrared objects in the Galactic plane can be classified into different stellar populations based on the colours inferred from their broad-band photometric magnitudes [J, H and Ks from 2 Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), and the four Spitzer/IRAC bands]. The algorithms tested in this pilot study are variants of the k-nearest neighbours approach, which is ideal for exploratory studies of classification problems where interrelations between variables and classes are complicated. The aims of this study are (1) to provide an automated tool to select reliable WR candidates and potentially other classes of objects, (2) to measure the efficiency of infrared colour selection at performing these tasks and (3) to lay the groundwork for statistically inferring the total number of WR stars in our Galaxy. We report the performance results obtained over a set of known objects and selected candidates for which we have carried out follow-up spectroscopic observations, and confirm the discovery of four new WR stars.

  5. Relative deviation between a uniformly weighted propagator and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A further processing of windowing in the computation of the quantum propagator, ks, for a simple harmonic oscillator is performed with variation in space; instead of time as in Ituen (2003b). All the four window functions are analysed as before, namely, random, Wr, exponential, We, gaussian, Wg and velocity, Wvwindow ...

  6. Urease activity as an index for assessing the maturity of cow manure and wheat residue vermicomposts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudkolai, Saber Tayebi; Nourbakhsh, Farshid

    2017-06-01

    The establishment of a reliable index is an essential need to assess the degree of stability and maturity of solid wastes vermicomposts. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of vermicomposting process on some chemical (pH, EC, OC, TN, lignin and C:N ratio) and biochemical properties of the cow manure (CM) and wheat residue (WR). Results demonstrated that during vermicomposting process of CM and WR urease activity was highly correlated with the time of vermicomposting (r=-0.97 ∗∗ for CM and r=-0.99 ∗∗ for WR), and well able to show the stability of organic waste. The urease activity showed significant correlations with the C:N ratio during the vermicomposting of CM and WR (r=0.89 ∗ and r=0.93 ∗∗ respectively) therefore it can be considered as a reliable indicator for determining the maturity and stability of organic wastes during vermicomposting process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Search for a heavy right-handed W boson and a heavy neutrino in events with two same-flavor leptons and two jets at sqrt(s)=13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for a heavy right-handed $\\mathrm W$ gauge boson and a heavy right-handed neutrino at the CERN LHC has been conducted by the CMS collaboration in events with two same-flavor leptons ($\\mathrm e$ or $\\mu$) and two jets, using 2016 proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $\\mathrm{35.9\\,fb^{-1}}$. No excess above the standard model expectation is seen in the invariant mass distribution of the dilepton plus dijet system. Assuming identical couplings and decay branching fractions as the standard model $\\mathrm W$ gauge boson, and that only one heavy neutrino flavor ${\\mathrm N}_R$ contributes significantly to the ${\\mathrm W}_R$ decay width, the region in the two-dimensional ($m_{{\\mathrm W}_R}$, $m_{{\\mathrm N}_R}$) mass plane excluded at a $95\\%$ confidence level extends to approximately $m_{{\\mathrm W}_R}= \\mathrm{4.4\\,TeV}$ and covers a large range of neutrino masses below the ${\\mathrm W}_R$ boson mass. This analysis provides the most stringent limits to date.

  8. Public-Private Ventures for Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Activities. A Solution to the Loss of Appropriated Funds. Volume 7. Appendices O, P, and Q

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    central Florida. Nearby Disney World ensures keen competition among restaurants and fast-food franchises . Within walking distance of the base there is a...under a flat management fee. The Restaurant Industry This industry is typified by the Marriott Corporation and American Cafe , a subsidiary of W.R

  9. Wise reasoning in the face of everyday life challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, Igor; Gerlach, Tanja M.; Denissen, J.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    How stable vs. dynamic is wisdom in daily life? We conducted a daily diary study of wise reasoning (WR) by recording people's reflections on daily challenges in terms of three facets: intellectual humility, self-transcendence, and consideration of others' perspectives/compromise. We observed

  10. Effect of Acute Maximal Exercise on Circulating Levels of Interleukin-12 during Ramadan Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedelmalek, Salma; Souissi, Nizar; Takayuki, Akimoto; Hadouk, Sami; Tabka, Zouhair

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Ramadan fasting on circulating levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12) after a brief maximal exercise. NINE SUBJECTS PERFORMED A WINGATE TEST ON THREE DIFFERENT OCCASIONS: (i) the first week of Ramadan (1WR), (ii) the fourth week of Ramadan (4WR), and (iii) three weeks after Ramadan (AR). Blood samples were taken before, immediately and 60 min after the exercise. Plasma concentrations of IL-12 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Variance analysis revealed no significant effect of Ramadan on P(peak) and P(mean) during the three testing periods. Considering the effect of Ramadan on plasma concentrations of IL-12, analysis of the variance revealed a significant Ramadan effect (F((2,) (16))=66.27; P effect (F((2,) (16))= 120.66; P Ramadan × time) of test interaction (F((4,) (32))=2.40; P>0.05). For all measures, IL-12 levels were lower during 1WR and 4WR in comparison with AR (P effects, IL-12 levels measured immediately after the exercise were significantly higher than those measured before and at 60 minutes after the exercise (P Ramadan.

  11. Additive manufacturing of Ka-band antennas for wireless communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armendariz, Unai; Rommel, Simon; Rodríguez Páez, Juan Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of WR-28 waveguide horn antennas operating in the Ka-band frequency range between 26.5 GHz and 40 GHz through 3D printing. Three different antennas are fabricated from polylactide acid filaments in conductive and non-conductive variants; the latter i...

  12. Evaluation and Performance Analysis of 3D Printing Technique for Ka-Band Antenna Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armendariz, Unai; Rommel, Simon; Rodríguez Páez, Juan Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of 3D printed WR-28 waveguide horn antennas operating in the Ka-band frequency range between 26.5GHz and 40GHz. Three antennas are fabricated from polylactide acid filaments in conductive and non-conductive variants; the latter is covered...

  13. Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bal-Price, Anna; Coecke, Sandra; Costa, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Bal-Price AK, Coecke S, Costa L, Crofton KM, Fritsche E, Goldberg A, Grandjean P, Lein PJ, Li A, Lucchini R, Mundy WR, Padilla S, Persico A, Seiler AEM, Kreysa J. Conference Report: Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation. Altex 2012: 29: 202-15....

  14. Fabrication, testing and analysis of steel/composite DLS adhesive joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nashim, S.; Nisar, J.; Tsouvalis, N.

    2009-01-01

    0/90 WR GFRP and 0/90 UD CFRP laminates and steel. The focus here is on CFRP/steel joint due to availability of test data. The thickness of the outer adherend varies from 3 mm to 6 mm. Shear overlaps of 25-200mm were considered. The overall objectives are (i) to assess the quality of the standard...

  15. 75 FR 81287 - Mortgagee Review Board: Administrative Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... to address discrepancies prior to approval of the insurance endorsement. 15. WR Starkey Mortgage, LLP..., the Board accepted a settlement offer from Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. (Countrywide) to pay a civil..., the Board accepted a settlement offer from Action Mortgage Corporation (AMC) to pay a civil money...

  16. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a new wheat-rye 4R chromosome translocation line resistant to powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Diaoguo; Zheng, Qi; Zhou, Yilin; Ma, Pengtao; Lv, Zhenling; Li, Lihui; Li, Bin; Luo, Qiaoling; Xu, Hongxing; Xu, Yunfeng

    2013-07-01

    Rye is an important and valuable gene resource for wheat improvement. However, due to extensive growing of cultivars with disease resistance genes from short arm of rye chromosome 1R and coevolution of pathogen virulence and host resistance, these cultivars successively lost resistance to pathogens. Identification and deployment of new resistance gene sources in rye are, therefore, of especial importance and urgency. A new wheat-rye line, designated as WR41-1, was produced through distant hybridization and chromosome engineering protocols between common wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 6 and rye cultivar German White. It was proved to be a new wheat-rye T4BL·4RL and T7AS·4RS translocation line using sequential genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (mc-FISH), and expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) marker analysis. WR41-1 showed high levels of resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) pathogens prevalent in China at the adult growth stage and 13 of 23 Bgt isolates tested at the seedling stage. According to its resistant pattern to 23 different Bgt isolates, WR41-1 may possess new gene(s) for resistance to powdery mildew, which differed from previously identified and known powdery mildew genes from rye (Pm7, Pm8, Pm17, and Pm20). In addition, WR41-1 was cytologically stable, had a desirable fertility, and is expected to be useful in wheat improvement.

  17. Addition to chapter VI b (p. 2011)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1972-01-01

    Botanic Garden at the University of Malaya. A plan was submitted by Professor W.R. Stanton, head of the Botany Division, University of Malaya, K.L., to establish a new botanic garden of some 100 acres as a teaching facility and for the benefit of biological education institutes and the general

  18. Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Chemotherapy for Patients With Early-Stage Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma of Waldeyer Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yong-Gang; Qi, Shu-Nan; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Wang, Wei-Hu; Jin, Jing; Song, Yong-Wen; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); He, Xiao-Hui; Dong, Mei [Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Chen, Bo; Lu, Ning-Ning; Li, Ning; Tang, Yuan; Tang, Yu; Dai, Jian-Rong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Li, Ye-Xiong, E-mail: yexiong12@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric benefit, prognosis, and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for early-stage, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of Waldeyer ring (WR-DLBCL). Methods and Materials: Sixty-one patients with early-stage WR-DLBCL who received chemotherapy followed by IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Dosimetric parameters for the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated, and survival was calculated. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the effect of the mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the parotid glands on xerostomia. Results: The median conformity index and homogeneity index of the planning target volume (PTV) were 0.83 and 0.90, respectively, demonstrating very good coverage of the target volume. The mean dose to the parotid glands was 24.9 Gy. The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and locoregional control (LRC) were 94.7%, 93.1%, and 98.3%, respectively. Early and late toxicities were mild, and no patient experienced late grade ≥3 toxicities. The D{sub mean} to the parotid glands had a linear correlation with late grade ≥2 xerostomia. Conclusions: IMRT after chemotherapy can provide excellent dose conformity and achieve favorable survival and LRC with mild toxicities in patients with early-stage WR-DLBCL. Dose constraints for the parotid glands should be limited to <24 Gy for early-stage WR-DLBCL.

  19. The timing master for the FAIR accelerator facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, R.C.; Fleck, T.; Kreider, M.; Mauro, S.

    2012-01-01

    One central design feature of the FAIR accelerator complex is a high level of parallel beam operation, imposing ambitious demands on the timing and management of accelerator cycles. Several linear accelerators, synchrotrons, storage rings and beam lines have to be controlled and reconfigured for each beam production chain on a pulse-to-pulse basis, with cycle lengths ranging from 20 ms to several hours. This implies initialization, synchronization of equipment on the time scale down to the ns level, inter-dependencies, multiple paths and contingency actions like emergency beam dump scenarios. The FAIR timing system will be based on White Rabbit (WR) network technology, implementing a central Timing Master (TM) unit to orchestrate all machines. The TM is subdivided into separate functional blocks: the Clock Master, which deals with time and clock sources and their distribution over WR, the Management Master, which administrates all WR timing receivers, and the Data Master, which schedules and coordinates machine instructions and broadcasts them over the WR network. The TM triggers equipment actions based on the transmitted execution time. Since latencies in the low μs range are required, this paper investigates the possibilities of parallelization in programmable hardware and discusses the benefits to either a distributed or monolithic timing master architecture. The proposed FPGA based TM will meet said timing requirements while providing fast reaction to interlocks and internal events and offers parallel processing of multiple signals and state machines. (authors)

  20. 123I-MIBG lung uptake in patients with diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Flores, L.G. II

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the relationship between 123 I-MIBG lung uptake and silent myocardial ischemia (SMI), cardiac autonomic neuropathy (AN) or clinical characteristics. For the quantitative analysis, lung to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (L/M) and heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio (H/M) were obtained from chest planar image. In addition, both lung washout ratio (%WR-L) and heart washout ratio (%WR-H) were calculated from early and delayed images. Each indices were compared in both diabetic and control groups. Mean values of H/M in diabetes with complication were significantly lower than those of control group. Particularly, AN(+)SMI(+) group showed lowest value. Similarly, mean values of %WR-H in diabetes with complication were significantly higher than those of control group and AN(+)SMI(+) group showed highest value. Although mean value of L/M in each diabetic group was significantly higher than that of control group, there was no statistical significance among each diabetes except AN(+)SMI(-) group on early image. Mean value of %WR-L in AN(+) or SMI(+) group was also significantly higher than that of control group, but there was no statistical significance among each diabetic group. The current study suggested that high pulmonary 123 I-MIBG uptake in diabetes was independent of the complication of SMI or AN. Pulmonary endothelial dysfunction related with severity of diabetes mellitus was considered to be the most important factor. (author)

  1. Disease: H00082 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0:397-409 (2004) DOI:10.1046/j.1365-2265.2004.01978.x ... PMID:12734493 (gene, env_factor, marker, autoantigen) ... AUTHORS ... Ai J, Leonha...rdt JM, Heymann WR. ... TITLE ... Autoimmune thyroid diseases: etiology, pathogenesis

  2. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WOLF-RAYET BUBBLE S 308

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Arthur, S. J.; Smith, R. C.; Snowden, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its northwest quadrant, map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a central cavity ∼22' in size and a shell thickness of ∼8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at 0.43 keV and O VII at 0.57 keV, and declines toward high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T 1 ∼ 1.1 × 10 6 K, T 2 ∼ 13 × 10 6 K), with a total X-ray luminosity ∼2 × 10 33 erg s –1 at the assumed distance of 1.5 kpc.

  3. Implication of the intestinal microbiome as a potential surrogate marker of immune responsiveness to experimental therapies in autoimmune diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Needell, J.C.; Dinarello, C.A.; Ir, D.; Robertson, C.E.; Ryan, S.M.; Kroehl, M.E.; Frank, D.N.; Zipris, D.

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune proinflammatory disease with no effective intervention. A major obstacle in developing new immunotherapies for T1D is the lack of means for monitoring immune responsiveness to experimental therapies. The LEW1.WR1 rat develops autoimmunity following infection

  4. Accurate Region-of-Interest Recovery Improves the Measurement of the Cell Migration Rate in the In Vitro Wound Healing Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Cesar; Cardona, Andrés; Galeano, July; Cortés-Mancera, Fabián; Sandoz, Patrick; Zarzycki, Artur

    2017-12-01

    The wound healing assay is widely used for the quantitative analysis of highly regulated cellular events. In this essay, a wound is voluntarily produced on a confluent cell monolayer, and then the rate of wound reduction (WR) is characterized by processing images of the same regions of interest (ROIs) recorded at different time intervals. In this method, sharp-image ROI recovery is indispensable to compensate for displacements of the cell cultures due either to the exploration of multiple sites of the same culture or to transfers from the microscope stage to a cell incubator. ROI recovery is usually done manually and, despite a low-magnification microscope objective is generally used (10x), repositioning imperfections constitute a major source of errors detrimental to the WR measurement accuracy. We address this ROI recovery issue by using pseudoperiodic patterns fixed onto the cell culture dishes, allowing the easy localization of ROIs and the accurate quantification of positioning errors. The method is applied to a tumor-derived cell line, and the WR rates are measured by means of two different image processing software. Sharp ROI recovery based on the proposed method is found to improve significantly the accuracy of the WR measurement and the positioning under the microscope.

  5. PROF DR FELIX V. lATEGAN: Die Boer se Roer. Die Groot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF DR FELIX V. lATEGAN: Die Boer se. Roer. Die Groot Geweerboek van Suid-. Afrika. Tafelberg. Uitgewers. Kaapstad, pp. 209, bibliografie, register. Sonder die Boer en sy roer is die geskiede:lis van ons land feitlik ondenkbc:wr en dit is clan ook vo/kome juis gesien dat die skrywer van hierdie baanbrekerswerk die ...

  6. Numerical analysis for fatigue life prediction on railroad RCF crack initiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Y.; Markine, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, a numerical procedure for surface crack initiation analysis based on the critical plane approach is proposed. The complex stress/strain state of wheel and rail (W/R) contact is analysed by means of submodelling approach together with the transient contact nodal loads obtained

  7. Enzymatic hydrolysis of esters from 2-carboxy-6- methoxy-2,3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Enzymatic hydrolysis .... ml), followed by water (2 × 15 ml) and dried with anhydrous sodium .... dOptical purity of the acid was determined as the methyl ester by HPLC. eE values ..... Harada I, Hirose Y, Nakaozaki M (1968). ... Nicholas WR, Yang CG, Shi Z, He C (2006). Gold(I)- ...

  8. Analyzing Predictors of High Opioid Use in the U.S. Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN OPERATIONS RESEARCH from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL September 2016 Approved by: Lyn R...Wakely risk assessment model (Version 102). Retrieved from https://predictivemodeler.com/sitecontent/book/Ch06_Applications/ Actuarial /WR A_Model

  9. Social factors associated with mental disorders with risk situations in the primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lopes da Costa Drummond

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate patients with mental disorders, with or without risk situations, treated at primary health care (PHC units. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was performed in samples of 240 patients living in a region of high social vulnerability in Belo Horizonte. The response variable was mental disorders with risk situations (MD-WR. The explanatory variables were gender, age, marital status, literacy, education, employment, social benefits and per capita income. Instruments from Berkman and Syme (social network, Sherbourne and Stewart (social support, adapted for Brazil, were applied. Pearson's χ2 test and binary logistic regression were used for the adjusted analyzes. RESULTS: The factors associated with MD-WR were being male (OR = 3.62; 95%CI 1.84 - 7.09; having "up to one confident relative" only (OR = 2.53; 95%CI 1.18 - 5.42; being "not able to return home" when away from their living area (OR = 3.49; 95%CI 1.40 - 8.71. The reduction in the affective dimension of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS scale increases the chance of MD-WR. Conclusion: The availability and access to social and support networks are lower for patients with MD-WR and need to be strengthened to promote autonomy and citizenship among its users. We conclude that there is the need of public policies to increase the availability of social networking equipment and social support projects, encouraging the participation of families.

  10. Fruit waste adsorbent for ammonia nitrogen removal from synthetic solution: Isotherms and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahrim, AY; Lija, Y.; Ricky, L. N. S.; Azreen, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, four types of watermelon rind (WR) adsorbents; fresh WR, modified WR with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4) were used as a potential low-cost adsorbent to remove NH3-N from solution. The adsorption data were fitted with the adsorption isotherm and kinetic models to predict the mechanisms and kinetic characteristics of the adsorption process. The equilibrium data agreed well with Langmuir isotherm model with highest correlation (R2=1.00). As for kinetic modelling, the adsorption process follows pseudo-second order for all four types of adsorbents which has R2 value of 1.0 and calculated adsorption capacity, Qe of 1.2148mg/g. The calculated Qe for pseudo-second order has the smallest difference with the experimental Qe and thus suggest that this adsorption process is mainly governed by chemical process involving cations sharing or exchange between WR adsorbent and NH3-N in the solution.

  11. Report and Analysis of the May 1979 Marine Surface Layer Micrometeorological Experiment at San Nicolas Island, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-31

    November of 1976 by the National Oceano - graphic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The -arameter Typical Measurement Accurac maximum and minimum tide... sols using Thin Plastic Scintillators," Nucl. Layer," Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 18, 107-127. Instrum. Methods 108, 467-470. Kidwell, KB., & W.R. Seguin

  12. A Review and Annotated Bibliography of Training Performance Measurement and Assessment Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    between short ter (30-59 day) obseration reports of combat performance and thoe based an O ds or me. Key Points: Found no significant diffwmw betwemn 3D ...AuthWr: Uh Iler, J. E., I Drucke , A. Corporate Author: Not Avoilable 9 lmmr: Points out chyge of mphosis in MiIiitary research. Trend Is my from

  13. Requirements Engineering and Analysis Workshop Proceedings Held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on 12-14 March 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    urally. 6.5 Summary of Current or Potential Approaches Many approaches to context analysis were discussed by the group, including: * Causal Trees * SWOT ... Apple Computer, 1988 1 Aseltine, J., Beam, W.R., Palmer, J.D., Sage, A.P., 1989, Introduction To Computer Systems: Analysis, Design and Application

  14. Auctioned IPOs : The U.S. Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degeorge, F.; Derrien, F.; Womack, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Between 1999 and 2007, WR Hambrecht has completed 19 IPOs in the U.S. using an auction mechanism. We analyze investor behavior and mechanism performance in these auctioned IPOs using detailed bidding data. The existence of some bids posted at high prices suggests that some investors (mostly retail)

  15. Sexual behaviour of in-school adolescents in Ibadan, South-West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    auprès de leurs parents et dans la média. Nous concluons ... studies in Nigeria have also reported high rate of parental ... used to validate all entries. ..... adolescent children's sexuality: A study of ... Oladepo O, Brieger W.R: Sexual Attitudes.

  16. The effect of open air conditions on the properties of wooden material

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the impregnation materials of Tanalith-C (CCA) and Protim 230 WR were used as preservative and water repellant. Wooden materials were taken from beech and black pine. The samples were made subject to weathering conditions for one year. At the end of this period, changes occurred in the samples' ...

  17. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, April, May, June 1987. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-07-01

    This document is a collection of reprinted technical reports. Partial contents include: Effect of ionizing radiation on prostaglandins and gastric secretion in rhesus monkeys; Characterization of rat prothymocyte with monoclonal antibodies recognizing rat lymphocyte membrane antigenic determinants; Effects of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced condition taste aversion; Ethanol-induced taste aversions; Lack of involvement of acetaldehyde and the area postrema; Dose and time relationships of the radioprotector WR-2721 on locomotor activity in mice; Purification and analysis of rat hematopoietic stem cells by flow cytometry, Plasma histamine and catecholamine levels during hypotension induced by morphine and compound 48/80; Effects of ionizing radiation on hippocampal excitability, Tumor necrosis factor/cachectin is a less-potent inducer of serum amyloid A synthesis than interleukin 1, Protection of mice against fission-neutron irradiation by WR-2721 or WR-151327, Induction of colony-stimulating factor in vivo by recombinant interleukin 1 a and recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha; 16,16-Dimethyl prostaglandin E2 increases survival in mice following irradiation, Selenium pretreatment enhances the radioprotective effect and reduces the lethal toxicity of WR-2721; Rat phantom depth dose studies in electron, x-ray, gamma-ray, and reactor-radiation fields; Wall attenuation and scatter characteristics of ionization chambers at Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute.

  18. Pathoproteomics of testicular tissue deficient in the GARP component VPS54. The wobbler mouse model of globozoospermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jockusch, Harald; Holland, Ashlin; Staunten, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    observed for proteins involved in cell redox homeostasis, cytoskeleton formation, PTMs, detoxification and metabolism. The most dramatically decreased protein in WR testis was identified as fatty acid binding protein FABP3, as confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We conclude that a missense mutation in VPS54...

  19. Revealing the nebular properties and Wolf-Rayet population of IC10 with Gemini/GMOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Katie; Crowther, Paul A.; Archer, I.

    2017-12-01

    We present a deep imaging and spectroscopic survey of the Local Group irregular galaxy IC10 using Gemini North and GMOS to unveil its global Wolf-Rayet (WR) population. We obtain a star formation rate (SFR) of 0.045 ± 0.023 M⊙ yr-1, for IC10 from the nebular H α luminosity, which is comparable to the Small Magellanic Cloud. We also present a revised nebular oxygen abundance of log(O/H) + 12 = 8.40 ± 0.04, comparable to the LMC. It has previously been suggested that for IC10 to follow the WR subtype-metallicity dependance seen in other Local Group galaxies, a large WN population awaits discovery. Our search revealed three new WN stars, and six candidates awaiting confirmation, providing little evidence to support this claim. The new global WR star total of 29 stars is consistent with the Large Magellanic Cloud population when scaled to the reduced SFR of IC10. For spectroscopically confirmed WR stars, the WC/WN ratio is lowered to 1.0; however, including all potential candidates, and assuming those unconfirmed to be WN stars, would reduce the ratio to ∼0.7. We attribute the high WC/WN ratio to the high star formation surface density of IC10 relative to the Magellanic Clouds, which enhances the frequency of high-mass stars capable of producing WC stars.

  20. Immunogenicity of recombinant feline infectious peritonitis virus spike protein in mice and kittens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Vennema, H.; Groot, R. de; Harbour, D.A.; Dalderup, M.; Gruffydd-Jones, T.; Spaan, W.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding the fusogenic spike protein of the coronavirus causing feline infectious peritonitis (FIVP) was recombined into the genome of vaccinia virus, strain WR. The recombinant induced spike protein specific, in vitro neutralizing antibodies in mkice. When kittens were immunized with the

  1. 123I-BMIPP delayed scintigraphic imaging in patients with chronic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Keisuke; Akashi, Yoshihiro J.; Yoneyama, Kihei; Shimokawa, Mitsuhiro; Musha, Haruki

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the ability of 123 I-beta-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid ( 123 I-BMIPP) to evaluate the heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio and myocardial global washout rate (WR) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The severity of CHF was evaluated on the basis of the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification. Twenty patients with CHF (13 with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and 7 with ischemic cardiomyopathy) and 11 age-matched controls underwent myocardial radionuclide imaging. Scintigraphic images were obtained from each participant at the early (30 min following radio-isotope injection) and late (4 h) phases using 123 I-BMIPP. The H/M ratio and WR were calculated from planar images. Concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured prior to the scintigraphic study. The 123 I-BMIPP uptake of early H/M and global WR did not significantly differ among groups, but uptake of delayed H/M was significantly lower in patients with NYHA class III than in controls (control 2.47±0.39; class III 1.78±0.28 P 123 I-BMIPP uptake of delayed H/M enhances the image of CHF severity. The myocardial WR of 123 I-BMIPP also effectively depicted the severity of CHF. (author)

  2. Hypolipidemic effect of aqueous leaf extract of carmona microphylla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Pharmacology, Hainan Medical University, School of ... Purpose: To investigate the hypolipidemic effects of the aqueous leaf extract of ... HepG2 liver cells, as well as in high-fat diet (HFD)- and triton WR-1339 ... antidote to food poisoning [14,15]. In the ..... atorvastatin (p.o. 5 mg/kg); C. microphylla aqueous.

  3. An Archeological Survey of the San Diego River

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-08-27

    This site wr.e located where Friars Road has been greatly widened and apartments and a gas station have been built. An area of shell and flake soattei...were found in a group of large boulders • with midden on the north side of El Nopal Road, in a vacant lot east of & residence (Pigure 31). Mano

  4. Search for a Heavy Right-Handed W Boson and Heavy Right-Handed Neutrino of the Left-Right Symmetric Extension of the Standard Theory

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00345539

    A search for a heavy right-handed $W_{R}$ boson, and heavy right-handed neutrinos $N_{\\ell}$ ($\\ell = e, \\mu$) performed by the CMS experiment is summarized here. Using the 2.6 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity recorded by the CMS experiment in 2015 at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, this search seeks evidence of a $W_{R}$ boson and $N_{\\ell}$ neutrinos in events with two leptons and two jets. The data do not significantly exceed expected backgrounds, and are consistent with expected results of the Standard Theory given uncertainties. For Standard Theory extensions with strict left-right symmetry, and assuming only one $N_{\\ell}$ flavor contributes significantly to the $W_{R}$ decay width, mass limits are set in the two-dimensional $(M_{W_{R}}, M_{N_{\\ell}})$ plane at 95\\% confidence level. The limits extend to a $W_{R}$ mass of 3.3 TeV in the electron channel and 3.5 TeV in the muon channel, and span a wide range of $M_{N_{\\ell}}$ masses below $M_{W_{R}}$.

  5. Search for tb resonances in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdelalim, A A; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abouzeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Akesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Akiyama, A; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Aliyev, M; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral, P; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amorós, G; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Andrieux, M-L; Anduaga, X S; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoun, S; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Arutinov, D; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Asman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Aubert, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Ay, C; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bahinipati, S; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barashkou, A; Barbaro Galtieri, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartsch, V; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beale, S; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Behera, P K; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendel, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertella, C; Bertin, A; Bertinelli, F; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bitenc, U; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blazek, T; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V B; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bolnet, N M; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Bondarenko, V G; Bondioli, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, C N; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Botterill, D; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozhko, N I; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Braem, A; Branchini, P; Brandenburg, G W; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brendlinger, K; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Brodbeck, T J; Brodet, E; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brown, H; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butin, F; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Buttinger, W; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarri, P; Cambiaghi, M; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Canale, V; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Cantero, J; 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Chiefari, G; Chikovani, L; Childers, J T; Chilingarov, A; Chiodini, G; Chisholm, A S; Chislett, R T; Chizhov, M V; Choudalakis, G; Chouridou, S; Christidi, I A; Christov, A; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chu, M L; Chudoba, J; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Ciftci, R; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Ciocca, C; Ciocio, A; Cirilli, M; Citterio, M; Ciubancan, M; Clark, A; Clark, P J; Cleland, W; Clemens, J C; Clement, B; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coe, P; Cogan, J G; Coggeshall, J; Cogneras, E; Colas, J; Colijn, A P; Collins, N J; Collins-Tooth, C; Collot, J; Colon, G; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Conidi, M C; Consonni, M; Consonni, S M; Consorti, V; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conti, G; Conventi, F; Cook, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Copic, K; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Costin, T; Côté, D; Courneyea, L; Cowan, G; Cowden, C; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Crescioli, F; Cristinziani, M; Crosetti, G; 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Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wong, W C; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wraight, K; Wright, C; Wright, M; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wunstorf, R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xie, S; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Xu, D; Xu, G; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ybeles Smit, G V; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Young, C J; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaets, V G; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zanello, L; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeller, M; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Zeniš, T; Zinonos, Z; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, S; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zieminska, D; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Zivković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    2012-08-24

    This Letter presents a search for tb resonances in 1.04 fb(-1) of LHC proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. Events with a lepton, missing transverse momentum, and two jets are selected and the invariant mass of the corresponding final state is reconstructed. The search exploits the shape of the tb invariant mass distribution compared to the expected standard model backgrounds. The model of a right-handed W(R)' with standard model-like couplings is chosen as the benchmark model for this search. No statistically significant excess of events is observed in the data, and upper limits on the cross section times the branching ratio of W(R)' resonances at 95% C.L. lie in the range of 6.1-1.0 pb for W(R)' masses ranging from 0.5 to 2.0 TeV. These limits are translated into a lower bound on the allowed right-handed W(R)' mass, giving m(W(R)'))>1.13 TeV at 95% C.L.

  6. 6TH Saint Petersburg International Conference on Integrated Navigation Systems. (6eme Conference Internationale de Saint Petersbourg sur les Systemes de Navigation Integree)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Kharisov V.N., Perov A.I., Boldin V.A. (editors). 1977. The global satelllite radio-navigational system 20. Wu W.-R. Target tracking with glint...the coordinates of the OP techniques for their searching and extracting in deep seas. These techniques. have yielded Researches have shown that, an OP

  7. Correlation between γ-ray-induced DNA double-strand breakage and cell killing after biologically relevant doses: analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the degree of correlation between γ-ray-induced lethality and DNA double-strand breaks (dsbs) after biologically relevant doses of radiation. Radiation lethality was modified by treating 14 C-labelled Chinese hamster ovary cells with either of two aminothiols (WR-1065 or WR-255591) and the associated effect on dsb induction was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The use of phosphorimaging to analyse the distribution of 14 C-activity in the gel greatly improved the low-dose resolution of the PFGE assay. Both WR-1065 and WR-255591 protected against dsb induction and lethality to a similar extent after low doses of radiation. although this correlation broke down when supralethal doses were used to induce dsbs. Thus, the level of dsbs induced in these cells as measured by PFGE after survival-curve doses of γ-radiation is consistently predictive of the degree of lethality obtained, implying a cause-effect relationship between these two parameters and confirming previous results obtained using the neutral filter elution assay for dsbs. (author)

  8. Flexitime in an Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    and Costigan (1973) conducted a longitudinal study of employee responses to the four day week in a medium-sized pharmaceutical company. The patterns...New York, New York, 1979. Nord, W.R. and Costigan, R. Worker adjustment to the four - day week : a longitudinal study. Journal of Applied Psychology, 58

  9. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2013-08-09

    Aug 9, 2013 ... Diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis: a consensus document. International Ascites Club. J Hepatol. 2000; 32(1):142-153. PubMed | Google Scholar. 2. Caly WR, Strauss E. A prospective study of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis. J Hepatol. 1993; 18(3):353-.

  10. CDC Vital Signs: Drinking and Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adapted from The ABCs of BAC, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 2005, and How to Control Your Drinking, WR Miller and RF Munoz, University of New Mexico, 1982. Self-reported annual drinking and driving episodes SOURCE: CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, ...

  11. ON THE LAUNCHING AND STRUCTURE OF RADIATIVELY DRIVEN WINDS IN WOLF–RAYET STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D., E-mail: ro@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2016-04-20

    Hydrostatic models of Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars typically contain low-density outer envelopes that inflate the stellar radii by a factor of several and are capped by a denser shell of gas. Inflated envelopes and density inversions are hallmarks of envelopes that become super-Eddington as they cross the iron-group opacity peak, but these features disappear when mass loss is sufficiently rapid. We re-examine the structures of steady, spherically symmetric wind solutions that cross a sonic point at high optical depth, identifying the physical mechanism through which the outflow affects the stellar structure, and provide an improved analytical estimate for the critical mass-loss rate above which extended structures are erased. Weak-flow solutions below this limit resemble hydrostatic stars even in supersonic zones; however, we infer that these fail to successfully launch optically thick winds. WR envelopes will therefore likely correspond to the strong, compact solutions. We also find that wind solutions with negligible gas pressure are stably stratified at and below the sonic point. This implies that convection is not the source of variability in WR stars, as has been suggested; however, acoustic instabilities provide an alternative explanation. Our solutions are limited to high optical depths by our neglect of Doppler enhancements to the opacity, and do not account for acoustic instabilities at high Eddington factors; yet, they do provide useful insights into WR stellar structures.

  12. Sex Differences in Neurophysiological Activation Patterns During Phonological Input Processing: An Influencing Factor for Normative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Annelies; van Mierlo, Pieter; Hartsuiker, Robert J; Santens, Patrick; De Letter, Miet

    2015-11-01

    In the context of neurophysiological normative data, it has been established that aging has a significant impact on neurophysiological correlates of auditory phonological input processes, such as phoneme discrimination (PD) and word recognition (WR). Besides age, sex is another demographic factor that influences several language processes. We aimed to disentangle whether sex has a similar effect on PD and WR. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in 20 men and 24 women. During PD, three phonemic contrasts (place and manner of articulation and voicing) were compared using the attentive P300 and pre-attentive Mismatch Negativity. To investigate WR, real words were contrasted with pseudowords in a pre-attentive oddball task. Women demonstrated a larger sensitivity to spectrotemporal differences, as evidenced by larger P300 responses to the place of articulation (PoA) contrast and larger P300 and MMN responses than men in PoA-based PD. Men did not display such sensitivity. Attention played an important role, considering that women needed more attentional resources to differentiate between PoA and the other phonemic contrasts. During WR, pseudowords evoked larger amplitudes already 100 ms post-stimulus independent of sex. However, women had decreased P200 latencies, but longer N400 latencies in response to pseudowords, whereas men showed increased N400 latencies compared to women in response to real words. The current results demonstrate significant sex-related influences on phonological input processes. Therefore, existing neurophysiological normative data for age should be complemented for the factor sex.

  13. Final Report: Continuation Study: A Systems Approach to Understanding Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Intraspecies variation in emerging hyperinfectious bacterial strains in nature, PLoS Pathogens (08 2011) TOTAL: 1 Received Book TOTAL: Received Book...K.C., Lyons, M.J., Goldberg , J., Simpson, J., Williams, W.M., Toomey, R., Eisen, S.A., True, W.R., Cloitr, M., Wolfe, J. and Tsuang, M.T., 2003. A

  14. Two-Region Model for Soil Water Repellency as a Function of Matric Potential and Water Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunarathna, Anurudda Kumara; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2010-01-01

    by the so-called Dexter index) is useful for predicting if soils are likely to exhibit WR. Expression of soil water repellency depends on soil water content; however, only a limited amount of predictive description is available to date. In this study, based on experimental data, a simple two-region model...

  15. Cellular Consequences of Telomere Shortening in Histologically Normal Breast Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    axillary node metastasis, and histopathologic grading. Cancer 1984;54:2237–2242. 26 Anderson WF, Chu KC , Chatterjee N, et al. Tumor variants by hormone...alternatively lengthened telomeres. Am J Pathol 2010, 177:2694–2700 26. Hakin-Smith V, Jellinek DA, Levy D, Carroll T, Teo M, Timperley WR, McKay MJ

  16. The effect of air dried conditions on mechanical and physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... small dimension wooden material is used and this affects the cost of ... The first serious application of laminating technique ... buildings, stock hangar, farms and stables constructions ... resistant lamine elements to air dried condition were easy .... the other was organic solvent water repellent protim WR230.

  17. Air Force Construction Contract Disputes: An Analysis of Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals Cases to Identify Dispute Types and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    IDirecting Work 7. DifrngSt 19. Laspector Improperly Conditions StpigWr 8. Changes in Zecs . -l 20. Fraud, Latent Defects, -I or Gross Errors 9. Challenges...1979. 346 11. Doyle, Peter G. "What the Contractor Expects of the Architect," Building Design and Construction, May 1978, pp. 94-9d. 12. "Exam Required

  18. Hypolipidemic effect of aqueous leaf extract of carmona microphylla ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the hypolipidemic effects of the aqueous leaf extract of Carmona microphylla (Lam.) G. Don. (CAE) in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The lipid-lowering effect of CAE was investigated in oleic acid (OA)-induced steatosis in HepG2 liver cells, as well as in high-fat diet (HFD)- and triton WR-1339 ...

  19. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  20. A study of lightning activity over land and oceanic regions of India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    important point and above results have strongly motivated us to take up the study of land–land and land–ocean contrast in lightning activity over. India. The geographic regions of India chosen for the present study include: • Eastern region (ER) and western region (WR) of India,. • East coast of India and a strip of six oceanic.

  1. Are Wolf-Rayet Stars Able to Pollute the Interstellar Medium of Galaxies? Results from Integral Field Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Pérez-Montero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial distribution of chemical abundances in a sample of low metallicity Wolf-Rayet (WR galaxies selected from the SDSS. We used the integral field spectroscopy technique in the optical spectral range (3700 Å–6850 Å with PMAS attached to the CAHA 3.5 m telescope. Our statistical analysis of the spatial distributions of O/H and N/O, as derived using the direct method or strong-line parameters consistent with it, indicates that metallicity is homogeneous in five out of the six analysed objects in scales of the order of several kpc. Only in the object WR404 is a gradient of metallicity found in the direction of the low surface brightness tail. In contrast, we found an overabundance of N/O in spatial scales of the order of hundreds of pc associated with or close to the positions of the WR stars in 4 out of the 6 galaxies. We exclude possible hydrodynamical causes, such as the metal-poor gas inflow, for this local pollution by means of the analysis of the mass-metallicity relation (MZR and mass-nitrogen-to-oxygen relation (MNOR for the WR galaxies catalogued in the SDSS.

  2. A Study of Strategic Lessons Learned in Vietnam. Volume I. The Enemy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-30

    side,. of the CambediAn-South Vietnamese border, a legacy from the Viet Minh and the basis for PAV,4’s logistical infr- estructure . It was rot until...Communist support. 20. LTC Lance J. Burton USO , Norti. Vietnaut’s Mil~tary l.ogistics System: Its Contribution to the Wr_ .l-b69, (Fort Leav-nworth

  3. Acute kinematic and kinetic adaptations to wearable resistance during vertical jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macadam, Paul; Simperingham, Kim D; Cronin, John B; Couture, Grace; Evison, Chloe

    2017-06-01

    One variation of vertical jump (VJ) training is resisted or weighted jump training, where wearable resistance (WR) enables jumping to be overloaded in a movement specific manner. A two-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc contrasts was used to determine the acute changes in VJ performance with differing load magnitudes and load placements. Kinematic and kinetic data were quantified using a force plate and contact mat. Twenty sport active subjects (age: 27.8 ± 3.8 years; body mass (BM): 70.2 ± 12.2 kg; height: 1.74 ± 0.78 m) volunteered to participate in the study. Subjects performed the counter movement jump (CMJ), drop jump (DJ) and pogo jump (PJ) wearing no resistance, 3% or 6% BM affixed to the upper or lower body. The main finding in terms of the landing phase was that the effect of WR was non-significant (P > .05) on peak ground reaction force. With regard to the propulsive phase the main findings were that for both the CMJ and DJ, WR resulted in a significant (P sports where VJ's are important components as it may provide a novel movement specific training stimulus. Highlights WR of 3 or 6 % BM provided a means to overload the subjects in this study resulting in decreased propulsive power and velocity that lead to a reduced jump height and landing force. Specific strength exercises that closely mimic sporting performance are more likely to optimise transference, therefore WR with light loads of 3-6% body mass (BM)appear a suitable tool for movement specific overload training and maximising transference to sporting performance. Practitioners can safely load their athletes with upper or lower body WR of 3-6% BM without fear of overloading the athletesover and above the landing forces they are typically accustomed too. As a training stimulus it would seem the WR loading provides adequate overload and athletes should focus on velocity of movement to improve power output and jump height i.e. take-off velocity.

  4. Relationship between late ventricular potentials and myocardial {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy with mild to moderate heart failure: results of a prospective study of sudden death events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, Shu [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Gunma (Japan); Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Toyama, Takuji; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Gunma (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiya; Sumino, Hiroyuki; Kumakura, Hisao; Minami, Kazutomo; Ichikawa, Shuichi [Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Matsumoto, Naoya [Nihon University School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, Yuichi [Health Park Clinic, Department of Imaging, Gunma (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Late ventricular potentials (LPs) are considered to be useful for identifying patients with heart failure at risk of developing ventricular arrhythmias. {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, which is used to evaluate cardiac sympathetic activity, has demonstrated cardiac sympathetic denervation in patients with malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. This study was undertaken to clarify the relationship between LPs and {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy findings in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). A total of 56 patients with DCM were divided into an LP-positive group (n = 24) and an LP-negative group (n = 32). During the compensated period, the delayed heart/mediastinum count (H/M) ratio, delayed total defect score (TDS), and washout rate (WR) were determined from {sup 123}I-MIBG images and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentrations were measured. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV), left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV), and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were simultaneously determined by echocardiography. LVEDV, LVESV, LVEF and plasma BNP concentrations were similar in the two groups. However, TDS was significantly higher (35 {+-} 8 vs. 28 {+-} 6, p < 0.005), the H/M ratio was significantly lower (1.57 {+-} 0.23 vs. 1.78 {+-} 0.20, p < 0.005), and the WR was significantly higher (60 {+-} 14% vs. 46 {+-} 12%, p < 0.001) in the LP-positive than in the LP-negative group. The average follow-up time was 4.5 years, and there were nine sudden deaths among the 56 patients (16.1%). In logistic regression analysis, the incidences of sudden death events were similar in those LP-negative with WR <50%, LP-negative with WR {>=}50% and LP-positive with WR <50% (0%, 10.0% and 14.3%, respectively), but was significantly higher (41.2%) in those LP-positive with WR {>=}50% (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, and p < 0.05, respectively). The present study demonstrated that the values of cardiac {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters

  5. Voluntary wheel running increases satellite cell abundance and improves recovery from disuse in gastrocnemius muscles from mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Matthew J; Hajira, Ameena; Mohamed, Junaith S; Alway, Stephen E

    2018-02-22

    Reloading of atrophied muscles after hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU) can induce injury and prolong recovery. Low-impact exercise, such as voluntary wheel running, has been identified as a non-damaging rehabilitation therapy in rodents, but its effects on muscle function, morphology, and satellite cell activity after HSU are unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that low impact wheel running would increase satellite cell proliferation and improve recovery of muscle structure and function after HSU in mice. Young adult male and female C57BL/6 mice (n=6/group) were randomly placed into 5 groups. These included HSU without recovery (HSU), normal ambulatory recovery for 14 days after HSU (HSU+NoWR), and voluntary wheel running recovery for 14 days after HSU (HSU+WR). Two control groups were used: non-suspended mice-cage controls (Control) and voluntary wheel running controls (ControlWR). Satellite cell activation, was evaluated by providing mice 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in their drinking water. As expected, HSU significantly reduced in vivo maximal force and decreased the in vivo fatigability and decreased type I and IIa myosin heavy chain (MHC) abundance in plantarflexor muscles. HSU+WR mice significantly improved plantarflexor fatigue resistance, increased type type I and IIa MHC abundance, increased fiber cross sectional area (CSA), and an increased the percentage of type I and IIA muscle fibers in the gastrocnemius muscle. HSU+WR mice also had a significantly greater percentage of BrdU-positive and Pax 7 positive nuclei inside muscle fibers and a greater MyoD to Pax 7 protein ratio when compared to HSU+NoWR mice. The mechanotransduction protein Yes-associated protein (YAP) was elevated with reloading after HSU, but HSU+WR had lower levels of the inactive phosphorylated YAP serine127 which may have contributed to increased satellite cell activation creased with reloading after HSU. These results indicate that voluntary wheel running increased YAP

  6. Spatial distribution of soil moisture and hydrophobicity in the immediate period after a grassland fire in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.; Pundyte, N.; Vaitkute, D.; Cepanko, V.; Pranskevicius, M.; Ubeda, X.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Cerda, A.

    2012-04-01

    Fire can affect significantly soil moisture (SM) and water repellency (WR) in the immediate period after the fire due the effect of the temperatures into soil profile and ash. This impact can be very heterogeneous, even in small distances, due to different conditions of combustion (e.g. fuel and soil moisture, fuel amount and type, distribution and connection, and geomorphological variables as aspect and slope) that influences fire temperature and severity. The aim of this work it is study the spatial distribution of SM and WR in a small plot (400 m2 with a sampling distance of 5 m) immediately after the a low severity grassland fire.. This was made in a burned but also in a control (unburned) plot as reference to can compare. In each plot we analyzed a total of 25 samples. SM was measured gravimetrically and WR with the water drop penetration time test (WDPT). Several interpolation methods were tested in order to identify the best predictor of SM and WR, as the Inverse Distance to a Weight (IDW) (with the power of 1,2,3,4 and 5), Local Polynomial with the first and second polynomial order, Polynomial Regression (PR), Radial Basis Functions (RBF) as Multilog (MTG), Natural Cubic Spline (NCS), Multiquadratic (MTQ), Inverse Multiquadratic (IMTQ) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) and Ordinary Kriging. Interpolation accuracy was observed with the cross-validation method that is achieved by taking each observation in turn out of the sample and estimating from the remaining ones. The errors produced in each interpolation allowed us to calculate the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). The best method is the one that showed the lower RMSE. The results showed that on average the SM in the control plot was 13.59 % (±2.83) and WR 2.9 (±1.3) seconds (s). The majority of the soils (88%) were hydrophilic (WDPT 5s). We did not identify significant relationships among the variables (r=0.06, p>0.05) and the CV% was higher in WR (65.85%) than SM (19.96%). Overall we identified no significant

  7. Beyond the Borders of a Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Side-by-Side Comparison Click on image for larger view The outlying regions around the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, or M83, are highlighted in this composite image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array in New Mexico. The blue and pink pinwheel in the center is the galaxy's main stellar disk, while the flapping, ribbon-like structures are its extended arms. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer is an ultraviolet survey telescope. Its observations, shown here in blue and green, highlight the galaxy's farthest-flung clusters of young stars up to 140,000 light-years from its center. The Very Large Array observations show the radio emission in red. They highlight gaseous hydrogen atoms, or raw ingredients for stars, which make up the lengthy, extended arms. Astronomers are excited that the clusters of baby stars match up with the extended arms, because this helps them better understand how stars can be created out in the 'backwoods' of a galaxy. In this image, far-ultraviolet light is blue, near-ultraviolet light is green and radio emission at a wavelength of 21 centimeters is red. What Lies Beyond the Edge of a Galaxy The side-by-side comparison shows the Southern Pinwheel galaxy, or M83, as seen in ultraviolet light (right) and at both ultraviolet and radio wavelengths (left). While the radio data highlight the galaxy's long, octopus-like arms stretching far beyond its main spiral disk (red), the ultraviolet data reveal clusters of baby stars (blue) within the extended arms. The ultraviolet image was taken by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer between March 15 and May 20, 2007, at scheduled intervals. Back in 2005, the telescope first photographed M83 over a shorter period of time. That picture was the first to reveal far-flung baby stars forming up to 63,000 light-years from the edge of the main spiral disk. This came as a surprise to astronomers because a galaxy's outer

  8. Characterizing Wolf-Rayet stars in the near- and mid-infrared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faherty, Jacqueline K. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Shara, Michael M.; Zurek, David; Kanarek, Graham [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Moffat, Anthony F. J., E-mail: jfaherty@dtm.ciw.edu [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-05-01

    We present refined color-color selection criteria for identifying Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars using available mid-infrared (MIR) photometry from WISE in combination with near-infrared (NIR) photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Using a sample of spectrally classified objects, we find that WR stars are well distinguished from the field stellar population in the (W1 – W2) versus (J – K{sub s} ) color-color diagram, and further distinguished from other emission line objects such as planetary nebulae, Be, and cataclysmic variable stars using a combination of NIR and MIR color constraints. As proof of concept we applied the color constraints to a photometric sample in the Galactic plane, located WR star candidates, and present five new spectrally confirmed and classified WC (1) and WN (4) stars. Analysis of the 0.8-5.0 μm spectral data for a subset of known, bright WC and WN stars shows that emission lines (primarily He I) extend into the 3.0-5.0 μm spectral region, although their strength is greatly diminished compared to the 0.8-2.5 μm region. The WR population stands out relative to background field stars at NIR and MIR colors due to an excess continuum contribution, likely caused by free-free scattering in dense winds. Mean photometric properties of known WRs are presented and imply that reddened late-type WN and WC sources are easier to detect than earlier-type sources at larger Galactic radii. WISE W3 and W4 images of 10 WR stars show evidence of circumstellar shells linked to mass ejections from strong stellar winds.

  9. Modification of bone marrow radiosensitivity by medicinal plant extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganasoundari, A.; Zare, S. M.; Uma Devi, P. [Department of Radiobiology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal 576 119 (India)

    1997-07-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone, and Plumbagin (Pi), a naphthoquinone, from the roots of Withania somnifera and Plumbage rosea, respectively, have been shows to possess growth inhibitory and radiosensitizing effects on experimental mouse tumours. An aqueous extract of the leaves of Ocimum sanctum (OE) was found to protect mice against radiation lethality. Therefore, the radiomodifying effects of the above plant products on the bone marrow of the adult Swiss mouse was studied. Single doses of WA (30 mg kg{sup -1}) or P1 (5 mg kg{sup -1}) were injected intraperitoneally tip) and OE (10 mg kg{sup -1}) was injected ip once daily for five consecutive days. Administration of extracts was followed by 2 Gy whole body gamma irradiation. Bone marrow stem cell survival was studied by an exogenous spleen colony unit (CFU-S) assay. The effects of WA and P1 were compared with that of cyclophosphamide (CP) and radioprotection by OE was compared with that of WR-2721 (WR). Radiation reduced the CFU-S to less than 50% of normal. WA, CP and P1 significantly enhanced this effect and reduced the CFU-S to almost the same extent (to <20% of normal), although individually WA and P1 were less cytotoxic than CP. These results indicate that radiosensitization by WE and P1 is not tumour specific. OE significantly increased CFU-S compared with radiotherapy (RT) alone. OE + RT gave a higher stem cell survival (p < 0.05) than that produced by WR + RT. While WR alone had a toxic effect, OE treatment showed no such effect, suggesting that the latter may have an advantage over WR in clinical application. (author)

  10. Assessment of salivary gland dysfunction following chemoradiotherapy using quantitative salivary gland scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosuda, Shigeru; Satoh, Michinao; Yamamoto, Fuyumi; Uematsu, Minoru; Kusano, Shoichi

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:To assess chemoradiotherapy-induced salivary gland dysfunction using quantitative salivary gland scintigraphy (QSGS), and whether QSGS is capable of predicting the grade of persistent salivary dysfunction after chemoradiotherapy. Methods: From a time-activity curve using a stimulation test, the washout rate (WR) calculated was assessed. All glands (n = 155) were classified into four groups: a no-therapy group (n = 18), a chemotherapy alone group (n = 31), a radiotherapy alone group (n = 50), and a chemoradiotherapy group (n = 56). Subjective descriptions of xerostomia were recorded 1 year after the completion of the treatment period, and the 32 glands subjected to irradiation with or without chemotherapy were assessed. Results: The WR values were significantly lower in glands that received chemoradiotherapy than in glands treated with radiotherapy alone (mean: 0.75 x 10 -3 , n = 40 vs. 0.22, n = 36, p < 0.015), but there was no significant difference in the WR values between the no-therapy group and the chemotherapy alone group. The mean values of WR were lower in the chemoradiotherapy glands than in the radiotherapy alone glands in each of cumulative dose ranges of 1-20, 21-30, and 31-60 Gy. With regard to recovery from xerostomia, the WR values at a cumulative dose range of 20 to 40 Gy were significantly lower in the not improved group (-0.418, n = 16) than in the improved group (0.245, n = 16) (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Chemotherapy per se has no or little adverse effect on salivary function, but combination chemotherapy can deteriorate radiation-induced injury of the salivary glands. QSGS appears useful in predicting the grade of persistent xerostomia following chemoradiotherapy

  11. Iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine cardiac scintigraphy in patients with diabetes mellitus. Therapeutic effects of aldose reductase inhibitor and vitamin B{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsunomiya, Keita [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    Twenty normal volunteers (C group) and 56 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) who did not have ischemic heart diseases (DM group), were evaluated by means of iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. The uptake ratio between the cardiac muscle and the upper mediastinum was calculated. The ratio determined from the initial I-123-MIBG scintigraphy image was expressed as HMi, and that determined from the delayed image was expressed as HMd. The washout rate percentage (%WR) was calculated. At least one instance of either the HMi, the HMd, or %WR was outside the mean{+-}1 standard deviation of C group in 34 DM group patients. Aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI) was administered to 17 of the 34 patients and Vitamin B{sub 12} (VB{sub 12}) to the remaining 17 patients, for 3 to 5 months. Before and after treatment, scintigraphic studies with I-123-MIBG were carried out, and the HMi, HMd, and %WR were calculated. There were no significant differences found in FBG, HbA1c, or 1.5-AG levels after treatment with either drug, when compared to the pretreatment values. Both HMi and HMd in the DM group were significantly lower, and %WR was significantly higher than in the C group. The changes in HMi, HMd, and %WR after treatment with ARI were not significant. After treatment with VB{sub 12}, the HMi and HMd levels were significantly increased (p<0.01). Thus, measurement of myocardial MIBG accumulation is a promising new method to detect cardiac sympathetic denervation in diabetic patients. With these changes in treatment, VB{sub 12} was shown to be effective for improvement of HMi and HMd in NIDDM. (author)

  12. Weak central coherence in weight-restored adolescent anorexia nervosa: Characteristics and remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbach, Noam; Perry, Amit; Sher, Helene; Lock, James D; Henik, Avishai

    2017-08-01

    Weak central coherence (WCC) refers to a bias towards processing details (local processing) at the expense of paying attention to the bigger picture (global processing). Multiple studies reported WCC in adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). Evidence for WCC in adolescents with AN has been inconsistent. The current study characterizes WCC in weight-restored adolescents with AN (WR-AN) using a direct measure of WCC, and examines whether WCC can be remediated by increasing alertness level-a manipulation that was found useful in enhancing global processing in healthy individuals and clinical populations. 40 adolescents (18 WR-AN and 22 healthy adolescents) performed a global/local processing task (Navon task). Auditory alerting cues that elevate alertness level were integrated into the task. Both groups processed global information faster than local information. However, compared with controls, adolescents with WR-AN were better at ignoring an irrelevant bigger picture while attending to details (smaller global interference) and had greater difficulty ignoring irrelevant details while attending to the bigger picture (larger local interference). These differences were attenuated when adolescents with WR-AN were under a state of high alertness. Additionally, the local interference effect was positively correlated with three independent self-report questionnaires assessing eating disorders symptomatology. This study suggests that abnormal interference by irrelevant global and local information is a central characteristic of WCC in adolescents with WR-AN that cannot be accounted for by enduring illness or malnourishment. Additionally, this study demonstrates that WCC can be temporarily remediated by encouraging a state of high alertness. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Reply to Comment by Roques et al. on "Base Flow Recession from Unsaturated-Saturated Porous Media considering Lateral Unsaturated Discharge and Aquifer Compressibility"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiuyu; Zhan, Hongbin; Zhang, You-Kuan; Schilling, Keith

    2018-04-01

    Roques et al. (https://doi.org/10.1002/2017WR022085) claims that they have proposed an exponential time step (ETS) method to improve the computing method of Liang et al. (https://doi.org/10.1002/2017WR020938) which used a constant time step (CTS) method on the derivative for dQ/dt in field data, where Q is the base flow discharge and t is the time since the start of base flow recession. This reply emphasizes that the main objective of Liang et al. (https://doi.org/10.1002/2017WR020938) was to develop an analytical model to investigate the effects of the unsaturated flow on base flow recession, not on the data interpretation methods. The analytical model indicates that the base flow recession hydrograph behaves as dQ/dt ˜aQb with the exponent b close to 1 at late times, which is consistent with previous theoretical models. The model of Liang et al. (https://doi.org/10.1002/2017WR020938) was applied to field data where the derivative of dQ/dt was computed using the CTS method, a method that has been widely adopted in previous studies. The ETS method proposed by Roques et al. (https://doi.org/10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.07.013) appears to be a good alternative but its accuracy needs further validation. Using slopes to fit field data as proposed by Roques et al. (https://doi.org/10.1002/2017WR022085) appears to match data satisfactorily at early times whereas it performs less satisfactorily at late times and leads to the exponent b being obviously larger than 1.

  14. Quantitative Estimation of the Impact of European Teleconnections on Interannual Variation of East Asian Winter Temperature and Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Young-Kwon; Kim, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The impact of European teleconnections including the East AtlanticWest Russia (EA-WR), the Scandinavia (SCA), and the East Atlantic (EA) on East Asian winter temperature variability was quantified and compared with the combined effect of the Arctic Oscillation (AO), the Western Pacific (WP), and the El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), which are originated in the Northern Hemispheric high-latitudes or the Pacific. Three European teleconnections explained 22-25 percent of the total monthly upper-tropospheric height variance over Eurasia. Regression analysis revealed warming by EA-WR and EA and cooling by SCA over mid-latitude East Asia during their positive phase and vice versa. Temperature anomalies were largely explained by the advective temperature change process at the lower troposphere. The average spatial correlation over East Asia (90-180E, 10-80N) for the last 34 winters between observed and reconstructed temperature comprised of AO, WP and ENSO effect (AWE) was approximately 0.55, and adding the European teleconnection components (ESE) to the reconstructed temperature improved the correlation up to approximately 0.64. Lower level atmospheric structure demonstrated that approximately five of the last 34 winters were significantly better explained by ESE than AWE to determine East Asian seasonal winter temperatures. We also compared the impact between EA-WR and AO on the 1) East Asian winter monsoon, 2) cold surge, and 3) the Siberian high. These three were strongly coupled, and their spatial features and interannual variation were somewhat better explained by EA-WR than AO. Results suggest that the EA-WR impact must be treated more importantly than previously thought for a better understanding of East Asian winter temperature and monsoon variability.

  15. Hot Gas in the Wolf–Rayet Nebula NGC 3199

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toalá, J. A.; Chu, Y.-H. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica (ASIAA), Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Marston, A. P. [European Space Agency/STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, Granada E-18008 (Spain); Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The Wolf–Rayet (WR) nebula NGC 3199 has been suggested to be a bow shock around its central star, WR 18, which is presumably a runaway star, because optical images of the nebula show a dominating arc of emission southwest of the star. We present the XMM-Newton detection of extended X-ray emission from NGC 3199, unveiling the powerful effect of the fast wind from WR 18. The X-ray emission is brighter in the region southeast of the star and an analysis of the spectral properties of the X-ray emission reveals abundance variations: (i) regions close to the optical arc present nitrogen-rich gas enhanced by the stellar wind from WR 18 and (ii) gas at the eastern region exhibits abundances close to those reported for the nebular abundances derived from optical studies, which is a signature of an efficient mixing of the nebular material with the stellar wind. The dominant plasma temperature and electron density are estimated to be T ≈ 1.2 × 10{sup 6} K and n {sub e} = 0.3 cm{sup −3} with an X-ray luminosity in the 0.3–3.0 keV energy range of L {sub X} = 2.6 × 10{sup 34} erg s{sup −1}. Combined with information derived from Herschel and the recent Gaia first data release, we conclude that WR 18 is not a runaway star and that the formation, chemical variations, and the shape of NGC 3199 depend on the initial configuration of the interstellar medium.

  16. Molecular Cytogenetic Identification of a New Wheat-Rye 6R Chromosome Disomic Addition Line with Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaoguo An

    Full Text Available Rye (Secale cereale L. possesses many valuable genes that can be used for improving disease resistance, yield and environment adaptation of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. However, the documented resistance stocks derived from rye is faced severe challenge due to the variation of virulent isolates in the pathogen populations. Therefore, it is necessary to develop desirable germplasm and search for novel resistance gene sources against constantly accumulated variation of the virulent isolates. In the present study, a new wheat-rye line designated as WR49-1 was produced through distant hybridization and chromosome engineering protocols between common wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 6 and rye cultivar German White. Using sequential GISH (genomic in situ hybridization, mc-FISH (multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization, mc-GISH (multicolor GISH and EST (expressed sequence tag-based marker analysis, WR49-1 was proved to be a new wheat-rye 6R disomic addition line. As expected, WR49-1 showed high levels of resistance to wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt pathogens prevalent in China at the adult growth stage and 19 of 23 Bgt isolates tested at the seedling stage. According to its reaction pattern to different Bgt isolates, WR49-1 may possess new resistance gene(s for powdery mildew, which differed from the documented powdery mildew gene, including Pm20 on chromosome arm 6RL of rye. Additionally, WR49-1 was cytologically stable, had improved agronomic characteristics and therefore could serve as an important bridge for wheat breeding and chromosome engineering.

  17. Electrical anisotropy of gas hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anne E.; Anderson, Barbara I.; Rasmus, John; Sun, Keli; Li, Qiming; Collett, Timothy S.; Goldberg, David S.

    2012-01-01

    We present new results and interpretations of the electricalanisotropy and reservoir architecture in gashydrate-bearingsands using logging data collected during the Gulf of MexicoGasHydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II. We focus specifically on sandreservoirs in Hole Alaminos Canyon 21 A (AC21-A), Hole Green Canyon 955 H (GC955-H) and Hole Walker Ridge 313 H (WR313-H). Using a new logging-while-drilling directional resistivity tool and a one-dimensional inversion developed by Schlumberger, we resolve the resistivity of the current flowing parallel to the bedding, R| and the resistivity of the current flowing perpendicular to the bedding, R|. We find the sandreservoir in Hole AC21-A to be relatively isotropic, with R| and R| values close to 2 Ω m. In contrast, the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic. In these reservoirs, R| is between 2 and 30 Ω m, and R| is generally an order of magnitude higher. Using Schlumberger's WebMI models, we were able to replicate multiple resistivity measurements and determine the formation resistivity the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoir in Hole WR313-H. The results showed that gashydrate saturations within a single reservoir unit are highly variable. For example, the sand units in Hole WR313-H contain thin layers (on the order of 10-100 cm) with varying gashydrate saturations between 15 and 95%. Our combined modeling results clearly indicate that the gashydrate-bearingsandreservoirs in Holes GC955-H and WR313-H are highly anisotropic due to varying saturations of gashydrate forming in thin layers within larger sand units.

  18. Usefulness of {sup 123}I-Meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy for evaluation of cardiac sympathetic nervous system function in diabetic patients.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Koji; Nakatani, Yuko; Doi, Kenji; Adachi, Gakuji; Takada, Kou

    2001-11-01

    The cardiac sympathetic nervous system function of diabetic patients with no definite cardiovascular complications other than hypertension was evaluated by {sup 123}I -MIBG myocardial scintigraphy. The subjects consisted of 82 diabetic patients, 59 men, 23 women, mean age 57 years, 17 with hypertension and 65 with normal blood pressure, and they were compared with normal controls (8 men and 3 women, mean age 54 years). Myocardial scintigraphy was performed 10 minutes and 4 hours after administration of MIBG. The superior mediastinum and whole myocardium were set as regions of interest, and the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M ratio) and the washout rate (%WR) were calculated. The mean observation period was 18{+-}12 months, and 17 of the 65 diabetic patients with normal blood pressure before the study developed hypertension during the observation period. There were significant differences in H/M ratio and %WR between the diabetic patients and normal controls (H/M ratio; 1.96{+-}0.34 vs 2.27{+-}0.20, %WR; 24.71{+-}16.99% vs 12.89{+-}11.94). The diabetic patients with hypertension had higher morbidity with diabetic retinopathy and a lower H/M ratio. The 17 patients who developed hypertension during the observation period showed an increase in %WR and a reduction in the H/M ratio. Five patients who died during the observation period had a reduced H/M ratio and increased of %WR. {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in diabetic patients was shown to be useful for detecting cardiac sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, predicting the development of hypertension, and identifying patients who had a poor outcome. Diabetic patients with abnormal signals on MIBG myocardial scintigraphy need to be monitored much more carefully. (K.H.)

  19. Usefulness of 123I-Meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy for evaluation of cardiac sympathetic nervous system function in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Koji; Nakatani, Yuko; Doi, Kenji; Adachi, Gakuji; Takada, Kou; Onishi, Satoshi

    2001-01-01

    The cardiac sympathetic nervous system function of diabetic patients with no definite cardiovascular complications other than hypertension was evaluated by 123 I -MIBG myocardial scintigraphy. The subjects consisted of 82 diabetic patients, 59 men, 23 women, mean age 57 years, 17 with hypertension and 65 with normal blood pressure, and they were compared with normal controls (8 men and 3 women, mean age 54 years). Myocardial scintigraphy was performed 10 minutes and 4 hours after administration of MIBG. The superior mediastinum and whole myocardium were set as regions of interest, and the heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M ratio) and the washout rate (%WR) were calculated. The mean observation period was 18±12 months, and 17 of the 65 diabetic patients with normal blood pressure before the study developed hypertension during the observation period. There were significant differences in H/M ratio and %WR between the diabetic patients and normal controls (H/M ratio; 1.96±0.34 vs 2.27±0.20, %WR; 24.71±16.99% vs 12.89±11.94). The diabetic patients with hypertension had higher morbidity with diabetic retinopathy and a lower H/M ratio. The 17 patients who developed hypertension during the observation period showed an increase in %WR and a reduction in the H/M ratio. Five patients who died during the observation period had a reduced H/M ratio and increased of %WR. 123 I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in diabetic patients was shown to be useful for detecting cardiac sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, predicting the development of hypertension, and identifying patients who had a poor outcome. Diabetic patients with abnormal signals on MIBG myocardial scintigraphy need to be monitored much more carefully. (K.H.)

  20. Evaluation of rectus extraocular muscles using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy for assessment of disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hong; Wang, Zhenchang; Xian, Junfang; Li, Jing; Chen, Qinghua; Ai, Likun

    2012-01-01

    Background. It is important to assess the activity of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) for planning optimal treatment strategy. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) is a technique for assessment of microcirculation status. The correlation between disease activity and the microcirculation characteristics of extraocular muscles (EOMs) has been demonstrated in GO. Purpose. To investigate the changes of rectus EOMs in patients with active vs. inactive GO using DCE-MRI, and to evaluate the value of DCE-MRI in assessing the activity of GO. Material and Methods. Rectus EOMs of 20 healthy controls, 18 patients with active GO, and 16 patients with inactive GO were studied. The signal intensity (SI) of rectus EOMs on T 2 W images was evaluated. Regions of interest were placed on each rectus on DCE-MRI images. The DCE-MRI parameters including time to peak enhancement (T peak ), enhancement ratio (ER), and wash-out ratio (WR) were calculated. Results. There were significant differences in SI and T peak , ER and WR values among the three groups (P = 0.000). However, there was no significant difference in SI between the active and inactive groups (P = 0.07). Tpeak values of each rectus were significantly increased in inactive group compared with the active group (P peak ), maximum ER (maxER) and maximum WR (maxWR) (P peak , maxER and maxWR were 156.98s, 1.31 and 13.50% respectively, giving positive predictive values of 68.00%, 88.90%, and 94.44% for the assessment of disease activity. Conclusion. DCE-MRI could demonstrate the micro circulatory changes of rectus EOMs in both active and inactive GO, and this MRI method is a useful tool in differentiating active from inactive GO

  1. 123I-BMIPP delayed scintigraphic imaging in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Keisuke; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Yoneyama, Kihei; Shimokawa, Mitsuhiro; Musha, Haruki

    2008-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to clarify the ability of 123I-beta-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (123I-BMIPP) to evaluate the heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio and myocardial global washout rate (WR) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The severity of CHF was evaluated on the basis of the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification. Twenty patients with CHF (13 with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and 7 with ischemic cardiomyopathy) and 11 age-matched controls underwent myocardial radionuclide imaging. Scintigraphic images were obtained from each participant at the early (30 min following radio-isotope injection) and late (4 h) phases using 123I-BMIPP. The H/M ratio and WR were calculated from planar images. Concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured prior to the scintigraphic study. The 123I-BMIPP uptake of early H/M and global WR did not significantly differ among groups, but uptake of delayed H/M was significantly lower in patients with NYHA class III than in controls (control 2.47 +/- 0.39; class III 1.78 +/- 0.28, P < 0.05). The uptake of delayed H/M and global WR correlated with plasma log BNP in all participants (r = -0.38, P < 0.05; 0.43, P < 0.05, respectively). These data suggest that 123I-BMIPP uptake of delayed H/M enhances the image of CHF severity. The myocardial WR of 123I-BMIPP also effectively depicted the severity of CHF.

  2. The washout rate of (123)I-BMIPP and the evolution of left ventricular function in patients with successfully reperfused ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: comparisons with the echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Shankar K; Sarai, Masayoshi; Yamada, Akira; Toyama, Hiroshi; Motoyama, Sadako; Harigaya, Hiroto; Hara, Tomonori; Naruse, Hiroyuki; Hishida, Hitoshi; Ozaki, Yukio

    2010-02-01

    The evolution of the oxidative metabolism of (11)C acetate parallels the recovery of left ventricular(LV) contraction following acute myocardial infarction(AMI). This study was designed to unravel, for the first time, the impact of the global washout rate(WR) of (123)I-beta-methyl-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) on the recovery of LV function followingAMI, as evidenced from conventional echocardiography.Twenty consecutive patients (age: 58 +/- 13 years; 16 males and 4 females) with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were enrolled and all of them underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). (123)I-BMIPP cardiac scintigraphy was performed at 7 +/- 3 days after admission. The WR was calculated from the polar map and the regional BMIPP defect score was calculated using a 17 segment model. Echocardiography was performed within 24 h of admission and at 3 months to record the ejection fraction (EF), the wall motion score index (WMSI), the ratio of the mitralinflow velocity to the early diastolic velocity (E/E0)and the myocardial performance index (MPI). The mean global WR of the BMIPP was 22.12 +/- 7.22%, and it was significantly correlated with the improvement of the WMSI (r = 0.61, P\\0.004). However,the relative changes of the EF, E/E0 and MPI were not correlated with the WR. The BMIPP defect score (18 +/- 10) was significantly correlated with the WMSI on admission (r = 0.74, P = 0.0002), but the defect score was not correlated with the relative changes of any of the echocardiographic parameters. We proved that the WR of the BMIPP is a promising indicator of improvement of the LV wall motion (WMSI) following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and successful reperfusion.

  3. A new Wolf-Rayet star and its circumstellar nebula in Aquila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Hamann, W.-R.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Fabrika, S.; Valeev, A. F.

    2010-04-01

    We report the discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star in Aquila via detection of its circumstellar nebula (reminiscent of ring nebulae associated with late WN stars) using the Spitzer Space Telescope archival data. Our spectroscopic follow-up of the central point source associated with the nebula showed that it is a WN7h star (we named it WR121b). We analysed the spectrum of WR121b by using the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet model atmospheres, obtaining a stellar temperature of ~=50kK. The stellar wind composition is dominated by helium with ~20 per cent of hydrogen. The stellar spectrum is highly reddened [E(B - V) = 2.85mag]. Adopting an absolute magnitude of Mv = -5.7, the star has a luminosity of logL/Lsolar = 5.75 and a mass-loss rate of 10-4.7Msolaryr-1, and resides at a distance of 6.3kpc. We searched for a possible parent cluster of WR121b and found that this star is located at ~=1° from the young star cluster embedded in the giant HII region W43 (containing a WN7+a/OB? star - WR121a). We also discovered a bow shock around the O9.5III star ALS9956, located at from the cluster. We discuss the possibility that WR121b and ALS9956 are runaway stars ejected from the cluster in W43. Based on observations collected at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center, Calar Alto, jointly operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie Heidelberg and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC). E-mail: vgvaram@mx.iki.rssi.ru (VVG); akniazev@saao.ac.za (AYK); wrh@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de (WRH); berdnik@sai.msu.ru (LNB); fabrika@sao.ru (SF); azamat@sao.ru (AFV)

  4. [Effect of straw-returning on the storage and distribution of different active fractions of soil organic carbon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hul; Wang, Xu-dong; Tian, Xiao-hong

    2014-12-01

    The impacts of straw mulching and returning on the storage of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral associated organic carbon (MOC), and their proportions to the total organic carbon (TOC) were studied based on a field experiment. The results showed that compared to the treatment of wheat straw soil-returning (WR), the storage of TOC and MOC decreased by 4.1% and 9.7% respectively in 0-20 cm soil in the treatment with wheat straw mulching (WM), but the storage of DOC and POC increased by 207.7% and 11.9%, and TOC and POC increased significantly in 20-40 cm soil. Compared to the treatment with maize straw soil-returning (MR), the storage of TOC and MOC in the plough pan soil of the treatment with maize straw mulching (MM) increased by 13.6% and 14.6% , respectively. Compared to the WR-MR treatment, the storage of TOC and MOC in top soil (0-20 icm) significantly decreased by 8.5% and 10.3% respectively in WM-MM treatment. The storage of TOC, and POC in top soil was significantly higher in the treatments with maize straw soil-returning or mulching than that with wheat straw. Compared to the treatment without straw (CK), the storage of TOC in top soil increased by 5.2% to 18.0% in the treatments with straw returning or mulching in the six modes (WM, WR, MM, MR, WM-MM,WR-MR) (Porganic carbon fraction in soil, straw soil-returning had the potential to accumulate stable organic carbon fraction. Considering organic carbon sequestration in cropland in the region of Guanzhong plain, maize straw mulching or soil-returning was better than wheat straw, and wheat straw and maize straw soil-returning (WR-MR) were better than wheat and maize straw mulching (WM-MM).

  5. Stellar X-Ray Polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, J.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the stellar end-state black holes, pulsars, and white dwarfs that are X-ray sources should have polarized X-ray fluxes. The degree will depend on the relative contributions of the unresolved structures. Fluxes from accretion disks and accretion disk corona may be polarized by scattering. Beams and jets may have contributions of polarized emission in strong magnetic fields. The Gravity and Extreme Magnetism Small Explorer (GEMS) will study the effects on polarization of strong gravity of black holes and strong magnetism of neutron stars. Some part of the flux from compact stars accreting from companion stars has been reflected from the companion, its wind, or accretion streams. Polarization of this component is a potential tool for studying the structure of the gas in these binary systems. Polarization due to scattering can also be present in X-ray emission from white dwarf binaries and binary normal stars such as RS CVn stars and colliding wind sources like Eta Car. Normal late type stars may have polarized flux from coronal flares. But X-ray polarization sensitivity is not at the level needed for single early type stars.

  6. The environment of the wind-wind collision region of η Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, C.; Walter, R.

    2018-02-01

    Context. η Carinae is a colliding wind binary hosting two of the most massive stars and featuring the strongest wind collision mechanical luminosity. The wind collision region of this system is detected in X-rays and γ-rays and offers a unique laboratory for the study of particle acceleration and wind magneto-hydrodynamics. Aim. Our main goal is to use X-ray observations of η Carinae around periastron to constrain the wind collision zone geometry and understand the reasons for its variability. Methods: We analysed 10 Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations, which were obtained around the 2014 periastron. The NuSTAR array monitored the source from 3 to 30 keV, which allowed us to grasp the continuum and absorption parameters with very good accuracy. We were able to identify several physical components and probe their variability. Results: The X-ray flux varied in a similar way as observed during previous periastrons and largely as expected if generated in the wind collision region. The flux detected within 10 days of periastron is lower than expected, suggesting a partial disruption of the central region of the wind collision zone. The Fe Kα line is likely broadened by the electrons heated along the complex shock fronts. The variability of its equivalent width indicates that the fluorescence region has a complex geometry and that the source obscuration varies quickly with the line of sight.

  7. NuSTAR Search for Hard X-ray Emission from the Star Formation Regions in Sh2-104

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthelf, Eric V.

    2016-04-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of Sh2-104, a compact Hii region containing several young massive stellar clusters (YMSCs). We have detected distinct hard X-ray sources coincident with localized VERITAS TeV emission recently resolved from the giant gamma-ray complex MGRO J2019+37 in the Cygnus region. Faint, diffuse X-ray emission coincident with the eastern YMSC in Sh2-104 is likely the result of colliding winds of component stars. Just outside the radio shell of Sh2-104 lies 3XMM J201744.7+365045 and nearby nebula NuSTAR J201744.3+364812, whose properties are most consistent with extragalactic objects. The combined XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum of 3XMM J201744.7+365045 is well-fit to an absorbed power-law model with NH = (3.1+/-1.0)E22 1/cm^2 and photon index Gamma = 2.1+/-0.1. Based on possible long-term flux variation and lack of detected pulsations (Sh2-104 will help identify the nature of the X-ray sources and their relation to MGRO J2019+37.

  8. The multi-messenger approach to particle acceleration by massive stars: a science case for optical, radio and X-ray observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Becker, Michaël

    2018-04-01

    Massive stars are extreme stellar objects whose properties allow for the study of some interesting physical processes, including particle acceleration up to relativistic velocities. In particular, the collisions of massive star winds in binary systems lead notably to acceleration of electrons involved in synchrotron emission, hence their identification as non-thermal radio emitters. This has been demonstrated for about 40 objects so far. The relativistic electrons are also expected to produce non-thermal high-energy radiation through inverse Compton scattering. This class of objects permits thus to investigate non-thermal physics through observations in the radio and high energy spectral domains. However, the binary nature of these sources introduces some stringent requirements to adequately interpret their behavior and model non-thermal processes. In particular, these objects are well-established variable stellar sources on the orbital time-scale. The stellar and orbital parameters need to be determined, and this is notably achieved through studies in the optical domain. The combination of observations in the visible domain (including e.g. 3.6-m DOT) with radio measurements using notably GMRT and X-ray observations constitutes thus a promising strategy to investigate particle-accelerating colliding-wind binaries in the forthcoming decade.

  9. A LIGHTHOUSE EFFECT IN ETA CARINAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madura, Thomas I.; Groh, Jose H.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new model for the behavior of scattered time-dependent, asymmetric near-UV emission from the nearby ejecta of η Car. Using a three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulation of η Car's binary colliding winds, we show that the 3D binary orientation derived by Madura et al. in 2012 is capable of explaining the asymmetric near-UV variability observed in the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Camera F220W images of Smith et al.. Models assuming a binary orientation with i ≈ 130°-145°, ω ≈ 230°-315°, P.A. z ≈ 302°-327° are consistent with the observed F220W near-UV images. We find that the hot binary companion does not significantly contribute to the near-UV excess observed in the F220W images. Rather, we suggest that a bore-hole effect and the reduction of Fe II optical depths inside the wind-wind collision cavity carved in the extended photosphere of the primary star lead to the time-dependent directional illumination of circumbinary material as the companion moves about in its highly elliptical orbit.

  10. SYMBIOTIC STARS IN X-RAYS. III. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuñez, N. E. [Instituto de Ciencias Astronómicas de la Tierra y del Espacio (ICATE-UNSJ, CONICET), Av. España (S) 1512, J5402DSP, San Juan (Argentina); Nelson, T. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455 (United States); Mukai, K. [CRESST and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, (NASA/GSFC), Greenbelt, MD 20 771, USA. (United States); Sokoloski, J. L. [Columbia Astrophysics Lab, 550 W120th St., 1027 Pupin Hall, MC 5247 Columbia University, 10027, New York (United States); Luna, G. J. M., E-mail: nnunez@icate-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (IAFE, CONICET-UBA), Av. Inte. Güiraldes 2620, C1428ZAA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-06-10

    We describe the X-ray emission as observed by Suzaku from five symbiotic stars that we selected for deep Suzaku observations after their initial detection with ROSAT, ASCA , and Swift . We find that the X-ray spectra of all five sources can be adequately fit with absorbed optically thin thermal plasma models, with either single- or multi-temperature plasmas. These models are compatible with the X-ray emission originating in the boundary layer between an accretion disk and a white dwarf. The high plasma temperatures of kT > 3 keV for all five targets were greater than expected for colliding winds. Based on these high temperatures as well as previous measurements of UV variability and UV luminosity and the large amplitude of X-ray flickering in 4 Dra, we conclude that all five sources are accretion-powered through predominantly optically thick boundary layers. Our X-ray data allow us to observe a small optically thin portion of the emission from these boundary layers. Given the time between previous observations and these observations, we find that the intrinsic X-ray flux and the intervening absorbing column can vary by factors of three or more on a timescale of years. However, the location of the absorber and the relationship between changes in accretion rate and absorption are still elusive.

  11. The Contribution of Stellar Winds to Cosmic Ray Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeongbhin; Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2018-04-01

    Massive stars blow powerful stellar winds throughout their evolutionary stages from the main sequence to Wolf-Rayet phases. The wind mechanical energy of a massive star deposited to the interstellar medium can be comparable to the explosion energy of a core-collapse supernova that detonates at the end of its life In this study, we estimate the kinetic energy deposition by massive stars in our Galaxy by considering the integrated Galactic initial mass function and modeling the stellar wind luminosity. The mass loss rate and terminal velocity of stellar winds during the main sequence, red supergiant, and Wolf-Rayet stages are estimated by adopting theoretical calculations and observational data published in the literature. We find that the total stellar wind luminosity by all massive stars in the Galaxy is about Lw ≈ 1.1×1041 ergs, which is about 1/4 of the power of supernova explosions, LSN ≈ 4.8×1041 ergs. If we assume that ˜1-1% of the wind luminosity could be converted to Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) through collisonless shocks such as termination shocks in stellar bubbles and superbubbles, colliding-wind shocks in binaries, and bow-shocks of massive runaway stars, stellar winds are expected to make a significant contribution to GCR production, though lower than that of supernova remnants.

  12. SYMBIOTIC STARS IN X-RAYS. III. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuñez, N. E.; Nelson, T.; Mukai, K.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Luna, G. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the X-ray emission as observed by Suzaku from five symbiotic stars that we selected for deep Suzaku observations after their initial detection with ROSAT, ASCA , and Swift . We find that the X-ray spectra of all five sources can be adequately fit with absorbed optically thin thermal plasma models, with either single- or multi-temperature plasmas. These models are compatible with the X-ray emission originating in the boundary layer between an accretion disk and a white dwarf. The high plasma temperatures of kT > 3 keV for all five targets were greater than expected for colliding winds. Based on these high temperatures as well as previous measurements of UV variability and UV luminosity and the large amplitude of X-ray flickering in 4 Dra, we conclude that all five sources are accretion-powered through predominantly optically thick boundary layers. Our X-ray data allow us to observe a small optically thin portion of the emission from these boundary layers. Given the time between previous observations and these observations, we find that the intrinsic X-ray flux and the intervening absorbing column can vary by factors of three or more on a timescale of years. However, the location of the absorber and the relationship between changes in accretion rate and absorption are still elusive.

  13. Discovery of a new bona fide luminous blue variable in Norma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Berdnikov, L. N.

    2015-12-01

    We report the results of optical spectroscopy of the candidate evolved massive star MN44 revealed via detection of a circular shell with the Spitzer Space Telescope. First spectra taken in 2009 May-June showed the Balmer lines in emission as well as numerous emission lines of iron, which is typical of luminous blue variables (LBVs) near the visual maximum. New observations carried out in 2015 May-September detected significant changes in the spectrum, indicating that the star became hotter. We found that these changes are accompanied by significant brightness variability of MN44. In particular, the Ic-band brightness decreased by ≈ 1.6 mag during the last six years and after reaching its minimum in 2015 June has started to increase. Using archival data, we also found that the Ic-band brightness increased by ≈3 mag in ≈30 yr preceding our observations. MN44 therefore represents the 17th known example of the Galactic bona fide LBVs. We detected a nitrogen-rich knot to the north-west of the star, which might represent an interstellar cloudlet interacting with the circumstellar shell. We discuss a possible association between MN44 and the INTEGRAL transient source of hard X-ray emission IGR J16327-4940, implying that MN44 might be either a colliding-wind binary or a high-mass X-ray binary.

  14. Exploring functional relationships between post-fire soil water repellency, soil structure and physico-chemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarfeld, Jamie; Brook, Anna; Keestra, Saskia; Wittenberg, Lea

    2016-04-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) and aggregate stability (AS) are two soil properties that are typically modified after burning and impose significant influence on subsequent hydrological and geomorphological dynamics. The response of AS and soil WR to fire depends upon how fire has influenced other key soil properties (e.g. soil OM, mineralogy). Meanwhile, routine thinning of trees and woody vegetation may alter soil properties (e.g. structure and porosity, wettability) by use of heavy machinery and species selection. The study area is situated along a north-facing slope of Mount Carmel national park (Israel). The selected sites are presented as a continuum of management intensity and fire histories. To date, the natural baseline of soil WR has yet to be thoroughly assessed and must be investigated alongside associated soil aggregating parameters in order to understand its overall impact. This study examines (i) the natural baseline of soil WR and physical properties compared to those of disturbed sites in the immediate (controlled burn) and long-term (10-years), and (ii) the interactions of soil properties with different control factors (management, surface cover, seasonal-temporal, burn temperature, soil organic carbon (OC) and mineralogy) in Mediterranean calcareous soils. Analysis of surface soil samples before and after destruction of WR by heating (200-600°C) was implemented using a combination of traditional methods and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Management and surface cover type conditioned the wettability, soil structure and porosity of soils in the field, although this largely did not affect the heat-induced changes observed in the lab. A positive correlation was observed along an increasing temperature gradient, with relative maxima of MWD and BD reached by most soils at the threshold of 400-500°C. Preliminary analyses of soil OC (MIR) and mineralogical composition (VIS-NIR) support existing research regarding: (i) the importance of soil OC quality and

  15. Hyperbolic-cosine waveguide tapers and oversize rectangular waveguide for reduced broadband insertion loss in W-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. II. Broadband characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Anderson, James R.; Mainali, Laxman; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Strangeway, Robert A. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Physics, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Experimental results have been reported on an oversize rectangular waveguide assembly operating nominally at 94 GHz. It was formed using commercially available WR28 waveguide as well as a pair of specially designed tapers with a hyperbolic-cosine shape from WR28 to WR10 waveguide [R. R. Mett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 074704 (2011)]. The oversize section reduces broadband insertion loss for an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) probe placed in a 3.36 T magnet. Hyperbolic-cosine tapers minimize reflection of the main mode and the excitation of unwanted propagating waveguide modes. Oversize waveguide is distinguished from corrugated waveguide, overmoded waveguide, or quasi-optic techniques by minimal coupling to higher-order modes. Only the TE{sub 10} mode of the parent WR10 waveguide is propagated. In the present work, a new oversize assembly with a gradual 90° twist was implemented. Microwave power measurements show that the twisted oversize waveguide assembly reduces the power loss in the observe and pump arms of a W-band bridge by an average of 2.35 dB and 2.41 dB, respectively, over a measured 1.25 GHz bandwidth relative to a straight length of WR10 waveguide. Network analyzer measurements confirm a decrease in insertion loss of 2.37 dB over a 4 GHz bandwidth and show minimal amplitude distortion of approximately 0.15 dB. Continuous wave EPR experiments confirm these results. The measured phase variations of the twisted oversize waveguide assembly, relative to an ideal distortionless transmission line, are reduced by a factor of two compared to a straight length of WR10 waveguide. Oversize waveguide with proper transitions is demonstrated as an effective way to increase incident power and the return signal for broadband EPR experiments. Detailed performance characteristics, including continuous wave experiment using 1 μM 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl in aqueous solution, provided here serve as a benchmark for other broadband low-loss probes in

  16. Hyperbolic-cosine waveguide tapers and oversize rectangular waveguide for reduced broadband insertion loss in W-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. II. Broadband characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Anderson, James R.; Mainali, Laxman; Hyde, James S.; Strangeway, Robert A.; Mett, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results have been reported on an oversize rectangular waveguide assembly operating nominally at 94 GHz. It was formed using commercially available WR28 waveguide as well as a pair of specially designed tapers with a hyperbolic-cosine shape from WR28 to WR10 waveguide [R. R. Mett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 074704 (2011)]. The oversize section reduces broadband insertion loss for an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) probe placed in a 3.36 T magnet. Hyperbolic-cosine tapers minimize reflection of the main mode and the excitation of unwanted propagating waveguide modes. Oversize waveguide is distinguished from corrugated waveguide, overmoded waveguide, or quasi-optic techniques by minimal coupling to higher-order modes. Only the TE 10 mode of the parent WR10 waveguide is propagated. In the present work, a new oversize assembly with a gradual 90° twist was implemented. Microwave power measurements show that the twisted oversize waveguide assembly reduces the power loss in the observe and pump arms of a W-band bridge by an average of 2.35 dB and 2.41 dB, respectively, over a measured 1.25 GHz bandwidth relative to a straight length of WR10 waveguide. Network analyzer measurements confirm a decrease in insertion loss of 2.37 dB over a 4 GHz bandwidth and show minimal amplitude distortion of approximately 0.15 dB. Continuous wave EPR experiments confirm these results. The measured phase variations of the twisted oversize waveguide assembly, relative to an ideal distortionless transmission line, are reduced by a factor of two compared to a straight length of WR10 waveguide. Oversize waveguide with proper transitions is demonstrated as an effective way to increase incident power and the return signal for broadband EPR experiments. Detailed performance characteristics, including continuous wave experiment using 1 μM 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl in aqueous solution, provided here serve as a benchmark for other broadband low-loss probes in

  17. Betwixt and between: workplace perspectives on work reintegration in the eldercare sector in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladekjær Larsen, Eva; Labriola, Merete; Vinther Nielsen, Claus; Schultz Petersen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary return-to-work (RTW) policies in Denmark and other welfare nations recommend employees on long-term sick leave, due to physical or mental health problems, to RTW gradually. Factors that influence the process of work reintegration (WR) is well documented, however, co-workers experiences of this process are a rather new research topic. Moreover, in the context of the present research, no studies have so far explored the workplace as an arena for social interaction. The aim of this study was to explore co-workers' experiences of the reintegration process and how these experiences are related to social positions at the workplace. Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted at two nursing homes that were in a process WR after long-term sick leave. The data consist of field notes, policy documents, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Data were organized by use of NVivo. A theoretical framework was adopted which enabled us to approach and interpret the reintegration process as one that changed the social position of the returning employee. The dataset demonstrates how the returnee is in a state of being betwixt and between the social positions of a co-worker and a non-co-worker. This is illustrated in three cases which show that this state prevents the returnee from taking on the role as a co-worker, excludes the returnee from the workplace, and creates uncertainty for all workplace actors. The study highlighted that WR creates a social position for the returnee that complicates the working routine and causes uncertainty in social interactions. Implications for Rehabilitation Work reintegration (WR) after long-term sick leave is commonly characterized by reduced working hours and modified working tasks. The WR process influences the whole work place including co-workers' everyday working life and complicates work situations where work tasks and roles are negotiated between the returning worker and co-workers. Future WR policies and guidelines could

  18. MICROORGANISMS IN CONFECTIONERY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľubomíra Juhaniaková

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine microbiological quality of confectionery products. In confectionery products microbiological parameters: coliforms bacteria, microscopic filamentous fungi and yeasts, Salmonella sp. and staphylococci were observed. The confectionery products were evaluated: Kremes - honey cube, roll Arabica, roll Rona, roll stuffed with apricot cream, honey cube, pinwheel caramel, Sachovnica cut, Zora cut and curd cake. For microbiological tests 18 samples of confectionery products were used. Numbers of coliforms bacteria in confectionery products ranged from <1x101 to 4x102 cfu.g-1, the number of microscopic fungi ranged from 0 to <1x101 cfu.g-1, the number of yeasts from <1x101 to 5.5x102 cfu.g-1, cells of Salmonella sp. were not detected and the number of staphylococci was from 0 to <1x101 cfu.g-1. All investigated samples of confectionary products were in accordance with the Codex Alimentarius of the Slovak Republic.

  19. Isolation and proteomic analysis of Chlamydomonas centrioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lani C; Marshall, Wallace F

    2008-01-01

    Centrioles are barrel-shaped cytoskeletal organelles composed of nine triplet microtubules blades arranged in a pinwheel-shaped array. Centrioles are required for recruitment of pericentriolar material (PCM) during centrosome formation, and they act as basal bodies, which are necessary for the outgrowth of cilia and flagella. Despite being described over a hundred years ago, centrioles are still among the most enigmatic organelles in all of cell biology. To gain molecular insights into the function and assembly of centrioles, we sought to determine the composition of the centriole proteome. Here, we describe a method that allows for the isolation of virtually "naked" centrioles, with little to no obscuring PCM, from the green alga, Chlamydomonas. Proteomic analysis of this material provided evidence that multiple human disease gene products encode protein components of the centriole, including genes involved in Meckel syndrome and Oral-Facial-Digital syndrome. Isolated centrioles can be used in combination with a wide variety of biochemical assays in addition to being utilized as a source for proteomic analysis.

  20. Development and matching of binocular orientation preference in mouse V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, Basabi; Shah, Nishal P

    2014-01-01

    Eye-specific thalamic inputs converge in the primary visual cortex (V1) and form the basis of binocular vision. For normal binocular perceptions, such as depth and stereopsis, binocularly matched orientation preference between the two eyes is required. A critical period of binocular matching of orientation preference in mice during normal development is reported in literature. Using a reaction diffusion model we present the development of RF and orientation selectivity in mouse V1 and investigate the binocular orientation preference matching during the critical period. At the onset of the critical period the preferred orientations of the modeled cells are mostly mismatched in the two eyes and the mismatch decreases and reaches levels reported in juvenile mouse by the end of the critical period. At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective. In literature around 40% cortical cells are reported as orientation selective in mouse V1. The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells. The absence of near neighbor interaction among cortical cells during the development of thalamo-cortical wiring causes a salt and pepper organization in the orientation preference map in mice. It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.