WorldWideScience

Sample records for colliding pulse method

  1. Pulsed RF Sources for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the workshop on pulsed RF sources for linear colliders. The workshop examined the performance of RF sources for possible future linear colliders. Important sources were presented on new type of klystrons, gyrotrons and gyroklystrons. A number of auxiliary topics were covered, including modulators, pulse compression, power extraction, windows, electron guns and gun codes. The workshop was sponsored by the International Committee for Future Accelerators(ICFA), the U.S. Department of Energy and the Center for Accelerator Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory. There were forty one papers presented at the workshop and all forty one have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  2. Chirp of monolithic colliding pulse mode-locked diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, M.; Bischoff, S.; Franck, Thorkild

    1997-01-01

    Spectrally resolved streak camera measurements of picosecond pulses emitted by hybridly colliding pulse mode-locked (CPM) laser diodes are presented in this letter. Depending on the modulation frequency both blue-chirped (upchirped) and red-chirped (downchirped) pulses can be observed. The two...... different regimes and the transition between them are characterized experimentally and the behavior is explained on the basis of our model for the CPM laser dynamics. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics....

  3. Modelling colliding-pulse mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Svend

    or to determine the optimum operation conditions. The purpose of this thesis is to elucidate some of the physics of interest in the field of semiconductor laser modelling, semiconductor optics and fiber optics. To be more specific we will investigate: The Colliding-Pulse Mode-Locked (CPM) Quantum Well (QW) laser...... diode; the excitonic semiconductor response for varying material thickness in the case of linear optics; and modulational instability of electromagnetic waves in media with spatially varying non-linearity....

  4. Colliding scalar pulses in the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkai Hisaaki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We numerically investigated how the nonlinear dynamics depends on the dimensionality and on the higher-order curvature corrections in the form of Gauss-Bonnet (GB terms, with a model of colliding scalar pulses in plane-symmetric space-time. We observed that a collision of large scalar pulses will produce a large-curvature region, of which the magnitude depends on αGB. The normal corrections (αGB > 0 work for avoiding the appearance of singularity, although it is inevitable.

  5. Power supply and pulsing strategies for the future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogna, A S; Weber, M; Göttlicher, P

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the power delivery systems of the future linear colliders exploits the pulsed bunch structure of the beam in order to minimize the average current in the cables and the electronics and thus to reduce the material budget and heat dissipation. Although modern integrated circuit technologies are already available to design a low-power system, the concepts on how to pulse the front-end electronics and further reduce the power are not yet well understood. We propose a possible implementation of a power pulsing system based on a DC/DC converter and we choose the Analog Hadron Calorimeter as a specific example. The model features large switching currents of electronic modules in short time intervals to stimulate the inductive components along the cables and interconnections.

  6. Pulse-shaping mechanism in colliding-pulse mode-locked laser diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Svend; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Mørk, J.

    1995-01-01

    The large signal dynamics of passively colliding pulse mode-locked laser diodes is studied. We derive a model which explains modelocking via the interplay of gain and loss dynamics; no bandwidth limiting element is necessary for pulse formation. It is found necessary to have both fast and slow...... absorber dynamics to achieve mode-locking. Significant chirp is predicted for pulses emitted from long lasers, in agreement with experiment. The pulse width shows a strong dependence on both cavity and saturable absorber length. (C) 1995 American Institute of Physics....

  7. Colliding Pulse Mode-Locked Laser Diode using Multimode Interference Reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon Gallegos, Carlos; Guzmán, R.C.; Jimenez, A.; Leijtens, X.J.M.; Carpintero, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel fully monolithic Colliding Pulse Mode-Locked Laser Diode (CPML) using Multimode Interference Reflectors (MMIRs) to create the laser resonator. We demonstrate experimentally for the first time to our knowledge the Colliding Pulse mode-locking of a laser using MMIRs by observation

  8. Laser pulse stacking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  9. Modelling and characterization of colliding-pulse mode-locked (CPM) quantum well lasers. [MPS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bischoff, Svend; Brorson, S.D.; Franck, T.

    1996-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of passive colliding pulse mode-locked quantum well lasers is presented. The theoretical model for the gain dynamics is based on semi-classical density matrixequations. The gain dynamics are characterized exp...

  10. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  11. On e(+)e(-) pair production by colliding electromagnetic pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narozhny, NB; Bulanov, SS; Mur, VD; Popov, VS

    2004-01-01

    Electron-positron pair production from vacuum in an electromagnetic field created by two counterpropagating focused laser pulses interacting with each other is analyzed. The dependence of the number of produced pairs on the intensity of a laser pulse and the focusing parameter is studied with a

  12. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, M., E-mail: martin.hansson@fysik.lth.se; Aurand, B.; Ekerfelt, H.; Persson, A.; Lundh, O.

    2016-09-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second pulse in relation to the main pulse. Furthermore, the peak energy of the electrons in the beams is controlled by moving the collision point along the optical axis of the main pulse, and thereby changing the acceleration length in the plasma. - Highlights: • Compact colliding pulse injection set-up used to produce low energy spread e-beams. • Beam charge controlled by rotating the polarization of injection pulse. • Peak energy controlled by point of collision to vary the acceleration length.

  13. Pulse Capacitors for Next Generation Linear Colliders. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    During this Phase I SBIR research program, Nanomaterials Research Corporation (NRC) successfully demonstrated high-voltage multilayer capacitors produced from sub-100 nm ceramic powders. The devices produced by NRC exhibited properties that make them particularly useful for pulse power applications. These properties include (1) high capacitance (2) low loss (3) high breakdown voltage (4) high insulation resistance and (5) rapid discharge characteristics. Furthermore, the properties of the nanostructured capacitors were consistently found to exceed those of components that represent the state of the art within the industry. Encouraged by these results, NRC is planning to submit a Phase II proposal with the objective of securing seed capital to continue this development effort

  14. 50-fs pulse generation directly from a colliding-pulse mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser using an antiresonant ring mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, Kazunori; Mogi, Kazuo

    1991-05-01

    50-fs pulses were directly generated from a colliding-pulse mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. To achieve the colliding-pulse mode locking, a miniature antiresonant ring containing an organic saturable dye jet was employed as the end mirror for the linear cavity laser. Based on measured dispersion of intracavity elements, a prism pair was implemented to control the cavity dispersion. The generated pulses have no linear chirp but do exhibit parabolic instantaneous frequency owing to third-order dispersion introduced by the prism pair.

  15. Pulse-by-pulse energy measurement at the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, G.; Briggs, D.; Collins, B.; Petree, M.

    1992-01-01

    The stanford Linear Collider (SLC) collides a beam of electrons and positrons at 92 GeV. It is the first colliding linac, and produces Z 0 particles for High-Energy Physics measurements. The energy of each beam must be measured to one part in 10 4 on every collision (120 Hz). An Energy Spectrometer in each beam line after collision produces two stripes of high-energy synchrotron radiation with critical energy of a few MeV. The distance between these two stripes at an imaging plane measures the beam energy. The Wire- Imaging Synchrotron Radiation Detector (WISRD) system comprises a novel detector, data acquisition electronics, readout and analysis. The detector comprises an array of wires for each synchrotron stripe. The electronics measure secondary emission charge on each wire of each array. A Macintosh II (using THINK C, THINK Class Library) and DSP coprocessor (using ANSI C) acquire and analyze the data, and display and report the results for SLC operation

  16. Pulse-by-pulse energy measurement at the Stanford Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, G.; Briggs, D.; Collins, B.; Petree, M.

    1992-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) collides a beam of electrons and positrons at 92 GeV. It is the first colliding linac, and produces Z(sup 0) particles for High-Energy Physics measurements. The energy of each beam must be measured to one part in 10(exp 4) on every collision (120 Hz). An Energy Spectrometer in each beam line after the collision produces two stripes of high-energy synchrotron radiation with critical energy of a few MeV. The distance between these two stripes at an imaging plane measures the beam energy. The Wire-Imaging Synchrotron Radiation Detector (WISRD) system comprises a novel detector, data acquisition electronics, readout, and analysis. The detector comprises an array of wires for each synchrotron stripe. The electronics measure secondary emission charge on each wire of each array. A Macintosh II (using THINK C, THINK Class Library) and DSP coprocessor (using ANSI C) acquire and analyze the data, and display and report the results for SLC operation.

  17. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  18. General method for final focus system design for circular colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo de Maria

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Colliders use final focus systems to reduce the transverse beam sizes at the interaction point in order to increase collision event rates. The maximum focal strength (gradient of the quadrupoles, and the maximum beam size in them, together limit the beam size reduction that is possible. The goal of a final focus system design is to find the best compromise between quadrupole aperture and quadrupole gradient, for the magnet technology that is used. This paper develops a design method that identifies the intrinsic limitations of a final focus system, validates the results of the method against realistic designs, and reports its application to the upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider final focus.

  19. Colliding pulse injection experiments in non-collinear geometry for controlled laser plasma wakefield acceleration of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric H.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Leemans, Wim P.; Nakamura, Kei; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Schroeder, Carl B.; Bruhwiler, D.; Cary, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    An optical injection scheme for a laser-plasma based accelerator which employs a non-collinear counter-propagating laser beam to push background electrons in the focusing and acceleration phase via ponderomotive beat with the trailing part of the wakefield driver pulse is discussed. Preliminary experiments were performed using a drive beam of a 0 = 2.6 and colliding beam of a 1 = 0.8 both focused on the middle of a 200 mu m slit jet backed with 20 bar, which provided ∼ 260 mu m long gas plume. The enhancement in the total charge by the colliding pulse was observed with sharp dependence on the delay time of the colliding beam. Enhancement of the neutron yield was also measured, which suggests a generation of electrons above 10 MeV

  20. Dual branch high voltage pulse generator for the beam extraction of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonthond, J; Ducimetière, L; Jansson, U; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    2002-01-01

    The LHC beam extraction kicker system, MKD, is composed of 15 fast kicker magnets per beam to extract the particles in one turn from the collider and to dispose them, after dilution, on an external absorber. Each magnet is powered by a separate pulse generator. The original single branch generator consisted of a discharge capacitor in series with a solid state closing switch left bracket 1 right bracket operating at 30 kV. In combination with a parallel freewheel diode stack this generator produced a current pulse of 2.7 mus rise time, 18.5 kA amplitude and about 1.8 ms fall time, of which only about 90 mus are needed to dump the beam. The freewheel diode circuit is equipped with a flat top current droop compensation network, consisting of a low voltage, low stray inductance, high current discharge capacitor. Extensive reliability studies have meanwhile suggested to further increase the operational safety of this crucial system by equipping each generator with two parallel branches. This paper presents the re...

  1. Multiple Colliding Electromagnetic Pulses: A Way to Lower the Threshold of e+e- Pair Production from Vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhny, N. B.; Nees, J.; Popov, V. S.

    2010-01-01

    The scheme of a simultaneous multiple pulse focusing on one spot naturally arises from the structural features of projected new laser systems, such as the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) and High Power laser Energy Research (HiPER). It is shown that the multiple pulse configuration is beneficial for observing e + e - pair production from a vacuum under the action of sufficiently strong electromagnetic fields. The field of focused pulses is described using a realistic three-dimensional model based on an exact solution of the Maxwell equations. The e + e - pair production threshold in terms of electromagnetic field energy can be substantially lowered if, instead of one or even two colliding pulses, multiple pulses are focused on one spot. The multiple pulse interaction geometry gives rise to subwavelength field features in the focal region. These features result in the production of extremely short e + e - bunches.

  2. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 (micro)m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  3. Proposed method to produce a highly polarized e+ beam for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okugi, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Masami; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    1996-01-01

    We propose a method to produce a spin-polarized e + beam using e + e - pair-creation by circularly polarized photons. Assuming Compton scattering of an unpolarized e - beam and circularly polarized laser light, scattered γ-rays at the high end of the energy spectrum are also circularly polarized. If those γ-rays are utilized to create e ± pairs on a thin target, the spin-polarization is preserved for e + 's at the high end of their energy spectrum. By using the injector linac of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK and a commercially available Nd:YAG pulse laser, we can expect about 10 5 polarized e + 's per second with a degree of polarization of 80% and a kinetic energy of 35-80 MeV. The apparatus for creation and measurement of polarized e + 's is being constructed. We present new idea for possible application of our method to future linear colliders by utilizing a high-power CO 2 laser. (author)

  4. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, David

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest in the possibility of positive-negative muon colliders was reflected in the second workshop on the Physics Potential and Development of Muon Colliders, held in Sausalito, California, from 16-19 November, with some 60 attendees. It began with an overview of the particle physics goals, detector constraints, the muon collider and mu cooling, and source issues. The major issue confronting muon development is the possible luminosity achievable. Two collider energies were considered: 200 + 200 GeV and 2 + 2 TeV. The major particle physics goals are the detection of the higgs boson(s) for the lower energy collider, together with WW scattering and supersymmetric particle discovery. At the first such workshop, held in Napa, California, in 1992, it was estimated that a luminosity of some 10 30 and 3 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 for the low and high energy collider might be achieved (papers from this meeting were published in the October issue of NIM). This was considered a somewhat conservative estimate at the time. At the Sausalito workshop the goal was to see if a luminosity of 10 32 to 10 34 for the two colliders might be achievable and usable by a detector. There were five working groups - physics, 200 + 200 GeV collider, 2 + 2 TeV collider, detector design and backgrounds, and muon cooling and production methods. Considerable progress was made in all these areas at the workshop.

  5. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  6. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  7. NLO production of W' bosons at hadron colliders using the MCatNLO and POWHEG methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaefstathiou, A.; Latunde-Dada, O.

    2009-01-01

    We present a next-to-leading order (NLO) treatment of the production of a new charged heavy vector boson, generically called W', at hadron colliders via the Drell-Yan process. We fully consider the interference effects with the Standard Model W boson and allow for arbitrary chiral couplings to quarks and leptons. We present results at both leading order (LO) and NLO in QCD using the MCatNLO/Herwig++ and POWHEG methods. We derive theoretical observation curves on the mass-width plane for both the LO and NLO cases at different collider luminosities. The event generator used, Wpnlo, is fully customisable and publicly available.

  8. Influence of different approaches for dynamical performance optimization of monolithic passive colliding-pulse mode-locked laser diodes emitting around 850 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prziwarka, T.; Klehr, A.; Wenzel, H.; Fricke, J.; Bugge, F.; Weyers, M.; Knigge, A.; Tränkle, G.

    2018-02-01

    Monolithic laser diodes which generate short infrared pulses in the picosecond and sub-picosecond ranges with high peak power are ideal sources for many applications like e.g. THz-time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) scanning systems. The achievable THz bandwidth is limited by the length of the optical pulses. Due to the fact that colliding-pulse mode locking (CPM) leads to the shortest pulses which could reached by passive mode locking, we experimentally investigated in detail the dynamical and electro optical performance of InGaAsP based quantum well CPM laser diodes with well-established vertical layer structures. Simple design modifications whose implementation is technically easy were realized. Improvements of the device performance in terms of pulse duration, output power, and noise properties are presented in dependence on the different adaptions. From the results we extract an optimized configuration with which we have reached pulses with durations of ≍1.5 ps, a peak power of > 1 W and a pulse-to-pulse timing jitter < 200 fs. The laser diodes emit pulses at a wavelength around 850 nm with a repetition frequency of ≍ 12.4 GHz and could be used as pump source for GaAs antennas to generate THz-radiation. Approaches for reducing pulse width, increasing output power, and improving noise performance are described.

  9. Method for pulse to pulse dose reproducibility applied to electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ighigeanu, D.; Martin, D.; Oproiu, C.; Cirstea, E.; Craciun, G.

    2002-01-01

    An original method for obtaining programmed beam single shots and pulse trains with programmed pulse number, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration and pulse dose is presented. It is particularly useful for automatic control of absorbed dose rate level, irradiation process control as well as in pulse radiolysis studies, single pulse dose measurement or for research experiments where pulse-to-pulse dose reproducibility is required. This method is applied to the electron linear accelerators, ALIN-10 of 6.23 MeV and 82 W and ALID-7, of 5.5 MeV and 670 W, built in NILPRP. In order to implement this method, the accelerator triggering system (ATS) consists of two branches: the gun branch and the magnetron branch. ATS, which synchronizes all the system units, delivers trigger pulses at a programmed repetition rate (up to 250 pulses/s) to the gun (80 kV, 10 A and 4 ms) and magnetron (45 kV, 100 A, and 4 ms).The accelerated electron beam existence is determined by the electron gun and magnetron pulses overlapping. The method consists in controlling the overlapping of pulses in order to deliver the beam in the desired sequence. This control is implemented by a discrete pulse position modulation of gun and/or magnetron pulses. The instabilities of the gun and magnetron transient regimes are avoided by operating the accelerator with no accelerated beam for a certain time. At the operator 'beam start' command, the ATS controls electron gun and magnetron pulses overlapping and the linac beam is generated. The pulse-to-pulse absorbed dose variation is thus considerably reduced. Programmed absorbed dose, irradiation time, beam pulse number or other external events may interrupt the coincidence between the gun and magnetron pulses. Slow absorbed dose variation is compensated by the control of the pulse duration and repetition frequency. Two methods are reported in the electron linear accelerators' development for obtaining the pulse to pulse dose reproducibility: the method

  10. Large subcriticality measurement by pulsed neutron method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Y.; Yoshida, A.; Nishina, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Kanda, K.

    1985-01-01

    To establish the method determining large subcriticalities in the field of nuclear criticality safety, the authors performed pulsed neutron experiments using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) at Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University and the Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator attached to the assembly. The area-ratio method proposed by Sjoestrand was employed to evaluate subcriticalities from neutron decay curves measured. This method has the shortcomings that the neutron component due to a decay of delayed neutrons remarkably decreases as the subcriticality of an objective increases. To overcome the shortcoming, the authors increased the frequency of pulsed neutron generation. The integral-version of the area-ratio method proposed by Kosaly and Fisher was employed in addition in order to remove a contamination of spatial higher modes from the decay curve. The latter becomes significant as subcriticality increases. The largest subcriticality determined in the present experiments was 125.4 dollars, which was equal to 0.5111 in a multiplication factor. The calculational values evaluated by the computer code KENO-IV with 137 energy groups based on the Monte Carlo method agreed well with those experimental values

  11. Feedback Systems for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an integral part of the design. Feedback requirements for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at high bandwidth and fast response. To correct for the motion of individual bunches within a train, both feedforward and feedback systems are planned. SLC experience has shown that feedback systems are an invaluable operational tool for decoupling systems, allowing precision tuning, and providing pulse-to-pulse diagnostics. Feedback systems for the NLC will incorporate the key SLC features and the benefits of advancing technologies

  12. Measurement of subcriticality by a pulsing α-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jitarev, V.E.; Kachanov, V.M.; Kuzmin, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    The report presents results of a pulsing α-method [1] for determination of the WWER system subcriticality. The pulsing α-method permits to conduct measurements of system subcriticality in conditions of subcritical state and large neutron background. Therefore this method can be used for the control of a subcriticality of storehouses of a burn up nuclear fuel and stopped reactor. (Authors)

  13. Tube welding by the pulsed tig method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, N.T.

    1973-01-01

    During the construction of the helical wound boiler pods for the AGR stations at Hartlepool and Heysham, automatic TIG-welding techniques were used. In some cases limited access excluded the use of wire feed techniques and autogenous techniques had to be used. To resolve the problem of excessive concavity which occurred when using constant current autogenous techniques on 14.5 mm OD mild steel tubes of 1.8 mm thickness, pulsed-TIG welding was applied. By modifying the trailing edge of the pulse to produce a crater fill with each pulse, susceptibility to porosity and solidification cracking was reduced. The incorporation of digital counter permitted pulse duration, background duration, and electrode indexing distance to be monitored. (U.K.)

  14. Method for integrating a train of fast, nanosecond wide pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a method used to integrate a train of fast, nanosecond wide pulses. The pulses come from current transformers in a RF LINAC beamline. Because they are ac signals and have no dc component, true mathematical integration would yield zero over the pulse train period or an equally erroneous value because of a dc baseline shift. The circuit used to integrate the pulse train first stretches the pulses to 35 ns FWHM. The signals are then fed into a high-speed, precision rectifier which restores a true dc baseline for the following stage - a fast, gated integrator. The rectifier is linear over 55dB in excess of 25 MHz, and the gated integrator is linear over a 60 dB range with input pulse widths as short as 16 ns. The assembled system is linear over 30 dB with a 6 MHz input signal

  15. A Radiation Dosimetry Method Using Pulsed Optically Stimulated Luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselrod, M.S.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the determination of absorbed radiation dose is described based on pulsed optically stimulated luminescence (POSL). The method relies upon the stimulation of an irradiated sample with a train of light pulses from a suitable light source (e.g. a laser) using a wavelength which is within the range of wavelengths corresponding to the radiation-induced optical absorption in the irradiated sample. The subsequent emitted light, due to the detrapping of trapped charges and their subsequent recombination with charge of the opposite sign, is synchronously detected in the period between each stimulation pulse. The total luminescence is summed over the desired number of stimulation pulses and this forms the measured POSL signal. By monitoring the emitted light only in the period between stimulation pulses one can reduce the optical filtering required to discriminate between the stimulation light and the emission light; in this way a high measurement efficiency, and, therefore, a high radiation sensitivity (luminescence intensity per unit absorbed dose) is achieved. Key parameters in the method are the intrinsic luminescence lifetime for the material being used as the luminescent detector, the width of the optical stimulation pulse, and the period between pulses. For optimum operation the measurement parameters should be such that both the pulse width and the time between pulses are much less than the luminescence lifetime. By appropriate choice of the power of the optical stimulation, the frequency of the stimulation pulses, and the total stimulation period, one can also re-measure the absorbed dose several times. In this way, a re-read capability is available with the procedure. The method is illustrated using light from a 2nd-harmonic Nd:YAG laser, with irradiated, anion-deficient aluminium oxide as the luminescent detector material. (author)

  16. HARMONIC ANALYSIS OF SVPWM INVERTER USING MULTIPLE-PULSES METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet YUMURTACI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Space Vector Modulation (SVM technique is a popular and an important PWM technique for three phases voltage source inverter in the control of Induction Motor. In this study harmonic analysis of Space Vector PWM (SVPWM is investigated using multiple-pulses method. Multiple-Pulses method calculates the Fourier coefficients of individual positive and negative pulses of the output PWM waveform and adds them together using the principle of superposition to calculate the Fourier coefficients of the all PWM output signal. Harmonic magnitudes can be calculated directly by this method without linearization, using look-up tables or Bessel functions. In this study, the results obtained in the application of SVPWM for values of variable parameters are compared with the results obtained with the multiple-pulses method.

  17. Simulation methods of nuclear electromagnetic pulse effects in integrated circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jili; Liu Yuan; En Yunfei; Fang Wenxiao; Wei Aixiang; Yang Yuanzhen

    2013-01-01

    In the paper the ways to compute the response of transmission line (TL) illuminated by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) were introduced firstly, which include finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and trans-mission line matrix (TLM); then the feasibility of electromagnetic topology (EMT) in ICs nuclear electromagnetic pulse (NEMP) effect simulation was discussed; in the end, combined with the methods computing the response of TL, a new method of simulate the transmission line in IC illuminated by NEMP was put forward. (authors)

  18. Pulsed interrupter and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Joel Lawton; Kratz, Robert

    2015-06-09

    Some embodiments provide interrupter systems comprising: a first electrode; a second electrode; a piston movably located at a first position and electrically coupled with the first and second electrodes establishing a closed state, the piston comprises an electrical conductor that couples with the first and second electrodes providing a conductive path; an electromagnetic launcher configured to, when activated, induce a magnetic field pulse causing the piston to move away from the electrical coupling with the first and second electrodes establishing an open circuit between the first and second electrodes; and a piston control system comprising a piston arresting system configured to control a deceleration of the piston following the movement of the piston induced by the electromagnetic launcher such that the piston is not in electrical contact with at least one of the first electrode and the second electrode when in the open state.

  19. Apparatus and method for generating high density pulses of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.; Oettinger, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for the production of high density pulses of electrons using a laser energized emitter. Caesium atoms from a low pressure vapour atmosphere are absorbed on and migrate from a metallic target rapidly heated by a laser to a high temperature. Due to this heating time being short compared with the residence time of the caesium atoms adsorbed on the target surface, copious electrons are emitted which form a high current density pulse. (U.K.)

  20. Neural network and area method interpretation of pulsed experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dulla, S.; Picca, P.; Ravetto, P. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Energetica, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino (Italy); Canepa, S. [Lab of Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour LRS, Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The determination of the subcriticality level is an important issue in accelerator-driven system technology. The area method, originally introduced by N. G. Sjoestrand, is a classical technique to interpret flux measurement for pulsed experiments in order to reconstruct the reactivity value. In recent times other methods have also been developed, to account for spatial and spectral effects, which were not included in the area method, since it is based on the point kinetic model. The artificial neural network approach can be an efficient technique to infer reactivities from pulsed experiments. In the present work, some comparisons between the two methods are carried out and discussed. (authors)

  1. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity micro + micro - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed

  2. Method of reconstructing a moving pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, S J; Horton, R D; Hwang, D Q; Evans, R W; Brockington, S J; Johnson, J [UC Davis Department of Applied Science, Livermore, CA, 94551 (United States)

    2007-11-15

    We present a method of analyzing a set of N time signals f{sub i}(t) that consist of local measurements of the same physical observable taken at N sequential locations Z{sub i} along the length of an experimental device. The result is an algorithm for reconstructing an approximation F(z,t) of the field f(z,t) in the inaccessible regions between the points of measurement. We also explore the conditions needed for this approximation to hold, and test the algorithm under a variety of conditions. We apply this method to analyze the magnetic field measurements taken on the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) plasma accelerator; providing a direct means of visualizing experimental data, quantifying global properties, and benchmarking simulation.

  3. Nuclear pulse signal processing techniques based on blind deconvolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Pengfei; Yang Lei; Qi Zhong; Meng Xiangting; Fu Yanyan; Li Dongcang

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a method of measurement and analysis of nuclear pulse signal, the FPGA to control high-speed ADC measurement of nuclear radiation signals and control the high-speed transmission status of the USB to make it work on the Slave FIFO mode, using the LabVIEW online data processing and display, using the blind deconvolution method to remove the accumulation of signal acquisition, and to restore the nuclear pulse signal with a transmission speed, real-time measurements show that the advantages. (authors)

  4. Pulsed Plasma Lubrication Device and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); D'Agostino, Saverio A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a lubrication device comprising a solid lubricant disposed between and in contact with a first electrode and a second electrode dimensioned and arranged such that application of an electric potential between the first electrode and the second electrode sufficient to produce an electric arc between the first electrode and the second electrode to produce a plasma in an ambient atmosphere at an ambient pressure which vaporizes at least a portion of the solid lubricant to produce a vapor stream comprising the solid lubricant. Methods to lubricate a surface utilizing the lubrication device in-situ are also disclosed.

  5. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  6. Colliding druthers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Johnson, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations are made to maximize the usefulness of the colliding beam facility of the Main Ring and Energy Doubler at the Fermilab accelerator. The advantages of the transposed crossing geometry over the kissing geometry are pointed out

  7. Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppenfeld, D.

    1999-01-01

    These lectures are intended as a pedagogical introduction to physics at $e^+e^-$ and hadron colliders. A selection of processes is used to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of the different machines. The discussion includes $W$ pair production and chargino searches at $e^+e^-$ colliders, Drell-Yan events and the top quark search at the Tevatron, and Higgs searches at the LHC.

  8. Polarized Electrons for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.

    2004-01-01

    Future electron-positron linear colliders require a highly polarized electron beam with a pulse structure that depends primarily on whether the acceleration utilizes warm or superconducting rf structures. The International Linear Collider (ILC) will use cold structures for the main linac. It is shown that a dc-biased polarized photoelectron source such as successfully used for the SLC can meet the charge requirements for the ILC micropulse with a polarization approaching 90%

  9. Method for estimating off-axis pulse tube losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, T.; Mulcahey, T. I.; Taylor, R. P.; Spoor, P. S.; Conrad, T. J.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Some Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers (PTCs) exhibit sensitivity to gravitational orientation and often exhibit significant cooling performance losses unless situated with the cold end pointing downward. Prior investigations have indicated that some coolers exhibit sensitivity while others do not; however, a reliable method of predicting the level of sensitivity during the design process has not been developed. In this study, we present a relationship that estimates an upper limit to gravitationally induced losses as a function of the dimensionless pulse tube convection number (NPTC) that can be used to ensure that a PTC would remain functional at adverse static tilt conditions. The empirical relationship is based on experimental data as well as experimentally validated 3-D computational fluid dynamics simulations that examine the effects of frequency, mass flow rate, pressure ratio, mass-pressure phase difference, hot and cold end temperatures, and static tilt angle. The validation of the computational model is based on experimental data collected from six commercial pulse tube cryocoolers. The simulation results are obtained from component-level models of the pulse tube and heat exchangers. Parameter ranges covered in component level simulations are 0-180° for tilt angle, 4-8 for length to diameter ratios, 4-80 K cold tip temperatures, -30° to +30° for mass flow to pressure phase angles, and 25-60 Hz operating frequencies. Simulation results and experimental data are aggregated to yield the relationship between inclined PTC performance and pulse tube convection numbers. The results indicate that the pulse tube convection number can be used as an order of magnitude indicator of the orientation sensitivity, but CFD simulations should be used to calculate the change in energy flow more accurately.

  10. Optimization methods of pulse-to-pulse alignment using femtosecond pulse laser based on temporal coherence function for practical distance measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Linghui; Guo, Yin; Lin, Jiarui; Cui, Pengfei; Zhu, Jigui

    2018-02-01

    An interferometer technique based on temporal coherence function of femtosecond pulses is demonstrated for practical distance measurement. Here, the pulse-to-pulse alignment is analyzed for large delay distance measurement. Firstly, a temporal coherence function model between two femtosecond pulses is developed in the time domain for the dispersive unbalanced Michelson interferometer. Then, according to this model, the fringes analysis and the envelope extraction process are discussed. Meanwhile, optimization methods of pulse-to-pulse alignment for practical long distance measurement are presented. The order of the curve fitting and the selection of points for envelope extraction are analyzed. Furthermore, an averaging method based on the symmetry of the coherence function is demonstrated. Finally, the performance of the proposed methods is evaluated in the absolute distance measurement of 20 μ m with path length difference of 9 m. The improvement of standard deviation in experimental results shows that these approaches have the potential for practical distance measurement.

  11. Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, J.

    2001-01-01

    After several years of study e''+ e''- linear colliders in the TeV range have emerged as the major and optimal high-energy physics projects for the post-LHC era. These notes summarize the present status form the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC era. These notes summarize the present status, from the main accelerator and detector features to their physics potential. The LHC is expected to provide first discoveries in the new energy domain, whereas an e''+ e''- linear collider in the 500 GeV-1 TeV will be able to complement it to an unprecedented level of precision in any possible areas: Higgs, signals beyond the SM and electroweak measurements. It is evident that the Linear Collider program will constitute a major step in the understanding of the nature of the new physics beyond the Standard Model. (Author) 22 refs

  12. Collider workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The promise of initial results after the start of operations at CERN's SPS proton-antiproton collider and the prospects for high energy hadron collisions at Fermilab (Tevatron) and Brookhaven (ISABELLE) provided a timely impetus for the recent Topical Workshop on Forward Collider Physics', held at Madison, Wisconsin, from 10-12 December. It became the second such workshop to be held, the first having been in 1979 at the College de France, Paris. The 100 or so participants had the chance to hear preliminary results from the UA1, UA4 and UA5 experiments at the CERN SPS collider, together with other new data, including that from proton-antiproton runs at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

  13. Asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Colestock, P.; Goderre, G.; Johnson, D.; Martin, P.; Holt, J.; Kaplan, D.

    1993-01-01

    The study of CP violation in beauty decay is one of the key challenges facing high energy physics. Much work has not yielded a definitive answer how this study might best be performed. However, one clear conclusion is that new accelerator facilities are needed. Proposals include experiments at asymmetric electron-positron colliders and in fixed-target and collider modes at LHC and SSC. Fixed-target and collider experiments at existing accelerators, while they might succeed in a first observation of the effect, will not be adequate to study it thoroughly. Giomataris has emphasized the potential of a new approach to the study of beauty CP violation: the asymmetric proton collider. Such a collider might be realized by the construction of a small storage ring intersecting an existing or soon-to-exist large synchrotron, or by arranging collisions between a large synchrotron and its injector. An experiment at such a collider can combine the advantages of fixed-target-like spectrometer geometry, facilitating triggering, particle identification and the instrumentation of a large acceptance, while the increased √s can provide a factor > 100 increase in beauty-production cross section compared to Tevatron or HERA fixed-target. Beams crossing at a non-zero angle can provide a small interaction region, permitting a first-level decay-vertex trigger to be implemented. To achieve large √s with a large Lorentz boost and high luminosity, the most favorable venue is the high-energy booster (HEB) at the SSC Laboratory, though the CERN SPS and Fermilab Tevatron are also worth considering

  14. Future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    The high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, pp), of lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders are considered. Technical arguments for increased energy in each type of machine are presented. Their relative size, and the implications of size on cost are discussed

  15. Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  16. Concrete deterioration: detection by ultrasonic pulse velocity method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutan, N.M.; Jaafar, M.S.; Hamdan, S.

    2003-01-01

    Tests were performed to evaluate the feasibility of using Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity Method (UPVM) in detecting defect and determining its depth during the early age concrete. Five reinforced concrete (RC) slabs of grade 30, 40 and 50 specimens at day 3, 7,14 and 28 with a fabricated void at a known location were used. The results obtained were compared to determine the accuracy of the method hence the effectiveness of the method with different strength and as the concrete matures. This method detects defects in specimens during the early age The accuracy varies with concrete strength and as the concrete mature. The test results indicate the method can be used to assess the in-situ properties of concrete or for quality control on site. The method showed better accuracy with stronger concrete detects defects with the accuracy ranging from 55.75-99.62% from day 3-28 (full strength) respectively. (author)

  17. Nuclear pulse signal processing technique based on blind deconvolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Pengfei; Yang Lei; Fu Tingyan; Qi Zhong; Li Dongcang; Ren Zhongguo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a method for measurement and analysis of nuclear pulse signal, with which pile-up signal is removed, the signal baseline is restored, and the original signal is obtained. The data acquisition system includes FPGA, ADC and USB. The FPGA controls the high-speed ADC to sample the signal of nuclear radiation, and the USB makes the ADC work on the Slave FIFO mode to implement high-speed transmission status. Using the LabVIEW, it accomplishes online data processing of the blind deconvolution algorithm and data display. The simulation and experimental results demonstrate advantages of the method. (authors)

  18. Pulsed neutron method for diffusion, slowing down, and reactivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, N.G.

    1985-01-01

    An outline is given on the principles of the pulsed neutron method for the determination of thermal neutron diffusion parameters, for slowing-down time measurements, and for reactivity determinations. The historical development is sketched from the breakthrough in the middle of the nineteen fifties and the usefulness and limitations of the method are discussed. The importance for the present understanding of neutron slowing-down, thermalization and diffusion are point out. Examples are given of its recent use for e.g. absorption cross section measurements and for the study of the properties of heterogeneous systems

  19. Bifurcation-free design method of pulse energy converter controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolokolov, Yury; Ustinov, Pavel; Essounbouli, Najib; Hamzaoui, Abdelaziz

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a design method of pulse energy converter (PEC) controllers is proposed. This method develops a classical frequency domain design, based on the small signal modeling, by means of an addition of a nonlinear dynamics analysis stage. The main idea of the proposed method consists in fact that the PEC controller, designed with an application of the small signal modeling, is tuned after with taking into the consideration an essentially nonlinear nature of the PEC that makes it possible to avoid bifurcation phenomena in the PEC dynamics at the design stage (bifurcation-free design). Also application of the proposed method allows an improvement of the designed controller performance. The application of this bifurcation-free design method is demonstrated on an example of the controller design of direct current-direct current (DC-DC) buck converter with an input electromagnetic interference filter.

  20. A pulsed neutron Ramsey's method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)]. E-mail: yasuhiro.masuda@kek.jp; Ino, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Jeong, S.C. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Muto, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Skoy, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Reasearch, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Watanabe, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2005-02-15

    A Ramsey's method with pulsed neutrons is proposed. A Ramsey signal, which is a neutron spin rotation about a static magnetic field for a time interval between two separated oscillatory fields, is observed as a function of a neutron time of flight (TOF) in this method. The neutron spin rotation or the RF oscillation is used as a clock of the neutron velocity measurement which ranges from cold to epithermal neutron energies. This method together with the TOF measurement can be used for neutron inelastic scattering experiments. In addition, this method can be applied to the measurement of magnetic and pseudomagnetic fields in matter, and also to neutron spin manipulation for spin dependent scattering.

  1. Colliding muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Is a muon-muon collider really practical? That is the question being asked by Bob Palmer. Well known in particle physics, Palmer, with Nick Samios and Ralph Shutt, recently won the American Physical Society's Panofsky Prize for their 1964 discovery of the omega minus. As well as contributing to other major experiments, both at CERN and in the US, he has contributed ideas to stochastic cooling and novel acceleration schemes

  2. Pulse shape method for the Chimera silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagano, A.; Arena, N.; Cardella, G.; D' Andrea, M.; Filippo, E. de; Fichera, F.; Giudice, N.; Guardone, N.; Grimaldi, A.; Nicotra, D.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Politi, G.; Rapicavoli, C.; Rizza, G.; Russotto, P.; Sacca, G.; Urso, S.; Lanzano, G. [Catania Univ., INFN Catania and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Alderighi, M.; Sechi, G. [INFN Milano and Istituto di Fisica Cosmica CNR, Milano (Italy); Amorini, F.; Anzalone, A.; Cali, C.; Campagna, V.; Cavallaro, S.; Di Stefano, A.; Giustolisi, F.; La Guidara, E.; Lanzalone, G.; Maiolino, C.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Salamone, S. [Catania Univ., INFN-LNS and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia (Italy); Auditore, L.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M. [Messina Univ., INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Bassini, R.; Boiano, C.; Guazzoni, P.; Russo, S.; Sassi, M.; Zetta, L. [Milano Univ., INFN Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Blicharska, J.; Grzeszczuk, A. [Silesia Univ., Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Chatterjee, M.B. [Saha Institute Of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); Geraci, E.; Zipper, W. [Bologna Univ., INFN Bologna and Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Rosato, E.; Vigilante, M. [Napoli Univ., INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Schroder, W.U.; T-ke, J. [Rochester Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Rochester, N.Y. (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Since January 2003, the 4{pi} CHIMERA (Charged Heavy Ions Mass and Energy Resolving Array) detector in its full configuration has successfully been operated at the 'Catania Laboratori Nazionali del Sud' (LNS) accelerator facility. The detector has been used with a variety of beams from the Superconducting Cyclotron in heavy-ion reaction studies at Fermi bombarding energies. Future experiments with a focus on isospin physics at Fermi energies, planned for both primary and less intense secondary particle beams, suggest the development of new and more versatile experimental particle identification methods. Recent achievements in implementing specific pulse shape particle identification methods for CHIMERA silicon detectors are reported. They suggest an upgrade of the present charge and mass identification capability of CHIMERA by a simple extension of the method. (authors)

  3. Quinary excitation method for pulse compression ultrasound measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, D M J; Freear, S

    2008-04-01

    A novel switched excitation method for linear frequency modulated excitation of ultrasonic transducers in pulse compression systems is presented that is simple to realise, yet provides reduced signal sidelobes at the output of the matched filter compared to bipolar pseudo-chirp excitation. Pulse compression signal sidelobes are reduced through the use of simple amplitude tapering at the beginning and end of the excitation duration. Amplitude tapering using switched excitation is realised through the use of intermediate voltage switching levels, half that of the main excitation voltages. In total five excitation voltages are used creating a quinary excitation system. The absence of analogue signal generation and power amplifiers renders the excitation method attractive for applications with requirements such as a high channel count or low cost per channel. A systematic study of switched linear frequency modulated excitation methods with simulated and laboratory based experimental verification is presented for 2.25 MHz non-destructive testing immersion transducers. The signal to sidelobe noise level of compressed waveforms generated using quinary and bipolar pseudo-chirp excitation are investigated for transmission through a 0.5m water and kaolin slurry channel. Quinary linear frequency modulated excitation consistently reduces signal sidelobe power compared to bipolar excitation methods. Experimental results for transmission between two 2.25 MHz transducers separated by a 0.5m channel of water and 5% kaolin suspension shows improvements in signal to sidelobe noise power in the order of 7-8 dB. The reported quinary switched method for linear frequency modulated excitation provides improved performance compared to pseudo-chirp excitation without the need for high performance excitation amplifiers.

  4. Conventional power sources for colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 μsec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 μsec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 μsec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths

  5. PULSE REFERENCED CONTROL METHOD FOR ENHANCED POWER AMPLIFICATION OF A PULSE MODULATED SIGNAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    , by introducing continuous delays on the individual pulse edges on the basis of error information provided by an error processing block. One preferred embodiment of the invention comprises: a Correction Unit with means to control the delays of the individual pulse edges as a function of a control input signal $i...

  6. A Novel Method and Error Analysis for Beam Optics Measurements and Corrections at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Langner, Andy Sven; Rossbach, Jörg; Tomás, Rogelio

    2017-02-17

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently the world's largest particle accelerator with the highest center of mass energy in particle collision experiments. The control of the particle beam focusing is essential for the performance reach of such an accelerator. For the characterization of the focusing properties at the LHC, turn-by-turn beam position data is simultaneously recorded at numerous measurement devices (BPMs) along the accelerator, while an oscillation is excited on the beam. A novel analysis method for these measurements ($N$-BPM method) is developed here, which is based on a detailed analysis of systematic and statistical error sources and their correlations. It has been applied during the commissioning of the LHC for operation at an unprecedented energy of 6.5 TeV. In this process a stronger focusing than its design specifications has been achieved. This results in smaller transverse beam sizes at the collision points and allows for a higher rate of particle collisions. For the derivation of ...

  7. A method to reduce the suppression of relevant pulses in pulse weight discriminators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, P.

    1975-01-01

    The pulse height analyzer is used, for instance, with proportional counters. Pulses are broken down into amplitude ranges in accordance with their maximum amplitudes. In pulse height analyzers with real time analog-digital conversion only one deadtime is needed for the respective range selected. For this purpose, all discriminator thresholds of the amplitude stores connected parallel are actuated as an input pulse arrives. The leading edges of the discriminator signals set the amplitude range flip-flop. Only the flip-flop circuit of the maximum amplitude range reached remains set whilst all the others are erased. The trailing edge of the discriminator signals actuates the evaluation of the information stored by the flip-flop circuit selected. It triggers a pulse extender and resets the flip-flop selected. Therefore, only the amplitude range selected needs a deadtime. The pulse extender in addition reduces the processing time of the analyzer by the output pulse length. The characteristic used for the trailing edge is the backward count of the real time analog-digital converter. (DG/RF) [de

  8. Water flow measurements with the pulsed neutron activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, P.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and study the feasibility of a flow-meter, based on the pulsed neutron activation method. It is a non-invasive method with good potential regarding accuracy. However, the ultimate accuracy has not been fully investigated before. Two series of flow rate measurements have been performed and analysed. The first series was done under moderately accurate flow calibration conditions to get sufficient confidence in the method and to get indication of the obtainable accuracy. The results were encouraging and further measurements with high accuracy flow calibration were planned. A dedicated loop was designed and built, and it was used with satisfactory performance. Two models have been used for analysis of recorded data; time weighting method and a fit to Taylor diffusion theory. The results show that the accuracy in mean flow velocity obtained from the used analysis models is in the range of 2-4% for Reynolds numbers greater than 10,000. Data recorded from high calibration measurements will also be used for validation of future calculations. 19 refs, 4 figs

  9. A novel method and error analysis for beam optics measurements and corrections at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Andy Sven

    2017-02-03

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently the world's largest particle accelerator with the highest center of mass energy in particle collision experiments. The control of the particle beam focusing is essential for the performance reach of such an accelerator. For the characterization of the focusing properties at the LHC, turn-by-turn beam position data is simultaneously recorded at numerous measurement devices (BPMs) along the accelerator, while an oscillation is excited on the beam. A novel analysis method for these measurements (N-BPM method) is developed here, which is based on a detailed analysis of systematic and statistical error sources and their correlations. It has been applied during the commissioning of the LHC for operation at an unprecedented energy of 6.5TeV. In this process a stronger focusing than its design specifications has been achieved. This results in smaller transverse beam sizes at the collision points and allows for a higher rate of particle collisions. For the derivation of the focusing parameters at many synchrotron light sources, the change of the beam orbit is observed, which is induced by deliberate changes of magnetic fields (orbit response matrix). In contrast, the analysis of turn-by-turn beam position measurements is for many of these machines less precise due to the distance between two BPMs. The N-BPM method overcomes this limitation by allowing to include the measurement data from more BPMs in the analysis. It has been applied at the ALBA synchrotron light source and compared to the orbit response method. The significantly faster measurement with the N-BPM method is a considerable advantage in this case. Finally, an outlook is given to the challenges which lie ahead for the control of the beam focusing at the HL-LHC, which is a future major upgrade of the LHC.

  10. RF pulse methods for use with surface coils: Frequency-modulated pulses and parallel transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Michael; Uğurbil, Kamil

    2018-06-01

    The first use of a surface coil to obtain a 31P NMR spectrum from an intact rat by Ackerman and colleagues initiated a revolution in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS). Today, we take it for granted that one can detect signals in regions external to an RF coil; at the time, however, this concept was most unusual. In the approximately four decade long period since its introduction, this simple idea gave birth to an increasing number of innovations that has led to transformative changes in the way we collect data in an in vivo magnetic resonance experiment, particularly with MRI of humans. These innovations include spatial localization and/or encoding based on the non-uniform B1 field generated by the surface coil, leading to new spectroscopic localization methods, image acceleration, and unique RF pulses that deal with B1 inhomogeneities and even reduce power deposition. Without the surface coil, many of the major technological advances that define the extraordinary success of MRI in clinical diagnosis and in biomedical research, as exemplified by projects like the Human Connectome Project, would not have been possible.

  11. Two Methods For Simulating the Strong-Strong Beam-Beam Interaction in Hadron Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnock, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    We present and compare the method of weighted macro particle tracking and the Perron-Frobenius operator technique for simulating the time evolution of two beams coupled via the collective beam-beam interaction in 2-D and 4-D (transverse) phase space. The coherent dipole modes, with and without lattice nonlinearities and external excitation, are studied by means of the Vlasov-Poisson system

  12. Jet-Underlying Event Separation Method for Heavy Ion Collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    OpenAIRE

    Hanks, J. A.; Sickles, A. M.; Cole, B. A.; Franz, A.; McCumber, M. P.; Morrison, D. P.; Nagle, J. L.; Pinkenburg, C. H.; Sahlmueller, B.; Steinberg, P.; von Steinkirch, M.; Stone, M.

    2012-01-01

    Reconstructed jets in heavy ion collisions are a crucial tool for understanding the quark-gluon plasma. The separation of jets from the underlying event is necessary particularly in central heavy ion reactions in order to quantify medium modifications of the parton shower and the response of the surrounding medium itself. There have been many methods proposed and implemented for studying the underlying event substructure in proton-proton and heavy ion collisions. In this paper, we detail a me...

  13. Automating methods to improve precision in Monte-Carlo event generation for particle colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleisberg, Tanju

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this thesis was the development of tools for the automated calculation of exact matrix elements, which are a key for the systematic improvement of precision and confidence for theoretical predictions. Part I of this thesis concentrates on the calculations of cross sections at tree level. A number of extensions have been implemented in the matrix element generator AMEGIC++, namely new interaction models such as effective loop-induced couplings of the Higgs boson with massless gauge bosons, required for a number of channels for the Higgs boson search at LHC and anomalous gauge couplings, parameterizing a number of models beyond th SM. Further a special treatment to deal with complicated decay chains of heavy particles has been constructed. A significant effort went into the implementation of methods to push the limits on particle multiplicities. Two recursive methods have been implemented, the Cachazo-Svrcek-Witten recursion and the colour dressed Berends-Giele recursion. For the latter the new module COMIX has been added to the SHERPA framework. The Monte-Carlo phase space integration techniques have been completely revised, which led to significantly reduced statistical error estimates when calculating cross sections and a greatly improved unweighting efficiency for the event generation. Special integration methods have been developed to cope with the newly accessible final states. The event generation framework SHERPA directly benefits from those new developments, improving the precision and the efficiency. Part II was addressed to the automation of QCD calculations at next-to-leading order. A code has been developed, that, for the first time fully automates the real correction part of a NLO calculation. To calculate the correction for a m-parton process obeying the Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction method the following components are provided: 1. the corresponding m+1-parton tree level matrix elements, 2. a number dipole subtraction terms to remove

  14. Automating methods to improve precision in Monte-Carlo event generation for particle colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleisberg, Tanju

    2008-07-01

    The subject of this thesis was the development of tools for the automated calculation of exact matrix elements, which are a key for the systematic improvement of precision and confidence for theoretical predictions. Part I of this thesis concentrates on the calculations of cross sections at tree level. A number of extensions have been implemented in the matrix element generator AMEGIC++, namely new interaction models such as effective loop-induced couplings of the Higgs boson with massless gauge bosons, required for a number of channels for the Higgs boson search at LHC and anomalous gauge couplings, parameterizing a number of models beyond th SM. Further a special treatment to deal with complicated decay chains of heavy particles has been constructed. A significant effort went into the implementation of methods to push the limits on particle multiplicities. Two recursive methods have been implemented, the Cachazo-Svrcek-Witten recursion and the colour dressed Berends-Giele recursion. For the latter the new module COMIX has been added to the SHERPA framework. The Monte-Carlo phase space integration techniques have been completely revised, which led to significantly reduced statistical error estimates when calculating cross sections and a greatly improved unweighting efficiency for the event generation. Special integration methods have been developed to cope with the newly accessible final states. The event generation framework SHERPA directly benefits from those new developments, improving the precision and the efficiency. Part II was addressed to the automation of QCD calculations at next-to-leading order. A code has been developed, that, for the first time fully automates the real correction part of a NLO calculation. To calculate the correction for a m-parton process obeying the Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction method the following components are provided: 1. the corresponding m+1-parton tree level matrix elements, 2. a number dipole subtraction terms to remove

  15. Colliding nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, Roger; Remaud, Bernard; Suraud, E.; Durand, Dominique; Tamain, Bernard; Gobbi, A.; Cugnon, J.; Drapier, Olivier; Govaerts, Jan; Prieels, Rene

    1995-09-01

    This 14. international school Joliot-Curie of nuclear physic deals with nuclei in collision at high energy. Nine lectures are included in the proceedings of this summer school: 1 - From statistical mechanics outside equilibrium to transport equations (Balian, R.); 2 - Modeling of heavy ions reactions (Remaud, B.); 3 - Kinetic equations in heavy ions physics (Suraud, E.); 4 - Colliding nuclei near the Fermi energy (Durand, D.; Tamain, B.); 5 - From the Fermi to the relativistic energy domain: which observable? For which physics? (Gobbi, A.); 6 - Collisions at relativistic and ultra relativistic energies, Theoretical aspects (Cugnon, J.); 7 - Quark-gluon plasma: experimental signatures (Drapier, O.); 8 - Electroweak interaction: a window on physics beyond the standard model (Govaerts, J.); 9 - Symmetry tests in β nuclear process: polarization techniques (Prieels, R.)

  16. Wavelength selection method with standard deviation: application to pulse oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Jaccaud, Camille; Paez, Gonzalo; Strojnik, Marija

    2011-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy provides useful biological information after the radiation has penetrated through the tissue, within the therapeutic window. One of the significant shortcomings of the current applications of spectroscopic techniques to a live subject is that the subject may be uncooperative and the sample undergoes significant temporal variations, due to his health status that, from radiometric point of view, introduce measurement noise. We describe a novel wavelength selection method for monitoring, based on a standard deviation map, that allows low-noise sensitivity. It may be used with spectral transillumination, transmission, or reflection signals, including those corrupted by noise and unavoidable temporal effects. We apply it to the selection of two wavelengths for the case of pulse oximetry. Using spectroscopic data, we generate a map of standard deviation that we propose as a figure-of-merit in the presence of the noise introduced by the living subject. Even in the presence of diverse sources of noise, we identify four wavelength domains with standard deviation, minimally sensitive to temporal noise, and two wavelengths domains with low sensitivity to temporal noise.

  17. New methods of generation of ultrashort laser pulses for ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Hamal, Karel; Kubecek, V.; Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    To reach the millimeter satellite laser ranging accuracy, the goal for nineties, new laser ranging techniques have to be applied. To increase the laser ranging precision, the application of the ultrashort laser pulses in connection with the new signal detection and processing techniques, is inevitable. The two wavelength laser ranging is one of the ways to measure the atmospheric dispersion to improve the existing atmospheric correction models and hence, to increase the overall system ranging accuracy to the desired value. We are presenting a review of several nonstandard techniques of ultrashort laser pulses generation, which may be utilized for laser ranging: compression of the nanosecond pulses using stimulated Brillouin and Raman backscattering; compression of the mode-locked pulses using Raman backscattering; passive mode-locking technique with nonlinear mirror; and passive mode-locking technique with the negative feedback.

  18. Photon Linear Collider Gamma-Gamma Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J.

    2012-01-01

    High energy photon - photon collisions can be achieved by adding high average power short-pulse lasers to the Linear Collider, enabling an expanded physics program for the facility. The technology required to realize a photon linear collider continues to mature. Compton back-scattering technology is being developed around the world for low energy light source applications and high average power lasers are being developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion.

  19. Method for spatially modulating X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2015-03-10

    A method and apparatus are provided for spatially modulating X-rays or X-ray pulses using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based X-ray optics. A torsionally-oscillating MEMS micromirror and a method of leveraging the grazing-angle reflection property are provided to modulate X-ray pulses with a high-degree of controllability.

  20. Electrochemical synthesis of nanosized hydroxyapatite by pulsed direct current method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nur, Adrian; Rahmawati, Alifah; Ilmi, Noor Izzati; Affandi, Samsudin; Widjaja, Arief [Departement of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology, Kampus ITS Sukolilo, Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24

    Synthesis of nanosized of hydroxyapatite (HA) by electrochemical pulsed direct current (PDC) method has been studied. The aim of this work is to study the influence of various PDC parameters (pH initial, electrode distance, duty cycle, frequency, and amplitude) on particle surface area of HA powders. The electrochemical synthesis was prepared in solution Ca{sup 2+}/EDTA{sup 4−}/PO{sub 4}{sup 3+} at concentration 0.25/0.25/0.15 M for 24 h. The electrochemical cell was consisted of two carbon rectangular electrodes connected to a function generator to produce PDC. There were two treatments for particles after electrosynthesized, namely without aging and aged for 2 days at 40 °C. For both cases, the particles were filtered and washed by demineralized water to eliminate the impurities and unreacted reactants. Then, the particles were dried at 100 °C for 2 days. The dried particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, surface area analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra and thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. HA particles can be produced when the initial pH > 6. The aging process has significant effect on the produced HA particles. SEM images of HA particles showed that the powders consisted of agglomerates composed of fine crystallites and have morphology plate-like and sphere. The surface area of HA particles is in the range of 25 – 91 m{sup 2}/g. The largest particle surface area of HA was produced at 4 cm electrode distance, 80% cycle duty, frequency 0.1 Hz, amplitude 9 V and with aging process.

  1. Method for measuring the stochastic properties of corona and partial-discharge pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Brunt, R.J.; Kulkarni, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    A new method is described for measuring the stochastic behavior of corona and partial-discharge pulses which utilizes a pulse selection and sorting circuit in conjunction with a computer-controlled multichannel analyzer to directly measure various conditional and unconditional pulse-height and pulse-time-separation distributions. From these measured distributions it is possible to determine the degree of correlation between successive discharge pulses. Examples are given of results obtained from measurements on negative, point-to-plane (Trichel-type) corona pulses in a N 2 /O 2 gas mixture which clearly demonstrate that the phenomenon is inherently stochastic in the sense that development of a discharge pulse is significantly affected by the amplitude of and time separation from the preceding pulse. It is found, for example, that corona discharge pulse amplitude and time separation from an earlier pulse are not independent random variables. Discussions are given about the limitations of the method, sources of error, and data analysis procedures required to determine self-consistency of the various measured distributions

  2. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  3. Effects of Resonant and Random Excitations on the Proton Beam in the Large Hadron Collider, with Applications to the Design of Pulsed Hollow Electron Lenses for Active Halo Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitterer, Miriam; Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Redaelli, Stefano; Valuch, Daniel

    2018-04-19

    We present the results of numerical simulations and experimental studies about the effects of resonant and random excitations on proton losses, emittances, and beam distributions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In addition to shedding light on complex nonlinear effects, these studies are applied to the design of hollow electron lenses (HEL) for active beam halo control. In the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC), a considerable amount of energy will be stored in the beam tails. To control and clean the beam halo, the installation of two hollow electron lenses, one per beam, is being considered. In standard electron-lens operation, a proton bunch sees the same electron current at every revolution. Pulsed electron beam operation (i.e., different currents for different turns) is also considered, because it can widen the range of achievable halo removal rates. For an axially symmetric electron beam, only protons in the halo are excited. If a residual field is present at the location of the beam core, these particles are exposed to time-dependent transverse kicks and to noise. We discuss the numerical simulations and the experiments conducted in 2016 and 2017 at injection energy in the LHC. The excitation patterns were generated by the transverse feedback and damping system, which acted as a flexible source of dipole kicks. Proton beam losses, emittances, and transverse distributions were recorded as a function of excitation patterns and strengths. The resonant excitations induced rich dynamical effects and nontrivial changes of the beam distributions, which, to our knowledge, have not previously been observed and studied in this detail. We conclude with a discussion of the tolerable and achievable residual fields and proposals for further studies.

  4. PWM pulse pattern optimization method using carrier frequency modulation. Carrier shuhasu hencho ni yoru PWM pulse pattern saitekikaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwaji, Y.; Fukuda, S. (Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan))

    1991-07-15

    Sinusoidal inverters are getting more widely used keeping pace with the development of semiconductor switching elements. This paper discusses optimizing a PWM pulse pattern at an inverter output to drive an induction motor, proposes methods for improving distortion and torque ripples using a carrier frequency modulation (CFM), and describes a method for realizing the improvement through use of a single-chip microcomputer. The method defines evaluation parameters corresponding to the distortion and torque ripples, and optimizes the CFM depth to the parameters. The PWM pulse pattern has its voltage vector and time width so selected that the time integrated space vector of a three-phase voltage approaches a circular locus. Furthermore, the carrier frequency, that is the sampling frequency of the inverter, is also adjusted so that the above evaluation parameters are minimized. The addition of a new variable called the frequency modulation provides freedom in selecting an output characteristic as called for by the purpose. 12 refs., 18 figs.

  5. Application of pulse spectro- zonal luminescent method for the rapid method of material analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsin, V.M.; Oleshko, V.I.; Yakovlev, A.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The scope of luminescent methods of the analysis covers enough a big around of substances as the luminescence can be excited in overwhelming majority of nonmetals. Analytical opportunities of luminescent methods can be essentially expanded by use of pulse excitation and registration of spectra of a luminescence with the time resolved methods. The most perspective method is to use pulses of high-current electron beams with the nanosecond duration for excitation from the following reasons: excitation is carried out ionizing, deeply enough by a penetrating radiation; the pulse of radiation has high capacity, up to 10 8 W, but energy no more than 1 J; the pulse of radiation has the nanosecond duration. Electrons with energy in 300-400 keV will penetrate on depth into some tenth shares of mm, i.e. they create volumetric excitation of a sample. Therefore the luminescence raised by an electronic beam has the information about volumetric properties of substance. High density of excitation allow to find out and study the centers (defects) having a small yield of a luminescence, to analyze the weakly luminescent objects. Occurrence of the new effects is possible useful to analyze of materials. There is an opportunity of reception of the information from change of spectral structure of a luminescence during the time after the ending of a pulse of excitation and kinetic characteristics of attenuation of luminescence. The matter is the energy of radiation is absorbed mainly by a matrix, then electronic excitations one is transferred the centers of a luminescence (defects) of a lattice. Therefore during the time after creation electronic excitations the spectrum of a luminescence can repeatedly change, transferring the information on the centers (defects) which are the most effective radiators at present time. Hence, the study of change of spectra of radiation during the time allows providing an additional way of discrimination of the information on the centers of a

  6. CEDM Controller for a Linear Pulse Motor by using Pulse Width Modulation Method in Integral Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joon-Koo; Keum, Jong-Yong; Park, Heui-Youn

    2007-01-01

    Integral Reactor SMART is under development at KAERI. The design characteristics of SMART are radically different from those employed in currently operating loop type PWR in Korea. The reliability and accuracy of Control Rod Drive Mechanism are very important to the reactor safety and the design of the Plant Protection System. The SMART CEDM designed for fine-step movement consists of a linear pulse motor, reed switch type sensor with top and bottom limit switches which also act as Control Element Assembly(CEA) Position indicator, The linear pulse motor is a four phase synchronous DC electric machine with inner stator and output stator in coolant medium inside a strong housing. The objective of this paper is to introduce and to explain the CEDM controller CEDM Controller is being developed with a new design concept and digital technology to reduce the Operating Error and improve the systems' reliability and availability. And Switched Mode Power Supply is also being developed with digital hardware technology. This paper involves the test details and result

  7. Improvement of chirped pulse contrast using electro-optic birefringence scanning filter method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Shuguang; Wang Xianglin; Wang Qishan; Zhang Bin; Sun Nianchun; Wang Fei

    2013-01-01

    A method using scanning filter to improve the contrast of chirped pulse is proposed, and the principle of this method is analyzed. The scanning filter is compared with the existing pulse-picking technique and nonlinear filtering technique. The scanning filter is a temporal gate that is independent on the intensity of the pulses, but on the instantaneous wavelengths of light. Taking the electro-optic birefringence scanning filter as an example, the application of scanning filter methods is illustrated. Based on numerical simulation and experimental research, it is found that the electro-optic birefringence scanning filter can eliminate a prepulse which is several hundred picoseconds before the main pulse, and the main pulse can maintain a high transmissivity. (authors)

  8. Simultaneous hit finding and timing method for pulse shape analysis of drift chamber signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaile, D; Schaile, O; Schwarz, J

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for the analysis of the digitized signal waveform of drift chamber pulses is described which yields a good multihit resolution and an accurate drift time determination with little processing time. The method has been tested and evaluated with measured pulse shapes from the full size prototype of the OPAL central detector which were digitized by 100 MHz FADCs. (orig.).

  9. Simultaneous hit finding and timing method for pulse shape analysis of drift chamber signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaile, D; Schaile, O; Schwarz, J

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for the analysis of the digitized signal waveform of drift chamber pulses is described which yields a good multihit resolution and an accurate drift time determination with little processing time. The method has been tested and evaluated with measured pulse shapes from the full size prototype of the OPAL central detector which were digitized by 100 MHz FADCs.

  10. Linear collider systems and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, G.A.

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the systems and sub-systems involved in so-called ''conventional'' e + e - linear colliders and to study how their design affects the overall cost of these machines. There are presently a total of at least six 500 GeV c. of m. linear collider projects under study in the world. Aside from TESLA (superconducting linac at 1.3 GHz) and CLIC (two-beam accelerator with main linac at 30GHz), the other four proposed e + e - linear colliders can be considered ''conventional'' in that their main linacs use the proven technique of driving room temperature accelerator sections with pulsed klystrons and modulators. The centrally distinguishing feature between these projects is their main linac rf frequency: 3 GHz for the DESY machine, 11.424 GHz for the SLAC and JLC machines, and 14 GHz for the VLEPP machine. The other systems, namely the electron and positron sources, preaccelerators, compressors, damping rings and final foci, are fairly similar from project to project. Probably more than 80% of the cost of these linear colliders will be incurred in the two main linacs facing each other and it is therefore in their design and construction that major savings or extra costs may be found

  11. Method for single-shot measurement of picosecond laser pulse-lengths without electronic time dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrala, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    A two-source shear pattern recording is proposed as a method for single-shot measurement of the pulse shape from nearly monochromatic sources whose pulse lengths are shorter than their coherence times. The basis of this method relies on the assertion that if two identical electromagnetic pulses are recombined with a time delay greater than the sum of their pulse widths, the recordable spatial pattern has no fringes in it. At an arbitrary delay, translated into an actual spatial recording position, the recorded modulated intensity will sample the corresponding laser intensity at that delay time, but with a modulation due to the coherence function of the electromagnetic pulse. Two arrangements are proposed for recording the pattern. The principles, the design parameters, and the methodologies of these arrangements are presented. Resolutions of the configurations and their limitations are given as well

  12. Physics at Future Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    1999-01-01

    After a brief review of the Big Issues in particle physics, we discuss the contributions to resolving that could be made by various planned and proposed future colliders. These include future runs of LEP and the Fermilab Tevatron collider, B factories, RHIC, the LHC, a linear electron-positron collider, an electron-proton collider in the LEP/LHC tunnel, a muon collider and a future larger hadron collider (FLHC). The Higgs boson and supersymmetry are used as benchmarks for assessing their capabilities. The LHC has great capacities for precision measurements as well as exploration, but also shortcomings where the complementary strengths of a linear electron-positron collider would be invaluable. It is not too soon to study seriously possible subsequent colliders.

  13. Efficient method to design RF pulses for parallel excitation MRI using gridding and conjugate gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuo; Ji, Jim

    2014-04-01

    Parallel excitation (pTx) techniques with multiple transmit channels have been widely used in high field MRI imaging to shorten the RF pulse duration and/or reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR). However, the efficiency of pulse design still needs substantial improvement for practical real-time applications. In this paper, we present a detailed description of a fast pulse design method with Fourier domain gridding and a conjugate gradient method. Simulation results of the proposed method show that the proposed method can design pTx pulses at an efficiency 10 times higher than that of the conventional conjugate-gradient based method, without reducing the accuracy of the desirable excitation patterns.

  14. Hadron-hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Month, M.; Weng, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The objective is to investigate whether existing technology might be extrapolated to provide the conceptual framework for a major hadron-hadron collider facility for high energy physics experimentation for the remainder of this century. One contribution to this large effort is to formalize the methods and mathematical tools necessary. In this report, the main purpose is to introduce the student to basic design procedures. From these follow the fundamental characteristics of the facility: its performance capability, its size, and the nature and operating requirements on the accelerator components, and with this knowledge, we can determine the technology and resources needed to build the new facility

  15. Geometric buckling measurements using the pulsed neutron source method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoestrand, N G; Mednis, J; Nilsson, T

    1959-03-15

    The geometric buckling of cylindrical reactors with one or both ends rounded has been determined by pulsed source measurements with small polyethylene geometries. The results were in general accord with theoretical calculations. The diffusion parameters of polyethylene were also determined. The diffusion length was 2.12 {+-} 0.03 cm, and for the capture cross section of hydrogen a value of 0.337 {+-} 0.005 barns was found. The effect of control rods was studied using thin cadmium rods in water. Good agreement was found for axial, central rods, whereas the theoretical predictions for the effect of diagonal rods were too high.

  16. Geometric buckling measurements using the pulsed neutron source method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoestrand, N.G.; Mednis, J.; Nilsson, T.

    1959-03-01

    The geometric buckling of cylindrical reactors with one or both ends rounded has been determined by pulsed source measurements with small polyethylene geometries. The results were in general accord with theoretical calculations. The diffusion parameters of polyethylene were also determined. The diffusion length was 2.12 ± 0.03 cm, and for the capture cross section of hydrogen a value of 0.337 ± 0.005 barns was found. The effect of control rods was studied using thin cadmium rods in water. Good agreement was found for axial, central rods, whereas the theoretical predictions for the effect of diagonal rods were too high

  17. Berkeley mini-collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, L.S.

    1984-06-01

    The Berkeley Mini-Collider, a heavy-ion collider being planned to provide uranium-uranium collisions at T/sub cm/ less than or equal to 4 GeV/nucleon, is described. The central physics to be studied at these energies and our early ideas for a collider detector are presented

  18. Linear colliders - prospects 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.

    1985-06-01

    We discuss the scaling laws of linear colliders and their consequences for accelerator design. We then report on the SLAC Linear Collider project and comment on experience gained on that project and its application to future colliders. 9 refs., 2 figs

  19. Very high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1986-03-01

    The luminosity and energy requirements are considered for both proton colliders and electron-positron colliders. Some of the basic design equations for high energy linear electron colliders are summarized, as well as design constraints. A few examples are given of parameters for very high energy machines. 4 refs., 6 figs

  20. Methods for evaluating physical processes in strong external fields at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. Furry picture and quasi-classical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, Stefano [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Hartin, Anthony [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Future linear colliders designs, ILC and CLIC, are expected to be powerful machines for the discovery of Physics Beyond the Standard Model and subsequent precision studies. However, due to the intense beams (high luminosity, high energy), strong electromagnetic fields occur in the beam-beam interaction region. In the context of precision high energy physics, the presence of such strong fields may yield sensitive corrections to the observed electron-positron processes. The Furry picture of quantum states gives a conceptually simple tool to treat physics processes in an external field. A generalization of the quasi-classical operator method (QOM) as an approximation is considered too.

  1. Pulse-shape discrimination in radioanalytical methods. Part I. Delayed fission neutron counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posta, S.; Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Cervena, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study the principle of pulse shape discrimination (PSD) has been employed in delayed fission neutron counting (DNC) method. Effective elimination of unwanted gamma background signals in measured radiation spectra has been proved. (author)

  2. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-01-01

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e + e - collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two

  3. The Neutron-Gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination Method for Neutron Flux Detection in the ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiufeng; Li Shiping; Cao Hongrui; Yin Zejie; Yuan Guoliang; Yang Qingwei

    2013-01-01

    The neutron flux monitor (NFM), as a significant diagnostic system in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will play an important role in the readings of a series of key parameters in the fusion reaction process. As the core of the main electronic system of the NFM, the neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination (n-γ PSD) can distinguish the neutron pulse from the gamma pulse and other disturbing pulses according to the thresholds of the rising time and the amplitude pre-installed on the board, the double timing point CFD method is used to get the rising time of the pulse. The n-γ PSD can provide an accurate neutron count. (magnetically confined plasma)

  4. Pulsed voltage electrospray ion source and method for preventing analyte electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Vilmos [Knoxville, TN; Van Berkel, Gary [Clinton, TN

    2011-12-27

    An electrospray ion source and method of operation includes the application of pulsed voltage to prevent electrolysis of analytes with a low electrochemical potential. The electrospray ion source can include an emitter, a counter electrode, and a power supply. The emitter can include a liquid conduit, a primary working electrode having a liquid contacting surface, and a spray tip, where the liquid conduit and the working electrode are in liquid communication. The counter electrode can be proximate to, but separated from, the spray tip. The power system can supply voltage to the working electrode in the form of a pulse wave, where the pulse wave oscillates between at least an energized voltage and a relaxation voltage. The relaxation duration of the relaxation voltage can range from 1 millisecond to 35 milliseconds. The pulse duration of the energized voltage can be less than 1 millisecond and the frequency of the pulse wave can range from 30 to 800 Hz.

  5. An efficient motion-resistant method for wearable pulse oximeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2008-05-01

    Reduction of motion artifact and power saving are crucial in designing a wearable pulse oximeter for long-term telemedicine application. In this paper, a novel algorithm, minimum correlation discrete saturation transform (MCDST) has been developed for the estimation of arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), based on an optical model derived from photon diffusion analysis. The simulation shows that the new algorithm MCDST is more robust under low SNRs than the clinically verified motion-resistant algorithm discrete saturation transform (DST). Further, the experiment with different severity of motions demonstrates that MCDST has a slightly better performance than DST algorithm. Moreover, MCDST is more computationally efficient than DST because the former uses linear algebra instead of the time-consuming adaptive filter used by latter, which indicates that MCDST can reduce the required power consumption and circuit complexity of the implementation. This is vital for wearable devices, where the physical size and long battery life are crucial.

  6. Analysis of the neutron flux in an annular pulsed reactor by using finite volume method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mário A.B. da; Narain, Rajendra; Bezerra, Jair de L., E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com, E-mail: narain@ufpe.br, E-mail: jairbezerra@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociências. Departamento de Energia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Production of very intense neutron sources is important for basic nuclear physics and for material testing and isotope production. Nuclear reactors have been used as sources of intense neutron fluxes, although the achievement of such levels is limited by the inability to remove fission heat. Periodic pulsed reactors provide very intense fluxes by a rotating modulator near a subcritical core. A concept for the production of very intense neutron fluxes that combines features of periodic pulsed reactors and steady state reactors was proposed by Narain (1997). Such a concept is known as Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) and was analyzed by using diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions and Finite Difference Method with Crank-Nicolson formalism. This research aims to analyze the flux distribution in the Very Intense Continuous Flux High Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) by using the Finite Volume Method and compares its results with those obtained by the previous computational method. (author)

  7. Analysis of the neutron flux in an annular pulsed reactor by using finite volume method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mário A.B. da; Narain, Rajendra; Bezerra, Jair de L.

    2017-01-01

    Production of very intense neutron sources is important for basic nuclear physics and for material testing and isotope production. Nuclear reactors have been used as sources of intense neutron fluxes, although the achievement of such levels is limited by the inability to remove fission heat. Periodic pulsed reactors provide very intense fluxes by a rotating modulator near a subcritical core. A concept for the production of very intense neutron fluxes that combines features of periodic pulsed reactors and steady state reactors was proposed by Narain (1997). Such a concept is known as Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) and was analyzed by using diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions and Finite Difference Method with Crank-Nicolson formalism. This research aims to analyze the flux distribution in the Very Intense Continuous Flux High Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) by using the Finite Volume Method and compares its results with those obtained by the previous computational method. (author)

  8. Connectivity among computer-aided engineering methods, procedures, and tools used in developing the SSC collider magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallas, N.; Jalloh, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    The accomplishment of functional productivity for the computer aided engineering (CAE) environment at the magnet engineering department (ME) of the magnet systems division (MSD) at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) involves most of the basic aspects of information engineering. It is highly desirable to arrive at a software and hardware topology that offers total, two-way (back and forth), automatic and direct software and hardware connectivity among computer-aided design and drafting (CADD), analysis codes, and office automation tools applicable to the disciplines involved. This paper describes the components, data flow, and practices employed in the development of the CAE environment from a systems engineering aspect rather than from the analytical angle. When appropriate, references to case studies are made in order to demonstrate the connectivity of the techniques used

  9. Connectivity among computer-aided engineering methods, procedures, and tools used in developing the SSC collider magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallas, N.; Jalloh, A.R.

    1992-03-01

    The accomplishment of functional productivity for the computer aided engineering (CAE) environment at the magnet engineering department (ME) of the magnet systems divisions (MSD) at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) involves most of the basic aspects of information engineering. It is highly desirable to arrive at a software and hardware topology that offers total, two-way (back and forth), automatic and direct software and hardware connectivity among computer-aided design and drafting (CADD), analysis codes, and office automation tools applicable to the disciplines involved. This paper describes the components, data flow, and practices employed in the development of the CAE environment from a systems engineering aspect rather than from the analytical angle. When appropriate, references to case studies are made in order to demonstrate the connectivity of the techniques used

  10. Standard Test Method for Measuring Dose for Use in Linear Accelerator Pulsed Radiation Effects Tests

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a calorimetric measurement of the total dose delivered in a single pulse of electrons from an electron linear accelerator or a flash X-ray machine (FXR, e-beam mode) used as an ionizing source in radiation-effects testing. The test method is designed for use with pulses of electrons in the energy range from 10 to 50 MeV and is only valid for cases in which both the calorimeter and the test specimen to be irradiated are“thin” compared to the range of these electrons in the materials of which they are constructed. 1.2 The procedure described can be used in those cases in which (1) the dose delivered in a single pulse is 5 Gy (matl) (500 rd (matl)) or greater, or (2) multiple pulses of a lower dose can be delivered in a short time compared to the thermal time constant of the calorimeter. Matl refers to the material of the calorimeter. The minimum dose per pulse that can be acceptably monitored depends on the variables of the particular test, including pulse rate, pulse uniformity...

  11. Some thoughts about millimeter-wave drivers for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an attempt is made to overview some problems important for the development of high-power millimeter-wave drivers for future linear colliders. Since the microwave pulse duration required at high frequencies is much shorter than at low ones, two options seem possible. The first one is to develop 'moderate' power level, long-pulse tubes based on relatively reliable technology and then greatly compress these microwave pulses. The second one is to operate at much higher voltages and to directly generate very high-power pulses of the required length. Besides discussing pros and cons of these options, an overview of the methods of mode selection in oversized microwave circuits required for producing multimegawatt power at millimeter wavelengths is presented. Also the issue of thermal limitations caused by microwave losses in circuit walls is discussed, and some scaling laws for the maximum power and pulse duration are given

  12. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinza, D.E.; Coulter, D.R.; Liang, R.H.; Gupta, A.

    1987-01-01

    Energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams were generated by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin films of indium-tin oxide (ITO). Mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films were carried out by mass spectrometry. The peak flux, found to occur at 10 eV, is estimated from this data to be 3 x 10(20) m(-2) s(-1). Analysis of the time-of-flight data indicates a number of processes contribute to the formation of the atomic oxygen beam. The absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3) 3s(1) (5S) level of atomic oxygen blown off from ITO films is supported by the failure to observe emission at 777.3 nm from the 2p(3) 3p(1) (5P/sub J/) levels. Reactive scattering experiments with polymer film targets for atomic oxygen bombardment are planned using a universal crossed molecular beam apparatus

  13. Calibration method of the pulsed X-ray relative sensitivity for ST401 plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hongwei; Song Guzhou; Wang Kuilu

    2011-01-01

    The relative sensitivity calibration method of the pulsed X-ray in ST401 plastic scintillator is presented. Experimental relative sensitivity calibrations of the plastic scintillators of different thicknesses from 1 mm to 50 mm are accomplished on the 'Chenguang' pulsed X-ray source and a Co radioactive source, The uncertainty of the calibration data is evaluated, which can be treated as the experimental evidence for the relative sensitivity conversion of ST401 plastic scintillator. (authors)

  14. Silver-halide sensitized gelatin (SHSG) processing method for pulse holograms recorded on VRP plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstigneeva, Maria K.; Drozdova, Olga V.; Mikhailov, Viktor N.

    2002-06-01

    One of the most important area of holograph applications is display holography. In case of pulse recording the requirement for vibration stability is easier than compared to CW exposure. At the same time it is widely known that the behavior of sliver-halide holographic materials strongly depends on the exposure duration. In particular the exposure sensitivity drastically decreases under nanosecond pulse duration. One of the effective ways of the diffraction efficiency improvement is SHSG processing method. This processing scheme is based on high modulation of refractive index due to microvoids appearance inside emulsion layer. It should be mentioned that the SHSG method was used earlier only in the cases when the holograms were recorded by use of CW lasers. This work is devoted to the investigation of SHSG method for pulse hologram recording on VRP plates. We used a pulsed YLF:Nd laser with pulse duration of 25 nanoseconds and wavelength of 527 nm. Both transmission and reflection holograms were recorded. The different kinds of bleaching as well as developing solutions were investigated. Our final processing scheme includes the following stages: 1) development in non-tanning solution, 2) rehalogenating bleach, 3) intermediate alcohol drying, 4) uniform second exposure, 5) second development in diluted developer, 6) reverse bleaching, 7) fixing and 8) gradient drying in isopropyl alcohol. Diffraction efficiency of transmission holograms was of about 60 percent and reflection mirror holograms was of about 45 percent. Thus we have demonstrated the SHSG processing scheme for producing effective holograms on VRP plates under pulse exposure.

  15. Software filtering method to suppress spike pulse interference in multi-channel scaler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shun; Zhao Xiuliang; Li Zhiqiang; Zhao Yanhui

    2008-01-01

    In the test on anti-jamming function of a multi-channel scaler, we found that the spike pulse interference on the second level counter caused by the motor start-stop operations brings a major count error. There are resolvable characteristics between effective signal and spike pulse interference, and multi-channel hardware filtering circuit is too huge and can't filter thoroughly, therefore we designed a software filtering method. In this method based on C8051F020 MCU, we dynamically store sampling values of one channel in only a one-byte variable and distinguish the rise-trail edge of a signal and spike pulse interference because of value changes of the variable. Test showed that the filtering software method can solve the error counting problem of the multi-channel scaler caused by the motor start-stop operations. The flow chart and source codes of the method were detailed in this paper. (authors)

  16. The dynamic method for time-of-flight measurement of thermal neutron spectra from pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepyolyshev, Yu.N.; Chuklyaev, S.V.; Tulaev, A.B.; Bobrakov, V.F.

    1995-01-01

    A time-of-flight method for measurement of thermal neutron spectra in pulsed neutron sources with an efficiency more than 10 5 times higher than the standard method is described. The main problems associated with the electric current technique for time-of-flight spectra measurement are examined. The methodical errors, problems of special neutron detector design and other questions are discussed. Some experimental results for spectra from the surfaces of water and solid methane moderators obtained at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor (Dubna, Russia) are presented. (orig.)

  17. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1997-03-01

    During the period of the 50's and the 60's colliders were developed. Prior to that time there were no colliders, and by 1965 a number of small devices had worked, good understanding had been achieved, and one could speculate, as Gersh Budker did, that in a few years 20% of high energy physics would come from colliders. His estimate was an under-estimate, for now essentially all of high energy physics comes from colliders. The author presents a brief review of that history: sketching the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological advances which made it all possible

  18. Pulse shape discrimination and classification methods for continuous depth of interaction encoding PET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roncali, Emilie; Phipps, Jennifer E; Marcu, Laura; Cherry, Simon R

    2012-01-01

    In previous work we demonstrated the potential of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors with depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding capability based on phosphor-coated crystals. A DOI resolution of 8 mm full-width at half-maximum was obtained for 20 mm long scintillator crystals using a delayed charge integration linear regression method (DCI-LR). Phosphor-coated crystals modify the pulse shape to allow continuous DOI information determination, but the relationship between pulse shape and DOI is complex. We are therefore interested in developing a sensitive and robust method to estimate the DOI. Here, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was implemented to classify the events based on information extracted from the pulse shape. Pulses were acquired with 2×2×20 mm 3 phosphor-coated crystals at five irradiation depths and characterized by their DCI values or Laguerre coefficients. These coefficients were obtained by expanding the pulses on a Laguerre basis set and constituted a unique signature for each pulse. The DOI of individual events was predicted using LDA based on Laguerre coefficients (Laguerre-LDA) or DCI values (DCI-LDA) as discriminant features. Predicted DOIs were compared to true irradiation depths. Laguerre-LDA showed higher sensitivity and accuracy than DCI-LDA and DCI-LR and was also more robust to predict the DOI of pulses with higher statistical noise due to low light levels (interaction depths further from the photodetector face). This indicates that Laguerre-LDA may be more suitable to DOI estimation in smaller crystals where lower collected light levels are expected. This novel approach is promising for calculating DOI using pulse shape discrimination in single-ended readout depth-encoding PET detectors. (paper)

  19. Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An apparatus and a computer-implemented method for generating pulses synchronized to a rising edge of a tachometer signal from rotating machinery are disclosed. For example, in one embodiment, a pulse state machine may be configured to generate a plurality of pulses, and a period state machine may be configured to determine a period for each of the plurality of pulses.

  20. Double-Carrier Phase-Disposition Pulse Width Modulation Method for Modular Multilevel Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fayun; Luo, An; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Modular multilevel converters (MMCs) have become one of the most attractive topologies for high-voltage and high-power applications. A double-carrier phase disposition pulse width modulation (DCPDPWM) method for MMCs is proposed in this paper. Only double triangular carriers with displacement ang......, the proposed method and theoretical analysis are verified by simulation and experimental results. View Full-Text...

  1. The modified pulse-spray method using Urokinase in subacute and chronic thrombotic arterial occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youn Kil; Hahn, Seong Tae; Baek, Jee Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the modified pulse-spray method using Urokinase(UK) in subacute and chronic thrombotic arterial occlusion. Modified pulse-spray methods using UK were performed in seven patients with subacute (1 week-1month) to chronic (1month-5years) occlusive symptoms such as limb pain, claudication and impotence. Angiographic examination revealed thrombotic occlusion of the aorta, common iliac arteries, brachial arterio-venous hemodialysis graft and femoro-popliteal bypass graft. The patients underwent thrombolysis using modified pulse-spray and additional constant infusion of UK. In the presence of underlying stenosis or organized clots, balloon angioplasty or stent placement was performed. Complete lysis was obtained in five of seven patients. For initial lysis, the mean dose of UK was 420,000 units, and the mean modified pulse-spray time was 50 minutes. Mean total dose of UK and mean total time for complete lysis were 800,000 units and 161 minutes, respectively. Thrombolysis of the femoro-popliteal bypass graft failed due to severe occlusion of the distal anastomosis. Partial lysis was achieved in one patient with aorto-illac occlusion, but further thrombolysis was stopped due to bleeding at the puncture site. The modified pulse-spray method using UK is effective in treating subacute and chronic arterial thrombotic occlusion. It augments the speed, safety and efficacy of thrombolysis. When underlying stenosis or organized clots remain after thrombolysis, ballon angioplasty or stent placement would be helpful

  2. The Dynamic Method for Time-of-Flight Measurement of Thermal Neutron Spectra from Pulsed Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu.N.; Tulaev, A.B.; Bobrakov, V.F.

    1994-01-01

    The time-of-flight method for a measurement of thermal neutron spectra in the pulsed neutron sources with high efficiency of neutron registration, more than 10 5 times higher in comparison with traditional one, is described. The main problems connected with the electric current technique for time-of-flight spectra measurement are examined. The methodical errors, problems of a special neutron detector design and other questions are discussed. Some experimental results, spectra from surfaces of the water and solid methane moderators, obtained in the pulsed reactor IBR-2 (Dubna, Russia) are presented. 4 refs., 5 figs

  3. Determination of diffusion coefficients in polypyrrole thin films using a current pulse relaxation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Reginald M.; Vandyke, Leon S.; Martin, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The current pulse E sub oc relaxation method and its application to the determination of diffusion coefficients in electrochemically synthesized polypyrrole thin films is described. Diffusion coefficients for such films in Et4NBF4 and MeCN are determined for a series of submicron film thicknesses. Measurement of the double-layer capacitance, C sub dl, and the resistance, R sub u, of polypyrrole thin films as a function of potential obtained with the galvanostatic pulse method is reported. Measurements of the electrolyte concentration in reduced polypyrrole films are also presented to aid in the interpretation of the data.

  4. Tevatron Collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.J.

    1990-02-01

    The physics of hadron colliders is briefly reviewed. Issues for further study are presented. Particular attention is given to the physics opportunities for a high luminosity (≥ 100 pb -1 /experiment/run) Upgrade of the Tevatron Collider. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Stanford's linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, B.

    1985-01-01

    The peak of the construction phase of the Stanford Linear Collider, SLC, to achieve 50 GeV electron-positron collisions has now been passed. The work remains on schedule to attempt colliding beams, initially at comparatively low luminosity, early in 1987. (orig./HSI).

  6. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1985-01-01

    A report is given on the goals and progress of the SLAC Linear Collider. The author discusses the status of the machine and the detectors and give an overview of the physics which can be done at this new facility. He also gives some ideas on how (and why) large linear colliders of the future should be built

  7. Time interval approach to the pulsed neutron logging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingwu; Su Weining

    1994-01-01

    The time interval of neighbouring neutrons emitted from a steady state neutron source can be treated as that from a time-dependent neutron source. In the rock space, the neutron flux is given by the neutron diffusion equation and is composed of an infinite terms. Each term s composed of two die-away curves. The delay action is discussed and used to measure the time interval with only one detector in the experiment. Nuclear reactions with the time distribution due to different types of radiations observed in the neutron well-logging methods are presented with a view to getting the rock nuclear parameters from the time interval technique

  8. Polarized electron sources for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Ecklund, S.D.; Miller, R.H.; Schultz, D.C.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    Linear colliders require high peak current beams with low duty factors. Several methods to produce polarized e - beams for accelerators have been developed. The SLC, the first linear collider, utilizes a photocathode gun with a GaAs cathode. Although photocathode sources are probably the only practical alternative for the next generation of linear colliders, several problems remain to be solved, including high voltage breakdown which poisons the cathode, charge limitations that are associated with the condition of the semiconductor cathode, and a relatively low polarization of ≤5O%. Methods to solve or at least greatly reduce the impact of each of these problems are at hand

  9. Key technical issues associated with a method of pulse compression. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, R.O. Jr.

    1980-06-01

    Key technical issues for angular multiplexing as a method of pulse compression in a 100 KJ KrF laser have been studied. Environmental issues studied include seismic vibrations man-made vibrations, air propagation, turbulence, and thermal gradient-induced density fluctuations. These studies have been incorporated in the design of mirror mounts and an alignment system, both of which are reported. A design study and performance analysis of the final amplifier have been undertaken. The pulse compression optical train has been designed and assessed as to its performance. Individual components are described and analytical relationships between the optical component size, surface quality, damage threshold and final focus properties are derived. The optical train primary aberrations are obtained and a method for aberration minimization is presented. Cost algorithms for the mirrors, mounts, and electrical hardware are integrated into a cost model to determine system costs as a function of pulse length, aperture size, and spot size

  10. Accurate step-FMCW ultrasound ranging and comparison with pulse-echo signaling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Shyam; Singh, Rahul S.; Lee, Michael; Cox, Brian P.; Culjat, Martin O.; Grundfest, Warren S.; Lee, Hua

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a method setup for high-frequency ultrasound ranging based on stepped frequency-modulated continuous waves (FMCW), potentially capable of producing a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to traditional pulse-echo signaling. In current ultrasound systems, the use of higher frequencies (10-20 MHz) to enhance resolution lowers signal quality due to frequency-dependent attenuation. The proposed ultrasound signaling format, step-FMCW, is well-known in the radar community, and features lower peak power, wider dynamic range, lower noise figure and simpler electronics in comparison to pulse-echo systems. In pulse-echo ultrasound ranging, distances are calculated using the transmit times between a pulse and its subsequent echoes. In step-FMCW ultrasonic ranging, the phase and magnitude differences at stepped frequencies are used to sample the frequency domain. Thus, by taking the inverse Fourier transform, a comprehensive range profile is recovered that has increased immunity to noise over conventional ranging methods. Step-FMCW and pulse-echo waveforms were created using custom-built hardware consisting of an arbitrary waveform generator and dual-channel super heterodyne receiver, providing high SNR and in turn, accuracy in detection.

  11. Nanosecond time-resolved EPR in pulse radiolysis via the spin echo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trifunac, A.D.; Norris, J.R.; Lawler, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and operation of a time-resolved electron spin echo spectrometer suitable for detecting transient radicals produced by 3 MeV electron radiolysis is described. Two modes of operation are available: Field swept mode which generates a normal EPR spectrum and kinetic mode in which the time dependence of a single EPR line is monitored. Techniques which may be used to minimize the effects of nonideal microwave pulses and overlapping sample tube signals are described. The principal advantages of the spin echo method over other time-resolved EPR methods are: (1) Improved time resolution (presently approx.30--50 nsec) allows monitoring of fast changes in EPR signals of transient radicals, (2) Lower susceptibility to interference between the EPR signal and the electron beam pulse at short times, and (3) Lack of dependence of transient signals on microwave field amplitude or static field inhomogeneity at short times. The performance of the instrument is illustrated using CIDEP from acetate radical formed in pulsed radiolysis of aqueous solutions of potassium acetate. The relaxation time and CIDEP enhancement factor obtained for this radical using the spin echo method compare favorably with previous determinations using direct detection EPR. Radical decay rates yield estimates of initial radical concentrations of 10 -4 10 -3 M per electron pulse. The Bloch equations are solved to give an expression for the echo signal for samples exhibiting CIDEP using arbitrary microwave pulse widths and distributions of Larmor frequencies. Conditions are discussed under which the time-dependent signal would be distorted by deviations from an ideal nonselective 90 0 --tau--180 0 pulse sequence

  12. A method of precise profile analysis of diffuse scattering for the KENS pulsed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todate, Y.; Fukumura, T.; Fukazawa, H.

    2001-01-01

    An outline of our profile analysis method, which is now of practical use for the asymmetric KENS pulsed thermal neutrons, are presented. The analysis of the diffuse scattering from a single crystal of D 2 O is shown as an example. The pulse shape function is based on the Ikeda-Carpenter function adjusted for the KENS neutron pulses. The convoluted intensity is calculated by a Monte-Carlo method and the precision of the calculation is controlled. Fitting parameters in the model cross section can be determined by the built-in nonlinear least square fitting procedure. Because this method is the natural extension of the procedure conventionally used for the triple-axis data, it is easy to apply with generality and versatility. Most importantly, furthermore, this method has capability of precise correction of the time shift of the observed peak position which is inevitably caused in the case of highly asymmetric pulses and broad scattering function. It will be pointed out that the accurate determination of true time-of-flight is important especially in the single crystal inelastic experiments. (author)

  13. Application of pulse pile-up correction spectrum to the library least-squares method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    The Monte Carlo simulation code CEARPPU has been developed and updated to provide pulse pile-up correction spectra for high counting rate cases. For neutron activation analysis, CEARPPU correction spectra were used in library least-squares method to give better isotopic activity results than the convention library least-squares fitting with uncorrected spectra.

  14. Recent Development of Radioanalytical Methods at the IBR-2 Pulsed Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarov, V.M.; Peresedov, V.F.

    1994-01-01

    Experience in the application of radioanalytical methods, including NAA, at the IBR-2 pulsed fast reactor is reviewed. Details of the instruments dedicated to neutron activation analysis and radiography studies are reported. Applications of resonance neutrons to environmental monitoring and to the investigation of high-purity materials, are examplified. 15 refs. 9 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Multi-Gaussian fitting for pulse waveform using Weighted Least Squares and multi-criteria decision making method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Lisheng; Feng, Shuting; Meng, Max Q-H; Wang, Kuanquan

    2013-11-01

    Analysis of pulse waveform is a low cost, non-invasive method for obtaining vital information related to the conditions of the cardiovascular system. In recent years, different Pulse Decomposition Analysis (PDA) methods have been applied to disclose the pathological mechanisms of the pulse waveform. All these methods decompose single-period pulse waveform into a constant number (such as 3, 4 or 5) of individual waves. Furthermore, those methods do not pay much attention to the estimation error of the key points in the pulse waveform. The estimation of human vascular conditions depends on the key points' positions of pulse wave. In this paper, we propose a Multi-Gaussian (MG) model to fit real pulse waveforms using an adaptive number (4 or 5 in our study) of Gaussian waves. The unknown parameters in the MG model are estimated by the Weighted Least Squares (WLS) method and the optimized weight values corresponding to different sampling points are selected by using the Multi-Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) method. Performance of the MG model and the WLS method has been evaluated by fitting 150 real pulse waveforms of five different types. The resulting Normalized Root Mean Square Error (NRMSE) was less than 2.0% and the estimation accuracy for the key points was satisfactory, demonstrating that our proposed method is effective in compressing, synthesizing and analyzing pulse waveforms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Synchronization method of digital pulse power supply for heavy ions accelerator in Lanzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongkun; Zhao Jiang; Wu Fengjun; Zhang Huajian; Chen Youxin; Huang Yuzhen; Gao Daqing; Zhou Zhongzu; Yan Huaihai; Yan Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the synchrotron depends on its synchronization. A kind of synchronization method of digital pulse power supply in Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR) was presented in detail, which is a kind of system on a programmable chip (SOPC) based on optical fiber and optical-custom component. The test of the digital power supply was performed and the current wave forms of pulse mode were given. The results show that all targets can meet the design requirements. (authors)

  17. Analysis of Crystallographic Structure of a Japanese Sword by the Pulsed Neutron Transmission Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, K.; Ayukawa, N.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Uchida, T.; Uno, S.; Grazzi, F.; Scherillo, A.

    We measured two-dimensional transmission spectra of pulsed neutron beams for a Japanese sword sample. Atom density, crystalline size, and preferred orientation of crystals were obtained using the RITS code. The position dependence of the atomic density is consistent with the shape of the sample. The crystalline size is very small and shows position dependence, which is understood by the unique structure of Japanese swords. The preferred orientation has strong position dependence. Our study shows the usefulness of the pulsed neutron transmission method for cultural metal artifacts.

  18. Initial position estimation method for permanent magnet synchronous motor based on improved pulse voltage injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Z.; Lu, K.; Ye, Y.

    2011-01-01

    According to saliency of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM), the information of rotor position is implied in performance of stator inductances due to the magnetic saturation effect. Researches focused on the initial rotor position estimation of PMSM by injecting modulated pulse voltage...... vectors. The relationship between the inductance variations and voltage vector positions was studied. The inductance variation effect on estimation accuracy was studied as well. An improved five-pulses injection method was proposed, to improve the estimation accuracy by choosing optimaized voltage vectors...

  19. [The development of a wearable pulse oximeter sensor and study of the calibration method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoling; Cai, Guiyan

    2009-08-01

    The paper first analyses the principles of measurement of the two-wave oximeter and their limitations in technology. We propose to filter off motion interference from pulse oximeter signal using an algorithm based on the Beer-Lambert law that requires a three-wave probe (660 nm, 850 nm, and 940 nm). Based on the new algorithm, this paper describes the design principle of the circuitry and the software flowchart. Also, we study the calibration method of the pulse oximeter sensor and discuss the results in this paper.

  20. Measurement of H'(0.07) with pulse height weighting integration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liye, LIU; Gang, JIN; Jizeng, MA

    2002-01-01

    H'(0.07) is an important quantity for radiation field measurement in health physics. One of the plastic scintillator measurement methods is employing the weak current produced by PMT. However, there are some weaknesses in the current method. For instance: sensitive to environment humidity and temperature, non-linearity energy response. In order to increase the precision of H'(0.07) measurement, a Pulse Height Weighting Integration Method is introduced for its advantages: low noise, high sensitivity, data processable, wide measurement range. Pulse Height Weighting Integration Method seems to be acceptable to measure directional dose equivalent. The representative theoretical energy response of the pre-described method accords with the preliminary experiment result

  1. Towards future circular colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  2. Innovations in electrophoretic deposition: Alternating current and pulsed direct current methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chávez-Valdez, Alejandra; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes emerging developments in the field of alternating current (AC) and pulsed direct current (DC) electrophoretic deposition (EPD) in aqueous or organic media. Numerous applications of AC-EPD are discussed including two major groups of investigations: (i) AC-EPD to suppress water hydrolysis at high voltages in inorganic (ceramic) coatings and (ii) AC-EPD for deposition of biological entities. The deposition, purification and manipulation of carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles by AC-EPD to form specific arrays, for development of sensors and other electronic devices and the application of AC-EPD as method for separation of particles according to their shape or size are also presented. Other applications reviewed relate to the fabrication by AC-EPD of toxic gas sensors from oxides and superconducting layers. The main materials being examined by AC-EPD are inorganic, including carbon nanotubes, TiO 2 nanoparticles, Al 2 O 3 , Si, SnO 2 , ZnO and WO 3 and biological entities, e.g. bacteria cells. For pulsed EPD, the applications reviewed are divided in pulsed current and pulsed voltage EPD. Among the applications of pulsed EPD, the formation of thick films from aqueous suspensions without water decomposition, the fabrication of multilayer and composite materials and the size-selective deposition of ceramic nanoparticles are the most important investigated to date, based on the quality of the coatings and deposits obtained and their relevance for applications.

  3. Air pulse deformation measurement: a preliminary method for noninvasive vocal fold pliability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Hans; Lindestad, P Å; Hertegård, S

    2011-01-01

    A new method, air pulse pliability measurement, is presented, with which the pliability and elasticity of the vocal folds was measured in vitro and in vivo using air pulses. The size of the mucosal movements induced by air pulse stimulation was measured with a laser-based technique. The air pulses fed via a 2-mm tubing, introduced through the working channel of a flexible endoscope. Both in vitro and in vivo tests were performed. Nine normal, vocally healthy subjects were examined by air pulse stimulations of the vocal folds, of the skin (cheek and dorsum of the hand) and of the inside of the lips. The in vitro tests showed a coefficient of variation of 5% within a range of 1-5 mm from the probe to the surface. The elasticity data showed no differences between vocal folds, lips or cheek. The hand data showed a significantly higher stiffness as compared to the other 3 measuring points (p measuring points, but in ideal conditions on skin it was 9%. The results show that the technique allows automatic, quantitative, noninvasive vocal fold pliability measurements on awake subjects. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Method for measuring the resistive transition and critical current in superconductors using pulsed current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, W.C.; Jones, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the intragranular critical current of a granular superconductive material, comprising the steps of: conducting a substantially rectangular electronic pulse through said material so as to conduct a current through said material such that when said intragranular critical current of said material is exceeded, any grains present in said material are in a superconducting state when said current is less than said intragranular critical current, said material having a critical temperature; measuring said current through said material while conducting said pulse; measuring a voltage difference across said material while conducting said pulse; and determining said intragranular critical current through said material by varying said current to discern a current level at which an electrical resistance of said material increases to that of a non-superconducting state as the grains of said material transition from said superconducting to said non-superconducting state

  5. Method to generate a pulse train of few-cycle coherent radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Garcia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We develop a method to generate a long pulse train of few-cycle coherent radiation by modulating an electron beam with a high power laser. The large energy modulation disperses the beam in a radiating undulator and leads to the production of phase-locked few-cycle coherent radiation pulses. These pulses are produced at a high harmonic of the modulating laser, and are longitudinally separated by the modulating laser wavelength. We discuss an analytical model for this scheme and investigate the temporal and spectral properties of this radiation. This model is compared with numerical simulation results using the unaveraged code Puffin. We examine various harmful effects and how they might be avoided, as well as a possible experimental realization of this scheme.

  6. SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Bell, R.A.; Brown, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    The SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER is designed to achieve an energy of 100 GeV in the electron-positron center-of-mass system by accelerating intense bunches of particles in the SLAC linac and transporting the electron and positron bunches in a special magnet system to a point where they are focused to a radius of about 2 microns and made to collide head on. The rationale for this new type of colliding beam system is discussed, the project is described, some of the novel accelerator physics issues involved are discussed, and some of the critical technical components are described

  7. [Commissioning of the newly constructed Beijing electron-positron collider BEPC, Beijing, China, and visit to SRRC to discuss magnet manufacturing and measurement methods, Taipei, Taiwan, November 11--27, 1988]: Foreign trip report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    The traveller was invited to IHEP to participate in the commissioning of the newly constructed Beijing electron-positron collider BEPC, give a status report on the AGS Booster Project and to assess the feasibility of sub-contracting booster sextupoles to IHEP. The trip to SRRC was undertaken to discuss magnet manufacturing and measurement methods

  8. Method of analysis to determine subcritical reactivity from the pulsed neutron experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, P.B.

    1975-06-01

    The published methods for the deduction of reactivity from pulsed neutron experiments on subcritical reactors are reviewed. Each method is categorized as inherently yielding a result that is either spatially independent or spatially dependent. The spatially independent results are formally identical with the static reactivity; the result does not depend, in principle, on the location of either the pulsed neutron source or the neutron detector during data collection. The spatially dependent results only approximate the static reactivity; the results are affected, in varying degrees, by the locations of the source and detector. Among the techniques yielding spatially independent results are the Space-Time method of Parks and Stewart and the Inhour method of Preskitt et al. Spatially dependent results are obtained with the Sjoestrand, Gozani, and Garelis-Russell methods which are examined with and without the kinetic distortion corrections given by Becker and Quisenberry. Intercomparisons of all methods are made with reference to pulsed neutron experiments on both unreflected and reflected reactors. Recommendations are made concerning the best choice of method under the various experimental conditions that are likely to be encountered. 14 references. (U.S.)

  9. A search for the ttH (H → bb) channel at the Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector using a matrix element method

    CERN Document Server

    Basye, Austin Thomas

    A matrix element method analysis of the Standard Model Higgs boson, produced in association with two top quarks decaying to the lepton-plus-jets channel is presented. Based on 20.3 fb−1 of √s=8 TeV data, produced at the Large Hadron Collider and collected by the ATLAS detector, this analysis utilizes multiple advanced techniques to search for tt ̄H signatures with a 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to two b-quarks. After categorizing selected events based on their jet and b-tag multiplicities, signal rich regions are analyzed using the matrix element method. Resulting variables are then propagated to two parallel multivariate analyses utilizing Neural Networks and Boosted Decision Trees respectively. As no significant excess is found, an observed (expected) limit of 3.4 (2.2) times the Standard Model cross-section is determined at 95% confidence, using the CLs method, for the Neural Network analysis. For the Boosted Decision Tree analysis, an observed (expected) limit of 5.2 (2.7) times the Standard Model cr...

  10. Studying Intense Pulsed Light Method Along With Corticosteroid Injection in Treating Keloid Scars

    OpenAIRE

    Shamsi Meymandi, Simin; Rezazadeh, Azadeh; Ekhlasi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Results of various studies suggest that the hypertrophic and keloid scars are highly prevalent in the general population and are irritating both physically and mentally. Objective: Considering the variety of existing therapies, intense pulsed light (IPL) method along with corticosteroid injection was evaluated in treating these scars. Materials and Methods: 86 subjects were included in this clinical trial. Eight sessions of therapeutic intervention were done with IPL along with co...

  11. Detection of Irradiated Korean Wheat Flour by Viscosity and Pulsed Photostimulated Luminescence (PPSL) Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, S.D.; Chang, K.S.; Oh, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study was carried out to establish methods for irradiation detection of irradiation in Korean wheat flour by pulsed photostimulated luminescence (PPSL) and viscometric methods. The photon counts of the irradiated Korean wheat flour measured by PPSL immediately after irradiation increased with increasing irradiation dose. The photon counts in the irradiated Korean wheat flour almost disappeared with lapse of time after storage in normal room conditions, but irradiation detection was still possible after 6 months in darkroom conditions

  12. Linear collider: a preview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  13. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  14. FERMILAB: Preparing to collide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Against the background of stringent Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) regulations mandated by the US Department of Energy for all national Labs, Fermilab prepared to mount the next major Tevatron proton-antiproton collider run

  15. Linear collider: a preview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-11-01

    Since no linear colliders have been built yet it is difficult to know at what energy the linear cost scaling of linear colliders drops below the quadratic scaling of storage rings. There is, however, no doubt that a linear collider facility for a center of mass energy above say 500 GeV is significantly cheaper than an equivalent storage ring. In order to make the linear collider principle feasible at very high energies a number of problems have to be solved. There are two kinds of problems: one which is related to the feasibility of the principle and the other kind of problems is associated with minimizing the cost of constructing and operating such a facility. This lecture series describes the problems and possible solutions. Since the real test of a principle requires the construction of a prototype I will in the last chapter describe the SLC project at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

  16. A comparison of two methods of pulse-shape discrimination for alpha-gamma separation with trans-stilbene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, G.; Cojocaru, M.

    1977-01-01

    A method for measurement of low level alpha particles in high level gamma background is investigated. Because of its pulse-shape-discrimination properties and being a solid scintillator, trans-stilbene seems to be the proper scintillator, for this purpose. The investigation was done by measuring the effect of different gamma background level (from very low to very high) on constant alpha count rate. Two different pulse-shape-discrimination systems were used and compared. The Ortec system measures the pulse fall time and supplies a corresponding pulse height and the Elscint system checks whether the pulse is what is expected to be the gamma pulse, or is a longer pulse. Both systems yielded good results and were found to be adequate for alpha-gamma separation with trans-stilbene. (Auth.)

  17. A single-probe heat pulse method for estimating sap velocity in trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bernal, Álvaro; Testi, Luca; Villalobos, Francisco J

    2017-10-01

    Available sap flow methods are still far from being simple, cheap and reliable enough to be used beyond very specific research purposes. This study presents and tests a new single-probe heat pulse (SPHP) method for monitoring sap velocity in trees using a single-probe sensor, rather than the multi-probe arrangements used up to now. Based on the fundamental conduction-convection principles of heat transport in sapwood, convective velocity (V h ) is estimated from the temperature increase in the heater after the application of a heat pulse (ΔT). The method was validated against measurements performed with the compensation heat pulse (CHP) technique in field trees of six different species. To do so, a dedicated three-probe sensor capable of simultaneously applying both methods was produced and used. Experimental measurements in the six species showed an excellent agreement between SPHP and CHP outputs for moderate to high flow rates, confirming the applicability of the method. In relation to other sap flow methods, SPHP presents several significant advantages: it requires low power inputs, it uses technically simpler and potentially cheaper instrumentation, the physical damage to the tree is minimal and artefacts caused by incorrect probe spacing and alignment are removed. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Dedicating Fermilab's Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-01-15

    It was a bold move to have a fullscale dedication ceremony for the new proton-antiproton Collider at the Fermilab Tevatron on 13 October, two days before the first collisions were seen. However the particles dutifully behaved as required, and over the following weekend the Collider delivered its goods at a total energy of 1600 GeV, significantly boosting the world record for laboratory collisions.

  19. Superconducting linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The advantages of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) for particle accelerators have been demonstrated by successful operation of systems in the TRISTAN and LEP electron-positron collider rings respectively at the Japanese KEK Laboratory and at CERN. If performance continues to improve and costs can be lowered, this would open an attractive option for a high luminosity TeV (1000 GeV) linear collider

  20. FERMILAB: Collider detectors -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Last month's edition (April, page 12) included a status report on data collection and preliminary physics results from the 'newcomer' DO detector at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. This time the spotlight falls in the Veteran' CDF detector, in action since 1985 and meanwhile significantly upgraded. Meanwhile the Tevatron collider continues to improve, with record collision rates

  1. A novel method of calculating the energy deposition curve of nanosecond pulsed surface dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Kun; Wang, Xinying; Lu, Jiayu; Cui, Quansheng; Pang, Lei; Di, Dongxu; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2015-01-01

    To obtain the energy deposition curve is very important in the fields to which nanosecond pulse dielectric barrier discharges (NPDBDs) are applied. It helps the understanding of the discharge physics and fast gas heating. In this paper, an equivalent circuit model, composed of three capacitances, is introduced and a method of calculating the energy deposition curve is proposed for a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge (NPSDBD) plasma actuator. The capacitance C d and the energy deposition curve E R are determined by mathematically proving that the mapping from C d to E R is bijective and numerically searching one C d that satisfies the requirement for E R to be a monotonically non-decreasing function. It is found that the value of capacitance C d varies with the amplitude of applied pulse voltage due to the change of discharge area and is dependent on the polarity of applied voltage. The bijectiveness of the mapping from C d to E R in nanosecond pulse volumetric dielectric barrier discharge (NPVDBD) is demonstrated and the feasibility of the application of the new method to NPVDBD is validated. This preliminarily shows a high possibility of developing a unified approach to calculate the energy deposition curve in NPDBD. (paper)

  2. A fast pulse phase estimation method for X-ray pulsar signals based on epoch folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Mengfan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available X-ray pulsar-based navigation (XPNAV is an attractive method for autonomous deep-space navigation in the future. The pulse phase estimation is a key task in XPNAV and its accuracy directly determines the navigation accuracy. State-of-the-art pulse phase estimation techniques either suffer from poor estimation accuracy, or involve the maximization of generally non-convex object function, thus resulting in a large computational cost. In this paper, a fast pulse phase estimation method based on epoch folding is presented. The statistical properties of the observed profile obtained through epoch folding are developed. Based on this, we recognize the joint probability distribution of the observed profile as the likelihood function and utilize a fast Fourier transform-based procedure to estimate the pulse phase. Computational complexity of the proposed estimator is analyzed as well. Experimental results show that the proposed estimator significantly outperforms the currently used cross-correlation (CC and nonlinear least squares (NLS estimators, while significantly reduces the computational complexity compared with NLS and maximum likelihood (ML estimators.

  3. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  4. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The int...

  5. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb$_{3}$Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The in...

  6. Towards a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.

    2011-01-01

    A multi TeV Muon Collider is required for the full coverage of Terascale physics. The physics potential for a Muon Collider at ∼3 TeV and integrated luminosity of 1 ab -1 is outstanding. Particularly strong cases can be made if the new physics is SUSY or new strong dynamics. Furthermore, a staged Muon Collider can provide a Neutrino Factory to fully disentangle neutrino physics. If a narrow s-channel resonance state exists in the multi-TeV region, the physics program at a Muon Collider could begin with less than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 luminosity. Detailed studies of the physics case for a 1.5-4 TeV Muon Collider are just beginning. The goals of such studies are to: (1) identify benchmark physics processes; (2) study the physics dependence on beam parameters; (3) estimate detector backgrounds; and (4) compare the physics potential of a Muon Collider with those of the ILC, CLIC and upgrades to the LHC.

  7. Photon collider at TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-01-01

    High energy photon colliders (γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e + e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3)L e + e - . Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e + e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e + e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is ''an optical storage ring (optical trap)'' with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems

  8. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W.; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to √s=500 GeV

  9. Topics in Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    rapidity distribution in the Drell-Yan process, an important discovery channel for new physics at hadron colliders. We introduce a powerful new method for calculating differential distributions in hard scattering processes. We apply our results to the analysis of fixed target experiments, which provide important constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton.

  10. RHIC spin: The first polarized proton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1994-01-01

    The very successful program of QCD and electroweak tests at the high energy hadron colliders have shown that the perturbative QCD has progressed towards becoming a ''precision'' theory. At the same time, it has been shown that with the help of Siberian Snakes it is feasible to accelerate polarized protons to high enough energies where the proven methods of collider physics can be used to probe the spin content of the proton but also where fundamental tests of the spin effects in the standard model are possible. With Siberian Snakes the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) will be the first collider to allow for 250 GeV on 250 GeV polarized proton collisions

  11. Development of gap measurement technique in-vessel corium retention using ultrasonic pulse echo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Kil Mo; Kim, Jong Hwan; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kim, Sang Baik; Sim, Cheul Muu

    1999-03-01

    A gap between a molten material and a lower vessel is formed in the LAVA experiment, a phase 1 study of Sonata-IV program. In this technical report, quantitative results of the gap measurement using an off-line ultrasonic pulse echo method are presented. This report aims at development of an appropriate ultrasonics test method, by analyzing the problems from the external environmental reason and the internal characteristic reason. The signal analyzing methods to improve the S/N ratio in these problems are divided into the time variant synthesized signal analyzing method and the time invariant synthesized signal analyzing method. In this report, the possibility of the application of these two methods to the gap signal and the noise is considered. In this test, the signal of the propagational direction and reflectional direction through solid-liquid-solid specimen was analyzed to understand the behavior of the reflectional signal in a multi-layered structure by filling the gap with water between the melt and the lower head vessel. The quantitative gap measurement using the off-line ultrasonic pulse echo method was available for a little of the scanned region. But furtherly using DSP technique and imaging technique, the better results will be obtained. Some of the measured signals are presented as 2-dimensional spherical mapping method using distance and amplitude. Other signals difficult in quantitative measurement are saved for a new signal processing method. (author). 11 refs., 4 tabs., 54 figs

  12. Method and apparatus for improving the quality and efficiency of ultrashort-pulse laser machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Brent C.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Perry, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the quality and efficiency of machining of materials with laser pulse durations shorter than 100 picoseconds by orienting and maintaining the polarization of the laser light such that the electric field vector is perpendicular relative to the edges of the material being processed. Its use is any machining operation requiring remote delivery and/or high precision with minimal collateral dames.

  13. Novel Method of Unambiguous Moving Target Detection in Pulse-Doppler Radar with Random Pulse Repetition Interval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Blind zones and ambiguities in range and velocity measurement are two important issues in traditional pulse-Doppler radar. By generating random deviations with respect to a mean Pulse Repetition Interval (PRI, this paper proposes a novel algorithm of Moving Target Detection (MTD based on the Compressed Sensing (CS theory, in which the random deviations of the PRIare converted to the Restricted Isometry Property (RIP of the observing matrix. The ambiguities of range and velocity are eliminated by designing the signal parameters. The simulation results demonstrate that this scheme has high performance of detection, and there is no ambiguity and blind zones as well. It can also shorten the coherent processing interval compared to traditional staggered PRI mode because only one pulse train is needed instead of several trains.

  14. Method of high precision interval measurement in pulse laser ranging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Lv, Xin-yuan; Mao, Jin-jin; Liu, Wei; Yang, Dong

    2013-09-01

    Laser ranging is suitable for laser system, for it has the advantage of high measuring precision, fast measuring speed,no cooperative targets and strong resistance to electromagnetic interference,the measuremen of laser ranging is the key paremeters affecting the performance of the whole system.The precision of the pulsed laser ranging system was decided by the precision of the time interval measurement, the principle structure of laser ranging system was introduced, and a method of high precision time interval measurement in pulse laser ranging system was established in this paper.Based on the analysis of the factors which affected the precision of range measure,the pulse rising edges discriminator was adopted to produce timing mark for the start-stop time discrimination,and the TDC-GP2 high precision interval measurement system based on TMS320F2812 DSP was designed to improve the measurement precision.Experimental results indicate that the time interval measurement method in this paper can obtain higher range accuracy. Compared with the traditional time interval measurement system,the method simplifies the system design and reduce the influence of bad weather conditions,furthermore,it satisfies the requirements of low costs and miniaturization.

  15. FUTURE CIRCULAR COLLIDER LOGISTICS STUDY

    CERN Document Server

    Beißert, Ulrike; Kuhlmann, Gerd; Nettsträter, Andreas; Prasse, Christian; Wohlfahrt, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN in Geneva is the largest and most powerful collider in the world. CERN and its research and experimental infrastructure is not only a focus for the science community but is also very much in the public eye. With the Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study, CERN has begun to examine the feasibility of a new underground accelerator ring with a length of approximately 100 kilometres. Logistics is of great importance for the construction, assembly and operation of the FCC. During the planning, construction and assembly of the LHC, logistics proved to be one of the key factors. As the FCC is even larger than the LHC, logistics will also become more and more significant. This report therefore shows new concepts, methods and analytics for logistics, supply chain and transport concepts as part of the FCC study. This report deals with three different logistics aspects for the planning and construction phase of FCC: 1. A discussion of d...

  16. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices

  17. Photon-photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R ampersand D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy

  18. An auto-triggered anode potential lowering method on increase of after-pulses in a GM-counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Ryuji; Narita, Yuichi

    1982-01-01

    The number of after-pulses generated in an organic quenching GM-counter depends on the pulsed radiation intensity, and it can be usable for the intensity measurement. The increase of the number of after-pulse occurrence (occurring rate) per one exposure to pulsed radiation improves the efficiency in intensity measurement, and is effective to the measurement in low intensity region. The attempt to increase the number of after-pulse factors, to hold those in a GM-counter for more than the dead time and further to improve the after-pulse yield is the presently reported auto-triggered anode potential lowering method. In this report, the experimental apparatus and its procedure are described, and the experimental results about the dependence of after-pulse occurring rate are described on the anode potential lowering duration, on the lowered anode potential, on the high anode potential, and on the intensity of pulsed X-ray. The after-pulse occurring rate by this method showed the dependence on radiation intensity in the range from 4.5 x 10 -4 to 1.1 x 10 -2 mu R/burst, and the occurrence rate can be increased up to about 40 times as much as the mode to lower anode potential only during exposure in this range. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  19. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  20. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  1. In vitro biological performance of minerals substituted hydroxyapatite coating by pulsed electrodeposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopi, Dhanaraj, E-mail: dhanaraj_gopi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Karthika, Arumugam; Nithiya, Subramani [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Kavitha, Louis [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-03-01

    The present study deals with the optimization of minerals (Sr, Mg and Zn) substituted hydroxyapatite coatings (M-HAP) at different pulse on and off time (1 s, 2 s, 3 s and 4 s) by pulsed electrodeposition method. The formation of M-HAP coating was investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction studies (XRD). The morphological features and the content of Sr, Mg and Zn ions in M-HAP coated Ti–6Al–4V were investigated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). The electrochemical studies were performed for M-HAP coated Ti–6Al–4V in simulated body fluid which exhibited better corrosion resistance at the prolonged pulse off time. The in vitro cell adhesion test revealed that the M-HAP coating is found appropriate for the formation of new cell growth which proves the enhanced biocompatible nature of the coating. Thus the M-HAP coating will serve as a potential candidate in orthopedic applications. - Highlights: • We successfully achieved minerals substituted HAP coatings on Ti alloy by PED method. • The M-HAP coated Ti alloy exhibited better bioresistivity in SBF. • The as-coated sample showed antimicrobial activity and better cell viability. • The in vitro test displayed the formation of new cell growth. • The M-HAP coating can serve as a better candidate in orthopedic applications.

  2. Digital baseline estimation method for multi-channel pulse height analyzing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Wuyun; Wei Yixiang; Ai Xianyun

    2005-01-01

    The basic features of digital baseline estimation for multi-channel pulse height analysis are introduced. The weight-function of minimum-noise baseline filter is deduced with functional variational calculus. The frequency response of this filter is also deduced with Fourier transformation, and the influence of parameters on amplitude frequency response characteristics is discussed. With MATLAB software, the noise voltage signal from the charge sensitive preamplifier is simulated, and the processing effect of minimum-noise digital baseline estimation is verified. According to the results of this research, digital baseline estimation method can estimate baseline optimally, and it is very suitable to be used in digital multi-channel pulse height analysis. (authors)

  3. analysis of large electromagnetic pulse simulators using the electric field integral equation method in time domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamali, J.; Aghajafari, R.; Moini, R.; Sadeghi, H.

    2002-01-01

    A time-domain approach is presented to calculate electromagnetic fields inside a large Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) simulator. This type of EMP simulator is used for studying the effect of electromagnetic pulses on electrical apparatus in various structures such as vehicles, a reoplanes, etc. The simulator consists of three planar transmission lines. To solve the problem, we first model the metallic structure of the simulator as a grid of conducting wires. The numerical solution of the governing electric field integral equation is then obtained using the method of moments in time domain. To demonstrate the accuracy of the model, we consider a typical EMP simulator. The comparison of our results with those obtained experimentally in the literature validates the model introduced in this paper

  4. Comparison of the analog and digital pulse-shaping methods in signal processing in nuclear detections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnabi, H.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this article is to describe the potential applications of the new improved digital techniques and provide a meaningful figure of merit for the comparison of the analog and digital methods. The experimental operation of a typical digital pulse shaper used in a spectrometer with the 23 Na source and a Ge y-ray detector is discussed. The effect of different imposed dead time on the counted pulses is investigated. It is noticed that nuclear events distribution in all ranges of dead time does not obey Poisson's law and deviation from this distribution depends on the counting rate. For a given dead time, deviation from this distribution increases linearly by increasing imposed dead time. For a fixed dead time, when counting rate increases deviation from Poisson's distribution law increases accordingly, and vice versa. (Author)

  5. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  6. The Colliding Beams Sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Sequencer (CBS) is a computer program used to operate the pbar-p Collider by synchronizing the applications programs and simulating the activities of the accelerator operators during filling and storage. The Sequencer acts as a meta-program, running otherwise stand alone applications programs, to do the set-up, beam transfers, acceleration, low beta turn on, and diagnostics for the transfers and storage. The Sequencer and its operational performance will be described along with its special features which include a periodic scheduler and command logger. 14 refs., 3 figs

  7. Superphysics at UNK collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kereselidze, A.R.; Liparteliani, A.G.; Sokolov, A.A.; Volkov, G.G.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical incompleteness of standard model and the way of going beyond frames on the basis of supersymmetry are considered. The most important directions of experimental researches at the colliders of a new generation are given. Theoretical estimates of masses of supersymmetrical particles in the framework of N=1 supergravity obtained from compactification of the popular E 8 xE 8 superstring theories are presented. The experimental search for supersymmetrical particles at the UNK pp-collider (√s=6 TeV) is performed

  8. Hadron collider luminosity limitations

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    1992-01-01

    The three colliders operated to date have taught us a great deal about the behaviour of both bunched and debunched beams in storage rings. The main luminosity limitations are now well enough understood that most of them can be stronglu attenuated or eliminated by approriate design precautions. Experience with the beam-beam interaction in both the SPS and the Tevatron allow us to predict the performance of the new generation of colliders with some degree of confidence. One of the main challenges that the accelerator physicist faces is the problem of the dynamic aperture limitations due to the lower field quality expected, imposed by economic and other constraints.

  9. An Improved Clutter Suppression Method for Weather Radars Using Multiple Pulse Repetition Time Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjie Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation of an improved clutter suppression method for the multiple pulse repetition time (PRT technique based on simulated radar data. The suppression method is constructed using maximum likelihood methodology in time domain and is called parametric time domain method (PTDM. The procedure relies on the assumption that precipitation and clutter signal spectra follow a Gaussian functional form. The multiple interleaved pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs that are used in this work are set to four PRFs (952, 833, 667, and 513 Hz. Based on radar simulation, it is shown that the new method can provide accurate retrieval of Doppler velocity even in the case of strong clutter contamination. The obtained velocity is nearly unbiased for all the range of Nyquist velocity interval. Also, the performance of the method is illustrated on simulated radar data for plan position indicator (PPI scan. Compared with staggered 2-PRT transmission schemes with PTDM, the proposed method presents better estimation accuracy under certain clutter situations.

  10. Gas phase collision dynamics by means of pulse-radiolysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Yoshihiko

    1989-01-01

    After a brief survey of recent advances in gas-phase collision dynamics studies using pulse radiolysis methods, the following two topics in our research programs are presented with emphasis on the superior advantages of the pulse radiolysis methods over the various methods of gas-phase collision dynamics, such as beam methods, swarm methods and flow methods. One of the topics is electron attachment to van der Waals molecules. The attachment rates of thermal electrons to O 2 and other molecules in dense gases have been measured in wide ranges of both gas temperatures and pressures, from which experimental evidence has been obtained for electron attachment to van der Waals molecules. The results have been compared with theories and discussed in terms of the effect of van der Waals interaction on the electron attachment resonance. The obtained conclusions have been related with investigations of electron attachment, solvation and localization in the condensed phase. The other is Penning ionization and its related processes. The rate constants for the de-excitation of He(2 1 P), He(2 3 S), Ne( 3 P 0 ), Ne( 3 P 1 ), Ne( 3 P 2 ), Ar( 1 P 1 ), Ar( 3 P 1 ), by atoms and molecules have been measured in the temperature range from 100 to 300 K, thus obtaining the collisional energy dependence of the de-excitation cross sections. The results are compared in detail with theories classified according to the excited rare gas atoms in the metastable and resonance states. (author)

  11. Methods and optical fibers that decrease pulse degradation resulting from random chromatic dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertkov, Michael; Gabitov, Ildar

    2004-03-02

    The present invention provides methods and optical fibers for periodically pinning an actual (random) accumulated chromatic dispersion of an optical fiber to a predicted accumulated dispersion of the fiber through relatively simple modifications of fiber-optic manufacturing methods or retrofitting of existing fibers. If the pinning occurs with sufficient frequency (at a distance less than or are equal to a correlation scale), pulse degradation resulting from random chromatic dispersion is minimized. Alternatively, pinning may occur quasi-periodically, i.e., the pinning distance is distributed between approximately zero and approximately two to three times the correlation scale.

  12. Study on variance-to-mean method as subcriticality monitor for accelerator driven system operated with pulse-mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Hideto; Kitamura, Yasunori; Yamane, Yoshihiro; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Unesaki, Hironobu

    2003-01-01

    Two types of the variance-to-mean methods for the subcritical system that was driven by the periodic and pulsed neutron source were developed and their experimental examination was performed with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a pulsed neutron generator. As a result, it was demonstrated that the prompt neutron decay constant could be measured by these methods. From this fact, it was concluded that the present variance-to-mean methods had potential for being used in the subcriticality monitor for the future accelerator driven system operated with the pulse-mode. (author)

  13. [Application of three heat pulse technique-based methods to determine the stem sap flow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Fan, Jun

    2015-08-01

    It is of critical importance to acquire tree transpiration characters through sap flow methodology to understand tree water physiology, forest ecology and ecosystem water exchange. Tri-probe heat pulse sensors, which are widely utilized in soil thermal parameters and soil evaporation measurement, were applied to implement Salix matsudana sap flow density (Vs) measurements via heat-ratio method (HRM), T-Max method (T-Max) and single-probe heat pulse probe (SHPP) method, and comparative analysis was conducted with additional Grainer's thermal diffusion probes (TDP) measured results. The results showed that, it took about five weeks to reach a stable measurement stage after TPHP installation, Vs measured with three methods in the early stage after installation was 135%-220% higher than Vs in the stable measurement stage, and Vs estimated via HRM, T-Max and SHPP methods were significantly linearly correlated with Vs estimated via TDP method, with R2 of 0.93, 0.73 and 0.91, respectively, and R2 for Vs measured by SHPP and HRM reached 0.94. HRM had relatively higher precision in measuring low rates and reverse sap flow. SHPP method seemed to be very promising to measure sap flow for configuration simplicity and high measuring accuracy, whereas it couldn' t distinguish directions of flow. T-Max method had relatively higher error in sap flow measurement, and it couldn' t measure sap flow below 5 cm3 · cm(-2) · h(-1), thus this method could not be used alone, however it could measure thermal diffusivity for calculating sap flow when other methods were imposed. It was recommended to choose a proper method or a combination of several methods to measure stem sap flow, based on specific research purpose.

  14. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, B M; O'Flynn, B; Mathewson, A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  15. Investigation of a pulsed current annealing method in reusing MOSFET dosimeters for in vivo IMRT dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Guang-Wen; Qi, Zhen-Yu, E-mail: qizhy@sysucc.org.cn; Deng, Xiao-Wu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of pulsed current annealing in reusing metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters forin vivo intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry. Methods: Several MOSFETs were irradiated atd{sub max} using a 6 MV x-ray beam with 5 V on the gate and annealed with zero bias at room temperature. The percentage recovery of threshold voltage shift during multiple irradiation-annealing cycles was evaluated. Key dosimetry characteristics of the annealed MOSFET such as the dosimeter's sensitivity, reproducibility, dose linearity, and linearity of response within the dynamic range were investigated. The initial results of using the annealed MOSFETs for IMRT dosimetry practice were also presented. Results: More than 95% of threshold voltage shift can be recovered after 24-pulse current continuous annealing in 16 min. The mean sensitivity degradation was found to be 1.28%, ranging from 1.17% to 1.52%, during multiple annealing procedures. Other important characteristics of the annealed MOSFET remained nearly consistent before and after annealing. Our results showed there was no statistically significant difference between the annealed MOSFETs and their control samples in absolute dose measurements for IMRT QA (p = 0.99). The MOSFET measurements agreed with the ion chamber results on an average of 0.16% ± 0.64%. Conclusions: Pulsed current annealing provides a practical option for reusing MOSFETs to extend their operational lifetime. The current annealing circuit can be integrated into the reader, making the annealing procedure fully automatic.

  16. Investigation of a pulsed current annealing method in reusing MOSFET dosimeters for in vivo IMRT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Guang-Wen; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Wu; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of pulsed current annealing in reusing metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters forin vivo intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry. Methods: Several MOSFETs were irradiated atd max using a 6 MV x-ray beam with 5 V on the gate and annealed with zero bias at room temperature. The percentage recovery of threshold voltage shift during multiple irradiation-annealing cycles was evaluated. Key dosimetry characteristics of the annealed MOSFET such as the dosimeter's sensitivity, reproducibility, dose linearity, and linearity of response within the dynamic range were investigated. The initial results of using the annealed MOSFETs for IMRT dosimetry practice were also presented. Results: More than 95% of threshold voltage shift can be recovered after 24-pulse current continuous annealing in 16 min. The mean sensitivity degradation was found to be 1.28%, ranging from 1.17% to 1.52%, during multiple annealing procedures. Other important characteristics of the annealed MOSFET remained nearly consistent before and after annealing. Our results showed there was no statistically significant difference between the annealed MOSFETs and their control samples in absolute dose measurements for IMRT QA (p = 0.99). The MOSFET measurements agreed with the ion chamber results on an average of 0.16% ± 0.64%. Conclusions: Pulsed current annealing provides a practical option for reusing MOSFETs to extend their operational lifetime. The current annealing circuit can be integrated into the reader, making the annealing procedure fully automatic

  17. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  18. QCD and collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, William James

    1991-12-01

    1. Some basic theory. 2. Two important applications: - e+ e- annihilation (LEPSLS) ; deep inelastic scattering (HERA). 3. Other applications..., large Pt jets, W and Z, heavy quark production..., (pp- colliders). In this lecture: some basic theory. 1. QCD as a non abelian gauge field theory. 2. Asymptotic freedom. 3. Beyond leading order - renormalisation schemes. 4. MS.

  19. Superconducting Super Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, M.L.

    1986-04-01

    The scientific need for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is outlined, along with the history of the development of the SSC concept. A brief technical description is given of each of the main points of the SSC conceptual design. The construction cost and construction schedule are discussed, followed by issues associated with the realization of the SSC. 8 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  20. High luminosity particle colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-03-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  1. Diffraction at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  2. LINEAR COLLIDERS: 1992 workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Settles, Ron; Coignet, Guy

    1992-01-01

    As work on designs for future electron-positron linear colliders pushes ahead at major Laboratories throughout the world in a major international collaboration framework, the LC92 workshop held in Garmisch Partenkirchen this summer, attended by 200 machine and particle physicists, provided a timely focus

  3. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    't Hooft, Gerardus; Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, Paul; Stapnes, Steinar; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Stachel, Johanna; Lederman, Leon Max

    2007-01-01

    Several articles about the LHC: The Making of the standard model; high-energy colliders and the rise of the standard model; How the LHC came to be; Building a behemoth; Detector challenges at the LHC; Beyond the standard model with the LHC; The quest for the quark-gluon plasma; The God particle et al. (42 pages

  4. Review of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seishi

    1992-01-01

    The status of R and D of future e + e - linear colliders proposed by the institutions throughout the world is described including the JLC, NLC, VLEPP, CLIC, DESY/THD and TESLA projects. The parameters and RF sources are discussed. (G.P.) 36 refs.; 1 tab

  5. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  6. High energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C.

    1997-02-01

    The authors consider the high energy physics advantages, disadvantages and luminosity requirements of hadron (pp, p anti p), lepton (e + e - , μ + μ - ) and photon-photon colliders. Technical problems in obtaining increased energy in each type of machine are presented. The machines relative size are also discussed

  7. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs

  8. B factory with hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockyer, N.S.

    1990-01-01

    The opportunities to study B physics in a hadron collider are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the technological developments necessary for these experiments. The R and D program of the Bottom Collider Detector group is reviewed. (author)

  9. Studying intense pulsed light method along with corticosteroid injection in treating keloid scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsi Meymandi, Simin; Rezazadeh, Azadeh; Ekhlasi, Ali

    2014-02-01

    Results of various studies suggest that the hypertrophic and keloid scars are highly prevalent in the general population and are irritating both physically and mentally. Considering the variety of existing therapies, intense pulsed light (IPL) method along with corticosteroid injection was evaluated in treating these scars. 86 subjects were included in this clinical trial. Eight sessions of therapeutic intervention were done with IPL along with corticosteroid intralesional injection using 450 to 1200 NM filter, Fluence 30-40 J/cm2, pulse duration of 2.1-10 ms and palsed delay 10-40 ms with an interval of three weeks. To specify the recovery consequences and complication rate and to determine features of the lesion, the criteria specified in the study of Eroll and Vancouver scar scale were used. The level of clinical improvement, color improvement and scar height was 89.1%, 88.8% and 89.1% respectively. The incidence of complications (1 telangiectasia case, 7 hyperpigmentation cases and 2 atrophy cases) following treatment with IPL was 11.6%. Moreover, the participants' satisfaction with IPL method was 88.8%. This study revealed that a combined therapy (intralesional corticosteroid injection + IPL) increases the recovery level of hypertrophic and keloid scars. It was also demonstrated that this method had no significant side effect and patients were highly satisfied with this method.

  10. The CERN linear collider test facility (CTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baconnier, Y.; Battisti, S.; Bossart, R.; Delahaye, J.P.; Geissler, K.K.; Godot, J.C.; Huebner, K.; Madsen, J.H.B.; Potier, J.P.; Riche, A.J.; Sladen, J.; Suberlucq, G.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W.

    1992-01-01

    The CTF (Collider Test Facility) was brought into service last year. The 3 GHz gun produced a beam of 3 MeV/c which was accelerated to 40 MeV/c. This beam, passing a prototype CLIC (linear collider) structure, generated a sizeable amount of 30 GHz power. This paper describes the results and experience with the gun driven by a 8 ns long laser pulse and its CsI photo cathode, the beam behaviour, the beam diagnostics in particular with the bunch measurements by Cerenkov or transition radiation light and streak camera, the photo cathode research, and the beam dynamics studies on space charge effects. (Author)4 figs., tab., 6 refs

  11. Detection methods of pulsed X-rays for transmission tomography with a linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.

    1988-07-01

    Appropriate detection methods are studied for the development of a high energy tomograph using a linear accelerator for nondestructive testing of bulky objects. The aim is the selection of detectors adapted to a pulsed X-ray source and with a good behavior under X-ray radiations of several MeV. Performance of semiconductors (HgI 2 , Cl doped CdTe, GaAs, Bi 12 Ge0 20 ) and a scintillator (Bi 4 Ge 3 0 12 ) are examined. A prototype tomograph gave images that show the validity of detectors for analysis of medium size equipment such as a concrete drum of 60 cm in diameter [fr

  12. Development of a Novel Method for the Exploration of the Thermal Response of Superfluid Helium Cooled Superconducting Cables to Pulse Heat Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, T.; Koettig, T.; van Weelderen, R.; Bremer, J.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    Management of transient heat deposition in superconducting magnets and its extraction from the aforementioned is becoming increasingly important to bring high energy particle accelerator performance to higher beam energies and intensities. Precise knowledge of transient heat deposition phenomena in the magnet cables will permit to push the operation of these magnets as close as possible to their current sharing limit, without unduly provoking magnet quenches. With the prospect of operating the Large Hadron Collider at CERN at higher beam energies and intensities an investigation into the response to transient heat loads of LHC magnets, operating in pressurized superfluid helium, is being performed. The more frequently used approach mimics the cable geometry by resistive wires and uses Joule-heating to deposit energy. Instead, to approximate as closely as possible the real magnet conditions, a novel method for depositing heat in cable stacks made out of superconducting magnet-cables has been developed. The goal is to measure the temperature difference as a function of time between the cable stack and the superfluid helium bath depending on heat load and heat pulse length. The heat generation in the superconducting cable and precise measurement of small temperature differences are major challenges. The functional principle and experimental set-up are presented together with proof of principle measurements.

  13. Application of the pulsed neutron technique on the reactors ALIZE - AQUILON (1963); Application de la methode des neutrons pulses sur les piles ALIZE et AQUILON (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemart, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Different methods of measuring the ratio effective delayed fraction / prompt neutron lifetime, {alpha}{sub c}, are described. According to the classic pulsed neutron technique the negative reactivity due to a localized absorber is given by {rho} / {beta}{sub eff} = {alpha} / {alpha}{sub c} -1 Experiments are reported which show that in this case {alpha}{sub c} can not be considered constant for large reactivities. The absorber element distorts the flux in the system, increasing the importance of the reflector. An application of the pulsed neutron method to the measurement of critical distributed boron concentrations of various absorber elements is described. Less time is required than for the usual super-critical techniques, and the experimental analysis is simplified. It is interesting to note that the results are not influenced by the spectral sensitivity of the control element. A modified pulsed neutron method has been tried out. This procedure was used to determine by measurements at sub-critical the critical water level of uranium-heavy water lattices with a high precision. (author) [French] Differents modes operatoires pour definir la valeur du rapport pourcentage effectif de neutrons retardes / temps de vie, {alpha}{sub c}, sont exposes. La methode classique par neutrons pulses definit l'anti-reactivite d'un element absorbant a partir de la relation: {rho} / {beta}{sub eff} {alpha} / {alpha}{sub c} -1 Les manipulations effectuees montrent qu'on ne peut considerer dans ce cas {alpha}{sub c} constant pour de tres grandes anti-reactivites. L'absorbant introduit dans la pile deforme le flux et augmente l'importance du reflecteur. Une application de la methode des neutrons pulses pour mesurer le titre critique en mg de B/l de divers absorbants est signalee. Les operations sont effectuees en regime sous-critique avec un certain gain de temps et une grande facilite de depouillement. Il est interessant de noter que les resultats ne sont pas

  14. Application of the pulsed neutron technique on the reactors ALIZE - AQUILON (1963); Application de la methode des neutrons pulses sur les piles ALIZE et AQUILON (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquemart, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    Different methods of measuring the ratio effective delayed fraction / prompt neutron lifetime, {alpha}{sub c}, are described. According to the classic pulsed neutron technique the negative reactivity due to a localized absorber is given by {rho} / {beta}{sub eff} = {alpha} / {alpha}{sub c} -1 Experiments are reported which show that in this case {alpha}{sub c} can not be considered constant for large reactivities. The absorber element distorts the flux in the system, increasing the importance of the reflector. An application of the pulsed neutron method to the measurement of critical distributed boron concentrations of various absorber elements is described. Less time is required than for the usual super-critical techniques, and the experimental analysis is simplified. It is interesting to note that the results are not influenced by the spectral sensitivity of the control element. A modified pulsed neutron method has been tried out. This procedure was used to determine by measurements at sub-critical the critical water level of uranium-heavy water lattices with a high precision. (author) [French] Differents modes operatoires pour definir la valeur du rapport pourcentage effectif de neutrons retardes / temps de vie, {alpha}{sub c}, sont exposes. La methode classique par neutrons pulses definit l'anti-reactivite d'un element absorbant a partir de la relation: {rho} / {beta}{sub eff} {alpha} / {alpha}{sub c} -1 Les manipulations effectuees montrent qu'on ne peut considerer dans ce cas {alpha}{sub c} constant pour de tres grandes anti-reactivites. L'absorbant introduit dans la pile deforme le flux et augmente l'importance du reflecteur. Une application de la methode des neutrons pulses pour mesurer le titre critique en mg de B/l de divers absorbants est signalee. Les operations sont effectuees en regime sous-critique avec un certain gain de temps et une grande facilite de depouillement. Il est interessant de noter que les resultats ne sont pas affectes par la

  15. Pulsed Dilution Method for the Recovery of Aggregated Mouse TNF-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merat Mahmoodi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The expression of mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α in Escherichia coli is a favorable way to get high yield of protein; however, the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, which is the consequence of insoluble accumulated proteins, is a major obstacle in this system. To overcome this obstacle, we used a pulsed dilution method to convert the product to its native conformation. Methods: Reducing agent and guanidine hydrochloride were used to solubilize inclusion bodies formed after TNF-(α expression. Then, the refolding procedure was performed by pulsed dilution of the denatured protein into a refolding buffer. The properly-folded protein was purified by metal affinity chromatography. Results: SDS-PAGE showed a 19.9 kDa band related to the mature TNF-(α protein. The protein was recognized by anti-mouse TNF-(α on western blots. The final concentration of the purified recombinant TNF-(α was 62.5 μg/mL. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates the efficiency of this method to produce a high yield of folded mature TNF- (α.

  16. Elemental redistribution in coloured films on SUS304 stainless steel produced by current pulse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.J.; Duh, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Coloured films are deposited on an SUS304 substrate by the square wave current pulse method in a 2.5 M CrO 3 + 5 M H 2 SO 4 solution at 75 C. The absolute ratio of anodic to cathodic charge density and the corresponding final value of cathodic potential provide an easy and appropriate approach to the control of colour in the current pulse colouring method. This is proved in this study for a frequency region lower than 1 Hz. The corresponding cathodic potential increases with increasing dwell time in the negative applied current region and is related to the colour tone of the deposited film. The total time required to obtain the same thickness of coloured film is shorter at lower frequency than at higher frequency, which takes more time to charge the double layer. The thickness of the coloured films is determined by both Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling and is of submicron order. The film thickness is proportional to the introduced total charge per unit area in the current pulse colouring process. CrO + and FeO + ions are observed in the coloured films and their concentrations increase as the colouring time is increased. The Fe concentration in the coloured films is lower than that in the substrate and decreases with the colouring time. It is the iron species that first becomes involved in the anodic reaction and the spinel oxide structure of iron and chromium is present in the coloured films. (orig.)

  17. Automatic inverse methods for the analysis of pulse tests: application to four pulse tests at the Leuggern borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, J.; Samper, J.; Vives, L.; Kuhlmann, U.

    1989-07-01

    Four pulse tests performed for NAGRA at the Leuggern borehole were analyzed using automatic test sequence matching techniques. Severe identifiability problems were unveiled during the process. Because of these problems, the identifiability of aquifer parameters (hydraulic conductivity, storativity and skin conductivity) from pulse tests similar to those performed in the Leuggern borehole was studied in two synthetic examples. The first of these had a positive skin effect and the second had a negative skin effect. These synthetic examples showed that, for the test conditions at the Leuggern borehole, estimating formation hydraulic conductivity may be nearly impossible for the cases of positive and negative skin factors. In addition, identifiability appears to be quite sensitive to the values of the parameters and to other factors such as skin thickness. Nevertheless, largely because of the manner in which the tests were conducted (i.e. relatively long injection time and performance of both injection and withdrawal), identifiability of the actual tests was much better than suggested by the synthetic examples. Only one of the four tests was nearly nonidentifiable. In all, the match between measured and computed aquifer responses was excellent for all the tests, and formation hydraulic conductivities were estimated within a relatively narrow uncertainty interval. (author) 19 refs., 59 figs., 28 tabs

  18. Human Heart Pulse Wave Responses Measured Simultaneously at Several Sensor Placements by Two MR-Compatible Fibre Optic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Myllylä

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental measurements conducted using two noninvasive fibre optic methods for detecting heart pulse waves in the human body. Both methods can be used in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For comparison, the paper also performs an MRI-compatible electrocardiogram (ECG measurement. By the simultaneous use of different measurement methods, the propagation of pressure waves generated by each heart pulse can be sensed extensively in different areas of the human body and at different depths, for example, on the chest and forehead and at the fingertip. An accurate determination of a pulse wave allows calculating the pulse transit time (PTT of a particular heart pulse in different parts of the human body. This result can then be used to estimate the pulse wave velocity of blood flow in different places. Both measurement methods are realized using magnetic resonance-compatible fibres, which makes the methods applicable to the MRI environment. One of the developed sensors is an extraordinary accelerometer sensor, while the other one is a more common sensor based on photoplethysmography. All measurements, involving several test patients, were performed both inside and outside an MRI room. Measurements inside the MRI room were conducted using a 3-Tesla strength closed MRI scanner in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at the Oulu University Hospital.

  19. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  20. The International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    List Benno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Linear Collider (ILC is a proposed e+e− linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200–500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  1. The International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Benno

    2014-04-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed e+e- linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200-500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  2. The SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, N.

    1992-01-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has begun a new era of operation with the SLD detector. During 1991 there was a first engineering run for the SLD in parallel with machine improvements to increase luminosity and reliability. For the 1992 run, a polarized electron source was added and more than 10,000 Zs with an average of 23% polarization have been logged by the SLD. This paper discusses the performance of the SLC in 1991 and 1992 and the technical advances that have produced higher luminosity. Emphasis will be placed on issues relevant to future linear colliders such as producing and maintaining high current, low emittance beams and focusing the beams to the micron scale for collisions. (Author) tab., 2 figs., 18 refs

  3. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  4. Linear Colliders TESLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the TESLA (TeV Superconducting Linear Accelerator) collaboration (at present 19 institutions from seven countries) is to establish the technology for a high energy electron-positron linear collider using superconducting radiofrequency cavities to accelerate its beams. Another basic goal is to demonstrate that such a collider can meet its performance goals in a cost effective manner. For this the TESLA collaboration is preparing a 500 MeV superconducting linear test accelerator at the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg. This TTF (TESLA Test Facility) consists of four cryomodules, each approximately 12 m long and containing eight 9-cell solid niobium cavities operating at a frequency of 1.3 GHz

  5. Lattice Boltzmann method for short-pulsed laser transport in a multi-layered medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2015-01-01

    We construct a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional multi-layered medium with distinct refractive index in each layer. The left boundary is irradiated normally by a short-pulsed laser. The Fresnel interfaces conditions, which incorporate reflection and refraction, are used at the boundaries and the interfaces. Based on the Fresnel's law and Snell's law, the interfacial intensity formulas are introduced. The collimated and diffuse intensities are treated individually. At a transient time step, the collimated component is first solved by LBM and then embedded into the transient radiative transfer equation as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the intensities at the interfaces is adopted. The transient radiative transfer in a two-layer medium is first investigated, and the time-resolved results are validated by comparing with those by the Monte Carlo method (MCM). Of particular interest, the angular intensities along the slab at different times are presented to illustrate a variety of interesting phenomena, and the discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interfaces is discussed. The effects of various parameters on the time-resolved signals are examined. - Highlights: • Transient radiative transfer in a multi-layered medium is solved by LBM. • The boundary and interfaces are all considered as Fresnel surfaces. • The LBM solution for the collimated pulse is derived. • Discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interface is illustrated and discussed

  6. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth by pulsed laser deposition and thermal chemical vapor deposition methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Jung Inn; Nam, Chunghee; Lee, Seonghoon

    2002-01-01

    We have grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on the various substrates such as a planar p-type Si(1 0 0) wafer, porous Si wafer, SiO 2 , Si 3 N 4 , Al 2 O 3 , and Cr by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at 800 deg.C, using C 2 H 2 gas as a carbon source and Fe catalyst films deposited by a pulsed laser on the substrates. The Fe films were deposited for 5 min by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The advantage of Fe deposition by PLD over other deposition methods lies in the superior adhesion of Fe to a Si substrate due to high kinetic energies of the generated Fe species. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that vertically well-aligned carbon nanotubes are grown on Fe nanoparticles formed from the thermal annealing of the Fe film deposited by PLD on the various substrates. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show that the Fe film annealed at 800 deg.C is broken to Fe nanoparticles of 10-50 nm in size. We show that the appropriate density of Fe nanoparticles formed from the thermal annealing of the film deposited by PLD is crucial in growing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Using a PLD and a lift-off method, we developed the selective growth of carbon nanotubes on a patterned Fe-coated Si substrate

  7. Pulsed magnetic flux leakage method for hairline crack detection and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolo, Chukwunonso K.; Meydan, Turgut

    2018-04-01

    The Magnetic Flux leakage (MFL) method is a well-established branch of electromagnetic Non-Destructive Testing (NDT), extensively used for evaluating defects both on the surface and far-surface of pipeline structures. However the conventional techniques are not capable of estimating their approximate size, location and orientation, hence an additional transducer is required to provide the extra information needed. This research is aimed at solving the inevitable problem of granular bond separation which occurs during manufacturing, leaving pipeline structures with miniature cracks. It reports on a quantitative approach based on the Pulsed Magnetic Flux Leakage (PMFL) method, for the detection and characterization of the signals produced by tangentially oriented rectangular surface and far-surface hairline cracks. This was achieved through visualization and 3D imaging of the leakage field. The investigation compared finite element numerical simulation with experimental data. Experiments were carried out using a 10mm thick low carbon steel plate containing artificial hairline cracks with various depth sizes, and different features were extracted from the transient signal. The influence of sensor lift-off and pulse width variation on the magnetic field distribution which affects the detection capability of various hairline cracks located at different depths in the specimen is explored. The findings show that the proposed technique can be used to classify both surface and far-surface hairline cracks and can form the basis for an enhanced hairline crack detection and characterization for pipeline health monitoring.

  8. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-09-10

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 × 10{sup 34} cm{sup –2}s{sup –1}. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance (“cooling”). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  9. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Juettner Fernandes, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    What really happened during the Big Bang? Why did matter form? Why do particles have mass? To answer these questions, scientists and engineers have worked together to build the largest and most powerful particle accelerator in the world: the Large Hadron Collider. Includes glossary, websites, and bibliography for further reading. Perfect for STEM connections. Aligns to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts. Teachers' Notes available online.

  10. QCD for Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Skands, Peter

    2011-01-01

    These lectures are directed at a level suitable for graduate students in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics. They are intended to give an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as it is used in collider physics applications. The aim is to bring the reader to a level where informed decisions can be made concerning different approaches and their uncertainties. The material is divided into four main areas: 1) fundamentals, 2) perturbative QCD, ...

  11. A pulse-shape discrimination method for improving Gamma-ray spectrometry based on a new digital shaping filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhang-jian; Chen, Chuan; Luo, Jun-song; Xie, Xing-hong; Ge, Liang-quan; Wu, Qi-fan

    2018-04-01

    It is a usual practice for improving spectrum quality by the mean of designing a good shaping filter to improve signal-noise ratio in development of nuclear spectroscopy. Another method is proposed in the paper based on discriminating pulse-shape and discarding the bad pulse whose shape is distorted as a result of abnormal noise, unusual ballistic deficit or bad pulse pile-up. An Exponentially Decaying Pulse (EDP) generated in nuclear particle detectors can be transformed into a Mexican Hat Wavelet Pulse (MHWP) and the derivation process of the transform is given. After the transform is performed, the baseline drift is removed in the new MHWP. Moreover, the MHWP-shape can be discriminated with the three parameters: the time difference between the two minima of the MHWP, and the two ratios which are from the amplitude of the two minima respectively divided by the amplitude of the maximum in the MHWP. A new type of nuclear spectroscopy was implemented based on the new digital shaping filter and the Gamma-ray spectra were acquired with a variety of pulse-shape discrimination levels. It had manifested that the energy resolution and the peak-Compton ratio were both improved after the pulse-shape discrimination method was used.

  12. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  13. The Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emma, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is the first and only high-energy e + e - linear collider in the world. Its most remarkable features are high intensity, submicron sized, polarized (e - ) beams at a single interaction point. The main challenges posed by these unique characteristics include machine-wide emittance preservation, consistent high intensity operation, polarized electron production and transport, and the achievement of a high degree of beam stability on all time scales. In addition to serving as an important machine for the study of Z 0 boson production and decay using polarized beams, the SLC is also an indispensable source of hands-on experience for future linear colliders. Each new year of operation has been highlighted with a marked improvement in performance. The most significant improvements for the 1994-95 run include new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings, an upgrade to the optics and diagnostics of the final focus systems, and a higher degree of polarization from the electron source. As a result, the average luminosity has nearly doubled over the previous year with peaks approaching 10 30 cm -2 s -1 and an 80% electron polarization at the interaction point. These developments as well as the remaining identifiable performance limitations will be discussed

  14. Integral-equation based methods for parameter estimation in output pulses of radiation detectors: Application in nuclear medicine and spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian-Behbahani, Mohammad-Reza; Saramad, Shahyar

    2018-04-01

    Model based analysis methods are relatively new approaches for processing the output data of radiation detectors in nuclear medicine imaging and spectroscopy. A class of such methods requires fast algorithms for fitting pulse models to experimental data. In order to apply integral-equation based methods for processing the preamplifier output pulses, this article proposes a fast and simple method for estimating the parameters of the well-known bi-exponential pulse model by solving an integral equation. The proposed method needs samples from only three points of the recorded pulse as well as its first and second order integrals. After optimizing the sampling points, the estimation results were calculated and compared with two traditional integration-based methods. Different noise levels (signal-to-noise ratios from 10 to 3000) were simulated for testing the functionality of the proposed method, then it was applied to a set of experimental pulses. Finally, the effect of quantization noise was assessed by studying different sampling rates. Promising results by the proposed method endorse it for future real-time applications.

  15. [New technology for linear colliders.] Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the contract is to devise and analyze new technologies appropriate for future linear colliders. The focus of our research during 1986 has been the coaxial pulse line (CPL) accelerating structure. It is similar to a wake field structure, except that it replaces the annular ring beam driver by an annular TEM wave. The driver wave can be launched using a capacitor discharge arrangement similar to induction linacs. The structure has the combined advantages of high gradient (∼200 MeV/m) and high efficiency (perhaps ∼50%). A high-power lasertron based on a ribbon electron beam is proposed

  16. A method for the formation of Pt metal nanoparticle arrays using nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owusu-Ansah, Ebenezer; Horwood, Corie A.; Birss, Viola I.; Shi, Yujun J., E-mail: shiy@ucalgary.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); El-Sayed, Hany A. [Institute for Technical Electrochemistry, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    Nanosecond pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films, deposited on a dimpled Ta (DT) surface, has been studied here in order to form ordered Pt nanoparticle (NP) arrays. The DT substrate was fabricated via a simple electrochemical anodization process in a highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HF solution. Pt thin films (3–5 nm) were sputter coated on DT and then dewetted under vacuum to generate NPs using a 355 nm laser radiation (6–9 ns, 10 Hz). The threshold laser fluence to fully dewet a 3.5 nm thick Pt film was determined to be 300 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our experiments have shown that shorter irradiation times (≤60 s) produce smaller nanoparticles with more uniform sizes, while longer times (>60 s) give large nanoparticles with wider size distributions. The optimum laser irradiation time of 1 s (10 pulses) has led to the formation of highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays with an average nanoparticle size of 26 ± 3 nm with no substrate deformation. At the optimum condition of 1 s and 500 mJ/cm{sup 2}, as many as 85% of the dewetted NPs were found neatly in the well-defined dimples. This work has demonstrated that pulsed laser dewetting of Pt thin films on a pre-patterned dimpled substrate is an efficient and powerful technique to produce highly ordered Pt nanoparticle arrays. This method can thus be used to produce arrays of other high-melting-point metal nanoparticles for a range of applications, including electrocatalysis, functionalized nanomaterials, and analytical purposes.

  17. Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium dioxide thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, Yoshiaki; Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Ohshima, Tamiko; Nakashima, Shouta; Kawazoe, Syuichi; Toma, Tetsuya

    2006-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coated on titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) thin films has been developed to supplement the defects of both TiO 2 and HAp. Thin films have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method using HAp and HAp(10%) + TiO 2 targets. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that there are many small peaks of Ca 1 0(PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 crystal, and no impurity other than HAp is detected in HAp films prepared using pure HAp target. The composition ratio of the film was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). HAp coatings on TiO 2 thin films have been prepared using HAp(10%) + TiO 2 targets. XRD and XPS measurements suggest that crystalline HAp + TiO 2 thin films are obtained by the PLD method using HAp(10%) + TiO 2 target

  18. Test accelerator for linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, S.; Akai, K.; Akemoto, M.; Araki, S.; Hayano, H.; Hugo, T.; Ishihara, N.; Kawamoto, T.; Kimura, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Kubo, T.; Kurokawa, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Mizuno, H.; Odagiri, J.; Otake, Y.; Sakai, H.; Shidara, T.; Shintake, T.; Suetake, M.; Takashima, T.; Takata, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Urakawa, J.; Yamamoto, N.; Yokoya, K.; Yoshida, M.; Yoshioka, M.; Yamaoka, Y.

    1989-01-01

    KEK has proposed to build Test Accelerator Facility (TAF) capable of producing a 2.5 GeV electron beam for the purpose of stimulating R ampersand D for linear collider in TeV region. The TAF consists of a 1.5 GeV S-band linear accelerator, 1.5 GeV damping ring and 1.0 GeV X-band linear accelerator. The TAF project will be carried forward in three phases. Through Phase-I and Phase-II, the S-band and X-band linacs will be constructed, and in Phase-III, the damping ring will be completed. The construction of TAF Phase-I has started, and the 0.2 GeV S-band injector linac has been almost completed. The Phase-I linac is composed of a 240 keV electron gun, subharmonic bunchers, prebunchers and traveling buncher followed by high-gradient accelerating structures. The SLAC 5045 klystrons are driven at 450 kV in order to obtain the rf-power of 100 MW in a 1 μs pulse duration. The rf-power from a pair of klystrons are combined into an accelerating structure. The accelerating gradient up to 100 MeV/m will be obtained in a 0.6 m long structure. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Supervised learning methods for pathological arterial pulse wave differentiation: A SVM and neural networks approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Joana S; Cardoso, João; Pereira, Tânia

    2018-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to develop an automatic method based on supervised learning methods, able to distinguish healthy from pathologic arterial pulse wave (APW), and those two from noisy waveforms (non-relevant segments of the signal), from the data acquired during a clinical examination with a novel optical system. The APW dataset analysed was composed by signals acquired in a clinical environment from a total of 213 subjects, including healthy volunteers and non-healthy patients. The signals were parameterised by means of 39pulse features: morphologic, time domain statistics, cross-correlation features, wavelet features. Multiclass Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination (SVM RFE) method was used to select the most relevant features. A comparative study was performed in order to evaluate the performance of the two classifiers: Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). SVM achieved a statistically significant better performance for this problem with an average accuracy of 0.9917±0.0024 and a F-Measure of 0.9925±0.0019, in comparison with ANN, which reached the values of 0.9847±0.0032 and 0.9852±0.0031 for Accuracy and F-Measure, respectively. A significant difference was observed between the performances obtained with SVM classifier using a different number of features from the original set available. The comparison between SVM and NN allowed reassert the higher performance of SVM. The results obtained in this study showed the potential of the proposed method to differentiate those three important signal outcomes (healthy, pathologic and noise) and to reduce bias associated with clinical diagnosis of cardiovascular disease using APW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Stacking gels: A method for maximising output for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng See

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, the gold standard of molecular typing methods, has a major disadvantage of an unusually long electrophoretic time. From the original protocol of 6 days, it was modified to 3 days and subsequently to a single day. We describe the procedure of stacking five to six gels one on top of another in order to increase and maximize the output in a shorter time without compromising the resolution and reproducibility. All the variables that affect pulsed field gels during electrophoresis were taken into consideration. We firstly optimized the parameters to be used and secondly determined whether stacking of five to six gels had any effect on the molecular separation during electrophoresis in comparison with a single gel run. DNA preparation, restriction, electrophoresis, staining and gel documentation was carried out based on previously published methods. Gels were analysed using BioNumerics and dice coefficient and unweighted pair group methods were used to generate dendrograms based on 1.5% tolerance values. Identical band profiles and band resolution-separation were seen in the PFGE patterns with single gel and multiple stacking gels. Cluster analysis further strengthened the fact that results from stacking gels were reproducible and comparable with a single gel run. This method of stacking gels saves time and maximizes the output at the same time. The run time for a single gel was about 28 hours, but with six stacked gels the run time was 54 hours compared with 28 x 6 = 168 hours if they were run separately as single gels thus saving time of 67.86%. Beside the big factor of saving time, stacking gels save resources (electricity, reagents, water, chemicals and working time by increasing the sample throughput in a shorter time without compromising on quality of data. But optimization of working parameters is vital depending on the PFGE system used.

  1. Pulse to pulse monitoring of the SLD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogart, J.; Huffer, M.; Russell, J.

    1993-04-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider produces bunches of positrons and polarized electrons which collide at 120 hertz inside the SLD detector. A limited amount of information is collected for each pulse in the modules which do real-time data acquisition. Buffers of approximately ten seconds' worth of this monitor data are periodically delivered to a VAX. The generation and uses of the monitor data will be discussed

  2. Sync transmission method and apparatus for high frequency pulsed neutron spectral analysis systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culver, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    An improved synchronization system was developed for high-frequency pulsed-neutron gamma ray well-logging which extends the upper limit of the usable source pulsing frequency. A clock is used to pulse the neutron generator at a given frequency and a scaler generates scaled-down sync pulses at a lower frequency. Radiation from the formations surrounding the borehole is detected and electrical signals related functionally to the radiation are generated. The scaled-down sync pulses and electrical signals are transmitted to the earth's surface via a seven conductor well logging cable. (DN)

  3. The muon collider (Sandro's snake)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a feasibility study for the design of a muon collider. Recognized the fact that the particle lifetime increases linearly with the energy, we have adopted a scheme where steps of cooling and acceleration are entwined. We have indeed found convenient to accelerate the beam as fast as possible to increase its chances of survival, and necessary to dilute the action of cooling throughout the entire accelerating process to make it more effective and affordable. All acceleration and cooling steps are executed in a single pass essentially along a curvilinear and open path. We do not believe it is possible to handle the beam otherwise in circular and closed rings, as it has been proposed in the past. The example shown in this paper describes a muon collider at the energy of 250 GeV per beam and a luminosity of 4 x 10 28 cm -2 s -1 . We have adopted an extrapolation of the stochastic cooling method for the reduction of the beam emittance

  4. Neutron-Gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination With Ne-213 Liquid Scintillator By Using Digital Signal Processing Combined With Similarity Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardiyanto

    2008-01-01

    Neutron-Gamma Pulse Shape Discrimination with a NE-213 Liquid Scintillator by Using Digital Signal Processing Combined with Similarity Method. Measurement of mixed neutron-gamma radiation is difficult because a nuclear detector is usually sensitive to both radiations. A new attempt of neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination for a NE-213 liquid scintillator is presented by using digital signal processing combined with an off-line similarity method. The output pulse shapes are digitized with a high speed digital oscilloscope. The n-γ discrimination is done by calculating the index of each pulse shape, which is determined by the similarity method, and then fusing it with its corresponding pulse height. Preliminary results demonstrate good separation of neutron and gamma-ray signals from a NE-213 scintillator with a simple digital system. The results were better than those with a conventional rise time method. Figure of Merit is used to determine the quality of discrimination. The figure of merit of the discrimination using digital signal processing combined with off-line similarity method are 1.9; 1.7; 1.1; 1.1; and 0.8; on the other hand by using conventional method the rise time are 0.9; 0.9; 0.9; 0.7; and 0.4 for the equivalent electron energy of 800; 278; 139; 69; and 30 keV. (author)

  5. Pulse shape discrimination in neutron depth profiling radioanalytical method. Part II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vacík, Jiří; Červená, Jarmila; Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Havránek, Vladimír; Hoffmann, Jiří; Pošta, S.; Fink, D.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 49, - (1999), s. 417-422 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/96/0077; GA ČR GV202/97/K038; GA AV ČR KSK1048601 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.328, year: 1999

  6. Linear collider applications of superconducting RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The most promising technology for producing interactions of electrons and positrons in TeV energy range is the linear collider. In the linear collider each and every collision of charged particles depends on the production of the charges at rest and then the acceleration of those charges to full energy. The particles that exit the interaction region are discharded. A consequence of this mode of operation is that the luminosity of the machine is ultimately determined by the efficiency with which AC power can be converted into beam power. The consideration of superconducting cavities is motivated by the need for high efficiency. Thus, the high emittance around a beam collider and low emittance around beams are discussed first in the present report. Flat beams are then addressed focusing on the characteristics of the source, final focus, and beam stability. The beam stability, in particular, is discussed in detail in relation to the multiple bunch transverse stability, wake field induced energy spread, trapped modes, pulse width, duty cycle, RF power, and refrigerator power. (N.K.)

  7. Linear collider accelerator physics issues regarding alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require more stringent alignment tolerances than those for the SLC with regard to the accelerating structures, quadrupoles, and beam position monitors. New techniques must be developed to achieve these tolerances. A combination of mechanical-electrical and beam-based methods will likely be needed

  8. Pulse pile-up. I: Short pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1990-07-01

    The search for rare large pulses against an intense background of smaller ones involves consideration of pulse pile-up. Approximate methods are presented, based on ruin theory, by which the probability of such pile-up may be estimated for pulses of arbitrary form and of arbitrary pulse-height distribution. These methods are checked against cases for which exact solutions are available. The present paper is concerned chiefly with short pulses of finite total duration. (Author) (5 refs., 24 figs.)

  9. Amplifiable DNA from Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by a low strength pulsed electric field method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitzthum, Frank; Geiger, Georg; Bisswanger, Hans; Elkine, Bentsian; Brunner, Herwig; Bernhagen, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    An efficient electric field-based procedure for cell disruption and DNA isolation is described. Isoosmotic suspensions of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were treated with pulsed electric fields of Pulses had an exponential decay waveform with a time constant of 3.4 µs. DNA yield was linearly dependent on time or pulse number, with several thousand pulses needed. Electrochemical side-effects and electrophoresis were minimal. The lysates contained non-fragmented DNA which was readily amplifiable by PCR. As the method was not limited to samples of high specific resistance, it should be applicable to physiological fluids and be useful for genomic and DNA diagnostic applications. PMID:10734214

  10. Studies on the transmission and processing of pulse-shaped signals from nuclear radiation detectors using methods of systems theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spillekothen, H.G.

    2007-01-01

    Using methods of the systems theory of electronic communications and theoretical electrical science, this study describes the transmission of pulse-shaped signals from nuclear radiation detectors from the detector over ''electrically long lines'' (cables) to the output of the first pulse amplifier. The example of pulses from BF 3 -proportional counters shows, using the Fourier transformation, that pulses from radiation detectors contain a frequency spectrum ranging well above 10 8 Hz. If these pulses are transmitted to the first amplifier over a line length of several meters, the laws of the theory of transmission lines must be taken into account to avoid false signals caused by reflections. In the example, line equations are applied and the influence of the line and the terminating impedance is demonstrated. The influence of the frequency response ν(ω) and the phase response δ(ω) of the amplifier is also considered in the sample calculation. The methods presented make it possible to analyze and optimize the transmission and amplification of signals from radiation detectors. Close agreement emerges between empirically observed and calculated pulse shapes. (orig.)

  11. Elucidation of hydrodesulfurization mechanism using 35S radioisotope pulse tracer methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabe, Toshiaki; Qian, Weihua; Ishihara, Atsushi

    1997-01-01

    Molybdenum-based catalysts as hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts are among the most important industrial catalysts. One of the new approaches characterizing the structure of such catalysts and the behavior of sulfur over the 'working' catalyst is a 35S radioisotope pulse tracer method (RPTM). By tracing the behavior of sulfur in the HDS reaction and sulfur exchange reaction over the sulfided Mo/Al 2 O 3 and Co-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalysts under practical reaction conditions, it becomes possible for us to observe the catalytic behavior of the catalyst in situ. The formation process of active sites, the important role that H 2 S plays in this process, and the promotion by cobalt for Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalyst have become better understood

  12. Effect of different methods of pulse width modulation on power losses in an induction motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyaev, Alexander; Fokin, Dmitrii; Shuharev, Sergey; Ten, Evgenii

    2017-10-01

    We consider the calculation of modulation power losses in a system “induction motor-inverter” for various pulse width modulation (PWM) methods of the supply voltage. Presented values of modulation power losses are the result of modeling a system “DC link - two-level three-phase voltage inverter - induction motor - load”. In this study the power losses in a system “induction motor - inverter” are computed, as well as losses caused by higher harmonics of PWM supply voltage, followed by definition of active power consumed by the DC link for a specified value mechanical power on the induction motor shaft. Mechanical power was determined by the rotation speed and the torque on the motor shaft in various quasi-sinusoidal supply voltage PWM modes. These calculations reveal the best coefficient of performance (COP) in a system of a variable frequency drive (VFD) with independent voltage inverter controlled by induction motor PWM.

  13. Practical Method for engineering Erbium-doped fiber lasers from step-like pulse excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causado-Buelvas, J D; Gomez-Cardona, N D; Torres, P

    2011-01-01

    A simple method, known as 'easy points', has been applied to the characterization of Erbium-doped fibers, aiming for the engineering of fiber lasers. Using low- optical-power flattop pulse excitations it has been possible to determine both the attenuation coefficients and the intrinsic saturation powers of doped single-mode fibers at 980 and 1550 nm. Laser systems have been projected for which the optimal fiber length and output power have been determined as a function of the input power. Ring and linear laser cavities have been set up, and the characteristics of the output laser have been obtained and compared with the theoretical predictions based on the 'easy points' parameters.

  14. Integrable discretizations and self-adaptive moving mesh method for a coupled short pulse equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Bao-Feng; Chen, Junchao; Chen, Yong; Maruno, Ken-ichi; Ohta, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, integrable semi-discrete and fully discrete analogues of a coupled short pulse (CSP) equation are constructed. The key to the construction are the bilinear forms and determinant structure of the solutions of the CSP equation. We also construct N-soliton solutions for the semi-discrete and fully discrete analogues of the CSP equations in the form of Casorati determinants. In the continuous limit, we show that the fully discrete CSP equation converges to the semi-discrete CSP equation, then further to the continuous CSP equation. Moreover, the integrable semi-discretization of the CSP equation is used as a self-adaptive moving mesh method for numerical simulations. The numerical results agree with the analytical results very well. (paper)

  15. The maturity characterization of orange fruit by using high frequency ultrasonic echo pulse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboudaoud, I; Faiz, B; Aassif, E; Izbaim, D; Abassi, D; Malainine, M; Azergui, M; Moudden, A

    2012-01-01

    In this present work, we develop a new ultrasonic echo pulse method in order to study the feasibility of maturity assessment of orange fruit. This study concerns two varieties of orange (Navel and Mandarin) which are the most harvested in the region of Souss-Massa-Drāa in Morocco. We worked in the range of high frequencies by the means of a focusing transducer with 20MHz as a central frequency. By taking into account the strong attenuation of the ultrasounds in the texture of fruits and vegetables, we limited our study only to the external layer of orange peel. This control is based mainly on the measure of the ultrasonic parameters eventually velocity and attenuation in order to check the aptitude of this technique to detect the maturity degree of the fruit without passing by penetrometric and biochemical measurements which are generally destructives but the mostly correlated with human perception concerning the firmness of the fruit.

  16. Singular Value Decomposition Method to Determine Distance Distributions in Pulsed Dipolar Electron Spin Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Madhur; Freed, Jack H

    2017-11-16

    Regularization is often utilized to elicit the desired physical results from experimental data. The recent development of a denoising procedure yielding about 2 orders of magnitude in improvement in SNR obviates the need for regularization, which achieves a compromise between canceling effects of noise and obtaining an estimate of the desired physical results. We show how singular value decomposition (SVD) can be employed directly on the denoised data, using pulse dipolar electron spin resonance experiments as an example. Such experiments are useful in measuring distances and their distributions, P(r) between spin labels on proteins. In noise-free model cases exact results are obtained, but even a small amount of noise (e.g., SNR = 850 after denoising) corrupts the solution. We develop criteria that precisely determine an optimum approximate solution, which can readily be automated. This method is applicable to any signal that is currently processed with regularization of its SVD analysis.

  17. Apparatus and method for pulsed laser deposition of materials on wires and pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Felix E.

    2003-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses are disclosed which allow uniform coatings to be applied by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on inner and outer surfaces of cylindrical objects, such as rods, pipes, tubes, and wires. The use of PLD makes this technique particularly suitable for complex multicomponent materials, such as superconducting ceramics. Rigid objects of any length, i.e., pipes up to a few meters, and with diameters from less than 1 centimeter to over 10 centimeters can be coated using this technique. Further, deposition is effected simultaneously onto an annular region of the pipe wall. This particular arrangement simplifies the apparatus, reduces film uniformity control difficulties, and can result in faster operation cycles. In addition, flexible wires of any length can be continuously coated using the disclosed invention.

  18. Carbon Nano-particle Synthesized by Pulsed Arc Discharge Method as a Light Emitting Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Ramin; Ahmadi, Mohamad Taghi; Ismail, Razali

    2018-04-01

    Owing to the specific properties such as high mobility, ballistic carrier transport and light emission, carbon nano-particles (CNPs) have been employed in nanotechnology applications. In the presented work, the CNPs are synthesized by using the pulsed arc discharge method between two copper electrodes. The rectifying behaviour of produced CNPs is explored by assuming an Ohmic contact between the CNPs and the electrodes. The synthesized sample is characterized by electrical investigation and modelling. The current-voltage (I-V) relationship is investigated and bright visible light emission from the produced CNPs was measured. The electroluminescence (EL) intensity was explored by changing the distance between two electrodes. An incremental behaviour on EL by a resistance gradient and distance reduction is identified.

  19. Device and methods for writing and erasing analog information in small memory units via voltage pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gabaly Marquez, Farid; Talin, Albert Alec

    2018-04-17

    Devices and methods for non-volatile analog data storage are described herein. In an exemplary embodiment, an analog memory device comprises a potential-carrier source layer, a barrier layer deposited on the source layer, and at least two storage layers deposited on the barrier layer. The memory device can be prepared to write and read data via application of a biasing voltage between the source layer and the storage layers, wherein the biasing voltage causes potential-carriers to migrate into the storage layers. After initialization, data can be written to the memory device by application of a voltage pulse between two storage layers that causes potential-carriers to migrate from one storage layer to another. A difference in concentration of potential carriers caused by migration of potential-carriers between the storage layers results in a voltage that can be measured in order to read the written data.

  20. The super collider revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Pato, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors suggest a revised version of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) that employs the planned SSC first stage machine as an injector of 0.5 TeV protons into a power laser accelerator. The recently developed Non-linear Amplification of Inverse Bremsstrahlung Acceleration (NAIBA) concept dictates the scenario of the next stage of acceleration. Post Star Wars lasers, available at several laboratories, can be used for the purpose. The 40 TeV CM energy, a target of the SSC, can be obtained with a new machine which can be 20 times smaller than the planned SSC

  1. Diffusion Parameters of BeO by the Pulsed Neutron Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, B.V.; Nargundkar, V.R.; Subbarao, K.

    1965-01-01

    The use of the pulsed neutron method for the precise determination of the diffusion parameters of moderators is described. The diffusion parameters of BeO have been obtained by this method. The neutron bursts were produced from a cascade accelerator by pulsing the ion source and using the Be (d, n) reaction. The detector was an enriched boron trifluoride proportional counter. It is shown that by a proper choice of the counter position arid length, and the source position, most of the space harmonics can be eliminated. Any constant background can be accounted for in the calculation of the decay constant. Very large bucklings were not used to avoid time harmonics. Any remaining harmonic content was rendered ineffective by the use of adequate time delay. The decay constant of the fundamental mode of the thermal neutron population was determined for several bucklings. Conditions to be satisfied for an accurate determination of the diffusion cooling constant C are discussed. The following values are obtained for BeO: λ 0 = absorption constant = 156.02 ± 4.37 s -1 D = diffusion coefficient = (1.3334 ± 0.0128) x 10 5 cm 2 /s C = diffusion cooling constant = (-4.8758 ± 0.5846) x 10 5 cm 4 /s. The effect of neglecting the contribution of the B 6 term on the determination of the diffusion parameters was estimated and is shown to be considerable. The reason for the longstanding discrepancy between the values of C obtained for the same moderator by different workers is attributed to this. (author) [fr

  2. Validity of the cumulant method for a pulse nonlinear Kerr oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grygiel, K.; Leonski, W.; Szlachetka, P.

    1998-01-01

    We study the dynamics of an anharmonic oscillator driven by a train of pulses. The cumulant expansion and quantum evolution operator approaches are presented and compared. The modifications introduced by quantum mechanics into the dynamics of classical systems which manifest chaos are a problem of great importance. It is known that quantization modifies the dynamics of classical system is usually studied by means of the equation for the Wigner function derived from the quantum Liouville equation. In Wigner's formulation of quantum mechanics we treat a quantum system in a 'classical way' including all their quantum features. And what is more, we can contrast the quantum and classical dynamics within the framework of one formalism. The problem is, that the equations for the Wigner functions are mathematically cumbersome and their analytic solutions for most nonlinear systems are unknown. However, instead of the equation for the Wigner function we can use the set of equations for statistical moments generated by our equation for the Wigner function. It is obvious that in this approach a quantum system is governed by an infinite set of equations. Therefore, for numerical reasons the set of equations for statistical moments has to be truncated at a finite number, which means approximating it. It is known that first cumulant approximation represents the classical dynamics. The second cumulant approximation adds the first quantum corrections to the classical dynamics. In this paper we compare some aspects of the cumulant method and the method used by Leonski and Tanas to study an anharmonic oscillator driven by a train of pulses. The Kerr oscillator model is the same ad that is discussed in an earlier paper albeit without the damping mechanism

  3. Heavy leptons at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnemus, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The recent advent of high energy hadron colliders capable of producing weak bosons has opened new vistas for particle physics research, including the search for a possible fourth generation heavy charged lepton, which is the primary topic of the thesis. Signals for identifying a new heavy lepton have been calculated and compared to Standard Model backgrounds. Results are presented for signals at the CERN collider, the Fermilab collider, and the proposed Superconducting Supercollider

  4. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e + -e - collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2γ at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines

  5. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  6. Application of pulsed flash thermography method for specific defect estimation in aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić Ljubiša D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nondestructive thermal examination can uncover the presence of defects via temperature distribution profile anomalies that are created on the surface as a result of a defect. There are many factors that affect the temperature distribution map of the surface being tested by Infrared Thermography. Internal defect properties such as thermal conductivity, heat capacity and defect depth, play an important role in the temperature behavior of the pixels or regions being analyzed. Also, it is well known that other external factors such as the convection heat transfer, variations on the surface emissivity and ambient radiation reflectivity can affect the thermographic signal received by the infrared camera. In this paper we considered a simple structure in the form of flat plate covered with several defects, whose surface we heated with a uniform heat flux impulse. We conducted a theoretical analysis and experimental test of the method for case of defects on an aluminum surface. First, experiments were conducted on surfaces with intentionally created defects in order to determine conditions and boundaries for application of the method. Experimental testing of the pulsed flash thermography (PFT method was performed on simulated defects on an aluminum test plate filled with air and organic compound n-hexadecane, hydrocarbon that belongs to the Phase Change Materials (PCMs. Study results indicate that it is possible, using the PFT method, to detect the type of material inside defect holes, whose presence disturbs the homogeneous structure of aluminum.

  7. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  8. Circuit-field coupled finite element analysis method for an electromagnetic acoustic transducer under pulsed voltage excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Kuan-Sheng; Huang Song-Ling; Zhao Wei; Wang Shen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) under voltage excitation and considers the non-uniform distribution of the biased magnetic field. A complete model of EMATs including the non-uniform biased magnetic field, a pulsed eddy current field and the acoustic field is built up. The pulsed voltage excitation is transformed to the frequency domain by fast Fourier transformation (FFT). In terms of the time harmonic field equations of the EMAT system, the impedances of the coils under different frequencies are calculated according to the circuit-field coupling method and Poynting's theorem. Then the currents under different frequencies are calculated according to Ohm's law and the pulsed current excitation is obtained by inverse fast Fourier transformation (IFFT). Lastly, the sequentially coupled finite element method (FEM) is used to calculate the Lorentz force in the EMATs under the current excitation. An actual EMAT with a two-layer two-bundle printed circuit board (PCB) coil, a rectangular permanent magnet and an aluminium specimen is analysed. The coil impedances and the pulsed current are calculated and compared with the experimental results. Their agreement verified the validity of the proposed method. Furthermore, the influences of lift-off distances and the non-uniform static magnetic field on the Lorentz force under pulsed voltage excitation are studied. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  9. Scaling linear colliders to 5 TeV and above

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Detailed designs exist at present for linear colliders in the 0.5-1.0 TeV center-of-mass energy range. For linear colliders driven by discrete rf sources (klystrons), the rf operating frequencies range from 1.3 GHz to 14 GHz, and the unloaded accelerating gradients from 21 MV/m to 100 MV/m. Except for the collider design at 1.3 GHz (TESLA) which uses superconducting accelerating structures, the accelerating gradients vary roughly linearly with the rf frequency. This correlation between gradient and frequency follows from the necessity to keep the ac open-quotes wall plugclose quotes power within reasonable bounds. For linear colliders at energies of 5 TeV and above, even higher accelerating gradients and rf operating frequencies will be required if both the total machine length and ac power are to be kept within reasonable limits. An rf system for a 5 TeV collider operating at 34 GHz is outlined, and it is shown that there are reasonable candidates for microwave tube sources which, together with rf pulse compression, are capable of supplying the required rf power. Some possibilities for a 15 TeV collider at 91 GHz are briefly discussed

  10. Majorana Higgses at colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Collider signals of heavy Majorana neutrino mass origin are studied in the minimal Left-Right symmetric model, where their mass is generated spontaneously together with the breaking of lepton number. The right-handed triplet Higgs boson Δ, responsible for such breaking, can be copiously produced at the LHC through the Higgs portal in the gluon fusion and less so in gauge mediated channels. At Δ masses below the opening of the V V decay channel, the two observable modes are pair-production of heavy neutrinos via the triplet gluon fusion gg → Δ → NN and pair production of triplets from the Higgs h → ΔΔ → 4 N decay. The latter features tri- and quad same-sign lepton final states that break lepton number by four units and have no significant background. In both cases up to four displaced vertices may be present and their displacement may serve as a discriminating variable. The backgrounds at the LHC, including the jet fake rate, are estimated and the resulting sensitivity to the Left-Right breaking scale extends well beyond 10 TeV. In addition, sub-dominant radiative modes are surveyed: the γγ, Zγ and lepton flavour violating ones. Finally, prospects for Δ signals at future e + e - colliders are presented.

  11. Method for controlling an accelerator-type neutron source, and a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Givens, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    The patent deals with an accelerator-type neutron source which employs a target, an ionization section and a replenisher for supplying accelerator gas. A positive voltage pulse is applied to the ionization section to produce a burst of neutrons. A negative voltage pulse is applied to the ionization section upon the termination of the positive voltage pulse to effect a sharp cut-off to the burst of neutrons. 4 figs

  12. Hadronic vs. electromagnetic pulse shape discrimination in CsI(Tl) for high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, S.; Roney, J. M.

    2018-03-01

    Pulse shape discrimination using CsI(Tl) scintillators to perform neutral hadron particle identification is explored with emphasis towards application at high energy electron-positron collider experiments. Through the analysis of the pulse shape differences between scintillation pulses from photon and hadronic energy deposits using neutron and proton data collected at TRIUMF, it is shown that the pulse shape variations observed for hadrons can be modelled using a third scintillation component for CsI(Tl), in addition to the standard fast and slow components. Techniques for computing the hadronic pulse amplitudes and shape variations are developed and it is shown that the intensity of the additional scintillation component can be computed from the ionization energy loss of the interacting particles. These pulse modelling and simulation methods are integrated with GEANT4 simulation libraries and the predicted pulse shape for CsI(Tl) crystals in a 5 × 5 array of 5 × 5 × 30 cm3 crystals is studied for hadronic showers from 0.5 and 1 GeV/c KL0 and neutron particles. Using a crystal level and cluster level approach for photon vs. hadron cluster separation we demonstrate proof-of-concept for neutral hadron detection using CsI(Tl) pulse shape discrimination in high energy electron-positron collider experiments.

  13. An automated pulse labelling method for structure-activity relationship studies with antibacterial oxazolidinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustice, D C; Brittelli, D R; Feldman, P A; Brown, L J; Borkowski, J J; Slee, A M

    1990-01-01

    The 3-aryl-2-oxooxazolidinones are a new class of synthetic antibacterial agents that potently inhibit protein synthesis. An automated pulse labelling method with [3H]-lysine was developed with Bacillus subtilis to obtain additional quantitative activity data for structure-activity relationship studies with the oxazolidinones. Inhibition constants were calculated after a Logit fit of the data into the formula: % of control = 100/(1 + e[-B(X - A)]), where B is the slope of the model, X is the natural log of the inhibitor concentration and A is the natural log of the inhibitor concentration required to inhibit protein synthesis by 50% (ln IC50). When substituents at the 5-methyl position of the heterocyclic ring (B-substituent) were NHCOCH3, OH or Cl, the correlation coefficient was 0.87 between the MIC and IC50 values (for all compounds with MICs less than or equal to 16 micrograms/ml). The D-isomers of DuP 721 (A-substituent = CH3CO) and DuP 105 (A-substituent = CH3SO) gave MICs of 128 micrograms/ml and IC50s of greater than or equal to 50 micrograms/ml for protein synthesis, showing that only the L-isomers were active. By MIC testing, oxazolidinones with the B-substituent of NHCOCH3 and the A-substituent of CH3CO, NO2, CH3S, CH3SO2 or (CH3)2CH had comparable antibacterial potency; however, pulse labelling analysis showed that compounds with an A-substituent of CH3CO or NO2 were more potent inhibitors of protein synthesis.

  14. A harmonic pulse testing method for leakage detection in deep subsurface storage formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Alexander Y.; Lu, Jiemin; Hovorka, Susan

    2015-06-01

    Detection of leakage in deep geologic storage formations (e.g., carbon sequestration sites) is a challenging problem. This study investigates an easy-to-implement frequency domain leakage detection technology based on harmonic pulse testing (HPT). Unlike conventional constant-rate pressure interference tests, HPT stimulates a reservoir using periodic injection rates. The fundamental principle underlying HPT-based leakage detection is that leakage modifies a storage system's frequency response function, thus providing clues of system malfunction. During operations, routine HPTs can be conducted at multiple pulsing frequencies to obtain experimental frequency response functions, using which the possible time-lapse changes are examined. In this work, a set of analytical frequency response solutions is derived for predicting system responses with and without leaks for single-phase flow systems. Sensitivity studies show that HPT can effectively reveal the presence of leaks. A search procedure is then prescribed for locating the actual leaks using amplitude and phase information obtained from HPT, and the resulting optimization problem is solved using the genetic algorithm. For multiphase flows, the applicability of HPT-based leakage detection procedure is exemplified numerically using a carbon sequestration problem. Results show that the detection procedure is applicable if the average reservoir conditions in the testing zone stay relatively constant during the tests, which is a working assumption under many other interpretation methods for pressure interference tests. HPT is a cost-effective tool that only requires periodic modification of the nominal injection rate. Thus it can be incorporated into existing monitoring plans with little additional investment.

  15. Pulse shape analysis based on similarity and neural network with digital-analog fusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardiyanto, M.P.; Uritani, A.; Sakai, H.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.

    2000-01-01

    Through the measurement of 22 Na γ-rays, it has been demonstrated that the correction process was well done by fusing the similarity values with the pulse heights measured by the analog system, where at least four improvements in the energy spectrum characteristics were recognized, i.e., the increase of the peak-to-valley ratio, the photopeak area, the photopeak sharpness without discarding any events, and the 1,275 keV γ-ray photopeak was seen. The use of a slow digitizer was the main problem for this method. However, it can be solved easily using a faster digitizer. The fusion method was also applied for the beta-gamma mixed spectra separation. Mixed spectra of beta-gamma of the 137 Cs- 90 Sr mixed source could be separated well. We made a comparison between the energy spectrum of 137 Cs as a result of independent measurement with the result of the separation. After being compared, both FWHM agreed quite well. However, there was a slight difference between the two spectra on the peak-to-valley ratio. This separation method is simple and useful so that it can be applied for many other similar applications. (S.Y.)

  16. Advanced neutron imaging methods with a potential to benefit from pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobl, M.; Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Penumadu, D.; Manke, I.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade neutron imaging has seen significant improvements in instrumentation, detection and spatial resolution. Additionally, a variety of new applications and methods have been explored. As a consequence of an outstanding development nowadays various techniques of neutron imaging go far beyond a two- and three-dimensional mapping of the attenuation coefficients for a broad range of samples. Neutron imaging has become sensitive to neutron scattering in the small angle scattering range as well as with respect to Bragg scattering. Corresponding methods potentially provide spatially resolved and volumetric data revealing microstructural inhomogeneities, texture variations, crystalline phase distributions and even strains in bulk samples. Other techniques allow for the detection of refractive index distribution through phase sensitive measurements and the utilization of polarized neutrons enables radiographic and tomographic investigations of magnetic fields and properties as well as electrical currents within massive samples. All these advanced methods utilize or depend on wavelength dependent signals, and are hence suited to profit significantly from pulsed neutron sources as will be discussed.

  17. On-line Monitoring Device for High-voltage Switch Cabinet Partial Discharge Based on Pulse Current Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Tao, S.; Zhang, X. Z.; Cai, H. W.; Li, P.; Feng, Y.; Zhang, T. C.; Li, J.; Wang, W. S.; Zhang, X. K.

    2017-12-01

    The pulse current method for partial discharge detection is generally applied in type testing and other off-line tests of electrical equipment at delivery. After intensive analysis of the present situation and existing problems of partial discharge detection in switch cabinets, this paper designed the circuit principle and signal extraction method for partial discharge on-line detection based on a high-voltage presence indicating systems (VPIS), established a high voltage switch cabinet partial discharge on-line detection circuit based on the pulse current method, developed background software integrated with real-time monitoring, judging and analyzing functions, carried out a real discharge simulation test on a real-type partial discharge defect simulation platform of a 10KV switch cabinet, and verified the sensitivity and validity of the high-voltage switch cabinet partial discharge on-line monitoring device based on the pulse current method. The study presented in this paper is of great significance for switch cabinet maintenance and theoretical study on pulse current method on-line detection, and has provided a good implementation method for partial discharge on-line monitoring devices for 10KV distribution network equipment.

  18. Vanilla Technicolor at Linear Colliders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Jarvinen, Matti; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the reach of Linear Colliders (LC)s for models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We show that LCs can efficiently test the compositeness scale, identified with the mass of the new spin-one resonances, till the maximum energy in the center-of-mass of the colliding leptons. In ...

  19. Future prospects for electron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Toge, N

    2001-01-01

    An overview on the future prospects for electron colliders is presented. In the first part of this paper we will walk through the status of current development of next-generation electron linear colliders of sub-TeV to TeV energy range. Then we will visit recent results from technological developments which aim at longer term future for higher energy accelerators.

  20. Linear colliders for photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The enthusiasm of the first international workshop on photonphoton colliders and associated physics, held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory from 28 March - 1 April, could have set a ball rolling. According to proponents of this physics, the particle physics one can study with a high energy linear collider is special and complements that of a hadron supercollider

  1. The photon collider at TESLA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Badelek, B.; Bloechinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkman, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chýla, Jiří; Ciftci, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 30 (2004), s. 5097-5186 ISSN 0217-751X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010920 Keywords : photon collider * linear collider * gamma-gamma * photon-photon * photon electron * Compton scattering Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.054, year: 2004

  2. Overview of colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, J.C.; Month, M.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of the colliding beam facilities in existence today. The major high energy physics facilities around the world are described, and a view is presented of the beam collisions in which the instruments used to make the beams collide and those used to detect the products of particle interactions in the beam overlap region are described

  3. A walk-free centroid method for lifetime measurements with pulsed beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julin, R.; Kantele, J.; Luontama, M.; Passoja, A.; Poikolainen, T.

    1977-09-01

    A delayed-coincidence lifetime measurement method based on a comparison of walk-free centroids of time spectra is presented. The time is measured between the cyclotron RF signal and the pulse from a plastic scintillation detector followed by a fixed energy selection. The events to be time-analyzed are selected from the associated charge-particle spectrum of a silicon detector which is operated in coincidence with the scintillator, i.e., independently of the formation of the signal containing the time information. With this technique, with the micropulse FWHM of typically 500 to 700 ps, half-lives down to the 10 ps region can be measured. The following half-lives are obtained with the new method: 160+-6 ps for the 2032 keV level in 209 Pb; 45+-10 ps and 160+-20 ps for the 1756.8 keV (0 2 + ) and 2027.3 keV (0 3 + ) levels in 116 Sn, respectively. (author)

  4. A novel method for active fissile mass estimation with a pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubi, C., E-mail: chendb331@gmail.com [Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, POB 9001, Beer Sheva (Israel); Ridnik, T.; Israelashvili, I. [Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center of the Negev, POB 9001, Beer Sheva (Israel); Pedersen, B. [Nuclear Security Unit, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Via E. Fermi, 2749 JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    Neutron interrogation facilities for mass evaluation of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) samples are divided into two main categories: passive interrogation, where all neutron detections are due to spontaneous events, and active interrogation, where fissions are induced on the tested material by an external neutron source. While active methods are, in general, faster and more effective, their analysis is much harder to carry out. In the paper, we will introduce a new formalism for analyzing the detection signal generated by a pulsed source active interrogation facility. The analysis is aimed to distinct between fission neutrons from the main neutron source in the system, and the surrounding “neutron noise”. In particular, we derive analytic expressions for the first three central moments of the number of detections in a given time interval, in terms of the different neutron sources. While the method depends on exactly the same physical assumptions as known models, the simplicity of the suggested formalism allows us to take into account the variance of the external neutron source—an effect that was so far neglected.

  5. A novel method for active fissile mass estimation with a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubi, C.; Ridnik, T.; Israelashvili, I.; Pedersen, B.

    2013-01-01

    Neutron interrogation facilities for mass evaluation of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) samples are divided into two main categories: passive interrogation, where all neutron detections are due to spontaneous events, and active interrogation, where fissions are induced on the tested material by an external neutron source. While active methods are, in general, faster and more effective, their analysis is much harder to carry out. In the paper, we will introduce a new formalism for analyzing the detection signal generated by a pulsed source active interrogation facility. The analysis is aimed to distinct between fission neutrons from the main neutron source in the system, and the surrounding “neutron noise”. In particular, we derive analytic expressions for the first three central moments of the number of detections in a given time interval, in terms of the different neutron sources. While the method depends on exactly the same physical assumptions as known models, the simplicity of the suggested formalism allows us to take into account the variance of the external neutron source—an effect that was so far neglected

  6. A Real-Time Analysis Method for Pulse Rate Variability Based on Improved Basic Scale Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Chou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Base scale entropy analysis (BSEA is a nonlinear method to analyze heart rate variability (HRV signal. However, the time consumption of BSEA is too long, and it is unknown whether the BSEA is suitable for analyzing pulse rate variability (PRV signal. Therefore, we proposed a method named sliding window iterative base scale entropy analysis (SWIBSEA by combining BSEA and sliding window iterative theory. The blood pressure signals of healthy young and old subjects are chosen from the authoritative international database MIT/PhysioNet/Fantasia to generate PRV signals as the experimental data. Then, the BSEA and the SWIBSEA are used to analyze the experimental data; the results show that the SWIBSEA reduces the time consumption and the buffer cache space while it gets the same entropy as BSEA. Meanwhile, the changes of base scale entropy (BSE for healthy young and old subjects are the same as that of HRV signal. Therefore, the SWIBSEA can be used for deriving some information from long-term and short-term PRV signals in real time, which has the potential for dynamic PRV signal analysis in some portable and wearable medical devices.

  7. Soviet Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the high energy physics program in the USSR during 1960s-1970s culminated with a decision to build the Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK) to carry out fixed target and colliding beam experiments. The UNK was to have three rings. One ring was to be built with conventional magnets to accelerate protons up to the energy of 600 GeV. The other two rings were to be made from superconducting magnets, each ring was supposed to accelerate protons up to the energy of 3 TeV. The accelerating rings were to be placed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of 21 km. As a 3 x 3 TeV collider, the UNK would make proton-proton collisions with a luminosity of 4 x 1034 cm-1s-1. Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino was a project leading institution and a site of the UNK. Accelerator and detector research and development studies were commenced in the second half of 1970s. State Committee for Utilization of Atomic Energy of the USSR approved the project in 1980, and the construction of the UNK started in 1983. Political turmoil in the Soviet Union during late 1980s and early 1990s resulted in disintegration of the USSR and subsequent collapse of the Russian economy. As a result of drastic reduction of funding for the UNK, in 1993 the project was restructured to be a 600 GeV fixed target accelerator only. While the ring tunnel and proton injection line were completed by 1995, and 70% of all magnets and associated accelerator equipment were fabricated, lack of Russian federal funding for high energy physics halted the project at the end of 1990s.

  8. Towards the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    The broad physics potential of e+e- linear colliders was recognized by the high energy physics community right after the end of LEP in 2000. In 2007, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) now under construction at CERN will obtain its first collisions. The LHC, colliding protons with protons at 14 TeV, will discover a standard model Higgs boson over the full potential mass range, and should be sensitive to new physics into the several TeV range. The program for the Linear Collider (LC) will be set in the context of the discoveries made at the LHC. All the proposals for a Linear Collider will extend the discoveries and provide a wealth of measurements that are essential for giving deeper understanding of their meaning, and pointing the way to further evolution of particle physics in the future. For the mexican groups is the right time to join such an effort

  9. CERN balances linear collider studies

    CERN Multimedia

    ILC Newsline

    2011-01-01

    The forces behind the two most mature proposals for a next-generation collider, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) study, have been steadily coming together, with scientists from both communities sharing ideas and information across the technology divide. In a support of cooperation between the two, CERN in Switzerland, where most CLIC research takes place, recently converted the project-specific position of CLIC Study Leader to the concept-based Linear Collider Study Leader.   The scientist who now holds this position, Steinar Stapnes, is charged with making the linear collider a viable option for CERN’s future, one that could include either CLIC or the ILC. The transition to more involve the ILC must be gradual, he said, and the redefinition of his post is a good start. Though not very much involved with superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology, where ILC researchers have made significant advances, CERN participates in many aspect...

  10. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The μ + μ - collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged

  11. A method for ultrashort electron pulse-shape measurement using coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, G.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2003-03-01

    In this paper we discuss a method for nondestructive measurements of the longitudinal profile of sub-picosecond electron bunches for X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). The method is based on the detection of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) spectrum produced by a bunch passing a dipole magnet system. This work also contains a systematic treatment of synchrotron radiation theory which lies at the basis of CSR. Standard theory of synchrotron radiation uses several approximations whose applicability limits are often forgotten: here we present a systematic discussion about these assumptions. Properties of coherent synchrotron radiation from an electron moving along an arc of a circle are then derived and discussed. We describe also an effective and practical diagnostic technique based on the utilization of an electromagnetic undulator to record the energy of the coherent radiation pulse into the central cone. This measurement must be repeated many times with different undulator resonant frequencies in order to reconstruct the modulus of the bunch form-factor. The retrieval of the bunch profile function from these data is performed by means of deconvolution techniques: for the present work we take advantage of a constrained deconvolution method. We illustrate with numerical examples the potential of the proposed method for electron beam diagnostics at the TESLA test facility (TTF) accelerator. Here we choose, for emphasis, experiments aimed at the measure of the strongly non-Gaussian electron bunch profile in the TTF femtosecond-mode operation. We demonstrate that a tandem combination of a picosecond streak camera and a CSR spectrometer can be used to extract shape information from electron bunches with a narrow leading peak and a long tail. (orig.)

  12. Phenylalanine isotope pulse method to measure effect of sepsis on protein breakdown and membrane transport in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Have, Gabriella A M; Engelen, Mariëlle P K J; Wolfe, Robert R; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2017-06-01

    The primed-continuous (PC) phenylalanine (Phe) stable isotope infusion methodology is often used as a proxy for measuring whole body protein breakdown (WbPB) in sepsis. It is unclear if WbPB data obtained by an easy-to-use single IV Phe isotope pulse administration (PULSE) are comparable to those by PC. Compartmental modeling with PULSE could provide us more insight in WbPB in sepsis. Therefore, in the present study, we compared PULSE with PC as proxy for WbPB in an instrumented pig model with Pseudomonas aeruginosa- induced severe sepsis (Healthy: n = 9; Sepsis: n = 13). Seventeen hours after sepsis induction, we compared the Wb rate of appearance (WbR a ) of Phe obtained by PC (L-[ ring - 13 C 6 ]Phe) and PULSE (L-[ 15 N]Phe) in arterial plasma using LC-MS/MS and (non)compartm e ntal modeling. PULSE-WbR a was highly correlated with PC-WbR a ( r  = 0.732, P sepsis (Healthy: 3,378 ± 103; Sepsis: 4,333 ± 160 nmol·kg BW -1 ·min -1 , P = 0.0002). With PULSE, sepsis was characterized by an increase of the metabolic shunting (Healthy: 3,021 ± 347; Sepsis: 4,233 ± 344 nmol·kg BW -1 ·min -1 , P = 0.026). Membrane transport capacity was the same. Both PC and PULSE methods are able to assess changes in WbR a of plasma Phe reflecting WbPB changes with high sensitivity, independent of the (patho)physiological state. The easy-to-use (non)compartmental PULSE reflects better the real WbPB than PC. With PULSE compartmental analysis, we conclude that the membrane transport capacity for amino acids is not compromised in severe sepsis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. NLC. A test accelerator for the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.F.; Burke, D.L.; Callin, R.; Caryotakis, G.; Cassel, R.; Clark, S.L.; Deruyter, H.; Fant, K.; Fuller, R.; Heifets, S.; Hoag, H.; Humphrey, R.; Kheifets, S.; Koontz, R.; Kroll, N.M.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.; Paterson, J.M.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; Rifkin, J.; Spencer, J.; Tantawi, S.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Vylet, V.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Yeremian, A.; Youngman, B.

    1993-01-01

    At SLAC, we are pursuing the design of a Next Linear Collider (NLC) which would begin with a center-of-mass energy of 0.5 TeV, and be upgradable to at least 1.0 TeV. To achieve this high energy, we have been working on the development of a high-gradient 11.4-GHz (X-band) linear accelerator for the main linac of the collider. In this paper, we present the design of a 'Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator' (NLCTA). The goal of the NLCTA is to incorporate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures, RF pulse compression systems and klystrons into a short linac which will then be a test bed for beam dynamics issues related to high-gradient acceleration. (orig.)

  14. A test accelerator for the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.F.; Burke, D.L.; Callin, R.; Caryotakis, G.; Cassel, R.; Clark, S.L.; Deruyter, H.; Fant, K.; Fuller, R.; Heifets, S.; Hoag, H.; Humphrey, R.; Kheifets, S.; Koontz, R.; Lavine, T.; Loew, G.A.; Menegat, A.; Miller, R.H.; Paterson, J.M.; Pearson, C.; Phillips, R.; Rifkin, J.; Spencer, J.; Tantawi, S.; Thompson, K.A.; Vlieks, A.; Vylet, V.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B.; Yeremian, A.; Youngman, B.; Kroll, N.M.; Nantista, C.

    1993-07-01

    At SLAC, the authors are pursuing the design of a Next Linear Collider (NLC) which would begin with a center-of-mass energy of 0.5 TeV, and be upgradable to at least 1.0 TeV. To achieve this high energy, they have been working on the development of a high-gradient 11.4-GHz (X-band) linear accelerator for the main linac of the collider. In this paper, they present the design of a open-quotes Next Linear Collider Test Acceleratorclose quotes (NLCTA). The goal of the NLCTA is to incorporate the new technologies of X-band accelerator structures, RF pulse compression systems and klystrons into a short linac which will then be a test bed for beam dynamics issues related to high-gradient acceleration

  15. A hybrid body technique: does the pulse diagnostic cun guan chi method have Chinese-Tibetan origins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the medieval origins of the main pulse diagnostic method in contemporary Chinese medicine, sometimes known as san bu (three sectors) method, which requires physicians to examine the mai (vessels, vessel movements or pulse) on the wrist at the three locations cun guan chi (inch, gate, foot). The article provides evidence to suggest that this body technique grew out of an earlier Chinese one, the cun chi (inch-foot) method, which appears to have aimed at investigating the qualities of yin and yang in order to determine the condition of a patient by means of exploring fairly large areas of the patient's body surface with the palms. The article furthermore posits that the cun chi method was decisively transformed in medieval times, presumably due to the impact of early Tibetan pulse diagnostic practices: it became framed in a numerology of three and started advocating the use of the fingertips for sensing the pulse beats. The article, which draws on detailed textual analyses of medieval manuscripts, on visual evidence and also on psychophysical research, furthermore highlights how misunderstandings can constructively contribute to cultural communication.

  16. Substrate bias effect on crystallinity of polycrystalline silicon thin films prepared by pulsed ion-beam evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Fazlat; Gunji, Michiharu; Yang, Sung-Chae; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang, Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology, Extreme Energy-Density Research Inst., Nagaoka, Niigata (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    The deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films has been tried by a pulsed ion-beam evaporation method, where high crystallinity and deposition rate have been achieved without heating the substrate. The crystallinity and the deposition rate were improved by applying bias voltage to the substrate, where instantaneous substrate heating might have occurred by ion-bombardment. (author)

  17. Substrate bias effect on crystallinity of polycrystalline silicon thin films prepared by pulsed ion-beam evaporation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Fazlat; Gunji, Michiharu; Yang, Sung-Chae; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang, Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    The deposition of polycrystalline silicon thin films has been tried by a pulsed ion-beam evaporation method, where high crystallinity and deposition rate have been achieved without heating the substrate. The crystallinity and the deposition rate were improved by applying bias voltage to the substrate, where instantaneous substrate heating might have occurred by ion-bombardment. (author)

  18. Thermophysical data for various transition metals at high temperatures obtained by a submicrosecond-pulse-heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seydel, U.; Bauhof, H.; Fucke, W.; Wadle, H.

    1979-01-01

    Thermophysical data for several transition metals are reported including enthalpies, electric resistivities, and specific volumes at the melting transition, and volume expansion coefficients and heat capacities in the liquid phase. Values for the critical temperatures, pressures, and volumes are given for molybdenum and tungsten. All data have been obtained by a submicrosecond-pulse-heating method. (author)

  19. A pulse stacking method of particle counting applied to position sensitive detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basilier, E.

    1976-03-01

    A position sensitive particle counting system is described. A cyclic readout imaging device serves as an intermediate information buffer. Pulses are allowed to stack in the imager at very high counting rates. Imager noise is completely discriminated to provide very wide dynamic range. The system has been applied to a detector using cascaded microchannel plates. Pulse height spread produced by the plates causes some loss of information. The loss is comparable to the input loss of the plates. The improvement in maximum counting rate is several hundred times over previous systems that do not permit pulse stacking. (Auth.)

  20. [Calculation and analysis of arc temperature field of pulsed TIG welding based on Fowler-Milne method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Hua, Xue-Ming; Wu, Yi-Xiong; Li, Fang

    2012-09-01

    Pulsed TIG welding is widely used in industry due to its superior properties, and the measurement of arc temperature is important to analysis of welding process. The relationship between particle densities of Ar and temperature was calculated based on the theory of spectrum, the relationship between emission coefficient of spectra line at 794.8 nm and temperature was calculated, arc image of spectra line at 794.8 nm was captured by high speed camera, and both the Abel inversion and Fowler-Milne method were used to calculate the temperature distribution of pulsed TIG welding.

  1. Investigation of ZnTe thin films grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotlyarchuk, B.; Savchuk, V.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is devoted to optimization of the Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) growth condition of ZnTe films on various substrates and subsequent investigation of relevant parameters of growth process, structural, optical and electrical properties of grown films. Studies of the effect of growth parameters on the structural quality and properties of grown films were carried out. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the ZnTe films, which have been deposited at optimal substrate temperatures, were characterized by a (111) preferred orientation with large average grain size. The optical transmission and reflectance in the energy range 1.5-5.5 eV for films grown at various substrate temperatures were measured. We calculated the variation in the absorption coefficient with the photon energy from the transmittance spectrum for samples grown at various substrate temperatures. Obtained data were analyzed and the value of the absorption coefficient, for allowed direct transitions, has been determined as a function of photon energy. We found that the undoped ZnTe films, which were grown by the PLD method, are typically p-type and possess resistivity in the range of 10 3 Ωcm at room temperature. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Determining the water use of rambutan and longkong during phenological development by heat-pulse method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sdoodee, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The water use of two species of tropical fruit trees: rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum and longkong (Aglaia dookkoo Griff. were investigated by heat-pulse method. The sapflow rate of both species were determined during phenological development. An experiment was established at Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla Province. Characteristics of sapwood in each species and optimum depth for probe implanting on the trunk were investigated. During the measurement period, diurnal changes of photon flux density, leaf water potential and stomatal conductance were recorded. It was found that sapwood of rambutan and longkong were homogeneous. An appropriate probe depth to implant on the trunk was 25 mm from bark. It was found that diurnal changes of sapflow rates of each species varied with the changes of radiation, leaf water potential and stomata conductance. The results of measurement showed that water use decreased at pre-flowering stage, and fruit maturity stage. In rambutan, water use increased during vegetative growth stage followed by flowering stage. The marked increase of water use in rambutan was during fruit development. In longkong, water use increased at the flowering stage followed by vegetative growth stage, and the peak of water use was during fruit development.

  3. Designing Pulse Laser Surface Modification of H13 Steel Using Response Surface Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a design of experiment (DOE) for laser surface modification process of AISI H13 tool steel in achieving the maximum hardness and minimum surface roughness at a range of modified layer depth. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 tool steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, overlap percentage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The response surface method with Box-Behnken design approach in Design Expert 7 software was used to design the H13 laser surface modification process. Metallographic study and image analysis were done to measure the modified layer depth. The modified surface roughness was measured using two-dimensional surface profilometer. The correlation of the three laser processing parameters and the modified surface properties was specified by plotting three-dimensional graph. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. From metallographic study, the laser modified surface depth was between 37 μm and 150 μm. The average surface roughness recorded from the 2D profilometry was at a minimum value of 1.8 μm. The maximum hardness achieved was between 728 and 905 HV0.1. These findings are significant to modern development of hard coatings for wear resistant applications.

  4. Technology transfer considerations for the collider dipole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodzeit, C.; Fischer, R.

    1991-03-01

    The R ampersand D program at the national laboratories has resulted in significant advances in design and fabrication methods for the Collider Dipole Magnets. The status of the transfer of the technology developed by the laboratories is reviewed. The continuation of the technology transfer program is discussed with a description of: (1) the relation of technology transfer activities to collider dipole product development; (2) content of the program relating to key magnet performance issues; and (3) methods to implement the program. 5 refs

  5. Short Pulsed Laser Methods for Velocimetry and Thermometry in High Enthalpy Facilities, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A suite of pulsed laser diagnostics is proposed for studying aspects of planetary entry and Earth atmospheric reentry in arc jets. For example, dissociation of...

  6. Systolic Blood Pressure Accuracy Enhancement in the Electronic Palpation Method Using Pulse Waveform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sorvoja, H

    2001-01-01

    .... Systolic pressure errors were defined and correlations with other specific values, like pressure rise time, pulse wave velocity, systolic pressure, augmentation, arm circumference and body mass index were calculated...

  7. SLAC collider injector, RF-drive synchronization and trigger electronics, and 15-AMP thermionic-gun development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koontz, R.; Miller, R.; McKinney, T.; Wilmunder, A.

    1981-02-01

    The rf drive system for the Collider Injector Development (EL CID) including laser timing, subharmonic buncher drive and phasing, and accelerator rf drive is described. The rf synchronized master trigger generation scheme for the collider is outlined. Also, a 15 amp peak, 200 kV short pulse gun being developed at SLAC as a backup to the Sinclair laser gun is described

  8. A standardized method to determine the concentration of extracellular vesicles using tunable resistive pulse sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Vogel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the pathogenic role of extracellular vesicles (EVs in disease and their potential diagnostic and therapeutic utility is extremely reliant on in-depth quantification, measurement and identification of EV sub-populations. Quantification of EVs has presented several challenges, predominantly due to the small size of vesicles such as exosomes and the availability of various technologies to measure nanosized particles, each technology having its own limitations. Materials and Methods: A standardized methodology to measure the concentration of extracellular vesicles (EVs has been developed and tested. The method is based on measuring the EV concentration as a function of a defined size range. Blood plasma EVs are isolated and purified using size exclusion columns (qEV and consecutively measured with tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS. Six independent research groups measured liposome and EV samples with the aim to evaluate the developed methodology. Each group measured identical samples using up to 5 nanopores with 3 repeat measurements per pore. Descriptive statistics and unsupervised multivariate data analysis with principal component analysis (PCA were used to evaluate reproducibility across the groups and to explore and visualise possible patterns and outliers in EV and liposome data sets. Results: PCA revealed good reproducibility within and between laboratories, with few minor outlying samples. Measured mean liposome (not filtered with qEV and EV (filtered with qEV concentrations had coefficients of variance of 23.9% and 52.5%, respectively. The increased variance of the EV concentration measurements could be attributed to the use of qEVs and the polydisperse nature of EVs. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of this standardized methodology to facilitate comparable and reproducible EV concentration measurements.

  9. Hadron collider physics 2005. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanelli, M.; Clark, A.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Hadron Collider Physics Symposia (HCP) are a new series of conferences that follow the merger of the Hadron Collider Conferences with the LHC Symposia series, with the goal of maximizing the shared experience of the Tevatron and LHC communities. This book gathers the proceedings of the first symposium, HCP2005, and reviews the state of the art in the key physics directions of experimental hadron collider research: - QCD physics - precision electroweak physics - c-, b-, and t-quark physics - physics beyond the Standard Model - heavy ion physics The present volume will serve as a reference for everyone working in the field of accelerator-based high-energy physics. (orig.)

  10. The standard model and colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-03-01

    Some topics in the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed, as well as how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders which will become operational in the next few years. The radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed briefly, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which are relevant to hadron colliders are then discussed. Some of the problems which the standard model does not solve are discussed, and the energy ranges accessible to the new colliders are indicated

  11. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  12. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  13. When Black Holes Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the fascinating phenomena predicted by General Relativity, Einstein's theory of gravity, black holes and gravitational waves, are particularly important in astronomy. Though once viewed as a mathematical oddity, black holes are now recognized as the central engines of many of astronomy's most energetic cataclysms. Gravitational waves, though weakly interacting with ordinary matter, may be observed with new gravitational wave telescopes, opening a new window to the universe. These observations promise a direct view of the strong gravitational dynamics involving dense, often dark objects, such as black holes. The most powerful of these events may be merger of two colliding black holes. Though dark, these mergers may briefly release more energy that all the stars in the visible universe, in gravitational waves. General relativity makes precise predictions for the gravitational-wave signatures of these events, predictions which we can now calculate with the aid of supercomputer simulations. These results provide a foundation for interpreting expect observations in the emerging field of gravitational wave astronomy.

  14. Laser optics for a γ-γ collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klem, D.E.; Seppala, L.

    1996-06-01

    The constraints on an optical system to convert the electron beams to γ-ray beams for a γ-γ collider are considered. We show that the range of possible designs is limited by the requirement of near head-on collisions and present a design which achieves two passes of the laser pulse with arbitrary control of the polarization. For certain polarization combinations, four passes appear possible. 16 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument.

  16. Collider Physics an Experimental Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvezio Pagliarone, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews shortly a small part of the contents of a set of lectures, presented at the XIV International School of Particles and Fields in Morelia, state of Michoacan, Mexico, during November 2010. The main goal of those lectures was to introduce students to some of the basic ideas and tools required for experimental and phenomenological analysis of collider data. In particular, after an introduction to the scientific motivations, that drives the construction of powerful accelerator complexes, and the need of reaching high center of mass energies and luminosities, some basic concept about collider particle detectors will be discussed. A status about the present running colliders and collider experiments as well as future plans and research and development is also given.

  17. Prospects for Future Collider Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-10-20

    One item on the agenda of future colliders is certain to be the Higgs boson. What is it trying to tell us? The primary objective of any future collider must surely be to identify physics beyond the Standard Model, and supersymmetry is one of the most studied options. it Is supersymmetry waiting for us and, if so, can LHC Run 2 find it? The big surprise from the initial 13-TeV LHC data has been the appearance of a possible signal for a new boson X with a mass ~750 GeV. What are the prospects for future colliders if the X(750) exists? One of the most intriguing possibilities in electroweak physics would be the discovery of non-perturbative phenomena. What are the prospects for observing sphalerons at the LHC or a future collider?

  18. CLIC: developing a linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a CERN project to provide high-energy electron-positron collisions. Instead of conventional radio-frequency klystrons, CLIC will use a low-energy, high-intensity primary beam to produce acceleration.

  19. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  20. Control Rod Reactivity Measurements in the Aagesta Reactor with the Pulsed Neutron Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoereus, K

    1969-07-01

    An extensive series of control rod measurements was made in the Aagesta reactor during the low power experimental period following the first criticality. This report describes the part of these investigations made with the pulsed neutron method, comprising nearly 300 measurements. The main objective was the determination of control rod reactivity worths for different rods and groups of rods, but some supplementary measurements were also made, e.g. a determination of the prompt neutron decay constant for the delayed critical condition and four different cores. The cores consisted of 20, 32, 68, and 140 fuel elements respectively, and measurements were made at room temperature and with the moderator level close to critical for each core, and for the 140-element core also with full moderator height and at the temperatures 140 deg C and 215 deg C. Both fully and partly inserted control rod groups were investigated. The measurements at critical water level give directly the control rod reactivity worths, whereas those with full water height give the shut-down reactivity. A comparison was made between measured reactivity worths for a number of rod groups and those calculated with the HETERO code. The prompt neutron decay constant at delayed criticality {alpha}{sub 0}={beta}/l, for the full core at 215 deg C was found to be 9.60 {+-} 0.30/sec, corresponding to l = 0.76 {+-} 0.02 msec. The shut-down reactivity with 16 coarse control rods in pos. A-D 22, 40-04, 44, 26 is -5% at 25 deg C and -13% at 215 deg C. The relative error is usually around 8% in the reactivity worths, originating mainly from the higher harmonics content in the measured curves.

  1. The rise of colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1992-06-01

    It is a particular pleasure for me to have this opportunity to review for you the rise of colliding beams as the standard technology for high-energy-physics accelerators. My own career in science has been intimately tied up in the transition from the old fixed-target technique to colliding-beam work. I have led a kind of double life both as a machine builder and as an experimenter, taking part in building and using the first of the colliding-beam machines, the Princeton-Stanford Electron-Electron Collider, and building the most recent advance in the technology, the Stanford Linear Collider. The beginning was in 1958, and in the 34 years since there has been a succession of both electron and proton colliders that have increased the available center-of-mass energy for hard collisions by more than a factor of 1000. For the historians here, I regret to say that very little of this story can be found in the conventional literature. Standard operating procedure for the accelerator physics community has been publication in conference proceedings, which can be obtained with some difficulty, but even more of the critical papers are in internal laboratory reports that were circulated informally and that may not even have been preserved. In this presentation I shall review what happened based on my personal experiences and what literature is available. I can speak from considerable experience on the electron colliders, for that is the topic in which I was most intimately involved. On proton colliders my perspective is more than of an observer than of a participant, but I have dug into the literature and have been close to many of the participants

  2. Review of pulsed rf power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    I am going to talk about pulsed high-power rf generation for normal-conducting electron and positron linacs suitable for applications to high-energy physics in the Next Linear Collider, or NLC. The talk will cover some basic rf system design issues, klystrons and other microwave power sources, rf pulse-compression devices, and test facilities for system-integration studies

  3. RF power generation for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowkes, W.R.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Miller, R.H.; Pearson, C.; Spalek, G.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wilson, P.B.

    1990-06-01

    The next linear collider will require 200 MW of rf power per meter of linac structure at relatively high frequency to produce an accelerating gradient of about 100 MV/m. The higher frequencies result in a higher breakdown threshold in the accelerating structure hence permit higher accelerating gradients per meter of linac. The lower frequencies have the advantage that high peak power rf sources can be realized. 11.42 GHz appears to be a good compromise and the effort at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is being concentrated on rf sources operating at this frequency. The filling time of the accelerating structure for each rf feed is expected to be about 80 ns. Under serious consideration at SLAC is a conventional klystron followed by a multistage rf pulse compression system, and the Crossed-Field Amplifier. These are discussed in this paper

  4. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  5. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10 35 cm -2 s -1 . The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design

  6. When Moons Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufu, Raluca; Aharonson, Oded

    2017-10-01

    Impacts between two orbiting satellites is a natural consequence of Moon formation. Mergers between moonlets are especially important for the newly proposed multiple-impact hypothesis as these moonlets formed from different debris disks merge together to form the final Moon. However, this process is relevant also for the canonical giant impact, as previous work shows that multiple moonlets are formed from the same debris disk.The dynamics of impacts between two orbiting bodies is substantially different from previously heavily studied planetary-sized impacts. Firstly, the impact velocities are smaller and limited to, thus heating is limited. Secondly, both fragments have similar mass therefore, they would contribute similarly and substantially to the final satellite. Thirdly, this process can be more erosive than planetary impacts as the velocity of ejected material required to reach the mutual Hill sphere is smaller than the escape velocity, altering the merger efficiency. Previous simulations show that moonlets inherit different isotopic signatures from their primordial debris disk, depending on the parameters of the collision with the planet. We therefore, evaluate the degree of mixing in moonlet-moonlet collisions in the presence of a planetary gravitational field, using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). Preliminary results show that the initial thermal state of the colliding moonlets has only a minor influence on the amount of mixing, compared to the effects of velocity and impact angle over their likely ranges. For equal mass bodies in accretionary collisions, impact angular momentum enhances mixing. In the hit-and-run regime, only small amounts of material are transferred between the bodies therefore mixing is limited. Overall, these impacts can impart enough energy to melt ~15-30% of the mantle extending the magma ocean phase of the final Moon.

  7. The CERN SPS proton–antiproton collider

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Rudiger

    2016-01-01

    One of CERN's most ambitious and successful projects was the search for the intermediate bosons, W and Z [1]. The accelerator part of the project relied on a number of innovations in accelerator physics and technology. The invention of the method of stochastic cooling and the extension by many orders of magnitude beyond the initial proof of principle demonstration allowed the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator. Major modifications to the 26 GeV PS complex and the conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which had just started up as an accelerator, to a collider were required. The SPS collider had to master the beam–beam effect far beyond limits reached before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the UA1 and UA2 experiments.

  8. Accuracy of methods for detecting an irregular pulse and suspected atrial fibrillation: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggar, Jaspal S; Coleman, Tim; Lewis, Sarah; Heneghan, Carl; Jones, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Pulse palpation has been recommended as the first step of screening to detect atrial fibrillation. We aimed to determine and compare the accuracy of different methods for detecting pulse irregularities caused by atrial fibrillation. We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and LILACS until 16 March 2015. Two reviewers identified eligible studies, extracted data and appraised quality using the QUADAS-2 instrument. Meta-analysis, using the bivariate hierarchical random effects method, determined average operating points for sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative likelihood ratios (PLR, NLR); we constructed summary receiver operating characteristic plots. Twenty-one studies investigated 39 interventions (n = 15,129 pulse assessments) for detecting atrial fibrillation. Compared to 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) diagnosed atrial fibrillation, blood pressure monitors (BPMs; seven interventions) and non-12-lead ECGs (20 interventions) had the greatest accuracy for detecting pulse irregularities attributable to atrial fibrillation (BPM: sensitivity 0.98 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.92-1.00), specificity 0.92 (95% CI 0.88-0.95), PLR 12.1 (95% CI 8.2-17.8) and NLR 0.02 (95% CI 0.00-0.09); non-12-lead ECG: sensitivity 0.91 (95% CI 0.86-0.94), specificity 0.95 (95% CI 0.92-0.97), PLR 20.1 (95% CI 12-33.7), NLR 0.09 (95% CI 0.06-0.14)). There were similar findings for smartphone applications (six interventions) although these studies were small in size. The sensitivity and specificity of pulse palpation (six interventions) were 0.92 (95% CI 0.85-0.96) and 0.82 (95% CI 0.76-0.88), respectively (PLR 5.2 (95% CI 3.8-7.2), NLR 0.1 (95% CI 0.05-0.18)). BPMs and non-12-lead ECG were most accurate for detecting pulse irregularities caused by atrial fibrillation; other technologies may therefore be pragmatic alternatives to pulse palpation for the first step of atrial fibrillation screening. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  9. Spatial distribution of ozone density in pulsed corona discharges observed by two-dimensional laser absorption method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan)

    2004-03-07

    The spatial distribution of ozone density is measured in pulsed corona discharges with a 40 {mu}m spatial resolution using a two-dimensional laser absorption method. Discharge occurs in a 13 mm point-to-plane gap in dry air with a pulse duration of 100 ns. The result shows that the ozone density increases for about 100 {mu}s after the discharge pulse. The rate coefficient of the ozone-producing reaction, O + O{sub 2} + M {yields} O{sub 3} + M, is estimated to be 3.5 x 10{sup -34} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}. It is observed that ozone is mostly distributed in the secondary-streamer channel. This suggests that most of the ozone is produced by the secondary streamer, not the primary streamer. After the discharge pulse, ozone diffuses into the background from the secondary-streamer channel. The diffusion coefficient of ozone is estimated to be approximately 0.1 to 0.2 cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}.

  10. Spatial distribution of ozone density in pulsed corona discharges observed by two-dimensional laser absorption method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2004-01-01

    The spatial distribution of ozone density is measured in pulsed corona discharges with a 40 μm spatial resolution using a two-dimensional laser absorption method. Discharge occurs in a 13 mm point-to-plane gap in dry air with a pulse duration of 100 ns. The result shows that the ozone density increases for about 100 μs after the discharge pulse. The rate coefficient of the ozone-producing reaction, O + O 2 + M → O 3 + M, is estimated to be 3.5 x 10 -34 cm 6 s -1 . It is observed that ozone is mostly distributed in the secondary-streamer channel. This suggests that most of the ozone is produced by the secondary streamer, not the primary streamer. After the discharge pulse, ozone diffuses into the background from the secondary-streamer channel. The diffusion coefficient of ozone is estimated to be approximately 0.1 to 0.2 cm 2 s -1

  11. Method and equipment for fast transmission of a signal consisting of many data pulses by a normal well-logging cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, R.W. Jr.; Whatley, H.A. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Well logging methods and equipment in general and a nuclear well logging process and apparatus in particular are presented. They increase the number of pulses which can be transmitted to the top of the well from a well logging instrument placed at the bottom, during a given time interval, by means of a processing giving two pulses for each pulse corresponding to a detection. The equipment is a double-spectrum well logging system, with near and far detectors [fr

  12. The Antiproton-Ion-Collider at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, R.; Fabbietti, L.; Faestemann, T.; Homolka, J.; Kienle, P.; Ring, P.; Suzuki, K.; Bosch, F.; Franzke, B.; Kozhuharov, Ch.; Litvinov, Y.; Nolden, F.; Cargnelli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Hirtl, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Hayano, R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2006-01-01

    An antiproton-ion collider (AIC) has been proposed for the FAIR Project at Darmstadt to independently determine rms radii for protons and neutrons in stable and short lived nuclei by means of antiproton annihilation at medium energies. The AIC makes use of the ELISe electron ion collider complex to store, cool and collide antiprotons of 30 MeV energy with short lived radioactive ions in the NESR. The exotic nuclei are produced by projectile fragmentation or projectile fission and separated in the Super FRS. By detecting the loss of stored ions using the Schottky method the total absorption cross-section for antiprotons on the stored ions with mass A will be measured. Cross sections for the absorption on protons and neutrons, respectively, will be measured by the detection of residual nuclei with A-1 either by the Schottky method or by detecting them in recoil detectors after the first dipole stage of the NESR following the interaction zone. The absorption cross sections are in first order directly proportional to the mean square radii

  13. The antiproton ion collider at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbietti, L.; Faestermann, T.; Homolka, J.; Kienle, P.; Kruecken, R.; Ring, P.; Suziki, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Frankze, B.; Kozhuharov, C.; Nolden, F.; Cargnelli, M.; Fuhrmann, H.; Hirtl, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Hayano, R.S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Lenske, H.; Litvinov, Y.; Shatunov, Y.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Vostrikov, V.A.; Wycech, S.

    2005-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to determine the charge and the matter radii instable and short lived nuclei using an pBar-A collider. The experiment makes use of the appropriately modified electron-ion collider Elise, to collide 30 MeV anti-protons with 740 AMeV ions. The anti-protons are first collected in the CR ring with 3 GeV energy and then cooled in the RESR ring to 30 MeV. The heavy ions produced in the SFRS are precooled in the CR ring, cooled in the RESR ring to 740 AMeV and fed to the NESR ring. The total pBar-nucleon annihilation cross-section is measured detecting the loss of stored ions and the pBar-n, pBar-p cross-sections detecting the A - 1 (Z - 1 or N - 1) nuclei left over after the annihilation, using the Schottcky method. Theoretical predictions show that the annihilation cross-section is proportional to the mean squared radius. (author)

  14. Determination of reactivity of multiplying systems filled with spherical HTGR-fuel elements using kinetic methods with regard to the pulsed-neutron method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drueke, V.

    1978-06-01

    At three critical or subcritical facilities - two of them filled with spherical HTGR-fuel elements - the reactivity is determined using kinetic methods. Besides the inverskinetic method the applicability of the pulsed-neutron method is investigated. The experimental results using the pulsed-neutron method are compared partly with the inverskinetic method and partly with diffusion-calculations. It is shown, that in the HTGR the space dependence of the reactivity in radial direction is not remarkable in spite of the 'kinetic distortion'; on the contrary in axial direction - the direction of the external neutron source - space dependent reactivity worths are measured. The results of the pulsed-neutron methods of Sjoestrand and Simmons-King are rather good applicable in all configurations. For the method of Sjoestrand it is necessary to select the detector positions, whereas for Simmons-King the calculated life-time determines the results. Therefore it is proposed to compare calculated and measured decay constants of the prompt neutron field in future. (orig.) [de

  15. A new method for compensation of the effect of charging transformer's leakage inductance on PFN voltage regulation in Klystron pulse modulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Akhil, E-mail: akhilpatel@rrcat.gov.in; Kale, Umesh; Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2017-04-21

    The Line type modulators have been widely used to generate high voltage rectangular pulses to power the klystron for high power RF generation. In Line type modulator, the Pulse Forming Network (PFN) which is a cascade combination of lumped capacitors and inductors is used to store the electrical energy. The charged PFN is then discharged into a klystron by firing a high voltage Thyratron switch. This discharge generates a high voltage rectangular pulse across the klystron electrodes. The amplitude and phase of Klystron's RF output is governed by the high voltage pulse amplitude. The undesired RF amplitude and phase stability issues arises at the klystron's output due to inter-pulse and during the pulse amplitude variations. To reduce inter-pulse voltage variations, the PFN is required to be charged at the same voltage after every discharge cycle. At present, the combination of widely used resonant charging and deQing method is used to regulate the pulse to pulse PFN voltage variations but the charging transformer's leakage inductance puts an upper bound on the regulation achievable by this method. Here we have developed few insights of the deQing process and devised a new compensation method to compensate this undesired effect of charging transformer's leakage inductance on the pulse to pulse PFN voltage stability. This compensation is accomplished by the controlled partial discharging of the split PFN capacitor using a low voltage MOSFET switch. Theoretically, very high values of pulse to pulse voltage stability may be achieved using this method. This method may be used in deQing based existing modulators or in new modulators, to increase the pulse to pulse voltage stability, without having a very tight bound on charging transformer's leakage inductance. Given a stable charging power supply, this method may be used to further enhance the inter-pulse voltage stability of modulators which employ the direct charging, after replacing the

  16. A study of two kinds of electromagnetic pulse antennas with a continuous resistive loading using the FDTD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Congguang; Zhou Hui

    2003-01-01

    The cylindrical and conical monopole antenna with a continuous resistive loading is considered as a radiator in the experiments of the electromagnetic pulse compatibility. The various principle of the resistive loading is discussed in details and the characters of the antennas are studied using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method. The key techniques of the calculating are presented. The results are in good agreement with the documents and the theory

  17. Selenium and Trace Element Distribution in Astragalus Plants: Developing a Differential Pulse Polarographic Method for Their Determination

    OpenAIRE

    SOMER, Güler; ÇALIŞKAN, A. Cengiz

    2007-01-01

    Astragalus plants have a wide range of applications in pharmaceuticals (gum tragacanth), as thickening agents in foods, and may have applications in controlling cancer cells. They are used as feed for animals and they are indicator plants for selenium. Because of their use in health-related areas it is very important to determine their selenium and trace element content with high accuracy. A new differential pulse polarographic method was established for trace element determination (...

  18. Metal release in a stainless steel Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) system Part I. Effect of different pulse shapes; theory and experimental method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodenburg, B.; Morren, J.; Berg, H.E.; Haan, S.W.H.de

    2005-01-01

    Liquid pumpable food is mostly pasteurised by heat treatment. In the last decennia there is an increasing interest in so-called Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) treatment. During this treatment food is pumped between two metal electrodes and exposed to short high electric field pulses, typical 2-4 kV

  19. Luminosity Tuning at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmer, W

    2006-01-01

    By measuring and adjusting the beta-functions at the interaction point (IP the luminosity is being optimized. In LEP (Large Electron Positron Collider) this was done with the two closest doublet magnets. This approach is not applicable for the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) due to the asymmetric lattice. In addition in the LHC both beams share a common beam pipe through the inner triplet magnets (in these region changes of the magnetic field act on both beams). To control and adjust the beta-functions without perturbation of other optics functions, quadrupole groups situated on both sides further away from the IP have to be used where the two beams are already separated. The quadrupoles are excited in specific linear combinations, forming the so-called "tuning knobs" for the IP beta-functions. For a specific correction one of these knobs is scaled by a common multiplier. The different methods which were used to compute such knobs are discussed: (1) matching in MAD, (2)i...

  20. Antimicrobial activity of biopolymer–antibiotic thin films fabricated by advanced pulsed laser methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R., E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Popescu, C.; Dorcioman, G.; Miroiu, F.M.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Gittard, S.D.; Miller, P.R.; Narayan, R.J. [Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7575 (United States); Enculescu, M. [National Institute for Materials Physics, PO Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chrisey, D.B. [Tulane University, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    We report on thin film deposition by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of two polymer–drug composite thin film systems. A pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) was used to deposit composite thin films of poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) containing several gentamicin concentrations. FTIR spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that MAPLE-transferred materials exhibited chemical structures similar to those of drop cast materials. Scanning electron microscopy data indicated that MAPLE may be used to fabricate thin films of good morphological quality. The activity of PDLLA–gentamicin composite thin films against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was demonstrated using drop testing. The influence of drug concentration on microbial viability was also assessed. Our studies indicate that polymer–drug composite thin films prepared by MAPLE may be used to impart antimicrobial activity to implants, medical devices, and other contact surfaces.

  1. An Improved Method of Mitigating Laser Induced Surface Damage Growth in Fused Silica Using a Rastered, Pulsed CO2 Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Nostrand, M J; Wegner, P L

    2010-10-21

    A new method of mitigating (arresting) the growth of large (>200 m diameter and depth) laser induced surface damage on fused silica has been developed that successfully addresses several issues encountered with our previously-reported large site mitigation technique. As in the previous work, a tightly-focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot is scanned over the damage site by galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous work, the laser is pulsed instead of CW, with the pulse length and repetition frequency chosen to allow substantial cooling between pulses. This cooling has the important effect of reducing the heat-affected zone capable of supporting thermo-capillary flow from scale lengths on the order of the overall scan pattern to scale lengths on the order of the focused laser spot, thus preventing the formation of a raised rim around the final mitigation site and its consequent down-stream intensification. Other advantages of the new method include lower residual stresses, and improved damage threshold associated with reduced amounts of redeposited material. The raster patterns can be designed to produce specific shapes of the mitigation pit including cones and pyramids. Details of the new technique and its comparison with the previous technique will be presented.

  2. Systolic Blood Pressure Accuracy Enhancement in the Electronic Palpation Method Using Pulse Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    adrenalin) or vasodilating (Nipride or Nitromex) medicines. Also painkillers and anesthetics (Oxanest, Diprivan, Fentanyl and Rapifen) may have affected...the measurements. It is hard to distinguish the effects of medication and assess their relation to blood pressure errors and pulse shapes...CONCLUSION During this study, 51 cardiac operated patients were measured to define the effects of arterial stiffening on the accuracy of the

  3. A new method for multi-channel Fabry-Perot spectroscopy of light pulses in the nanosecond regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behn, R.

    1975-01-01

    The demand for powerful multichannel spectrometers raised, e.g., in laser scattering plasma diagnostics, gave rise to the question if it would not be possible to avoid the light losses occuring in the use of multichannel Fabry-Perot spectrometers. These losses can be avoided with the technique presented here. The reflected light is collected and fed back to the interferometer at a different angle. It can thus be recovered for registration in another spectral channel. This method is particularly suitable for the investigation of short light pulses. A spectrum can thus be scanned step by step with full utilization of the transit time of the light pulse. In addition to light recovery, there is another advantage in that only one detector is used for multichannel analysis, thus eliminating calibration problems. In the annex to the report, emission spectres of different dye laser versions are presented and explained. (orig./GG) [de

  4. Spectral encoding method for measuring the relative arrival time between x-ray/optical pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bionta, M. R.; Hartmann, N.; Weaver, M.; French, D.; Glownia, J. M.; Bostedt, C.; Chollet, M.; Ding, Y.; Fritz, D. M.; Fry, A. R.; Krzywinski, J.; Lemke, H. T.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schorb, S.; Zhu, D.; White, W. E.; Nicholson, D. J.; Cryan, J. P.; Baker, K.; Kane, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The advent of few femtosecond x-ray light sources brings promise of x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments that can measure chemical and structural changes in the 10–100 fs time regime. Widely distributed timing systems used at x-ray Free-Electron Laser facilities are typically limited to above 50 fs fwhm jitter in active x-ray/optical synchronization. The approach of single-shot timing measurements is used to sort results in the event processing stage. This has seen wide use to accommodate the insufficient precision of active stabilization schemes. In this article, we review the current technique for “measure-and-sort” at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The relative arrival time between an x-ray pulse and an optical pulse is measured near the experimental interaction region as a spectrally encoded cross-correlation signal. The cross-correlation provides a time-stamp for filter-and-sort algorithms used for real-time sorting. Sub-10 fs rms resolution is common in this technique, placing timing precision at the same scale as the duration of the shortest achievable x-ray pulses

  5. Analysis and prediction of radioelement dispersion in the marine environment by the pulse response method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boust, D.; Fraizier, A.; Hairie, A.; Baron, Y.

    1995-01-01

    This work presents analysis and prediction of the dispersion of radioelements in the marine environment based on the pulse response theory. The analysis is made on three data sets over the period 1984-1988: the amounts of gamma-emitting radioelements contained in controlled releases from the nuclear reprocessing plant of La Hague (=signal emission point), and gamma-emitting radionuclide concentrations in sea water at two stations (signal reception points), situated at 8 and 35 km distance from the release point. Using this data base, the pulse response is determined for each station and for each element. This allows us to estimate the mean delay and the amplitude of the reception signal (i.e. the concentrations of radioelements) and its sensitivity to wind forcing. We then demonstrate that the convolution of the pulse response and released radionuclide time-series is capable of yielding a fairly good prediction of the concentrations at each station. Some particularities of the behaviour of 137 Cs, 106 Ru and 60 Co are evidenced by comparison with that of 125 Sb, assumed to be a conservative element in sea water: adsorption of 106 Ru and 60 Co on to particles, additional sources of 137 Cs. The mean delays calculated for 125 Sb at each station are close to each other (28-30 days) despite their different distances from the release point, and are explained by the specific hydrodynamics of the studied area. (Authors). 16 refs., 9 figs

  6. Method and apparatus for obtaining very high energy laser pulses: photon cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vali, V.; Krogstad, R.S.; Goldstein, R.

    1975-01-01

    Apparatus is arranged in selected embodiments of several combinations, each sometimes being referred to as a system, and each embodiment establishing a large enclosable chamber containing a laser energy reacting medium through which a laser beam is created. When laser energy pulses of such a beam are created, they are guided in a continuous path using reflectors in this chamber, and they receive supplemental energy units from multiple spaced laser pumps. Each laser pump is effective in respect to its own inverted population laser energy source, and each laser pump is triggered by an overall excitation control system. The laser beam is thereby supplemented to a higher level at each laser pump. Yet at all times the laser energy reacting medium remains at a level below super radiance. A working unit or working pulse of a laser beam is allowed to escape from each large enclosable chamber through an escape exit only when a preselected very high energy level is reached. The escape exit of this chamber may be designed to be destroyed by the exiting high level pulse energy of the laser beam. Also an escape exit may be opened upon the operation of a piezoelectric decoupler. (U.S.)

  7. Investigation of a pulsed current annealing method in reusing MOSFET dosimeters for in vivo IMRT dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guang-Wen; Qi, Zhen-Yu; Deng, Xiao-Wu; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2014-05-01

    To explore the feasibility of pulsed current annealing in reusing metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters for in vivo intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry. Several MOSFETs were irradiated at d(max) using a 6 MV x-ray beam with 5 V on the gate and annealed with zero bias at room temperature. The percentage recovery of threshold voltage shift during multiple irradiation-annealing cycles was evaluated. Key dosimetry characteristics of the annealed MOSFET such as the dosimeter's sensitivity, reproducibility, dose linearity, and linearity of response within the dynamic range were investigated. The initial results of using the annealed MOSFETs for IMRT dosimetry practice were also presented. More than 95% of threshold voltage shift can be recovered after 24-pulse current continuous annealing in 16 min. The mean sensitivity degradation was found to be 1.28%, ranging from 1.17% to 1.52%, during multiple annealing procedures. Other important characteristics of the annealed MOSFET remained nearly consistent before and after annealing. Our results showed there was no statistically significant difference between the annealed MOSFETs and their control samples in absolute dose measurements for IMRT QA (p = 0.99). The MOSFET measurements agreed with the ion chamber results on an average of 0.16% ± 0.64%. Pulsed current annealing provides a practical option for reusing MOSFETs to extend their operational lifetime. The current annealing circuit can be integrated into the reader, making the annealing procedure fully automatic.

  8. Siting the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.; Rooney, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering established the Super Collider Site Evaluation Committee to evaluate the suitability of proposed sites for the Superconducting Super Collider. Thirty-six proposals were examined by the committee. Using the set of criteria announced by DOE in its Invitation for Site Proposals, the committee identified eight sites that merited inclusion on a ''best qualified list.'' The list represents the best collective judgment of 21 individuals, carefully chosen for their expertise and impartiality, after a detailed assessment of the proposals using 19 technical subcriteria and DOE's life cycle cost estimates. The sites, in alphabetical order, are: Arizona/Maricopa; Colorado; Illinois; Michigan/Stockbridge; New York/Rochester; North Carolina; Tennessee; and Texas/Dallas-Fort Worth. The evaluation of these sites and the Superconducting Super Collider are discussed in this book

  9. Muon collider interaction region design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Alexahin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Design of a muon collider interaction region (IR presents a number of challenges arising from low β^{*}<1  cm, correspondingly large beta-function values and beam sizes at IR magnets, as well as the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. As a consequence, the designs of the IR optics, magnets and machine-detector interface are strongly interlaced and iterative. A consistent solution for the 1.5 TeV center-of-mass muon collider IR is presented. It can provide an average luminosity of 10^{34}  cm^{-2} s^{-1} with an adequate protection of magnet and detector components.

  10. X-ray lasing in colliding plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.W.; Davis, J.; Velikovich, A.L.; Whitney, K.G.

    1997-01-01

    Conditions favorable for the achievement of population inversion and large gains in short-pulse laser-heated selenium have been reported on previously [K. G. Whitney et al., Phys. Rev. E 50, 468 (1994)]. However, the required density profiles to minimize refraction and amplification losses can be difficult to achieve in conventional laser heated blowoff plasmas. The feasibility of accelerating plasma with a laser, and letting it collide with a solid density wall plasma has been explored. The density of the resulting shocked plasma can be controlled and refraction can be reduced in this design. A radiation hydrodynamics model is used to simulate the collision of the laser produced selenium plasma with the wall plasma. The heating of the stagnated plasma with a short-pulse laser is then simulated, providing the hydrodynamic response of the selenium plasma and detailed configuration nonequilibrium atomic populations. From the results of these calculations, it appears feasible to create an x-ray lasing selenium plasma with gains in the J=0 endash 1 line at 182 Angstrom in excess of 100cm -1 . copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  11. The determination of reactivity at a compact core with low absorption reflector by means of the pulsed neutron method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecker, R.; Drueke, V.; Ahmad, S.K.; Kacmary, S.; Paul, N.

    1976-09-01

    Pulsed measurements at a compact critical facility with low absorption reflector are described. By a number of such measurements at different points of the system a proper value for the reactivity can be determined, which allows a meaningful comparison with values calculated by static computer codes in spite of the presence of kinetic distortion in the system. A modified area ratio method is developed and applied to the measurements; furthermore a method is shown, which allows to suppress in this systems the kinetic distortion in the fundamental mode by application of special detectors. (orig.) [de

  12. Recent results from hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    This is a summary of some of the many recent results from the CERN and Fermilab colliders, presented for an audience of nuclear, medium-energy, and elementary particle physicists. The topics are jets and QCD at very high energies, precision measurements of electroweak parameters, the remarkably heavy top quark, and new results on the detection of the large flux of B mesons produced at these machines. A summary and some comments on the bright prospects for the future of hadron colliders conclude the talk. 39 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Dark spectroscopy at lepton colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2018-03-01

    Rich and complex dark sectors are abundant in particle physics theories. Here, we propose performing spectroscopy of the mass structure of dark sectors via mono-photon searches at lepton colliders. The energy of the mono-photon tracks the invariant mass of the invisible system it recoils against, which enables studying the resonance structure of the dark sector. We demonstrate this idea with several well-motivated models of dark sectors. Such spectroscopy measurements could potentially be performed at Belle II, BES-III and future low-energy lepton colliders.

  14. Physics beyond Colliders Kickoff Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kickoff workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  15. Workshop on Physics Beyond Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kick-off workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  16. Emittance control in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Before completing a realistic design of a next-generation linear collider, the authors must first learn the lessons taught by the first generation, the SLC. Given that, they must make designs fault tolerant by including correction and compensation in the basic design. They must also try to eliminate these faults by improved alignment and stability of components. When these two efforts cross, they have a realistic design. The techniques of generation and control of emittance reviewed here provide a foundation for a design which can obtain the necessary luminosity in a next-generation linear collider

  17. Beam dynamics problems for next generation linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoya, Kaoru

    1990-01-01

    The most critical issue for the feasibility of high-energy e + e - linear colliders is obviously the development of intense microwave power sources. Remaining problems, however, are not trivial and in fact some of them require several order-of-magnitude improvement from the existing SLC parameters. The present report summarizes the study status of the beam dynamics problems of high energy linear colliders with an exaggeration on the beam-beam phenomenon at the interaction region. There are four laboratories having linear collider plans, SLAC, CERN, Novosibirsk-Protovino, and KEK. The parameters of these projects scatter in some range but seem to converge slowly if one recalls the status five years ago. The beam energy will be below 500GeV. The basic requirements to the damping ring are the short damping time and small equilibrium emittance. All the proposed designs make use of tight focusing optics and strong wiggler magnets to meet these requirements and seem to have no major problems at least compared with other problems in the colliders. One of the major problems in the linac is the transverse beam blow-up due to the wake field created by the head of the bunch and, in the case of multiple bunches per pulse, by the preceeding bunches. (N.K.)

  18. Wakefield damping in a pair of X-band accelerators for linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger M. Jones

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the means to damp the wakefield left behind ultrarelativistic charges. In particular, we focus on a pair of traveling wave accelerators operating at an X-band frequency of 11.424 GHz. In order to maximize the efficiency of acceleration, in the context of a linear collider, multiple bunches of charged particles are accelerated within a given pulse of the electromagnetic field. The wakefield left behind successive bunches, if left unchecked, can seriously disturb the progress of trailing bunches and can lead to an appreciable dilution in the emittance of the beam. We report on a method to minimize the influence of the wakefield on trailing bunches. This method entails detuning the characteristic mode frequencies which make up the electromagnetic field, damping the wakefield, and interleaving the frequencies of adjacent accelerating structures. Theoretical predictions of the wakefield and modes, based on a circuit model, are compared with experimental measurements of the wakefield conducted within the ASSET facility at SLAC. Very good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment and this allows us to have some confidence in designing the damping of wakefields in a future linear collider consisting of several thousand of these accelerating structures.

  19. Wakefield Damping in a Pair of X-Band Accelerators for Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.; Adolphsen, C.E.; Wang, J.W.; Li, Z.; SLAC

    2006-01-01

    We consider means to damp the wake-field left behind ultra-relativistic charges. In particular, we focus on a pair of travelling wave accelerators operating at an X-band frequency of 11.424 GHz. In order to maximize the efficiency of acceleration, in the context of a linear collider, multiple bunches of charged particles are accelerated within a given pulse of the electromagnetic field. The wake-field left behind successive bunches, if left unchecked, can seriously disturb the progress of trailing bunches and can lead to an appreciable dilution in the emittance of the beam. We report on a method to minimize the influence of the wake-field on trailing bunches. This method entails detuning the characteristic mode frequencies which make-up the electromagnetic field, damping the wake-field, and interleaving the frequencies of adjacent accelerating structures. Theoretical predictions of the wake-field and modes, based on a circuit model, are compared with experimental measurements of the wake-field conducted within the ASSET facility at SLAC. Very good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment and this allows us to have some confidence in designing the damping of wake-fields in a future linear collider consisting of several thousand of these accelerating structures

  20. High-power rf pulse compression with SLED-II at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nantista, C.

    1993-04-01

    Increasing the peak rf power available from X-band microwave tubes by means of rf pulse compression is envisioned as a way of achieving the few-hundred-megawatt power levels needed to drive a next-generation linear collider with 50--100 MW klystrons. SLED-II is a method of pulse compression similar in principal to the SLED method currently in use on the SLC and the LEP injector linac. It utilizes low-los resonant delay lines in place of the storage cavities of the latter. This produces the added benefit of a flat-topped output pulse. At SLAC, we have designed and constructed a prototype SLED-II pulse-compression system which operates in the circular TE 01 mode. It includes a circular-guide 3-dB coupler and other novel components. Low-power and initial high-power tests have been made, yielding a peak power multiplication of 4.8 at an efficiency of 40%. The system will be used in providing power for structure tests in the ASTA (Accelerator Structures Test Area) bunker. An upgraded second prototype will have improved efficiency and will serve as a model for the pulse compression system of the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator)

  1. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  2. Multi-frequency accelerating strategy for the contrast source inversion method of ultrasound waveform tomography using pulse data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongxiang; Azuma, Takashi; Qu, Xiaolei; Takagi, Shu

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we construct a multi-frequency accelerating strategy for the contrast source inversion (CSI) method using pulse data in the time domain. CSI is a frequency-domain inversion method for ultrasound waveform tomography that does not require the forward solver through the process of reconstruction. Several prior researches show that the CSI method has a good performance of convergence and accuracy in the low-center-frequency situation. In contrast, utilizing the high-center-frequency data leads to a high-resolution reconstruction but slow convergence on large numbers of grid. Our objective is to take full advantage of all low frequency components from pulse data with the high-center-frequency data measured by the diagnostic device. First we process the raw data in the frequency domain. Then multi-frequency accelerating strategy helps restart CSI in the current frequency using the last iteration result obtained from the lower frequency component. The merit of multi- frequency accelerating strategy is that computational burden decreases at the first few iterations. Because the low frequency component of dataset computes on the coarse grid with assuming a fixed number of points per wavelength. In the numerical test, the pulse data were generated by the K-wave simulator and have been processed to meet the computation of the CSI method. We investigate the performance of the multi-frequency and single-frequency reconstructions and conclude that the multi-frequency accelerating strategy significantly enhances the quality of the reconstructed image and simultaneously reduces the average computational time for any iteration step.

  3. A simple, semi-quantitative method for measuring pulsed soft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahama, Y.; Du, J.; Yanagidaira, T.; Hirano, K.

    1993-01-01

    A simple semi-quantitative measurement and image processing system for pulsed soft X-rays with a time and spatial resolution is proposed. Performance of the system is examined using a cylindrical soft X-ray source generated with a plasma device. The system consists of commercial facilities which are easily obtained such as a microchannel plate-phosphor screen combination, a CCD camera, an image memory board and a personal computer. To make a quantitative measurement possible, the image processing and observation of the phosphor screen current are used in conjunction. (author)

  4. Methods and Apparatus for Pulsed-DC Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator and Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corke, Thomas C. (Inventor); Kaszeta, Richard (Inventor); Gold, Calman (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A plasma generating device intended to induce a flow in a fluid via plasma generation includes a dielectric separating two electrodes and a power supply. The first electrode is exposed to a fluid flow while the second electrode is positioned under the dielectric. The power supply is electrically coupled to a switch and the first and second electrodes. When the power supply is energized by repeated action of the switch, it causes a pulsed DC current between the electrodes which causes the fluid to ionize generating a plasma. The generation of the plasma induces a force with a velocity component in the fluid.

  5. Survey of simulation methods for modeling pulsed sieve-plate extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhart, L.

    1979-03-01

    The report first considers briefly the use of liquid-liquid extraction in nuclear fuel reprocessing and then describes the operation of the pulse column. Currently available simulation models of the column are reviewed, and followed by an analysis of the information presently available from which the necessary parameters can be obtained for use in a model of the column. Finally, overall conclusions are given regarding the information needed to develop an accurate model of the column for materials accountability in fuel reprocessing plants. 156 references

  6. Ablation of CdTe with 100 μs Nd:YAG laser pulses: dependence on target preparation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rzeszutek, J.; Savchuk, V.; Oszwaldowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    The results of experimental studies of the ablation of CdTe with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1064 nm) performed with 100 μs pulses and repetition time of 35 Hz are presented for the pulse energy range from 0.13 to 0.25 J. The main goal is to elucidate the dependence of the ablation process on the target preparation method. The investigation of the vapour stream intensity and chemical composition and their evolution with time are performed with a quadrupole mass spectrometer synchronized with the laser pulses. These studies are performed for three kinds of targets: a target made of CdTe bulk crystal (BC target), a target made of CdTe fine powder pressed under the pressure of 700 atm (PP target), and a target made of loose CdTe powder (N-PP target). The applicability of these targets for obtaining high quality CdTe thin films is determined. The best chemical composition of the vapour stream can be obtained with the BC target. A major drawback of this target is the energetic threshold for ablation with Nd:YAG laser and resulting delay in the ablation process above the threshold. The advantage of powder targets over BC target is the lack of any ablation threshold or delay. Weaker angular dependence of the particle emission (associated with the surface roughness), if confirmed in further experiments, can be the most important advantage of PP and N-PP targets. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. X-band klystrons for Japan Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, H.; Odagiri, J.; Higo, T.; Yonezawa, H.; Yamaguchi, N.

    1992-01-01

    To achieve the acceleration gradient of 100 MeV/m necessary for the future linear collider in X-band, an RF power source which could produce more than 100 MW peak power with the pulse duration of 500 nsec is needed even with the factor 4 RF pulse compression system. As the first step for the development of the 100 MW class klystrons in X-band (11.424 GHz), a 30 MW class klystron named XB-50K was tested several times since 1990. XB-50K was tested up to the peak power of 18 MW with the pulse duration of 100 ns. A new 100 MW class klystron named XB-72K was designed and fabricated. Some test results of this klystron are reported. (Author) 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Collider Scaling and Cost Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper deals with collider cost and scaling. The main points of the discussion are the following ones: 1) scaling laws and cost estimation: accelerating gradient requirements, total stored RF energy considerations, peak power consideration, average power consumption; 2) cost optimization; 3) Bremsstrahlung considerations; 4) Focusing optics: conventional, laser focusing or super disruption. 13 refs

  9. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    11KEK, Tsukuba, Japan. 12Cornell University ... This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth ... In view of the requirements of the hour and the available skills and interests, it was decided to .... The actual computation, which is long and somewhat tedious, is currently under way and is ...

  10. Collider physics: A theorist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, S.D.

    1986-06-01

    Recent experimental results from the CERN anti p p Collider are reviewed from a theorist's perspective. The conclusion is that the standard model is impressively verified and nothing else seems to be present. Some other relevant phenomenological and theoretical issues are also reviewed

  11. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moch, S

    2008-02-15

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W{sup {+-}}/Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  12. Hard QCD at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch, S.

    2008-02-01

    We review the status of QCD at hadron colliders with emphasis on precision predictions and the latest theoretical developments for cross sections calculations to higher orders. We include an overview of our current information on parton distributions and discuss various Standard Model reactions such as W ± /Z-boson, Higgs boson or top quark production. (orig.)

  13. The SPS panti p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareyte, J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this lecture is to give a general idea of how the collider works. The fact that one of the beams is composed of scarce precious antiprotons imposes strong constraints on the operation of such a machine. Solutions to these specific problems will be described. (orig./HSI)

  14. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  15. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including ...

  16. Electroweak results from hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarteau, Marcel

    1997-01-01

    A review of recent electroweak results from hadron colliders is given. Properties of the W ± and Z 0 gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities are presented. The emphasis is placed on the measurement of the mass of the W boson and the measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings

  17. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged magnet and retrofit others to correct the underlynig design flaw, which could delay the start-up of the mammouth subterranean machine." (1,5 page)

  18. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC, ILC and the CERN management.

  19. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-03-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B.

  20. CERN's Large Hadron Collider project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearnley, Tom A.

    1997-01-01

    The paper gives a brief overview of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project. After an outline of the physics motivation, we describe the LHC machine, interaction rates, experimental challenges, and some important physics channels to be studied. Finally we discuss the four experiments planned at the LHC: ATLAS, CMS, ALICE and LHC-B

  1. Beam-Based Nonlinear Optics Corrections in Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Malitsky, Nikolay; Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, which gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 3 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non linear correction techniques.

  2. Accuracy improvement in leak detection of charcoal adsorbers by halide pulse integration method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, B.J.; Banks, E.M. [NUCON International, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Due to the phaseout of the supply of R-11, which is used as a charcoal adsorber leak-testing agent, several new substitutes have been suggested and tested. Pulse testing using agents with higher boiling points produced longer response times (due to prolonged evaporation and dispersion times). This longer evaporation time alters the pulse shape and lowers the peak concentration. Since the dispersion and evaporation time under different ambient condition are unpredictable, the peak concentration becomes unpredictable as well. One way to eliminate this unpredictability is to determine the area under the curve (of concentration versus time) after test-agent injection rather than the peak concentration (height). This value should be independent of the injection time and evaporation rate as long as the volume of the test agent injected remains constant. Thus, tests were performed with a constant volume injection of test agent but with different injection times and evaporation rates. The area under the curve of concentration versus time was then compared with the peak concentration for each injection. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking

  4. Summary of the Linear Collider Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The focus of the Linear Collider Working Group was on a next generation linear collider. Topics discussed are: parameters; damping rings; bunch compression and pre-acceleration; linac; final focus; and multibunch effects. 8 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  5. Lasers and future high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-02-01

    Future high energy colliders, directions for particle physics and relationship to new technology such as lasers are discussed. Experimental approaches to explore New Physics with emphasis on the utility of high energy colliders are also discussed

  6. Physics at hadron colliders: Experimental view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    The physics of the hadron-hadron collider experiment is considered from an experimental point of view. The problems encountered in determination of how well the standard model describes collider results are discussed. 53 refs., 58 figs

  7. Strings and superstrings. Electron linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessandrini, V.; Bambade, P.; Binetruy, P.; Kounnas, C.; Le Duff, J.; Schwimmer, A.

    1989-01-01

    Basic string theory; strings in interaction; construction of strings and superstrings in arbitrary space-time dimensions; compactification and phenomenology; linear e+e- colliders; and the Stanford linear collider were discussed [fr

  8. Tau physics at p bar p colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments

  9. NOVOSIBIRSK/STANFORD: colliding linac beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Plans to use colliding beams from linear accelerators are being considered at Novosibirsk and Stanford. The VLEPP scheme proposed for Novosibirsk and the Stanford single pass collider scheme are described. (W.D.L.).

  10. World lays groundwork for future linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2010-01-01

    "New physics from the Large Hadron Collider can best be explored with a large lepton collider; realizing one will require mobilizing accelerator and particle physicists, funding agencies, and politicians" (3 pages)

  11. Method of summation of amplitudes of coinciding pulses from Ge(Li) detectors used to study cascades of gamma-transitions in (n,#betta#) reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdzel', A.A.; Vasil'eva, Eh.V.; Elizarov, O.I.

    1982-01-01

    Main performanes and peculiarities of spectrometer based on the coincidence pulse amplitude total-count method and containing two Ge(La) detectors with transmission neutron spectrometer - IBR-30 pulse reactor are considered. It is shown on the 35 Cl(n, #betta#) reaction that the method of summalion of amplitudes of coinciding pulses from the Ge(Li) detector can be used to study the cascades of two #betta#-transitions with a total energy similar to the neutron binding energy. The shape of the response function of this spectrometer was studied versus the energies of #betta#-transition cascades

  12. Multi-TeV muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuffer, D.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that muons may be used in a future generation of high-energy high-luminosity μ + μ - and μ - p colliders is presented. The problem of collecting and cooling high-intensity muon bunches is discussed and ionization cooling is described. High-energy collider scenarios are outlined; muon colliders may become superior to electron colliders in the multi-TeV energy range

  13. Determination of adiabatic temperature change in MnFe(P,Ge) compounds with pulse-field method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trung, N T; Tegus, O; Cam Thanh, D T; Buschow, K H J; Brueck, E; Klaasse, J C P

    2010-01-01

    Fast magnetic measurements performed by means of a 20 T pulse-field magnet provide a good approach for directly monitoring the magnetocaloric effect of the MnFe(P,Ge) compounds. Based on the comparison of magnetization curves obtained either in an adiabatic or isothermal process, we propose that the method introduced by Levitin et al is applicable to determine the adiabatic temperature change for an equivalent field change in first-order magnetic transition materials. More strikingly, experimental results confirm that the first-order nature of the transition in MnFe(P,Ge) alloys is not a limiting factor to the operation frequency of a magnetic refrigerator.

  14. DC-pulsed voltage electrochemical method based on duty cycle self-control for producing TERS gold tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, V E; Kharintsev, S S; Salakhov, M Kh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a modified dc-pulsed low voltage electrochemical method in which a duty cycle is self tuned while etching. A higher yield of gold tips suitable for performing tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements is demonstrated. The improvement is caused by the self-control of the etching rate along the full surface of the tip. A capability of the gold tips to enhance a Raman signal is exemplified by TERS spectroscopy of single walled carbon nanotubes bundle, sulfur and vanadium oxide

  15. Advanced silicon sensors for future collider experiments

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00437143; Moll, Michael; Mannelli, Marcello

    In this thesis, we address two key technological challenges: the radiation tolerance assessment and timing performance studies of thin planar diodes to be used as sensing technology in the recently approved CMS forward sampling calorimeter for the HL-LHC operation, the High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL); and, complementary, we carried out a detailed study of a novel kind of position sensitive microstrip sensors for ionising particles which implements the well established charge-division method to determine the particle impinging position along the microstrip electrode direction; this technology could become an interesting low-material budget solution for the new generation of tracking detectors to be operated in the future lepton collider experiments.

  16. Cost optimization of induction linac drivers for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in high reliability components for linear induction accelerators (LIA) make possible the use of these devices as economical power drives for very high gradient linear colliders. A particularly attractive realization of this ''two-beam accelerator'' approach is to configure the LIA as a monolithic relativistic klystron operating at 10 to 12 GHz with induction cells providing periodic reacceleration of the high current beam. Based upon a recent engineering design of a state-of-the-art, 10- to 20-MeV LIA at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, this paper presents an algorithm for scaling the cost of the relativistic klystron to the parameter regime of interest for the next generation high energy physics machines. The algorithm allows optimization of the collider luminosity with respect to cost by varying the characteristics (pulse length, drive current, repetition rate, etc.) of the klystron. It also allows us to explore cost sensitivities as a guide to research strategies for developing advanced accelerator technologies

  17. RF pulse compression in the NLC test accelerator at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavine, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    At the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), the authors are designing a Next Linear Collider (NLC) with linacs powered by X-band klystrons with rf pulse compression. The design of the linac rf system is based on X-band prototypes which have been tested at high power, and on a systems-integration test - the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) - which is currently under construction at SLAC. This paper discusses some of the systems implications of rf pulse compression, and the use of pulse compression in the NLCTA, both for peak power multiplication and for controlling, by rf phase modulation, intra-pulse variations in the linac beam energy

  18. Measurement of long-range multiparticle azimuthal correlations with the subevent cumulant method in p p and p +Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Abidi, S. H.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adachi, S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adelman, J.; Adersberger, M.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Afik, Y.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agheorghiesei, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akatsuka, S.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akilli, E.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albicocco, P.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Alderweireldt, S. C.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Ali, B.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alshehri, A. A.; Alstaty, M. I.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Angerami, A.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antel, C.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antrim, D. J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Araujo Ferraz, V.; Arce, A. T. H.; Ardell, R. E.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahmani, M.; Bahrasemani, H.; Baines, J. T.; Bajic, M.; Baker, O. K.; Bakker, P. J.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisits, M.-S.; Barkeloo, J. T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beck, H. C.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beermann, T. A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernardi, G.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Bethani, A.; Bethke, S.; Betti, A.; Bevan, A. J.; Beyer, J.; Bianchi, R. M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Billoud, T. R. V.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bisanz, T.; Bittrich, C.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blue, A.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. 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C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Flierl, B. M.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Förster, F. A.; Forti, A.; Foster, A. G.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Freund, B.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, L. G.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Ganguly, S.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; García Pascual, J. A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gasnikova, K.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gee, C. N. 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H.; Huo, P.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Hyneman, R.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Iltzsche, F.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Isacson, M. F.; Ishijima, N.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Ito, F.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, P.; Jacobs, R. M.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Janus, P. A.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javå¯Rek, T.; Javurkova, M.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jelinskas, A.; Jenni, P.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiang, Z.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Jivan, H.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, C. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S. D.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kaji, T.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kanjir, L.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawade, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kay, E. F.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kellermann, E.; Kempster, J. J.; Kendrick, J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khader, M.; Khalil-Zada, F.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Kharlamova, T.; Khodinov, A.; Khoo, T. 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E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultan, D. M. S.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Suruliz, K.; Suster, C. J. E.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Swift, S. P.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Tahirovic, E.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takasugi, E. H.; Takeda, K.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanioka, R.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, A. J.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Thais, S. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thiele, F.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Tian, Y.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Todt, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Tornambe, P.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Treado, C. J.; Trefzger, T.; Tresoldi, F.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsang, K. W.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tu, Y.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tulbure, T. T.; Tuna, A. N.; Turchikhin, S.; Turgeman, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Tuts, P. M.; Ucchielli, G.; Ueda, I.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Uno, K.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usui, J.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vadla, K. O. H.; Vaidya, A.; Valderanis, C.; Valdes Santurio, E.; Valente, M.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valéry, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallier, A.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Graaf, H.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varni, C.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vasquez, J. G.; Vasquez, G. A.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Furelos, D.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viaux Maira, N.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigani, L.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vishwakarma, A.; Vittori, C.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, Q.; Wang, R.-J.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, W.; Wang, W.; Wang, Z.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, A. F.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. M.; Weber, S. W.; Weber, S. A.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weirich, M.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M. D.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Weston, T. D.; Whalen, K.; Whallon, N. L.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A. S.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; Whiteson, D.; Whitmore, B. W.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilk, F.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winkels, E.; Winklmeier, F.; Winston, O. J.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wobisch, M.; Wolf, A.; Wolf, T. M. H.; Wolff, R.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wong, V. W. S.; Woods, N. L.; Worm, S. D.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xi, Z.; Xia, L.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Xu, T.; Xu, W.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamane, F.; Yamatani, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yigitbasi, E.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Yu, J.; Yu, J.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zacharis, G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zemaityte, G.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zou, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    A detailed study of multiparticle azimuthal correlations is presented using p p data at √{s }=5.02 and 13 TeV, and p +Pb data at √{sNN}=5.02 TeV, recorded with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The azimuthal correlations are probed using four-particle cumulants cn{4 } and flow coefficients vn{4 } =(-cn{4 } ) 1 /4 for n =2 and 3, with the goal of extracting long-range multiparticle azimuthal correlation signals and suppressing the short-range correlations. The values of cn{4 } are obtained as a function of the average number of charged particles per event, Nch>">Nch, using the recently proposed two-subevent and three-subevent cumulant methods, and compared with results obtained with the standard cumulant method. The standard method is found to be strongly biased by short-range correlations, which originate mostly from jets with a positive contribution to cn{4 } . The three-subevent method, on the other hand, is found to be least sensitive to short-range correlations. The three-subevent method gives a negative c2{4 } , and therefore a well-defined v2{4 } , nearly independent of method, as expected for long-range collective behavior. Finally, the measured values of v2{4 } and v2{2 } are used to estimate the number of sources relevant for the initial eccentricity in the collision geometry. The results based on the subevent cumulant technique provide direct evidence, in small collision systems, for a long-range collectivity involving many particles distributed across a broad rapidity interval.

  19. Transverse emittance measurement of high-current single pulse beams using pepper-pot method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Jianlin; Zhou Changgeng; Qiu Rui

    2013-01-01

    A pepper pot-imaging plate system has been developed and used to measure the 4-D transverse emittance of a vacuum arc ion source. Single beam pulses of tens to hundreds milliamperes were extracted from the plasma with 64 kV high voltage. An imaging plate was laid after the pepper pot to visualize the ion beamlets passing though the holes on the pepper pot. An application program was developed to show the phase-space distribution and calculate the ellipse and RMS emittances. The normalized RMS emittances are about 6.41 π·mm·mrad in x-direction and 4.61 π·mm·mrad in y-direction. It is shown that the emittance of the vacuum arc ion source is much larger than that of other types of ion sources, which is mainly attributed to the high current and the convex meniscus of this source. (authors)

  20. Linear extrapolation distance for a black cylindrical control rod with the pulsed neutron method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewenhielm, G.

    1978-03-01

    The objective of this experiment was to measure the linear extrapolation distance for a central black cylindrical control rod in a cylindrical water moderator. The radius for both the control rod and the moderator was varied. The pulsed neutron technique was used and the decay constant was measured for both a homogeneous and a heterogeneous system. From the difference in the decay constants the extrapolation distance could be calculated. The conclusion is that within experimental error it is safe to use the approximate formula given by Pellaud or the more exact one given by Kavenoky. We can also conclude that linear anisotropic scattering is accounted for in a correct way in the approximate formula given by Pellaud and Prinja and Williams

  1. Method for pulse control in a laser including a stimulated brillouin scattering mirror system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz B.

    2007-10-23

    A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

  2. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering: A method to increase deposition rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, Priya; McLain, Jake; Ruzic, David N; Shchelkanov, Ivan A.

    2015-01-01

    High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) is a state-of-the-art physical vapor deposition technique with several industrial applications. One of the main disadvantages of this process is its low deposition rate. In this work, the authors report a new magnetic field configuration, which produces deposition rates twice that of conventional magnetron's dipole magnetic field configuration. Three different magnet pack configurations are discussed in this paper, and an optimized magnet pack configuration for HPPMS that leads to a higher deposition rate and nearly full-face target erosion is presented. The discussed magnetic field produced by a specially designed magnet assembly is of the same size as the conventional magnet assembly and requires no external fields. Comparison of deposition rates with different power supplies and the electron trapping efficiency in complex magnetic field arrangements are discussed

  3. Preparation of Gd2O3 Ultrafine Nanoparticles by Pulse Electrodeposition Followed by Heat-treatment Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aghazadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gd2O3 nanoparticles were prepared by a two–step process; cathodic electrodeposition followed by heat-treatment method. First, Gd(OH3 nanoparticles was galvanostatically deposited from nitrate bath on the steel substrate by pulse current (PC mode. The deposition experiments was conducted at a typical on-time and off-time (ton=1ms and toff=1ms for 60 min. The electrodeposited precursor was then heat-treated at 600 oC for 3h to obtain oxide product (i.e. Gd2O3. The morphological and structural analyses confirmed that the gadolinium hydroxynitrate nanoparticles with composition of [Gd(OH2.5(NO30.5 yH2O] and uniform size about 10 nm have been prepared during pulse cathodic electrodeposition process. Furthermore, mechanism of the gadolinium hydroxynitrate nanoparticles was explained based on the base (OH– electrogeneration process on the cathode surface. The morphological observations by SEM and TEM, and structural analyses via XRD and FT-IR revealed that the oxide product is composed of well-dispersed Gd2O3 nanoparticles with pure cubic crystalline structure. It was observed that the calcination process has no effect on the morphology of the Gd2O3 nanoparticles. Mechanism of oxide formation during heat-treatment step was investigated by DSC-TG analysis and discussed in detail. The results of this work showed that pulse current deposition followed by heat–treatment can be recognized as an easy and facile method for preparation of the Gd2O3 fine nanoparticles.

  4. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass by Dynamical Likelihood Method using the Lepton + Jets Events with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubo, Taichi [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2008-02-01

    We have measured the top quark mass with the dynamical likelihood method. The data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.7fb-1 was collected in proton antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV with the CDF detector at Fermilab Tevatron during the period March 2002-March 2007. We select t$\\bar{t}$ pair production candidates by requiring one high energy lepton and four jets, in which at least one of jets must be tagged as a b-jet. In order to reconstruct the top quark mass, we use the dynamical likelihood method based on maximum likelihood method where a likelihood is defined as the differential cross section multiplied by the transfer function from observed quantities to parton quantities, as a function of the top quark mass and the jet energy scale(JES). With this method, we measure the top quark mass to be 171.6 ± 2.0 (stat.+ JES) ± 1.3(syst.) = 171.6 ± 2.4 GeV/c2.

  5. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton-proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  6. Application of conventional laser technology to gamma-gamma colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, C.E.; Kurnit, N.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    1995-01-01

    A future e - e + (electron-positron) linear collider can be configured with perhaps minimal modification to serve as an γ-γ (gamma-gamma) or a e - -γ collider. This is accomplished by Compton-backscattering low energy photons (from a laser source) off of the high-energy electron beams prior to the crossing of the electron beams. However, to be competitive with the e - e + configuration, the luminosity cannot be compromised in the process. This requires that the laser source deliver a sufficient number of photons per pulse with a pulse format and rate matching that of the electron beams. As it turns out, this requires an average optical power of 5 to 15 kW from the laser which is beyond the current state of the art. In this paper, the authors address how to generate the required pulse format and how the high average power requirement can be met with conventional laser technology. They also address concerns about the survivability of mirrors located near the interaction point. Finally, they list a program of research and development which addresses some of the unknowns in such a system

  7. The Dual-Angle Method for Fast, Sensitive T1 Measurement in Vivo with Low-Angle Adiabatic Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, P. A.; Ouwerkerk, R.

    A new method for measuring T1 based on a measurement of the ratio, R, of the steady-state partially saturated NMR signals acquired at two fixed low flip angles (hip-angle and excitation-field ( B1) inhomogeneity result in roughly proportionate errors in the apparent T1. The method is best implemented with adiabatic low-angle pulses such as B1-independent rotation (BIR-4) or BIR-4 phase-cycled (BIRP) pulses, which permit measurements with surface coils. Experimental validation was obtained at 2 T by comparison of unlocalized inversion-recovery and dual-angle proton ( 1H) and phosphorus ( 31P) measurements from vials containing doped water with 0.04 ≤ T1 ≤ 2.8 s and from the metabolites in the calf muscles of eight human volunteers. Calf muscle values of 6 ± 0.5 s for phosphocreatine and around 3.7 ± 0.8 s for the adenosine triphosphates (ATP) were in good agreement with inversion-recovery T1 values and values from the literature. Use of the dual-angle method accelerated T1 measurement time by about fivefold over inversion recovery. The dual-angle method was implemented in a one-dimensional localized surface-coil 31P spectroscopy sequence, producing consistent T1 measurements from phantoms, the calf muscle, and the human liver. 31P T1 values of ATP in the livers of six volunteers were about 0.5 ± 0.1 to 0.6 ± 0.2 s: the total exam times were about 35 minutes per subject. The method is ideally suited to low-sensitivity and/or low-concentration moieties, such as in 31P NMR in vivo, where study-time limitations are critical, and for rapid 1H T1 imaging.

  8. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  9. Perspectives on large linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1987-11-01

    Three main items in the design of large linear colliders are presented. The first is the interrelation of energy and luminosity requirements. These two items impose severe constraints on the accelerator builder who must design a machine to meet the needs of experimentl high energy physics rather than designing a machine for its own sake. An introduction is also given for linear collider design, concentrating on what goes on at the collision point, for still another constraint comes here from the beam-beam interaction which further restricts the choices available to the accelerator builder. The author also gives his impressions of the state of the technology available for building these kinds of machines within the next decade. The paper concludes with a brief recommendation for how we can all get on with the work faster, and hope to realize these machines sooner by working together. 10 refs., 9 figs

  10. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-05-13

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch.

  11. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch

  12. New collider scheme at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, H.G.

    1984-07-01

    This paper presents current ideas from Berkeley concerning a possible new facility for studying the phase transition from hadronic matter to quark matter. The physics ideas have evolved over a period of more than five years, the VENUS concept for a 25 GeV/nucleon colliding beam facility having been presented in 1979. The concept for the Minicollider has been, like that of VENUS, the work of Hermann Grunder and Christoph Leemann

  13. Perspectives on large Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1987-01-01

    The accelerator community now generally agrees that the Linear Collider is the most cost-effective technology for reaching much higher energies in the center-of-mass than can be attained in the largest of the e + e - storage rings, LEP. Indeed, even as the first linear collider, the SLC at SLAC, is getting ready to begin operations groups, at SLAC, Novosibirsk, CERN and KEK are doing R and D and conceptual design studies on a next generation machine in the 1 TeV energy region. In this perspectives talk I do not want to restrict my comments to any particular design, and so I will talk about a high-energy machine as the NLC, which is shorthand for the Next Linear Collider, and taken to mean a machine with a center-of-mass energy someplace in the 0.5 to 2 TeV energy range with sufficient luminosity to carry out a meaningful experimental program. I want to discuss three main items with you. The first is the interrelation of energy and luminosity requirements. These two items impose severe constraints on the accelerator builder. Next, I will give an introduction to linear collider design, concentrating on what goes on at the collision point, for still another constraint comes here from the beam-beam interaction which further restricts the choices available to the accelerator builder.Then, I want to give my impressions of the state of the technology available for building these kinds of machines within the next decade

  14. Stanford Linear Collider magnet positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wand, B.T.

    1991-08-01

    For the installation of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) the positioning and alignment of the beam line components was performed in several individual steps. In the following the general procedures for each step are outlined. The calculation of ideal coordinates for the magnets in the entire SLC will be discussed in detail. Special emphasis was given to the mathematical algorithms and geometry used in the programs to calculate these ideal positions. 35 refs., 21 figs

  15. Physics goals of future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    These lectures describe some of the physics goals that future colliders are designed to achieve. Emphasis is on the SSC, but its capabilities are compared to those of other machines, and set in a context of what will be measured before the SSC is ready. Physics associated with the Higgs sector is examined most thoroughly, with a survey of the opportunities to find evidence of extended gauge theories

  16. Dynamic Test Method Based on Strong Electromagnetic Pulse for Electromagnetic Shielding Materials with Field-Induced Insulator-Conductor Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Zhao, Min; Wang, Qingguo

    2018-01-01

    In order to measure the pulse shielding performance of materials with the characteristic of field-induced insulator-conductor phase transition when materials are used for electromagnetic shielding, a dynamic test method was proposed based on a coaxial fixture. Experiment system was built by square pulse source, coaxial cable, coaxial fixture, attenuator, and oscilloscope and insulating components. S11 parameter of the test system was obtained, which suggested that the working frequency ranges from 300 KHz to 7.36 GHz. Insulating performance is good enough to avoid discharge between conductors when material samples is exposed in the strong electromagnetic pulse field up to 831 kV/m. This method is suitable for materials with annular shape, certain thickness and the characteristic of field-induced insulator-conductor phase transition to get their shielding performances of strong electromagnetic pulse.

  17. Study on cardiac function in atomic bomb survivors, using pulsed doppler method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Shinzo; Takayama, Sadamatsu; Nakano, Kikuo; Mito, Kazuyo; Kato, Masafumi; Ito, Chikako

    1989-01-01

    Influences of A-bombing on the cardiovascular system are of great interest in the graying society. Therefore, diastolic blood circulation was examined by pulsed doppler echocardiography in 44 A-bomb survivors (25 men and 19 women), with an average age of 59 years, who had been exposed at ≤ 2000 m from the hypocenter. Age- and sex-matched A-bomb survivors, who had been exposed at ≥ 3000 m or entered the city 4 days after the bombing, served as the control. Regarding both the peak velocity of atrial contraction (PVAC) and peak velocity of rapid filling (PVRF), there was no significant difference between the exposed and control groups. In the control group, PVAC was significantly associated with aging (p<0.05). A decreased PVRF was significantly observed with aging in both the exposed group (p<0.01) and the control group (p<0.001). There was no marked difference in the ratio of PVAC to PVRF among all of the age groups in both groups; it was significantly increased with aging. Deceleration half time of rapid filling was significantly prolonged in older age group in the exposed group, although there was no difference in the acceleration half time between the exposed and control groups. These findings indicated none of the influences of A-bombing on diastolic function of the heart. (N.K.)

  18. Design of shielded encircling send-receive type pulsed eddy current probe using numerical analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Kil [Dept. of Electircal Engineeirng, Kunsan National University, Kunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    An encircling send-receive type pulsed eddy current (PEC) probe is designed for use in aluminum tube inspection. When bare receive coils located away from the exciter were used, the peak time of the signal did not change although the distance from the exciter increased. This is because the magnetic flux from the exciter coil directly affects the receive coil signal. Therefore, in this work, both the exciter and the sensor coils were shielded in order to reduce the influence of direct flux from the exciter coil. Numerical simulation with the designed shielded encircling PEC probe showed the corresponding increase of the peak time as the sensor distance increased. Ferrite and carbon steel shields were compared and results of the ferrite shielding showed a slightly stronger peak value and a quicker peak time than those of the carbon steel shielding. Simulation results showed that the peak value increased as the defect size (such as depth and length) increased regardless of the sensor location. To decide a proper sensor location, the sensitivity of the peak value to defect size variation was investigated and found that the normalized peak value was more sensitive to defect size variation when the sensor was located closer to the exciter.

  19. Electrochemical properties of Sn/C nanoparticles fabricated by redox treatment and pulsed wire evaporation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ju-Seok; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Cho, Kwon-Koo

    2017-09-01

    Tin (Sn) based anode materials are the most promising anode materials for lithium-ion batteries due to their high theoretical capacity corresponding to the formation of Li4.4Sn composition (Li4.4Sn, 994 mAh/g). However, the applications of tin based anodes to lithium-ion battery system are generally limited by a large volume change (>260%) during lithiation and delithiation cycle, which causes pulverize and poor cycling stability. In order to overcome this shortcoming, we fabricate a Sn/C nanoparticle with a yolk-shell structure (Sn/void/C) by using pulsed wire evaporation process and oxidation/reduction heat treatment. Sn nanoparticles are encapsulated by a conductive carbon layer with structural buffer that leaves enough room for expansion and contraction during lithium insertion/desertion. We expect that the yolk-shell structure has the ability to accommodate the volume changes of tin and leading to an improved cycle performance. The Sn/Void/C anode with yolk-shell structure shows a high specific capacity of 760 mAh/g after 50 cycles.

  20. Particle production at collider energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geich-Gimbel, C.

    1987-11-01

    Key features of the SPS panti p Collider and the detectors of the UA-experiments involved are dealt with in chapter 2, which includes and accord to the ramping mode of the Collider, which allowed to raise the c.m. energy to 900 GeV in the UA5/2 experiment. The following chapters concentrate on physics results. Starting with a discussion of cross sections and diffraction dissociation in chapter 3 we then continue with a presentation of basic features of particle production such as rapidity and multiplicity distributions in chapter 4. There one of the unexpected findings at Collider energies, the breakdown of the so-called KNO-scaling, and new regularities potentially governing multiplicity distributions, are discussed. The findings about correlations among the final state particles, which may tell about the underlying dynamics of multi-particle production and be relevant to models thereof, are described in due detail in chapter 5. Transverse spectra and their trends with energy are shown in chapter 6. Results on identified particles are collected in a separate chapter in order to stress that this piece of information was an important outcome of the UA5 experiment. (orig./HSI)

  1. Implementation and validation of the linear collider final focus prototype: ATF2 at KEK (Japan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renier, Y.

    2010-06-01

    The two linear collider projects (ILC and CLIC) require beam delivery systems with the same local chromaticity correction scheme in the final focus. ATF2 at KEK (Japan), an implementation of this scheme scaled down in energy, uses the beam extracted from ATF, which is one of the most successful damping rings in the world. The ATF2 goals are to prove the feasibility and the stability of the linear collider final focus system and to define and test the experimental correction procedures. The nominal beam sizes at the interaction point are 3 μm horizontally and 37 nm vertically. The work in this thesis was started before the commissioning and covered its first year at KEK. At the beginning, we observed that the stripline BPMs were not working properly so we investigated their behavior in detail. The problem was characterized and later solved in 2010 by upgrading the electronics. We then developed an efficient procedure to check the modeling of the beam line, comparing measurements of transfer matrices to model predictions calculated on line. After obtaining a good agreement, we were able to successfully test the trajectory correction algorithm which had been developed, reducing the difference between BPM measurements and the target values down to 0.5 mm horizontally and 0.2 mm vertically. We also successfully developed an algorithm to reconstruct pulse to pulse beam trajectory fluctuations with sub-micron precision. This reconstruction also gave a precise determination of the energy fluctuation, allowing a global fit of the dispersion function along the beam line with a precision of a few mm. A simple and robust IP beam size tuning method using sextupoles displacements was also studied in simulation, whose performance indicates that, given some assumptions on the error level of the beam, convergence within 20% of the nominal beam size should be possible in 8 hours with a 80% probability. (author)

  2. Accuracy improvement in measurement of arterial wall elasticity by applying pulse inversion to phased-tracking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyachi, Yukiya; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2018-07-01

    In our studies on ultrasonic elasticity assessment, minute change in the thickness of the arterial wall was measured by the phased-tracking method. However, most images in carotid artery examinations contain multiple-reflection noise, making it difficult to evaluate arterial wall elasticity precisely. In the present study, a modified phased-tracking method using the pulse inversion method was examined to reduce the influence of the multiple-reflection noise. Moreover, aliasing in the harmonic components was corrected by the fundamental components. The conventional and proposed methods were applied to a pulsated tube phantom mimicking the arterial wall. For the conventional method, the elasticity was 298 kPa without multiple-reflection noise and 353 kPa with multiple-reflection noise on the posterior wall. That of the proposed method was 302 kPa without multiple-reflection noise and 297 kPa with multiple-reflection noise on the posterior wall. Therefore, the proposed method was very robust against multiple-reflection noise.

  3. Energy efficiency and choice of parameters for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claus, J.

    1986-01-01

    Three possible ways of converting beam power into luminosity are investigated: two short bunches colliding with each other, two long ones doing so, and two pulses of bunch trains which interact. Some of the implications of linacs for very high frequencies are considered, emphasizing the factors that influence the efficiency of converting rf power into luminosity and assuming that suitable power sources are or will be available. Some characteristics of structures that seem feasible for very high frequency accelerators are described. 6 refs., 6 figs

  4. Experimental gyroklystron studies for TeV linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, W.; Hogan, B.; Matthews, H.W.; Specht, V.; Cheng, J.; Latham, P.E.; Striffler, C.D.; Granastein, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    At the University of Maryland we are exploring the feasibility of gyroklystrons as RF sources for future colliders. To this end, we have developed a 9.85 GHz tube which produces 1 μs pulses in excess of 27 MW at a saturated efficiency of 32% and a gain of 37 dB. The beam energy and current are 430 kV and 150-200 A, respectively. In this paper, we summarize our progress to date and describe our plans for future experiments that should culminate in amplifier outputs in excess of 100 MW. (Author) 4 figs., 6 refs

  5. Computer aided method of low voltage power distribution networks protection system against lightning and electromagnetic pulse generated by high altitude nuclear burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroubine, J.

    1989-01-01

    The lightning creates an electromagnetic field which produces a slow duration and high energy pulse of current on low voltage power distribution networks. On the other hand an high altitude nuclear burst generates an electromagnetic pulse which causes fast and intense interferences. We describe here the specifications of a passive filter that can reject these interferences. We used a computer aided method of simulation to create a prototype. Experimental results confirm the validity of the model used for simulation [fr

  6. Pulse regime in formation of fractal fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, B. M., E-mail: bmsmirnov@gmail.com [Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The pulse regime of vaporization of a bulk metal located in a buffer gas is analyzed as a method of generation of metal atoms under the action of a plasma torch or a laser beam. Subsequently these atoms are transformed into solid nanoclusters, fractal aggregates and then into fractal fibers if the growth process proceeds in an external electric field. We are guided by metals in which transitions between s and d-electrons of their atoms are possible, since these metals are used as catalysts and filters in interaction with gas flows. The resistance of metal fractal structures to a gas flow is evaluated that allows one to find optimal parameters of a fractal structure for gas flow propagation through it. The thermal regime of interaction between a plasma pulse or a laser beam and a metal surface is analyzed. It is shown that the basic energy from an external source is consumed on a bulk metal heating, and the efficiency of atom evaporation from the metal surface, that is the ratio of energy fluxes for vaporization and heating, is 10{sup –3}–10{sup –4} for transient metals under consideration. A typical energy flux (~10{sup 6} W/cm{sup 2}), a typical surface temperature (~3000 K), and a typical pulse duration (~1 μs) provide a sufficient amount of evaporated atoms to generate fractal fibers such that each molecule of a gas flow collides with the skeleton of fractal fibers many times.

  7. Beam-strahlung effects in e-p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.

    1982-09-01

    The electromagnetic fields produced by one beam in an interaction point of a colliding-beam facility cause to the emission of synchrotron radiation by the other beam. This effect, the beam strahlung, for the e+e - colliders has been considered by several authors, and they have pointed out that the effect is very important consideration at very-high-energy e+e - colliders. At the first glance, the beam-strahlung effect can play an important role in the e-p collision due to the fact that the circulating currents in the collider are much higher than those of the e+e - machine. However the detailed study shows that is not the case because of the collision geometry involved. What follows in this note is the beam-strahlung derivations using the method previously used by Hofmann and Keil. The difference between this note and that of Hofman and Keil is that in the case of e+e - collider, equal mass particles are involved in the consideration and, in the e-p case, the electrons radiate and the protons provide the electromagnetic fields

  8. Modelling NDE pulse-echo inspection of misorientated planar rough defects using an elastic finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettit, J. R.; Lowe, M. J. S. [UK Research Centre for NDE, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Walker, A. E. [Rolls-Royce Nuclear, PO BOX 2000, Derby, DE21 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-31

    Pulse-echo ultrasonic NDE examination of large pressure vessel forgings is a design and construction code requirement in the power generation industry. Such inspections aim to size and characterise potential defects that may have formed during the forging process. Typically these defects have a range of orientations and surface roughnesses which can greatly affect ultrasonic wave scattering behaviour. Ultrasonic modelling techniques can provide insight into defect response and therefore aid in characterisation. However, analytical approaches to solving these scattering problems can become inaccurate, especially when applied to increasingly complex defect geometries. To overcome these limitations a elastic Finite Element (FE) method has been developed to simulate pulse-echo inspections of embedded planar defects. The FE model comprises a significantly reduced spatial domain allowing for a Monte-Carlo based approach to consider multiple realisations of defect orientation and surface roughness. The results confirm that defects aligned perpendicular to the path of beam propagation attenuate ultrasonic signals according to the level of surface roughness. However, for defects orientated away from this plane, surface roughness can increase the magnitude of the scattered component propagating back along the path of the incident beam. This study therefore highlights instances where defect roughness increases the magnitude of ultrasonic scattered signals, as opposed to attenuation which is more often assumed.

  9. Tests of experimental fuel elements by the method of nuclear-thermal pulse loadings in 'HYDRA' reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastoyashchaya, O.V.; Lebedev, Yu. M.; Chechurov, A.M.; Khvostionov, Ye

    1997-01-01

    The results of tests of experimental fuel elements with uranium dioxide fuel composition embedded in Al and Zr matrix with the enrichment from 90% to 36% in respect to U-235 performed at the pulse 'HYDRA' reactor are presented in this paper. Testing is performed in the frame-work of extensive research program studying the behavior of fuel elements (FE) of research and mini nuclear power systems in case of practically immediate energy release in the fuel taking place during the RIA-type accidents. Duration of the neutron pulse when testing in 'HYDRA' reactor is from 7 to 20 ms. The methods of diagnostics of the state of FE prior to and after testing in the reactor are developed and verified. Mathematical model describing temperature fields inside the FE in the process of testing. and accounting for non-uniformity of fuel composition has been developed in order to summarize experimental results. Experimental data on the limiting values of the energy density leading to deformation and degradation of FE depending on the type of fuel composition have been obtained and the mechanisms for the development of these processes have been determined. The nature of physical-chemical processes taking place in the fuel composition and fuel cladding depending on material composition under different levels of energy deposition is demonstrated. The data on hydrogen generation and radioactive product release out of fuel after failure of FE are presented. (author)

  10. Water accessibility in a membrane-inserting peptide comparing Overhauser DNP and pulse EPR methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segawa, Takuya F., E-mail: takuya.segawa@alumni.ethz.ch; Doppelbauer, Maximilian; Garbuio, Luca; Doll, Andrin; Polyhach, Yevhen O.; Jeschke, Gunnar, E-mail: gjeschke@ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-05-21

    Water accessibility is a key parameter for the understanding of the structure of biomolecules, especially membrane proteins. Several experimental techniques based on the combination of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with site-directed spin labeling are currently available. Among those, we compare relaxation time measurements and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments using pulse EPR with Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at X-band frequency and a magnetic field of 0.33 T. Overhauser DNP transfers the electron spin polarization to nuclear spins via cross-relaxation. The change in the intensity of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of H{sub 2}O at a Larmor frequency of 14 MHz under a continuous-wave microwave irradiation of the nitroxide spin label contains information on the water accessibility of the labeled site. As a model system for a membrane protein, we use the hydrophobic α-helical peptide WALP23 in unilamellar liposomes of DOPC. Water accessibility measurements with all techniques are conducted for eight peptides with different spin label positions and low radical concentrations (10–20 μM). Consistently in all experiments, the water accessibility appears to be very low, even for labels positioned near the end of the helix. The best profile is obtained by Overhauser DNP, which is the only technique that succeeds in discriminating neighboring positions in WALP23. Since the concentration of the spin-labeled peptides varied, we normalized the DNP parameter ϵ, being the relative change of the NMR intensity, by the electron spin concentration, which was determined from a continuous-wave EPR spectrum.

  11. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 10 6 -10 9 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, I sp ∼10 6 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameterx10-meters length, magnetic field ∼7 Tesla, ion beam current ∼10 A, and fuels of either D-He 3 ,P-B 11 ,P-Li 6 ,D-Li 6 , etc

  12. Electron Lenses for the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermilab; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab; Bruce, Roderik [CERN; Redaelli, Stefano [CERN; Rossi, Adriana [CERN; Salvachua, Belen [CERN

    2014-07-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. This project is moving towards a technical design in 2014, with the goal to build the devices in 2015-2017, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles.

  13. The Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.; Adolphsen, C.; Bane, K.

    1993-04-01

    During the past several years, there has been tremendous progress the development of the RF system and accelerating structures for a Next Linear Collider (NLC). Developments include high-power klystrons, RF pulse compression systems and damped/detuned accelerator structures to reduce wakefields. In order to integrate these separate development efforts into an actual X-band accelerator capable of accelerating the electron beams necessary for an NLC, we are building an NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA). The goal of the NLCTA is to bring together all elements of the entire accelerating system by constructing and reliably operating an engineered model of a high-gradient linac suitable for the NLC. The NLCTA will serve as a testbed as the design of the NLC evolves. In addition to testing the RF acceleration system, the NLCTA is designed to address many questions related to the dynamics of the beam during acceleration. In this paper, we will report oil the status of the design, component development, and construction of the NLC Test Accelerator

  14. Electron lenses for the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari†, G; Bruce, R; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Salvachua Ferrando, B

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beamswhose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-bybunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beamcompensation, and for the demonstration of halo scrapingwith hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in RHIC at BNL. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program and the European HiLumi LHC Design Study, hollow electron beam collimation was studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the LHC upgrades. A conceptual design was recently completed, and the project is moving towards a technical design in 2014–2015 for construction in 2015–2017, if needed, after resuming LHC operations and re-assessing collimation needs and requirements at 6.5 TeV. Because of the...

  15. Family of electrovac colliding wave solutions of Einstein's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.; Ernst, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    Beginning with any colliding wave solution of the vacuum Einstein equations, a corresponding electrified colliding wave solution can be generated through the use of a transformation due to Harrison [J. Math. Phys. 9, 1744 (1968)]. The method, long employed in the context of stationary axisymmetric fields, is equally applicable to colliding wave solutions. Here it is applied to a large family of vacuum metrics derived by applying a generalized Ehlers transformation to solutions published recently by Ernst, Garcia, and Hauser (EGH) [J. Math. Phys. 28, 2155, 2951 (1987); 29, 681 (1988)]. Those EGH solutions were themselves a generalization of solutions first derived by Ferrari, Ibanez, and Bruni [Phys. Rev. D 36, 1053 (1987)]. Among the electrovac solutions that are obtained is a charged version of the Nutku--Halil [Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 1379 (1977)] metric that possesses an arbitrary complex charge parameter

  16. Vacuum technology issues for the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joestlein, H.

    1989-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider, to be built in Texas, will provide an energy of 40 TeV from colliding proton beams. This energy is twenty times higher than currently available from the only other cryogenic collider, the Fermilab Tevatron, and will allow experiments that can lead to a better understanding of the fundamental properties of matter. The energy scale and the size of the new machine pose intriguing challenges and opportunities for the its vacuum systems. The discussion will include the effects of synchrotron radiation on cryogenic beam tubes, cold adsorption pumps for hydrogen, methods of leak checking large cryogenic systems, the development of cold beam valves, and radiation damage to components, especially electronics. 9 figs., 1 tab

  17. Beam dynamics verification in linacs of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The SLAC two-mile linac has been upgraded to accelerate high current, low emittance electron and positron beams to be used in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). After the upgrade was completed, extensive beam studies were made to verify that the design criteria have been met. These tests involved the measurement of emittance, beam phase space orientation, energy dispersion, trajectory oscillations, bunch length, energy spectrum and wakefields. The methods, the systems and the data cross checks are compared for the various measurements. Implications for the next linear collider are discussed. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The key element of our pulsed power program is concentration of power in time and space by suppression of breakdown in dielectrics and in vacuum. Magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines and magnetic suppression of insulator flashover have continued as the main reserch directions. Vacuum insulated line studies at Physics International have been expanded and a test bed at Sandia, called MITE (Magnetically Insulated Transmission Experiment), is under development. The choice for the baseline EBFA design will depend on the outcome of these studies and should be made in July 1977. The slow and intermediate speed pulsed power approaches to EBFA will be based on Proto I and Proto II results and several of the projected EBFA subsystems are presently being tested in Proto II. A further stage of power concentration, within the vacuum diode itself, would considerably ease the burden on dielectrics; methods of power multiplication involving magnetically imploded plasmas are being considered and tests have begun using the Ripple III apparatus

  19. A novel and practical approach for determination of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter using a pulse-echo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Zhang, Shuzeng; Barnard, Dan; Li, Xiongbing

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter β are frequently made for early detection of damage in various materials. The practical implementation of the measurement technique has been limited to the through-transmission setup for determining the nonlinearity parameter of the second harmonic wave. In this work, a feasibility study is performed to assess the possibility of using pulse-echo methods in determining the nonlinearity parameter β of solids with a stress-free boundary. The multi-Gaussian beam model is developed based on the quasilinear theory of the KZK equation. Simulation results and discussion are presented for the reflected beam fields of the fundamental and second harmonic waves, the uncorrected β behavior and the properties of total correction that incorporate reflection, attenuation and diffraction effects.

  20. Paired Pulse Basis Functions for the Method of Moments EFIE Solution of Electromagnetic Problems Involving Arbitrarily-shaped, Three-dimensional Dielectric Scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Anne I.; Rao, Sadasiva M.; Baginski, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    A pair of basis functions is presented for the surface integral, method of moment solution of scattering by arbitrarily-shaped, three-dimensional dielectric bodies. Equivalent surface currents are represented by orthogonal unit pulse vectors in conjunction with triangular patch modeling. The electric field integral equation is employed with closed geometries for dielectric bodies; the method may also be applied to conductors. Radar cross section results are shown for dielectric bodies having canonical spherical, cylindrical, and cubic shapes. Pulse basis function results are compared to results by other methods.

  1. Simulation of tail distributions in electron-positron circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.

    1992-02-01

    In addition to the Gaussian shaped core region, particle bunches in electron-positron circular colliders have a rarefied halo region of importance in determining beam lifetimes and backgrounds in particle detectors. A method is described which allows simulation of halo particle distributions

  2. What have we learned from relativistic heavy-ion collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 4. — journal of. April 2003 physics pp. 765–786. What have we learned from relativistic heavy-ion collider? ... What do we hope and expect to learn in .... experimental results and difficult numerical, presumably lattice Monte–Carlo simulation, ... For technical reasons, lattice Monte–Carlo methods are very difficult to.

  3. 600 kV modulator design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.; de Lamare, J.; Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1992-07-01

    Preliminary design for the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) requires a pulse power source to produce a 600 kV, 600 A, 1.4 μs, 0.1% flat top pulse with rise and fall times of approximately 100 ns to power an X-Band klystron with a microperveance of 1.25 at ∼ 100 MW peak RF power. The design goals for the modulator, including those previously listed, are peak modulator pulse power of 340 MW operating at 120 Hz. A three-stage darlington pulse-forming network, which produces a >100 kV, 1.4 μs pulse, is coupled to the klystron load through a 6:1 pulse transformer. Careful consideration of the transformer leakage inductance, klystron capacitance, system layout, and component choice is necessary to produce the very fast rise and fall times at 600 kV operating continuously at 120 Hz

  4. Doubling time measurement by method of digital integration of pulses from a CFU7 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, Guy

    1968-01-01

    The author reports an experimental study which aimed at measuring the doubling time with a CFU7 fission chamber by using an integration method on the Siloette pile with a new core and with a spent core, and at comparing results with those obtained with a specific instrument which receives information from an ionisation chamber. The interest of this method relies on the fact that the fission chamber is insensitive to gamma radiations

  5. Optimization of Experimental Conditions of the Pulsed Current GTAW Parameters for Mechanical Properties of SDSS UNS S32760 Welds Based on the Taguchi Design Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefieh, M.; Shamanian, M.; Saatchi, A.

    2012-09-01

    Taguchi design method with L9 orthogonal array was implemented to optimize the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding parameters for the hardness and the toughness of super duplex stainless steel (SDSS, UNS S32760) welds. In this regard, the hardness and the toughness were considered as performance characteristics. Pulse current, background current, % on time, and pulse frequency were chosen as main parameters. Each parameter was varied at three different levels. As a result of pooled analysis of variance, the pulse current is found to be the most significant factor for both the hardness and the toughness of SDSS welds by percentage contribution of 71.81 for hardness and 78.18 for toughness. The % on time (21.99%) and the background current (17.81%) had also the next most significant effect on the hardness and the toughness, respectively. The optimum conditions within the selected parameter values for hardness were found as the first level of pulse current (100 A), third level of background current (70 A), first level of % on time (40%), and first level of pulse frequency (1 Hz), while they were found as the second level of pulse current (120 A), second level of background current (60 A), second level of % on time (60%), and third level of pulse frequency (5 Hz) for toughness. The Taguchi method was found to be a promising tool to obtain the optimum conditions for such studies. Finally, in order to verify experimental results, confirmation tests were carried out at optimum working conditions. Under these conditions, there were good agreements between the predicted and the experimental results for the both hardness and toughness.

  6. High energy particle colliders: past 20 years, next 20 years and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-01

    Particle colliders for high energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the collider has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size and the cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but its pace of progress has greatly slowed down. In this paper we very briefly review the method and the history of colliders, discuss in detail the developments over the past two decades and the directions of the R and D toward near future colliders which are currently being explored. Finally, we make an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and outline the changes in the paradigm required for the next breakthroughs.

  7. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R.

    1995-01-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies

  8. Colliding with a crunching bubble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freivogel, Ben; Freivogel, Ben; Horowitz, Gary T.; Shenker, Stephen

    2007-03-26

    In the context of eternal inflation we discuss the fate of Lambda = 0 bubbles when they collide with Lambda< 0 crunching bubbles. When the Lambda = 0 bubble is supersymmetric, it is not completely destroyed by collisions. If the domain wall separating the bubbles has higher tension than the BPS bound, it is expelled from the Lambda = 0 bubble and does not alter its long time behavior. If the domain wall saturates the BPS bound, then it stays inside the Lambda = 0 bubble and removes a finite fraction of future infinity. In this case, the crunch singularity is hidden behind the horizon of a stable hyperbolic black hole.

  9. Beam dynamics in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss some basic beam dynamics issues related to obtaining and preserving the luminosity of a next generation linear collider. The beams are extracted from a damping ring and compressed in length by the first bunch compressor. They are then accelerated in a preaccelerator linac up to an energy appropriate for injection into a high gradient linac. In many designs this pre-acceleration is followed by another bunch compression to reach a short bunch. After acceleration in the linac, the bunches are finally focused transversely to a small spot. 27 refs., 1 fig

  10. The proton-antiproton collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, L.

    1988-01-01

    The subject of this lecture is the CERN Proton-Antiproton (panti p) Collider, in which John Adams was intimately involved at the design, development, and construction stages. Its history is traced from the original proposal in 1966, to the first panti p collisions in the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in 1981, and to the present time with drastically improved performance. This project led to the discovery of the intermediate vector boson in 1983 and produced one of the most exciting and productive physics periods in CERN's history. (orig.)

  11. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  12. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel M. [IIT, Chicago

    2015-05-29

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  13. METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF THERMAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE LAYER OF GRANULAR MEDIA WITH ELEMENTS OF PULSED THERMAL NDT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Shokina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the Department of Food Production of Murmansk State Technical University (MSTU was developed a method of producing smoke fuel using infrared energy supply. The method provides a stable temperature pyrolysis of wood fuel is less than 400 ° C. Kinetic of the heating layer of fuel (wooden chips is affected by chip's density and moisture content. The method of calculating of the optimum modes of smoke produce, which is based on a system of differential equations of heat and mass transfer in the IR smoke generator, was previously proposed. The system of equations includes thermal characteristics (TC of the fuel layer (e.g. specific heat, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity. The exact definition of these characteristics affect the accuracy of the experimental calculation of optimal process conditions with use of the developed software. A definition of layer's TC by a method with elements of pulsed thermal NDT. The use of thermal imager is proposed for measuring the temperature of the irritated surface of the porous wooden chip's lawyer.

  14. A quantification method for peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) using gas chromatography (GC) with a non-radioactive pulsed discharge detector (PDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jaffe, Daniel A.; Gao, Xin; McClure, Crystal D.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, we developed a method for continuous PAN measurements by gas chromatography (GC) with a non-radioactive pulsed discharge detector (PDD). Operational parameters were optimized based on the ratio of peak height over baseline noise (P/N ratio). The GC/PDD system was compared with a traditional radioactive electron-capture detector (ECD). In the lab, the method detection limit (MDL) of the new GC/PDD method (9 pptv) was lower than the radioactive GC/ECD method (15 pptv), demonstrating its excellent potential. The MDL of GC/PDD in the field campaign at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO) was 23 pptv, higher than in the lab. This was caused in part by the decreased slope of the calibration curve resulting from the low air pressure level at MBO. However, the MDL level of GC/PDD at MBO is still low enough for accurate PAN measurements, although special attention should be paid to its application at high-elevation sites. Observations of PAN were conducted at MBO in the summer of 2016 with the GC/PDD system, and provided more evidence of the performance of the system. PAN was found to be highly correlated with CO. The promising performance of GC/PDD which does not require a radioactive source makes it a useful approach for accurate PAN measurements in the field.

  15. Single-electron multiplication statistics as a combination of Poissonian pulse height distributions using constraint regression methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballini, J.-P.; Cazes, P.; Turpin, P.-Y.

    1976-01-01

    Analysing the histogram of anode pulse amplitudes allows a discussion of the hypothesis that has been proposed to account for the statistical processes of secondary multiplication in a photomultiplier. In an earlier work, good agreement was obtained between experimental and reconstructed spectra, assuming a first dynode distribution including two Poisson distributions of distinct mean values. This first approximation led to a search for a method which could give the weights of several Poisson distributions of distinct mean values. Three methods have been briefly exposed: classical linear regression, constraint regression (d'Esopo's method), and regression on variables subject to error. The use of these methods gives an approach of the frequency function which represents the dispersion of the punctual mean gain around the whole first dynode mean gain value. Comparison between this function and the one employed in Polya distribution allows the statement that the latter is inadequate to describe the statistical process of secondary multiplication. Numerous spectra obtained with two kinds of photomultiplier working under different physical conditions have been analysed. Then two points are discussed: - Does the frequency function represent the dynode structure and the interdynode collection process. - Is the model (the multiplication process of all dynodes but the first one, is Poissonian) valid whatever the photomultiplier and the utilization conditions. (Auth.)

  16. A new method for obtaining time resolved optical spectra of transients produced by a single pulse of electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, S.; Schmidt, K.H.; Martin, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    The essential features of the kinetic spectroscopic method and the kinetic spectrophotometric method are summarized. It is stated that the new method embodies some of the advantages of both. A diagram of the apparatus is shown. This is essentially a version of a conventional pulse radiolysis experimental arrangement with the modification that the usual monochromator is replaced by a spectrograph equipped with a horizontal and a vertical slit and the usual photomultiplier-amplifier detector is replaced by a streak camera (TRW) incorporating an image converter tube (ICT) and a TV camera interfaced to a 2000 channel Biomation transient recorder. The time resolved absorption spectrum (or emission spectrum) is displayed on the P-11 phosphor of the ICT. This image is focussed on the photoelements of the TV tube. The TV camera scans the image of the spectrum stored on these elements and the output of this scan is stored in the Biomation. This recorder is in turn interfaced to a Sigma 5 computer. Results are presented for several experiments, from which it is concluded that with the present equipment absorbances down to 0.02 can be measured, and a time resolution of 1ns can be achieved. It is stated that with improved equipment it should be possible to extend the time resolution of the method to less than 50 picoseconds. (U.K.)

  17. Kinematics and resolution at future ep colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Klein, M.

    1992-01-01

    Limitations due to resolution and kinematics are discussed of the (Q 2 , x) range accessible with electron-proton colliders after HERA. For the time after HERA one may think of two electron-proton colliders: an asymmetric energy machine and a rather symmetric one. Both colliders are compared here in order to study the influence of the different E l /E p ratios on the accessible kinematic range which is restricted due to angular coverage, finite detector resolution and calibration uncertainties

  18. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  19. Estimates of Fermilab Tevatron collider performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, G.

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a model which has been used to estimate the average luminosity performance of the Tevatron collider. In the model, the average luminosity is related quantitatively to various performance parameters of the Fermilab Tevatron collider complex. The model is useful in allowing estimates to be developed for the improvements in average collider luminosity to be expected from changes in the fundamental performance parameters as a result of upgrades to various parts of the accelerator complex

  20. Particle physics experiments at high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2011-01-01

    Written by one of the detector developers for the International Linear Collider, this is the first textbook for graduate students dedicated to the complexities and the simplicities of high energy collider detectors. It is intended as a specialized reference for a standard course in particle physics, and as a principal text for a special topics course focused on large collider experiments. Equally useful as a general guide for physicists designing big detectors. (orig.)

  1. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds

  2. FUTURE LEPTON COLLIDERS AND LASER ACCELERATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Future high energy colliders along with their physics potential, and relationship to new laser technology are discussed. Experimental approaches and requirements for New Physics exploration are also described

  3. SLAC-Linac-Collider (SLC) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-02-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider Project (SLC) and its features are described in this paper. In times of ever increasing costs for energy the electron storage ring principle is about to reach its practical limit. A new class of colliding beam beam facilities, the Linear Colliders, are getting more and more attractive and affordable at very high center-of-mass energies. The SLC is designed to be a poineer of this new class of colliding beam facilities and at the same time will serve as a valuable tool to explore the high energy physics at the level of 100 GeV in the center-of-mass system

  4. 1995 second modulator-klystron workshop: A modulator-klystron workshop for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This second workshop examined the present state of modulator design and attempted an extrapolation for future electron-positron linear colliders. These colliders are currently viewed as multikilometer-long accelerators consisting of a thousand or more RF sources with 500 to 1,000, or more, pulsed power systems. The workshop opened with two introductory talks that presented the current approaches to designing these linear colliders, the anticipated RF sources, and the design constraints for pulse power. The cost of main AC power is a major economic consideration for a future collider, consequently the workshop investigated efficient modulator designs. Techniques that effectively apply the art of power conversion, from the AC mains to the RF output, and specifically, designs that generate output pulses with very fast rise times as compared to the flattop. There were six sessions that involved one or more presentations based on problems specific to the design and production of thousands of modulator-klystron stations, followed by discussion and debate on the material.

  5. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE 01 -TE 10 mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ((ge) 1 μs) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 μs pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated that two of

  6. On the estimation of subcritical reactivity by the pulsed α-method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulepin, V.S.

    1974-01-01

    A technique for calculating the neutron generation time is considered. It is based on the use of only basic (non-conjugate) conditionally critical reactor equations. The formula is drawn to show the relation between the reactivity coefficient Ksub(eff), damping decrement and neutron generation time. Some transformations result in a conditionally critical equation at Ksub(eff) equal to unit, from which the neutron generation time is found that is necessary to measure subcritical reactivity by the α-method

  7. Method of measuring the current density distribution and emittance of pulsed electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, H.B.

    1979-07-01

    This method of current density measurement employs an array of many Faraday cups, each cup being terminated by an integrating capacitor. The voltages of the capacitors are subsequently displayed on a scope, thus giving the complete current density distribution with one shot. In the case of emittance measurements, a moveable small-diameter aperture is inserted at some distance in front of the cup array. Typical results with a two-cathode, two-energy electron source are presented. (orig.)

  8. A Pulse Wave Velocity Based Method to Assess the Mean Arterial Blood Pressure Limits of Autoregulation in Peripheral Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Tripathi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Constant blood flow despite changes in blood pressure, a phenomenon called autoregulation, has been demonstrated for various organ systems. We hypothesized that by changing hydrostatic pressures in peripheral arteries, we can establish these limits of autoregulation in peripheral arteries based on local pulse wave velocity (PWV.Methods: Electrocardiogram and plethysmograph waveforms were recorded at the left and right index fingers in 18 healthy volunteers. Each subject changed their left arm position, keeping the right arm stationary. Pulse arrival times (PAT at both fingers were measured and used to calculate PWV. We calculated ΔPAT (ΔPWV, the differences between the left and right PATs (PWVs, and compared them to the respective calculated blood pressure at the left index fingertip to derive the limits of autoregulation.Results: ΔPAT decreased and ΔPWV increased exponentially at low blood pressures in the fingertip up to a blood pressure of 70 mmHg, after which changes in ΔPAT and ΔPWV were minimal. The empirically chosen 20 mmHg window (75–95 mmHg was confirmed to be within the autoregulatory limit (slope = 0.097, p = 0.56. ΔPAT and ΔPWV within a 20 mmHg moving window were not significantly different from the respective data points within the control 75–95 mmHg window when the pressure at the fingertip was between 56 and 110 mmHg for ΔPAT and between 57 and 112 mmHg for ΔPWV.Conclusions: Changes in hydrostatic pressure due to changes in arm position significantly affect peripheral arterial stiffness as assessed by ΔPAT and ΔPWV, allowing us to estimate peripheral autoregulation limits based on PWV.

  9. Very large hadron collider (VLHC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    A VLHC informal study group started to come together at Fermilab in the fall of 1995 and at the 1996 Snowmass Study the parameters of this machine took form. The VLHC as now conceived would be a 100 TeV hadron collider. It would use the Fermilab Main Injector (now nearing completion) to inject protons at 150 GeV into a new 3 TeV Booster and then into a superconducting pp collider ring producing 100 TeV c.m. interactions. A luminosity of {approximately}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned. Our plans were presented to the Subpanel on the Planning for the Future of US High- Energy Physics (the successor to the Drell committee) and in February 1998 their report stated ``The Subpanel recommends an expanded program of R&D on cost reduction strategies, enabling technologies, and accelerator physics issues for a VLHC. These efforts should be coordinated across laboratory and university groups with the aim of identifying design concepts for an economically and technically viable facility`` The coordination has been started with the inclusion of physicists from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Cornell University. Clearly, this collaboration must expanded internationally as well as nationally. The phrase ``economically and technically viable facility`` presents the real challenge.

  10. Stochastic cooling in muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10 30 cm -2 s -1 as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to ∼10 3 for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW

  11. Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Lance

    2006-01-01

    In the coming decade, the search for the Higgs boson, and for new particles representing physics beyond the Standard Model, will be carried out by colliding protons at the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. A collision of two protons, each of which is made out of quarks and gluons, is inherently messy. Feynman likened it to smashing two Swiss watches together to figure out how they work. In recent decades, we have learned better how the Swiss watches work, using the theory of quark-gluon interactions, quantum chromodynamics. Armed with this knowledge, we can better predict the results of collisions at the Tevatron and the LHC, to see whether the Standard Model holds up or fails, or whether new particles are in the data. But a major bottleneck is simply in adding up Feynman diagrams, for which the rules are well known, yet there can be thousands of extremely complicated diagrams. In fact, the sum of all diagrams is often much simpler than the typical one, suggesting hidden symmetries and better ways to compute. In the past two years, spinoffs from a new theory, 'twistor string theory', have led to very efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams for making such predictions, as I will explain.

  12. Flavorful leptoquarks at hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Gudrun; Loose, Dennis; Nišandžić, Ivan

    2018-04-01

    B -physics data and flavor symmetries suggest that leptoquarks can have masses as low as a few O (TeV ) , predominantly decay to third generation quarks, and highlight p p →b μ μ signatures from single production and p p →b b μ μ from pair production. Abandoning flavor symmetries could allow for inverted quark hierarchies and cause sizable p p →j μ μ and j j μ μ cross sections, induced by second generation couplings. Final states with leptons other than muons including lepton flavor violation (LFV) ones can also arise. The corresponding couplings can also be probed by precision studies of the B →(Xs,K*,ϕ )e e distribution and LFV searches in B -decays. We demonstrate sensitivity in single leptoquark production for the large hadron collider (LHC) and extrapolate to the high luminosity LHC. Exploration of the bulk of the parameter space requires a hadron collider beyond the reach of the LHC, with b -identification capabilities.

  13. The Collider dipole magnet program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, R.W.; Bailey, R.; Bever, D.; Bogart, L.; Gigg, G.; Packer, M.; Page, L.; Stranberg, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider will consist of more large superconducting magnets than have been built to date. Over 12,000 superconducting magnets are required and more than 8,000 will be Collider dipoles. The dipole magnet program is on the critical path of the project and requires the optimized utilization of the Nation's resources - National Laboratories, Universities and Industry. General Dynamics and Westinghouse Electric Corporation have been chosen as the Leader and Follower companies for the design of producible magnets and the manufacturing of the SSC dipoles. Industry has the necessary experience, skills and facilities required to produce reliable and cost effective dipole magnets. At peak production, 10 CDMs per day, very large quantities (nearly 130 metric tonnes/day) of materials will have to be procured from companies nationwide and fabricated into defect-free magnets. A key element of the SSCL's strategy to produce the most efficient CDM program is to employ the Leader-Follower approach, with the Leader transferring technology from the laboratories to the Leader's facility, fully integrating the Follower in the producibility and tooling/factory design efforts, and assisting the Follower in magnet qualification tests. General Dynamics is ready to help build America's most powerful research tool. Management is in place, the facilities are ready for activation and resources are available for immediate assignment

  14. Development of a microchip-pulsed electrochemical method for rapid determination of L-DOPA and tyrosine in Mucuna pruriens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinchun; Chen, Zuanguang; Yang, Fan; Pan, Jianbin; Li, Yinbao

    2013-05-01

    L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is a well-recognized therapeutic compound to Parkinson's disease. Tyrosine is a precursor for the biosynthesis of L-DOPA, both of which are widely found in traditional medicinal material, Mucuna pruriens. In this paper, we described a validated novel analytical method based on microchip capillary electrophoresis with pulsed electrochemical detection for the simultaneous measurement of L-DOPA and tyrosine in M. pruriens. This protocol adopted end-channel amperometric detection using platinum disk electrode on a homemade glass/polydimethylsiloxane electrophoresis microchip. The background buffer consisted of 10 mM borate (pH 9.5) and 0.02 mM cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, which can produce an effective resolution for the two analytes. In the optimal condition, sufficient electrophoretic separation and sensitive detection for the target analytes can be realized within 60 s. Both tyrosine and L-DOPA yielded linear response in the concentration range of 5.0-400 μM (R(2) > 0.99), and the LOD were 0.79 and 1.1 μM, respectively. The accuracy and precision of the established method were favorable. The present method shows several merits such as facile apparatus, high speed, low cost and minimal pollution, and provides a means for the pharmacologically active ingredients assay in M. pruriens. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Multimoded rf delay line distribution system for the Next Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Tantawi

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The delay line distribution system is an alternative to conventional pulse compression, which enhances the peak power of rf sources while matching the long pulse of those sources to the shorter filling time of accelerator structures. We present an implementation of this scheme that combines pairs of parallel delay lines of the system into single lines. The power of several sources is combined into a single waveguide delay line using a multimode launcher. The output mode of the launcher is determined by the phase coding of the input signals. The combined power is extracted from the delay line using mode-selective extractors, each of which extracts a single mode. Hence, the phase coding of the sources controls the output port of the combined power. The power is then fed to the local accelerator structures. We present a detailed design of such a system, including several implementation methods for the launchers, extractors, and ancillary high power rf components. The system is designed so that it can handle the 600 MW peak power required by the Next Linear Collider design while maintaining high efficiency.

  16. Application of the Monte Carlo method in calculation of energy-time distribution from a pulsed photon source in homogeneous air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, R.D.; Vojvodic, V.I.; Orlic, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    The stochastic nature of photon interactions with matter and the characteristics of photon transport through real materials, are very well suited for applications of the Monte Carlo method in calculations of the energy-space distribution of photons. Starting from general principles of the Monte Carlo method, physical-mathematical model of photon transport from a pulsed source is given for the homogeneous air environment. Based on that model, a computer program is written which is applied in calculations of scattered photons delay spectra and changes of the photon energy spectrum. Obtained results provide the estimation of the timespace function of the electromagnetic field generated by photon from a pulsed source. (author)

  17. Measuring and calculational complex on the base of multi-detector system and the kinetics parametrs by the method of neutron pulsed source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselova, G.P.; Grachev, A.V.; Ivanova, N.K.

    1985-01-01

    Description of hardware of a measuring and calculation complex (MCC) designed for measuring neutron-physical characteristics of a reactor by the neutron pulsed method simultaneously from 8 detectors and the MERA-60 computer software used by MCC for measuring dependences of neutron generation and life time on the reactivity change is presented. The complex serviceability is tested at one of the PEI physical stands. MCC operation during a year has demonstrated its high reliability and a possibility of being used both for pulsed and other methods for investigating physical stands without introduction of supplementary equipment

  18. [Orthogonal design method to optimize rehabilitation prescription of pulsed electric field at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points for spinal cord injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifeng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Lin; Liu, Yanyan; Sun, Xianyue; Li, Lingyan; Hou, Jing

    2015-01-01

    By using orthogonal design method to optimnize prescription of pulsed electric field at Jiaji (EX- B 2) points for spinal cord injury (SCI). Fifty six patients of SCI were selected, in which 36 cases were divided into orthogonal design trial and 20 cases were into clinical verification. With 36 patients who received orthogonal design trial, Frankel grading scale was used as observation index to screen optimal prescription of pulsed electric field. Pulse frequency (factor A) included low frequency (factor A(I), 10(2) Hz). moderate frequency (factor A(II), 10(4) Hz) and high frequency (factor A(III), 10(3) Hz); pulse amplitude (factor B) included 0-30 V (factor B ), 0-60 V (factor B(II)) and 0-90 V (factor B(III)); pulse width (factor C) included 0.1 ms (factor C(I)). 0.6 ms (factor C(II)) and 0.9 ms (factor C(III)); acupuncture time (factor D) included one month (DI), three months (D(II)) and five months (D(III)). Twenty patients were used for clinical efficacy observation and the effects of screened optimal pre scription of pulsed electric field at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points combined with regular rehabilitation training on spasm se- verity, score of sensory and motor functions, Barthel index and Frankel score were observed. (1) As results of orthogonal design trial, the optimal prescription was A(III) B(III), C(I), D(III), which were high frequency (10(3) Hz), 0-90 V of pulse amplitude, 0.4 ms of pulse width and 5 months of treatment time. (2) As results of 20 patient clinical verification, Ashworth score, tendon reflex and clonus were all significantly improved (Ppulsed electric field at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points for spinal cord injury is high frequency (10& Hz), 0-90 V of pulse amplitude, 0.4 ms of pulse width and 5 months of treatment time. The optimal prescription of pulsed electric field at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points combined with regular rehabilitation could obviously improve spasm severity, enhance senso- ry and motor functions, and ameliorate activity of daily life and

  19. Multiple coil pulsed magnetic resonance method for measuring cold SSC dipole magnet field quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.G.; Moore, J.M.; Wong, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The operating principles and system architecture for a method to measure the magnetic field multipole expansion coefficients are described in the context of the needs of SSC dipole magnets. The operation of an 8-coil prototype system is discussed. Several of the most important technological issues that influence the design are identified and the basis of their resolution is explained. The new features of a 32-coil system presently under construction are described, along with estimates of its requirements for measurement time and data storage capacity

  20. Recent development of radioanalytical method at IBR-2 pulsed fast reactor of the JINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarov, V.M.; Pavlov, S.S.; Herrera, E.

    1991-01-01

    The experience of the use of radioanalytical methods, including NAA at IBR-2 pilsed fast reactor of the JINR, is discussed. Physical and technical parameters of the experimental installation designed for NAA and radiography are given. The detailed examples of the application of resonance neutrons to the control of the environment in the geology of oil, in multi-element analysis of food products and superpure materials as well as in nuclear physics are reviewed. The works on the application of the neutron isotopes sources for express determination of nitrogen content in original and synthetic materials are introduced. 7 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  1. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such as Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air, and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of metal into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tailpipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  2. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] and LHC [Large Hadron Collider] experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs

  3. Colliding bodies optimization extensions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kaveh, A

    2015-01-01

    This book presents and applies a novel efficient meta-heuristic optimization algorithm called Colliding Bodies Optimization (CBO) for various optimization problems. The first part of the book introduces the concepts and methods involved, while the second is devoted to the applications. Though optimal design of structures is the main topic, two chapters on optimal analysis and applications in constructional management are also included.  This algorithm is based on one-dimensional collisions between bodies, with each agent solution being considered as an object or body with mass. After a collision of two moving bodies with specified masses and velocities, these bodies again separate, with new velocities. This collision causes the agents to move toward better positions in the search space.  The main algorithm (CBO) is internally parameter independent, setting it apart from previously developed meta-heuristics. This algorithm is enhanced (ECBO) for more efficient applications in the optimal design of structures...

  4. QCD and Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Sapeta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    We review various aspects of jet physics in the context of hadron colliders. We start by discussing the definitions and properties of jets and recent development in this area. We then consider the question of factorization for processes with jets, in particular for cases in which jets are produced in special configurations, like for example in the region of forward rapidities. We review numerous perturbative methods for calculating predictions for jet processes, including the fixed-order calculations as well as various matching and merging techniques. We also discuss the questions related to non-perturbative effects and the role they play in precision jet studies. We describe the status of calculations for processes with jet vetoes and we also elaborate on production of jets in forward direction. Throughout the article, we present selected comparisons between state-of-the-art theoretical predictions and the data from the LHC.

  5. Sfermion Precision Measurements at a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Freitas, A.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Bartl, A.; Blair, G.A.; Blochinger, C.; Boos, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Datta, A.; Djouadi, A.; Fraas, H.; Guasch, J.; Hesselbach, S.; Hidaka, K.; Hollik, W.; Kernreiter, T.; Maniatis, M.; von Manteuffel, A.; Martyn, H.U.; Miller, D.J.; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Muhlleitner, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Kluge, Hannelies; Porod, W.; Sola, J.; Sopczak, A.; Stahl, A.; Weber, M.M.; Zerwas, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    At future e+- e- linear colliders, the event rates and clean signals of scalar fermion production - in particular for the scalar leptons - allow very precise measurements of their masses and couplings and the determination of their quantum numbers. Various methods are proposed for extracting these parameters from the data at the sfermion thresholds and in the continuum. At the same time, NLO radiative corrections and non-zero width effects have been calculated in order to match the experimental accuracy. The substantial mixing expected for the third generation sfermions opens up additional opportunities. Techniques are presented for determining potential CP-violating phases and for extracting tan(beta) from the stau sector, in particular at high values. The consequences of possible large mass differences in the stop and sbottom system are explored in dedicated analyses.

  6. Transportation studies: 40-MM collider dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daly, E.

    1992-01-01

    Several fully functional 40-mm Collider Dipole Magnets (CDM) were instrumented with accelerometers to monitor shock and vibration loads during transport. The magnets were measured with optical tooling telescopes before and after transport. Changes in mechanical alignment due to shipping and handling were determined. The mechanical stability of the cryogen lines were checked using the same method. Field quality and dipole angle were measured warm before and after transport to determine changes in these parameters. Power spectra were calculated for accelerometers located on the cold mass, vacuum vessel, and trailer bed. Where available, plots of field quality and dipole roll both before and after were created. Shipping loads measured were largest in the vertical direction, where most of the structural deformation of the magnet was evident. It was not clear that magnetic performance was affected by the shipping and handling environment

  7. Sfermion precision measurements at a linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, A.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Bartl, A.; Blair, G.; Bloechinger, C.; Boos, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Datta, A.; Djouadi, A.; Fraas, H.; Guasch, J.; Hesselbach, S.; Hidaka, K.; Hollik, W.; Kernreiter, T.; Maniatis, M.; Manteuffel, A. von; Martyn, H.-U.; Miller, D.J.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Muehlleitner, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Nowak, H.; Porod, W.; Sola, J.; Sopczak, A.; Stahl, A.; Weber, M.M.; Zerwas, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    At prospective e ± e - linear colliders, the large cross-sections and clean signals of scalar fermion production--in particular for the scalar leptons - allow very precise measurements of their masses and couplings and the determination of their quantum numbers. Various methods are proposed for extracting these parameters from the data at the sfermion thresholds and in the continuum. At the same time, NLO radiative corrections and non-zero width effects have been calculated in order to match the experimental accuracy. The substantial mixing expected in the third generation opens up additional opportunities. Techniques are presented for determining potential CP-violating phases and for extracting tan β from the stau sector, in particular at high values. The consequences of possible large mass differences in the stop and sbottom system are explored in dedicated analyses

  8. Sfermion precision measurements at a linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, A.

    2003-01-01

    At future e + e - linear colliders, the event rates and clean signals of scalar fermion production--in particular for the scalar leptons--allow very precise measurements of their masses and couplings and the determination of their quantum numbers. Various methods are proposed for extracting these parameters from the data at the sfermion thresholds and in the continuum. At the same time, NLO radiative corrections and non-zero width effects have been calculated in order to match the experimental accuracy. The substantial mixing expected for the third generation sfermions opens up additional opportunities. Techniques are presented for determining potential CP-violating phases and for extracting tan β from the stau sector, in particular at high values. The consequences of possible large mass differences in the stop and sbottom system are explored in dedicated analyses

  9. Tracking study of hadron collider boosters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, S.; Bourianoff, G.; Huang, Y.; Mahale, N.

    1992-07-01

    A simulation code SIMPSONS (previously called 6D-TEASE T) of single- and multi-particle tracking has been developed for proton synchrotrons. The 6D phase space coordinates are calculated each time step including acceleration with an arbitrary ramping curve by integration of the rf phase. Space-charge effects are modelled by means of the Particle In Cell (PIC) method. We observed the transverse emittance growth around the injection energy of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) with and without second harmonic rf cavities which reduce peak line density. We also employed the code to see the possible transverse emittance deterioration around the transition energy in the Medium Energy Booster (MEB) and to estimate the emittance dilution due to an injection error of the MEB.

  10. A proof of the conformal collider bounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, Diego M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, Postbus 94485, 1090 GL, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Li, Daliang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Meltzer, David [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Poland, David [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Rejon-Barrera, Fernando [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, Postbus 94485, 1090 GL, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-06-20

    In this paper, we prove that the “conformal collider bounds” originally proposed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2008/05/012 hold for any unitary parity-preserving conformal field theory (CFT) with a unique stress tensor in dimensions d≥3. In particular this implies that the ratio of central charges for a unitary 4d CFT lies in the interval (31/18)≥(a/c)≥(1/3). For superconformal theories this is further reduced to (3/2)≥(a/c)≥(1/2). The proof relies only on CFT first principles — in particular, bootstrap methods — and thus constitutes the first complete field theory proof of these bounds. We further elaborate on similar bounds for non-conserved currents and relate them to results obtained recently from deep inelastic scattering.

  11. On the evaluation of the correction factor μ (rho', tau') for the periodic pulse method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The inconveniences associated with the purely numerical approach we have chosen to solve some of the problems which arise in connection with the source-pulser method are twofold. On the one hand, there is the trouble of calculating the tables for μ, requiring several nights of computer time. On the other hand, apart from some simple limiting values as μ = 1 for tau' = 0 or 1, μ = 1/0.5 + /0.5 - tau'/ for rho' → 0 (and 0 > 1, no appropriate analytical form for the correction factor μ of sufficient precision is known for the moment. This drawback, we hope, is partly removed by a tabulation which should cover the whole region of practical interest. The computer programs for both the evaluation of μ and the Monte Carlo simulation are available upon request

  12. A method for ultra-short pulse-shape measurements using far infrared coherent radiation from an undulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, G.; Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Yurkov, M.V.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a method for non-destructive measurements of the longitudinal profile of sub-picosecond electron bunches for X-ray free electron lasers. The method is based on the detection of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) produced by a bunch passing through an undulator. Coherent radiation energy within a central cone turns out to be proportional, per pulse, to the square modulus of the bunch form-factor at the resonant frequency of the fundamental harmonic. An attractive feature of the proposed technique is the absence of any apparent limitation which would distort measurements. Indeed, the radiation process takes place in vacuum and is described by analytical formulae. CSR propagates to the detector placed in vacuum. Since CSR energy is in the range up to a fraction of mJ, a simple bolometer is used to measure the energy with a high accuracy. The proposed technique is very sensitive and it is capable of probing the electron bunches with a resolution down to a few microns

  13. Effect of oxygen vacancy induced by pulsed magnetic field on the room-temperature ferromagnetic Ni-doped ZnO synthesized by hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Min [Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 149 Yanchang Road, 200072 Shanghai (China); Li, Ying, E-mail: liying62@shu.edu.cn [Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 149 Yanchang Road, 200072 Shanghai (China); Tariq, Muhammad; Hu, Yemin; Li, Wenxian; Zhu, Mingyuan; Jin, Hongmin [Shanghai University, Laboratory for Microstructures, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 149 Yanchang Road, 200072 Shanghai (China); Li, Yibing [School of Chemistry, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052 (Australia)

    2016-08-05

    Room temperature ferromagnetic 2% Ni doped ZnO rods were synthesized by high pulsed magnetic field-assisted hydrothermal method. A detailed study on the effect of high pulsed magnetic field on morphology, structural and magnetic properties of the ZnO rods has been carried out systematically by varying the intensity of field from 0 to 4 T. X-ray diffraction, Energy-dispersive spectroscopy measurements, and Raman spectra analysis suggest that all the samples have hexagonal wurtzite structure without detectable impurity. Field emission scanning electron microscopy images indicate that the particle size of samples decrease with increasing intensity of field. High resolution transmission electron microscopy observation ensures that the Ni ions addition do not change the wurtzite host matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the incorporation of Ni elements as divalent state and the dominant presence of oxygen vacancies in samples fabricated under 4 T pulsed magnetic field. Hysteresis loops demonstrate that the saturation magnetization increased regularly with the mounting magnetic field. On the framework of bound magnetic polaron model, the rising content of oxygen vacancies, as donor defect, lead to the stronger ferromagnetism in samples with pulsed magnetic field. Our findings provide a new insight for tuning the defect density by precisely controlling the intensity of field in order to get the desired magnetic behavior at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the magnetization versus magnetic field curves for 2%Ni doped ZnO as prepared with 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 T pulsed magnetic field at 290 K. For 0 T sample, no ferromagnetic response is observed. But all the samples synthesized with field were well-defined hysteresis loops. The saturation magnetization estimated from the hysteresis loop come out to be ∼0.0024, 0.0023, 0.0036 and 0.0061 emu/g for 1 T, 2 T, 3 T and 4 T samples, respectively. As shown in the curves, the room

  14. New method of analysis wave processes in pulse generators based on lines with distributed parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sleptsov, S N; Sleptsov, A N [NSC ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2001-07-01

    Structure and superconductivity of thick polycrystalline niobium-carbon coatings (Nb{sub 1-x}C{sub x}, O {<=} x < 0.3) deposited from low-energy self-ion-atomic Nb- and C- fluxes onto substrates with the temperature range 500...650 K were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, TEM of oxidic replicas and resistivity measurement method at low temperature. It is founded, that Nb{sub 1-x}C{sub x} coatings with carbon concentration range 9...15 at.% have an unusual high superconducting transition temperature T{sub C} approx 12 K. Dependency of critical current density of these coatings on temperature is not monotonous and have a sharp bend near T{sub C} approx approx 9.5 K Structural analysis of these coatings has revealed they have a quasi-ternary phase composition consisting of Nb(b.c.c.), sub-carbide Nb{sub 2}C(c.p.h.) and metastable carbide 'Nbc{sub x}' with f.c.c. structure. The results obtained are discussed from a point of view of 'NbC{sub x}' phase forming at Nb and Nb{sub 2}C phases interface. It is also shown, that Nb{sub 1-x}C{sub x} coatings with carbon concentration less than 5 at.% revealed supersaturated solid solution and have T{sub C} approx approx 9.5 K. Kinetics of diffusive decomposition of niobium-carbon coatings during isothermal annealing was also investigated.

  15. Polarization Effects at a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-01-01

    For Muon Colliders, Polarization will be a useful tool if high polarization is achievable with little luminosity loss. Formulation and effects of beam polarization and luminosity including polarization effects in Higgs resonance studies are discussed for improving precision measurements and Higgs resonance ''discovery'' capability e.g. at the First Muon Collider (FMC)

  16. Higgs and SUSY searches at future colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... searches at future colliders, particularly comparing and contrasting the capabilities of LHC and next linear collider (NLC), including the aspects of Higgs searches in supersymmetric theories. I will also discuss how the search and study of sparticles other than the Higgs can be used to give information about the parameters ...

  17. Physicist pins hopes on particle collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Physicist pins hopes on particle collider By Deseret Morning News Published: Monday, Dec. 31, 27 12:4 a.m. MST FONT Scott Thomas, a 187 State University graduate, is working at the frontiers of science. The theoretical physicist is crafting ways to extract fundamental secrets that seem certain to be uncovered by the Large Hadron Collider.

  18. Technical challenge of future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himel, T.

    1986-05-01

    The next generation of high energy e + e - colliders is likely to be built with colliding linear accelerators. A lot of research and development is needed before such a machine can be practically built. Some of the problems and recent progress made toward their solution are described here. Quantum corrections to beamstrahlung, the production of low emittance beams and strong focusing techniques are covered

  19. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We examine, in a model independent way, the sensitivity of a linear collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to a pair of gauge bosons, including the possibility of. CP violation. We construct several observables that probe the various possible anomalous couplings. For an intermediate mass Higgs, a collider ...

  20. Last magnet in place for colossal collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "Workers have installed the last magnet for the world's mew highest-energy particle smasher, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The installation marks an important milestone; however, researchers still may not get the collider completed in time to start it up in November as planned." (1 page)