WorldWideScience

Sample records for colliding beam physics

  1. Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    INSTR17, the International Conference on Instrumentation for Colliding Beam Physics, will be held in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia, on 27 February – 4 March, 2017. The conference covers novel methods of particle detection used in various experiments at particle accelerators as well as in astrophysics. It is organized in close relationship with the Vienna Conference on Instrumentation (last held in 2016) and the Pisa Meeting on Advanced Detectors (last held in 2015). The deadline for registration and abstract submission is 15 January. For more details visit the conference website instr17.inp.nsk.su. Will be published in: JINST

  2. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  3. Colliding beam physics at Fermilab: detector considerations, general topics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.K. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the Colliding Beams Experiment Department at Fermilab was to bring about collisions of the stored beams in the energy Doubler/Saver and Main Ring, and construct experimental areas with appropriate detectors. To explore the feasibility of using the Main Ring as a storage device, several studies were carried out to investigate beam growth, loss, and the backgrounds in detectors at possible intersection regions. This range of developments constituted the major topics at the 1977 Summer Study reported here. Emphasis in part two is on detector considerations and general topics. 22 papers from this part are included in the data base. (GHT)

  4. Characterizing new physics with polarized beams at high-energy hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuks, Benjamin [Theory Division, Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien/Département Recherches Subatomiques,Université de Strasbourg/CNRS-IN2P3, 23 rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Proudom, Josselin [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie,Université Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, 53 avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France); Rojo, Juan [Theory Division, Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Schienbein, Ingo [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie,Université Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, 53 avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble (France)

    2014-05-12

    The TeV energy region is currently being explored by both the ATLAS and CMS experiments of the Large Hadron Collider and phenomena beyond the Standard Model are extensively searched for. Large fractions of the parameter space of many models have already been excluded, and the ranges covered by the searches will certainly be increased by the upcoming energy and luminosity upgrades. If new physics has to be discovered in the forthcoming years, the ultimate goal of the high-energy physics program will consist of fully characterizing the newly-discovered degrees of freedom in terms of properties such as their masses, spins and couplings. The scope of this paper is to show how the availability of polarized beams at high-energy proton-proton colliders could yield a unique discriminating power between different beyond the Standard Model scenarios. We first discuss in a model-independent way how this discriminating power arises from the differences between polarized and unpolarized parton distribution functions. We then demonstrate how polarized beams allow one not only to disentangle different production mechanisms giving the same final-state signature, but also to obtain information on the parameters of the hypothetical new physics sector of the theory. This is illustrated in the case of a particular class of scenarios leading to monotop production. We consider three specific models that could produce a monotop signature in unpolarized proton collisions, and show how they could be distinguished by means of single- and double-spin asymmetries in polarized collisions. Our results are presented for both the Large Hadron Collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of 14 TeV and a recently proposed Future Circular Collider assumed to collide protons at a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV.

  5. The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Raja et al.

    2001-08-08

    The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

  6. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  7. Transverse mode coupling instability of colliding beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. White

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In high brightness circular colliders, coherent and incoherent beam dynamics are dominated by beam-beam interactions. It is generally assumed that the incoherent tune spread introduced by the beam-beam interactions is sufficiently large to cure any instabilities originating from impedance. However, as the two counterrotating beams interact they can give rise to coherent dipole modes and therefore modify the coherent beam dynamics and stability conditions. In this case, coherent beam-beam effects and impedance cannot be treated independently and their interplay should be taken into account in any realistic attempt to study the beam stability of colliding beams. Due to the complexity of these physics processes, numerical simulations become an important tool for the analysis of this system. Two approaches are proposed in this paper: a fully self-consistent multiparticle tracking including particle-in-cell Poisson solver for the beam-beam interactions and a linearized model taking into account finite bunch length effects. To ensure the validity of the results a detailed benchmarking of these models was performed. It will be shown that under certain conditions coherent beam-beam dipole modes can couple with higher order headtail modes and lead to strong instabilities with characteristics similar to the classical transverse mode coupling instability originating from impedance alone. Possible cures for this instability are explored both for single bunch and multibunch interactions. Simulation results and experimental evidences of the existence of this instability at the LHC will be presented for the specific case of offset collisions.

  8. Accelerator physics at the Tevatron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the developments in accelerator physics and technology implemented at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, the world’s most powerful accelerator for almost twenty years prior to the completion of the Large Hadron Collider. The book covers the history of collider operation and upgrades, novel arrangements of beam optics and methods of orbit control, antiproton production and cooling, beam instabilities and feedback systems, halo collimation, and advanced beam instrumentation. The topics discussed show the complexity and breadth of the issues associated with modern hadron accelerators, while providing a systematic approach needed in the design and construction of next generation colliders. This book is a valuable resource for researchers in high energy physics and can serve as an introduction for students studying the beam physics of colliders.

  9. Beam loss mechanisms in relativistic heavy-ion colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, Roderik; Gilardoni, S; Wallén, E

    2009-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the largest particle accelerator ever built, is presently under commissioning at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). It will collide beams of protons, and later Pb82+ ions, at ultrarelativistic energies. Because of its unprecedented energy, the operation of the LHC with heavy ions will present beam physics challenges not encountered in previous colliders. Beam loss processes that are harmless in the presently largest operational heavy-ion collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory, risk to cause quenches of superconducting magnets in the LHC. Interactions between colliding beams of ultrarelativistic heavy ions, or between beam ions and collimators, give rise to nuclear fragmentation. The resulting isotopes could have a charge-to-mass ratio different from the main beam and therefore follow dispersive orbits until they are lost. Depending on the machine conditions and the ion species, these losses could occur in loca...

  10. Topics in Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    It is an exciting time for high energy physics. Several experiments are currently exploring uncharted terrain; the next generation of colliders will begin operation in the coming decade. These experiments will together help us understand some of the most puzzling issues in particle physics: the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of flavor physics. It is clear that the primary goal of theoretical particle physics in the near future is to support and guide this experimental program. These tasks can be accomplished in two ways: by developing experimental signatures for new models which address outstanding problems, and by improving Standard Model predictions for precision observables. We present here several results which advance both of these goals. We begin with a study of non-commutative field theories. It has been suggested that TeV-scale non-commutativity could explain the origin of CP violation in the SM. We identify several distinct signatures of non-commutativity in high energy processes. We also demonstrate the one-loop quantum consistency of a simple spontaneously broken non-commutative U(1) theory; this result is an important preface to any attempt to embed the SM within a non-commutative framework. We then investigate the phenomenology of extra-dimensional theories, which have been suggested recently as solutions to the hierarchy problem of particle physics. We first examine the implications of allowing SM fields to propagate in the full five-dimensional spacetime of the Randall-Sundrum model, which solves the hierarchy problem via an exponential ''warping'' of the Planck scale induced by a five-dimensional anti de-Sitter geometry. In an alternative extra-dimensional theory, in which all SM fields are permitted to propagate in flat extra dimensions, we show that properties of the Higgs boson are significantly modified. Finally, we discuss the next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections to the dilepton

  11. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  12. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  13. Physics at Hadronic Colliders course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Present and future hadron colliders play an important role in the investigation of fundamental questions of particle physics. After an introductory lecture, tests of the Standard Model and measurements of its parameters (like the mass of the top quark) at hadron colliders are presented. In addition, it will be discussed how the Higgs boson can be searched for at hadron colliders and how "New Physics", i.e. physics beyond the Standard Model, can be explored. Results are presented from the currently ongoing run at the Tevatron proton antiproton collider at the US research lab Fermilab. In addition, the rich physics potential of the experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is discussed. Note: Prerequisite Knowledge: - The Standard Model (Lecture by A. Pich) - Beyond The Standard Model (Lecture by E. Kiritsis)

  14. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  15. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  16. Self colliding beams ('migma') and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Maglic, Bogdan C; Mazarakis, M; Miller, R A; Nering, J; Powell, C; Treglio, J

    1975-01-01

    While much of the early work on colliding beams was done in the US, the lead on the development of this technique is now held by Europe. The most spectacular being the only colliding of nuclei in the intersecting storage rings at CERN. The idea of using colliding beams for fusion is nearly as old as is the interest in fusion as a source of power, but the problems of low reaction rate and high Coulomb scattering initially seemed insurmountable. The authors describe recent work done at the Fusion Energy Corporation which attempts to overcome these problems. (9 refs).

  17. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  18. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  19. Time average neutralized migma: A colliding beam/plasma hybrid physical state as aneutronic energy source — A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglich, Bogdan C.

    1988-08-01

    A D + beam of kinetic energy Ti = 0.7 MeV was stored in a "simple mirror" magnetic field as self-colliding orbits or migma and neutralized by ambient, oscillating electrons whose bounce frequencies were externally controlled. Space charge density was exceeded by an order of magnitude without instabilities. Three nondestructive diagnostic methods allowed measurements of ion orbit distribution, ion storage times, ion energy distribution, nuclear reaction rate, and reaction product spectrum. Migma formed a disc 20 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm thick. Its ion density was sharply peaked in the center; the ion-to-electron temperature ratio was TiTe ˜ 10 3; ion-electron temperature equilibrium was never reached. The volume average and central D + density were n = 3.2 × 10 9 cm -3 and nc = 3 × 10 10 cm -3 respectively, compared to the space charge limit density nsc = 4 × 10 8 cm -3. The energy confinement time was τc = 20-30 s, limited by the change exchange reactions with the residual gas in the vacuum (5 × 10 -9 Torr). The ion energy loss rate was 1.4 keV/s. None of the instabilities that were observed in mirrors at several orders of magnitude lower density occurred. The proton energy spectrum for dd + d → T + p + 4 MeV shows that dd collided at an average crossing angle of 160°. Evidence for exponential density buildup has also been observed. Relative to Migma III results and measured in terms of the product of ion energy E, density n, and confinement time τ, device performance was improved by a factor of 500. Using the central fast ion density, we obtained the triple product: Tnτ ≅ 4 × 10 14 keV s cm -3, which is greater than that of the best fusion devices. The luminosity (collision rate per unit cross section) was ˜ 10 29 cm -2s -1, with o.7 A ion current through the migma center. The stabilizing features of migma are: (1) large Larmor radius; (2) small canonical angular momentum; (3) short axial length z (disc shape); (4) nonadiabatic motions in r and z

  20. B physics at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    This paper discusses the physics opportunity and challenges for doing high precision B physics experiments at hadron colliders. It describes how these challenges have been addressed by the two currently operating experiments, CDF and D0, and how they are addressed by three experiments, ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb, at the LHC.

  1. Beam Dynamics Challenges for Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The luminosity of hadron colliders rises with the beam intensity, until some limit is encountered, mostly due to head-on and long-range beam-beam interaction, due to electron cloud, or due to conventional impedance sources. Also beam losses caused by various mechanisms may affect the performance. The limitations can be alleviated, if not overcome, by a proper choice of beam parameters and by dedicated compensation schemes. Examples include alternating crossing at several interaction points, electromagnetic wires, super-bunches, electron lenses, clearing electrodes, and nonlinear collimation. I discuss such mitigating measures and related research efforts, with special emphasis on the LHC and its upgrade.

  2. Prospects for Multi-Tev Two-Beam Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, Ronald D

    2002-08-12

    Recent work at CERN and SLAC has opened the possibility of the development of concrete designs for electron positron linear colliders that have a center of mass energy substantially above 1 TeV [1,2]. These designs are based on high gradient, normal conducting acceleration with the power provided by an auxiliary beam that is efficiently accelerated in a fully loaded, low frequency linac. This type of power source offers a flexibility to develop linear collider designs that have a wide range of parameters. In particular, the choice of frequency can be made without regard to the availability of high power RF sources, at least up to about 30 GHz. This paper explores possible linear collider designs taking into account limits on acceleration gradient and beam-beam effects. The study shows that electron positron linear colliders have an energy reach far in excess of 1 TeV. In particular we show that an X-band linear collider powered with conventional sources might be upgraded using two-beam techniques to an energy far above 1 TeV. Thus, the linear collider offers a platform for continued exploration at the energy frontier of High Energy Physics.

  3. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  4. The charged beam dumps for the international linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R; Broome, T; Densham, C; Vincke, H

    2006-01-01

    The baseline configuration of the International Linear Collider requires 2 beam dumps per interaction region, each rated to 18MW of beam power, together with additional beam dumps for tuning purposes and machine protection. The baseline design uses high pressure moving water dumps, first developed for the SLC and used in the TESLA design, although a gas based dump is also being considered. In this paper we discuss the progress made by the international community on both physics and engineering studies for the beam dumps.

  5. Physics at the linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Baer, H.; Battaglia, M.; Belanger, G.; Fujii, K.; Kalinowski, J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kiyo, Y.; Olive, K.; Simon, F.; Uwer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Zerwas, P. M.; Arbey, A.; Asano, M.; Bagger, J.; Bechtle, P.; Bharucha, A.; Brau, J.; Brümmer, F.; Choi, S. Y.; Denner, A.; Desch, K.; Dittmaier, S.; Ellwanger, U.; Englert, C.; Freitas, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godfrey, S.; Greiner, N.; Grojean, C.; Grünewald, M.; Heisig, J.; Höcker, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kogler, R.; Krawczyk, M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Kroseberg, J.; Liebler, S.; List, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mambrini, Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Mnich, J.; Mönig, K.; Mühlleitner, M. M.; Pöschl, R.; Porod, W.; Porto, S.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schmitt, M.; Serpico, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stål, O.; Stefaniak, T.; Stöckinger, D.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G. W.; Zeune, L.; Moortgat, F.; Xella, S.; Bagger, J.; Brau, J.; Ellis, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Komamiya, S.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Mnich, J.; Peskin, M.; Schlatter, D.; Wagner, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive review of physics at an linear collider in the energy range of GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  6. State of hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grannis, P.D. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The 9th Topical Workshop on Proton-Antiproton Collider Physics in Tsukuba Japan demonstrated clearly the enormous breadth of physics accessible in hadron cowders. Although no significant chinks were reported in the armor of the Standard Model, new results presented in this meeting have expanded our knowledge of the electroweak and strong interactions and have extended the searches for non-standard phenomena significantly. Much of the new data reported came from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab cowder. Superb operation of the Tevatron during the 1992-1993 Run and significant advances on the detector fronts -- in particular, the emergence of the new D0 detector as a productive physics instrument in its first outing and the addition of the CDF silicon vertex detector -- enabled much of this advance. It is noteworthy however that physics from the CERN collider experiments UA1 and UA4 continued to make a large impact at this meeting. In addition, very interesting summary talks were given on new results from HERA, cosmic ray experiments, on super-hadron collider physics, and on e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments at LEP and TRISTAN. These summaries are reported in elsewhere in this volume.

  7. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  8. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  9. A study of beam-beam effects in hadron colliders with a large number of bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Pieloni, Tatiana; Bay, Aurelio; Rivkin, Leonid

    2008-01-01

    A particle beam is a collection of a large number of charges and represents an electromagnetic potential for other charges, therefore exerting forces on itself and other beams. The control of this so called Beam-Beam Interactions (BBIs) in particle colliders is fundamental to preserve beam stability and achieve the collider maximal luminosity. In the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, these forces are experienced as localized periodic distortions when the two beams cross each other in the four experimental areas. The forces are most important for high density beams, i.e. high intensity and small beam sizes. Each LHC beam is composed of 2808 bunches, each containing $10^{11}$ protons and with a transverse size of 16~$\\mu $m at the interaction points. These extreme parameters are the key to obtain high ``luminosity'', i. e. the number of collisions per second needed to study rare physics phenomena. The BBI is therefore often the limiting factor for the luminosity of colliders. Within all BB effect...

  10. and collider physics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This report summarises [1] the activities of the working group on ' and collider physics'. Presented are the results of investigations relating to various scenarios of su- persymmetry breaking and their collider signatures and the consequences of violation of. К-parity for both collider signals as well as various -meson decay ...

  11. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Raychaudhari, Amitava

    2009-01-01

    In an epoch when particle physics is awaiting a major step forward, the Large Hydron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva will soon be operational. It will collide a beam of high energy protons with another similar beam circulation in the same 27 km tunnel but in the opposite direction, resulting in the production of many elementary particles some never created in the laboratory before. It is widely expected that the LHC will discover the Higgs boson, the particle which supposedly lends masses to all other fundamental particles. In addition, the question as to whether there is some new law of physics at such high energy is likely to be answered through this experiment. The present volume contains a collection of articles written by international experts, both theoreticians and experimentalists, from India and abroad, which aims to acquaint a non-specialist with some basic issues related to the LHC. At the same time, it is expected to be a useful, rudimentary companion of introductory exposition and technical expert...

  12. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083092; Burkart, Florian; Schmidt, Rudiger; Shutov, A; Wollmann, Daniel; Piriz, A

    2016-01-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850  km/h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC...

  13. The polarized electron beam for the SLAC Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, M.

    1996-10-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider has been colliding a polarized electron beam with an unpolarized positron beam at the Z{sup 0} resonance for the SLD experiment since 1992. An electron beam polarization of close to 80% has been achieved for the experiment at luminosities up to 8 {center_dot} 10{sup 29} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This is the world`s first and only linear collider, and is a successful prototype for the next generation of high energy electron linear colliders. This paper discusses polarized beam operation for the SLC, and includes aspects of the polarized source, spin transport and polarimetry.

  14. Beam induced hydrodynamic tunneling in the future circular collider components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A future circular collider (FCC has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t at a typical speed of 850  km/h. Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2 iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the “hydrodynamic tunneling.” These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  15. Accelerator physics in ERL based polarized electron ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yue [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    This talk will present the current accelerator physics challenges and solutions in designing ERL-based polarized electron-hadron colliders, and illustrate them with examples from eRHIC and LHeC designs. These challenges include multi-pass ERL design, highly HOM-damped SRF linacs, cost effective FFAG arcs, suppression of kink instability due to beam-beam effect, and control of ion accumulation and fast ion instabilities.

  16. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  17. Design of beam optics for the future circular collider e^{+}e^{-} collider rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Oide

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A beam optics scheme has been designed for the future circular collider-e^{+}e^{-} (FCC-ee. The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [P. Raimondi, D. Shatilov, and M. Zobov, arXiv:physics/0702033; P. Raimondi, M. Zobov, and D. Shatilov, in Proceedings of the 22nd Particle Accelerator Conference, PAC-2007, Albuquerque, NM (IEEE, New York, 2007, p. TUPAN037.] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles, by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So-called “tapering” of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh [A. Chancé et al., Proceedings of IPAC’16, 9–13 May 2016, Busan, Korea, TUPMW020 (2016.] as closely as possible. Sufficient transverse/longitudinal dynamic aperture (DA has been obtained, including major dynamical effects, to assure an adequate beam lifetime in the presence of beamstrahlung and top-up injection. In particular, a momentum acceptance larger than ±2% has been obtained, which is better than the momentum acceptance of typical collider rings by about a factor of 2. The effects of the detector solenoids including their compensation elements are taken into account as well as synchrotron radiation in all magnets. The optics presented in this paper is a step toward a full conceptual design for the collider. A number of issues

  18. Heavy-ion physics studies for the Future Circular Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armesto, N. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Dainese, A., E-mail: andrea.dainese@pd.infn.it [INFN — Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); D' Enterria, D. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland); Masciocchi, S. [EMMI and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Roland, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Salgado, C.A. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain); Leeuwen, M. van [Nikhef, National Institute for Subatomic Physics and Institute for Subatomic Physics of Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wiedemann, U.A. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study is aimed at assessing the physics potential and the technical feasibility of a new collider with centre-of-mass energies, in the hadron–hadron collision mode including proton and nucleus beams, more than seven times larger than the nominal LHC energies. An electron–positron collider in the same tunnel is also considered as an intermediate step, which in the long term would allow for electron–hadron collisions. First ideas on the physics opportunities with heavy ions at the FCC are presented, covering the physics of quark–gluon plasma, gluon saturation, photon-induced collisions, as well as connections with the physics of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  19. Transverse beams stability studies at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Pieloni, Tatiana

    2015-01-30

    A charged particle beam travelling at the speed of light produces large electromagnetic wake fields which, through interactions with its surroundings, act back on the particles in the beam. This coupled system may become unstable, resulting in a deterioration of the beam quality. Such effects play a major role in most existing storage rings, as they limit the maximum performance achievable. In a collider, the presence of a second beam significantly changes the dynamics, as the electromagnetic interactions of the two beams on each other are usually very strong and may, also, limit the collider performances. This thesis treats the coherent stability of the two beams in a circular collider, including the effects of the electromagnetic wake fields and of the beam-beam interactions, with particular emphasis on CERN's Large Hadron Collider. As opposed to other colliders, this machine features a large number of bunches per beam each experiencing multiple long-range and head-on beam-beam interactions. Existing models...

  20. Preliminary design of the beam screen cooling for the Future Circular Collider of hadron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kotnig, C

    2015-01-01

    Following recommendations of the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. This study considers an option for a very high energy (100 TeV) hadron-hadron collider located in a quasi-circular underground tunnel having a circumference of 80 to 100 km. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy hadron beam increases by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the LHC. To reduce the entropic load on the superconducting magnets' refrigeration system, beam screens are indispensable to extract the heat load at a higher temperature level. After illustrating the decisive constraints of the beam screen's refrigeration design, this paper presents a preliminary design of the length of a continuous cooling loop comparing helium and neon, for different cooling channel geometries with emphasis on the cooling length limitations and the exergetic efficiency.

  1. Experimental Physics Investigations using Colliding Beam Detectors at Fermilab and the LHC & Nonperturbative Quantum Field Theory: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skubic, P. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Abbott, B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Gutierrez, P. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Strauss, M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Kalbfleisch, G. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Kao, C. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Milton, K. A. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Task A: during the past three years, the D collaboration has gone from a period that has concentrated on the analysis of Run I data and the construction of the Run II detector, to the commissioning of the Run II detector and the start of Run II analysis with ≈214 pb₋1 data recorded so far. During the coming years, we expect to collect a factor of 30 to 60 times more data than we did during Run I. This data will be used to test the limits of the standard model (SM), search for new phenomena, and possibly see hints of the Higgs boson. Task B: A major thrust for the past eight years has been based on our experimental project to search for magnetic monopoles produced at Fermilab. Although the experiment has now been concluded, with a nal paper submitted to Physical Review D, theoretically much work remains to be done. A proper interpretation of the experimental results requires improved calculations, both relativistic and nonrelativistic, of the binding of monopoles to atomic nuclei through the anomalous magnetic moment interaction. Improved calculations of the production of monopoles through the Drell-Yan process are also being carried out.

  2. Heavy-ion physics studies for the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, Nestor; d'Enterria, David; Masciocchi, Silvia; Roland, Christof; Salgado, Carlos; van Leeuwen, Marco; Wiedemann, Urs

    2014-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study is aimed at assessing the physics potential and the technical feasibility of a new collider with centre-of-mass energies, in the hadron-hadron collision mode including proton and nucleus beams, more than seven-times larger than the nominal LHC energies. An electron-positron collider in the same tunnel is also considered as an intermediate step, which would provide the electron-hadron option in the long term. First ideas on the physics opportunities with heavy ions at the FCC are presented, covering the physics of Quark-Gluon Plasma, gluon saturation, photon-induced collisions, as well as connections with ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  3. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  4. Working group report: Collider and flavour physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... The activities of the working group took place under two broad subgroups: Collider Physics subgroup and Flavour Physics subgroup. Reports on some of the projects undertaken are included. Also, some of the leading discussions organized by the working group are summarized.

  5. Nonlinear interaction of colliding beams in particle storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, J C; Month, M

    1979-01-01

    When two beams of high energy particles moving in opposite directions are brought into collision, a large amount of energy is available for the production of new particles. However to obtain a sufficiently high event rate for rare processes, such as the production of the intermediate vector boson (Z/sub 0/ and W/sup + -/), large beam currents are also required. Under this circumstance, the high charge density of one beam results in a classical electromagnetic interaction on the particles in the other beam. This very nonlinear space charge force, caled the beam-beam force, limits the total circulating charge and, thereby, the ultimate performance of the colliding ring system. The basic nature of the beam-beam force is discussed, indicating how it is quite different in the case of continuous beams, which cross each other at an angle as compared to the case of bunched beams which collide head-on. Some experimental observations on the beam-beam interaction in proton-proton and electron-positron beams are then reviewed and interpreted. An important aspect of the beam-beam problem in storage rings is to determine at what point in the analysis of the particle dynamics is it relevant to bring in the concepts of stochasticity, slow diffusion, and resonance overlap. These ideas are briefly discussed.

  6. Physics and technology of the next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The authors present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center-of-mass energy 0.5--1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. The physics goals discussed here are: Standard Model processes and simulation; top quark physics; Higgs boson searches and properties; supersymmetry; anomalous gauge boson couplings; strong WW scattering; new gauge bosons and exotic particles; e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, e{sup {minus}}{gamma}, and {gamma}{gamma} interactions; and precision tests of QCD.

  7. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keisuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Grojean, Christophe; /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona; Peskin, Michael E.; Barklow, Tim; /SLAC; Gao, Yuanning; /Tsinghua U., Beijing, CHEP; Kanemura, Shinya; /Toyama U.; Kim, Hyungdo; /Seoul Natl U.; List, Jenny; /DESY; Nojiri, Mihoko; /KEK, Tsukuba; Perelstein, Maxim; /Cornell U., LEPP; Poeschl, Roman; /LAL, Orsay; Reuter, Juergen; /DESY; Simon, Frank; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Tanabe, Tomohiko; /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Yu, Jaehoon; /Texas U., Arlington; Wells, James D.; /Michigan U., MCTP; Murayama, Hitoshi; /UC, Berkeley /LBNL /Tokyo U., IPMU; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; /Tohoku U.

    2015-06-23

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  8. Search for new physics at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarelli, Giorgio; /INFN, Pisa

    2005-09-01

    In this paper I present the most recent results of the ongoing searches, mainly from Tevatron Collider experiments, for new physics beyond the Standard Model. While no signal has been seen so far, many analyses are reaching the point in which either a discovery will take place or strong limit on currently popular theories will be set.

  9. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this talk I shall begin by summarizing the importance of the Higgs physics studies at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). I shall then give a short description of the pre-LHC constraints on the Higgs mass and the theoretical predictions for the LHC along with a discussion of the current experimental results, ending with ...

  10. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton-proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  11. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Schroeder

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultrahigh accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasilinear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultrashort bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10^{17}  cm^{-3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1  μm wavelength lasers with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  12. Investigation of beam self-polarization in the future e+e− circular collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075800

    2016-01-01

    The use of resonant depolarization has been suggested for precise beam energy measurements (better than 100 keV) in the eþe− Future Circular Collider (FCC-eþe−) for Z and WW physics at 45 and 80 GeV beam energy respectively. Longitudinal beam polarization would benefit the Z peak physics program; however it is not essential and therefore it will be not investigated here. In this paper the possibility of selfpolarized leptons is considered. Preliminary results of simulations in presence of quadrupole misalignments and beam position monitors (BPMs) errors for a simplified FCC-eþe− ring are presented.

  13. Investigation of beam self-polarization in the future e^{+}e^{-} circular collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gianfelice-Wendt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of resonant depolarization has been suggested for precise beam energy measurements (better than 100 keV in the e^{+}e^{-} Future Circular Collider (FCC-e^{+}e^{-} for Z and WW physics at 45 and 80 GeV beam energy respectively. Longitudinal beam polarization would benefit the Z peak physics program; however it is not essential and therefore it will be not investigated here. In this paper the possibility of self-polarized leptons is considered. Preliminary results of simulations in presence of quadrupole misalignments and beam position monitors (BPMs errors for a simplified FCC-e^{+}e^{-} ring are presented.

  14. Simulation of Head-on Beam-Beam Limitations in Future High Energy Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, Xavier; Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; Tambasco, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) project calls for studies in a new regime of beam-beam interactions. While the emittance damping due to synchrotron radiation is still slower than in past or existing lepton colliders, it is significantly larger than in other hadron colliders. The slow reduction of the emittance is profitable for higher luminosity in term of transverse beam size at the interaction points and also to mitigate long-range beam-beam effects, potentially allowing for a reduction of the crossing angle between the beams during the operation. In such conditions, the strength of head-on beam-beam interactions increases, potentially limiting the beam brightness. 4D weak-strong and strong-strong simulations are performed in order to assess these limitations.

  15. 1st Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Juste, A; Martínez, M; Riu, I; Sorin, V

    2013-01-01

    The conference is the result of merging two series of international conferences, "Physics at Large Hadron Collider" (PLHC2012) and "Hadron Collider Physics Symposium" (HCP2012). With a program devoted to topics such as the Standard Model and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Beauty and Heavy Ion Physics, the conference aims at providing a lively forum for discussion between experimenters and theorists of the latest results and of new ideas. LHCP 2013 will be hosted by IFAE (Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies) in Barcelona (Spain), and will take place from May 13 to 18, 2013. The venue will be the Hotel Catalonia Plaza, Plaza España (Barcelona). More information will be posted soon. For questions, please contact lhcp2013@ifae.es.

  16. Photon collider beam simulation with CAIN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    low-energy electrons are deflected to much larger angles by the interaction with the opposite electron bunch, as shown in figure 2 (right). 4. Detector magnetic field. The largest contribution to the outgoing beam smearing is due to the interactions between two electron beams. Nevertheless, a cone with an opening angle of ...

  17. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    OpenAIRE

    Olvegård, M.; Adli, E.; Andreazza, W; Bolzon, B; Bravin, E.; Chritin, N; Dabrowski, A.; Döbert, S; Duraffourg, M; Lefèvre, T.; Lillestøl, R.; Ziemann, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider, CLIC is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addre...

  18. Beam Physics at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    2003-01-01

    The design of the Large Hadron Collider incorporates the accumulated knowledge obtained from previous generations of hadron colliders. Among the well known effects limiting machine performance are intrabeam scattering, the beam-beam interaction and stability against collective motion. Simulations and recent experiments in the SPS have shown that the electron cloud effect observed in the B-factories will be present both in the LHC and in its injector. All of these phenomena are discussed together with the measure taken in the machine design to overcome them.

  19. Advances in Beam Cooling for Muon Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev

    2006-09-01

    A six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas is the basis for the latest plans for muon colliders. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields, where emittance exchange is achieved by using a continuous homogeneous absorber. Momentum-dependent path length differences in the dense hydrogen energy absorber provide the required correlation between momentum and ionization loss to accomplish longitudinal cooling. Recent studies of an 800 MHz RF cavity pressurized with hydrogen, as would be used in this application, show that the maximum gradient is not limited by a large external magnetic field, unlike vacuum cavities. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, will be employed to further reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that is being developed for an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment. The status of the designs, simulations, and tests of the cooling components for a high luminosity, low emittance muon collider will be reviewed.

  20. BARD: Interpreting new frontier energy collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuteson, Bruce; /MIT; Mrenna, Stephen; /Fermilab

    2006-02-01

    No systematic procedure currently exists for inferring the underlying physics from discrepancies observed in high energy collider data. We present Bard, an algorithm designed to facilitate the process of model construction at the energy frontier. Top-down scans of model parameter space are discarded in favor of bottom-up diagrammatic explanations of particular discrepancies, an explanation space that can be exhaustively searched and conveniently tested with existing analysis tools.

  1. 14th Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, T

    2003-01-01

    Hadron colliders probe physics at new energy frontiers and search for new particles and forces. In addition, hadron colliders now provide also an environment for precision physics. The present volume collects the results from recently completed runs at major colliders as well as new ideas about collider physics and techniques. It will serve as the main source of reference in the field for many years to come.

  2. Approaches to Beam Stabilization in X-Band Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, J; Markiewicz, T W; Seryi, Andrei

    2004-01-01

    In order to stabilize the beams at the interaction point, the X-band linear collider proposes to use a combination of techniques: inter-train and intra-train beam-beam feedback, passive vibration isolation, and active vibration stabilization based on either accelerometers or laser interferometers. These systems operate in a technologically redundant fashion: simulations indicate that if one technique proves unusable in the final machine, the others will still support adequate luminosity. Experiments underway for all of these technologies, have already demonstrated adequate performance.

  3. Combined phenomena of beam-beam and beam-electron cloud interactionsin circular e^{+}e^{-} colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito Ohmi

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available An electron cloud causes various effects in high intensity positron storage rings. The positron beam and the electron cloud can be considered a typical two-stream system with a certain plasma frequency. Beam-beam interaction is another important effect for high luminosity circular colliders. Colliding two beams can be considered as a two-stream system with another plasma frequency. We study the combined phenomena of the beam-electron cloud and beam-beam interactions from a viewpoint of two complex two-stream effects with two plasma frequencies.

  4. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E

    2001-06-05

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide.

  5. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

    2001-05-03

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

  6. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor

  7. MD 979: Beta-beating measurements on colliding beams

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves Jorge, Patrik; Pieloni, Tatiana; Buffat, Xavier; Carlier, Felix Simon; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Fol, Elena; Langner, Andy Sven; Medina Medrano, Luis Eduardo; Olexa, Jakub; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Valuch, Daniel; Wegscheider, Andreas; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The HL-LHC high brightness beams will give a large β-beating due to the head-on and long-range interactions since a beam-beam parameter of 0.01 per Interaction Point (IP) is expected. The β-heating induced by two head-on collision reaches 15%. A third IP, i.e. IP8, could bring the β-heating up to 24%. The aim of the Machine Development (MD) study was to test optics measurements with AC dipole and ADT on colliding beams at injection and to implement a correction of the β-heating due to to head-on collision in the two experiments IP1&5. Int his note, we summarize the first results of this test performed in the LHC.

  8. Beam-beam instability driven by wakefield effects in linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, R; Schulte, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The vertical beam profile distortions induced by wakefield effects in linear colliders (the so-called ``banana effect'') generate a beam-beam instability at the collision point when the vertical disruption parameter is large. We illustrate this effect in the case of the TESLA linear collider project. We specify the tolerance on the associated emittance growth, which translates into tolerances on injection jitter and, for a given tuning procedure, on structure misalignments. We look for possible cures based on fast orbit correction at the interaction point and using a fast luminosity monitor.

  9. CLIC-LHC-based FEL-nucleus collider: Feasibility and physics search potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavas, Omer [Department of Engineering of Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: yavas@eng.ankara.edu.tr; Corsini, Roberto [CERN, CH-1211, Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Braun, Hans [Institute of Physics Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Ave. 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Sultansoy, Saleh [Institute of Physics Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Ave. 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Science, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Guliyev, Ekber [Institute of Physics Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Ave. 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Yigit, Senay [Department of Engineering of Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Turkish Atomic Energy Authority, 06530 Lodullu, Ankara (Turkey); Ozcan, Aynur [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Science, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-11-01

    The feasibility of a CLIC-LHC-based FEL-nucleus collider is investigated. It is shown that the proposed scheme satisfies all requirements of an ideal photon source for the nuclear resonance fluorescence method. The tunability, monochromaticity and high polarization of the FEL beam together with high statistics and huge energy of LHC nucleus beams will give a unique opportunity to determine different characteristics of excited nuclear levels. The physics potential of the proposed collider is illustrated for a beam of Pb nuclei.

  10. CLIC-LHC Based FEL-Nucleus Collider: Feasibility and Physics Search Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Delahaye, J P; Guliyev, E; Ozcan, A; Sultansoy, S; Yavas, O; Yigit, S

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of a CLIC-LHC based FEL-nucleus collider is investigated. It is shown that the proposed scheme satisfies all requirements of an ideal photon source for the Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence method. The tunability, monochromaticity and high polarization of the FEL beam together with high statistics and huge energy of LHC nucleus beams will give an unique opportunity to determine different characteristics of excited nuclear levels. The physics potential of the proposed collider is illustrated for a beam of Pb nuclei.

  11. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Olvegård

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high-intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addressed experimentally at the CLIC test facility where up to 55% of the power is extracted from the beam in the test beam line, a small-scale version of the CLIC drive-beam decelerator, leaving the beam with a very wide energy profile. For monitoring of the transverse beam profile and Twiss parameters we use optical transition radiation screens and quadrupole scans. The intra-pulse-train energy spectrum before and after deceleration is measured with segmented beam dumps. In this paper we discuss the performance of these diagnostic devices with a particular emphasis on the large energy spread and its effect on the beam imaging techniques, and with a final outlook to the CLIC drive-beam diagnostics.

  12. Simulations of coherent beam-beam modes at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Zorzano-Mier, M P

    2000-01-01

    The transverse coherent motion of two colliding proton beams at the Large Hadron Collider is studied by multiparticle tracking. We use the beam-beam force for a Gaussian beam distribution with variable barycenters and rms beam sizes, and optionally include the effect of long-range collisions and external impedance. The simulation yields the coherent and incoherent oscillation frequencies, the emittance growth of either beam, and evidence for the existence or lack of Landau damping. For head-on collisions of beams with equal sizes, we find that the pi -mode frequency lies outside of the continuum frequency spread, if the ratio of the beam-beam parameters exceeds 0.6, in accordance with predictions. For smaller ratios of the beam- beam parameters, or if, for equal beam-beam parameters, the beam sizes are widely different, the pi mode is Landau damped. When long- range collisions are also included, undamped coherent modes do still exist outside the continuum, both with and without alternating crossing planes at ...

  13. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  14. Long-range beam-beam experiments in the relativistic heavy ion collider

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Milas, N; Robert-Demolaize, G

    2014-01-01

    Long-range beam-beam effects are a potential limit to the LHC performance with the nominal design parameters, and certain upgrade scenarios under discussion. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed and space is reserved in the LHC for such wires. Two current carrying wires were installed in RHIC to study the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects in a collider, as well as test the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The experimental data were used to benchmark simulations. We summarize this work.

  15. Beam parametr measurements for the SLAC linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Blocker, C.; Breidenbach, M.

    1981-01-01

    A stable, closely-controlled, high-intensity, single-bunch beam will be required for the SLAC Linear Collider. The characteristics of short-pulse, low-intensity beams in the SLAC linac have been studied. A new, high-intensity thermionic gun, subharmonic buncher and S-band buncher/accelerator section were installed recently at SLAC. With these components, up to 10/sup 11/ electrons in a single S-band bunch are available for injection into the linac. the first 100-m accelerator sector has been modified to allow control of short-pulse beams by a model-driven computer program. Additional instrumentation, including a computerized energy analyzer and emittance monitor have been added at the end of the 100-m sector. The beam intensity, energy spectrum, emittance, charge distribution and the effect of wake fields in the first accelerator sector have been measured. The new source and beam control system are described and the most recent results of the beam parameter measurements are discussed.

  16. Jet Physics at High Energy Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yang-Ting

    The future of new physics searches at the LHC will be to look for hadronic signals with jets. In order to distinguish a hadronic signal from its background, it is important to develop advanced collider physics techniques that make accurate theoretical predictions. This work centers on phenomenological and formal studies of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), including resummation of hadronic observables using Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), calculating anomalous dimensions of multi-Wilson line operators in AdS, and improving jet physics analysis using multiple event interpretations. Hadronic observables usually involve physics at different energy scales, and the calculations depend on large logarithms of the energy ratios. We can prove factorization theorems of observables and resum large logarithms using renormalization-group techniques. The heavy jet mass distribution for e +e- collisions is calculated at next-to-next-to-next-to leading logarithmic order (N3LL), and we measure the strong coupling constant at 0.3% accuracy. We also calculate the jet-mass distribution at partial N2LL in gamma + jet events at the LHC. The effect of non-global logarithms in resummation estimated, and it is significant only at the peak region. Soft QCD interactions among jets can be described by multi-Wilson line operators, with each Wilson line pointing along one of the jet directions. The anomalous dimensions of these operators are key for higher-order resummation. We study these operators using radial quantization and conformal gauge, which leads to a drastic simplification of the two-loop anomalous dimension calculation. We also find that the anomalous dimension calculation is closely related to a corresponding Witten diagram calculation. Jets are complicated objects to identify in high energy collider experiments. A single interpretation of each event can only extract a limited amount of information. We propose telescoping jet algorithms which give multiple event

  17. Center for Beam Physics papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M. [ed.

    1996-06-01

    Six papers are included in this collection. They cover: a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron and electron- electron collisions; constraints on laser-driven accelerators for a high-energy linear collider; progress on the design of a high luminosity muon-muon collider; RF power source development at the RTA test facility; sensitivity studies of crystalline beams; and single bunch collective effects in muon colliders.

  18. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-21

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010--2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5--4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An un-controlled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multi-stage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the co...

  19. Higgs physics at future colliders: Recent theoretical developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I review the physics of the Higgs sector in the standard model and its minimal supersymmetric extension, the MSSM. I will discuss the prospects for discovering the Higgs particles at the ungraded Tevatron, at the large hadron collider, and at a future high-energy e + e − linear collider with centre-of-mass energy in the ...

  20. Physics prospects at a linear -collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The talk described the prospects of studying standard model parameters as well as scenarios beyond the standard model, like the minimal supersymmetric standard model, theories with extra dimensions and theories with extra neutral gauge bosons, at a future linear + - collider.

  1. Two Complementary Strategies for New Physics Searches at Lepton Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooberman, Benjamin Henry [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-07-06

    In this thesis I present two complementary strategies for probing beyond-the-Standard Model physics using data collected in e+e- collisions at lepton colliders. One strategy involves searching for effects at low energy mediated by new particles at the TeV mass scale, at which new physics is expected to manifest. Several new physics scenarios, including Supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness, may lead to observable rates for charged lepton-flavor violating processes, which are forbidden in the Standard Model. I present a search for lepton-flavor violating decays of the Υ(3S) using data collected with the BABAR detector. This study establishes the 90% confidence level upper limits BF(Υ(3S) → eτ) < 5.0 x 10-6 and BF(Υ(3S) → μτ) < 4.1 x 10-6 which are used to place constraints on new physics contributing to lepton-flavor violation at the TeV mass scale. An alternative strategy is to increase the collision energy above the threshold for new particles and produce them directly. I discuss research and development efforts aimed at producing a vertex tracker which achieves the physics performance required of a high energy lepton collider. A small-scale vertex tracker prototype is constructed using Silicon sensors of 50 μm thickness and tested using charged particle beams. This tracker achieves the targeted impact parameter resolution of σLP = (5⊕10 GeV/pT) as well as a longitudinal vertex resolution of (260 ± 10) μm, which is consistent with the requirements of a TeV-scale lepton collider. This detector research and development effort must be motivated and directed by simulation studies of physics processes. Investigation of a dark matter-motivated Supersymmetry scenario is presented, in which the dark matter is composed of Supersymmetric neutralinos. In this scenario, studies of the e+e- → H0A0 production process allow for

  2. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather E; Nomerotski, Andrei; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael E; Pöschl, Roman; Reuter, Jürgen; Riemann, Sabine; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Servant, Geraldine; Tait, Tim M P

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  3. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Barklow, Tim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fujii, Keisuke [National Lab. for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tokai (Japan); Gao, Yuanning [Unlisted; Hoang, Andre [Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kanemura, Shinya [Univ. of Toyama (Japan); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Logan, Heather E. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Nomerotski, Andrei [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Perelstein, Maxim [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Peskin, Michael E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pöschl, Roman [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL); Reuter, Jürgen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Riemann, Sabine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Savoy-Navarro, Aurore [CNRS/IN2P3. Univ. Paris (France). Observatoire de Paris. AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC); Servant, Geraldine [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tait, Tim P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  4. Precise and fast beam energy measurement at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viti, Michele

    2010-02-15

    The international Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with a center-of-mass energy between 200 and 500 GeV and a peak luminosity of 2 . 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. For the physics program at this machine, an excellent bunch-by-bunch control of the beam energy is mandatory. Several techniques are foreseen to be implemented at the ILC in order to achieve this request. Energy spectrometers upstream and downstream of the electron/positron interaction point were proposed and the present default option for the upstream spectrometer is a beam position monitor based (BPM-based) spectrometer. In 2006/2007, a prototype of such a device was commissioned at the End Station A beam line at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in order to study performance and reliability. In addition, a novel method based on laser Compton backscattering has been proposed, since as proved at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), complementary methods are necessary to cross-check the results of the BPM-based spectrometer. In this thesis, an overview of the experiment at End Station A is given, with emphasis on the performance of the magnets in the chicane and first energy resolution estimations. Also, the novel Compton backscattering method is discussed in details and found to be very promising. It has the potential to bring the beam energy resolution well below the requirement of {delta}E{sub b}/E{sub b}=10{sup -4}. (orig.)

  5. COLLIDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Howie Day, Collide, Based on the original parody "Collide" by USLHC, inspired by the original song "Collide" written by Howie Day and Kevin Griffin. Re-record Produced by Mike Denneen Engineered by Patrick DiCenso -Vocals, Guitars, Keyboards- Howie Day -Guitar Patrick DiCenso -Bass- Ed Valuskas -Drums- Dave Brophy

  6. Optimum Choice of RF Frequency for Two Beam Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich

    2003-01-01

    Recent experimental results on normal conducting RF structures indicate that the scaling of the gradient limit with frequency is less favourable than what was believed. We therefore reconsider the optimum choice of RF frequency and iris aperture for a normal conducting, two-beam linear collider with E_CMS=3 TeV, a loaded accelerating gradient of 150 MV/m and a luminosity of 8 10^34 cm-^2 s^-1. The optimisation criterion is minimizing overall RF costs for investment and operation with constraints put on peak surface electric fields and pulsed heating of accelerating structures. Analytical models are employed where applicable, while interpolation on simulation program results is used for the calculation of luminosity and RF structure properties.

  7. The search for new physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Krasnikov, N V

    2004-01-01

    This is a review of various aspects of the large hadron collider project for the search for new physics (namely, the Higgs boson, supersymmetry, and exotics). The basic parameters of the CMS and ATLAS detectors are also discussed.

  8. ISABELLE: a 400 x 400 GeV proton--proton colliding beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design report is presented for the construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE, to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At this major research facility beams of protons with energies up to 400 GeV will be collided in six experimental areas. At each area particle physicists will install detector apparatus to study the interaction and reaction products for such very high energy collisions. The proposal results from several years of study and development work on such a facility. Topics discussed include: (1) introduction and summary of the proposal; (2) physics at ISABELLE (including physics objectives and typical experiments and detectors); description of ISABELLE (overview; magnetic ring structure and lattice characteristics; performance; beam transfer, stacking, and acceleration; magnet system; refrigeration system; vacuum system; power supplies, instrumentation, and control system; physical plant and experimental halls; and operation and safety); and (3) cost estimate and schedule.

  9. Working group report: Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is a summary of the activities of the Physics at the LHC working group in the XIth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-XI) held at the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, India in January 2010. We discuss the activities of each sub-working group on physics issues at colliders such as ...

  10. New physics with the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the 'strong' interactions between particles would be best investigated using a lepton-antilepton collider of energy 2 TeV or more. Plans for an accelerator of this type, called CLIC, have been underway at CERN for many years in collaboration with other accelerator laboratories (5 pages).

  11. Working group report: Collider and B physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The written reports received are included. Keywords. Higgs boson; supersymmetry; extra dimensions; B-decays. PACS Nos 14.60.St; 14.80.Cp; 13.35.Br. Introduction. It is generally hoped that the Higgs boson, supersymmetric particles, existence of extra dimensions ..... may be discovered at the upcoming colliders. Bulk of ...

  12. Physics possibilities at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review some recent studies about the parameter determination of top quarks, bosons, Higgs bosons, supersymmetric particles and in the ADD model of extra dimensions at a linear collider. Author Affiliations. Alfred Bartl1 Stefan Hesselbach1. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Wien, Boltzmanngasse 5, ...

  13. Physics possibilities at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    clarifying the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking will be the central problem which we have to solve with the next generation of high energy colliders. In the SM, electroweak symmetry breaking is achieved by the Higgs mechanism. The scalar Higgs boson, also predicted by this mechanism, has not been found so.

  14. Physics at a future collider beyond the LHC and a TeV class linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    After the LHC will have probed the physics at the TeV frontier, new generations of colliders capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain will need to be considered. Concepts for both high energy e+e- linear colliders and muon storage rings have been proposed as well as hadron colliders. Highly challenging R&D programs are presently pursued to demonstrate their principles. The definition of a physics programme in the multi-TeV range still requires essential data that is likely to become available only after the first years of LHC operation and, possibly, also the results from a TeV-class linear collider. At present we have to envisage several possible scenarios for the fundamental questions to be addressed by collider experiments in the next decade, to guide the choices in the accelerator designs and parameters. After a brief review of the main accelerator projects and the present status of their R&D, I shall discuss the main signatures of the physics of possible relevance in relation to the e...

  15. SLAC linear collider: the machine, the physics, and the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, B.

    1981-11-01

    The SLAC linear collider, in which beams of electrons and positrons are accelerated simultaneously, is described. Specifications of the proposed system are given, with calculated preditions of performance. New areas of research made possible by energies in the TeV range are discussed. (GHT)

  16. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  17. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bruce

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010–2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5–4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  18. Top physics at the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaroli, Fabrizio; /Purdue U.

    2007-10-01

    The top quark has been discovered in 1995 at the CDF and DO experiments located in the Tevatron ring at the Fermilab laboratory. After more than a decade the Tevatron collider, with its center-of-mass energy collisions of 1.96 TeV, is still the only machine capable of producing such exceptionally heavy particle. Here I present a selection of the most recent CDF and DO measurements performed analyzing {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity.

  19. Physics prospects at a linear e+e− collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the virtual Z in the decay H → Z∗Z for mH < 2mZ. The angular distribution of decay products in ..... become a reality. References. [1] American Linear Collider Working Group: J Bagger et al, arXiv:hep-ex/0007022. ACFA Linear Collider Working Group: K Abe et al, arXiv:hep-ph/0109166. ECFA/DESY LC Physics Working ...

  20. R&D for Collider Beauty Physics at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose an R&D program for the development of a Beauty trigger and innovative elements of the associated spectrometer. The program builds on the success of the recent S$\\bar{p}$pS collider run of the P238 Collaboration, in which clean signals from beam-beam interactions were observed in a large silicon strip microvertex detector running 1.5~mm from the circulating beams. A continuing successful R&D program of the type proposed could ultimately lead to a collider experiment at the LHC to study CP-violation and rare B decays. \\\\ \\\\ We request a fixed target run during late 1992 in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of a heavy flavour trigger which uses real time digital calculations on silicon strip data, implemented with a data driven processor.

  1. Virtual Corrections to Bremsstrahlung in High-Energy Collider Physics LHC and $e^+ e^-$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Yost, S A; Yost, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe radiative corrections to bremsstrahlung and their application to high energy collider physics, focusing on the applications to luminosity measurement, fermion pair production and radiative return. We review the status of one loop radiative corrections in BHLUMI and the KKMC, including cross checks with newer results developed independently for radiative return. We outline a YFS-exponentiated approach to the Drell-Yan process for LHC physics, including a discussion of the relevant radiative corrections.

  2. Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160109; Støvneng, Jon Andreas

    2017-08-15

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strength of the beam-beam interactions will be higher after the upgrade to the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, and also in the next generation of machines, as the Future Circular Hadron Collider. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and drives resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. For this thesis, a new code named CABIN (Cuda-Accelerated Beam-beam Interaction) has been developed to study the limitations caused by the impact of strong beam-beam interactions. In particular, the evolution of the beam emittance and beam intensity has been monitored to study the impact quantitatively...

  3. Realization of beam polarization at the linear collider and its application to EW processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Sollova, F.

    2006-07-15

    The use of beam polarization at the future ILC e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will benefit the physics program significantly. This thesis explores three aspects of beam polarization: the application of beam polarization to the study of electroweak processes, the precise measurement of the beam polarization, and finally, the production of polarized positrons at a test beam experiment. In the first part of the thesis the importance of beam polarization at the future ILC is exhibited: the benefits of employing transverse beam polarization (in both beams) for the measurement of triple gauge boson couplings (TGCs) in the W-pair production process are studied. The sensitivity to anomalous TGC values is compared for the cases of transverse and longitudinal beam polarization at a center of mass energy of 500 GeV. Due to the suppressed contribution of the t-channel {nu} exchange, the sensitivity is higher for longitudinal polarization. For some physics analyses the usual polarimetry techniques do not provide the required accuracy for the measurement of the beam polarization (around 0.25% with Compton polarimetry). The second part of the thesis deals with a complementary method to measure the beam polarization employing physics data acquired with two polarization modes. The process of single-W production is chosen due to its high cross section. The expected precision for 500 fb{sup -1} and W{yields}{mu}{nu} decays only, is {delta}P{sub e{sup -}}/P{sub e{sup -}}=0.26% and {delta}P{sub e{sup +}}/P{sub e{sup +}}=0.33%, which can be further improved by employing additional W-decay channels. The first results of an attempt to produce polarized positrons at the E-166 experiment are shown in the last part of the thesis. The E-166 experiment, located at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC's LINAC employs a helical undulator to induce the emission of circularly polarized gamma rays by the beam electrons. These gamma rays are converted into longitudinally polarized electron

  4. and collider physics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 009, India; Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464, Japan; Department of Physics, University of Hawaii, 2505 Correa Road, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, ...

  5. Physics Perspectives for a Future Circular Collider: FCC-ee

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The lectures will briefly discuss the parameters of a Future Circular Collider, before addressing in detail the physics perspectives and the challenges for the experiments and detector systems. The main focus will be on ee and pp collisions, but opportunities for e—p physics will also be covered. The FCC physics perspectives will be presented with reference to the ongoing LHC programme, including the physics potential from future upgrades to the LHC in luminosity and possibly energy.  

  6. Physics and technology of the Next Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhlman, S; Aiello, R; Akemoto, M; Alley, R; Assmann, R W; Baer, Howard W; Baltay, C; Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag; Barakat, B; Barker, A; Barklow, Timothy L; Barletta, W A; Bauer, D A; Bertolini, L R; Bharadwaj, V K; Bogart, J R; Bowden, G B; Bower, G; Brau, J E; Breidenbach, M; Brown, K L; Burke, D L; Burrows, P N; Byrd, J M; Cai, Y; Caryotakis, G; Cassel, R L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, P; Clark, S L; Cleaver, G B; Clem, D; Clendenin, J E; Corlett, J N; Corvin, C; Couture, G; Cuypers, F; Danielson, M; Deadrick, F J; Decker, Franz Josef; Donaldson, A R; Dragt, A J; Dubois, R; Early, R A; Ecklund, S D; Eichner, J; Einhorn, Martin B; Emma, P; Eppley, K R; Eriksson, L; Fahey, S; Farkas, Z D; Fawley, W M; Feng, J L; Fero, M J; Fisher, A S; Foundoulis, C; Fowkes, W R; Frey, R E; Frisch, J; Fuller, R W; Furman, M A; Genova, L F; Gintner, M; Giordano, G; Gluckstern, R L; Godfrey, S; Gold, S; Goluboff, M; Gross, G; Gunion, J F; Haber, Howard E; Han, T; Hanna, S; Hartman, S; Heifets, S A; Helm, R H; Hendrickson, L; Henestroza, E; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hewett, J L; Higashi, K; Higo, T; Hoag, H A; Hodgson, J; Hollebeek, R J; Holt, J A; Houck, T L; Humphrey, J W; Humphrey, R; Irwin, J; Jackson, A; Jacobsen, R A; Jaros, J A; Jobe, R Keith; Jones, R M; Kalyniak, P A; Kane, G L; Keller, L P; Kim, K J; Klem, D E; Ko, K; Koontz, R F; Kraft, E; Krejcik, P; Kroll, N M; Kubo, K; Kulikov, A; Lavine, T L; Li, H; Li, Z; Lidia, S M; Linebarger, W A; Loew, G A; Loewen, R J; Maeshima, K; Manly, S L; Marciano, W J; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; Mattison, T S; McDonald, K F; McKee, B; Messner, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Miller, R H; Minkowski, Peter; Minty, Michiko G; Moshammer, W; Munro, M H; Munroe, R; Murayama, H; Nantista, C D; Nauenberg, U; Nelson, E M; Nelson, H; Nelson, W R; Ng, C K; Nosochkov, Yu M; Ohgaki, T; Oide, K; Paige, Frank E; Palmer, D; Palmer, R B; Paterson, J M; Pearson, C; Perry, M; Peskin, Michael E; Phillips, R M; Phinney, N; Pope, R S; Raja, R; Raubenheimer, T O; Reginato, L; Rifkin, J; Riles, K; Rimmer, R A; Rinolfi, Louis; Rizzo, T; Robin, D; Rokni, S H; Ronan, Michael T; Rosenzweig, J; Ross, M C; Rowson, P C; Ruland, R E; Ruth, Ronald D; Saab, A; Sawyer, L; Schumm, B; Schwarz, H; Scott, B; Sessler, Andrew M; Sheppard, J C; Shoaee, H; Smith, S; Spence, W L; Spencer, C M; Spencer, J E; Sprehn, D; Strom, D; Stupakov, G; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, K; Tang, H; Tantawi, S G; Tata, Xerxes; Telnov, V I; Tenenbaum, P G; Thomas, S; Thompson, K A; Tian, F; Turner, J; Usher, T; Van Bibber, K; Van Kooten, R; Vanecek, D L; Vlieks, A E; Wagner, D L; Walz, D R; Wang, J W; Ward, B F L; Weidemann, A W; Westenskow, G A; White, T; Whittum, D H; Wilson, P B; Wilson, Z; Woodley, M; Woods, M; Wudka, J; Wurtele, J S; Xie, M; Yan, Y T; Yeremian, A D; Yokoya, K; Yu, S S; Zholents, A A; Zimmermann, Frank

    1996-01-01

    We present the current expectations for the design and physics program of an e+e- linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV -- 1 TeV. We review the experiments that would be carried out at this facility and demonstrate its key role in exploring physics beyond the Standard Model over the full range of theoretical possibilities. We then show the feasibility of constructing this machine, by reviewing the current status of linear collider technology and by presenting a precis of our `zeroth- order' design.

  7. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Applications are now open for the 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, which will take place at CERN from 6 to 15 June 2007. The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic program and application procedure. The application deadline is 9 March 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be given on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be  supported by in-depth discussion sess...

  8. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium in Evian

    CERN Multimedia

    Ludwik Dobrzynski and Emmanuel Tsesmelis

    The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian from 16 to 20 November 2009. The Hadron Collider Physics Symposium series has been a major forum for presentations of physics at the Tevatron over the past two decades. The merger of the former Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics with the LHC Symposium in 2005 brought together the Tevatron and LHC communities in a single forum. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian, on the shores of Lake Geneva, from 16-20 November 2009, some 17 years after the historic ECFA-CERN Evian meeting in March 1992 when Expressions of Interest for LHC detectors were presented for the first time. The 2009 event was organized jointly by CERN and the French high-energy physics community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). More than 170 people registered for this symposium. This year’s symposium was held at an important time for both the Tevatron and the LHC. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sam...

  9. Beam-size effect at colliders and correlations of particles in a beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Kotkin

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available For several processes at colliding beams, macroscopically large impact parameters give an essential contribution to the standard cross section. These impact parameters may be much larger than the transverse sizes of the colliding bunches. In that case, the standard calculations have to be essentially modified. The corresponding formulas for such a beam-size effect were given 20 years ago without taking into account correlations of particle coordinates in the beams. In the present paper we derive formulas necessary to take into account quantitatively the effect of particle correlations in the spectrum of bremsstrahlung as well as in pair production. Our results are quite different from those obtained in recent papers [V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov, Phys. Rev. D 66, 053009 (2002PRVDAQ0556-282110.1103/PhysRevD.66.053009; V. N. Baier and V. M. Katkov, hep-ph/0305304.]. We point out the origin of this difference.

  10. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group. Progress report, March 1, 1992--October 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  11. Hadron Collider Physics with Real Time Trajectory Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annovi, Alberto [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2005-01-01

    During last century experiments with accelerators have been extensively used to improve our understanding of matter. They are now the most common tool used to search for new phenomena in high energy physics. In the process of probing smaller distances and searching for new particles the center of mass energy has been steadily increased. The need for higher center of mass energy made hadron colliders the natural tool for discovery physics. Hadron colliders have a major drawback with respect to electron-positron colliders. As shown in fig. 1 the total cross section is several orders of magnitude larger than the cross section of interesting processes such as top or Higgs production. This means that, in order to observe interesting processes, it’s necessary to have collisions at very high rates and it becomes necessary to reject on-line most of the “non-interesting” events. In this thesis I have described the wide range of SVT applications within CDF.

  12. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001, 3 Studies of Exotic and Standard Model Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Asner, D.; Baer, H.; Bagger, J.; Balazs, C.; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Barron, J.; Baur, U.; Beach, R.; Bellwied, R.; Bigi, I.; Blochinger, C.; Boege, S.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.; Brau, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Burke, D.; Burrows, P.; Butler, J.N.; Chakraborty, D.; Cheng, H.C.; Chertok, M.; Choi, S.Y.; Cinabro, D.; Corcella, G.; Cordero, R.K.; Danielson, N.; Davoudiasl, H.; Dawson, S.; Denner, A.; Derwent, P.; Diaz, M.A.; Dima, M.; Dittmaier, S.; Dixit, M.; Dixon, L.; Dobrescu, B.; Doncheski, M.A.; Duckwitz, M.; Dunn, J.; Early, J.; Erler, J.; Feng, J.L.; Ferretti, C.; Fisk, H.E.; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, D.; Gibbons, L.; Godbole, R.; Godfrey, S.; Goodman, E.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Gronberg, J.; Gunion, J.; Haber, H.E.; Han, T.; Hawkings, R.; Hearty, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Heusch, C.; Hewett, J.; Hikasa, K.; Hiller, G.; Hoang, A.; Hollebeek, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Jacobsen, R.; Jaros, J.; Juste, A.; Kadyk, J.; Kalinowski, J.; Kalyniak, P.; Kamon, T.; Karlen, D.; Keller, L.; Koltick, D.; Kribs, G.; Kronfeld, A.; Leike, A.; Logan, H.E.; Lykken, J.; Macesanu, C.; Magill, S.; Marciano, W.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Martin, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matchev, K.; Moenig, K.; Montgomery, H.E.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Moreau, G.; Mrenna, S.; Murakami, B.; Murayama, H.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Newman, B.; Nojiri, M.; Orr, L.H.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Pathak, S.; Peskin, M.E.; Plehn, T.; Porter, F.; Potter, C.; Prescott, C.; Rainwater, D.; Raubenheimer, T.; Repond, J.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, T.; Ronan, M.; Rosenberg, L.; Rosner, J.; Roth, M.; Rowson, P.; Schumm, B.; Seppala, L.; Seryi, A.; Siegrist, J.; Sinev, N.; Skulina, K.; Sterner, K.L.; Stewart, I.; Su, S.; Tata, X.; Telnov, V.; Teubner, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, A.S.; van Bibber, K.; van Kooten, R.; Vega, R.; Wackeroth, D.; Wagner, D.; Waite, A.; Walkowiak, W.; Weiglein, G.; Wells, J.D.; W. Wester, III; Williams, B.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, R.; Winn, D.; Woods, M.; Wudka, J.; Yakovlev, O.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 3 reviews the possible experiments on that can be done at a linear collider on strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking, exotic particles, and extra dimensions, and on the top quark, QCD, and two-photon physics. It also discusses the improved precision electroweak measurements that this collider will make available.

  13. High energy density physics issues related to Future Circular Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2017-07-01

    A design study for a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator named, Future Circular Collider (FCC), is being carried out by the International Scientific Community. A complete design report is expected to be ready by spring 2018. The FCC will accelerate two counter rotating beams of 50 TeV protons in a tunnel having a length (circumference) of 100 km. Each beam will be comprised of 10 600 proton bunches, with each bunch having an intensity of 1011 protons. The bunch length is of 0.5 ns, and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns. Although there is an option for 5 ns bunch separation as well, in the present studies, we consider the former case only. The total energy stored in each FCC beam is about 8.5 GJ, which is equivalent to the kinetic energy of Airbus 380 (560 t) flying at a speed of 850 km/h. Machine protection is a very important issue while operating with such powerful beams. It is important to have an estimate of the damage caused to the equipment and accelerator components due to the accidental release of a partial or total beam at a given point. For this purpose, we carried out numerical simulations of full impact of one FCC beam on an extended solid copper target. These simulations have been done employing an energy deposition code, FLUKA, and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, BIG2, iteratively. This study shows that although the static range of a single FCC proton and its shower is about 1.5 m in solid copper, the entire beam will penetrate around 350 m into the target. This substantial increase in the range is due to the hydrodynamic tunneling of the beam. Our calculations also show that a large part of the target will be converted into high energy density matter including warm dense matter and strongly coupled plasmas.

  14. Academic Training: Physics at e+e- linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics at e+e- linear collider K. DESCH / Desy, Hamburg, D Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale to very high precision. The lecture series introduces the possibilities of a TeV linear collider (the International Linear Collider, ILC) in the fields of Higgs physics, alternative Electro-weak Symmetry Breaking scenarios, Supersymmetry, Extra Dimensions, and more exotic models. Also the prospects for highly improved measurements of SM parameters such as the top quark mass and electro-weak gauge boson properties are discussed. The implications for the design of an appropriate detector are outlined and current R&D developments are explained. Particular emphasis will be given to the complementarity and intimate interplay of physics at the LHC and the ILC. The additional benefit of multi-TeV e+e- collisions as envisaged i...

  15. Working group report: High energy and collider physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Rishikesh Vaidya20. 1Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005, India ... The projects undertaken in the working group I on high energy and collider physics can be classified into (i) Higgs ...... lous couplings for realistic polarization and integrated luminosity at a design LC energy of √s = 500 GeV.

  16. Physics at the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka

    2017-01-01

    This paper (based on an invited talk at the 18th Lomonosov Conference on Elementary Particle Physics) provides an overview of the physics program at CLIC, including updates on the ongoing studies on t-quark precision observables, massive vector-boson scattering and di-photon processes at high energies.

  17. Top quark physics at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Margaroli, F

    2015-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest fundamental particle known so far. As such, it is expected to play a crucial role in the study of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism and the generation of mass, as well as to serve as an ideal window into new physics. The discovery of a Higgs boson provides us additional experimental opportunities to test our current understanding of top quarks physics. In this contribution I will discuss the status of top quark physics as of 2014, and present a few recent highlights.

  18. Workshop on physics at the first muon collider and front-end of a muon collider: A brief summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geer, S.

    1998-02-01

    In November 1997 a workshop was held at Fermilab to explore the physics potential of the first muon collider, and the physics potential of the accelerator complex at the `front-end` of the collider. An extensive physics program emerged from the workshop. This paper attempts to summarize this physics program and to identify the main conclusions from the workshop. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. International Linear Collider Physics and detectors: 2011 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Fuster, Juan [IFIC- Valencia (Spain); Hesla, Leah [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Illenseer, Monika [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Royole-Degieux, Perrine [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Caen (France). Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL); Takahashi, Rika [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Warmbein, Barbara [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yamada, Sakue [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Zhang, Min [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP)

    2012-08-29

    The studies of physics and detectors for the International Linear Collider are an important parallel element to the effort for the ILC Technical Design Report. The studies comprise the physics opportunities, detector requirements, and detector development to achieve the challenging high performance demanded by the physics, as well as integration of detectors into the accelerator. The current phase of this effort began with a call for Letters of Intent (LOIs) in 2007 and will lead to the submission of Detailed Baseline Design (DBD) report together with the ILC Technical Design Report at the end of 2012. Here we summarise the current status of this process, review what it has accomplished and identify the work that still needs to be completed. This report, titled International Linear Collider Physics and Detectors: 2011 Status Report, does just this.

  20. Physics at the FCC-hh, a 100 TeV pp collider

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    A 100 TeV pp collider is under consideration, by the high-energy physics community, as an important step for the future development of our field, following the completion of the LHC and High-luminosity LHC physics programmes. In particular, CERN is considering 100 TeV pp collisions as the key target of a Future Circular Collider facility, built around a 100 km tunnel and designed to deliver pp, e+e- and ep collisions, in addition to a programme with heavy ion beams and with the injector complex. CERN is coordinating an international study tasked with the completion, by the end of 2018, of a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for this facility. This document presents the first results of the assessment of the physics potential of the hadronic part of this research programme (FCC-hh).

  1. Pushing the precision frontier in Collider Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The interplay between precise theory predictions and experimental measurements has written a success story in particle physics. After a brief journey into history we will review recent developments which have led  to "revolutions" with regard to precision calculations and to new insights into the structure of quantum field theory. The second part of the talk will focus on phenomenology, especially on Higgs boson pair production as a window to physics beyond the Standard Model, manifesting itself in a modification of those Higgs couplings which are still to a large extent unconstrained, in particular the Higgs boson self-coupling.

  2. Physics of extra dimensions at colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The success of general relativity inspired other attempts to unify geometry and physics. The Kaluza–Klein programme is the most well-known of these attempts, where, by invoking a higher-dimensional space–time it was hoped that one could unify gravity and electromagnetism. To recover the four-dimensional world of expe ...

  3. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We expect the LHC to unravel the secrets of the physics of the EWSB, as well as to provide pointers to the BSM .... On top of it, the resummation of soft and collinear corrections has been performed at the NNLL. The nonfactorizable EW and QCD corrections to the process have also been computed and shown to be ∼5%.

  4. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    June 6-15, 2007, CERN The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007 The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, extensively covered the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis t...

  5. When worlds collide (particle physics experiments)

    CERN Document Server

    Cunningham, J

    2005-01-01

    Preparations are underway at CERN for new particle smashing experiments. The author describes the construction challenge for the engineers involved. The engineering challenge is to construct the largest and most elaborate physics experiment ever proposed, with tolerances of microns. The design and manufacture of components has been subcontracted to more than 500 companies and institutions worldwide, including ones in India, Russia, Japan, France and the UK.

  6. arXiv Physics at the e+ e- Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Battaglia, M.; Belanger, G.; Fujii, K.; Kalinowski, J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kiyo, Y.; Olive, K.; Simon, F.; Uwer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Zerwas, P.M.; Arbey, A.; Asano, M.; Bechtle, P.; Bharucha, A.; Brau, J.; Brummer, F.; Choi, S.Y.; Denner, A.; Desch, K.; Dittmaier, S.; Ellwanger, U.; Englert, C.; Freitas, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godfrey, S.; Greiner, N.; Grojean, C.; Grunewald, M.; Heisig, J.; Hocker, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kogler, R.; Krawczyk, M.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Kroseberg, J.; Liebler, S.; List, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mambrini, Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Mnich, J.; Monig, K.; Muhlleitner, M.M.; Poschl, R.; Porod, W.; Porto, S.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schmitt, M.; Serpico, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stal, O.; Stefaniak, T.; Stockinger, D.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G.W.; Zeune, L.; Moortgat, F.; Xella, S.; Bagger, J.; Ellis, J.; Komamiya, S.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Peskin, M.; Schlatter, D.; Wagner, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range of sqrt{s}=92 GeV--3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

  7. arXiv Physics at the e+ e- Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Battaglia, M.; Belanger, G.; Fujii, K.; Kalinowski, J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kiyo, Y.; Olive, K.; Simon, F.; Uwer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Zerwas, P.M.; Arbey, A.; Asano, M.; Bechtle, P.; Bharucha, A.; Brau, J.; Brummer, F.; Choi, S.Y.; Denner, A.; Desch, K.; Dittmaier, S.; Ellwanger, U.; Englert, C.; Freitas, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godfrey, S.; Greiner, N.; Grojean, C.; Grunewald, M.; Heisig, J.; Hocker, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kogler, R.; Krawczyk, M.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Kroseberg, J.; Liebler, S.; List, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mambrini, Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Mnich, J.; Monig, K.; Muhlleitner, M.M.; Poschl, R.; Porod, W.; Porto, S.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schmitt, M.; Serpico, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stal, O.; Stefaniak, T.; Stockinger, D.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G.W.; Zeune, L.; Moortgat, F.; Xella, S.; Bagger, J.; Ellis, J.; Komamiya, S.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Peskin, M.; Schlatter, D.; Wagner, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range of sqrt{s}=92 GeV--3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

  8. Physics at the [Formula: see text] linear collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat-Pick, G; Baer, H; Battaglia, M; Belanger, G; Fujii, K; Kalinowski, J; Heinemeyer, S; Kiyo, Y; Olive, K; Simon, F; Uwer, P; Wackeroth, D; Zerwas, P M; Arbey, A; Asano, M; Bagger, J; Bechtle, P; Bharucha, A; Brau, J; Brümmer, F; Choi, S Y; Denner, A; Desch, K; Dittmaier, S; Ellwanger, U; Englert, C; Freitas, A; Ginzburg, I; Godfrey, S; Greiner, N; Grojean, C; Grünewald, M; Heisig, J; Höcker, A; Kanemura, S; Kawagoe, K; Kogler, R; Krawczyk, M; Kronfeld, A S; Kroseberg, J; Liebler, S; List, J; Mahmoudi, F; Mambrini, Y; Matsumoto, S; Mnich, J; Mönig, K; Mühlleitner, M M; Pöschl, R; Porod, W; Porto, S; Rolbiecki, K; Schmitt, M; Serpico, P; Stanitzki, M; Stål, O; Stefaniak, T; Stöckinger, D; Weiglein, G; Wilson, G W; Zeune, L; Moortgat, F; Xella, S; Bagger, J; Brau, J; Ellis, J; Kawagoe, K; Komamiya, S; Kronfeld, A S; Mnich, J; Peskin, M; Schlatter, D; Wagner, A; Yamamoto, H

    A comprehensive review of physics at an [Formula: see text] linear collider in the energy range of [Formula: see text] GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  9. 3rd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at ...

  10. 12th CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the twelfth edition, from 28th August to 6th September 2017. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Other schools, such as the CERN European School of High Energy Physics, may provide more appropriate training for students in experimental HEP who are still working towards their PhDs. Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2017, when CERN will welcome students to the twelfth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School. The School will include nine days of lectures and discussions, and one free day in the middle of the period. Limited scholarship ...

  11. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN, Physics, Machine, Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphson, C

    2011-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new electron-hadron collider, the LHeC, in which electrons of $60$ to possibly $140$\\,GeV collide with LHC protons of $7000$\\,GeV. With an $ep$ design luminosity of about $10^{33}$\\,cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, the Large Hadron Electron Collider exceeds the integrated luminosity collected at HERA by two orders of magnitude and the kinematic range by a factor of twenty in the four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements. These are projected to solve a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The LHeC thus becomes the world's cleanest high resolution microscope, designed to continue the path of deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering into unknown areas of physics and kinematics. The physics ...

  12. Beam-Based Nonlinear Optics Corrections in Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Malitsky, Nikolay; Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, which gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 3 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non linear correction techniques.

  13. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bruce

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the time evolution of the heavy-ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from run-7, colliding 100  GeV/nucleon ^{197}Au^{79+} beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multiparticle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the rf bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future ^{208}Pb^{82+} beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  14. Time evolution of the luminosity of colliding heavy-ion beams in BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the time evolution of the heavy-ion luminosity and bunch intensities in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. First, we present measurements from a large number of RHIC stores (from run-7), colliding 100GeV/nucleon Au79+197 beams without stochastic cooling. These are compared with two different calculation methods. The first is a simulation based on multiparticle tracking taking into account collisions, intrabeam scattering, radiation damping, and synchrotron and betatron motion. In the second, faster, method, a system of ordinary differential equations with terms describing the corresponding effects on emittances and bunch populations is solved numerically. Results of the tracking method agree very well with the RHIC data. With the faster method, significant discrepancies are found since the losses of particles diffusing out of the rf bucket due to intrabeam scattering are not modeled accurately enough. Finally, we use both methods to make predictions of the time evolution of the future Pb82+208 beams in the LHC at injection and collision energy. For this machine, the two methods agree well.

  15. Realistic Approach for Beam Dynamics Simulation with Synchrotron Radiation in High Energy Circular Lepton Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Glukhov, S A

    2017-01-01

    In extremely high energy circular lepton colliders, correct consideration of synchrotron radiation is important for beam dynamics simulation. We developed a fast precise effective method to track particles in a realistic lattice when the radiation effects are distributed along the orbit. In the present paper we study an effect of decreasing dynamic aperture due to radiation from quadrupole lenses in the FCC-ee lepton collider.

  16. Spin Transparency Mode in the NICA Collider with Solenoid Siberian Snakes for Proton and Deuteron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2017-12-01

    Two solenoid Siberian Snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in spin transparency mode of the NICA collider. The snake solenoids with a total field integral of 2×50 T·m are placed into the straight sections of the NICA collider. It allows one to control polarization of protons and deuterons up to 13.5 GeV/c and 4 GeV/c respectively. The snakes introduce a strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Snakes are presented.

  17. Theory Overview of Electroweak Physics at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John M. [Fermilab

    2016-09-03

    This contribution summarizes some of the important theoretical progress that has been made in the arena of electroweak physics at hadron colliders. The focus is on developments that have sharpened theoretical predictions for final states produced through electroweak processes. Special attention is paid to new results that have been presented in the last year, since LHCP2015, as well as on key issues for future measurements at the LHC.

  18. Working group report: Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Working group report: Physics at the Large Hadron Collider. Coordinators: D K GHOSH1,∗. , A NYFFELER2 and V RAVINDRAN2. Working group members: N Agarwal3, P Agarwal4, P Bandyopadhyay2,5,. R Basu6, B Bhattacherjee7, S S Biswal7, D Choudhury8, M Dahiya9, S Dutta9,. N Gaur8, K Ghosh10, R M Godbole11 ...

  19. Identification and Classification of Beam Loss Patterns in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Panagiotis, Theodoropoulos; Valentino, Gianluca; Redaelli, Stefano; Herbster, Mark

    The Large Hadron Collider, is the largest particle accelerator ever built, achieving record beam energy and beam intensity. Beam losses are unavoidable and can risk the safety of accelerator’s components. Beam loss maps are used to validate the collimation system, designed to protect the accelerator against beam losses. The complexity of this system requires well defined inspection methods and well defined case studies that ensure normal operation and efficient performance evaluation. In this work, enhancements are proposed to the existing validation methods with extensions towards automating the inspection mechanisms, introducing pattern recognition and statistical learning methods.

  20. Impact of detector simulation in particle physics collider experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Elvira, V.

    2017-06-01

    Through the last three decades, accurate simulation of the interactions of particles with matter and modeling of detector geometries has proven to be of critical importance to the success of the international high-energy physics (HEP) experimental programs. For example, the detailed detector modeling and accurate physics of the Geant4-based simulation software of the CMS and ATLAS particle physics experiments at the European Center of Nuclear Research (CERN) Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was a determinant factor for these collaborations to deliver physics results of outstanding quality faster than any hadron collider experiment ever before. This review article highlights the impact of detector simulation on particle physics collider experiments. It presents numerous examples of the use of simulation, from detector design and optimization, through software and computing development and testing, to cases where the use of simulation samples made a difference in the precision of the physics results and publication turnaround, from data-taking to submission. It also presents estimates of the cost and economic impact of simulation in the CMS experiment. Future experiments will collect orders of magnitude more data with increasingly complex detectors, taxing heavily the performance of simulation and reconstruction software. Consequently, exploring solutions to speed up simulation and reconstruction software to satisfy the growing demand of computing resources in a time of flat budgets is a matter that deserves immediate attention. The article ends with a short discussion on the potential solutions that are being considered, based on leveraging core count growth in multicore machines, using new generation coprocessors, and re-engineering HEP code for concurrency and parallel computing.

  1. Physics Opportunity with an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Patrizia [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the emergence of nucleons and nuclei and their interactions from the properties and dynamics of quarks and gluons in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is a fundamental and compelling goal of nuclear science. A high-energy, high-luminosity polarized electron-ion collider (EIC) will be needed to explore and advance many aspects of QCD studies in the gluon dominated regions in nucleon and nuclei. The federal Nuclear Science Advisory Committee unanimously approved a high-energy electro-ion collider to explore a new frontier in physics research. In fact, the committee calls the collider the country's next "highest priority" in new facility construction, and is one of four main recommendations contained in its 2015 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science. Two proposals for the EIC are being considered in the U.S.: one each at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) and at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). An overview of the physics opportunities an EIC presents to the nuclear science community in future decades is presented.

  2. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  3. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter Gregory [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  4. Fast and Precise Beam Energy Measurement using Compton Backscattering at e+e- Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminskiy, V V; Muchnoi, N Yu; Zhilich, V N

    2017-01-01

    The report describes a method for a fast and precise beam energy measurement in the beam energy range 0.5-2 GeV and its application at various e+e- colliders. Low-energy laser photons interact head-on with the electron or positron beam and produce Compton backscattered photons whose energy is precisely measured by HPGe detector. The method allows measuring the beam energy with relative accuracy of ∼2-5.10-5. The method was successfully applied at VEPP-4M, VEPP-3, VEPP-2000 (BINP, Russia) and BEPC-II (IHEP, China).

  5. Experience with High-Intensity Beam Scraping and Tail Population at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Burkart, F; Bruce, R; Mirarchi, D; Salvachua, B; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The population of beam tails at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a source of concern for the operation at higher beam energies and intensities when even small fractions of the beam could represent a potential danger is case of slow or fast losses, e.g. caused by orbit transients or by collimator movements. Different studies have been performed using the technique of collimator scans to probe the beam tail population in different conditions. The experience accumulated during the operation at 3.5 TeV and 4 TeV is reviewed.

  6. Proton beam emittance growth in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available With the significant beam intensity improvement in RHIC polarized proton run 2005 and run 2006, the emittance growth becomes a luminosity limiting factor. The beam emittance growth has a dependence on the dynamic pressure rise, which in RHIC proton runs is mainly caused by the electron cloud. The dependence of the emittance growth on other electron cloud related parameters is also identified. The beam instability is usually absent, and the emittance growth rate is much slower than the ones typically caused by the head-tail instability. It is suspected that the emittance growth is caused by the electron cloud below the instability threshold. A discussion follows.

  7. Impact of three-dimensional polarization profiles on spin-dependent measurements in colliding beam experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Fischer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the polarization-weighted luminosity (figure of merit in single and double spin measurements in colliding beam experiments. Applications to RHIC are discussed.

  8. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y P; Barranco, J; Tomás, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F; Calaga, R; Morita, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit...

  9. Beam-induced energy deposition issues in the Very Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V; Foster, G W

    2001-01-01

    Energy deposition issues are extremely important in the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) with huge energy stored in its 20 TeV (Stage-1) and 87.5 TeV (Stage-2) beams. The status of the VLHC design on these topics, and possible solutions of the problems are discussed. Protective measures are determined based on the operational and accidental beam loss limits for the prompt radiation dose at the surface, residual radiation dose, ground water activation, accelerator components radiation damage and quench stability. The beam abort and beam collimation systems are designed to protect accelerator from accidental and operational beam losses, IP region quadrupoles from irradiation by the products of beam-beam collisions, and to reduce the accelerator-induced backgrounds in the detectors. (7 refs).

  10. New type of beam size effect in the {ital W} boson production at {bold {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}} colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, K. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz and Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Guttenberg Universitaet, THEP, Staudinger weg 7, D 55099 Mainz (Germany); Serbo, V.G. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    1996-04-01

    The cross section for the reactions of the type {mu}{sup {minus}}{mu}{sup +}{r_arrow}{ital e}{nu}{sub {ital eX}} cannot be calculated by standard methods due to the {ital t}-channel singularity in the physical region. In this Letter we show that accounting for the finite sizes of the colliding beams results in the regularization of this singularity. The finite cross section, which is obtained in this way, turns out to be linearly proportional to the transverse sizes of the colliding beams. As an application of the above result we calculate the production of the {ital W} boson at the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders in the {mu}{sup {minus}}{mu}{sup +}{r_arrow}{ital e}{nu}{sub {ital eW}}{sup +} reaction. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Higgs physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abusleme, A.; Afanaciev, K.; Alipour Tehrani, N.; Balázs, C.; Benhammou, Y.; Benoit, M.; Bilki, B.; Blaising, J.-J.; Boland, M. J.; Boronat, M.; Borysov, O.; Božović-Jelisavčić, I.; Buckland, M.; Bugiel, S.; Burrows, P. N.; Charles, T. K.; Daniluk, W.; Dannheim, D.; Dasgupta, R.; Demarteau, M.; Díaz Gutierrez, M. A.; Eigen, G.; Elsener, K.; Felzmann, U.; Firlej, M.; Firu, E.; Fiutowski, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabriel, M.; Gaede, F.; García, I.; Ghenescu, V.; Goldstein, J.; Green, S.; Grefe, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Kačarević, G.; Kalinowski, J.; Kananov, S.; Klempt, W.; Kopec, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Krupa, B.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kulis, S.; Laštovička, T.; Lesiak, T.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Linssen, L.; Lukić, S.; Maier, A. A.; Makarenko, V.; Marshall, J. S.; Martin, V. J.; Mei, K.; Milutinović-Dumbelović, G.; Moroń, J.; Moszczyński, A.; Moya, D.; Münker, R. M.; Münnich, A.; Neagu, A. T.; Nikiforou, N.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nürnberg, A.; Pandurović, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perez Codina, E.; Peric, I.; Petric, M.; Pitters, F.; Poss, S. G.; Preda, T.; Protopopescu, D.; Rassool, R.; Redford, S.; Repond, J.; Robson, A.; Roloff, P.; Ros, E.; Rosenblat, O.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Shumeiko, N.; Sicking, E.; Simon, F.; Simoniello, R.; Sopicki, P.; Stapnes, S.; Ström, R.; Strube, J.; Świentek, K. P.; Szalay, M.; Tesař, M.; Thomson, M. A.; Trenado, J.; Uggerhøj, U. I.; van der Kolk, N.; van der Kraaij, E.; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M.; Vila, I.; Vogel Gonzalez, M.; Vos, M.; Vossebeld, J.; Watson, M.; Watson, N.; Weber, M. A.; Weerts, H.; Wells, J. D.; Weuste, L.; Winter, A.; Wojtoń, T.; Xia, L.; Xu, B.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zgura, I.-S.

    2017-07-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future {e+}{e-} collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 {TeV} , providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper is the first comprehensive presentation of the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating at three energy stages: √{s} = 350 {GeV} , 1.4 and 3 {TeV} . The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e+e- → ZH) and {W} {W} -fusion (e+e- → H ν_{!e} {\\bar{{ν }}_{!e} ), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Γ_{{H}}, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at √{s} > 1 {TeV} provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through {W} {W} -fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes {e+}{e-} → t {\\bar{t}} {H} and {e+}{e-} → {H} {H} {{ν}}_{!e} {\\bar{{ν }}}_{!e} allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of the precision achievable with Higgs measurements at CLIC and describes the interpretation of these measurements in a global fit.

  12. Higgs physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H.; Benhammou, Y.; Borysov, O.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Rosenblat, O. [Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abusleme, A.; Diaz Gutierrez, M.A.; Vogel Gonzalez, M. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Afanaciev, K.; Makarenko, V.; Shumeiko, N. [Belarusian State University, National Scientific and Educational Centre of Particle and High Energy Physics, Minsk (Belarus); Alipour Tehrani, N.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Grefe, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hynds, D.; Klempt, W.; Kulis, S.; Linssen, L.; Maier, A.A.; Muenker, R.M.; Muennich, A.; Nikiforou, N.; Nuernberg, A.; Perez Codina, E.; Petric, M.; Pitters, F.; Poss, S.G.; Redford, S.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Sicking, E.; Simoniello, R.; Stapnes, S.; Stroem, R.; Strube, J.; Weber, M.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Balazs, C.; Charles, T.K. [Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Benoit, M.; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M. [Universite de Geneve, Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire (DPNC), Geneva (Switzerland); Bilki, B.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Weerts, H.; Xia, L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Blaising, J.J. [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Boland, M.J.; Felzmann, U.; Rassool, R. [University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Boronat, M.; Fuster, J.; Garcia, I.; Ros, E.; Vos, M. [CSIC-University of Valencia, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Kacarevic, G.; Lukic, S.; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G.; Pandurovic, M. [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Buckland, M.; Vossebeld, J. [University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Bugiel, S.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kopec, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.P. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Crakow (Poland); Burrows, P.N. [Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Daniluk, W.; Krupa, B.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lesiak, T.; Moszczynski, A.; Pawlik, B.; Sopicki, P.; Wojton, T.; Zawiejski, L. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Crakow (Poland); Eigen, G.; Kraaij, E. van der [University of Bergen, Department of Physics and Technology, Bergen (Norway); Firu, E.; Ghenescu, V.; Neagu, A.T.; Preda, T.; Zgura, I.S. [Institute of Space Science, Bucharest (Romania); Gabriel, M.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Kolk, N. van der; Weuste, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Gaede, F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Goldstein, J. [University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Green, S.; Marshall, J.S.; Mei, K.; Thomson, M.A.; Xu, B. [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hawkes, C.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Watson, M.; Watson, N.; Winter, A. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Kalinowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Zarnecki, A.F. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Lastovicka, T. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Martin, V.J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Moya, D.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Vila, I. [CSIC-University of Cantabria, IFCA, Santander (Spain); Peric, I. [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik (IPE), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Protopopescu, D.; Robson, A. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Trenado, J. [University of Barcelona, Barcelona (ES); Uggerhoej, U.I. [Aarhus University, Aarhus (DK); Wells, J.D. [University of Michigan, Physics Department, Ann Arbor, MI (US)

    2017-07-15

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper is the first comprehensive presentation of the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating at three energy stages: √(s) = 350 GeV, 1.4 and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e{sup +}e{sup -} → ZH) and WW-fusion (e{sup +}e{sup -} → Hν{sub e} anti ν{sub e}), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Γ{sub H}, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at √(s) > 1 TeV provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through WW-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes e{sup +}e{sup -} → t anti tH and e{sup +}e{sup -} → HHν{sub e} anti ν{sub e} allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of the precision achievable with Higgs measurements at CLIC and describes the interpretation of these measurements in a global fit. (orig.)

  13. Physics with e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, Timothy L

    2003-05-05

    We describe the physics potential of e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders in this report. These machines are planned to operate in the first phase at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, before being scaled up to about 1 TeV. In the second phase of the operation, a final energy of about 2 TeV is expected. The machines will allow us to perform precision tests of the heavy particles in the Standard Model, the top quark and the electroweak bosons. They are ideal facilities for exploring the properties of Higgs particles, in particular in the intermediate mass range. New vector bosons and novel matter particles in extended gauge theories can be searched for and studied thoroughly. The machines provide unique opportunities for the discovery of particles in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the spectrum of Higgs particles, the supersymmetric partners of the electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons, and of the matter particles. High precision analyses of their properties and interactions will allow for extrapolations to energy scales close to the Planck scale where gravity becomes significant. In alternative scenarios, like compositeness models, novel matter particles and interactions can be discovered and investigated in the energy range above the existing colliders up to the TeV scale. Whatever scenario is realized in Nature, the discovery potential of e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders and the high-precision with which the properties of particles and their interactions can be analyzed, define an exciting physics programme complementary to hadron machines.

  14. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  15. ISABELLE: a proton-proton colliding beam facility. [Proposal for the construction of ISABELLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-04-01

    A proposal is presented for the construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE, to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At this major research facility, colliding beams of protons will be produced and studied by particle physicists. This proposal combines the interests of these particle physicists in exploring a new energy regime with the challenge of building a new research instrument. The proposal results from several years of considering such devices in parallel with extensive developmental work. The proposal is divided into several major parts. Following an introduction is an overall summary of the proposal covering its highlights. Part II contains a thorough discussion of the physics objectives that can be addressed by the storage ring. It begins with an explanation of current theoretical concepts that occupy the curiosity of high energy physicists. Then follows a brief discussion of possible experiments that might be assembled at the interaction regions to test these concepts. The third part of the proposal goes into the details of the design of the intersecting storage accelerators. It begins with a description of the entire facility and the design of the magnet ring structure. The processes of proton beam accumulation and acceleration are thoroughly described. The discussion then turns to the design of the components and subsystems for the accelerator. The accelerator elements are described followed by a description of the physical plant. The cost estimate and time scales are displayed in Part IV. Here the estimate has been based on the experience gained from working with the prototype units at the laboratory. The appendices are an important part of the proposal. The parameter list for the 200 x 200 GeV ISABELLE is carefully documented. An example of a possible research program can be found in an appendix. The performance of prototype units is documented in one of the appendices.

  16. Flavour physics and the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Valerie

    2012-02-28

    An exciting new era in flavour physics has just begun with the start of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHCb (where b stands for beauty) experiment, designed specifically to search for new phenomena in quantum loop processes and to provide a deeper understanding of matter-antimatter asymmetries at the most fundamental level, is producing many new and exciting results. It gives me great pleasure to describe a selected few of the results here-in particular, the search for rare B(0)(s)-->μ+ μ- decays and the measurement of the B(0)(s) charge-conjugation parity-violating phase, both of which offer high potential for the discovery of new physics at and beyond the LHC energy frontier in the very near future.

  17. Beam dynamics of the interaction region solenoid in a linear collider due to a crossing angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tenenbaum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Future linear colliders may require a nonzero crossing angle between the two beams at the interaction point (IP. This requirement in turn implies that the beams will pass through the strong interaction region solenoid with an angle, and thus that the component of the solenoidal field perpendicular to the beam trajectory is nonzero. The interaction of the beam and the solenoidal field in the presence of a crossing angle will cause optical effects not observed for beams passing through the solenoid on axis; these effects include dispersion, deflection of the beam, and synchrotron radiation effects. For a purely solenoidal field, the optical effects which are relevant to luminosity exactly cancel at the IP when the influence of the solenoid’s fringe field is taken into account. Beam size growth due to synchrotron radiation in the solenoid is proportional to the fifth power of the product of the solenoidal field, the length of the solenoid, and the crossing angle. Examples based on proposed linear collider detector solenoid configurations are presented.

  18. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  19. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Previtali, Valentina [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bruce, Roderik [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Redaelli, Stefano [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, Adriana [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salvachua Ferrando, Belen [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  20. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

  1. The Hunt for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Pran; Nelson, Brent; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dutta, Bhaskar; Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Han, Tao; Langacker, Paul; Mohapatra, Rabi; Valle, Jose; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Zerwas, Dirk; AbdusSalam, Shehu; Adam-Bourdarios, Claire; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Allanach, Benjamin; Altunkaynak, B.; Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Baer, Howard; Bajc, Borut; Buchmueller, O.; Carena, M.; Cavanaugh, R.; Chang, S.; Choi, Kiwoon; Csáki, C.; Dawson, S.; de Campos, F.; De Roeck, A.; Dührssen, M.; Éboli, O. J. P.; Ellis, J. R.; Flächer, H.; Goldberg, H.; Grimus, W.; Haisch, U.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hirsch, M.; Holmes, M.; Ibrahim, Tarek; Isidori, G.; Kane, Gordon; Kong, K.; Lafaye, Remi; Landsberg, G.; Lavoura, L.; Lee, Jae Sik; Lee, Seung J.; Lisanti, M.; Lüst, Dieter; Magro, M. B.; Mahbubani, R.; Malinsky, M.; Maltoni, Fabio; Morisi, S.; Mühlleitner, M. M.; Mukhopadhyaya, B.; Neubert, M.; Olive, K. A.; Perez, Gilad; Pérez, Pavel Fileviez; Plehn, T.; Pontón, E.; Porod, Werner; Quevedo, F.; Rauch, M.; Restrepo, D.; Rizzo, T. G.; Romão, J. C.; Ronga, F. J.; Santiago, J.; Schechter, J.; Senjanović, G.; Shao, J.; Spira, M.; Stieberger, S.; Sullivan, Zack; Tait, Tim M. P.; Tata, Xerxes; Taylor, T. R.; Toharia, M.; Wacker, J.; Wagner, C. E. M.; Wang, Lian-Tao; Weiglein, G.; Zeppenfeld, D.; Zurek, K.

    2010-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory to test the hypothesis of TeV scale strings and D brane models. An overview of these possibilities is presented in the spirit that it will serve as a companion to the Technical Design Reports (TDRs) by the particle detector groups ATLAS and CMS to facilitate the test of the new theoretical ideas at the LHC. Which of these ideas stands the test of the LHC data will govern the course of particle physics in the subsequent decades.

  2. A new method of RF power generation for two-beam linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; D'Amico, T E; Delahaye, J P; Guignard, Gilbert; Johnson, C; Millich, Antonio; Pearce, P; Rinolfi, Louis; Riche, A J; Schulte, Daniel; Thorndahl, L; Valentini, M; Wilson, Ian H; Ruth, Ronald D

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a new approach to two-beam acceleration. The energy for RF production is initially stored in a long-pulse electron beam which is efficiently accelerated to about 1.2 GeV by a fully loaded, conventional, low frequency (~1 GHz) linac. The beam pulse length is twice the length of the high-gradient linac. Segments of this long pulse beam are compressed using combiner rings to create a sequence of higher peak power drive beams with gaps in between. This train of drive beams is distributed from the end of the linac against the main beam direction down a common transport line so that each drive beam can power a section of the main linac. After a 180-degree turn, each high-current, low-energy drive beam is decelerated in low-impedance decelerator structures, and the resulti ng power is used to accelerate the low-current, high-energy beam in the main linac. The method discussed here seems relatively inexpensive is very flexible and can be used to accelerate beams for lin ear colliders over the...

  3. The Hunt for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Pran; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dutta, Bhaskar; Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Han, Tao; Langacker, Paul; Mohapatra, Rabi; Valle, Jose; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Zerwas, Dirk; AbdusSalam, Shehu; Adam-Bourdarios, Claire; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Allanach, Benjamin; Altunkaynak, B; Anchordoqui, Luis A; Baer, Howard; Bajc, Borut; Buchmueller, O; Carena, M; Cavanaugh, R; Chang, S; Choi, Kiwoon; Csaki, C; Dawson, S; de Campos, F; De Roeck, A; Duhrssen, M; Eboli, O J.P; Ellis, J R; Flacher, H; Goldberg, H; Grimus, W; Haisch, U; Heinemeyer, S; Hirsch, M; Holmes, M; Ibrahim, Tarek; Isidori, G; Kane, Gordon; Kong, K; Lafaye, Remi; Landsberg, G; Lavoura, L; Lee, Jae Sik; Lee, Seung J; Lisanti, M; Lust, Dieter; Magro, M B; Mahbubani, R; Malinsky, M; Maltoni, Fabio; Morisi, S; Muhlleitner, M M; Mukhopadhyaya, B; Neubert, M; Olive, K A; Perez, Gilad; Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Plehn, T; Ponton, E; Porod, Werner; Quevedo, F; Rauch, M; Restrepo, D; Rizzo, T G; Romao, J C; Ronga, F J; Santiago, Jose; Schechter, J; Senjanovic, G; Shao, J; Spira, M; Stieberger, S; Sullivan, Zack; Tait, Tim M P; Tata, Xerxes; Taylor, T R; Toharia, M; Wacker, J; Wagner, C E.M; Wang, Lian-Tao; Weiglein, G; Zeppenfeld, D; Zurek, K

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory ...

  4. Physics perspectives for a Future Circular Collider: FCC-hh/eh - Physics-Perspectives

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The lectures will briefly discuss the parameters of a Future Circular Collider, before addressing in detail the physics perspectives and the challenges for the experiments and detector systems. The main focus will be on ee and pp collisions, but opportunities for e—p physics will also be covered. The FCC physics perspectives will be presented with reference to the ongoing LHC programme, including the physics potential from future upgrades to the LHC in luminosity and possibly energy.

  5. International linear collider physics and detectors. 2011 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Oregon Univ., OR (United States); Fuster, Juan [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Hesla, Leah [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center; Illenseer, Monika; Warmbein, Barbara [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Royole-Degieux, Perrine [CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Takahashi, Rika [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamada, Sakue [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Gakuin Univ., Sendai (Japan); Min, Zhang (eds.) [IHEP, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01

    The studies of physics and detectors for the International Linear Collider are an important parallel element to the effort for the ILC Technical Design Report. The studies comprise the physics opportunities, detector requirements, and detector development to achieve the challenging high performance demanded by the physics, as well as integration of detectors into the accelerator. The current phase of this effort began with a call for Letters of Intent (LOIs) in 2007 and will lead to the submission of Detailed Baseline Design (DBD) report together with the ILC Technical Design Report at the end of 2012. Here we summarise the current status of this process, review what it has accomplished and identify the work that still needs to be completed. This report, titled International Linear Collider Physics and Detectors: 2011 Status Report, does just this. This report begins with a discussion of the outstanding issues in physics that motivate the construction of the ILC. It describes the organisation of the LOI process, the validation of the LOIs by the International Detector Advisory Group, and the results of R and D carried out to support the detector designs. The details of the concept detectors have already been published in the LOIs, which were completed in 2009. This report will, in a complementary way, describe the status of the detector R and D for each individual detector component and the status of the physics simulation infrastructure that has been built for the detector design process. Much of this work is carried out in cooperation between the two detector concept groups. This report describes the five common task groups and two working groups that have organised these cooperative activities. Many members of the detector concept groups and the common task groups have contributed to this report. Many more people have carried out the actual work that is reviewed. The complete list of members of each detector concept group can be found from the author lists of

  6. Lattice design and beam optics calculations for the new large-scale electron-positron collider FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Haerer, Bastian; Prof. Dr. Schmidt, Ruediger; Dr. Holzer, Bernhard

    Following the recommendations of the European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics, CERN launched the Future Circular Collider Study (FCC) to investigate the feasibility of large-scale circular colliders for future high energy physics research. This thesis presents the considerations taken into account during the design process of the magnetic lattice in the arc sections of the electron-positron version FCC-ee. The machine is foreseen to operate at four different centre-of-mass energies in the range of 90 to 350 GeV. Different beam parameters need to be achieved for every energy, which requires a flexible lattice design in the arc sections. Therefore methods to tune the horizontal beam emittance without re-positioning machine components are implemented. In combination with damping and excitation wigglers a precise adjustment of the emittance can be achieved. A very first estimation of the vertical emittance arising from lattice imperfections is performed. Special emphasis is put on the optimisation of the ...

  7. Physics overview: Introduction to international linear collider physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    measurements of electroweak processes at LEP and SLC in the 1990s have led us to confidence that gauge ... sis, inflation and dark energy require understanding physics scenario beyond the standard model. ..... sectors from ILC allow us to extrapolate SUSY breaking mass parameters toward the high energy scale.

  8. Progress on Optimization of the Nonlinear Beam Dynamics in the MEIC Collider Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Vasiliy S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, Fanglei [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Pilat, Fulvia [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nosochkov, Y. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sullivan, Michael [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wang, M.-H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wienands, Uli [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  9. Progress on optimization of the nonlinear beam dynamics in the MEIC collider rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosochkov, Y. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sullivan, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wang, M-H [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wienands, U. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Morozov, V. S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Ya. S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Lin, F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pilat, F. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Y. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-07-13

    One of the key design features of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab is a small beta function at the interaction point (IP) allowing one to achieve a high luminosity of up to 1034 cm-2s-1. The required strong beam focusing unavoidably causes large chromatic effects such as chromatic tune spread and beam smear at the IP, which need to be compensated. This paper reports recent progress in our development of a chromaticity correction scheme for the ion ring including optimization of dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance.

  10. Beam-related machine protection for the CERN Large Hadron Collider experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Appleby

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva stores 360 MJ per beam of protons at the top machine energy. This amount of energy storage presents a considerable challenge to the machine protection systems designed to protect both the machine and the six LHC experiments. This paper provides an overview of the machine protection systems relevant to the protection of the experiments, and demonstrates their operation and level of protection through a series of injection and stored beam failure scenarios. We conclude that the systems provide sufficient coverage for the protection of the experiments as far as reasonably possible.

  11. Development of a CVD diamond Beam Condition Monitor for CMS at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L; Gray, R; Ilgner, C; MacPherson, A; Oh, A; Pritchard, T; Stone, R; Worm, S

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will store 2808 bunches per colliding beam, with each bunch consisting of 1011 protons at an energy of 7 TeV. If there is a failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor fast increments of particle fluxes near the interaction point and, if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control to dump the beams. The system is being developed initially for the CMS experiment but it is sufficiently general to find potential applications elsewhere. Due to its high radiation hardness, CVD diamond was chosen for investigation as the BCM sensor. Various samples of CVD diamond have been characterized extensively with both a 90Sr source and in high-intensity test beams in order to assess the capabilities of such sensors and to study whether this detector technology is suitable for a BCM system. A selection of results fro...

  12. Design principles for high quality electron beams via colliding pulses in laser plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cormier-Michel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser plasma based accelerators have the potential to reduce dramatically the size and cost of future particle colliders and light sources. Production of high quality beams along with reproducibility, tunability, and efficiency are required for many applications. We present design principles for two-pulse colliding laser pulse injection mechanisms, which can meet these requirements. Simulations are used to determine the best conditions for the production of high quality beams: high charge, low energy spread, and low emittance. Simulations also allow access to the internal dynamics of the interaction, providing insight regarding further improvement of the beam quality. We find that a 20 pC beam can be accelerated to 300 MeV in 4 mm with only a few percent energy spread and transverse normalized emittance close to 1 mm mrad, using a 10 TW laser. We demonstrate that this design scales according to linear theory. Control of the laser pulse mode content and subsequent evolution in the plasma channel are shown to be critical for achieving the highest beam quality.

  13. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J.L.; Akay, A.N.; Aksakal, H.; Albacete, J.L.; Alekhin, S.; Allport, P.; Andreev, V.; Appleby, R.B.; Arikan, E.; Armesto, N.; Azuelos, G.; Bai, M.; Barber, D.; Bartels, J.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Belyaev, A.S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Bernard, N.; Bertolucci, S.; Bettoni, S.; Biswal, S.; Blumlein, J.; Bottcher, H.; Bogacz, A.; Bracco, C.; Brandt, G.; Braun, H.; Brodsky, S.; Buning, O.; Bulyak, E.; Buniatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Cakir, I.T.; Cakir, O.; Calaga, R.; Cetinkaya, V.; Ciapala, E.; Ciftci, R.; Ciftci, A.K.; Cole, B.A.; Collins, J.C.; Dadoun, O.; Dainton, J.; De Roeck, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Dudarev, A.; Eide, A.; Enberg, R.; Eroglu, E.; Eskola, K.J.; Favart, L.; Fitterer, M.; Forte, S.; Gaddi, A.; Gambino, P.; Garcia Morales, H.; Gehrmann, T.; Gladkikh, P.; Glasman, C.; Godbole, R.; Goddard, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Guffanti, A.; Guzey, V.; Gwenlan, C.; Han, T.; Hao, Y.; Haug, F.; Herr, W.; Herve, A.; Holzer, B.J.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jeanneret, B.; Jimenez, J.M.; Jowett, J.M.; Jung, H.; Karadeniz, H.; Kayran, D.; Kilic, A.; Kimura, K.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kluge, T.; Kocak, F.; Korostelev, M.; Kosmicki, A.; Kostka, P.; Kowalski, H.; Kramer, G.; Kuchler, D.; Kuze, M.; Lappi, T.; Laycock, P.; Levichev, E.; Levonian, S.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Lombardi, A.; Maeda, J.; Marquet, C.; Mellado, B.; Mess, K.H.; Milanese, A.; Moch, S.; Morozov, I.I.; Muttoni, Y.; Myers, S.; Nandi, S.; Nergiz, Z.; Newman, P.R.; Omori, T.; Osborne, J.; Paoloni, E.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pascaud, C.; Paukkunen, H.; Perez, E.; Pieloni, T.; Pilicer, E.; Pire, B.; Placakyte, R.; Polini, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pupkov, Y.; Radescu, V.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Rinol, L.; Rohini, R.; Rojo, J.; Russenschuck, S.; Sahin, M.; Salgado, C.A.; Sampei, K.; Sassot, R.; Sauvan, E.; Schneekloth, U.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schulte, D.; Senol, A.; Seryi, A.; Sievers, P.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Smith, W.; Spiesberger, H.; Stasto, A.M.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Sultansoy, S.; Sun, Y.P.; Surrow, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Taels, P.; Tapan, I.; Tasci, T.; Tassi, E.; Ten Kate, H.; Terron, J.; Thiesen, H.; Thompson, L.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomas Garcia, R.; Tommasini, D.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuckmantel, J.; Turkoz, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tywoniuk, K.; Unel, G.; Urakawa, J.; VanMechelen, P.; Variola, A.; Veness, R.; Vivoli, A.; Vobly, P.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Wallon, S.; Watt, G.; Weiss, C.; Wiedemann, U.A.; Wienands, U.; Willeke, F.; Xiao, B.W.; Yakimenko, V.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Zhang, Z.; Zimmermann, F.; Zlebcik, R.; Zomer, F.

    2012-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ ran...

  14. Beam Induced Electron Multipacting in the CERN Large Hadron Collider Accelerator LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pivi, M

    2000-01-01

    Electron multiplication driven by the electric field of the proton bunches is expected to occur in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), according to previous studies performed at CERN with two computer simulation codes. Electrons, secondary electrons and photo-electrons created by the beam will be accelerated in the electric field of the proton beam and will produce a large heat load at the surface, space charge in the chamber, coupling between the electrons and the beam and a pressure increase, which ultimately could cause the loss of the proton beam. It is, therefore, fundamental to study the phenomenon. The Ph.D. thesis work included studies and planning for the laboratory experimental setup to reproduce the electron multipacting induced by radio frequency, performing data aquisitionand analysis, modelization and simulations of the phenomenon, furthermore, to study the parameters influencing the effect, such as vacuum chamber material, cleaning, surface treatments, to better understand multipacting and determi...

  15. Beam Collimation and Machine-Detector Interface at the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, Nikolai V; Kostin, Mikhail A

    2005-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation, spray from the dumps and extraction lines, beam-gas and beam halo interactions with collimators and other components in the ILC beam delivery system create fluxes of muons and other secondaries which can exceed the tolerable levels at a detector by a few orders of magnitude. It is shown that with a multi-stage collimation system, magnetized iron spoilers which fill the tunnel and a set of masks in the detector, one can hopefully meet the design goals. Results of modeling with the STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss and energy deposition effects are presented in this paper. We concentrate on collimation system and mask design and optimization, short- and long-term survivability of the critical components (spoilers, absorbers, magnets, separators, dumps), dynamic heat loads and radiation levels in magnets and other components, machine-related backgrounds and damage in collider detectors, and environmental aspects (prompt dose, ground-water and air activation).

  16. Collider physics within the standard model a primer

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    2017-01-01

    With this graduate-level primer, the principles of the standard model of particle physics receive a particular skillful, personal and enduring exposition by one of the great contributors to the field. In 2013 the late Prof. Altarelli wrote: The discovery of the Higgs boson and the non-observation of new particles or exotic phenomena have made a big step towards completing the experimental confirmation of the standard model of fundamental particle interactions. It is thus a good moment for me to collect, update and improve my graduate lecture notes on quantum chromodynamics and the theory of electroweak interactions, with main focus on collider physics. I hope that these lectures can provide an introduction to the subject for the interested reader, assumed to be already familiar with quantum field theory and some basic facts in elementary particle physics as taught in undergraduate courses. “These lecture notes are a beautiful example of Guido’s unique pedagogical abilities and scientific vision”. From...

  17. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Cullinan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC requires beam position monitors (BPMs with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3 at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2/3  ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  18. Development of a beam condition monitor for use in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using synthetic diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Hernando, L; Ilgner, C; MacPherson, A; Oh, A; Pernegger, H; Pritchard, T; Stone, R; Worm, S

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will collide two counter rotating proton beams, each with a store energy about 350MJ; enough to melt 550kg of copper. If there is failure in an element of the accelerator, the resulting beam losses could cause damage not only to the machine but also to the experiments. A Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) is foreseen to monitor last increments of particle flux near the interaction point and if necessary, to generate an abort signal to the LHC accelerator control, to dump the beams. Due to its radiation hardness and minimal services requirements, synthetic CVD diamond is being considered as BCM sensor option. (12 refs).

  19. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001 - Part 3: Studies of Exotic and Standard Model Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, T.; et al.

    2001-06-13

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 3 reviews the possible experiments on that can be done at a linear collider on strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking, exotic particles, and extra dimensions, and on the top quark, QCD, and two-photon physics. It also discusses the improved precision electroweak measurements that this collider will make available.

  20. Probing space–time structure of new physics with polarized beams ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 69; Issue 5. Probing space-time structure of new physics with polarized beams at the international linear collider. B Ananthanarayan. New Physics at TeV Scale and Electroweak Precision Test Volume 69 Issue 5 November 2007 pp 849-854 ...

  1. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  2. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of γϵx = 3x10-6 m-rad and γϵy = 3x10-8 m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  3. Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction and its compensation in a high-luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montag C.; Oeftiger, A.; Fischer, W.

    2012-05-20

    One of the luminosity limits in a ring-ring electron-ion collider is the beam-beam effect on the electrons. In the limit of short ion bunches, simulation studies have shown that this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation with an electron lens. However, with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP in conjunction with a large beam-beam parameter, the electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside the long ion bunches. We present recent simulation results on the compensation of this beam-beam interaction with multiple electron lenses.

  4. Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on the Beam Size in Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosochkov, Y.

    2004-08-05

    In this paper, the authors discuss the optics effects of the realistic detector solenoid field on beam size at the Interaction Point (IP) of a future Linear Collider and their compensation. It is shown that most of the adverse effects on the IP beam size arise only from the part of the solenoid field which overlaps and extends beyond the final focusing quadrupoles. It is demonstrated that the most efficient and local compensation can be achieved using weak antisolenoids near the IP, while a correction scheme which employs only skew quadrupoles is less efficient, and compensation with strong antisolenoids is not appropriate. One of the advantages of the proposed antisolenoid scheme is that this compensation works well over a large range of the beam energy

  5. Compensation of detector solenoid effects on the beam size in a linear collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Nosochkov

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the optics effects of the realistic detector solenoid field on beam size at the interaction point (IP of a future linear collider and their compensation. It is shown that most of the adverse effects on the IP beam size arise only from the part of the solenoid field which overlaps and extends beyond the final focusing quadrupoles. It is demonstrated that the most efficient and local compensation can be achieved using the novel method of weak antisolenoids near the IP, while a correction scheme which employs only skew quadrupoles is less efficient, and compensation with strong antisolenoids is not appropriate. One of the advantages of the proposed antisolenoid scheme is that this compensation works well over a large range of the beam energy.

  6. Beam delivery system tuning and luminosity monitoring in the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dalena

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Emittance preservation in the beam delivery system (BDS is one of the major challenges in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC. The fast detuning of the final focus optics requires an on-line tuning procedure in order to keep luminosity close to the maximum. In this paper we discuss different tuning techniques to mitigate the displacement of magnets in the CLIC BDS and in particular in the final focus system. Some of them require a fast luminosity measurement. Here we study the possibility to use beam-beam background processes at CLIC 3 TeV c.m. energy as a fast luminosity signal. In particular, the hadron multiplicity in the detector region is investigated.

  7. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  8. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  9. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  10. Les Houches 2015: Physics at TeV colliders - new physics working group report

    CERN Document Server

    Brooijmans, G; Delgado, A.; Englert, C.; Falkowski, A.; Fuks, B.; Nikitenko, S.; Sekmen, S.; Barducci, D.; Bernon, J.; Bharucha, A.; Brehmer, J.; Brivio, I.; Buckley, A.; Burns, D.; Cacciapaglia, G.; Cai, H.; Carmona, A.; Carvalho, A.; Chalons, G.; Chen, Y.; Chivukula, R.S.; Conte, E.; Deandrea, A.; De Filippis, N.; Desai, N.; Flacke, T.; Frigerio, M.; Garcia-Pepin, M.; Gleyzer, S.; Goudelis, A.; Goertz, F.; Gras, P.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hewett, J.L.; Ittisamai, P.; Katz, A.; Kopp, J.; Kraml, S.; Krauss, M.E.; Kulkarni, S.; Laa, U.; Lacroix, S.; Lane, K.; Majumder, D.; Martin, A.; Mawatari, K.; Mohan, K.; Morse, D.M.; Mimasu, K.; Mühlleitner, M.; Nardecchia, M.; No, J.M.; Orlando, R.D.; Pani, P.; Papucci, M.; Polesello, G.; Pollard, C.; Porod, W.; Prosper, H.B.; Quirós, M.; Rizzo, T.; Sakurai, K.; Santiago, Jose; Sanz, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schmeier, D.; Sengupta, D.; Shao, H. -S.; Simmons, E.H.; Sonneveld, J.; Spieker, T.; Spira, M.; Tattersall, J.; Unel, G.; Vega-Morales, R.; Waltenberger, W.; Weiler, A.; You, T.; Zapata, O.A.; Zerwas, D.

    2016-01-01

    We present the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 1-19 June, 2015). Our report includes new physics studies connected with the Higgs boson and its properties, direct search strategies, reinterpretation of the LHC results in the building of viable models and new computational tool developments. Important signatures for searches for natural new physics at the LHC and new assessments of the interplay between direct dark matter searches and the LHC are also considered.

  11. Future Colliders for Particle Physics - "Big and Small" arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    Discoveries at high-energy particle colliders have established the standard model of particle physics. Technological innovation has helped to increase the collider energy at a much faster pace than the corresponding costs. New concepts will allow reaching ever higher luminosities and energies throughout the coming century. Cost-effective strategies for the collider implementation include staging. For example, a future circular collider could first provide electron-positron collisions, then hadron collisions (proton-proton and heavy-ion), and finally the collision of muons. Cooling-free muon colliders, realizable in a number of ways, promise an attractive and energy-efficient path towards lepton collisions at tens of TeV. While plasma accelerators and dielectric accelerators offer unprecedented gradients, the construction of a high-energy collider based on these new technologies still calls for significant improvements in cost and performance. Pushing the accelerating gradients or bending fields ever further, ...

  12. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Drees, K. A.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Miller, T. A.; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Pikin, A. I.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Schoefer, V.; Thieberger, P.; White, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  13. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  14. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001, 2 Higgs and Supersymmetry Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Asner, David Mark; Baer, H.; Bagger, Jonathan A.; Balazs, Csaba; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Barron, J.; Baur, Ulrich J.; Beach, R.; Bellwied, R.; Bigi, Ikaros I.Y.; Blochinger, C.; Boege, S.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.; Brau, James E.; Breidenbach, Martin; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Burke, David L.; Burrows, Philip N.; Butler, Joel N.; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Choi, Seong-Youl; Cinabro, David; Corcella, Gennaro; Cordero, R.K.; Danielson, N.; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dawson, S.; Denner, Ansgar; Derwent, P.; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Dima, M.; Dittmaier, Stefan; Dixit, M.; Dixon, Lance J.; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Doncheski, M.A.; Duckwitz, M.; Dunn, J.; Early, J.; Erler, Jens; Feng, Jonathan L.; Ferretti, C.; Fisk, H.Eugene; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, David W.; Gibbons, L.; Godbole, R.; Godfrey, S.; Goodman, E.; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Graf, N.; Grannis, Paul D.; Gronberg, Jeffrey Baton; Gunion, John F.; Haber, Howard E.; Han, Tao; Hawkings, Richard; Hearty, Christopher; Heinemeyer, Sven; Hertzbach, Stanley S.; Heusch, Clemens A.; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Hikasa, K.; Hiller, G.; Hoang, Andre H.; Hollebeek, Robert; Iwasaki, M.; Jacobsen, Robert Gibbs; Jaros, John Alan; Juste, A.; Kadyk, John A.; Kalinowski, J.; Kalyniak, P.; Kamon, Teruki; Karlen, Dean; Keller, L; Koltick, D.; Kribs, Graham D.; Kronfeld, Andreas Samuel; Leike, A.; Logan, Heather E.; Lykken, Joseph D.; Macesanu, Cosmin; Magill, Stephen R.; Marciano, William Joseph; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Martin, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matchev, Konstantin Tzvetanov; Monig, Klaus; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Moreau, G.; Mrenna, Stephen; Murakami, Brandon; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nauenberg, Uriel; Neal, H.; Newman, B.; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Orr, Lynne H.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Pathak, S.; Peskin, Michael E.; Plehn, Tilman; Porter, F.; Potter, C.; Prescott, C.; Rainwater, David Landry; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Repond, J.; Riles, Keith; Rizzo, Thomas Gerard; Ronan, Michael T.; Rosenberg, L.; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Roth, M.; Rowson, Peter C.; Schumm, Bruce Andrew; Seppala, L.; Seryi, Andrei; Siegrist, J.; Sinev, N.; Skulina, K.; Sterner, K.L.; Stewart, I.; Su, S.; Tata, Xerxes Ramyar; Telnov, Valery I.; Teubner, Thomas; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, Andre S.; van Bibber, Karl A.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vega, R.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Wagner, D.; Waite, Anthony P.; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Weiglein, Georg; Wells, James Daniel; Wester, William Carl, III; Williams, B.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, R.; Winn, D.; Woods, M.; Wudka, J.; Yakovlev, Oleg I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, Hai Jun

    2001-01-01

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 2 reviews the possible experiments on Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles that can be done at a linear collider.

  15. Summary of the very large hadron collider physics and detector workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, G.; Berger, M.; Brandt, A.; Eno, S. [and others

    1997-10-01

    One of the options for an accelerator beyond the LHC is a hadron collider with higher energy. Work is going on to explore accelerator technologies that would make such a machine feasible. This workshop concentrated on the physics and detector issues associated with a hadron collider with an energy in the center of mass of the order of 100 to 200 TeV.

  16. Coherent beam combining and noise analysis of a colliding pulse modelocked VECSEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Sandro M; Waldburger, Dominik; Alfieri, Cesare G E; Golling, Matthias; Keller, Ursula

    2017-08-07

    Optically-pumped SESAM-modelocked semiconductor disk lasers have become interesting ultrafast lasers with gigahertz pulse repetition rates, high average power and adjustable lasing wavelength. It is well established that colliding pulse modelocking (CPM) can generate both shorter pulses and improved stability. These improvements however typically come at the expense of a more complex ring cavity and two output beams. So far similar modelocking results have been obtained with CPM vertical external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) and with SESAM-modelocked VECSELs or modelocked integrated external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (MIXSELs) in a linear cavity. However coherent beam combining of the two output beams of a CPM VECSEL could result in a significantly higher peak power. This is interesting for example for applications in biomedical microscopy and frequency metrology. Here we demonstrate with a more detailed noise analysis that for both output beams of a CPM VECSEL the pulse repetition rates and the carrier envelope offset frequencies are locked to each other. In contrast to standard SESAM-modelocked VECSELs in a linear cavity, we only have been able to actively stabilize the pulse repetition rate of the CPM VECSEL by cavity length control and not by pump-power control. Furthermore, a first coherent beam combining experiment of the two output beams is demonstrated.

  17. The beam energy feedback system for Beijing electron positron collider II linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Chi, Y.; Liu, R.; Huang, X.

    2017-03-01

    A beam-energy feedback system has been developed for the injection linac to meet the beam quality needed for the Beijing electron positron collider II storage ring. This paper describes the implementation and commissioning of this system in detail. The system consists of an energy measurement unit, application software, and an actuator unit. A non-intersecting beam energy monitor was developed to allow real-time online energy adjustment. The beam energy adjustment is achieved by adjusting the output microwave phase of the RF power source station. The phase control mechanism has also been modified, and a new control method taking the return difference of the phase shifter into account is used to improve the system's performance. This system achieves the design aim and can adjust the beam center energy with a rate of 2 Hz. With the energy feedback system, the stability of the injection rate is better; the fluctuation range is reduced from 20 mA/min to 10 mA/min, while the stability of the beam center energy is maintained within ±0.1%.

  18. Large Hadron Collider slideshow shows future of physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Kramer, S E

    2007-01-01

    "The European organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has been building the Large Hadron Collider for many years, but it's finally taking shape and prepping to operate at full power in 2008." (1/2 page)

  19. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  20. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

  1. Two Methods For Simulating the Strong-Strong Beam-Beam Interaction in Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnock, Robert L.

    2002-11-11

    We present and compare the method of weighted macro particle tracking and the Perron-Frobenius operator technique for simulating the time evolution of two beams coupled via the collective beam-beam interaction in 2-D and 4-D (transverse) phase space. The coherent dipole modes, with and without lattice nonlinearities and external excitation, are studied by means of the Vlasov-Poisson system.

  2. HIGGS PHYSICS WITH A GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDER BASED ON CLIC 1*.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ASNER,D.; BURKHARDT,H.; DE ROECK,A.; ELLIS,J.; GRONBERG,J.; HEINEMEYER,S.; SCHMITT,M.; SCHULTE,D.; VELASCO,M.; ZIMMERMAN,F.

    2001-11-01

    We present the machine parameters and physics capabilities of the CLIC Higgs Experiment (CLICHE), a low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider based on CLIC 1, the demonstration project for the higher-energy two-beam accelerator CLIC. CLICHE is conceived as a factory capable of producing around 20,000 light Higgs bosons per year. We discuss the requirements for the CLIC 1 beams and a laser backscattering system capable of producing a {gamma}{gamma} total (peak) luminosity of 2.0 (0.36) x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with E{sub CM}({gamma}{gamma}) 115 GeV. We show how CLICHE could be used to measure accurately the mass, {bar b}b, WW and {gamma}{gamma} decays of a light Higgs boson. We illustrate how these measurements may distinguish between the Standard Model Higgs boson and those in supersymmetric and more general two-Higgs-doublet models, complementing the measurements to be made with other accelerators. We also comment on other prospects in {gamma}{gamma} and e{sup -}{gamma} physics with CLICHE.

  3. 100 kW CW highly-efficient multi-beam klystron for a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teryaev, Vladimir E.; Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Jiang, Yong; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2017-03-01

    Initial results are presented for the development of a CW highly-efficient RF source needed for operation of a future electron-ion collider. The design of this compact multi-beam klystron yields high efficiency (above 70%) for the power output of 125 kW at 952.6 MHz. The klystron is to work for the RF systems for ion acceleration in the polarized Medium-energy Electron Ion Collider as being developed at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  4. Detectors and Physics at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090240

    An electron-positron linear collider is an option for future large particle accelerator projects. Such a collider would focus on precision tests of the Higgs boson properties. This thesis describes three studies related to the optimisation of highly granular calorimeters and one study on the sensitivity of Higgs couplings at CLIC. Photon reconstruction algorithms were developed for highly granular calorimeters of a future linear collider detector. A sophisticated pattern recognition algorithm was implemented, which uses the topological properties of electromagnetic showers to identify photon candidates and separate them from nearby particles. It performs clustering of the energy deposits in the detector, followed by topological characterisation of the clusters, with the results being considered by a multivariate likelihood analysis. This algorithm leads to a significant improvement in the reconstruction of both single photons and multiple photons in high energy jets compared to previous reconstruction softwar...

  5. Physics at a 100 TeV pp Collider: Standard Model Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, M. L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zanderighi, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Aguilar Saavedra, J. A. [Univ. of Granada (Spain); Alekhin, S. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Inst. for High Energy Physics (IHEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Badger, S. [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bauer, C. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Becher, T. [Univ. Bern (Switzerland); Bertone, V. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Bonvini, M. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Boselli, S. [Univ. of Pavia (Italy); Bothmann, E. [Gottingen Univ. (Germany); Boughezal, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cacciari, M. [Univ. Paris Diderot (France); Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Carloni Calame, C M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Caola, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Campbell, J. M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Carrazza, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Chiesa, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Cieri, L. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Cimaglia, F. [Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Febres Cordero, F. [Physikalisches Inst., Freiburg (Germany); Ferrarese, P. [Gottingen Univ. (Germany); D' Enterria, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Ferrera, G. [Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Garcia i Tormo, X. [Univ. Bern (Switzerland); Garzelli, M. V. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Germann, E. [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hirschi, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Han, T. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ita, H. [Physikalisches Inst., Freiburg (Germany); Jager, B. [Univ. of Tubingen (Germany); Kallweit, S. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany); Karlberg, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Kuttimalai, S. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Krauss, F. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Larkoski, A. J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Lindert, J. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Luisoni, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Maierhofer, P. [Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Mattelaer, O. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Martinez, H. [Univ. of Pavia (Italy); Moch, S. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Montagna, G. [Univ. of Pavia (Italy); Moretti, M. [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Nason, P. [Univ. of Milano (Italy); Nicrosini, O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Oleari, C. [Univ. of Milano (Italy); Pagani, D. [Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Papaefstathiou, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Petriello, F. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Piccinini, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Pierini, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Pierog, T. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Pozzorini, S. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Re, E. [National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), Annecy-le-Vieux (France). Lab. of Annecy-le-Vieux for Theoretical Physics (LAPTh); Robens, T. [Technische Universitat Dresden (Germany); Rojo, J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Ruiz, R. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Sakurai, K. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Salam, G. P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salfelder, L. [Univ. of Tubingen (Germany); Schonherr, M. [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Schulze, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Schumann, S. [Univ. Gottingen (Germany); Selvaggi, M. [Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Shivaji, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Siodmok, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS), Krakow (Poland); Skands, P. [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Torrielli, P. [Univ. of Torino (Italy); Tramontano, F. [Univ. of Napoli (Italy); Tsinikos, I. [Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Tweedie, B. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Vicini, A. [Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Westhoff, S. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany); Zaro, M. [Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Zeppenfeld, D. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-06-22

    This report summarises the properties of Standard Model processes at the 100 TeV pp collider. We document the production rates and typical distributions for a number of benchmark Standard Model processes, and discuss new dynamical phenomena arising at the highest energies available at this collider. We discuss the intrinsic physics interest in the measurement of these Standard Model processes, as well as their role as backgrounds for New Physics searches.

  6. Ions for LHC Beam Physics and Engineering Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, Stephan; Baggiolini, Vito; Beuret, Andre; Blas, Alfred; Borburgh, Jan; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Carli, Christian; Chanel, Michel; Fowler, Tony; Gilardoni, S S; Gourber-Pace, Marine; Hancock, Steven; Hill, Charles E; Hourican, Michael; Jowett, John M; Kahle, Karsten; Kuchler, Detlef; Mahner, Edgar; Manglunki, Django; Martini, Michel; Paoluzzi, Mauro M; Pasternak, Jaroslaw; Pedersen, Flemming; Raich, Uli; Rossi, Carlo; Royer, Jean Pierre; Schindl, Karlheinz; Scrivens, Richard; Sermeus, Luc; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Tranquille, Gerard; Vretenar, Maurizio; Zickler, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The first phase of the heavy ion physics program at the LHC aims to provide lead-lead collisions at energies of 5.5 TeV per colliding nucleon pair and ion-ion luminosity of 1027 cm-2s-1. The transformation of CERN’s ion injector complex (Linac3-LEIR-PS-SPS) presents a number of beam physics and engineering challenges, which are described in this paper. In the LHC itself, there are fundamental performance limitations due to various beam loss mechanisms. To study these without risk of damage there will be an initial period of operation with a reduced number of nominal intensity bunches. While reducing the work required to commission the LHC with ions in 2008, this will still enable early physics discoveries.

  7. Final implementation, commissioning, and performance of embedded collimator beam position monitors in the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Baud, Guillaume; Bruce, Roderik; Gasior, Marek; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Olexa, Jakub; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Valloni, Alessandra; Wenninger, Jorg

    2017-08-01

    During Long Shutdown 1, 18 Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimators were replaced with a new design, in which beam position monitor (BPM) pick-up buttons are embedded in the collimator jaws. The BPMs provide a direct measurement of the beam orbit at the collimators, and therefore can be used to align the collimators more quickly than using the standard technique which relies on feedback from beam losses. Online orbit measurements also allow for reducing operational margins in the collimation hierarchy placed specifically to cater for unknown orbit drifts, therefore decreasing the β* and increasing the luminosity reach of the LHC. In this paper, the results from the commissioning of the embedded BPMs in the LHC are presented. The data acquisition and control software architectures are reviewed. A comparison with the standard alignment technique is provided, together with a fill-to-fill analysis of the measured orbit in different machine modes, which will also be used to determine suitable beam interlocks for a tighter collimation hierarchy.

  8. Final implementation, commissioning, and performance of embedded collimator beam position monitors in the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Valentino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During Long Shutdown 1, 18 Large Hadron Collider (LHC collimators were replaced with a new design, in which beam position monitor (BPM pick-up buttons are embedded in the collimator jaws. The BPMs provide a direct measurement of the beam orbit at the collimators, and therefore can be used to align the collimators more quickly than using the standard technique which relies on feedback from beam losses. Online orbit measurements also allow for reducing operational margins in the collimation hierarchy placed specifically to cater for unknown orbit drifts, therefore decreasing the β^{*} and increasing the luminosity reach of the LHC. In this paper, the results from the commissioning of the embedded BPMs in the LHC are presented. The data acquisition and control software architectures are reviewed. A comparison with the standard alignment technique is provided, together with a fill-to-fill analysis of the measured orbit in different machine modes, which will also be used to determine suitable beam interlocks for a tighter collimation hierarchy.

  9. Higgs physics at future colliders: Recent theoretical developments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at future e+e-linear colliders, where the clean environment and the expected high ... In this talk, I will summarize the studies that were performed recently in the sM ..... CTEQ4 PDF's. Figure 3. SM Higgs boson production cross-sections at the LHC. Left: σ(gg. H) as a function of MА at LO (dotted), NLO (dashed) and NLLO.

  10. Modeling colliding beams with an element by element representation of the storage ring guide field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Rubin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed model of the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR guide field, including beam-beam interaction computed in the weak-strong regime, is the basis for a multiturn simulation of luminosity. The simulation reproduces the dependence of luminosity on bunch current that is measured in the storage ring, at both high-energy (5.3   GeV/beam and in the wiggler-dominated low energy (CESR-c configuration (1.9   GeV/beam. Dynamics are determined entirely by the physics of propagation through the individual guide field elements with no free parameters. Energy dependence of the compensation of the transverse coupling introduced by the experimental solenoid is found to significantly degrade specific luminosity. The simulation also indicates a strong dependence of limiting beam-beam tune shift parameter on the geometric mean of synchrotron tune and bunch length.

  11. Weak interactions of colliding lepton beams with energy (10/sup 2/-10 /sup 3/) GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Dolgov, A D; Zakharov, V I

    1972-01-01

    Weak V-A interaction of colliding lepton beams at high energies is considered. It is shown that for colliding lepton antilepton beams, the contribution of weak interactions to the differential cross section of elastic scattering at angle theta =90 degrees prevails over that of electromagnetic interaction. The estimate of the weak cross section is based on the calculation of the imaginary part of the amplitude. A phenomenological description of the real art of the amplitude in the same approximation introduces a single unknown parameter. Provided the validity of dispersion relations with two subtractions is granted this parameter is related to the integral of total cross sections of ll and ll weak interactions.

  12. Future Linear Colliders: Detector R&D, Jet Reconstruction and Top Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2098729; Ros Martinez, Eduardo

    During the 20th century, discoveries and measurements at colliders, combined with progress in theoretical physics, allowed us to formulate the Standard Model of the in- teractions between the constituents of matter. Today, there are two advanced projects for a new installation that will collide electrons and positrons covering an energy range from several hundreds of GeV to the multi-TeV scale, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). These Future Linear Colliders give the opportunity to study the top quark with unprecedented precision. Measurements of top quark properties are of special interest, as the top quark is the heaviest ele- mentary particle of the SM. Precision measurements of top quark properties at e+e colliders promise therefore to be highly sensitive to physics beyond the SM. This thesis has three complementary parts. The first is dedicated to the R&D of the ILD detector concept for future e+e- colliders, more precisely, the innermost region of the de...

  13. Physics and guitars collide to make a big bang in schools

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Rock guitars, superstrings, 11 dimensions and the world's largest and highest energy particle accelerator are the lead instruments for the Institute of Physics' loudest schools lecture to date. "Rock in 11 dimensions: where physics and guitars collide" is an exciting, interactive and inspiring free talk for school students throughout the UK, building on everyday physics to explain groundbreaking research.

  14. Physics and guitars collide to make a big bang in schools

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Rock guitars, superstrings, 11 dimensions and the world's largest and highest energy particle accelerator are the lead instruments for the Institute of Physics' loudest schools lecture to date. 'Rock in 11 dimensions: where physics and guitars collide' is an exciting, interactive and inspiring free talk for school students throughout the UK, building on everyday physics to explain groundbreaking research.

  15. Future hadron colliders: From physics perspectives to technology R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, William [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Battaglia, Marco, E-mail: MBattaglia@lbl.gov [Santa Cruz Institute of Particle Physics, University of California at Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Klute, Markus [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Mangano, Michelangelo [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Prestemon, Soren [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rossi, Lucio; Skands, Peter [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-11-11

    High energy hadron colliders have been instrumental to discoveries in particle physics at the energy frontier and their role as discovery machines will remain unchallenged for the foreseeable future. The full exploitation of the LHC is now the highest priority of the energy frontier collider program. This includes the high luminosity LHC project which is made possible by a successful technology-readiness program for Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor and magnet engineering based on long-term high-field magnet R and D programs. These programs open the path towards collisions with luminosity of 5×10{sup 34} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} and represents the foundation to consider future proton colliders of higher energies. This paper discusses physics requirements, experimental conditions, technological aspects and design challenges for the development towards proton colliders of increasing energy and luminosity.

  16. Dual branch high voltage pulse generator for the beam extraction of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonthond, J; Ducimetière, L; Jansson, U; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    2002-01-01

    The LHC beam extraction kicker system, MKD, is composed of 15 fast kicker magnets per beam to extract the particles in one turn from the collider and to dispose them, after dilution, on an external absorber. Each magnet is powered by a separate pulse generator. The original single branch generator consisted of a discharge capacitor in series with a solid state closing switch left bracket 1 right bracket operating at 30 kV. In combination with a parallel freewheel diode stack this generator produced a current pulse of 2.7 mus rise time, 18.5 kA amplitude and about 1.8 ms fall time, of which only about 90 mus are needed to dump the beam. The freewheel diode circuit is equipped with a flat top current droop compensation network, consisting of a low voltage, low stray inductance, high current discharge capacitor. Extensive reliability studies have meanwhile suggested to further increase the operational safety of this crucial system by equipping each generator with two parallel branches. This paper presents the re...

  17. Radiation reaction induced spiral attractors in ultra-intense colliding laser beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The radiation reaction effects on electron dynamics in counter-propagating circularly polarized laser beams are investigated through the linearization theorem and the results are in great agreement with numeric solutions. For the first time, the properties of fixed points in electron phase-space were analyzed with linear stability theory, showing that center nodes will become attractors if the classical radiation reaction is considered. Electron dynamics are significantly affected by the properties of the fixed points and the electron phase-space densities are found to be increasing exponentially near the attractors. The density growth rates are derived theoretically and further verified by particle-in-cell simulations, which can be detected in experiments to explore the effects of radiation reaction qualitatively. The attractor can also facilitate realizing a series of nanometer-scaled flying electron slices via adjusting the colliding laser frequencies.

  18. Large-charge quasimonoenergetic electron beams produced by off-axis colliding laser pulses in underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z. G.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhang, B.; He, S. K.; Teng, J.; Hong, W.; Dong, K. G.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Gu, Y. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Electrons can be efficiently injected into a plasma wave by colliding two counterpropagating laser pulses in a laser wakefield acceleration. However, the generation of a high-quality electron beam with a large charge is difficult in the traditional on-axis colliding scheme due to the growth of the electron beam duration coming from the increase of the beam charge. To solve this problem, we propose an off-axis colliding scheme, in which the collision point is away from the axis of the driver pulse. We show that the electrons injected from the off-axis region are highly concentered on the tail of the bubble even for a large trapped charge, thus feeling almost the same accelerating field. As a result, quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a large charge can be produced. The validity of this scheme is confirmed by both the particle-in-cell simulations and the Hamiltonian model. Furthermore, it is shown that a Laguerre-Gauss (LG) laser can be adopted as the injection pulse to realize the off-axis colliding injection in three dimensions symmetrically, which may be useful in simplifying the technical layout of the real experiment setup.

  19. Physics at TeV e sup + e sup minus linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is presented of the physics opportunities at TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. Examples are given of physics that might emerge in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions and in {gamma}{gamma} collisions using the back-scattered laser technique, including {gamma}{gamma} {yields} ZZ scattering as a probe of ultraheavy quanta. The second portion of the talk focuses on physics that must emerge at or below the TeV scale--the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. In particular a very rough estimate is presented of the most challenging possible signal of symmetry breaking, strong WW scattering, as a function of collider energy. A subtheme, made explicit in the concluding section, is the continuing complementarity of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and pp colliders in the domain of TeV physics.

  20. Physics at TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is presented of the physics opportunities at TeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders. Examples are given of physics that might emerge in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions and in {gamma}{gamma} collisions using the back-scattered laser technique, including {gamma}{gamma} {yields} ZZ scattering as a probe of ultraheavy quanta. The second portion of the talk focuses on physics that must emerge at or below the TeV scale--the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. In particular a very rough estimate is presented of the most challenging possible signal of symmetry breaking, strong WW scattering, as a function of collider energy. A subtheme, made explicit in the concluding section, is the continuing complementarity of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and pp colliders in the domain of TeV physics.

  1. Initial Performance Studies of a General-Purpose Detector for Multi-TeV Physics at a 100 TeV pp Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S. V. [Argonne; Beydler, M. [Argonne; Kotwal, A. V. [Fermilab; Gray, L. [Fermilab; Sen, S. [Duke U.; Tran, N. V. [Fermilab; Yu, S. -S. [Taiwan, Natl. Central U.; Zuzelski, J. [Michigan State U.

    2016-12-21

    This paper describes simulations of detector response to multi-TeV physics at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) or Super proton-proton Collider (SppC) which aim to collide proton beams with a centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. The unprecedented energy regime of these future experiments imposes new requirements on detector technologies which can be studied using the detailed GEANT4 simulations presented in this paper. The initial performance of a detector designed for physics studies at the FCC-hh or SppC experiments is described with an emphasis on measurements of single particles up to 33 TeV in transverse momentum. The reconstruction of hadronic jets has also been studied in the transverse momentum range from 50 GeV to 26 TeV. The granularity requirements for calorimetry are investigated using the two-particle spatial resolution achieved for hadron showers.

  2. Jet Physics with A Large Ion Collider Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Jochen

    In the presence of the strongly-interacting medium created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, highly energetic partons from hard interactions lose energy through scattering and radiating. This effect, referred to as jet quenching, is observed as a suppression of particles with large momenta transverse to the beam axis (high-$p_\\perp$). To study the impact of the medium evolution on the energy loss modelling in the Monte Carlo event generator JEWEL, we compare results obtained for different scenarios of Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200~\\mathrm{GeV}$. For this purpose, JEWEL was extended to use the output of relativistic hydrodynamic calculations in the OSCAR2008H format. We find the modelling of common observables, e.g. the nuclear modification factor, to be rather insensitive to the details of the medium evolution, for which the analytically accessible Bjorken expansion can thus be considered adequate. The OSCAR interface now allows further studies also at LHC energies. Jets of large transve...

  3. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams Generating High-Energy-Density Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, IV; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. This data has been used as input to a sophisticated two--dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1~m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy de...

  4. Physics Perspectives for a Future Circular Collider: FCC-hh - Accelerator & Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The lectures will briefly discuss the parameters of a Future Circular Collider, before addressing in detail the physics perspectives and the challenges for the experiments and detector systems. The main focus will be on ee and pp collisions, but opportunities for e—p physics will also be covered. The FCC physics perspectives will be presented with reference to the ongoing LHC programme, including the physics potential from future upgrades to the LHC in luminosity and possibly energy.

  5. Physics results from the first electron-proton collider HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeck, A. de

    1995-03-01

    After two years of experimenting at the new ep collider HERA many new results have been obtained. In this report we have presented results on interactions of high energy photons with matter, and showed that similar to hadronic interactions, hard scattering is observed in these collisions. The different photoproduction processes have been isolated, and a first attempt was made to measure the structure of the photon at HERA. A new region has been explored for deep inelastic scattering interactions. The proton structure is probed to very small values of Bjorken-x, showing a large increase of with decreasing x. Events with a large rapidity gap have been observed and are identified as diffractive scattering. The first electroweak results became available by studying the production of charged current events. Searches for new, exotic phenomena were made, but no evidence for the breakdown of the standard model has been found. (orig.)

  6. New Physics at the LHC: A Les Houches Report. Physics at Tev Colliders 2007 - New Physics Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooijmans, Gustaaf H.; /Columbia U.; Delgado, A.; /Notre Dame U.; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab; Grojean, C.; /CERN /Saclay, SPhT; Narain, Meenakshi; /Brown U.; Alwall, Johan; /SLAC; Azuelos, Georges; /Montreal U. /TRIUMF; Black, K.; /Harvard U.; Boos, E.; /SINP, Moscow; Bose, Tulika; /Brown U.; Bunichev, V.; /SINP, Moscow; Chivukula, R.S.; /Michigan State U.; Contino, R.; /CERN; Djouadi, A.; /Louis Pasteur U., Strasbourg I /Orsay, LAL; Dudko, Lev V.; /Durham U.; Ferland, J.; /Montreal U.; Gershtein, Yuri S.; /Florida State U.; Gigg, M.; /Durham U.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Herquet, M.; /Louvain U.; Hirn, J.; /Yale U. /Brown U. /Boston U. /Annecy, LAPTH /INFN, Turin /Valencia U., IFIC /Yale U. /Arizona U. /Louis Pasteur U., Strasbourg I /Orsay, LAL /KEK, Tsukuba /Moscow State U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /CERN /Durham U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Sao Paulo, IFT /Fermilab /Zurich, ETH /Boston U. /DESY /CERN /Saclay, SPhT /Durham U. /Cambridge U. /Michigan State U. /Louis Pasteur U., Strasbourg I /Orsay, LAL /Annecy, LAPTH /Fermilab /CERN /Arizona U. /Northwestern U. /Argonne /Kyoto U. /Valencia U., IFIC /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-12-05

    We present a collection of signatures for physics beyond the standard model that need to be explored at the LHC. The signatures are organized according to the experimental objects that appear in the final state, and in particular the number of high p{sub T} leptons. Our report, which includes brief experimental and theoretical reviews as well as original results, summarizes the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 11-29 June, 2007).

  7. Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulley, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

  8. Les Houches guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, M.A.; Laenen, Eric; Tollefson, K.; Baer, H.; Boos, E.; Cox, B.; Engel, R.; Giele, W.; Huston, J.; Ilyin, S.; Kersevan, B.; Krauss, F.; Kurihara, Y.; Lonnblad, L.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.; Odaka, S.; Richardson, P.; Ryd, A.; Sjostrand, T.; Skands, Peter Z.; Was, Z.; Webber, B.R.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2005-01-01

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  9. Les Houches guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Matt A.; Frixione, Stefano; Laenen, Eric; Tollefson, Kirsten

    2004-03-01

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  10. Les Houches Guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, M.A

    2004-08-24

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  11. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...

  12. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects due to Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders.

    CERN Document Server

    Furuseth, Sondre

    2017-01-01

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. This report discusses results from an implementation of the weak-strong model, studying the effects of head-on beam-beam interactions. The assumptions has been shown to be valid for configurations where the growth and losses of the beam are small. The tracking has been done using an original code which applies graphic cards to reduce the computation time. The bunches in the beams have been modelled cylindrically symmetrical, based on a Gaussian distribution in three dimensions. This choice fits well with bunches...

  13. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between Pb ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, R.; /CERN; Bocian, D.; /Fermilab /CERN; Gilardoni, S.; Jowett, J.M.; /CERN

    2009-08-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the alice interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal {sup 208}Pb{sup 82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  14. Beam losses from ultraperipheral nuclear collisions between ^{208}Pb^{82+} ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bruce

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte Carlo shower simulation, and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of ^{208}Pb^{82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the ALICE interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal ^{208}Pb^{82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  15. Theoretical and Experimental Beam Plasma Physics (TEBPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental beam plasma physics (TEBPP) consists of a package of five instruments to measure electric and magnetic fields, plasma density and temperature, neutral density, photometric emissions, and energetic particle spectra during firings of the particle injector (SEPAC) electron beam. The package is developed on a maneuverable boom (or RMS) and is used to measure beam characteristics and induced perturbations field ( 10 m) and mid field ( 10 m to 100 m) along the electron beam. The TEBPP package will be designed to investigate induced oscillations and induced electromagnetic mode waves, neutral and ion density and temperature effects, and beam characteristics as a function of axial distance.

  16. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School 2013 open for applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2013, when CERN will welcome students to the eighth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School.   Experiments at hadron colliders will continue to provide our best tools for exploring physics at the TeV scale for some time. With the completion of the 7-8 TeV runs of the LHC, and the final results from the full Tevatron data sample becoming available, a new era in particle physics is beginning, heralded by the Higgs-like particle recently discovered at 125 GeV. To realize the full potential of these developments, CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the eighth edition, from 28 August to 6 September 2013. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school which particularly targets young postdocs in exper...

  17. Physics at a gamma gamma, e gamma and e-e- Option for a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    de Roeck, A

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a review of the studies made in the working group on gamma gamma and e gamma physics" of the ECFA/DESY workshop on linear collider physics. It reports on several new physics studies, in particular s-channel Higgs production. A summary of R&D activities for the interaction region is presented. The merits of e-e- collisions are briefly recalled.

  18. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling and Prospects for Muon Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Rolland P; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Barzi, Emanuela; Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, S A; Del Frate, Licia; Derbenev, Yaroslav S; Gonin, Ivan V; Hanlet, Pierrick M; Hartline, Robert; Kaplan, Daniel; Kuchnir, Moyses; Moretti, Alfred; Neuffer, David V; Paul, Kevin; Popovic, Milorad; Roberts, Thomas; Romanov, Gennady; Turrioni, Daniele; Yarba, Victor; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2005-01-01

    A six-dimensional(6D)cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas* is used to achieve the small transverse emittances demanded by a high-luminosity muon collider. This helical cooling channel**(HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange. Simulations verify the analytic predictions and have shown a 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m HCC segment. Using three such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost six orders of magnitude. After this, two new post-cooling ideas can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to one or two mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. In this report we discuss the status of and the plans for the HCC simulation and engineering efforts. We also describe the new post-cooling id...

  19. Large Hadron Collider Physics (LHCP2017) conference | 15-20 May 2017 | Shanghai

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The fifth Annual Large Hadron Collider Physics will be held in Shanghai and hosted by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in the period of May 15-20, 2017. The main goal of the conference is to provide intense and lively discussions between experimenters and theorists in such research areas as the Standard Model Physics and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Heavy Quark Physics and Heavy Ion Physics as well as to share a recent progress in the high luminosity upgrades and future colliders developments.     The LHCP2017 website: http://lhcp2017.physics.sjtu.edu.cn/ Event date: 15 - 20 May 2017 Location: Shanghai, China

  20. There’s more to particle physics at CERN than colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    CERN’s scientific programme must be compelling, unique, diverse, and integrated into the global landscape of particle physics. One of the Laboratory’s primary goals is to provide a diverse range of excellent physics opportunities and to put its unique facilities to optimum use, maximising the scientific return.   In this spirit, we have recently established a Physics Beyond Colliders study group with a mandate to explore the unique opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex to address some of today’s outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The study group will provide input to the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. The process kicked off with a two-day workshop at CERN on 6 and 7 September, organised by the study group conveners: Joerg Jaeckel (Heidelberg), Mike Lamont (CERN) and Claude Vallée (CPPM Marseille and DESY). Its purpo...

  1. Scientists hope collider makes a big bang Physics questions are effort's focus

    CERN Multimedia

    Nickerson, Colin

    2007-01-01

    "The aim of the audacious undertaking - whose centerpiece is the Large Hadron Collider,the largest, most powerful particle accelerator ever constructed - is to solve one of the most perturbing puzzles of physics: how did matter attain mass and form the cosmos? Even Einstein couldn't nail that one."(2 pages)

  2. Constraints on new physics from baryogenesis and Large Hadron Collider data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Poul H; O'Connell, Donal; Petersen, Troels C; Tranberg, Anders

    2013-11-27

    We demonstrate the power of constraining theories of new physics by insisting that they lead to electroweak baryogenesis, while agreeing with current data from the Large Hadron Collider. The general approach is illustrated with a singlet scalar extension of the standard model. Stringent bounds can already be obtained, which reduce the viable parameter space to a small island.

  3. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, J.

    2012-01-01

    n this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly

  4. Large hadron collider physics program: Compact muon solenoid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The LHC physics program at CERN addresses some of the fundamental issues in particle physics and CMS experiment would concentrate on them. The CMS detector is designed for the search of Standard Model Higgs boson in the whole possible mass range. Also it will be sensitive to Higgs bosons in the minimal ...

  5. Working group report: High energy and collider physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; Institute of Physics, 751 005, Bhubaneswar, India; Indian Institute of Science, 560 012, Bangalore, India; Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA; Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science ...

  6. Gaussian-Beam/Physical-Optics Design Of Beam Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veruttipong, Watt; Chen, Jacqueline C.; Bathker, Dan A.

    1993-01-01

    In iterative method of designing wideband beam-waveguide feed for paraboloidal-reflector antenna, Gaussian-beam approximation alternated with more nearly exact physical-optics analysis of diffraction. Includes curved and straight reflectors guiding radiation from feed horn to subreflector. For iterative design calculations, curved mirrors mathematically modeled as thin lenses. Each distance Li is combined length of two straight-line segments intersecting at one of flat mirrors. Method useful for designing beam-waveguide reflectors or mirrors required to have diameters approximately less than 30 wavelengths at one or more intended operating frequencies.

  7. Physics opportunities for vector-boson scattering at a future 100 TeV hadron collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, B.; Salfelder, L.; Worek, M.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2017-10-01

    Vector-boson scattering (VBS) processes provide particularly promising means for probing the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and to search for new physics in the weak sector. In the environment of a future proton-proton collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of 100 TeV, unprecedented opportunities arise for the investigation of this important class of reactions. We highlight the prominent features of VBS processes in this energy regime and discuss how the VBS signal can be isolated in the presence of a priori large QCD backgrounds. We find excellent opportunities for the analysis of VBS reactions in a kinematic range that is inaccessible to present colliders.

  8. Collider limits on new physics within micrOMEGAs_4.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barducci, D.; Bélanger, G.; Bernon, J.; Boudjema, F.; Da Silva, J.; Kraml, S.; Laa, U.; Pukhov, A.

    2018-01-01

    Results from the LHC put severe constraints on models of new physics. This includes constraints on the Higgs sector from the precise measurement of the mass and couplings of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, as well as limits from searches for other new particles. We present the procedure to use these constraints in micrOMEGAs by interfacing it to the external codes Lilith, HiggsSignals, HiggsBounds and SModelS. A few dedicated modules are also provided. With these new features, micrOMEGAs_4.3.4 provides a generic framework for evaluating dark matter observables together with collider and non-collider constraints.

  9. Higgs bosons, electroweak symmetry breaking, and the physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-02-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 {circle_plus} 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  10. Impact of large beam-induced heat loads on the transient operation of the beam screens and the cryogenic plants of the Future Circular Collider (FCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Rodrigues, H.; Tavian, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) under study at CERN will produce 50-TeV high-energy proton beams. The high-energy particle beams are bent by 16-T superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K and distributed over a circumference of 80 km. The circulating beams induce 5 MW of dynamic heat loads by several processes such as synchrotron radiation, resistive dissipation of beam image currents and electron clouds. These beam-induced heat loads will be intercepted by beam screens operating between 40 and 60 K and induce transients during beam injection. Energy ramp-up and beam dumping on the distributed beam-screen cooling loops, the sector cryogenic plants and the dedicated circulators. Based on the current baseline parameters, numerical simulations of the fluid flow in the cryogenic distribution system during a beam operation cycle were performed. The effects of the thermal inertia of the headers on the helium flow temperature at the cryogenic plant inlet as well as the temperature gradient experienced by the beam screen has been assessed. Additionally, this work enabled a thorough exergetic analysis of different cryogenic plant configurations and laid the building-block for establishing design specification of cold and warm circulators.

  11. Electromagnetic Design and Optimization of Directivity of Stripline Beam Position Monitors for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Draskovic, Drasko; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Lefèvre, Thibaut; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary electromagnetic design of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the High Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN. The design is fitted into a new octagonal shielded Beam Screen for the low-beta triplets and is optimized for high directivity. It also includes internal Tungsten absorbers, required to reduce the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets. The achieved broadband directivity in wakefield solver simulations presents significant improvement over the directivity of the current stripline BPMs installed in the LHC.

  12. Electroweak and B physics results from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, K.T.

    2001-01-30

    This writeup is an introduction to some of the experimental issues involved in performing electroweak and b physics measurements at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the electroweak sector, we discuss W and Z boson cross section measurements as well as the measurement of the mass of the W boson. For b physics, we discuss measurements of B{sup 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} mixing and CP violation. This paper is geared towards nonexperts who are interested in understanding some of the issues and motivations for these measurements and how the measurements are carried out.

  13. New physics hints in B decays and collider outlook

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There are currently two hints for new physics involving CP violation in → transitions: ≡ - / ≠ 0, and difference in direct CP asymmetry Δ A K π ≡ A K + π 0 − A K + π ≠ 0 . We explore the two scenarious with a large and unique new CP phase in ← tansitions. Motivated by ≠ 0, we update on the ...

  14. Dijet physics with CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The measurements of the dijet mass spectra, centrality ratio, azimuthal decorrelation and angular distribution are shown. Sensitivity of the phenomenological parameters used to model different event generators is also investigated. Prospects for observing evidence for new physics in these distributions are presented.

  15. B-physics results from the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-17

    Nov 17, 2012 ... mass energy, it is likely that flavour physics is paving the way for direct observations of new particles by the general purpose detectors at the LHC. References. [1] LHCb Collaboration: A A Alves et al, J. Instrum. 3, S08005 (2008). [2] E van Herwijnen, PoS ICHEP2010, 027 (2010). [3] ATLAS Collaboration: G ...

  16. Quest for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tpuser

    2011-11-19

    Nov 19, 2011 ... November 19, 2011. Quest for New Physics at the LHC. S. Banerjee 5. CMS as Higgs Finder. LEP. Natural Width -0.01. 1 10. 100 GeV. At the LHC search for the SM Higgs boson provides a good benchmark for the performance of a detector. Transparency from the early 90's ...

  17. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, June 6-15, 2007, CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis techniques and tools...

  18. Analysis of test-beam data with hybrid pixel detector prototypes for the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pequegnot, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is currently the most powerful accelerator in the world. This proton-proton collider is now stoppped to increase significantly its luminosity and energy, which would provide a larger discovery potential in 2014 and beyond. A high-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider, such as CLIC, is an option to complement and to extend the LHC physics programme. Indeed, a lepton collider gives access to additional physics processes, beyond those observable at the LHC, and therefore provides new discovery potential. It can also provide complementary and/or more precise information about new physics uncovered at the LHC. Many essential features of a detector are required to deliver the full physics potential of this CLIC machine. In this present report, I present my work on the vertex detector R\\&D for this future linear collider, which aims at developping highly granular and ultra-thin position sensitive detection devices with very low power consumption and fast time-stamping capability. We tested here thin silicon pixel...

  19. New physics hints in B decays and collider outlook

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Physics search, and we do have two hints from the B factories. The first is the difference in mixing-dependent CPV (TCPV) as measured in penguin-dominated b → s¯qq processes vs. tree-dominated b → s¯cc processes. One expects no CPV in. B0 → J/ψK0 decay, hence, by measuring TCPV in this process, one expects to.

  20. Collider aspects of flavor physics at high Q

    CERN Document Server

    del Aguila, F.; Allanach, B.C.; Alwall, Johan; Andreev, Yu.; Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Bartl, A.; Beccaria, M.; Bejar, S.; Benucci, L.; Bityukov, S.; Borjanovic, I.; Bozzi, G.; Burdman, Gustavo A.; Carvalho, J.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Clerbaux, Barbara; Carvalho De Campos, Fernando Luiz; de Gouvea, A.; Dennis, C.; Djouadi, A.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Ellwanger, U.; Fassouliotis, D.; Ferreira, P.M.; Frederix, R.; Fuks, Benjamin; Gerard, Jean-Marc; Giammanco, A.; Gninenko, Sergei; Gopalakrishna, S.; Goto, T.; Grzadkowski, B.; Guasch, J.; Hahn, T.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hektor, A.; Herquet, M.; Herrmann, B.; Hidaka, K.; Hirsch, M.K.; Hohenwarter-Sodek, K.; Hollik, W.; Hou, George W.S.; Hurth, T.; Ibarra, A.; Illana, J.; Kadastik, M.; Kalinin, S.; Karafasoulis, C.; Karagoz, Muge; Kernreiter, T.; Kirsanov, M.M.; Klasen, M.; Kou, E.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kraml, S.; Krasnikov, N.; Krauss, F.; Kyriakis, A.; Lari, T.; Lemaitre, V.; Macorini, G.; Magro, M.B.; Majerotto, W.; Maltoni, F.; Mehdiyev, R.; Misiak, M.; Moortgat, F.; Moreau, G.; Muhlleitner, M.; Muntel, M.; Onofre, A.; Ozcan, Veysi E.; Palla, F.; Panizzi, L.; Pape, L.; Penaranda, S.; Pittau, R.; Polesello, G.; Porod, W.; Pukhov, A.; Raidal, M.; Raklev, A.R.; Rebane, L.; Renard, F.M.; Restrepo, D.; Roupas, Z.; Santos, R.; Schumann, S.; Servant, G.; Siegert, F.; Skands, Peter Z.; Slavich, P.; Sola, J.; Spira, M.; Sultansoy, Saleh; Toropin, A.; Tricomi, A.; Tseng, J.; Unel, Gokhan; Valle, J.W.F.; Veloso, F.; Ventura, Andrea; Vermisoglou, G.; Verzegnassi, C.; Villanova del Moral, Albert; Weiglein, G.; Yilmaz, M.; Working Group 1 [on Flavour in the Era of the LHC

    2008-01-01

    This review presents flavour related issues in the production and decays of heavy states at LHC, both from the experimental side and from the theoretical side. We review top quark physics and discuss flavour aspects of several extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, little Higgs model or models with extra dimensions. This includes discovery aspects as well as measurement of several properties of these heavy states. We also present public available computational tools related to this topic.

  1. End-of-Fill Diffusion and Halo Population Measurements with Physics Beams at 6.5 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, Gianluca; Gorzawski, Arkadiusz; Redaelli, Stefano; Trad, Georges; Wagner, Joschka; Xu, Chen; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    Beam halo measurements at 6.5 TeV in the LHC were conducted with a full physics beam via collimator scrapings in end-of-fill MDs carried out in May and July 2016. From the time evolution of the beam losses in a collimator scan, it is possible to extract information on the halo diffusion and population. In the first MD, six scans were performed with two collimators in the vertical and horizontal planes in B1 and B2 respectively. The scans were done with squeezed colliding beams, with and without a gentle continuous transverse blow-up with the ADT (transverse damper) on a non-colliding bunch train. In the second MD, four scans were performed with the same collimators with squeezed colliding beams. The beam losses observed with the standard ionization chamber BLMs are compared to the diamond BLMs, and parametric fits of the diffusion model are applied to temporal loss patterns from colliding and non-colliding bunch trains. The results presented in this note also include the particle escape times and frequency an...

  2. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  3. Physics at the e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Liebler, S. [University of Hamburg, II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hamburg (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Baer, H. [University of Oklahoma, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Norman, OK (United States); Battaglia, M.; Stefaniak, T. [University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Belanger, G.; Serpico, P. [Universite Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (LAPTh), B.P.110, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Fujii, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Kalinowski, J.; Krawczyk, M. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Kiyo, Y. [Juntendo University, Department of Physics, Inzai, Chiba (Japan); Olive, K. [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Simon, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Uwer, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Berlin (Germany); Wackeroth, D. [SUNY at Buffalo, Department of Physics, Buffalo, NY (United States); Zerwas, P.M.; List, J.; Mnich, J.; Moenig, K.; Stanitzki, M.; Weiglein, G.; Mnich, J. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Arbey, A.; Mahmoudi, F. [Universite de Lyon, Villeurbonne Cedex (France); Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5574, Saint-Genis Laval Cedex (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Asano, M. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Bagger, J.; Bagger, J. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baltimore, MD (United States); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bechtle, P.; Desch, K.; Kroseberg, J. [University of Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Bharucha, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department T31, Garching (Germany); CNRS, Aix Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, Marseille (France); Brau, J.; Brau, J. [University of Oregon, Department of Physics, Eugene, OR (United States); Bruemmer, F. [LUPM, UMR 5299, Universite de Montpellier II et CNRS, Montpellier (France); Choi, S.Y. [Chonbuk National University, Department of Physics, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Denner, A.; Porod, W. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dittmaier, S. [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Ellwanger, U.; Mambrini, Y. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physique, UMR 8627, CNRS, Orsay (France); Englert, C. [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Freitas, A. [University of Pittsburgh, PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ginzburg, I. [Sobolev Institute of Mathematics and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Godfrey, S. [Carleton University, Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Ottawa (Canada); Greiner, N. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Grojean, C. [ICREA at IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Gruenewald, M. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Heisig, J. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, Aachen (Germany); Hoecker, A.; Moortgat, F.; Schlatter, D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kanemura, S. [University of Toyama, Department of Physics, Toyama (Japan); Kawagoe, K.; Kawagoe, K. [Kyushu University, Department of Physics, Fukuoka (Japan); Kogler, R. [University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Kronfeld, A.S.; Kronfeld, A.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Advanced Study, Garching (Germany); Matsumoto, S. [The University of Tokyo, Kavli IPMU (WPI), Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Muehlleitner, M.M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Poeschl, R. [Laboratoire de L' accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (FR); Porto, S. [University of Hamburg, II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hamburg (DE); Rolbiecki, K. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (PL); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (ES); Schmitt, M. [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Evanston, IL (US); Staal, O. [Stockholm University, The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (SE); Stoeckinger, D. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (DE); Wilson, G.W. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (US); Zeune, L. [ITFA, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (NL); Xella, S. [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute, Kobenhavn (DK); Ellis, J. [CERN, Geneva (CH); King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, Strand, London (GB); Komamiya, S. [The University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, and International Center for Elementary Particle Physics, Tokyo (JP); Peskin, M. [SLAC, Stanford University, CA (US); Wagner, A. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (DE); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (DE); Yamamoto, H. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Sendai, Miyagi (JP)

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider in the energy range of √(s) = 92 GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well. (orig.)

  4. New Physics at the LHC. A Les Houches Report Physics at TeV Colliders 2009 - New Physics Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Brooijmans, G; Kribs, G D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C; Agashe, K; Basso, L; Belanger, G; Belyaev, A; Black, K; Bose, T; Brunelière, R; Cacciapaglia, G; Carrera, E; Das, S P; Deandrea, A; De Curtis, S; Etienvre, A -I; Espinosa, J R; Fichet, S; Gauthier, L; Gopalakrishna, S; Gray, H; Gripaios, B; Guchait, M; Harper, S J; Henderson, C; Jackson, J; Karagöz, M; Kraml, S; Lane, K; Lari, T; Lee, S J; Lessard, J R; Maravin, Y; Martin, A; McElrath, B; Moreau, G; Moretti, S; Morrissey, D E; Mühlleitner, M; Poland, D; Pruna, G M; Pukhov, A; Raklev, A R; Robens, T; Rosenfeld, R; Rzehak, H; Salam, G P; Sekmen, S; Servant, G; Singh, R K; Smith, B C; Spira, M; Strassler, M J; Tomalin, I; Tytgat, M; Vos, M; Wacker, J G; Weitershausen, P v; Zurek, K M

    2010-01-01

    We present a collection of signatures for physics beyond the standard model that need to be explored at the LHC. First, are presented various tools developed to measure new particle masses in scenarios where all decays include an unobservable particle. Second, various aspects of supersymmetric models are discussed. Third, some signatures of models of strong electroweak symmetry are discussed. In the fourth part, a special attention is devoted to high mass resonances, as the ones appearing in models with warped extra dimensions. Finally, prospects for models with a hidden sector/valley are presented. Our report, which includes brief experimental and theoretical reviews as well as original results, summarizes the activities of the "New Physics" working group for the "Physics at TeV Colliders" workshop (Les Houches, France, 8-26 June, 2009).

  5. 3rd CERN-Fermilab HadronCollider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    EP Department

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at Fermilab. Further enquiries should ...

  6. For Information: CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Applications are Now Open for the CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School August 9-18, 2006 Please go to the school web site http://hcpss.fnal.gov/ and follow the links to the Application process. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 8, 2006. Successful applicants and support awards will be announced shortly thereafter. Also available on the web is the tentative academic program of the school. The main goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers a broad picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of hadron collider physics. The emphasis of the first school will be on the physics potential of the first years of data taking at the LHC, and on the experimental and theoretical tools needed to exploit that potential. A series of lectures and informal discussions will include an introduction to the theoretical and phenomenological framework of hadron collisions, and current theoretical models of frontier physics, as...

  7. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%–20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect. It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle

  8. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  9. Collider Aspects of Flavour Physics at High Q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Aguila, F.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Allanach, B.C.; Alwall, J.; Andreev, Yu.; Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Bartl, A.; Beccaria, M.; Bejar, S.; Benucci, L.; Bityukov, S.; Borjanovic, I.; Bozzi, G.; Burdman, G.; Carvalho, J.; Castro, N.; Clerbaux, B.; de Campos, F.; de Gouvea, A.; Dennis, C.; Djouadi, A.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Louvain U., CP3 /Moscow, INR /Valencia U. /Vienna U. /Salento U. /INFN, Lecce /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Barcelona, IFAE /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Karlsruhe U. /Sao Paulo U. /LIP, Coimbra /Brussels U. /Sao Paulo U., Guaratingueta /Northwestern U. /Oxford U. /Orsay, LPT /Athens U. /Lisbon U.

    2008-03-07

    This chapter of the report of the 'Flavour in the era of LHC' workshop discusses flavor related issues in the production and decays of heavy states at LHC, both from the experimental side and from the theoretical side. We review top quark physics and discuss flavor aspects of several extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, little Higgs model or models with extra dimensions. This includes discovery aspects as well as measurement of several properties of these heavy states. We also present public available computational tools related to this topic.

  10. Stabilization of Nanometre-Size Particle Beams in the Final Focus System of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S

    2003-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) study at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) is developing the design of a 3 TeV e+ e- linear collider. The discovery reach of this machine depends on obtaining a luminosity of 1035 cm_2s_1, which will be done by colliding beams with transverse spot sizes in the nanometre range ≈ 60 × 0:7 nm2). Tolerances on fast mechanical stability of the focusing quadrupoles reach the 0.2 nm level. The serious concern of magnet stabilization for future linear colliders has been addressed by building a CERN test stand on magnet stability, bringing together state-of-the-art stabilization technology, latest equipment for vibration measurements and realistic magnet prototypes. For the first time an accelerator magnet was successfully stabilized to the sub-nanometre level, reducing its vibrations level by one order of magnitude with respect to the supporting ground. The best measurements indicate transverse RMS vibration amplitudes (above 4 Hz) of (0.79+0.08) nm ho...

  11. Ringing in the new physics: The politics and technology of electron colliders in the United States, 1956--1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Elizabeth

    The ``November Revolution'' of 1974 and the experiments that followed consolidated the place of the Standard Model in modern particle physics. Much of the evidence on which these conclusions depended was generated by a new type of tool: colliding beam storage rings, which had been considered physically unfeasible twenty years earlier. In 1956 a young experimentalist named Gerry O'Neill dedicated himself to demonstrating that such an apparatus could do useful physics. The storage ring movement encountered numerous obstacles before generating one of the standard machines for high energy research. In fact, it wasn't until 1970 that the U.S. finally broke ground on its first electron-positron collider. Drawing extensively on archival sources and supplementing them with the personal accounts of many of the individuals who took part, Ringing in the New Physics examines this instance of post-World War II techno-science and the new social, political and scientific tensions that characterize it. The motivations are twofold: first, that the chronicle of storage rings may take its place beside mathematical group theory, computer simulations, magnetic spark chambers, and the like as an important contributor to a view of matter and energy which has been the dominant model for the last twenty-five years. In addition, the account provides a case study for the integration of the personal, professional, institutional, and material worlds when examining an episode in the history or sociology of twentieth century science. The story behind the technological development of storage rings holds fascinating insights into the relationship between theory and experiment, collaboration and competition in the physics community, the way scientists obtain funding and their responsibilities to it, and the very nature of what constitutes ``successful'' science in the post- World War II era.

  12. First Considerations on Beam Optics and Lattice Design for the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider FCC

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany Fernandez, R

    2014-01-01

    The present document explains the steps carried out in order to make the first design of the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) following the base line parameters that can be found in [1]. Two lattice layouts are presented, a ring collider with 12 arcs and 12 straight sections, four of them designed as interaction points, and a racetrack like collider with two arcs and two straight sections, each of them equipped with two interaction points. The lattice design presented in the paper is modular allowing the same modules be used for both layouts. The present document addresses as well the beta star reach at the interaction points.

  13. 6th International Conference on the Physics Opportunities at an ElecTron-Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sabatié, F; POETIC6

    2015-01-01

    POETIC6, the 6th edition of the International Conference on the "Physics Opportunities at an ElecTron-Ion Collider", will take place at Ecole Polytechnique in Palaiseau, France from Monday, September 7th to Friday, September 11th 2015, a few weeks before the National Science Advisory Committee recommends a new Long Range Plan to the United States' DOE and NSF. In the midst of this much-anticipated report, and following earlier workshops at Stellenbosch, Bloomington, Valparaiso, Jyvaskyla and Yale, it is timely for the POETIC series to become an international conference. The primary goal will remain to continue the advancement of the field of electron-ion collider physics. While the central theme of the conference will be the physics of a future electron-ion collider, the workshop will also cover strongly-related physics in the CEBAF, RHIC, and LHC experimental programs. The conference will aim primarily at developments on the theory/phenomenology side, but the latest accelerator and experimental developments ...

  14. Simulation study of electron cloud induced instabilities and emittance growth for the CERN Large Hadron Collider proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Schulte, Daniel; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The electron cloud may cause transverse single-bunch instabilities of proton beams such as those in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We simulate these instabilities and the consequent emittance growth with the code HEADTAIL, which models the turn-by-turn interaction between the cloud and the beam. Recently some new features were added to the code, in particular, electric conducting boundary conditions at the chamber wall, transverse feedback, and variable beta functions. The sensitivity to several numerical parameters has been studied by varying the number of interaction points between the bunch and the cloud, the phase advance between them, and the number of macroparticles used to represent the protons and the electrons. We present simulation results for both LHC at injection and SPS with LHC-type beam, for different electron-cloud density levels, chromaticities, and bunch intensities. Two regimes with qualitatively different emittance growth are observed: above th...

  15. N=4 Super-Yang-Mills Theory, QCD and Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Z.

    2004-10-04

    We review how (dimensionally regulated) scattering amplitudes in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory provide a useful testing ground for perturbative QCD calculations relevant to collider physics, as well as another avenue for investigating the AdS/CFT correspondence. We describe the iterative relation for two-loop scattering amplitudes in N=4 super-Yang-Mills theory found in (C. Anastasiou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91:251602 (2003),) and discuss recent progress toward extending it to three loops.

  16. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  17. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal`s photo multiplier tube (PMT).

  18. New target solution for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility: The granular waterfall target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Jie Cai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A new target solution, the granular waterfall target, is proposed here for a muon collider or a muon-decay neutrino beam facility, especially for the moment which adopts a 15 MW continuous-wave (cw superconducting linac. Compared to the mercury jet target, the granular waterfall target works by a much simpler mechanism which can operate with a much more powerful beam, which are indicated by the detailed investigations into the heat depositions and the evaluations of the temperature increases for different target concepts. By varying proton beam kinetic energy and the geometrical parameters of the waterfall target, an overall understanding of the figure of merit concerning muon production for this target concept as the target solutions of the long-baseline neutrino factory and the medium-baseline moment is obtained. With 8 GeV beam energy and the optimal geometrical parameters, the influence on muon yield by adopting different beam-target interaction parameters is explored. Studies and discussions of the design details concerning beam dumping are also presented.

  19. Impact of the 7 TeV/c Large Hadron Collider proton beam on a copper target

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Goddard, B; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kain, V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Temporal, M

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will allow for collision between two 7 TeV/c proton beams, each comprising 2808 bunches with 1.1*10/sup 11 / protons per bunch, traveling in opposite direction. The bunch length is 0.5 ns and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns so that the duration of the entire beam is about 89 mu s. The beam power profile in the transverse direction is a Gaussian with a standard deviation of 0.2 mm. The energy stored in each beam is about 350 MJ that is sufficient to melt 500 kg of copper. In case of a failure in the machine protection systems, the entire beam could impact directly onto an accelerator equipment. A first estimate of the scale of damage resulting from such a failure has been assessed for a solid copper target hit by the beam by carrying out three- dimensional energy deposition calculations and two-dimensional numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic response of the target. This work has shown that the penetration depth of the LHC protons will be be...

  20. Pre-Town Meeting on spin physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, Elke-Caroline; Bland, Leslie; Huang, Jin; Tarasov, Andrey [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Balitsky, Ian; Radyushkin, Anatoly [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States); Burkardt, Matthias [New Mexico State University, Department of Physics, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Burkert, Volker; Chen, Jian-Ping; Kubarovsky, Valery; Melnitchouk, Wally; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Richards, David [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, SUNY, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gamberg, Leonard [Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Grosse Perdekamp, Matthias [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Hyde, Charles [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Ji, Xiangdong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Department of Physics, and Shanghai Key Lab for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Shanghai (China); Peking University, Center for High-Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Jiang, Xiaodong; Liu, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kang, Zhong-Bo [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Mani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lajoie, John [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Liu, Keh-Fei [University of Kentucky, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Center for Computational Sciences, Lexington, KY (United States); Liuti, Simonetta [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mulders, Piet [VU University Amsterdam, Nikhef and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Prokudin, Alexei [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Sichtermann, Ernst; Yuan, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner [Tuebingen University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center-of-mass energy √(s) ∝ 20 to ∝ 100 GeV (upgradable to ∝ 150 GeV) and a luminosity up to ∝ 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini-review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper (A. Accardi et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 52, 268 (2016)). (orig.)

  1. CLIC: Physics potential of a high-energy e+e- collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future electron-positron collider under study. It foresees e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The CLIC study is an international collaboration hosted by CERN. The lectures provide a broad overview of the CLIC project, covering the physics potential, the particle detectors and the accelerator. An overview of the CLIC physics opportunities is presented. These are best exploited in a staged construction and operation scenario of the collider. The detector technologies, fulfilling CLIC performance requirements and currently under study, are described. The accelerator design and performance, together with its major technologies, are presented in the light of ongoing component tests and large system tests. The status of the optimisation studies (e.g. for cost and power) of the CLIC complex for the proposed energy staging is included. One lecture is dedicated to the use of CLIC technologies in free electron lasers and other ...

  2. Particle accelerators, colliders, and the story of high energy physics. Charming the cosmic snake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Raghavan

    2012-07-01

    The Nordic mythological Cosmic Serpent, Ouroboros, is said to be coiled in the depths of the sea, surrounding the Earth with its tail in its mouth. In physics, this snake is a metaphor for the Universe, where the head, symbolizing the largest entity - the Cosmos - is one with the tail, symbolizing the smallest - the fundamental particle. Particle accelerators, colliders and detectors are built by physicists and engineers to uncover the nature of the Universe while discovering its building blocks. ''Charming the Cosmic Snake'' takes the readers through the science behind these experimental machines: the physics principles that each stage of the development of particle accelerators helped to reveal, and the particles they helped to discover. The book culminates with a description of the Large Hadron Collider, one of the world's largest and most complex machines operating in a 27-km circumference tunnel near Geneva. That collider may prove or disprove many of our basic theories about the nature of matter. The book provides the material honestly without misrepresenting the science for the sake of excitement or glossing over difficult notions. The principles behind each type of accelerator is made accessible to the undergraduate student and even to a lay reader with cartoons, illustrations and metaphors. Simultaneously, the book also caters to different levels of reader's background and provides additional materials for the more interested or diligent reader. (orig.)

  3. Particle accelerators, colliders, and the story of high energy physics charming the cosmic snake

    CERN Document Server

    Jayakumar, Raghavan

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic mythological Cosmic Serpent, Ouroboros, is said to be coiled in the depths of the sea, surrounding the Earth with its tail in its mouth. In physics, this snake is a metaphor for the Universe, where the head, symbolizing the largest entity – the Cosmos – is one with the tail, symbolizing the smallest – the fundamental particle. Particle accelerators, colliders and detectors are built by physicists and engineers to uncover the nature of the Universe while discovering its building blocks. “Charming the Cosmic Snake” takes the readers through the science behind these experimental machines: the physics principles that each stage of the development of particle accelerators helped to reveal, and the particles they helped to discover. The book culminates with a description of the Large Hadron Collider, one of the world’s largest and most complex machines operating in a 27-km circumference tunnel near Geneva. That collider may prove or disprove many of our basic theories about the nature of matt...

  4. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, Igor M.

    2009-06-01

    The goals of the physics to be studied at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are very impressive. Four major experimental installations are ready to compete in obtaining and analyzing the data from high-energy hadron collisions. The main hope is to answer the most intricate questions ever asked concerning the most fundamental problems of matter and its fundamental forces and space structure. The design of the LHC and its four detectors is briefly described. We then review the main facts revealed previously by experimentalists at other accelerators. The most pertinent topics and the stage-by-stage plans for LHC investigations are discussed. Further prospects for high-energy physics are outlined.

  5. Model Independent Searches for New Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piper, Joel

    2009-06-01

    The standard model is a successful but limited theory. There is significant theoretical motivation to believe that new physics may appear at the energy scale of a few TeV, the lower end of which is currently probed by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The methods used to search for physics beyond the standard model in a model independent way and the results of theses searches based on 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector and 2.0 fb{sup -1} at the CDF detector are presented.

  6. Performance of a new generation RPCs for particle physics at colliders of the next generation

    CERN Document Server

    Paolozzi, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade of present and future experiments in particle physics at high luminosity colliders will require a level one trigger of high selectivity and robustness in order to cope with the very heavy background levels. This selectivity requires detectors with very good space and time resolution operating at high rate. We present in this paper the latest developments of the RPC detectors concerning rate capability (up to 30kHz/cm2), space resolution (few hundred microns) and time resolution (few hundred pico s). We also show that this improvement required the development of a fast, low noise and large dynamics front end electronics and a better understanding of the detector physics.

  7. Beam Size Estimation from Luminosity Scans at the LHC During 2015 Proton Physics Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hostettler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    As a complementary method for measuring the beam size for high-intensity beams at 6.5 TeV flat-top energy, beam separation scans were done regularly at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during 2015 proton physics operation. The luminosities measured by the CMS experiment during the scans were used to derive the convoluted beam size and orbit offset bunch-by-bunch. This contribution will elaborate on the method used to derive plane-by-plane, bunch-by-bunch emittances from the scan data, including uncertainties and corrections. The measurements are then compared to beam size estimations from absolute luminosity, synchrotron light telescopes, and wire scanners. In particular, the evolution of the emittance over the course of several hours in collisions is studied and bunch-by-bunch differences are highlighted.

  8. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1  V/(pC mm m.

  9. Calculation of abort thresholds for the Beam Loss Monitoring System of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Nemcic, Martin; Dehning, Bernd

    The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) System is one of the most critical machine protection systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland. Its main purpose is to protect the superconducting magnets from quenches and other equipment from damage by requesting a beam abort when the measured losses exceed any of the predefined threshold levels. The system consist of circa 4000 ionization chambers which are installed around the 27 kilometres ring (LHC). This study aims to choose a technical platform and produce a system that addresses all of the limitations with the current system that is used for the calculation of the LHC BLM abort threshold values. To achieve this, a comparison and benchmarking of the Java and .NET technical platforms is performed in order to establish the most suitable solution. To establish which technical platform is a successful replacement of the current abort threshold calculator, comparable prototype systems in Java and .NET we...

  10. Bunch-by-bunch measurement of transverse coherent beam-beam modes in the Fermilab Tevatron collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Stancari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A system for bunch-by-bunch detection of transverse proton and antiproton coherent oscillations in the Tevatron is described. It is based on the signal from a single beam-position monitor located in a region of the ring with large amplitude functions. The signal is digitized over a large number of turns and Fourier analyzed off-line with a dedicated algorithm. To enhance the signal, band-limited noise is applied to the beam for about 1 s. This excitation does not adversely affect the circulating beams even at high luminosities. The device has a response time of a few seconds, a frequency resolution of 1.6×10^{-5} in fractional tune, and it is sensitive to oscillation amplitudes of 60 nm. It complements Schottky detectors as a diagnostic tool for tunes, tune spreads, and beam-beam effects. Measurements of coherent mode spectra are presented to show the effects of betatron tunes, beam-beam parameter, and collision pattern, and to provide an experimental basis for beam-beam numerical codes. Comparisons with a simplified model of beam-beam oscillations are also described.

  11. Muon colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108556; Blondel, Alain; CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    1999-01-01

    Muon Colliders - Prospective Physics (J. Ellis). Muon storage rings can address fundamental issues in neutrino physics, enable precision Higgs physics, and advance the high-energy frontier in lepton-antilepton collisions. In this lecture, the principa with particular emphasis on neutrino and Higgs factories. Muon Colliders (D. Neuffer). In these lectures the concept of a high-energy high-luminosity µ+ - µ- collider is developed. A µ+ - µ- colliderwould provide heavy lepton collisions, with uniqu of Higgs bosons at 100-180 GeV energies, and it could be extended to multi-TeV energies.A µ+-µ- collider requires a high-intensity proton source for ¼-production, a high-acceptance decay channel to collect µ?s from ¼-decay, a µ-cooling system, a r system, and a high-luminosity collider ring for the collisions of short, intense µ+-µ- bunches. Critical problems exist in each of the collider concept components, and in the interaction-region detectors needed to analyze the collisions. These pro within the curr...

  12. A novel method and error analysis for beam optics measurements and corrections at the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, Andy Sven

    2017-02-03

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently the world's largest particle accelerator with the highest center of mass energy in particle collision experiments. The control of the particle beam focusing is essential for the performance reach of such an accelerator. For the characterization of the focusing properties at the LHC, turn-by-turn beam position data is simultaneously recorded at numerous measurement devices (BPMs) along the accelerator, while an oscillation is excited on the beam. A novel analysis method for these measurements (N-BPM method) is developed here, which is based on a detailed analysis of systematic and statistical error sources and their correlations. It has been applied during the commissioning of the LHC for operation at an unprecedented energy of 6.5TeV. In this process a stronger focusing than its design specifications has been achieved. This results in smaller transverse beam sizes at the collision points and allows for a higher rate of particle collisions. For the derivation of the focusing parameters at many synchrotron light sources, the change of the beam orbit is observed, which is induced by deliberate changes of magnetic fields (orbit response matrix). In contrast, the analysis of turn-by-turn beam position measurements is for many of these machines less precise due to the distance between two BPMs. The N-BPM method overcomes this limitation by allowing to include the measurement data from more BPMs in the analysis. It has been applied at the ALBA synchrotron light source and compared to the orbit response method. The significantly faster measurement with the N-BPM method is a considerable advantage in this case. Finally, an outlook is given to the challenges which lie ahead for the control of the beam focusing at the HL-LHC, which is a future major upgrade of the LHC.

  13. Review of electron beam therapy physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Almond, Peter R

    2006-07-07

    For over 50 years, electron beams have been an important modality for providing an accurate dose of radiation to superficial cancers and disease and for limiting the dose to underlying normal tissues and structures. This review looks at many of the important contributions of physics and dosimetry to the development and utilization of electron beam therapy, including electron treatment machines, dose specification and calibration, dose measurement, electron transport calculations, treatment and treatment-planning tools, and clinical utilization, including special procedures. Also, future changes in the practice of electron therapy resulting from challenges to its utilization and from potential future technology are discussed.

  14. Transient Beam Loading Effects in Gas-filled RF Cavities for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. [Fermilab; Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Freemire, B. [IIT, Chicago

    2013-06-01

    A gas-filled RF cavity can be an effective solution for the development of a compact muon ionization cooling channel. One possible problem expected in this type of cavity is the dissipation of significant RF power through the beam-induced plasmas accumulated inside the cavity (plasma loading). In addition, for the higher muon beam intensity, the effects of the beam itself on the cavity accelerating mode are non-negligible (beam loading). These beam- cavity interactions induce a transient phase which may be very harmful to the beam quality [1]. In this study, we estimate the transient voltage in a gas-filled RF cavity with both the plasma and conventional beam loading and discuss their compensation methods.

  15. A Novel Method and Error Analysis for Beam Optics Measurements and Corrections at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Langner, Andy Sven; Rossbach, Jörg; Tomás, Rogelio

    2017-02-17

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently the world's largest particle accelerator with the highest center of mass energy in particle collision experiments. The control of the particle beam focusing is essential for the performance reach of such an accelerator. For the characterization of the focusing properties at the LHC, turn-by-turn beam position data is simultaneously recorded at numerous measurement devices (BPMs) along the accelerator, while an oscillation is excited on the beam. A novel analysis method for these measurements ($N$-BPM method) is developed here, which is based on a detailed analysis of systematic and statistical error sources and their correlations. It has been applied during the commissioning of the LHC for operation at an unprecedented energy of 6.5 TeV. In this process a stronger focusing than its design specifications has been achieved. This results in smaller transverse beam sizes at the collision points and allows for a higher rate of particle collisions. For the derivation of ...

  16. Les Houches 2015: Physics at TeV Colliders Standard Model Working Group Report

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, J.R.; Becker, K.; Bell, M.; Bellm, J.; Bendavid, J.; Bothmann, E.; Boughezal, R.; Butterworth, J.; Carrazza, S.; Chiesa, M.; Cieri, L.; Ciulli, V.; Denner, A.; Duehrssen-Debling, M.; Falmagne, G.; Forte, S.; Francavilla, P.; Frederix, R.; Freytsis, M.; Gao, J.; Gras, P.; Grazzini, M.; Greiner, N.; Grellscheid, D.; Heinrich, G.; Hesketh, G.; Hoche, S.; Hofer, L.; Hou, T.J.; Huss, A.; Huston, J.; Isaacson, J.; Jueid, A.; Kallweit, S.; Kar, D.; Kassabov, Z.; Konstantinides, V.; Krauss, F.; Kuttimalai, S.; Lazapoulos, A.; Lenzi, P.; Li, Y.; Lindert, J.M.; Liu, X.; Luisoni, G.; Lonnblad, L.; Maierhofer, P.; Maître, D.; Marini, A.C.; Montagna, G.; Moretti, M.; Nadolsky, P.M.; Nail, G.; Napoletano, D.; Nicrosini, O.; Oleari, C.; Pagani, D.; Pandini, C.; Perrozzi, L.; Petriello, F.; Piccinini, F.; Platzer, S.; Pogrebnyak, I.; Pozzorini, S.; Prestel, S.; Reuschle, C.; Rojo, J.; Russo, L.; Schichtel, P.; Schonherr, M.; Schumann, S.; Siodmok, A.; Skands, P.; Soper, D.; Soyez, G.; Sun, P.; Tackmann, F.J.; Tackmann, K.; Takasugi, E.; Thaler, J.; Uccirati, S.; Utku, U.; Viliani, L.; Vryonidou, E.; Wang, B.T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, M.A.; Williams, C.; Winter, J.; Xie, K.P.; Yuan, C.P.; Yuan, F.; Zapp, K.; Zaro, M.

    2016-01-01

    This Report summarizes the proceedings of the 2015 Les Houches workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders. Session 1 dealt with (I) new developments relevant for high precision Standard Model calculations, (II) the new PDF4LHC parton distributions, (III) issues in the theoretical description of the production of Standard Model Higgs bosons and how to relate experimental measurements, (IV) a host of phenomenological studies essential for comparing LHC data from Run I with theoretical predictions and projections for future measurements in Run II, and (V) new developments in Monte Carlo event generators.

  17. Les Houches 2015: Physics at TeV Colliders Standard Model Working Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, J.R.; et al.

    2016-05-16

    This Report summarizes the proceedings of the 2015 Les Houches workshop on Physics at TeV Colliders. Session 1 dealt with (I) new developments relevant for high precision Standard Model calculations, (II) the new PDF4LHC parton distributions, (III) issues in the theoretical description of the production of Standard Model Higgs bosons and how to relate experimental measurements, (IV) a host of phenomenological studies essential for comparing LHC data from Run I with theoretical predictions and projections for future measurements in Run II, and (V) new developments in Monte Carlo event generators.

  18. Soft Fusion Energy Path: Isotope Production in Energy Subcritical/Economy Hypercritical D +D Colliding-Beam Mini Fusion Reactor `Exyder'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Tim; Maglich, Bogdan; Calsec Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Bethe1 and Sakharov2 argued for soft fusion energy path via isotope production, substantiated by Manheimer3. - Copious T and 3He production4 , 5 from D(d, p) T and D(d, n) 3He reactions in 725 KeV D +D colliding beams was measured in weak-focusing Self-Collider6 , 7 radius 0.15 m, in B = 3.12 T, non-linearly stabilized by electron cloud oscillations8 to confinement time = 24 s. Simulations6 predict that by switching to strong focusing9, 10 deuterons 0.75 MeV each, generate 1 3He +1T +1p + 1n at total input energy cost 10.72 MeV. Economic value of T and 3He is 65 and 120 MeV/atom, respectively. We obtain economic gain 205MeV/10.72 MeV ~ 2,000% i.e. 3He production funds cost of T. If first wall is made of Thorium n's will breed 233U releasing 200 MeV/fission, at neutron cost 5.36 MeV versus 160 MeV in beam on target, resulting in no cost 3He production, valued 75K/g. 1. Physics Today, May 1979, p.44; 2. Memoirs, Vintage Books, (1992); 3. Phys. Today, May 2012 p. 12; 4. Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 796 (1985); 5. Bull. APS, 57, No. 3 (2012); 6. Part. Acc.1, (1970); 7. ANEUTRONIC FUSION NIM A 271 1-167 (1988); 8. Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1818 (1993); 9. Part. Acc. 34, 13 (1990).

  19. Muon colliders, frictional cooling and universal extra dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Daniel E.

    2011-07-20

    A muon collider combines the advantages of proton-proton and electron-positron colliders, sidestepping many of their disadvantages, and has the potential to make discoveries and precision measurements at high energies. However, muons bring their own technical challenges, largely relating to their instability. We present a summary of the motivations and R and D efforts for a muon collider. We detail a scheme for preparing high-luminosity muon beams on timescales shorter than the muon lifetime, and an experiment to demonstrate aspects of this scheme at the Max Planck Institute for Physics. We also investigate the potentials to discover physics beyond the standard model at a muon collider. (orig.)

  20. Simulation of Hollow Electron Beam Collimation in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, I.A.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2012-05-01

    The concept of augmenting the conventional collimation system of high-energy storage rings with a hollow electron beam was successfully demonstrated in experiments at the Tevatron. A reliable numerical model is required for understanding particle dynamics in the presence of a hollow beam collimator. Several models were developed to describe imperfections of the electron beam profile and alignment. The features of the imperfections are estimated from electron beam profile measurements. Numerical simulations of halo removal rates are compared with experimental data taken at the Tevatron.

  1. Interaction of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Beam with Carbon Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kadi, Y; Shutov, A; Piriz, AR

    2006-01-01

    The LHC will operate at an energy of 7 TeV with a luminosity of 1034cm-2s-1. This requires two beams, each with 2808 bunches. The energy stored in each beam of 362 MJ. In a previous paper the mechanisms causing equipment damage in case of a failure of the machine protection system was discussed, assuming that the entire beam is deflected into a copper target [1, 2]. Another failure scenario is the deflection of beam into carbon material. Carbon collimators and beam absorbers are installed in many locations around the LHC to diffuse or absorb beam losses. Since the collimator jaws are close to the beam, it is very likely that they are hit first when the beam is accidentally deflected. Here we present the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the heating of a solid carbon cylinder irradiated by the LHC beam with nominal parameters, carried out using the BIG-2 computer code [3] while the energy loss of the 7 TeV protons in carbon is calculated using the well known FLUKA code [4]. Our calculation...

  2. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  3. Center for Beam Physics: 1994--95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is a fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of particle and photon beam physics, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage, and control of systems of charged particles and photons. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s team and gives a brief review of the multifaceted activities during 1994 and 1995.

  4. Self-consistent β functions and emittances of round colliding beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Otboyev

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The flip-flop effect with the linearized beam-beam force is formulated through self-consistent β functions and equilibrium emittances which are both affected by collision. We give the results of two models of emittance dependence. The effect of finite bunch length is also discussed.

  5. First Beam Based Aperture Measurements in the Arcs of the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Calaga, R; Dehning, B; Giovannozzi, M; Roncarolo, F; Tomás, R

    2010-01-01

    The LHC injection tests performed in August and early September 2008 in preparation for the circulating beam operation provided the first opportunity to measure with beam the mechanical aperture in two LHC sectors (2-3 and 7- 8). The aperture was probed by exciting free oscillations and local orbit bumps of the injected beam trajectories. Intensities of a few 109 protons were used to remain safely below the quench limit of superconductingmagnets in case of beam losses. The methods used to measure the mechanical aperture, the available on-line tools, and beam measurements for both sectors are presented. Detailed comparisons with the expected results from the as-built aperture models are also presented. It is shown that the measurements results are in good agreement with the LHC design aperture.

  6. Supersymmetry phenomenology in the context of neutrino physics and the large hadron collider LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanussek, Marja

    2012-05-15

    Experimentally, it is well established that the Standard Model of particle physics requires an extension to accommodate the neutrino oscillation data, which indicates that at least two neutrinos are massive and that two of the neutrino mixing angles are large. Massive neutrinos are naturally present in a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model which includes lepton-number violating terms (the B3 MSSM). Furthermore, supersymmetry stabilizes the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and the scale of unified theories or the Planck scale. In this thesis, we study in detail how neutrino masses are generated in the B3 MSSM. We present a mechanism how the experimental neutrino oscillation data can be realized in this framework. Then we discuss how recently published data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can be used to constrain the parameter space of this model. Furthermore, we present work on supersymmetric models where R-parity is conserved, considering scenarios with light stops in the light of collider physics and scenarios with near-massless neutralinos in connection with cosmological restrictions.

  7. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukraft, J

    2012-02-28

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy-ion experiment A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) took first data at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in proton-proton (pp) and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of the LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most quantum chromodynamics-inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high-density matter created at the LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect liquid.

  8. Interaction of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Beam with Solid Metallic Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, V E; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kain, V; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Tahir, N A; Temporal, M

    2004-01-01

    The LHC will operate at an energy of 7 TeV with a luminosity of 1034cm_2s_1. This requires two beams, each with 2808 bunches. The nominal intensity per bunch is 1.1 · 1011 protons. The energy stored in each beam is about 350 MJ, sufficient to heat and melt 500 kg of copper. Protection of machine equipment in the presence of such powerful beams is essential [1]. In this paper a specific failure of the protection system is discussed, resulting in the full beam accidentally being directed towards the accelerator equipment [2]. We carried out two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the heating of a solid copper block with a face area of 2 cm x 2 cm, which is irradiated by the LHC beam with nominal parameters. With the present simulations we estimate that after an impact of about 100 bunches the beam heated region has expanded drastically and the density in the inner 0.5 mm decreases by about a factor of 10. The bulk of the following beam will not be absorbed and continue to tunnel further and further into th...

  9. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  10. The STAR beam energy scan phase II physics and upgrades

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, C.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Vértési, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 967, č. 11 (2017), s. 800-803 ISSN 0375-9474 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * BES-II * detector upgrade * QCD phase diagram * physics oppotrunity Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.916, year: 2016

  11. Electron Beam Probe As A Nondestructive Single Bunch Diagnostic Tool For Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Logatchev, P V; Dikanskij, N S; Frolov, A R; Gusev, Y A; Malutin, D A; Starostenko, A A

    2004-01-01

    In this article we present the experience of using electron beam probe (EBP) on VEPP-4. EBP is destined to determine such parameters of ultrarelativistic bunches of charged particles as centre of mass transverse position, longitudinal charge distribution, spatial orientation. The method is based on a deflection of a thin probe beam on an electromagnetic field of investigated ultrarelativistic bunch. Measured deflection value allows to calculate the spatial charge density. Detailed description of methods for reconstruction of bunch's parameters is presented in [1], [2], [3].

  12. Neutralino production and decay at en e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with transversely polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S.Y. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)]|[Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea). Dept. of Physics; Drees, M. [Korea Inst. for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea)]|[Bonn Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.; Song, J. [Konkuk Univ., Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Physics

    2006-02-15

    Once supersymmetric neutralinos anti {chi}{sup 0} are produced copiously at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders, their characteristics can be measured with high precision. In particular, the fundamental parameters in the gaugino/higgsino sector of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) can be analyzed. Here we focus on the determination of possible CP-odd phases of these parameters. To that end, we exploit the electron/positron beam polarization, including transverse polarization, as well as the spin/angular correlations of the neutralino production e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{chi}{sub i}{sup 0}{chi}{sub j}{sup 0} and subsequent 2-body decays {chi}{sub i}{sup 0}{yields}{chi}{sub k}{sup 0}h, {chi}{sub k}{sup 0}Z, l{sub R}{sup {+-}}l{sup -+}, using (partly) optimized CP-odd observables. If no final-state polarizations are measured, the Z and h modes are independent of the {chi}{sub i}{sup 0} polarization, but CP-odd observables constructed from the leptonic decay mode can help in reconstructing the neutralino sector of the CP-noninvariant MSSM. However, transverse beam polarization does nto seem to be particularly useful in this context. (orig.)

  13. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Jos

    2012-02-28

    In this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly challenging: new detector technologies had to be developed; experimental set-ups that are larger and more complex than ever before had to be constructed; and larger collaborations than ever before had to be organized. Fundamental to the success were: the 'reference' provided by CERN, peer review, signed memoranda of understanding, well-organized resources review boards as an interface to the national funding agencies and collegial, but solidly organized, experimental collaborations.

  14. Fixed target project AFTER at the LHC beams for heavy ion and hadron physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurepin, A. B.; Topilskaya, N. S.

    2017-09-01

    High intensity proton and lead ion beams at the LHC collider allow one to use the beam halo by placing a fixed target or a bent crystal for beam extraction. The particle energy in this case is just half that at the RHIC collider, but the luminosity exceeds the collider luminosity many times. It is also possible to install a polarized target in the extracted beam. The project AFTER is aimed at investigation of rare processes, polarization phenomena, determination of the parameters required for analysis of cosmic rays and neutrino astrophysics, detailed investigation of quarkonia production and suppression depending on the phase transition of matter to the quark-gluon phase.

  15. Optical System Of The Powerful Multiple Beam L-band Klystron For Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A

    2004-01-01

    An optical system reported here was proposed and designed for Toshiba MBK (E3736). Toshiba MBK is the 10MW L-band multiple beam klystron being developed for TESLA (XFEL) project. The key features of this device are following. A new compact scheme of confined flow focusing, which allows using ring shape cavities at the klystron, operating on the fundamental mode. Low cathodes loading (2

  16. Protecting LHC IP1/IP5 Components Against Radiation Resulting from Colliding Beam Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, N V; Kerby, J S; Strait, J B

    2003-01-01

    Beam-induced energy deposition in the LHC high luminosity interaction region (IR) components due to both pp collisions and beam loss in the IR vicinity is a significant challenge for the design of the high luminosity insertions. It was shown in our previous studies that a set of absorbers would reduce both the peak power density and total heat load to tolerable levels. In this paper the results of further optimization and comprehensive MARS calculations are summarized for the LHC lattice, version 6.4, for the updated IP1 and IP5 layouts and a baseline pp-collision source term. Power density, power dissipation, particle fluxes and spectra, accumulated dose and residual dose rates are studied in the components of the inner triplets including their TAS absorbers, the TAN neutral beam absorbers, separation dipoles, and quadrupoles of the outer triplets and possible collimators there. Results are given for the nominal luminosity of 1034 cm-2 s-1. The current design is proved to provide the best safety margin under...

  17. Physics Case and Challenges for the Vertex Tracker at Future High Energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco

    2001-01-01

    The physics programme of high energy e+e- linear colliders relies on the accurate identification of fermions in order to study in details the profile of the Higgs boson, search for new particles and probe the multi-TeV mass region by means of precise electro-weak measurements and direct searches.

  18. Beam losses from ultra-peripheral nuclear collisions between $^{208}$Pb$^{82+}$ ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R.; Jowett, J.M.; Bocian, D.; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2009-01-01

    Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte-Carlo shower simulation and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of Pb ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the ALICE interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal Pb operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  19. Polarized positrons and electrons at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G. [CERN TH Division, Department of Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); IPPP, University of Durham, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: g.a.moortgat-pick@durham.ac.uk; Abe, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-390 (United States); Alexander, G. [University of Tel-Aviv, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Ananthanarayan, B. [Centre for High Energy Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, 560012 (India); Babich, A.A. [Pavel Sukhoi Technical University, Gomel, 246746 (Belarus); Bharadwaj, V. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Barber, D. [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Bartl, A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Wien, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Brachmann, A. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Chen, S. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-390 (United States); Clarke, J. [CCLRC, ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Clendenin, J.E. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Dainton, J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Desch, K. [Phys. Institut, Albert-Ludwigs Universitaet Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Diehl, M. [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Dobos, B.; Dorland, T. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-390 (United States); Dreiner, H.K. [Phys. Institut, Universitaet Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Eberl, H. [Inst. f. Hochenergiephysik, Osterr. Akademie d. Wissenschaften, A-1050 Wien (Austria); Ellis, J. [CERN TH Division, Department of Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  20. Spes: Exotic Beams for Nuclear Physics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, Alberto; Manzolaro, Mattia; Corradetti, Stefano; Scarpa, Daniele; Vasquez, Jesu; Rossignoli, Massimo; Monetti, Alberto; Calderolla, Michele; Prete, Gianfranco

    2014-02-01

    The SPES project at Laboratori di Legnaro of INFN (Italy) is concentrating on the production of neutron-rich radioactive nuclei for nuclear physics experiments using uranium fission at a rate of 1013 fission/s. The emphasis on neutron-rich isotopes is justified by the fact that this vast territory has been little explored. The Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) will be produced by the ISOL technique using proton induced fission on a direct target of UCx. The most critical element of the SPES project is the Multi-Foil Direct Target. Up to the present time, the proposed target represents an innovation in terms of its capability to sustain the primary beam power. This talk will present the status of the project financed by INFN, which is actually in the construction phase at Legnaro. In particular, developments related to the target and the ion-source activities using the surface ion source, plasma ion source, and laser ion source techniques will be reported.

  1. Beam Losses in the Extraction Line of a TeV E+ E- Linear Collider With a 20-Mrad Crossing Angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A.; /Uppsala U.; Nosochkov, Y.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    In this paper, we perform a detailed study of the power losses along the postcollision extraction line of a TeV e+e- collider with a crossing angle of 20 mrad between the beams at the interaction point. Five cases are considered here: four luminosity configurations for ILC and one for CLIC. For all of them, the strong beam-beam effects at the interaction point lead to an emittance growth for the outgoing beams, as well as to the production of beamstrahlung photons and e+e- pairs. The power losses along the 20 mrad extraction line, which are due to energy deposition by a fraction of the disrupted beam, of the beamstrahlung photons and of the e+e- coherent pairs, were estimated in the case of ideal collisions, as well as with a vertical position or angular o set at the interaction point.

  2. Physics requirements for the design of the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdee, T S

    2012-02-28

    The ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are discovery experiments. Thus, the aim was to make them sensitive to the widest possible range of new physics. New physics is likely to reveal itself in addressing questions such as: how do particles acquire mass; what is the particle responsible for dark matter; what is the path towards unification; do we live in a world with more space-time dimensions than the familiar four? The detection of the Higgs boson, conjectured to give mass to particles, was chosen as a benchmark to test the performance of the proposed experiment designs. Higgs production is one of the most demanding hypothesized processes in terms of required detector resolution and background discrimination. ATLAS and CMS feature full coverage, 4π-detectors to measure precisely the energies, directions and identity of all the particles produced in proton-proton collisions. Realizing this goal has required the collaborative efforts of enormous teams of people from around the world.

  3. Test Beams and Polarized Fixed Target Beams at the NLC

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Lewis; Pitthan, Rainer; Rokni, Sayed; Thompson, Kathleen; Kolomenski, Yury

    2001-01-01

    A conceptual program to use NLC beams for test beams and fixed target physics is described. Primary undisrupted polarized beams would be the most simple to use, but for NLC, the disrupted beams are of good enough quality that they could also be used, after collimation of the low energy tails, for test beams and fixed target physics. Pertinent issues are: what is the compelling physics, what are the requirements on beams and running time, and what is the impact on colliding beam physics runni...

  4. Tutorial on Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Proceeding from the collision point towards the source, we discuss purpose and design concepts of the various linear-collider subsystems, as well as important mechanisms of emittance dilution, beam diagnostics, and advanced tuning methods. In particular, we address beamstrahlung, linac emittance degradation due to dispersion and wake fields, scaling of damping-ring parameters with collider energy, fast beam-ion and electron-cloud instabilities, coherent synchrotron radiation, and rf guns. Five case studies are examined in detail.

  5. For information - Université de Genève : Accelerator Physics Challenges for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2005-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE Faculte des sciences Section de physique - Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet - 1211 GENEVE 4 Tél : (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Mercredi 16 March SEMINAIRE DE PHYSIQUE CORPUSCULAIRE à 17h00 - Auditoire Stückelberg Accelerator Physics Challenges for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN Prof. Olivier Bruning / CERN The Large Hadron Collider project at CERN will bring the energy frontier of high energy particle physics back to Europe and with it push the accelerator technology into uncharted teritory. The talk presents the LHC project in the context of the past CERN accelerator developments and addresses the main challenges in terms of technology and accelerator physics. Information: http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer: A. Cervera Villanueva

  6. Quantum tomography for collider physics: illustrations with lepton-pair production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, John C.; Ralston, John P.; Takaki, J. D. Tapia

    2018-01-01

    Quantum tomography is a method to experimentally extract all that is observable about a quantum mechanical system. We introduce quantum tomography to collider physics with the illustration of the angular distribution of lepton pairs. The tomographic method bypasses much of the field-theoretic formalism to concentrate on what can be observed with experimental data. We provide a practical, experimentally driven guide to model-independent analysis using density matrices at every step. Comparison with traditional methods of analyzing angular correlations of inclusive reactions finds many advantages in the tomographic method, which include manifest Lorentz covariance, direct incorporation of positivity constraints, exhaustively complete polarization information, and new invariants free from frame conventions. For example, experimental data can determine the entanglement entropy of the production process. We give reproducible numerical examples and provide a supplemental standalone computer code that implements the procedure. We also highlight a property of complex positivity that guarantees in a least-squares type fit that a local minimum of a χ 2 statistic will be a global minimum: There are no isolated local minima. This property with an automated implementation of positivity promises to mitigate issues relating to multiple minima and convention dependence that have been problematic in previous work on angular distributions.

  7. Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate extensions to four collaboration agreements for the design of key components of the beam-delivery and linac systems for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) for a duration of two years

  8. Proposal to negotiate three collaboration agreements in the context of the Future Circular Collider Study (FCC) concerning the development of HTS coated tapes integrated into the beam screen for impedance mitigation

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate three collaboration agreements in the context of the Future Circular Collider Study (FCC) concerning the development of HTS coated tapes integrated into the beam screen for impedance mitigation

  9. Druid, event display for the linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, M; Musat, G; Jeans, D; Pande, J

    2013-01-01

    Druid is a dedicated event display designed for the future e +e − linear colliders. Druid takes standard linear collider data files and detector geometry description files as input, it can visualize both physics event and detector geometry. Many displaying options are provided by Druid, giving easy access to different information. As a versatile event display, Druid supports all the latest linear collider detector models, Silicon Detector and International Large Detector, as well as the calorimeter prototypes operated in the CALICE test beam experiments. It has been utilized in many studies such as the verification of detector geometry, analysis of the simulated full events and test beam data as well as reconstruction algorithm development and code debugging.

  10. Data Quality Monitoring Framework for ATLAS Experiment: Performance Achieved with Colliding Beams at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Corso-Radu, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Ilchenko, Y; Kolos, S; Okawa, H; Slagle, K; Taffard, A

    2010-01-01

    With the delivery of the first proton-proton collisions by the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration had the opportunity to operate the detector under the environment it was designed for. These first runs have been of great interest not only for the high energy physics outcome, but also were used to perform a general commissioning of the system. The online data quality monitoring framework (DQMF) is a highly scalable distributed framework that is used to assess the quality of the data and the operational conditions of the detector, trigger and data acquisition system. DQMF provides quick feedback to the user about the correct functioning and performance of different parts of the detector, it quickly spots problems related with data quality and allows one to determine the origin of these problems. DQMF performs over forty thousand advanced data quality checks at a rate that depends on the histogram update frequency and it displays histograms and results of these checks on several dozens of monitors installed in the mai...

  11. Les Houches Physics at TeV Colliders 2005 Beyond the Standard Model Working Group: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allanach, B.C.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP; Grojean, C.; /Saclay, SPhT /CERN; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Accomando, E.; Azuelos, G.; Baer, H.; Balazs, C.; Belanger, G.; Benakli, K.; Boudjema, F.; Brelier, B.; Bunichev, V.; Cacciapaglia, G.; Carena, M.; Choudhury, D.; Delsart, P.-A.; De Sanctis, U.; Desch, K.; Dobrescu, B.A.; Dudko, L.; El Kacimi, M.; /Saclay,

    2006-03-17

    The work contained herein constitutes a report of the ''Beyond the Standard Model'' working group for the Workshop ''Physics at TeV Colliders'', Les Houches, France, 2-20 May, 2005. We present reviews of current topics as well as original research carried out for the workshop. Supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric models are studied, as well as computational tools designed in order to facilitate their phenomenology.

  12. Status of the Future Circular Collider Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Following the 2013 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the international Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study has been launched by CERN as host institute, to design an energy frontier hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new 80-100 km tunnel with a centre-of-mass energy of about 100 TeV, an order of magnitude beyond the LHC's, as a long-term goal. The FCC study also includes the design of a 90-350 GeV high-luminosity lepton collider (FCC-ee) installed in the same tunnel, serving as Higgs, top and Z factory, as a potential intermediate step, as well as an electron-proton collider option (FCC-he). The physics cases for such machines will be assessed and concepts for experiments will be developed in time for the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics by the end of 2018. The presentation will summarize the status of machine designs and parameters and discuss the essential technical components to be developed in the frame of the FCC study. Key elements are superconducting accelerator-dipole magnets with a field of 16 T for the hadron collider and high-power, high-efficiency RF systems for the lepton collider. In addition the unprecedented beam power presents special challenges for the hadron collider for all aspects of beam handling and machine protection. First conclusions of geological investigations and implementation studies will be presented. The status of the FCC collaboration and the further planning for the study will be outlined.

  13. Design of an 18 MW vortex flow water beam dump for 500 GeV electrons/positrons of an international linear collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyamurthy, Polepalle; Rai, Pravin; Tiwari, Vikas; Kulkarni, Kiran; Amann, John; Arnold, Raymond G.; Walz, Dieter; Seryi, Andrei; Davenne, Tristan; Caretta, Ottone; Densham, Chris; Appleby, Robert B.

    2012-07-01

    Beam dumps are essential components of any accelerator system. They are usually located at the end of the beam delivery systems and are designed to safely absorb and dissipate the particle energy. In the second stage of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), the electron and positron beams are accelerated to 500 GeV each (1 TeV total). Each bunch will have 2×1010 electrons/positrons, and 2820 bunches form one beam bunch train with time duration of 0.95 ms and 4 Hz frequency. The average beam power will be 18 MW with a peak power of 4.5 GW. The FLUKA code was used to determine the power deposited by the beam at all critical locations. This data forms the input into the thermal hydraulic analysis CFD code for detailed flow and thermal evaluation. Both 2D and 3D flow analyses were carried out at all the critical regions to arrive at optimum geometry and flow parameters of the beam dump. The generation and propagation of pressure waves due to rapid deposition of heat has also been analyzed.

  14. Electromagnetic fields and beam dynamics simulation for the superstructure of tesla linear collider considering field asymmetry caused by hom and power couplers

    CERN Document Server

    Lalayan, M V; Sobenin, N P; Shvedunov, V I; Zavadtsev, A A; Dohlus, M

    2001-01-01

    Some features of accelerating section field computation presented by the development of power and high order mode couplers for TESLA linear collider are considered. The devices mentioned produce electromagnetic field asymmetry in the beam area, thus causing transverse kick. For this kick and its influence on beam under acceleration parameters estimation the dynamics modelling calculations were done. 3D-simulation code MAFIA was used for field computation. These data were further used in beam dynamics calculations by means of TRMTrace code. Standing wave mode was simulated while considering HOM couplers, and travelling wave in case of power couplers. Transverse kicks and focussing forces are calculated for one HOM coupler design and two coaxial FM couplers.

  15. Looking For Physics Beyond The Standard Model: Searches For Charged Higgs Bosons At $e^{+}e^{-}$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kiiskinen, A P

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes direct searches for pair production of charged Higgs bosons performed in the data collected by the DELPHI detector at the LEP collider at CERN. In addition, the possibilities to discover and study heavy charged Higgs bosons at possible future high-energy linear colliders are presented. The existence of charged Higgs bosons is predicted by many extensions of the Standard Model. A possible discovery of these particles would be a solid proof for physics beyond the Standard Model. Discovery of charged Higgs bosons, and measurement of their properties, would also provide useful information about the structure of the more general theory. New analysis methods were developed for the searches performed at LEP. A large, previously unexplored, mass range for cover but no evidence for the existence of the charged Higgs bosons was found. This allowed setting new lower mass limits for the charged Higgs boson within the framework of general two Higgs doublet models. Results have been interpreted and pr...

  16. Ion beams in semiconductor physics and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalbitzer, S. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1992-01-01

    The remarkable progress during the last two decades in semiconductor device technology is partly due to the introduction of ion beams as a key instrument for the modification and analysis of semiconductors. The basic reason is seen in the inherent electrical property of ion beams to be accurately controllable in energy, dose and species. The basic penetration and incorporation mechanisms in elemental and compound semiconductors have been explored and growing agreement between experiment and theory has rendered ion implantation a predictable tool. Similarly, the high analytic potential of nuclear reactions with ion beams has been steadily exploited and outstanding results have been achieved. Some basic milestones in the development of the ion beam techniques will be reviewed and future trends discussed. (orig.).

  17. The Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lyndon

    2011-11-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most complex instrument ever built for particle physics research. It will, for the first time, provide access to the TeV-energy scale. Numerous technological innovations are necessary to achieve this goal. For example, two counterrotating proton beams are guided and focused by superconducting magnets whose novel two-in-one structure saves cost and allowed the machine to be installed in an existing tunnel. The very high (>8-T) field in the dipoles can be achieved only by cooling them below the transition temperature of liquid helium to the superfluid state. More than 80 tons of superfluid helium are needed to cool the whole machine. So far, the LHC has behaved reliably and predictably. Single-bunch currents 30% above the design value have been achieved, and the luminosity has increased by five orders of magnitude. In this review, I briefly describe the design principles of the major systems and discuss some initial results.

  18. Physics beyond the Standard Model and its Minimal Supersymmetric extension at large colliders

    OpenAIRE

    ??guila Gim??nez, Francisco del; Pittau, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    New large colliders will probe scales up to few TeV, indicating the way Nature has chosen to extend the Standard Model. We review alternative scenarios to the traditional Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model: the little Higgs model, split supersymmetry and extra dimensional models with low energy signals.

  19. Taking Energy to the Physics Classroom from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Xabier; Cid, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, the greatest experiment in history began. When in full operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will generate the greatest amount of information that has ever been produced in an experiment before. It will also reveal some of the most fundamental secrets of nature. Despite the enormous amount of information available on this…

  20. Beam-beam instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-08-01

    The subject of beam-beam instability has been studied since the invention of the colliding beam storage rings. Today, with several colliding beam storage rings in operation, it is not yet fully understood and remains an outstanding problem for the storage ring designers. No doubt that good progress has been made over the years, but what we have at present is still rather primitive. It is perhaps possible to divide the beam-beam subject into two areas: one on luminosity optimization and another on the dynamics of the beam-beam interaction. The former area concerns mostly the design and operational features of a colliding beam storage ring, while the later concentrates on the experimental and theoretical aspects of the beam-beam interaction. Although both areas are of interest, our emphasis is on the second area only. In particular, we are most interested in the various possible mechanisms that cause the beam-beam instability.

  1. Muon Collider Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pisin

    2003-06-02

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Detector background, polarization, and nonstandard operating conditions are discussed.

  2. Ion beam coolers in nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Äystö, J

    2003-01-01

    Cooling techniques for low-energy radioactive ion beams are reviewed together with applications on high-precision measurements of ground state properties of exotic nuclei. The emphasis in the presentation is on cooling, bunching and improving the overall characteristics of ion beams by RFQ-driven buffer gas cooling devices. Application of cooled and bunched beams in collinear laser spectroscopy to extract isotope shifts and hyperfine structure are presented with examples on radioactive Ti, Zr and Hf isotopes. The impact of the new-generation coolers on mass measurements of short-lived nuclei is discussed with examples on precision measurements of masses of super-allowed beta emitters. As a new concept, decay spectroscopy of radioactive ions trapped in a cooler Penning trap is presented.

  3. Physics at the high-energy frontier - the Large Hadron Collider project

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Robert; Evans, David; Gibson, Valerie; Nickerson, Richard; The Royal Society Discussion meeting

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), achieved its first particle collisions in late 2009 and is now running at 7 TeV, the highest energy ever attained in the laboratory, thereby opening the way for the search for many new phenomena. The aim of the meeting is to discuss the scientific, technical, sociological, political and financial challenges of bringing this huge international project to fruition.

  4. Nuclear physics with a medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Accardi, V. Guzey, A. Prokudin, C. Weiss

    2012-06-01

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC) with variable center-of-mass energy {radical}s {approx} 20-70 GeV and a luminosity {approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) and the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei: (i) the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon in QCD (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, correlations); (ii) the fundamental color fields in nuclei (nuclear parton densities, shadowing, coherence effects, color transparency); (iii) the conversion of color charge to hadrons (fragmentation, parton propagation through matter, in-medium jets). We briefly review the conceptual aspects of these questions and the measurements that would address them, emphasizing the qualitatively new information that could be obtained with the collider. Such a medium-energy EIC could be realized at Jefferson Lab after the 12 GeV Upgrade (MEIC), or at Brookhaven National Lab as the low-energy stage of eRHIC.

  5. International Linear Collider Reference Design Report Volume 2: Physics at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aarons, Gerald; Abe, Toshinori; Abernathy, Jason; Ablikim, Medina; Abramowicz, Halina; Adey, David; Adloff, Catherine; Adolphsen, Chris; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Agapov, Ilya; Ahn, Jung-Keun; Aihara, Hiroaki; Akemoto, Mitsuo; del Carmen Alabau, Maria; Albert, Justin; Albrecht, Hartwig; Albrecht, Michael; Alesini, David; Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Jim; Allison, Wade; /SLAC /Tokyo U. /Victoria U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Tel Aviv U. /Birmingham U. /Annecy, LAPP /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /DESY /Royal Holloway, U. of London /CERN /Pusan Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Notre Dame U. /Frascati /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Oxford U. /Hefei, CUST /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /Fermilab

    2011-11-14

    The triumph of 20th century particle physics was the development of the Standard Model and the confirmation of many of its aspects. Experiments determined the particle constituents of ordinary matter, and identified four forces that hold matter together and transform it from one form to another. Particle interactions were found to obey precise laws of relativity and quantum theory. Remarkable features of quantum physics were observed, including the real effects of 'virtual' particles on the visible world. Building on this success, particle physicists are now able to address questions that are even more fundamental, and explore some of the deepest mysteries in science. The scope of these questions is illustrated by this summary from the report Quantum Universe: (1) Are there undiscovered principles of nature; (2) How can we solve the mystery of dark energy; (3) Are there extra dimensions of space; (4) Do all the forces become one; (5) Why are there so many particles; (6) What is dark matter? How can we make it in the laboratory; (7) What are neutrinos telling us; (8) How did the universe begin; and (9) What happened to the antimatter? A worldwide program of particle physics investigations, using multiple approaches, is already underway to explore this compelling scientific landscape. As emphasized in many scientific studies, the International Linear Collider is expected to play a central role in what is likely to be an era of revolutionary advances. Discoveries from the ILC could have breakthrough impact on many of these fundamental questions. Many of the scientific opportunities for the ILC involve the Higgs particle and related new phenomena at Terascale energies. The Standard Model boldly hypothesizes a new form of Terascale energy, called the Higgs field, that permeates the entire universe. Elementary particles acquire mass by interacting with this field. The Higgs field also breaks a fundamental electroweak force into two forces, the electromagnetic

  6. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, J.S.

    1990-01-05

    This document presents our proposal to continue the activities of Boston University researchers in eight projects in high energy physics research: Colliding Beams Physics; Accelerator Design Physics; MACRO Project; Proton Decay Project; Theoretical Particle Physics; Muon G-2 Project; and Hadron Collider Physics. The scope of each of these projects is presented in detail in this paper.

  7. A Compact Magnetic Cloaking Device for Future Collider Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Benjamin; Dehmelt, Klaus; Deshpande, Abhay; Feege, Nils

    2013-10-01

    Accelerator-based nuclear physics experiments need detectors capable of measuring momenta of charged particles in the very far forward direction from the interaction point. This requires a uniform magnetic field close to and perpendicular to the collider's beam pipe. If there were a magnetic field inside the beam pipe, however, it would displace and depolarize the (charged, polarized) colliding beams. It has been demonstrated, although on a small scale, that a magnetic cloaking device combining a superconducting layer and a ferromagnetic layer can maintain a uniform magnetic field outside while creating a field-free region within. We present the design of a device based on the idea, which meets the size and magnetic field shielding requirements for a detector for the Electron Ion Collider (EIC). We report on the progress towards building a functional prototype. Supported by EIC Detector R&D funds provided by the US DOE.

  8. beam-beam interaction

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The Beam 1 (represented in blue) and the Beam 2 (represented in red) are colliding with an angle at the Interaction Point (IP). The angle is needed to avoid unwanted multiple collisions along the interaction region. Despite of the separation introduced by the angle, the two beams interact via their electromagnetic field, the so called "beam-beam" interaction.

  9. Soviet Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchetkov, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    Rapid growth of the high energy physics program in the USSR during 1960s-1970s culminated with a decision to build the Accelerating and Storage Complex (UNK) to carry out fixed target and colliding beam experiments. The UNK was to have three rings. One ring was to be built with conventional magnets to accelerate protons up to the energy of 600 GeV. The other two rings were to be made from superconducting magnets, each ring was supposed to accelerate protons up to the energy of 3 TeV. The accelerating rings were to be placed in an underground tunnel with a circumference of 21 km. As a 3 x 3 TeV collider, the UNK would make proton-proton collisions with a luminosity of 4 x 1034 cm-1s-1. Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino was a project leading institution and a site of the UNK. Accelerator and detector research and development studies were commenced in the second half of 1970s. State Committee for Utilization of Atomic Energy of the USSR approved the project in 1980, and the construction of the UNK started in 1983. Political turmoil in the Soviet Union during late 1980s and early 1990s resulted in disintegration of the USSR and subsequent collapse of the Russian economy. As a result of drastic reduction of funding for the UNK, in 1993 the project was restructured to be a 600 GeV fixed target accelerator only. While the ring tunnel and proton injection line were completed by 1995, and 70% of all magnets and associated accelerator equipment were fabricated, lack of Russian federal funding for high energy physics halted the project at the end of 1990s.

  10. Measurement and interpretation of transverse beam instabilities in the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) and extrapolations to HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067185; Arduini, Gianluigi; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Buffat, Xavier; Carver, Lee Robert; Iadarola, Giovanni; Li, Kevin Shing Bruce; Pieloni, Tatiana; Romano, Annalisa; Rumolo, Giovanni; Salvant, Benoit; Schenk, Michael; Tambasco, Claudia; Biancacci, Nicolo

    2016-01-01

    Since the first transverse instability observed in 2010, many studies have been performed on both measurement and simulation sides and several lessons have been learned. In a machine like the LHC, not only all the mechanisms have to be understood separately, but the possible interplays between the different phenomena need to be analysed in detail, including the beam-coupling impedance (with in particular all the necessary collimators to protect the machine but also new equipment such as crab cavities for HL-LHC), linear and nonlinear chromaticity, Landau octupoles (and other intrinsic nonlinearities), transverse damper, space charge, beam-beam (long-range and head-on), electron cloud, linear coupling strength, tune separation between the transverse planes, tune split between the two beams, transverse beam separation between the two beams, etc. This paper reviews all the transverse beam instabilities observed and simulated so far, the mitigation measures which have been put in place, the remaining questions an...

  11. Simulations of three one-dimensional limits of the strong-strong beam-beam interaction in hadron colliders using weighted macroparticle tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vogt

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available We develop the method of weighted macroparticle tracking (WMPT for simulating the time evolution of the moments of the phase space densities of two beams which are coupled via the collective (strong-strong beam-beam interaction in the absence of diffusion and damping. As an initial test we apply this method to study the π mode and the σ mode in three different 1D limits of the beam-beam interaction. The three limits are flat beams and transverse motion in the direction of the small width, round beams, and flat beams and motion in the direction of the large width. We have written a code (BBDeMo1D based on WMPT, which allows testing of all three limits and is suited for extension to 2 degrees of freedom.

  12. Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Fellow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Gail G. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Snopak, Pavel [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bao, Yu [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2015-03-20

    Muons are fundamental particles like electrons but much more massive. Muon accelerators can provide physics opportunities similar to those of electron accelerators, but because of the larger mass muons lose less energy to radiation, allowing more compact facilities with lower operating costs. The way muon beams are produced makes them too large to fit into the vacuum chamber of a cost-effective accelerator, and the short muon lifetime means that the beams must be reduced in size rather quickly, without losing too many of the muons. This reduction in size is called "cooling." Ionization cooling is a new technique that can accomplish such cooling. Intense muon beams can then be accelerated and injected into a storage ring, where they can be used to produce neutrino beams through their decays or collided with muons of the opposite charge to produce a muon collider, similar to an electron-positron collider. We report on the research carried out at the University of California, Riverside, towards producing such muon accelerators, as part of the Muon Accelerator Program based at Fermilab. Since this research was carried out in a university environment, we were able to involve both undergraduate and graduate students.

  13. The Role of polarized positrons and electrons in revealing fundamental interactions at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-01

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  14. Revealing Fundamental Interactions: the Role of Polarized Positrons and Electrons at the Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP; Abe, T.; Alexander, G.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Babich, A.A.; Bharadwaj, V.; Barber, D.; Bartl, A.; Brachmann, A.; Chen, S.; Clarke,; Clendenin, J.E.; Dainton, J.; Desch, K.; Diehl, M.; Dobos, B.; Dorland, T.; Eberl, H.; Ellis, John R.; Flottman, K.; Frass, H.; /CERN /Durham U., IPPP /Colorado U. /Tel-Aviv

    2005-07-06

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) is well-suited for discovering physics beyond the Standard Model and for precisely unraveling the structure of the underlying physics. The physics return can be maximized by the use of polarized beams. This report shows the paramount role of polarized beams and summarizes the benefits obtained from polarizing the positron beam, as well as the electron beam. The physics case for this option is illustrated explicitly by analyzing reference reactions in different physics scenarios. The results show that positron polarization, combined with the clean experimental environment provided by the linear collider, allows to improve strongly the potential of searches for new particles and the identification of their dynamics, which opens the road to resolve shortcomings of the Standard Model. The report also presents an overview of possible designs for polarizing both beams at the ILC, as well as for measuring their polarization.

  15. The CERN SPS proton-antiproton collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rudiger

    One of CERN's most ambitious and successful projects was the search for the intermediate bosons, W and Z [1]. The accelerator part of the project relied on a number of innovations in accelerator physics and technology. The invention of the method of stochastic cooling and the extension by many orders of magnitude beyond the initial proof of principle demonstration allowed the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator. Major modifications to the 26 GeV PS complex and the conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which had just started up as an accelerator, to a pbar p collider were required. The SPS collider had to master the beam-beam effect far beyond limits reached before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the UA1 and UA2 experiments.

  16. Lare Hadron Collider faces today

    CERN Multimedia

    Cartwright, Jon

    2007-01-01

    "The start-up of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN could be delayed after three of the magnets used to focus and manipulate the accelerator's proton beams failed premilinary tests at CERN earlier this week." (1 page)

  17. CLIC: developing a linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a CERN project to provide high-energy electron-positron collisions. Instead of conventional radio-frequency klystrons, CLIC will use a low-energy, high-intensity primary beam to produce acceleration.

  18. Successful Beam-Beam Tuneshift Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishofberger, Kip Aaron [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The performance of synchrotron colliders has been limited by the beam-beam limit, a maximum tuneshift that colliding bunches could sustain. Due to bunch-to-bunch tune variation and intra-bunch tune spread, larger tuneshifts produce severe emittance growth. Breaking through this constraint has been viewed as impossible for several decades. This dissertation introduces the physics of ultra-relativistic synchrotrons and low-energy electron beams, with emphasis placed on the limits of the Tevatron and the needs of a tuneshift-compensation device. A detailed analysis of the Tevatron Electron Lens (TEL) is given, comparing theoretical models to experimental data whenever possible. Finally, results of Tevatron operations with inclusion of the TEL are presented and analyzed. It is shown that the TEL provides a way to shatter the previously inescapable beam-beam limit.

  19. Nuclear physics with radioactive ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozub, Raymond L. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)

    2015-07-23

    This is a final report on DOE Grant No. DE FG02 96ER40955, which was active at Tennessee Technological University (TTU) from 1 March 1996 to 29 May 2015. Generally, this report will provide an overall summary of the more detailed activities presented in the progress reports, numbered DOE/ER/40955-1 through DOE/ER/40955-18, which were submitted annually to the DOE Office of Nuclear Physics.

  20. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  1. Towards future circular colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedikt, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) presently provides proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics program will extend through the second half of the 2030's. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ˜100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCCee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3 S n superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly-efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. Following the FCC concept, the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP) in Beijing has initiated a parallel design study for an e + e - Higgs factory in China (CEPC), which is to be succeeded by a high-energy hadron collider (SPPC). At present a tunnel circumference of 54 km and a hadron collider c.m. energy of about 70 TeV are being considered. After a brief look at the LHC, this article reports the motivation and the present status of the FCC study, some of the primary design challenges and R&D subjects, as well as the emerging global collaboration.

  2. Overview of Beam-Beam Effects in the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, V.

    2014-01-01

    For almost a quarter of a century the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider was the centrepiece of the world's high-energy physics program, from the start of operation in December 1985 until it was overtaken by the LHC in 2011. The initial design luminosity of the Tevatron was 1030 cm-2 s-1; however, as a result of two decades of upgrades, the accelerator has been able to deliver 430-times higher luminosities to each of two high-luminosity experiments, Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and D0. On the way to record high luminosities, many issues related to the electromagnetic beam-beam interaction of colliding beams have been addressed. Below we present a short overview of the beam-beam effects in the Tevatron.

  3. Workshop on Physics with Neutral Kaon Beam at JLab

    CERN Document Server

    Chudakov, E.; Meyer, C.; Pennington, M.; Ritman, J.; Strakovsky, I.; KL2016

    2016-01-01

    The KL2016 Workshop is following the Letter of Intent LoI12-15-001 "Physics Opportunities with Secondary KL beam at JLab" submitted to PAC43 with the main focus on the physics of excited hyperons produced by the Kaon beam on unpolarized and polarized targets with GlueX setup in Hall D. Such studies will broaden a physics program of hadron spectroscopy extending it to the strange sector. The Workshop was organized to get a feedback from the community to strengthen physics motivation of the LoI and prepare a full proposal. Further details about the Workshop can be found on the web page of the conference: http://www.jlab.org/conferences/kl2016/index.html .

  4. Start of run2 physics at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    Images from the CERN Control Centre (CCC), where operators control the LHC, and from the control rooms of the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments, where operators control huge detectors that capture data from collisions between beams of protons in the LHC.

  5. Summary of the ECFA Linear Collider Working Group on Beamstrahlung and Photon-Photon Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pisin

    2003-07-14

    This paper presents a concise summary of the developments achieved in the context of the ''Photons'' Working Group of the 1991 ECFA Workshop on Physics with Linear Colliders. After reviewing, in Section 2, the current knowledge on the beam-beam interaction and its main physics implications, they calculate in Section 3 effective photon and electron luminosity spectra. Section 4 discusses background issues associated with photon-photon processes. Finally, they briefly survey, in Section 5, recent updates on the principle issues and the physics potential of the so-called ''Compton Collider''.

  6. Measurements of beam halo diffusion and population density in the Tevatron and in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio

    Halo dynamics influences global accelerator performance: beam lifetimes, emittance growth, dynamic aperture, and collimation efficiency. Halo monitoring and control are also critical for the operation of high-power machines. For instance, in the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the energy stored in the beam tails may reach several megajoules. Fast losses can result in superconducting magnet quenches, magnet damage, or even collimator deformation. The need arises to measure the beam halo and to remove it at controllable rates. In the Tevatron and in the LHC, halo population densities and diffusivities were measured with collimator scans by observing the time evolution of losses following small inward or outward collimator steps, under different experimental conditions: with single beams and in collision, and, in the case of the Tevatron, with a hollow electron lens acting on a subset of bunches. After the LHC resumes operations, it is planned to compare measured diffusivities with the known strength of tran...

  7. International Linear Collider Reference Design Report Volume 2: PHYSICS AT THE ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Moenig, Klaus; Okada, Yasuhiro; Oreglia, Mark; Yamashita, Satoru; Aarons, Gerald; Abe, Toshinori; Abernathy, Jason; Ablikim, Medina; Abramowicz, Halina; Adey, David; Adloff, Catherine; Adolphsen, Chris; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Agapov, Ilya; Ahn, Jung-Keun; Aihara, Hiroaki; Akemoto, Mitsuo; del Carmen Alabau, Maria; Albert, Justin; Albrecht, Hartwig; Albrecht, Michael; Alesini, David; Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Jim; Allison, Wade; Amann, John; Amirikas, Ramila; An, Qi; Anami, Shozo; Ananthanarayan, B.; Anderson, Terry; Andricek, Ladislav; Anduze, Marc; Anerella, Michael; Anfimov, Nikolai; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa; Antipov, Sergei; Antoine, Claire; Aoki, Mayumi; Aoza, Atsushi; Aplin, Steve; Appleby, Rob; Arai, Yasuo; Araki, Sakae; Arkan, Tug; Arnold, Ned; Arnold, Ray; Arnowitt, Richard; Artru, Xavier; Arya, Kunal; Aryshev, Alexander; Asakawa, Eri; Asiri, Fred; Asner, David; Atac, Muzaffer; Atoian, Grigor; Attié, David; Augustin, Jean-Eudes; Augustine, David B.; Ayres, Bradley; Aziz, Tariq; Baars, Derek; Badaud, Frederique; Baddams, Nigel; Bagger, Jonathan; Bai, Sha; Bailey, David; Bailey, Ian R.; Baker, David; Balalykin, Nikolai I.; Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Baldy, Jean-Luc; Ball, Markus; Ball, Maurice; Ballestrero, Alessandro; Ballin, Jamie; Baltay, Charles; Bambade, Philip; Ban, Syuichi; Band, Henry; Bane, Karl; Banerjee, Bakul; Barbanotti, Serena; Barbareschi, Daniele; Barbaro-Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Desmond P.; Barbi, Mauricio; Bardin, Dmitri Y.; Barish, Barry; Barklow, Timothy L.; Barlow, Roger; Barnes, Virgil E.; Barone, Maura; Bartels, Christoph; Bartsch, Valeria; Basu, Rahul; Battaglia, Marco; Batygin, Yuri; Baudot, Jerome; Baur, Ulrich; Elwyn Baynham, D.; Beard, Carl; Bebek, Chris; Bechtle, Philip; Becker, Ulrich J.; Bedeschi, Franco; Bedjidian, Marc; Behera, Prafulla; Behnke, Ties; Bellantoni, Leo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Paul; Bentson, Lynn D.; Benyamna, Mustapha; Bergauer, Thomas; Berger, Edmond; Bergholz, Matthias; Beri, Suman; Berndt, Martin; Bernreuther, Werner; Bertolini, Alessandro; Besancon, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Beteille, Andre; Bettoni, Simona; Beyer, Michael; Bhandari, R.K.; Bharadwaj, Vinod; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Bhuyan, Ruchika; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Biagini, Marica; Bialowons, Wilhelm; Biebel, Otmar; Bieler, Thomas; Bierwagen, John; Birch, Alison; Bisset, Mike; Biswal, S.S.; Blackmore, Victoria; Blair, Grahame; Blanchard, Guillaume; Blazey, Gerald; Blue, Andrew; Blümlein, Johannes; Boffo, Christian; Bohn, Courtlandt; Boiko, V.I.; Boisvert, Veronique; Bondarchuk, Eduard N.; Boni, Roberto; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Boogert, Stewart; Boonekamp, Maarten; Boorman, Gary; Borras, Kerstin; Bortoletto, Daniela; Bosco, Alessio; Bosio, Carlo; Bosland, Pierre; Bosotti, Angelo; Boudry, Vincent; Boumediene, Djamel-Eddine; Bouquet, Bernard; Bourov, Serguei; Bowden, Gordon; Bower, Gary; Boyarski, Adam; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bozzi, Concezio; Brachmann, Axel; Bradshaw, Tom W.; Brandt, Andrew; Brasser, Hans Peter; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James E.; Breidenbach, Martin; Bricker, Steve; Brient, Jean-Claude; Brock, Ian; Brodsky, Stanley; Brooksby, Craig; Broome, Timothy A.; Brown, David; Brown, David; Brownell, James H.; Bruchon, Mélanie; Brueck, Heiner; Brummitt, Amanda J.; Brun, Nicole; Buchholz, Peter; Budagov, Yulian A.; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Bulyak, Eugene; Bungau, Adriana; Bürger, Jochen; Burke, Dan; Burkhart, Craig; Burrows, Philip; Burt, Graeme; Burton, David; Büsser, Karsten; Butler, John; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buzulutskov, Alexei; Cabruja, Enric; Caccia, Massimo; Cai, Yunhai; Calcaterra, Alessandro; Caliier, Stephane; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cao, Jun-Jie; Cao, J.S.; Capatina, Ofelia; Cappellini, Chiara; Carcagno, Ruben; Carena, Marcela; Carloganu, Cristina; Carosi, Roberto; Stephen Carr, F.; Carrion, Francisco; Carter, Harry F.; Carter, John; Carwardine, John; Cassel, Richard; Cassell, Ronald; Cavallari, Giorgio; Cavallo, Emanuela; Cembranos, Jose A.R.; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chandez, Frederic; Charles, Matthew; Chase, Brian; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chauveau, Jacques; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chehab, Robert; Chel, Stéphane; Chelkov, Georgy; Chen, Chiping; Chen, He Sheng; Chen, Huai Bi; Chen, Jia Er; Chen, Sen Yu; Chen, Shaomin; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xun; Chen, Yuan Bo; Cheng, Jian; Chevallier, M.; Chi, Yun Long; Chickering, William; Cho, Gi-Chol; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Choi, Jin-Hyuk; Choi, Jong Bum; Choi, Seong Youl; Choi, Young-Il; Choudhary, Brajesh; Choudhury, Debajyoti; Rai Choudhury, S.; Christian, David; Christian, Glenn; Christophe, Grojean; Chung, Jin-Hyuk; Church, Mike; Ciborowski, Jacek; Cihangir, Selcuk; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clarke, Christine; Clarke, Don G.; Clarke, James A.; Clements, Elizabeth; Coca, Cornelia; Coe, Paul; Cogan, John; Colas, Paul; Collard, Caroline; Colledani, Claude; Combaret, Christophe; Comerma, Albert; Compton, Chris; Constance, Ben; Conway, John; Cook, Ed; Cooke, Peter; Cooper, William; Corcoran, Sean; Cornat, Rémi; Corner, Laura; Cortina Gil, Eduardo; Clay Corvin, W.; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Cowan, Ray; Crawford, Curtis; Cremaldi, Lucien M; Crittenden, James A.; Cussans, David; Cvach, Jaroslav; da Silva, Wilfrid; Dabiri Khah, Hamid; Dabrowski, Anne; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dadoun, Olivier; Dai, Jian Ping; Dainton, John; Daly, Colin; Damerell, Chris; Danilov, Mikhail; Daniluk, Witold; Daram, Sarojini; Datta, Anindya; Dauncey, Paul; David, Jacques; Davier, Michel; Davies, Ken P.; Dawson, Sally; De Boer, Wim; De Curtis, Stefania; De Groot, Nicolo; de la Taille, Christophe; de Lira, Antonio; De Roeck, Albert; de Sangro, Riccardo; De Santis,Stefano; Deacon, Laurence; Deandrea, Aldo; Dehmelt, Klaus; Delagnes, Eric; Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Delebecque, Pierre; Delerue, Nicholas; Delferriere, Olivier; Demarteau, Marcel; Deng, Zhi; Denisov, Yu.N.; Densham, Christopher J.; Desch, Klaus; Deshpande, Nilendra; Devanz, Guillaume; Devetak, Erik; Dexter, Amos; Di benedetto, Vito; Diéguez, Angel; Diener, Ralf; Dinh, Nguyen Dinh; Dixit, Madhu; Dixit, Sudhir; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dollan, Ralph; Dong, Dong; Dong, Hai Yi; Dorfan, Jonathan; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doucas, George; Downing, Robert; Doyle, Eric; Doziere, Guy; Drago, Alessandro; Dragt, Alex; Drake, Gary; Drásal, Zbynek; Dreiner, Herbert; Drell, Persis; Driouichi, Chafik; Drozhdin, Alexandr; Drugakov, Vladimir; Du, Shuxian; Dugan, Gerald; Duginov, Viktor; Dulinski, Wojciech; Dulucq, Frederic; Dutta, Sukanta; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Dychkant, Alexandre; Dzahini, Daniel; Eckerlin, Guenter; Edwards, Helen; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Ehrlichman, Michael; Ehrlichmann, Heiko; Eigen, Gerald; Elagin, Andrey; Elementi, Luciano; Eliasson, Peder; Ellis, John; Ellwood, George; Elsen, Eckhard; Emery, Louis; Enami, Kazuhiro; Endo, Kuninori; Enomoto, Atsushi; Eozénou, Fabien; Erbacher, Robin; Erickson, Roger; Oleg Eyser, K.; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Fang, Shou Xian; Fant, Karen; Fasso, Alberto; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Fehlberg, John; Feld, Lutz; Feng, Jonathan L.; Ferguson, John; Fernandez-Garcia, Marcos; Luis Fernandez-Hernando, J.; Fiala, Pavel; Fieguth, Ted; Finch, Alexander; Finocchiaro, Giuseppe; Fischer, Peter; Fisher, Peter; Eugene Fisk, H.; Fitton, Mike D.; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischer, Manfred; Fleury, Julien; Flood, Kevin; Foley, Mike; Ford, Richard; Fortin, Dominique; Foster, Brian; Fourches, Nicolas; Francis, Kurt; Frey, Ariane; Frey, Raymond; Friedsam, Horst; Frisch, Josef; Frishman, Anatoli; Fuerst, Joel; Fujii, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Junpei; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fukuda, Shigeki; Funahashi, Yoshisato; Funk, Warren; Furletova, Julia; Furukawa, Kazuro; Furuta, Fumio; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gadow, Karsten; Gaede, Frank; Gaglione, Renaud; Gai, Wei; Gajewski, Jan; Galik, Richard; Galkin, Alexei; Galkin, Valery; Gallin-Martel, Laurent; Gannaway, Fred; Gao, Jian She; Gao, Jie; Gao, Yuanning; Garbincius, Peter; Garcia-Tabares, Luis; Garren, Lynn; Garrido, Luís; Garutti, Erika; Garvey, Terry; Garwin, Edward; Gascón, David; Gastal, Martin; Gatto, Corrado; Gatto, Raoul; Gay, Pascal; Ge, Lixin; Ge, Ming Qi; Ge, Rui; Geiser, Achim; Gellrich, Andreas; Genat, Jean-Francois; Geng, Zhe Qiao; Gentile, Simonetta; Gerbick, Scot; Gerig, Rod; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Ghosh, Kirtiman; Gibbons, Lawrence; Giganon, Arnaud; Gillespie, Allan; Gillman, Tony; Ginzburg, Ilya; Giomataris, Ioannis; Giunta, Michele; Gladkikh, Peter; Gluza, Janusz; Godbole, Rohini; Godfrey, Stephen; Goldhaber, Gerson; Goldstein, Joel; Gollin, George D.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Francisco Javier; Goodrick, Maurice; Gornushkin, Yuri; Gostkin, Mikhail; Gottschalk, Erik; Goudket, Philippe; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gournaris, Filimon; Graciani, Ricardo; Graf, Norman; Grah, Christian; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grandjean, Damien; Grannis, Paul; Grassellino, Anna; Graugés, Eugeni; Gray, Stephen; Green, Michael; Greenhalgh, Justin; Greenshaw, Timothy; Grefe, Christian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Gerald; Grimes, Mark; Grimm, Terry; Gris, Philippe; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groll, Marius; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Grondin, Denis; Groom, Donald; Gross, Eilam; Grunewald, Martin; Grupen, Claus; Grzelak, Grzegorz; Gu, Jun; Gu, Yun-Ting; Guchait, Monoranjan; Guiducci, Susanna; Guler, Ali Murat; Guler, Hayg; Gulmez, Erhan; Gunion, John; Guo, Zhi Yu; Gurtu, Atul; Ha, Huy Bang; Haas, Tobias; Haase, Andy; Haba, Naoyuki; Haber, Howard; Haensel, Stephan; Hagge, Lars; Hagura, Hiroyuki; Hajdu, Csaba; Haller, Gunther; Haller, Johannes; Hallermann, Lea; Halyo, Valerie; Hamaguchi, Koichi; Hammond, Larry; Han, Liang; Han, Tao; Hand, Louis; Handu, Virender K.; Hano, Hitoshi; Hansen, Christian; Hansen, Jørn Dines; Hansen, Jorgen Beck; Hara, Kazufumi; Harder, Kristian; Hartin, Anthony; Hartung, Walter; Hast, Carsten; Hauptman, John; Hauschild, Michael; Hauviller, Claude; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Chris; Hawkings, Richard; Hayano, Hitoshi; Hazumi, Masashi; He, An; He, Hong Jian; Hearty, Christopher; Heath, Helen; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedberg, Vincent; Hedin, David; Heifets, Samuel; Heinemeyer, Sven; Heini, Sebastien; Helebrant, Christian; Helms, Richard; Heltsley, Brian; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henschel, Hans; Hensel, Carsten; Hermel, Richard; Herms, Atilà; Herten, Gregor; Hesselbach, Stefan; Heuer, Rolf-Dieter; Heusch, Clemens A.; Hewett, Joanne; Higashi, Norio; Higashi, Takatoshi; Higashi, Yasuo; Higo, Toshiyasu; Hildreth, Michael D.; Hiller, Karlheinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen James; Himel, Thomas; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hioki, Zenro; Hirano, Koichiro; Hirose, Tachishige; Hisamatsu, Hiromi; Hisano, Junji; Hlaing, Chit Thu; Hock, Kai Meng; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hohlfeld, Mark; Honda, Yousuke; Hong, Juho; Hong, Tae Min; Honma, Hiroyuki; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horvath, Dezso; Hosoyama, Kenji; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Mi; Hou, Wei-Shu; Howell, David; Hronek, Maxine; Hsiung, Yee B.; Hu, Bo; Hu, Tao; Huang, Jung-Yun; Huang, Tong Ming; Huang, Wen Hui; Huedem, Emil; Huggard, Peter; Hugonie, Cyril; Hu-Guo, Christine; Huitu, Katri; Hwang, Youngseok; Idzik, Marek; Ignatenko, Alexandr; Ignatov, Fedor; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ilicheva, Tatiana; Imbault, Didier; Imhof, Andreas; Incagli, Marco; Ingbir, Ronen; Inoue, Hitoshi; Inoue, Youichi; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioakeimidi, Katerina; Ishihara, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishikawa, Tadashi; Issakov, Vladimir; Ito, Kazutoshi; Ivanov, V.V.; Ivanov, Valentin; Ivanyushenkov, Yury; Iwasaki, Masako; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Jackson, David; Jackson, Frank; Jacobsen, Bob; Jaganathan, Ramaswamy; Jamison, Steven; Janssen, Matthias Enno; Jaramillo-Echeverria, Richard; Jaros, John; Jauffret, Clement; Jawale, Suresh B.; Jeans, Daniel; Jedziniak, Ron; Jeffery, Ben; Jehanno, Didier; Jenner, Leo J.; Jensen, Chris; Jensen, David R.; Jiang, Hairong; Jiang, Xiao Ming; Jimbo, Masato; Jin, Shan; Keith Jobe, R.; Johnson, Anthony; Johnson, Erik; Johnson, Matt; Johnston, Michael; Joireman, Paul; Jokic, Stevan; Jones, James; Jones, Roger M.; Jongewaard, Erik; Jönsson, Leif; Joshi, Gopal; Joshi, Satish C.; Jung, Jin-Young; Junk, Thomas; Juste, Aurelio; Kado, Marumi; Kadyk, John; Käfer, Daniela; Kako, Eiji; Kalavase, Puneeth; Kalinin, Alexander; Kalinowski, Jan; Kamitani, Takuya; Kamiya, Yoshio; Kamiya, Yukihide; Kamoshita, Jun-ichi; Kananov, Sergey; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Kanemura, Shinya; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kang, Wen; Kanjial, D.; Kapusta, Frédéric; Karataev, Pavel; Karchin, Paul E.; Karlen, Dean; Karyotakis, Yannis; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Kasley, Paul; Katagiri, Hiroaki; Kato, Takashi; Kato, Yukihiro; Katzy, Judith; Kaukher, Alexander; Kaur, Manjit; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamura, Hiroyuki; Kazakov, Sergei; Kekelidze, V.D.; Keller, Lewis; Kelley, Michael; Kelly, Marc; Kelly, Michael; Kennedy, Kurt; Kephart, Robert; Keung, Justin; Khainovski, Oleg; Khan, Sameen Ahmed; Khare, Prashant; Khovansky, Nikolai; Kiesling, Christian; Kikuchi, Mitsuo; Kilian, Wolfgang; Killenberg, Martin; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Eun San; Kim, Eun-Joo; Kim, Guinyun; Kim, Hongjoo; Kim, Hyoungsuk; Kim, Hyun-Chui; Kim, Jonghoon; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kim, Peter; Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Shin-Hong; Kim, Sun Kee; Kim, Tae Jeong; Kim, Youngim; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimmitt, Maurice; Kirby, Robert; Kircher, François; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittel, Olaf; Klanner, Robert; Klebaner, Arkadiy L.; Kleinwort, Claus; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klinkby, Esben; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Marc; Kneisel, Peter; Ko, In Soo; Ko, Kwok; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kobayashi, Nobuko; Kobel, Michael; Koch, Manuel; Kodys, Peter; Koetz, Uli; Kohrs, Robert; Kojima, Yuuji; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolodziej, Karol; Kolomensky, Yury G.; Komamiya, Sachio; Kong, Xiang Cheng; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korbel, Volker; Koscielniak, Shane; Kostromin, Sergey; Kowalewski, Robert; Kraml, Sabine; Krammer, Manfred; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Krautscheid, Thorsten; Krawczyk, Maria; James Krebs, H.; Krempetz, Kurt; Kribs, Graham; Krishnagopal, Srinivas; Kriske, Richard; Kronfeld, Andreas; Kroseberg, Jürgen; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Kruecker, Dirk; Krüger, Hans; Krumpa, Nicholas A.; Krumshtein, Zinovii; Kuang, Yu Ping; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuchler, Vic; Kudoh, Noboru; Kulis, Szymon; Kumada, Masayuki; Kumar, Abhay; Kume, Tatsuya; Kundu, Anirban; Kurevlev, German; Kurihara, Yoshimasa; Kuriki, Masao; Kuroda, Shigeru; Kuroiwa, Hirotoshi; Kurokawa, Shin-ichi; Kusano, Tomonori; Kush, Pradeep K.; Kutschke, Robert; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Kvasnicka, Peter; Kwon, Youngjoon; Labarga, Luis; Lacasta, Carlos; Lackey, Sharon; Lackowski, Thomas W.; Lafaye, Remi; Lafferty, George; Lagorio, Eric; Laktineh, Imad; Lal, Shankar; Laloum, Maurice; Lam, Briant; Lancaster, Mark; Lander, Richard; Lange, Wolfgang; Langenfeld, Ulrich; Langeveld, Willem; Larbalestier, David; Larsen, Ray; Lastovicka, Tomas; Lastovicka-Medin, Gordana; Latina, Andrea; Latour, Emmanuel; Laurent, Lisa; Le, Ba Nam; Le, Duc Ninh; Le Diberder, Francois; Dû, Patrick Le; Lebbolo, Hervé; Lebrun, Paul; Lecoq, Jacques; Lee, Sung-Won; Lehner, Frank; Leibfritz, Jerry; Lenkszus, Frank; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Levy, Aharon; Lewandowski, Jim; Leyh, Greg; Li, Cheng; Li, Chong Sheng; Li, Chun Hua; Li, Da Zhang; Li, Gang; Li, Jin; Li, Shao Peng; Li, Wei Ming; Li, Weiguo; Li, Xiao Ping; Li, Xue-Qian; Li, Yuanjing; Li, Yulan; Li, Zenghai; Li, Zhong Quan; Liang, Jian Tao; Liao, Yi; Lilje, Lutz; Guilherme Lima, J.; Lintern, Andrew J.; Lipton, Ronald; List, Benno; List, Jenny; Liu, Chun; Liu, Jian Fei; Liu, Ke Xin; Liu, Li Qiang; Liu, Shao Zhen; Liu, Sheng Guang; Liu, Shubin; Liu, Wanming; Liu, Wei Bin; Liu, Ya Ping; Liu, Yu Dong; Lockyer, Nigel; Logan, Heather E.; Logatchev, Pavel V.; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lohse, Thomas; Lola, Smaragda; Lopez-Virto, Amparo; Loveridge, Peter; Lozano, Manuel; Lu, Cai-Dian; Lu, Changguo; Lu, Gong-Lu; Lu, Wen Hui; Lubatti, Henry; Lucotte, Arnaud; Lundberg, Björn; Lundin, Tracy; Luo, Mingxing; Luong, Michel; Luth, Vera; Lutz, Benjamin; Lutz, Pierre; Lux, Thorsten; Luzniak, Pawel; Lyapin, Alexey; Lynch, Clare; Ma, Li; Ma, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Ma, Wen-Gan; Macfarlane, David; Maciel, Arthur; MacLeod, Allan; MacNair, David; Mader, Wolfgang; Magill, Stephen; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Maiheu, Bino; Maity, Manas; Majchrzak, Millicent; Majumder, Gobinda; Makarov, Roman; Makowski, Dariusz; Malaescu, Bogdan; Mallik, C.; Mallik, Usha; Malton, Stephen; Malyshev, Oleg B.; Malysheva, Larisa I.; Mammosser, John; Mamta; Mamuzic, Judita; Manen, Samuel; Manghisoni, Massimo; Manly, Steven; Marcellini, Fabio; Marcisovsky, Michal; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Marks, Steve; Marone, Andrew; Marti, Felix; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Victoria; Martin-Chassard, Gisèle; Martinez, Manel; Martinez-Rivero, Celso; Martsch, Dennis; Martyn, Hans-Ulrich; Maruyama, Takashi; Masuzawa, Mika; Mathez, Hervé; Matsuda, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Shuji; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Mättig, Peter; Mattison, Thomas; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mawatari, Kentarou; Mazzacane, Anna; McBride, Patricia; McCormick, Douglas; McCormick, Jeremy; McDonald, Kirk T.; McGee, Mike; McIntosh, Peter; McKee, Bobby; McPherson, Robert A.; Meidlinger, Mandi; Meier, Karlheinz; Mele, Barbara; Meller, Bob; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Mendez, Hector; Mercer, Adam; Merkin, Mikhail; Meshkov, I.N.; Messner, Robert; Metcalfe, Jessica; Meyer, Chris; Meyer, Hendrik; Meyer, Joachim; Meyer, Niels; Meyners, Norbert; Michelato, Paolo; Michizono, Shinichiro; Mihalcea, Daniel; Mihara, Satoshi; Mihara, Takanori; Mikami, Yoshinari; Mikhailichenko, Alexander A.; Milardi, Catia; Miller, David J.; Miller, Owen; Miller, Roger J.; Milstene, Caroline; Mimashi, Toshihiro; Minashvili, Irakli; Miquel, Ramon; Mishra, Shekhar; Mitaroff, Winfried; Mitchell, Chad; Miura, Takako; Miyamoto, Akiya; Miyata, Hitoshi; Mjörnmark, Ulf; Mnich, Joachim; Moffeit, Kenneth; Mokhov, Nikolai; Molloy, Stephen; Monaco, Laura; Monasterio, Paul R.; Montanari, Alessandro; Moon, Sung Ik; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Mora de Freitas, Paulo; Morel, Federic; Moretti, Stefano; Morgunov, Vasily; Mori, Toshinori; Morin, Laurent; Morisseau, François; Morita, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Youhei; Morita, Yuichi; Morozov, Nikolai; Morozumi, Yuichi; Morse, William; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Moultaka, Gilbert; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Mudrinic, Mihajlo; Mueller, Alex; Mueller, Wolfgang; Muennich, Astrid; Muhlleitner, Milada Margarete; Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Müller, Thomas; Munro, Morrison; Murayama, Hitoshi; Muto, Toshiya; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Nabhiraj, P.Y.; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Nagamine, Tadashi; Nagano, Ai; Naito, Takashi; Nakai, Hirotaka; Nakajima, Hiromitsu; Nakamura, Isamu; Nakamura, Tomoya; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Nakao, Katsumi; Nakao, Noriaki; Nakayoshi, Kazuo; Nam, Sang; Namito, Yoshihito; Namkung, Won; Nantista, Chris; Napoly, Olivier; Narain, Meenakshi; Naroska, Beate; Nauenberg, Uriel; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nelson, Charles; Nelson, Janice; Nelson, Timothy; Nemecek, Stanislav; Neubauer, Michael; Neuffer, David; Newman, Myriam Q.; Nezhevenko, Oleg; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Nguyen, Anh Ky; Nguyen, Minh; Van Nguyen Thi,Hong; Niebuhr, Carsten; Niehoff, Jim; Niezurawski, Piotr; Nishitani, Tomohiro; Nitoh, Osamu; Noguchi, Shuichi; Nomerotski, Andrei; Noonan, John; Norbeck, Edward; Nosochkov, Yuri; Notz, Dieter; Nowak, Grazyna; Nowak, Hannelies; Noy, Matthew; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nyffeler, Andreas; Nygren, David; Oddone, Piermaria; O'Dell, Joseph; Oh, Jong-Seok; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohkuma, Kazumasa; Ohlerich, Martin; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Yukiyoshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Ohuchi, Norihito; Oide, Katsunobu; Okada, Nobuchika; Okamura, Takahiro; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Okumi, Shoji; Okumura, Ken-ichi; Olchevski, Alexander; Oliver, William; Olivier, Bob; Olsen, James; Olsen, Jeff; Olsen, Stephen; Olshevsky, A.G.; Olsson, Jan; Omori, Tsunehiko; Onel, Yasar; Onengut, Gulsen; Ono, Hiroaki; Onoprienko, Dmitry; Oren, Will; Orimoto, Toyoko J.; Oriunno, Marco; Orlandea, Marius Ciprian; Oroku, Masahiro; Orr, Lynne H.; Orr, Robert S.; Oshea, Val; Oskarsson, Anders; Osland, Per; Ossetski, Dmitri; Österman, Lennart; Ostiguy, Francois; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ottewell, Brian; Ouyang, Qun; Padamsee, Hasan; Padilla, Cristobal; Pagani, Carlo; Palmer, Mark A.; Pam, Wei Min; Pande, Manjiri; Pande, Rajni; Pandit, V.S.; Pandita, P.N.; Pandurovic, Mila; Pankov, Alexander; Panzeri, Nicola; Papandreou, Zisis; Paparella, Rocco; Para, Adam; Park, Hwanbae; Parker, Brett; Parkes, Chris; Parma, Vittorio; Parsa, Zohreh; Parsons, Justin; Partridge, Richard; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Pásztor, Gabriella; Paterson, Ewan; Patrick, Jim; Patteri, Piero; Ritchie Patterson, J.; Pauletta, Giovanni; Paver, Nello; Pavlicek, Vince; Pawlik, Bogdan; Payet, Jacques; Pchalek, Norbert; Pedersen, John; Pei, Guo Xi; Pei, Shi Lun; Pelka, Jerzy; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pellett, David; Peng, G.X.; Penn, Gregory; Penzo, Aldo; Perry, Colin; Peskin, Michael; Peters, Franz; Petersen, Troels Christian; Peterson, Daniel; Peterson, Thomas; Petterson, Maureen; Pfeffer, Howard; Pfund, Phil; Phelps, Alan; Van Phi, Quang; Phillips, Jonathan; Phinney, Nan; Piccolo, Marcello; Piemontese, Livio; Pierini, Paolo; Thomas Piggott, W.; Pike, Gary; Pillet, Nicolas; Jayawardena, Talini Pinto; Piot, Phillippe; Pitts, Kevin; Pivi, Mauro; Plate, Dave; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poehler, Michael; Poelker, Matthew; Poffenberger, Paul; Pogorelsky, Igor; Poirier, Freddy; Poling, Ronald; Poole, Mike; Popescu, Sorina; Popielarski, John; Pöschl, Roman; Postranecky, Martin; Potukochi, Prakash N.; Prast, Julie; Prat, Serge; Preger, Miro; Prepost, Richard; Price, Michael; Proch, Dieter; Puntambekar, Avinash; Qin, Qing; Qu, Hua Min; Quadt, Arnulf; Quesnel, Jean-Pierre; Radeka, Veljko; Rahmat, Rahmat; Rai, Santosh Kumar; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Ramberg, Erik; Ranjan, Kirti; Rao, Sista V.L.S.; Raspereza, Alexei; Ratti, Alessandro; Ratti, Lodovico; Raubenheimer, Tor; Raux, Ludovic; Ravindran, V.; Raychaudhuri, Sreerup; Re, Valerio; Rease, Bill; Reece, Charles E.; Regler, Meinhard; Rehlich, Kay; Reichel, Ina; Reichold, Armin; Reid, John; Reid, Ron; Reidy, James; Reinhard, Marcel; Renz, Uwe; Repond, Jose; Resta-Lopez, Javier; Reuen, Lars; Ribnik, Jacob; Rice, Tyler; Richard, François; Riemann, Sabine; Riemann, Tord; Riles, Keith; Riley, Daniel; Rimbault, Cécile; Rindani, Saurabh; Rinolfi, Louis; Risigo, Fabio; Riu, Imma; Rizhikov, Dmitri; Rizzo, Thomas; Rochford, James H.; Rodriguez, Ponciano; Roeben, Martin; Rolandi, Gigi; Roodman, Aaron; Rosenberg, Eli; Roser, Robert; Ross, Marc; Rossel, François; Rossmanith, Robert; Roth, Stefan; Rougé, André; Rowe, Allan; Roy, Amit; Roy, Sendhunil B.; Roy, Sourov; Royer, Laurent; Royole-Degieux, Perrine; Royon, Christophe; Ruan, Manqi; Rubin, David; Ruehl, Ingo; Jimeno, Alberto Ruiz; Ruland, Robert; Rusnak, Brian; Ryu, Sun-Young; Sabbi, Gian Luca; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadygov, Ziraddin Y; Saeki, Takayuki; Sagan, David; Sahni, Vinod C.; Saini, Arun; Saito, Kenji; Saito, Kiwamu; Sajot, Gerard; Sakanaka, Shogo; Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Salata, Zen; Salih, Sabah; Salvatore, Fabrizio; Samson, Joergen; Sanami, Toshiya; Levi Sanchez, Allister; Sands, William; Santic, John; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Sapronov, Andrey; Sarkar, Utpal; Sasao, Noboru; Satoh, Kotaro; Sauli, Fabio; Saunders, Claude; Saveliev, Valeri; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Sawyer, Lee; Saxton, Laura; Schäfer, Oliver; Schälicke, Andreas; Schade, Peter; Schaetzel, Sebastien; Scheitrum, Glenn; Schibler, Emilie; Schindler, Rafe; Schlösser, Markus; Schlueter, Ross D.; Schmid, Peter; Schmidt, Ringo Sebastian; Schneekloth, Uwe; Schreiber, Heinz Juergen; Schreiber, Siegfried; Schroeder, Henning; Peter Schüler, K.; Schulte, Daniel; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schumacher, Markus; Schumann, Steffen; Schumm, Bruce A.; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Scott, Duncan J.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Sefkow, Felix; Sefri, Rachid; Seguin-Moreau, Nathalie; Seidel, Sally; Seidman, David; Sekmen, Sezen; Seletskiy, Sergei; Senaha, Eibun; Senanayake, Rohan; Sendai, Hiroshi; Sertore, Daniele; Seryi, Andrei; Settles, Ronald; Sever, Ramazan; Shales, Nicholas; Shao, Ming; Shelkov, G.A.; Shepard, Ken; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Sheppard, John C.; Shi, Cai Tu; Shidara, Tetsuo; Shim, Yeo-Jeong; Shimizu, Hirotaka; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Yuuki; Shimogawa, Tetsushi; Shin, Seunghwan; Shioden, Masaomi; Shipsey, Ian; Shirkov, Grigori; Shishido, Toshio; Shivpuri, Ram K.; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Shulga, Sergey; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Shuvalov, Sergey; Si, Zongguo; Siddiqui, Azher Majid; Siegrist, James; Simon, Claire; Simrock, Stefan; Sinev, Nikolai; Singh, Bhartendu K.; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Pitamber; Singh, R.K.; Singh, S.K.; Singini, Monito; Sinha, Anil K.; Sinha, Nita; Sinha, Rahul; Sinram, Klaus; Sissakian, A.N.; Skachkov, N.B.; Skrinsky, Alexander; Slater, Mark; Slominski, Wojciech; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smith, A J Stewart; Smith, Alex; Smith, Brian J.; Smith, Jeff; Smith, Jonathan; Smith, Steve; Smith, Susan; Smith, Tonee; Neville Snodgrass, W.; Sobloher, Blanka; Sohn, Young-Uk; Solidum, Ruelson; Solyak, Nikolai; Son, Dongchul; Sonmez, Nasuf; Sopczak, Andre; Soskov, V.; Spencer, Cherrill M.; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Speziali, Valeria; Spira, Michael; Sprehn, Daryl; Sridhar, K.; Srivastava, Asutosh; St. Lorant, Steve; Stahl, Achim; Stanek, Richard P.; Stanitzki, Marcel; Stanley, Jacob; Stefanov, Konstantin; Stein, Werner; Steiner, Herbert; Stenlund, Evert; Stern, Amir; Sternberg, Matt; Stockinger, Dominik; Stockton, Mark; Stoeck, Holger; Strachan, John; Strakhovenko, V.; Strauss, Michael; Striganov, Sergei I.; Strologas, John; Strom, David; Strube, Jan; Stupakov, Gennady; Su, Dong; Sudo, Yuji; Suehara, Taikan; Suehiro, Toru; Suetsugu, Yusuke; Sugahara, Ryuhei; Sugimoto, Yasuhiro; Sugiyama, Akira; Suh, Jun Suhk; Sukovic, Goran; Sun, Hong; Sun, Stephen; Sun, Werner; Sun, Yi; Sun, Yipeng; Suszycki, Leszek; Sutcliffe, Peter; Suthar, Rameshwar L.; Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Atsuto; Suzuki, Chihiro; Suzuki, Shiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Swent, Richard; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swinson, Christina; Syresin, Evgeny; Szleper, Michal; Tadday, Alexander; Takahashi, Rika; Takahashi, Tohru; Takano, Mikio; Takasaki, Fumihiko; Takeda, Seishi; Takenaka, Tateru; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Tanaka, Masami; Tang, Chuan Xiang; Taniguchi, Takashi; Tantawi, Sami; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tartaglia, Michael A.; Tassielli, Giovanni Francesco; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Tavian, Laurent; Tawara, Hiroko; Taylor, Geoffrey; Telnov, Alexandre V.; Telnov, Valery; Tenenbaum, Peter; Teodorescu, Eliza; Terashima, Akio; Terracciano, Giuseppina; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Teubner, Thomas; Teuscher, Richard; Theilacker, Jay; Thomson, Mark; Tice, Jeff; Tigner, Maury; Timmermans, Jan; Titov, Maxim; Toge, Nobukazu; Tokareva, N.A.; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomasek, Lukas; Tomovic, Savo; Tompkins, John; Tonutti, Manfred; Topkar, Anita; Toprek, Dragan; Toral, Fernando; Torrence, Eric; Traversi, Gianluca; Trimpl, Marcel; Mani Tripathi, S.; Trischuk, William; Trodden, Mark; Trubnikov, G.V.; Tschirhart, Robert; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsuchiya, Kiyosumi; Tsukamoto, Toshifumi; Tsunemi, Akira; Tucker, Robin; Turchetta, Renato; Tyndel, Mike; Uekusa, Nobuhiro; Ueno, Kenji; Umemori, Kensei; Ummenhofer, Martin; Underwood, David; Uozumi, Satoru; Urakawa, Junji; Urban, Jeremy; Uriot, Didier; Urner, David; Ushakov, Andrei; Usher, Tracy; Uzunyan, Sergey; Vachon, Brigitte; Valerio, Linda; Valin, Isabelle; Valishev, Alex; Vamra, Raghava; Van der Graaf, Harry; Van Kooten, Rick; Van Zandbergen, Gary; Vanel, Jean-Charles; Variola, Alessandro; Varner, Gary; Velasco, Mayda; Velte, Ulrich; Velthuis, Jaap; Vempati, Sundir K.; Venturini, Marco; Vescovi, Christophe; Videau, Henri; Vila, Ivan; Vincent, Pascal; Virey, Jean-Marc; Visentin, Bernard; Viti, Michele; Vo, Thanh Cuong; Vogel, Adrian; Vogt, Harald; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorozhtsov, S.B.; Vos, Marcel; Votava, Margaret; Vrba, Vaclav; Wackeroth, Doreen; Wagner, Albrecht; Wagner, Carlos E.M.; Wagner, Stephen; Wake, Masayoshi; Walczak, Roman; Walker, Nicholas J.; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallon, Samuel; Walsh, Roberval; Walston, Sean; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walz, Dieter; Wang, Chao En; Wang, Chun Hong; Wang, Dou; Wang, Faya; Wang, Guang Wei; Wang, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Wang, Jiu Qing; Wang, Juwen; Wang, Lanfa; Wang, Lei; Wang, Min-Zu; Wang, Qing; Wang, Shu Hong; Wang, Xiaolian; Wang, Xue-Lei; Wang, Yi Fang; Wang, Zheng; Wanzenberg, Rainer; Ward, Bennie; Ward, David; Warmbein, Barbara; Warner, David W.; Warren, Matthew; Washio, Masakazu; Watanabe, Isamu; Watanabe, Ken; Watanabe, Takashi; Watanabe, Yuichi; Watson, Nigel; Wattimena, Nanda; Wayne, Mitchell; Weber, Marc; Weerts, Harry; Weiglein, Georg; Weiland, Thomas; Weinzierl, Stefan; Weise, Hans; Weisend, John; Wendt, Manfred; Wendt, Oliver; Wenzel, Hans; Wenzel, William A.; Wermes, Norbert; Werthenbach, Ulrich; Wesseln, Steve; Wester, William; White, Andy; White, Glen R.; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wienemann, Peter; Wierba, Wojciech; Wilksen, Tim; Willis, William; Wilson, Graham W.; Wilson, John A.; Wilson, Robert; Wing, Matthew; Winter, Marc; Wirth, Brian D.; Wolbers, Stephen A.; Wolff, Dan; Wolski, Andrzej; Woodley, Mark D.; Woods, Michael; Woodward, Michael L.; Woolliscroft, Timothy; Worm, Steven; Wormser, Guy; Wright, Dennis; Wright, Douglas; Wu, Andy; Wu, Tao; Wu, Yue Liang; Xella, Stefania; Xia, Guoxing; Xia, Lei; Xiao, Aimin; Xiao, Liling; Xie, Jia Lin; Xing, Zhi-Zhong; Xiong, Lian You; Xu, Gang; Xu, Qing Jing; Yajnik, Urjit A.; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yamada, Ryuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Naoto; Yamamoto, Richard; Yamamoto, Yasuchika; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamaoka, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Hideki; Yan, Wenbiao; Yang, Hai-Jun; Yang, Jin Min; Yang, Jongmann; Yang, Zhenwei; Yano, Yoshiharu; Yazgan, Efe; Yeh, G.P.; Yilmaz, Hakan; Yock, Philip; Yoda, Hakutaro; Yoh, John; Yokoya, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Hirokazu; York, Richard C.; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Yoshida, Takuo; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Young, Andrew; Yu, Cheng Hui; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Xian Ming; Yuan, Changzheng; Yue, Chong-Xing; Yue, Jun Hui; Zacek, Josef; Zagorodnov, Igor; Zalesak, Jaroslav; Zalikhanov, Boris; Zarnecki, Aleksander Filip; Zawiejski, Leszek; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeller, Michael; Zerwas, Dirk; Zerwas, Peter; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Zhai, Ji Yuan; Zhang, Bao Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Chuang; Zhang, He; Zhang, Jiawen; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jing Ru; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Zhige; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhang, Ziping; Zhao, Haiwen; Zhao, Ji Jiu; Zhao, Jing Xia; Zhao, Ming Hua; Zhao, Sheng Chu; Zhao, Tianchi; Zhao, Tong Xian; Zhao, Zhen Tang; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhou, De Min; Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Shun; Zhu, Shou Hua; Zhu, Xiong Wei; Zhukov, Valery; Zimmermann, Frank; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zisman, Michael S.; Zomer, Fabian; Zong, Zhang Guo; Zorba, Osman; Zutshi, Vishnu

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the physics case for the ILC. Baseline running at 500 GeV as well as possible upgrades and options are discussed. The opportunities on Standard Model physics, Higgs physics, Supersymmetry and alternative theories beyond the Standard Model are described.

  8. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K+ ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally

  9. Physics Design Considerations for Diagnostic X Electron Beam Transport System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y-J

    2000-04-10

    The Diagnostic X (D-X) beamlines will transport the DARHT-II beam from the end of the accelerator to the Diagnostic X firing point providing four lines of sight for x-ray radiography. The design goal for the Diagnostic X beamline is to deliver four x-ray pulses with the DARHT-II dose format and time integrated spot size on each line of sight. The D-X beamline's final focus should be compatible with a range of first conjugates from 1 m-5 m. Furthermore, the D-X beamline operational parameters and the beamline layout should not preclude a possible upgrade to additional lines of sight. The DARHT-II accelerator is designed to deliver beams at a rate of 1 pulse per minute or less. Tuning the D-X beamline with several hundred optical elements would be time consuming. Therefore, minimizing the required number of tuning shots for the D-X beamline is also an important design goal. Many different beamline configurations may be able to accomplish these design objectives, and high beam quality (i.e., high current and low emittance) must be maintained throughout the chosen beamline configuration in order to achieve the DARHT-II x-ray dose format. In general, the longer the distance a beam travels, the harder it is to preserve the beam quality. Therefore, from the point of view of maintaining beam quality, it is highly desirable to minimize the beamline length. Lastly, modification to the DARHT-II building and the downstream transport should be minimized. Several processes can degrade beam quality by increasing the beam emittance, increasing the time-varying transverse beam motion, creating a beam halo, or creating a time-varying beam envelope. In this report, we consider those processes in the passive magnet lattice beamline and indicate how they constrain the beamline design. The physics design considerations for the active components such as the kicker system will be discussed in Ref. 2. In Sec. I, we discuss how beam emittance affects the x-ray forward dose. We also

  10. Robustness of dark matter constraints and interplay with collider searches for New Physics arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Arbey, A.; Mahmoudi, F.; Robbins, G.

    We study the implications of dark matter searches, together with collider constraints, on the phenomenological MSSM with neutralino dark matter and focus on the consequences of the related uncertainties in some detail. We consider, inter alia, the latest results from AMS-02, Fermi-LAT and XENON1T. In particular, we examine the impact of the choice of the dark matter halo profile, as well as the propagation model for cosmic rays, for dark matter indirect detection and show that the constraints on the MSSM differ by two orders of magnitude depending on the astrophysical hypotheses. On the other hand, our limited knowledge of the local relic density in the vicinity of the Earth and the velocity of Earth in the dark matter halo leads to a factor 3 in the exclusion limits obtained by direct detection experiments. We identified the astrophysical models leading to the most conservative and the most stringent constraints and for each case studied the complementarities with the latest LHC measurements and limits from ...

  11. Physics with very high-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ colliding beams

    CERN Document Server

    Camilleri, Leslie Loris; Darriulat, Pierre; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Field, John; Fischer, H; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gaillard, Mary Katherin; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Johnsen, Kjell; Keil, Eberhard; Palmonari, Federico; Preparata, Giuliano; Richter, Burton; Rubbia, Carlo; Steinberger, Jack; Wiik, Bjørn Haavard; Willis, William J; Winter, Klaus

    1976-01-01

    This report consists of a collection of documents produced by a study group on large electron-positron storage rings (LEP). The reactions of interest in the weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions are discussed. The technical feasibility of the relevant experiments is investigated by attempting, in each case, the design of an experimental set-up. Event rates are estimated using currently prevailing theoretical models and by extrapolation of results at present accelerators. A number of technical reports previously issued by members of the LEP Design Study Group are included as appendices.

  12. Wideband current transformers for the surveillance of the beam extraction kicker system of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Defrance, C; Ducimetière, L; Vossenberg, E

    2007-01-01

    The LHC beam dumping system must protect the LHC machine from damage by reliably and safely extracting and absorbing the circulating beams when requested. Two sets of 15 extraction kicker magnets form the main active part of this system. A separate high voltage pulse generator powers each magnet. Because of the high beam energy and the consequences which could result from significant beam loss due to a malfunctioning of the dump system the magnets and generators are continuously surveyed in order to generate a beam abort as soon as an internal fault is detected. Amongst these surveillance systems, wideband current transformers have been designed to detect any erratic start in one of the generators. Output power should be enough to directly re-trigger all the power trigger units of the remaining 14 generators. The current transformers were developed in collaboration with industry. To minimize losses, high-resistivity cobalt alloy was chosen for the cores. The annealing techniques originally developed for LEP b...

  13. Proceedings of the 1992 workshops on high-energy physics with colliding beams. Volume 3, Electroweak symmetry breaking at colliding-beam facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Introduction to Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: Intermediate-Mass Higgs Bosons; Extended Higgs Sectors and Novel Searches; and Heavy Higgs Bosons and Strong WW Scattering.

  14. Contact Interaction and Resonant-Like Physics at Present and Future Colliders from Unparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2007-06-27

    High scale conformal physics can lead to unusual unparticle stuff at our low energies. In this paper we discuss how the exchange of unparticles between Standard Model fields can lead to new contact interaction physics as well as a pseudoresonance-like structure, an unresonance, that might be observable at the Tevatron or LHC in the Drell-Yan channel. The specific signatures of this scenario are quite unique and can be used to easily identify this new physics given sufficient integrated luminosity.

  15. When will we know a muon collider is feasible? Status and directions of muon accelerator R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, accelerate and collide high intensity beams of muons. At present, a high-luminosity multi-TeV muon collider presents a viable option for the next generation of lepton-lepton collider, which is believed to be needed to fully explore high energy physics in the era following the LHC discoveries. This paper briefly reviews the status of the accelerator R&D, addresses the question of the feasibility of a Muon Collider, what needs to be done to prove it and presents projected timeline of the project.

  16. Probing space–time structure of new physics with polarized beams ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At the international linear collider large beam polarization of both the elec- tron and ... e+e− can be of the type V, A, or S, P, or T. We calculate the relevant factor in the .... Such a combination of Dirac matrices is a product of odd number of them.

  17. Future Circular Collider Study FCC-he Baseline Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Bruning, Oliver; Klein, Max; Pellegrini, Dario; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Initial considerations are presented on the FCC-he, the electron-hadron collider con guration within the Future Circular Collider study. This note considers arguments for the choice of the electron beam energy based on physics, ep scattering kinematics and cost. The default con guration for the electron accelerator, as for the LHeC, is chosen to be a multi-turn energy recovery linac external to the proton beam tunnel. The main accelerator parameters of the FCC-he are discussed, assuming the concurrent operation of ep with the 100TeV cms energy pp collider. These are compared with the LHeC design concept, for increased performance as for a Higgs facility using the HL-LHC, and also the high energy HE-LHC ep collider configuration. Initial estimates are also provided for the luminosity performance of electron-ion colliders for the 60 GeV electron ERL when combined with the LHC, the HE-LHC and the FCC ion beams.

  18. Who cares about particle physics? making sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051327

    2016-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for particle physics, regularly makes the news. What kind of research happens at this international laboratory and how does it impact people's daily lives? Why is the discovery of the Higgs boson so important? Particle physics describes all matter found on Earth, in stars and all galaxies but it also tries to go beyond what is known to describe dark matter, a form of matter five times more prevalent than the known, regular matter. How do we know this mysterious dark matter exists and is there a chance it will be discovered soon? About sixty countries contributed to the construction of the gigantic Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its immense detectors. Dive in to discover how international teams of researchers work together to push scientific knowledge forward. Here is a book written for every person who wishes to learn a little more about particle physics, without requiring prior scientific knowledge. It starts from the basics to build a solid understanding of current res...

  19. Finite element analysis of rotating beams physics based interpolation

    CERN Document Server

    Ganguli, Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    This book addresses the solution of rotating beam free-vibration problems using the finite element method. It provides an introduction to the governing equation of a rotating beam, before outlining the solution procedures using Rayleigh-Ritz, Galerkin and finite element methods. The possibility of improving the convergence of finite element methods through a judicious selection of interpolation functions, which are closer to the problem physics, is also addressed. The book offers a valuable guide for students and researchers working on rotating beam problems – important engineering structures used in helicopter rotors, wind turbines, gas turbines, steam turbines and propellers – and their applications. It can also be used as a textbook for specialized graduate and professional courses on advanced applications of finite element analysis.

  20. The COMPASS Setup for Physics with Hadron Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, Ph.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Ciliberti, P.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Cotte, D.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Desforge, D.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Durand, D.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giganon, A.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Gregori, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Hoppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Menon, G.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, Ana Sofia; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pesaro, V.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pires, C.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymond, J-M.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Rousse, J.Y.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samartsev, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schluter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Weitzel, Q.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2015-01-01

    The main characteristics of the COMPASS experimental setup for physics with hadron beams are described. This setup was designed to perform exclusive measurements of processes with several charged and/or neutral particles in the final state. Making use of a large part of the apparatus that was previously built for spin structure studies with a muon beam, it also features a new target system as well as new or upgraded detectors. The hadron setup is able to operate at the high incident hadron flux available at CERN. It is characterised by large angular and momentum coverages, large and nearly flat acceptances, and good two and three-particle mass resolutions. In 2008 and 2009 it was successfully used with positive and negative hadron beams and with liquid hydrogen and solid nuclear targets. This article describes the new and upgraded detectors and auxiliary equipment, outlines the reconstruction procedures used, and summarises the general performance of the setup.

  1. High energy density physics with intense ion and laser beams. Annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyrich, K. (comp.)

    2004-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Laser plasma physics, plasma spectroscopy, beam interaction experiments, atomic and radiation physics, pulsed power applications, beam transport and accelerator research and development, properties of dense plasma, instabilities in beam-plasma interaction, beam transport in dense plasmas, short-pulse laser-matter interaction. (HSI)

  2. Very-high-energy antiproton physics colliding 1-TeV 'antiquarks' on heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Halzen, F

    1980-01-01

    Dorfan et al. (1965) demonstrated experimentally that one can extend the mass range of an accelerator by using the Fermi motion of nucleons inside heavy nuclear targets. The development of antiproton sources and intense pion beams at Fermilab and CERN makes possible a dramatic enhancement of this mechanism. The authors show that the increase in threshold production using antiprotons or pions rather than protons far exceeds the loss in luminosity. Furthermore, by using antiprotons in an internal-target experiment, the modest instantaneous rates and large signal/background ratio permit detailed study of the final state. (19 refs).

  3. Linear Collider Test Facility: Twiss Parameter Analysis at the IP/Post-IP Location of the ATF2 Beam Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolzon, Benoit; /Annecy, LAPP; Jeremie, Andrea; /Annecy, LAPP; Bai, Sha; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Bambade, Philip; /KEK, Tsukuba; White, Glen; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    At the first stage of the ATF2 beam tuning, vertical beam size is usually bigger than 3 {micro}m at the IP. Beam waist measurements using wire scanners and a laser wire are usually performed to check the initial matching of the beam through to the IP. These measurements are described in this paper for the optics currently used ({beta}{sub x} = 4cm and {beta}{sub y} = 1mm). Software implemented in the control room to automate these measurements with integrated analysis is also described. Measurements showed that {beta} functions and emittances were within errors of measurements when no rematching and coupling corrections were done. However, it was observed that the waist in the horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) plane was abnormally shifted and simulations were performed to try to understand these shifts. They also showed that multiknobs are needed in the current optics to correct simultaneously {alpha}{sub x}, {alpha}{sub y} and the horizontal dispersion (D{sub x}). Such multiknobs were found and their linearity and orthogonality were successfully checked using MAD optics code. The software for these multiknobs was implemented in the control room and waist scan measurements using the {alpha}{sub y} knob were successfully performed.

  4. Muon collider progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, Robert J. FNAL

    1998-08-01

    Recent progress in the study of muon colliders is presented. An international collaboration consisting of over 100 individuals is involved in calculations and experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of this new type of lepton collider. Theoretical efforts are now concentrated on low-energy colliders in the 100 to 500 GeV center-of-mass energy range. Credible machine designs are emerging for much of a hypothetical complex from proton source to the final collider. Ionization cooling has been the most difficult part of the concept, and more powerful simulation tools are now in place to develop workable schemes. A collaboration proposal for a muon cooling experiment has been presented to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee, and a proposal for a targetry and pion collection channel experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in preparation. Initial proton bunching and space-charge compensation experiments at existing hadron facilities have occurred to demonstrate proton driver feasibility.

  5. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detector, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The internat...

  6. Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In response to a request from the 2013 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, the global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is preparing the foundation for a next-generation large-scale accelerator infrastructure in the heart of Europe. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh), to be accommodated in a new ∼100 km tunnel near Geneva. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), which could be installed in the same tunnel as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on Nb3Sn superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton collider. The interna...

  7. Towards Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN presently provides proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 13 TeV. The LHC design was started more than 30 years ago, and its physics programme will extend through the second half of the 2030’s. The global Future Circular Collider (FCC) study is now preparing for a post-LHC project. The FCC study focuses on the design of a 100-TeV hadron collider (FCC-hh) in a new ∼100 km tunnel. It also includes the design of a high-luminosity electron-positron collider (FCC-ee) as a potential intermediate step, and a lepton-hadron collider option (FCC-he). The scope of the FCC study comprises accelerators, technology, infrastructure, detectors, physics, concepts for worldwide data services, international governance models, and implementation scenarios. Among the FCC core technologies figure 16-T dipole magnets, based on $Nb_3Sn$ superconductor, for the FCC-hh hadron collider, and a highly efficient superconducting radiofrequency system for the FCC-ee lepton c...

  8. The physics of small megavoltage photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreo, Pedro

    2017-11-27

    The increased interest during recent years in the use of small megavoltage photon beams in advanced radiotherapy techniques has led to the development of dosimetry recommendations by different national and international organizations. Their requirement of data suitable for the different clinical options available, regarding treatment units and dosimetry equipment, has generated a considerable amount of research by the scientific community during the last decade. The multiple publications in the field have led not only to the availability of new invaluable data, but have also contributed substantially to an improved understanding of the physics of their dosimetry. This work provides an overview of the most important aspects that govern the physics of small megavoltage photon beam dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-Bunch effect of resistive wall in the beam delivery system of the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mutzner, Raphael; Pieloni, Tatiana; Rivkin, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    Wake fields in the CLIC Beam Delivery System (BDS) can cause severe single or multi-bunch effects leading to luminosity loss. The main contributors in the BDS are geometric and resistive wall wake fields of the collimators and resistive wall wakes of the beam pipe. The present master thesis focuses only on the multi-bunch effects from resistive wall. Using particle tracking with wake fields through the BDS, we have established the aperture radius, above which the effect of the wake fields becomes negligible. Simulations were later extended to include a realistic aperture model along the BDS as well as the collimators. We examine the two cases of 3 TeV and 500 GeV in this work, for stainless steel and copper pipes.

  10. Physics potential for the measurement of sigma(H nu antinu ̄) x BR(H -->μ+μ-) at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, Gordana; Grefe, Christian; Kacarevic, Goran; Lukic, Strahinja; Pandurovic, Mila; Roloff, Philipp Gerhard; Smiljanic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of Higgs couplings at CLIC will offer the potential for a rich precision phys- ics programme and for the search for physics beyond the Standard Model(SM). The poten- tial for measuring the SM Higgs boson decay into two muons at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider is addressed in this paper. The study is performed using a full Geant4 detector simulation of the CLIC_ILD detector model, taking into consideration all the relevant physics and beam-induced background processes, as well as the instrumentation of the very forward region to identify high-energy electrons. In this analysis, we show that the branching ratio BR(H-->μ+μ-) times the Higgs production cross-section in W+W- fusion can be measured with 38% statistical accuracy at sqrt(s) = 1.4 TeV assuming an integrated luminosity of 1.5 ab-1 with unpolarised beams. If 80% electron beam polarisation is considered, as planned for CLIC, the statistical uncertainty of the measurement is 27%. Systematic uncertainties are negligible.

  11. E1 Working Group summary: Neutrino factories and muon colliders Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, T.; Balbekov, V.; Barenboim, G.; Harris, Deborah A.; Chou, W.; DeJongh, F.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; Neuffer, D.; Raja, R.; Romanino, A.; Shanahan, P.; Spentzouris, P.; Yu, J.; Barger, V.; Marfatia, D.; Han, Tao; Aoki, M.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, A.; Ichikawa, K.; Nakaya, T.; Machida, S.; Nagamine, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Ball, R.D.; Campanelli, Mario; Casper, D.; Molzon, W.; sobel, H.; Cline, D.B.; Cushman, P.; Diwan, M.; Kahn, S.; Morse, W.; Palmer, R.; Parsa, Zohreh; Roser, T.; Fleming, Bonnie T.; Formaggio, J.A.; Garren, A.; Gavela, M.B.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Hanson, G.; Berger, M.; Kayser, Boris; Jung, C.K.; Shrock, R.; McGrew, C.; Mocioiu, I.; Lindner, M.; McDonald, K.; McFarland, Kevin Scott; Nienaber, P.; Olness, F.; Pope, B.; Rigolin, S.; Roberts, L.; Schellman, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Wai, L.; Wang, Y.F.; Whisnant, K.; Zeller, M.

    2001-01-01

    We are in the middle of a time of exciting discovery, namely that neutrinos have mass and oscillate. In order to take the next steps to understand this potential window onto what well might be the mechanism that links the quarks and leptons, we need both new neutrino beams and new detectors. The new beamlines can and should also provide new laboratories for doing charged lepton flavor physics, and the new detectors can and should also provide laboratories for doing other physics like proton decay, supernovae searches, etc. The new neutrino beams serve as milestones along the way to a muon collider, which can answer questions in yet another sector of particle physics, namely the Higgs sector or ultimately the energy frontier. In this report we discuss the current status of neutrino oscillation physics, what other oscillation measurements are needed to fully explore the phenomenon, and finally, what other new physics can be explored as a result of building of these facilities.

  12. Probing new physics in diphoton production with proton tagging at the Large Hadron Collider

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fichet, S.; von Gersdorff, G.; Kepka, Oldřich; Lenzi, B.; Royon, C.; Saimpert, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 11 (2014), "114004-1"-"114004-4" ISSN 1550-7998 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : exclusive * LHC * photon * quartic Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  13. Search for New Physics in SHiP and at future colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080890; Serra, Nicola; Storaci, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    SHiP is a newly proposed fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS with the aim of searching for hidden particles that interact very weakly with SM particles. The work presented in this document investigates SHiP's physics reach in the parameter space of the Neutrino Minimal Standard Model ($\

  14. R&D with very forward detectors at linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenescu, Veta; FCAL Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The very forward region of the detector at a future linear collider will be instrumented with two sampling calorimeters - BeamCal and LumiCal - for fast beam parameter estimates, precise luminosity measurements, as well as for the improvement of the hermeticity of the detector at small angles. These very forward calorimeters are designed to sustain high radiation doses and deliver precise and valuable data for the machine- and physics-related measurements. Sensor and ASIC prototypes were developed and tested. Here we report on sensor characteristics and test-beam results obtained from a sensor plane assembled with front-end and ADC ASICs.

  15. Shedding Light on Dark Matter at Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A

    2013-01-01

    Dark matter remains one of the most puzzling mysteries in Fundamental Physics of our times. Experiments at high-energy physics colliders are expected to shed light to its nature and determine its properties. This review focuses on recent searches for dark-matter signatures at the Large Hadron Collider, also discussing related prospects in future e+e- colliders.

  16. Tevatron The Cinderella story or the art of collider

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The Tevatron Collider at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) is the world's highest energy particle collider at 1.8TeV c.m.e. The machine was a centerpiece of the US and world's High Energy Physics for many years. Currently, the Tevatron is in the last years of its operation in so-called Run II which started 2001 and is tentatively scheduled to end in 2010. In this lecture series, we'll try to learn from the exciting story of the Tevatron Collider Run II: the story of long preparations, great expectations, initial difficulties, years of "blood and sweat", continuous upgrades, exceeding its goals, high emotions, tune-up of accelerator organization for "combat fighting". The lectures will cover Introduction to the Tevatron, its history and Run II; "Plumbing" Issues; Beam Physics Issues; Luminosity Progress; Organization of Troops and Lessons for LHC.

  17. Anomaly! collider physics and the quest for new phenomena at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Dorigo, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    From the mid-1980s, an international collaboration of 600 physicists embarked on the investigation of subnuclear physics at the high-energy frontier. As well as discovering the top quark, the heaviest elementary particle ever observed, the physicists analyzed their data to seek signals of new physics which could revolutionize our understanding of nature. Anomaly! tells the story of that quest, and focuses specifically on the finding of several unexplained effects which were unearthed in the process. These anomalies proved highly controversial within the large team: to some collaborators they called for immediate publication, while to others their divulgation threatened to jeopardize the reputation of the experiment. Written in a confidential, narrative style, this book looks at the sociology of a large scientific collaboration, providing insight in the relationships between top physicists at the turn of the millennium. The stories offer an insider's view of the life cycle of the "failed" discoveries that un...

  18. Crabbing system for an electron-ion collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castilla, Alejandro [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    As high energy and nuclear physicists continue to push further the boundaries of knowledge using colliders, there is an imperative need, not only to increase the colliding beams' energies, but also to improve the accuracy of the experiments, and to collect a large quantity of events with good statistical sensitivity. To achieve the latter, it is necessary to collect more data by increasing the rate at which these processes are being produced and detected in the machine. This rate of events depends directly on the machine's luminosity. The luminosity itself is proportional to the frequency at which the beams are being delivered, the number of particles in each beam, and inversely proportional to the cross-sectional size of the colliding beams. There are several approaches that can be considered to increase the events statistics in a collider other than increasing the luminosity, such as running the experiments for a longer time. However, this also elevates the operation expenses, while increasing the frequency at which the beams are delivered implies strong physical changes along the accelerator and the detectors. Therefore, it is preferred to increase the beam intensities and reduce the beams cross-sectional areas to achieve these higher luminosities. In the case where the goal is to push the limits, sometimes even beyond the machines design parameters, one must develop a detailed High Luminosity Scheme. Any high luminosity scheme on a modern collider considers|in one of their versions|the use of crab cavities to correct the geometrical reduction of the luminosity due to the beams crossing angle. In this dissertation, we present the design and testing of a proof-of-principle compact superconducting crab cavity, at 750 MHz, for the future electron-ion collider, currently under design at Jefferson Lab. In addition to the design and validation of the cavity prototype, we present the analysis of the first order beam dynamics and the integration of the

  19. Speculative Reading, Speculative Physics – the Ontology of the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Clarissa A.L.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to illustrate the hermeneutics of reading against the highly image-dependent (rather than object-oriented world of experimental particle physics. Reading becomes the medium for mediating between the real and the virtual when constructing physical knowledge. “Virtual” particles, produced through material inter-course between machine and nature, are productive for rethinking the virtual/real entanglement. Reading enables a process of deconstructing and re-naturalizing microphysical trails, objects, and movements ‘transformed’ into machine code, post-detector. The process of reading is therefore the ‘detection,’ ‘observation,’ ‘measurement,’ ‘abduction,’ and ‘interpretation’ of coded information and knowledge; deciphered through data ‘selected’ for analysis, extrapolated as evidence for the confirmation/re-orientation of theoretical predictions, and included for the re-envisioning and revising of foundational explanations regarding the structure of modern physics. Reading as is explored here is about how reading as an act is inextricably linked with understanding one’s perspective and the ideology one is immersed in, thus influencing how discovery is made and articulated through theory-construction.

  20. Steel Tape-wound Cut Cores as Magnet Yokes for the Beam Dump Kickers of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, M; Jansson, U; Fox, D

    2004-01-01

    Fast pulsed magnets, also called kickers, are used in particle accelerators for beam injection, extraction and similar applications. To excite these magnets, typically current pulses with rise and fall times in the range of 100 ns to 10 µs, with pulse duration of up to 100 µs and amplitudes in the order of kilo Amperes, are used. The short rise time imposes low inductance circuits and high voltage operation. The yokes are usually made out of ferrite, with reaches field saturation at about 0.5 T.

  1. Challenges for highest energy circular colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikt, M; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

    2014-01-01

    A new tunnel of 80–100 km circumference could host a 100 TeV centre-of-mass energy-frontier proton collider (FCC-hh/VHE-LHC), with a circular lepton collider (FCCee/TLEP) as potential intermediate step, and a leptonhadron collider (FCC-he) as additional option. FCC-ee, operating at four different energies for precision physics of the Z, W, and Higgs boson and the top quark, represents a significant push in terms of technology and design parameters. Pertinent R&D efforts include the RF system, topup injection scheme, optics design for arcs and final focus, effects of beamstrahlung, beam polarization, energy calibration, and power consumption. FCC-hh faces other challenges, such as high-field magnet design, machine protection and effective handling of large synchrotron radiation power in a superconducting machine. All these issues are being addressed by a global FCC collaboration. A parallel design study in China prepares for a similar, but smaller collider, called CepC/SppC.

  2. The Electro-Optic Beam Position Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Doherty, James

    2013-01-01

    This reports outlines the development of a new ultra-wideband electro-optic beam position monitor (EO-BPM) for use in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which utilises birefringent crystals and the Pockels effect to monitor beam position. The physical principles behind the operation of the device and tested topology, which incorporates two Lithium Tantalate crystals, is discussed.

  3. SLAC linear collider conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The linear collider system is described in detail, including the transport system, the collider lattice, final focusing system, positron production, beam damping and compression, high current electron source, instrumentation and control, and the beam luminosity. The experimental facilities and the experimental uses are discussed along with the construction schedule and estimated costs. Appendices include a discussion of space charge effects in the linear accelerator, emittance growth in the collider, the final focus system, beam-beam instabilities and pinch effects, and detector backgrounds. (GHT)

  4. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-04-11

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  5. The CERN SPS proton–antiproton collider

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Rudiger

    2016-01-01

    One of CERN's most ambitious and successful projects was the search for the intermediate bosons, W and Z [1]. The accelerator part of the project relied on a number of innovations in accelerator physics and technology. The invention of the method of stochastic cooling and the extension by many orders of magnitude beyond the initial proof of principle demonstration allowed the construction of the Antiproton Accumulator. Major modifications to the 26 GeV PS complex and the conversion of the 300 GeV SPS, which had just started up as an accelerator, to a collider were required. The SPS collider had to master the beam–beam effect far beyond limits reached before and had to function in a tight symbiosis with the UA1 and UA2 experiments.

  6. Heavy-ion physics with the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Schukraft, J

    2012-01-01

    After close to 20 years of preparation, the dedicated heavy ion experiment ALICE took first data at the CERN LHC accelerator with proton collisions at the end of 2009 and with lead nuclei at the end of 2010. After a short introduction into the physics of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, this article recalls the main design choices made for the detector and summarizes the initial operation and performance of ALICE. Physics results from this first year of operation concentrate on characterizing the global properties of typical, average collisions, both in pp and nucleus-nucleus reactions, in the new energy regime of LHC. The pp results differ, to a varying degree, from most QCD inspired phenomenological models and provide the input needed to fine-tune their parameters. First results from Pb-Pb are broadly consistent with expectations based on lower energy data, indicating that high density matter created at LHC, while much hotter and larger, still behaves like a very strongly interacting, almost perfect...

  7. Special Colloquium for the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School: Main Dilemmas in Particle Physics for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    A review of the status of the most crucial issues in particle physics at the start of the LHC is presented. The main questions are related to electroweak symmetry breaking and the mystery of new physics at the TeV scale, that is reasonably expected to be nearby and yet must be very peculiar because it was not seen at LEP and in flavour physics experiments. The main current ideas on models will be discussed and their implications for LHC searches, dark matter etc.

  8. Structure-preserving geometric algorithms for plasma physics and beam physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hong

    2017-10-01

    Standard algorithms in the plasma physics and beam physics do not possess the long-term accuracy and fidelity required in the study of multi-scale dynamics, because they do not preserve the geometric structures of the physical systems, such as the local energy-momentum conservation, symplectic structure and gauge symmetry. As a result, numerical errors accumulate coherently with time and long-term simulation results are not reliable. To overcome this difficulty, since 2008 structure-preserving geometric algorithms have been developed. This new generation of algorithms utilizes advanced techniques, such as interpolating differential forms, canonical and non-canonical symplectic integrators, and finite element exterior calculus to guarantee gauge symmetry and charge conservation, and the conservation of energy-momentum and symplectic structure. It is our vision that future numerical capabilities in plasma physics and beam physics will be based on the structure-preserving geometric algorithms.

  9. Muon Collider Machine-Detector Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhov, Nikolai V.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    In order to realize the high physics potential of a Muon Collider (MC) a high luminosity of {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}-collisions at the Interaction Point (IP) in the TeV range must be achieved ({approx}10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}). To reach this goal, a number of demanding requirements on the collider optics and the IR hardware - arising from the short muon lifetime and from relatively large values of the transverse emittance and momentum spread in muon beams that can realistically be obtained with ionization cooling should be satisfied. These requirements are aggravated by limitations on the quadrupole gradients as well as by the necessity to protect superconducting magnets and collider detectors from muon decay products. The overall detector performance in this domain is strongly dependent on the background particle rates in various sub-detectors. The deleterious effects of the background and radiation environment produced by the beam in the ring are very important issues in the Interaction Region (IR), detector and Machine-Detector Interface (MDI) designs. This report is based on studies presented very recently.

  10. Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-08-01

    Isotopes and accelerators, hallmarks of nuclear physics, are finding increasingly sophisticated and effective applications in the medical field. Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes are now a $10B/yr business worldwide, with over 10 million procedures and patient studies performed every year. This paper will discuss the use of isotopes for these applications. In addition, beams of protons and heavy ions are being more and more widely used clinically for treatment of malignancies. To be discussed here as well will be the rationale and techniques associated with charged-particle therapy, and the progress in implementation and optimization of these technologies for clinical use.

  11. Lua(Jit) for computing accelerator beam physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    As mentioned in the 2nd developers meeting, I would like to open the debate with a special presentation on another language - Lua, and a tremendous technology - LuaJit. Lua is much less known at CERN, but it is very simple, much smaller than Python and its JIT is extremely performant. The language is a dynamic scripting language easy to learn and easy to embedded in applications. I will show how we use it in HPC for accelerator beam physics as a replacement for C, C++, Fortran and Python, with some benchmarks versus Python, PyPy4 and C/C++.

  12. Physics with a millimole of muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, C.

    1998-03-01

    The eventual prospect of muon colliders reaching several TeV encourages us to consider the experimental opportunities presented by very copious stores of muons, approaching 10{sup 21} per year. I summarize and comment upon some highlights of the Fermilab Workshop on Physics at the First Muon Collider and at the Front End of a Muon Collider. Topics include various varieties of {mu}{mu} colliders, {mu}p colliders, and applications of the intense neutrino beams that can be generated in muon storage rings.

  13. The Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Wright, Alison

    2007-01-01

    "We are on the threshold of a new era in particle-physics research. In 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - the hightest-energy accelerator ever built - will come into operation at CERN, the European labortory that straddles the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1/2 page)

  14. Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "In the spring 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) machine at CERN (the European Particle Physics laboratory) will be switched on for the first time. The huge machine is housed in a circular tunnel, 27 km long, excavated deep under the French-Swiss border near Geneva." (1,5 page)

  15. Why Large Hadron Collider?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... ... I discuss the high energy colliders leading up to LHC and their role in the discovery of these SM particles. Then I discuss the two main physics issues of LHC, i.e. Higgs mechanism and supersymmetry. I briefly touch upon Higgs and SUSY searches at LHC along with their cosmological implications.

  16. Theoretical study of the effect of the size of a high-energy proton beam of the Large Hadron Collider on the formation and propagation of shock waves in copper irradiated by 450-GeV proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Ryazanov, A I; Vasilyev, Ya S; Ferrari, A

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of 450GeV protons with copper, which is the material of the collimators of the Large Hadron Collider, has been theoretically studied. A theoretical model for the formation and propagation of shock waves has been proposed on the basis of the anal ysis of the energy released by a proton beam in the electronic subsystem of the material owing to the deceleration of secondary particles appearing in nuclear reactions induced by this beam on the electronic subsy stem of the material. The subsequent transfer of the energy from the excited electronic subsystem to the crystal lattice through the electron–phonon interaction has been described within the thermal spike model [I.M. Lifshitz, M.I. Kaganov, and L.V. Tanatarov, Sov. Phys. JETP 4 , 173 (1957); I.M. Lifshitz, M.I. Kaganov, and L.V. Tanatarov, At. Energ. 6 , 391 (1959); K. Yasui, Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. B 90 , 409 (1994)]. The model of the formation of shock waves involves energy exchange processes between excited electronic an...

  17. Collide@CERN Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Kieffer, Robert; Blas Temino, Diego; Bertolucci, Sergio; Mr. Decelière, Rudy; Mr. Hänni, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to “Collide@CERN Geneva Music”. Come to the public lecture about collisions between music and particle physics by the third winners of Collide@CERN Geneva, Vincent Hänni & Rudy Decelière, and their scientific inspiration partners, Diego Blas and Robert Kieffer. The event marks the beginning of their residency at CERN, and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 16 October 2014 at 19.00. Doors will open at 18.30.

  18. Phenomenology of new physics beyond the Standard Model: signals of Supersymmetry with displaced vertices and an extended Higgs sector at colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334334

    2017-08-02

    Our current understanding of matter and its interactions is summarised in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. Many experiments have tested the predictions of the SM with great success, but others have brought our ignorance into focus by showing us there are new phenomena that we can not describe within the framework of the SM. These include the experimental observations of neutrino masses and dark matter, which confirms there must be new physics. What this new physics may look like at colliders motivates the original work in this thesis, which comprises three studies: the prospects of future electron-positron colliders in testing a model with an extended Higgs sector with a scalar triplet, doublet and singlet; the discovery potential at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of a non-minimal Supersymmetric model via conventional sparticle searches and via searches for displaced vertices; and the experimental search for long-lived massive particles via a displaced vertex signature using data of proton-proton...

  19. Photon-photon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  20. US panel backs linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A draft report from a working group examining the future of American particle physics has stated that the US should give top priority to a high energy e-p collider, wherever it is built (2 paragraphs).

  1. Comparison of cone beam computed tomography imaging with physical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratemann, S A; Huang, J C; Maki, K; Miller, A J; Hatcher, D C

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of measuring linear distances between landmarks commonly used in orthodontic analysis on a human skull using two cone beam CT (CBCT) systems. Measurements of length were taken using volumetric data from two CBCT systems and were compared with physical measures using a calliper applied to one human adult skull. Landmarks were identified with chromium steel balls embedded at 32 cranial and 33 mandibular landmarks and the linear measures were taken with a digital calliper. The skull was then scanned with two different CBCT systems: the NewTom QR DVT 9000 (Aperio Inc, Sarasota, FL) and the Hitachi MercuRay (Hitachi Medico Technology, Tokyo, Japan). CT data including the landmark point data were threshold segmented using CyberMed's CB Works software (CB Works 1.0, CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The resulting segmentations were exported from CB Works as VRML (WRL) files to Amira software (Amira 3.1, Mercury Computer Systems GmbH, Berlin, Germany). The error was small compared with the gold standard of the physical calliper measures for both the NewTom (0.07+/-0.41 mm) and CB MercuRay (0.00+/-0.22 mm) generated data. Absolute error to the gold standard was slightly positive, indicating minor compression relative to the calliper measurement. The error was slightly smaller in the CB MercuRay than in the NewTom, probably related to a broader greyscale range for describing beam attenuation in 12-bit vs 8-bit data. The volumetric data rendered with both CBCT systems provided highly accurate data compared with the gold standard of physical measures directly from the skulls, with less than 1% relative error.

  2. Head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in the RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo,Y.; FischW; Abreu, N.; Beebe, E.; Montag, C.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Robert-Demolaize, G.

    2008-06-23

    The working point for the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is constrained between 2/3 and 7/10 in order to maintain good beam lifetime and polarization. To further increase the bunch intensity to improve the luminosity, a low energy Gaussian electron beam, or an electron lens is proposed to head-on collide with the proton beam to compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the proton-proton beam-beam interactions at IP6 and IP8. In this article, we outline the scheme of head-on beam-beam compensation in the RHIC and give the layout of e-lens installation and the parameters of the proton and electron beams. The involved physics and engineering issues are shortly discussed.

  3. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Calorimetry at a Future Electron-Positron Collider (3/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetry will play a central role in determining the physics reach at a future e+e- collider. The requirements for calorimetry place the emphasis on achieving an excellent jet energy resolution. The currently favoured option for calorimetry at a future e+e- collider is the concept of high granularity particle flow calorimetry. Here granularity and a high pattern recognition capability is more important than the single particle calorimetric response. In this lecture I will describe the recent progress in understanding the reach of high granularity particle flow calorimetry and the related R&D efforts which concentrate on test beam demonstrations of the technological options for highly granular calorimeters. I will also discuss alternatives to particle flow, for example the technique of dual readout calorimetry.

  4. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, Eric J.-M. [UNIV. JOSEPH FOURNIER, GRENOBLE, France

    2014-06-01

    Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  5. Physics perspectives at JLab with a polarized positron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voutier Eric

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Polarized positron beams are in some respect mandatory complements to polarized electron beams. The advent of the PEPPo concept for polarized positron production opens the possibility for the developement at the Jefferson Laboratory of a continuous polarized positron beam. The benefits of such a beam for hadronic structure studies are discussed, together with the technical and technological challenges to face.

  6. Conceptual design of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider: RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios, Nicholas P.

    1986-05-01

    The complete Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility will be a complex set of accelerators and beam transfer equipment connecting them. A significant portion of the total facility either exists or is under construction. Two existing Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will serve for the initial ion acceleration. Ions with a charge of -1 would be accelerated from ground to +15 MV potential, pass through a stripping foil, and accelerate back to ground potential, where they would pass through a second stripping foil. From there the ions will traverse a long transfer line to the AGS tunnel and be injected into the Booster accelerator. The Booster accelerates the ion bunch, and then the ions pass through one more stripper and then enter the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), where they are accelerated to the top AGS energy and transferred to the collider. Bending and focusing of ion beams is to be achieved by superconducting magnets. The physics goals behind the RHIC are enumerated, particularly as regards the study of quark matter and the characteristics of high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. The design of the collider and all its components is described, including the injector, the lattice, magnet system, cryogenic and vacuum systems, beam transfer, injection, and dump, rf system, and beam instrumentation and control system. Also given are cost estimates, construction schedules, and a management plan. (LEW)

  7. Polarized proton collider at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.; Allgower, C.; Bai, M.; Batygin, Y.; Bozano, L.; Brown, K.; Bunce, G.; Cameron, P.; Courant, E.; Erin, S.; Escallier, J.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hatanaka, K.; Huang, H.; Imai, K.; Ishihara, M.; Jain, A.; Lehrach, A.; Kanavets, V.; Katayama, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kelly, E.; Kurita, K.; Lee, S.Y.; Luccio, A.; MacKay, W.W. E-mail: mackay@bnl.govhttp://www.rhichome.bnl.gov/People/waldowaldo@bnl.gov; Mahler, G.; Makdisi, Y.; Mariam, F.; McGahern, W.; Morgan, G.; Muratore, J.; Okamura, M.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Ptitsin, V.; Ratner, L.; Roser, T.; Saito, N.; Satoh, H.; Shatunov, Y.; Spinka, H.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.; Tominaka, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Underwood, D.; Vasiliev, A.; Wanderer, P.; Willen, E.; Wu, H.; Yokosawa, A.; Zelenski, A.N

    2003-03-01

    In addition to heavy ion collisions (RHIC Design Manual, Brookhaven National Laboratory), RHIC will also collide intense beams of polarized protons (I. Alekseev, et al., Design Manual Polarized Proton Collider at RHIC, Brookhaven National Laboratory, 1998, reaching transverse energies where the protons scatter as beams of polarized quarks and gluons. The study of high energy polarized protons beams has been a long term part of the program at BNL with the development of polarized beams in the Booster and AGS rings for fixed target experiments. We have extended this capability to the RHIC machine. In this paper we describe the design and methods for achieving collisions of both longitudinal and transverse polarized protons in RHIC at energies up to {radical}s=500 GeV.

  8. Beam Effects on the Cryogenic System of LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Gayet, P; Winkler, G

    1998-01-01

    The LEP collider was operated during 1996 for the first time with superconducting cavities at the four interaction points. During operation for physics it was observed that the dissipated heat in the cavities is not only a function of the acceleration gradient, but depends also on beam characteristics such as intensity, bunch length and beam current. These beam effects had not been foreseen in the original heat budget of the LEP cryogenic system. The observations indicating the beam effect and its origin are presented. The available capacity of the refrigerators demonstrates that cryogenics might become a limiting factor for the performance of the LEP collider.

  9. Calorimetry for Lepton Collider Experiments – CALICE results and activities

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Bilki, B.; Cundiff, T.; De Lurgio, P.; Drake, G.; Francis, K.; Haberichter, B.; Guarino, V.; Kreps, A.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Skrzecz, F.; Smith, J.; Underwood, D.; Wood, K.; Xia, L.; Zhang, Q.; Zhao, A.; Price, T.; Watson, N.K.; Marshall, J.S.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Arfaoui, S.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Dotti, A.; Duarte Ramos, F.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Gerwig, H.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; Lam, C.B.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.I.; Muennich, A.; Nardulli, J.; Poss, S.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Speckmayer, P.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Soumpholphakdy, X.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Blazey, G.C.; Chakraborty, D.; Dyshkant, A.; Hedin, D.; Lima, J.G.R.; Salcido, R.; Zutshi, V.; Astakhov, V.; Babkin, V.A.; Bazylev, S.N.; Golovatyuk, S.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, N.; Malakhov, A.; Slepnev, S.; Tyapkin, I.; Volgin, S.V.; Zanevski, Y.; Zintchenko, A.; Dzahini, D.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Giraud, J.; Grondin, D.; Hostachy, J.Y.; Menu, J.; Rarbi, F-E.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Falley, G.; Gadow, K.; Gottlicher, P.; Gunter, C.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Kruger, K.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Vargas-Trevino, A.; Feege, N.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Ramilli, M.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Oishi, K.; Sudo, Y.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.; Wing, M.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Bonnevaux, A.; Combaret, C.; Caponetto, L.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Steen, A.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.C.; Marin, J.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Verdugo, A.; Buscher, V.; Masetti, L.; Schafer, U.; Tapprogge, S.; Wanke, R.; Welker, A.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Popov, V.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Andreev, V.; Kirikova, N.; Komar, A.; Kozlov, V.; Negodaev, M.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; Terkulov, A.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Karakash, A.; Popova, E.; Smirnov, S.; Baranova, N.; Boos, E.; d; Gladilin, L.; Karmanov, D.; Korolev, M.; Merkin, M.; Savin, A.; Voronin, A.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Augustin, J-E.; David, J.; Ghislain, P.; Lacour, D.; Lavergne, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Bouquet, B.; Callier, S.; Conforti, S.; Cornebise, P.; Dulucq, F.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; Guilhem, G.; Li, H.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Richard, F.; Poeschl, R.; Raux, L.; Rouene, J.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Wicek, F.; Zhang, Z.; Anduze, M.; Belkadhi, K.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C.; Cerutti, M.; Clerc, C.; Cornat, R.; Decotigny, D.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Jeans, D.; Magniette, F.; Matthieu, A.; Mora, P.; Musat, G.; Roche, N.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T.H.; Videau, H.; Bulanek, B.; Zacek, J.; Carna, M.; Gallus, P.; Lednicky, D.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Cvach, J.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Gapienko, V.; Semak, A.; Ukhanov, M.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Hamasaki, R.; Ide, H.; Inayoshi, S.; Itoh, S.; Kawakami, Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Kotera, K.; Nishiyama, M.; Obe, S.; Ono, H.; Ogawa, T.; Ohtsuka, N.; Sakuma, T.; Sato, H.; Takeshita, T.; Totsuka, S.; Tsubokawa, T.; Yanagida, K.; Yamaura, W.; Khan, A.; Kim, D.H.; Kong, D.J.; Oh, Y.D.; Uozumi, S.; Yang, Y.; Fuchi, R.; Ukegawa, F.; Gotze, M.; Hartbrich, O.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2012-01-01

    The CALICE collaboration conducts calorimeter R&D for highly granular calorimeters, mainly for their application in detectors for a future lepton collider at the TeV scale. The activities ranges from generic R&D with small devices up to extensive beam tests with prototypes comprising up to several 100000 calorimeter cells. CALICE has validated the performance of particle flow algorithms with test beam data and delivers the proof of principle that highly granular calorimeters can be built, operated and understood. The successes achieved in the past years allows the step from prototypes to calorimeter systems for particle physics detectors to be addressed.

  10. Status and plans of the Compact Linear Collider Study

    CERN Document Server

    Doebert, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) project is exploring the possibility of constructing a multiTeV linear electron-positron collider for high-energy frontier physics studies beyond the LHC era. The CLIC concept is based on high-gradient normal-conducting accelerating structures. The RF power for the acceleration of the colliding beams is produced by a two-beam acceleration scheme, where power is extracted from a high current drive beam that runs parallel with the main linac. The key ongoing studies involve accelerator parameter optimisation, technical studies and component development, alignment and stability, and include a number of system performance studies in test-facilities around the world. The CLIC physics potential and main detector issues, as well as possible implementation staging, are being studied in parallel. A summary of the progress and status of the corresponding studies will be given, as well as an outline of the preparation and work towards developing a CLIC implementation plan by 2018/19

  11. Collective accelerator for electron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.J.

    1985-05-13

    A recent concept for collective acceleration and focusing of a high energy electron bunch is discussed, in the context of its possible applicability to large linear colliders in the TeV range. The scheme can be considered to be a member of the general class of two-beam accelerators, where a high current, low voltage beam produces the acceleration fields for a trailing high energy bunch.

  12. Il Collisore LHC (Large Hadron Collider)

    CERN Multimedia

    Brianti, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    In 2007, in a new Collider in the tunnel of 27km, collisions will be made between very powerful beams of protons and ions. The energies will be very high to try to catch the most tiny particle (1 page)

  13. Large Hadron Collider manual

    CERN Document Server

    Lavender, Gemma

    2018-01-01

    What is the universe made of? How did it start? This Manual tells the story of how physicists are seeking answers to these questions using the world’s largest particle smasher – the Large Hadron Collider – at the CERN laboratory on the Franco-Swiss border. Beginning with the first tentative steps taken to build the machine, the digestible text, supported by color photographs of the hardware involved, along with annotated schematic diagrams of the physics experiments, covers the particle accelerator’s greatest discoveries – from both the perspective of the writer and the scientists who work there. The Large Hadron Collider Manual is a full, comprehensive guide to the most famous, record-breaking physics experiment in the world, which continues to capture the public imagination as it provides new insight into the fundamental laws of nature.

  14. Physics performance for measurements of chargino and neutralino pair production at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    A study of chargino and neutralino pair production at a CLIC collider operating at √s = 1.4 TeV is presented. Fully hadronic final states with four jets and missing transverse energy were considered. The analysis was performed using full detector simulation and including pileup from gg → hadrons interactions. Results for the masses and production cross sections of the chargino and the next-to-lightest neutralino are discussed.

  15. Quarkonium Physics at a Fixed-Target Experiment Using the LHC Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansberg, J.P.; /Orsay, IPN; Brodsky, S.J.; /SLAC; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Hadjidakis, C.; /Orsay, IPN

    2012-04-09

    We outline the many quarkonium-physics opportunities offered by a multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the p and Pb LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. This provides an integrated luminosity of 0.5 fb{sup -1} per year on a typical 1cm-long target. Such an extraction mode does not alter the performance of the collider experiments at the LHC. With such a high luminosity, one can analyse quarkonium production in great details in pp, pd and pA collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 115 GeV and at {radical}s{sub NN} {approx_equal} 72 GeV in PbA collisions. In a typical pp (pA) run, the obtained quarkonium yields per unit of rapidity are 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than those expected at RHIC and about respectively 10 (70) times larger than for ALICE. In PbA, they are comparable. By instrumenting the target-rapidity region, the large negative-x{sub F} domain can be accessed for the first time, greatly extending previous measurements by Hera-B and E866. Such analyses should help resolving the quarkonium-production controversies and clear the way for gluon PDF extraction via quarkonium studies. The nuclear target-species versatility provides a unique opportunity to study nuclear matter and the features of the hot and dense matter formed in PbA collisions. A polarised proton target allows the study of transverse-spin asymmetries in J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production, providing access to the gluon and charm Sivers functions.

  16. TEBPP: Theoretical and Experimental study of Beam-Plasma-Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H. R.; Bernstein, W.; Linson, L. M.; Papadopoulos, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Hallinan, T. J.; Leinbach, H.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of an electron beam (0 to 10 keV, 0 to 1.5 Amp) with the plasma and neutral atmospheres at 200 to 400 km altitude is studied with emphasis on applications to near Earth and cosmical plasmas. The interaction occurs in four space time regions: (1) near electron gun, beam coming into equilibrium with medium; (2) equilibrium propagation in ionosphere; (3) ahead of beam pulse, temporal and spatial precursors; (4) behind a beam pulse. While region 2 is of the greatest interest, it is essential to study Region 1 because it determines the characteristics of the beam as it enters 2 through 4.

  17. CERN Library | Pauline Gagnon presents the book "Who cares about particle physics? : making sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN" | 15 September

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2016-01-01

    "Who cares about particle physics? : making sense of the Higgs boson, the Large Hadron Collider and CERN ", by Pauline Gagnon. Thursday 15 September 2016, 16:00 - 17:30 in the CERN Library (Bldg 52 1-052) *Coffee will be served at 15:30* CERN, the European Laboratory for particle physics, regularly makes the news. What kind of research happens at this international laboratory and how does it impact people's daily lives? Why is the discovery of the Higgs boson so important? Particle physics describes all matter found on Earth, in stars and all galaxies but it also tries to go beyond what is known to describe dark matter, a form of matter five times more prevalent than the known, regular matter. How do we know this mysterious dark matter exists and is there a chance it will be discovered soon? About sixty countries contributed to the construction of the gigantic Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN and its immense detectors. Dive in to discover how international teams of researchers...

  18. Sixth international workshop on linear colliders. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urakawa, Junji [ed.

    1995-08-01

    The sixth international workshop on linear colliders (LC95) was held by KEK at Tsukuba Center for Institute. In the workshop 8 parallel working group were organized: WG1 (beam sources and injection linacs), WG2 (damping rings and bunch compressors), WG3 (a: RF sources and structures, b: superconducting cavities, c: two beam accelerators), WG4 (beam dynamics in main linacs), WG5 (final focus and integration regions), WG6 (beam instrumentation), WG7 (overall parameters and construction techniques), WG8 (gamma-gamma collider and miscellaneous). This issue compiles materials which were used in the workshop. (J.P.N.).

  19. Standard Model Background of the Cosmological Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi; Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi

    2017-06-30

    The inflationary universe can be viewed as a "cosmological collider" with an energy of the Hubble scale, producing very massive particles and recording their characteristic signals in primordial non-Gaussianities. To utilize this collider to explore any new physics at very high scales, it is a prerequisite to understand the background signals from the particle physics standard model. In this Letter we describe the standard model background of the cosmological collider.

  20. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros Tautiva, Sandra Jimena

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10 34 cm-2 s-1 luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7x the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5 T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in pp than pp collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller beta* for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  1. Design of a High Luminosity 100 TeV Proton Antiproton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveros Tuativa, Sandra Jimena [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Currently new physics is being explored with the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and with Intensity Frontier programs at Fermilab and KEK. The energy scale for new physics is known to be in the multi-TeV range, signaling the need for a future collider which well surpasses this energy scale. A 10$^{\\,34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ luminosity 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider is explored with 7$\\times$ the energy of the LHC. The dipoles are 4.5\\,T to reduce cost. A proton-antiproton collider is selected as a future machine for several reasons. The cross section for many high mass states is 10 times higher in $p\\bar{p}$ than $pp$ collisions. Antiquarks for production can come directly from an antiproton rather than indirectly from gluon splitting. The higher cross sections reduce the synchrotron radiation in superconducting magnets and the number of events per bunch crossing, because lower beam currents can produce the same rare event rates. Events are also more centrally produced, allowing a more compact detector with less space between quadrupole triplets and a smaller $\\beta^{*}$ for higher luminosity. To adjust to antiproton beam losses (burn rate), a Fermilab-like antiproton source would be adapted to disperse the beam into 12 different momentum channels, using electrostatic septa, to increase antiproton momentum capture 12 times. At Fermilab, antiprotons were stochastically cooled in one Debuncher and one Accumulator ring. Because the stochastic cooling time scales as the number of particles, two options of 12 independent cooling systems are presented. One electron cooling ring might follow the stochastic cooling rings for antiproton stacking. Finally antiprotons in the collider ring would be recycled during runs without leaving the collider ring, by joining them to new bunches with snap bunch coalescence and synchrotron damping. These basic ideas are explored in this work on a future 100 TeV proton-antiproton collider and the main parameters are presented.

  2. DIAGNOSTICS FOR ION BEAM DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Lidia, S.; Ni, P.A.

    2010-01-04

    Intense beams of heavy ions are capable of heating volumetric samples of matter to high energy density. Experiments are performed on the resulting warm dense matter (WDM) at the NDCX-I ion beam accelerator. The 0.3 MeV, 30-mA K{sup +} beam from NDCX-I heats foil targets by combined longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression of the ion beam. Both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam heat targets. The exotic state of matter (WDM) in these experiments requires specialized diagnostic techniques. We have developed a target chamber and fielded target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, laser Doppler-shift interferometer (VISAR), beam transmission diagnostics, and high-speed gated cameras. We also present plans and opportunities for diagnostic development and a new target chamber for NDCX-II.

  3. Final Cooling for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Castillo, John Gabriel [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2017-05-01

    To explore the new energy frontier, a new generation of particle accelerators is needed. Muon colliders are a promising alternative, if muon cooling can be made to work. Muons are 200 times heavier than electrons, so they produce less synchrotron radiation, and they behave like point particles. However, they have a short lifetime of 2.2 $\\mathrm{\\mu s}$ and the beam is more difficult to cool than an electron beam. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) was created to develop concepts and technologies required by a muon collider. An important effort has been made in the program to design and optimize a muon beam cooling system. The goal is to achieve the small beam emittance required by a muon collider. This work explores a final ionization cooling system using magnetic quadrupole lattices with a low enough $\\beta^{\\star} $ region to cool the beam to the required limit with available low Z absorbers.

  4. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumann, Michaela

    2015-04-29

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton-proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term ''heavy-ion collisions'' refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter luminosity lifetimes. As the production cross-sections for various physics processes under study of the experiments are still small at energies reachable with the LHC and because the heavy-ion run time is limited to a few days per year, it is essential to obtain the highest possible collision rate, i.e. maximise the instantaneous luminosity, in order to obtain enough events and therefore low statistical errors. Within this thesis, the past performance of the LHC in lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions, at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per colliding nucleon pair, is analysed and potential luminosity limitations are identified. Tools are developed to predict future performance and techniques are presented to further increase the luminosity. Finally, a perspective on the future of high energy heavy-ion colliders is given.

  5. The International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    List Benno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The International Linear Collider (ILC is a proposed e+e− linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 200–500 GeV, based on superconducting RF cavities. The ILC would be an ideal machine for precision studies of a light Higgs boson and the top quark, and would have a discovery potential for new particles that is complementary to that of LHC. The clean experimental conditions would allow the operation of detectors with extremely good performance; two such detectors, ILD and SiD, are currently being designed. Both make use of novel concepts for tracking and calorimetry. The Japanese High Energy Physics community has recently recommended to build the ILC in Japan.

  6. Large Hadron Collider The Discovery Machine

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The mammoth machine, after a nine-year construction period, is scheduled (touch wood) to begin producing its beams of particles later this year. The commissioning process is planned to proceed from one beam to two beams to colliding beams; from lower energies to the terascale; from weaker test intensities to stronger ones suitable for producing data at useful rates but more difficult to control.

  7. Druid, displaying root module used for linear collider detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan, M

    2012-01-01

    Based on the ROOT TEve/TGeo classes and the standard linear collider data structure, a dedicated linear collider event display has been developed. It supports the latest detector models for both International Linear Collider and Compact Linear Collider as well as the CALICE test beam prototypes. It can be used to visualise event information at the generation, simulation and reconstruction levels. Many options are provided in an intuitive interface. It has been heavily employed in a variety of analyses.

  8. Vertex Tracking at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated physics program at an high energy e+e- linear collider places special emphasis on the accuracy in extrapolating charged particle tracks to their production vertex to tag heavy quarks and leptons. This paper reviews physics motivations and performance requirements, sensor R&D directions and current results of the studies for a vertex tracker at a future linear collider.

  9. Beam-loss induced pressure rise of Large Hadron Collider collimator materials irradiated with 158  GeV/u In^{49+} ions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mahner

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available During heavy ion operation, large pressure rises, up to a few orders of magnitude, were observed at CERN, GSI, and BNL. The dynamic pressure rises were triggered by lost beam ions that impacted onto the vacuum chamber walls and desorbed about 10^{4} to 10^{7} molecules per ion. The deterioration of the dynamic vacuum conditions can enhance charge-exchange beam losses and can lead to beam instabilities or even to beam abortion triggered by vacuum interlocks. Consequently, a dedicated measurement of heavy-ion induced molecular desorption in the GeV/u energy range is important for Large Hadron Collider (LHC ion operation. In 2003, a desorption experiment was installed at the Super Proton Synchrotron to measure the beam-loss induced pressure rise of potential LHC collimator materials. Samples of bare graphite, sputter coated (Cu, TiZrV graphite, and 316 LN (low carbon with nitrogen stainless steel were irradiated under grazing angle with 158  GeV/u indium ions. After a description of the new experimental setup, the results of the pressure rise measurements are presented, and the derived desorption yields are compared with data from other experiments.

  10. A better beam quality

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Progress has been made on two fronts, providing physics data and preparing for higher intensities. Over the Whitsun weekend of May 22 to 24, 5 fills for physics provided almost 30 hours of stable colliding beams, all with bunch intensities around 2x1010 protons and at a β* of 2m. The first three of these fills were with 6 bunches per beam, giving 3 pairs of collisions in all experiments. For the other two fills, the number of bunches per beam was increased to 13, giving 8 pairs of colliding bunches, and for the first time luminosities were pushed above 1029 cm-2s-1, 2 orders of magnitude higher than first collisions in March. In between and after these physics fills, nominal bunches of 1011 protons were successfully ramped and brought into collision in ATLAS and CMS for the first time (not in stable beam conditions and without squeeze). Event rates seen by the experiments were in the expected range for these conditions. In the middle of this work, a short fill with beams of 7 nominal bunches was ...

  11. A Physical Description of the Response of Coupled Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hugin, Claus Thomas

    1997-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for computing the vibrational response and the net transmitted power of bending wave fields in system consisting of coupled finite beams. The method is based on a wave approach that utilises the reflection and transmission coefficients of the different beam joint...

  12. Stable massive particles at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbairn, M.; /Stockholm U.; Kraan, A.C.; /Pennsylvania U.; Milstead, D.A.; /Stockholm U.; Sjostrand, T.; /Lund U.; Skands, P.; /Fermilab; Sloan, T.; /Lancaster U.

    2006-11-01

    We review the theoretical motivations and experimental status of searches for stable massive particles (SMPs) which could be sufficiently long-lived as to be directly detected at collider experiments. The discovery of such particles would address a number of important questions in modern physics including the origin and composition of dark matter in the universe and the unification of the fundamental forces. This review describes the techniques used in SMP-searches at collider experiments and the limits so far obtained on the production of SMPs which possess various colour, electric and magnetic charge quantum numbers. We also describe theoretical scenarios which predict SMPs, the phenomenology needed to model their production at colliders and interactions with matter. In addition, the interplay between collider searches and open questions in cosmology such as dark matter composition are addressed.

  13. From neutrino physics to beam polarisation. A high precision story at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vormwald, Benedikt

    2014-03-15

    In this thesis, we investigate the experimental prospects of studying a supersymmetric model with bilinearly broken R parity at the International Linear Collider. In this model, neutrinos mix with the supersymmetric neutralinos such that neutrino properties can be probed by examining neutralino decays, which incorporate usually a lepton and a W/Z boson. As a study case, we focus on the determination of the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle θ{sub 23}, which is accessible via the ratio of the neutralino branching ratios BR(χ{sup 0}{sub 1}→Wμ)/BR(χ{sup 0}{sub 1}→Wτ). A detailed simulation of the International Large Detector has been performed for all Standard Model backgrounds and for χ{sup 0}{sub 1}-pair production within a simplified model. The study is based on ILC beam parameters according to the Technical Design Report for a center-of-mass energy of √(s)=500 GeV. From muonic χ{sup 0}{sub 1} decays, we find that the χ{sup 0}{sub 1} mass can be reconstructed with an uncertainty of δ(m{sub χ{sup 0}{sub 1}})=(40(stat.)+35(syst.)) MeV for an integrated luminosity of ∫Ldt=500 fb{sup -1}. The ratio of branching ratios can be determined to a precision of δ(BR(χ{sup 0}{sub 1}→Wμ)/BR(χ{sup 0}{sub 1}→Wτ))=2.9%. Due to this, the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle can be deduced with a precision comparable to modern neutrino experiments. Thus, the ILC is capable to test whether bRPV SUSY is the mechanism of neutrino mass generation. As also shown in the bRPV SUSY study of this thesis, beam polarisation is an important parameter in physics analyses at the ILC. The beam polarisation is measured with two Compton polarimeters per electron/positron beam. In order to achieve the design goal of an envisaged precision of 0.25%, the detector nonlinearity of the used Cherenkov detectors has to be determined very precisely. Herein, the main source of nonlinearity is expected to originate from the involved photomultipliers. For this reason, a differential

  14. Ultimate parameters of the photon collider at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mail: telnov@inp.nsk.su. Abstract. At linear colliders, the e+e− luminosity is limited by beam-collision effects, which determine the required emittances of beams in damping rings (DRs). In γγ collisions at the photon collider, these effects are ...

  15. Ultimate parameters of the photon collider at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At linear colliders, the + - luminosity is limited by beam-collision effects, which determine the required emittances of beams in damping rings (DRs). In collisions at the photon collider, these effects are absent, and so smaller emittances are desirable. In the present damping ring designs, nominal DR parameters ...

  16. R&D ERL: Beam dynamics, parameters, and physics to be learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayran, D.

    2010-02-01

    The R&D ERL facility at BNL aims to demonstrate CW operation of ERL with average beam current in the range of 0.1-1 ampere, combined with very high efficiency of energy recovery. The ERL is being installed in one of the spacious bays in Bldg. 912 of the RHIC/AGS complex (Fig. 1). The bay is equipped with an overhead crane. The facility has a control room, two service rooms and a shielded ERL cave. The control room is located outside of the bay in a separate building. The single story house is used for a high voltage power supply for 1 MW klystron. The two-story unit houses a laser room, the CW 1 MW klystron with its accessories, most of the power supplies and electronics. The ERL R&D program has been started by the Collider Accelerator Department (C-AD) at BNL as an important stepping-stone for 10-fold increase of the luminosity of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) using relativistic electron cooling of gold ion beams with energy of 100 GeV per nucleon. Furthermore, the ERL R&D program extends toward a possibility of using 10-20 GeV ERL for future electron-hadron/heavy ion collider, MeRHIC/eRHIC. These projects are the driving force behind the development of ampere-class ERL technology, which will find many applications including light sources and FELs. The intensive R&D program geared towards the construction of the prototype ERL is under way: from development of high efficiency photo-cathodes to the development of new merging system compatible with emittance compensation.

  17. International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    IWLC2010 International Workshop on Linear Colliders 2010ECFA-CLIC-ILC joint meeting: Monday 18 October - Friday 22 October 2010Venue: CERN and CICG (International Conference Centre Geneva, Switzerland) This year, the International Workshop on Linear Colliders organized by the European Committee for Future Accelerators (ECFA) will study the physics, detectors and accelerator complex of a linear collider covering both CLIC and ILC options.Contact Workshop Secretariat  IWLC2010 is hosted by CERN

  18. Electron lenses for super-colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the operating principles and technology of electron lenses in supercolliders.  Electron lenses are a novel instrument for high energy particle accelerators, particularly for the energy-frontier superconducting hadron colliders, including the Tevatron, RHIC, LHC and future very large hadron colliders.  After reviewing the issues surrounding beam dynamics in supercolliders, the book offers an introduction to the electron lens method and its application.  Further chapters describe the technology behind the electron lenses which have recently been proposed, built and employed for compensation of beam-beam effects and for collimation of high-energy high-intensity beams, for compensation of space-charge effects and several other applications in accelerators. The book will be an invaluable resource for those involved in the design, construction and operation of the next generation of hadron colliders.

  19. Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

    1984-11-13

    The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

  20. Beam-Based Alignment in CTF3 Test Beam Line

    OpenAIRE

    Sterbini, G; Dӧbert, S; Marín, E.; Lillestol, RL; Schulte, D.; Adli, E.

    2012-01-01

    The CLIC linear collider is based on the two beams acceleration scheme. During acceleration of the colliding beams, the drive beam suffers a large build up on its energy spread. In order to efficiently transport such a beam, beam-based alignment techniques together with tight prealignment tolerances are crucial. To evaluate the performance of these steering algorithms, a beam-based steering campaign has been conducted at the Test Beam Line of the CLIC Test Facility. In the following we presen...

  1. R&D progress toward future linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Voss, G A

    1999-01-01

    During the last 20 years there has been a worldwide effort to develop the physics and technology of linear colliders. Present goals at SLAC, KEK and DESY are to bring the R&D efforts to the point where proposals for 500/1000 GeV cms electron-positron colliders can be officially submitted in the years 2002/2003. The CLIC study at CERN aims at a second generation very high energy electron-positron collider, to be considered after completion of the LHC. The main areas of hardware R&D include efficient accelerating waveguides without harmful higher order mode (h.o.m) effects, high peak power klystrons, klystron modulators and RF-power compression. Test facilities have been put in place for the testing of h.o.m behavior of new waveguide designs (ASSET), focusing on low emittance beams to spot sizes in the nanometer range (FFTB) and damping particle oscillations in a special damping ring (ATF) to prepare low emittance bunch trains of electrons for injection into linear colliders. (0 refs).

  2. The Big Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Barna-Alper Productions Inc. Toronto

    2005-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is a gigantic particle-smasher, designed to discover the origins of the universe. Awe-inspiring in vision and scope, it’s also the most expensive physics experiment in history with a price-tag of 4 billion dollars.Documentary series "Mega builders" : a fast-paced, character-driven show that focuses on the world’s biggest and most intriguing engineering challenges – the projects that are making history, and the people who are making it happen.

  3. Design Issues of TeV Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Delahaye, J P

    1996-01-01

    Within the frame work of a world-wide collabora-tion, various possible approaches for Linear Colliders in the TeV energy range (TLC) and high luminosity (~ 1034 cm-2 sec-1) are explored in different laboratories and periodically compared in international workshops. The main accelerator physics issues required to meet the requested performance improvement by three orders of magnitude in luminosity and by a factor 10 in beam energy with respect to the unique linear collider presently operational, the SLC at SLAC, are reviewed, pointing out the main challenges common to all designs as well as the possible technological choices. Corresponding designs based on the improve-ment of present standard or the development of new tech-nologies are presented, emphasizing their main issues and specific challenges. The main goals of ambitious test facilities presently set-up to study the feasibility and cost of the various schemes in the next few years are introduced.

  4. The technical challenges of the Large Hadron Collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Paul

    2015-01-13

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a 27km circumference hadron collider, built at CERN to explore the energy frontier of particle physics. Approved in 1994, it was commissioned and began operation for data taking in 2009. The design and construction of the LHC presented many design, engineering and logistical challenges which involved pushing a number of technologies well beyond their level at the time. Since the start-up of the machine, there has been a very successful 3-year run with an impressive amount of data delivered to the LHC experiments. With an increasingly large stored energy in the beam, the operation of the machine itself presented many challenges and some of these will be discussed. Finally, the planning for the next 20 years has been outlined with progressive upgrades of the machine, first to nominal energy, then to progressively higher collision rates. At each stage the technical challenges are illustrated with a few examples.

  5. Probing contact interactions at high energy lepton colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, K. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Godfrey, S. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Ottawa Carleton Inst. for Physics; Hewett, J.A. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Fermion compositeness and other new physics can be signaled by the presence of a strong four-fermion contact interaction. Here the authors present a study of {ell}{ell}qq and {ell}{ell}{ell}{prime}{ell}{prime} contact interactions using the reactions: {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} {ell}{prime}{sup +} {ell}{prime}{sup {minus}}, b{anti b}, c{anti c} at future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders with {radical}s = 0.5--5 TeV and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders with {radical}s = 0.5, 4 TeV. They find that very large compositeness scales can be probed at these machines and that the use of polarized beams can unravel their underlying helicity structure.

  6. Physics Design Considerations for Diagnostic X Beam Transport System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y-J; Paul, A C

    2000-08-01

    Diagnostic X (D-X) transport system would extract the beam from the downstream transport line of the second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT-II[1]) and transport this beam to the D-X firing point via four branches of the beamline in order to provide four lines of sight for x-ray radiography. The design goal is to generate four DARHT-II-like x-ray pulses on each line of sight. In this paper, we discuss several potential beam quality degradation processes in the passive magnet lattice beamline and indicate how they constrain the D-X beamline design parameters, such as the background pressure, the pipe size, and the pipe material.

  7. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Service

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC and ILC, which led to a host of good results and important decisions. The International Linear Collider (ILC) and Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) studies both call for cutting-edge technologies. At first glance they may appear to be in competition, but they are in fact complementary and have a common objective – namely to propose a design , as soon as possible and at the lowest possible cost, for the linear accelerator best suited to taking over the baton of physics research at the high-energy frontier after the LHC.

  8. Workshop on Physics with Neutral Kaon Beam at JLab (KL2016) Mini-Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strakovsky, Igor I. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Amaryan, Moskov [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Chudakov, Eugene A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Meyer, Curtis A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Pennington, Michael R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ritman, James L. [Forschungszentrum Juelich Institut fuer Kernphysik

    2016-05-01

    The KL2016 Workshop is following the Letter of Intent LoI12-15-001 "Physics Opportunities with Secondary KL beam at JLab" submitted to PAC43 with the main focus on the physics of excited hyperons produced by the Kaon beam on unpolarized and polarized targets with GlueX setup in Hall D. Such studies will broaden a physics program of hadron spectroscopy extending it to the strange sector. The Workshop was organized to get a feedback from the community to strengthen physics motivation of the LoI and prepare a full proposal.

  9. Beta Beams: an accelerator based facility to explore Neutrino oscillation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Payet, J; Chance, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, VL; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; De Rosa, G; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A

    2011-01-01

    The discovery that the neutrino changes flavor as it travels through space has implications for the Standard Model of particle physics (SM)[1]. To know the contribution of neutrinos to the SM, needs precise measurements of the parameters governing the neutrino oscillations. This will require a high intensity beam-based neutrino oscillation facility. The EURONu Design Study will review three currently accepted methods of realizing this facility (the so-called Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make a decision on the layout and construction of the future European neutrino oscillation facility. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron neutrino and antineutrino beams by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and letting them decay in a race-track shaped storage ring. EURONu Beta Beams are based on CERNs infrastructure and the fact that some of the already ...

  10. Fast feedback for linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Allison, S.; Gromme, T.; Grossberg, P.; Himel, T.; Krauter, K.; MacKenzie, R.; Minty, M.; Sass, R. [and others

    1995-05-01

    A fast feedback system provides beam stabilization for the SLC. As the SLC is in some sense a prototype for future linear colliders, this system may be a prototype for future feedbacks. The SLC provides a good base of experience for feedback requirements and capabilities as well as a testing ground for performance characteristics. The feedback system controls a wide variety of machine parameters throughout the SLC and associated experiments, including regulation of beam position, angle, energy, intensity and timing parameters. The design and applications of the system are described, in addition to results of recent performance studies.

  11. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Beams: Working Group A Summary on High Brightness Beam Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmerge, John

    2003-03-19

    Working group A was devoted to high brightness beam production and characterization. The presentations and discussions could be categorized as cathode physics, new photoinjector designs, computational modeling of high brightness beams, and new experimental methods and results. Several novel injector and cathode designs were presented. However, a standard 1.5 cell rf photoinjector is still the most common source for high brightness beams. New experimental results and techniques were presented and thoroughly discussed. The brightest beam produced in a rf photoinjector published at the time of the workshop is approximately 2 10{sup 14} A/(m-rad){sup 2} at Sumitomo Heavy Industries in Japan with 1 nC of charge, a 9 ps FWHM long laser pulse and a normalized transverse emittance of 1.2 pm. The emittance was achieved by utilizing a temporally flat laser pulse which decreased the emittance by an estimated factor of 2 from the beam produced with a Gaussian pulse shape with an identical pulse length.

  12. Assessing Calorimeter Requirements for a 100 TeV Future Collider With Reference to New Physics Benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    Dylewsky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Plans for a future 100 TeV circular collider require the design of detection equipment capable of measuring events at such high energy. This study examined the simulated decay of hypothetical 10 TeV excited quarks in 100 TeV pp collisions with regard to the possibility of calorimeter punch-through. Two methods of parameterizing the energy resolution in detector simulations were employed to model the effects of particles escaping the hadronic calorimeter. Varying the constant term of the energy resolution parameterization caused the dijet mass distribution to broaden up to 58% with respect to the ATLAS default. Using the assumption that the jets' makeup could be approximated by 180 GeV pions, their expected signal degradation in calorimeters of varying depths was compared to the varied constant term trials. It was found that the broadening associated with a calorimeter of thickness 7 lambda was consistent with that caused by an increase of 1\\% in the constant term (from the ATLAS default).

  13. High energy physics with polarized beams and targets. [65 papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshak, M L [ed.

    1976-01-01

    Sixty-six papers are presented as a report on conference sessions held from August 23-27, 1976, at Argonne National Laboratory. Topics covered include: (1) strong interactions; (2) weak and electromagnetic interactions; (3) polarized beams; and (4) polarized targets. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for ERDA Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and for the INIS Atomindex. (PMA)

  14. Beamstrahlung spectra in next generation linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barklow, T.; Chen, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States)); Kozanecki, W. (DAPNIA-SPP, CEN-Saclay (France))

    1992-04-01

    For the next generation of linear colliders, the energy loss due to beamstrahlung during the collision of the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} beams is expected to substantially influence the effective center-of-mass energy distribution of the colliding particles. In this paper, we first derive analytical formulae for the electron and photon energy spectra under multiple beamstrahlung processes, and for the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {gamma}{gamma} differential luminosities. We then apply our formulation to various classes of 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider designs currently under study.

  15. Study the effect of beam energy spread and detector resolution on the search for Higgs boson decays to invisible particles at a future e{sup +}e{sup -} circular collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerri, Olmo; Podo, Alessandro [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); De Gruttola, Michele; Pierini, Maurizio [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Rolandi, Gigi [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-02-15

    We study the expected sensitivity to measure the branching ratio of Higgs boson decays to invisible particles at a future circular e{sup +}e{sup -} collider (FCC-ee) in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} → HZ with Z → l{sup +}l{sup -} (l = e or μ) using an integrated luminosity of 3.5 ab{sup -1} at a center-of-mass energy √(s) = 240 GeV. The impact of the energy spread of the FCC-ee beam and of the resolution in the reconstruction of the leptons is discussed. The minimum branching ratio for a 5σ observation after 3.5 ab{sup -1} of data taking is 1.7±0.1%(stat+syst). The branching ratio exclusion limit at 95% CL is 0.63±0.22%((stat+syst)). (orig.)

  16. A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, M.; Frisch, J.; Hast, C.; Jobe, R.K.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nelson, T.; Phinney, N.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Seryi, Andrei; Smith, S.; Szalata, Z.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Beard, C.; Densham, C.; Greenhalgh, R.Justin; Jackson, F.; Kalinin, A.; Zimmermann, F.; Zagorodnov, I.; Sugimoto, Y.; Walston, S.; Burton, D.; Smith, J.; Shales, N.; Sopczak, A.; Tucker, R.; Barlow, R.; Kurevlev, G.; Mercer, A.; Hildreth, M.; Burrows, P.; Christian, G.; Clarke, C.; Hartin, A.; Molloy, S.; White, G.; Mueller, W.; Weiland, T.; Watson, N.; Bailey, D.; Cussans, D.; Kolomensky, Y.; Slater, M.; Thomson, M.; Ward, D.; Boogert, S.; Liapine, A.; Malton, S.; Miller, D.J.; Wing, M.; Arnold, R.; Sinev, N.; Torrence, E.

    2005-01-01

    The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

  17. The collider of the future?

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Why are two studies for one linear collider being conducted in parallel? This is far from a duplication of effort or a waste of resources, since the two studies reflect a complementary strategy aimed at providing the best technology for future physics. On Friday 12 June CERN hosted the first joint meeting between CLIC, ILC and the CERN management.

  18. Fast Timing for Collider Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in fast timing particle detectors have opened up new possibilities to design collider detectors that fully reconstruct and separate event vertices and individual particles in the time domain. The applications of these techniques are considered for the physics at HL-LHC.

  19. Top production at hadron colliders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New results on top quark production are presented from four hadron collider experiments: CDF and D0 at the Tevatron, and ATLAS and CMS at the LHC. Cross-sections for single top and top pair production are discussed, as well as results on the top–antitop production asymmetry and searches for new physics including ...

  20. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged magnet and retrofit others to correct the underlynig design flaw, which could delay the start-up of the mammouth subterranean machine." (1,5 page)

  1. Large Hadron Collider nears completion

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Installation of the final component of the Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator is under way along the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva, Switzerland. When completed this summer, the LHC will be the world's largest and most complex scientific instrument. It is being constructed by the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest particle physics laboratories.

  2. Physics with polarized beams. Report of the ANL Technical Advisory Panel. [Research with polarized proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-11-01

    Experimental directions which will be the most useful in developing underlying theories of hadronic collisions are outlined. As a pedagogical device to accomplish this, approximate percentages of a total program which could be devoted to different areas have been quoted. Findings are presented in the form of a short basic report with several long detailed appendices. In the basic report our opinion as to the amount of polarized beam experimental effort that should be applied to the following areas is stated: nucleon-nucleon scattering, quasi-two-body processes, inclusive production, and new or unexplored areas (such as large p/sub T/ and invariance principles). Our reasoning is discussed briefly, however, the details are left for the appendices. Members of the panel present certain aspects of the above areas, which should be useful for planning and/or performing polarized beam experiments. The seven presentations are abstracted separately in ERA.

  3. Electron cloud studies for the LHC and future proton colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez Sánchez de la Blanca, César Octavio; Zimmermann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most powerful particle collider. Its main objectives are to explore the validity of the standard model of particle physics and to look for new physics beyond it, at unprecedented collision energies and rates. A good luminosity performance is imperative to attain these goals. In the last stage of the LHC commissioning (2011-2012), the limiting factor to achieving the design bunch spacing of 25 ns has been the electron cloud effects. The electron cloud is also expected to be the most important luminosity limitation after the first Long Shut-Down of the LHC (LS1), when the machine should be operated at higher energy and with 25-ns spacing, as well as for the planned luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC) and future high energy proton colliders (HE-LHC and VHE-LHC). This thesis contributes to the understanding of the electron cloud observations during the first run of the LHC (2010-2012), presents the first beam dynamics analysis for the next generation of high en...

  4. Genomic Physics. Multiple Laser Beam Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-03-01

    The synapses affected by Alzheimer's disease can be rejuvenated by the multiple ultrashort wavelength laser beams.[2] The guiding lasers scan the whole area to detect the amyloid plaques based on the laser scattering technique. The scanning lasers pinpoint the areas with plaques and eliminate them. Laser interaction is highly efficient, because of the focusing capabilities and possibility for the identification of the damaging proteins by matching the protein oscillation eigen-frequency with laser frequency.[3] Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, La Jolla, California, USA.

  5. Radiative corrections for the LHC and linear collider era

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laenen, E.; Wackeroth, D.

    2009-01-01

    We emphasize the importance of including radiative corrections when extracting physics from colliders such as the Tevatron Run II at Fermilab, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and a future linear collider (LC). We review both well-tested methods and recent advances for calculating these

  6. Bruno Touschek, from Betatrons to Electron-positron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, Carlo; Pellegrini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Bruno Touschek's life as a physicist spanned the period from World War II to the 1970s. He was a key figure in the developments of electron-positron colliders, storage rings, and gave important contributions to theoretical high energy physics. Storage rings, initially developed for high energy physics, are being widely used in many countries as synchrotron radiation sources and are a tool for research in physics, chemistry, biology environmental sciences and cultural heritage studies. We describe Touschek's life in Austria, where he was born, Germany, where he participated to the construction of a betatron during WWII, and Italy, where he proposed and led to completion the first electron-positron storage ring in 1960, in Frascati. We highlight how his central European culture influenced his life style and work, and his main contributions to physics, such as the discovery of the Touschek effect and beam instabilities in the larger storage ring ADONE.

  7. Ion spectroscopy for improvement of the physical beam model for therapy planning in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arico, Giulia

    2016-11-23

    Helium and carbon ions enable a more conformal dose distribution, narrower penumbra and higher relative biological effectiveness than photon and proton radiotherapy. However, they may undergo nuclear fragmentation in the patient tissues and the arising secondary fragments affect the delivered biological dose distributions. Currently there is a lack of data regarding ion nuclear fragmentation. One reason is the large size (up to some meters) of the experimental setups required for the investigations. In this thesis a new method is presented, which makes use of versatile pixelated semiconductor detectors (Timepix). This method is based on tracking of single particles and pattern recognition of their signals in the detectors. Measurements were performed at the HIT facility. The mixed radiation field arising from 430 MeV/u carbon ion beams and 221 MeV/u helium ion beams in water and in PMMA targets was investigated. The amounts of primary (carbon or helium) ions detected behind targets with the same water equivalent thickness (WET) were found to be in agreement within the statistical uncertainties. However, more fragments (differences up to 20% in case of H) and narrower lateral particle distributions were measured behind the PMMA than the water targets. The spectra of ions behind tissue surrogates and corresponding water targets with the same WET were analysed. The results obtained with adipose and inner bone surrogates and with the equivalent water phantoms were found to be consistent within the uncertainties. Significant differences in the results were observed in the case of lung and cortical bone surrogates when compared to the water phantoms. The experimental results were compared to FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations. This comparison could contribute to enhance the ion interaction models currently implemented for {sup 12}C and {sup 4}He ion beams.

  8. Optimisation analysis and improvement of the effective beam sizes in Accelerator Test Facility 2

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082063; Kisiel, Adam

    2016-10-20

    A lepton linear collider is considered by the accelerator and particle physics communities as an appropriate machine to perform high precision particle physics research in the TeV energy regime. There are two proposals for the future e+e- linear collider: the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC), both developed by two wide international collaborations with strong overlap between them. Both designs satisfy the particle physics requirements. At the TeV energy regime the cross sections of many processes of interest are small, therefore large luminosities on the order of 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1} at the interaction point (IP) are required to deliver the required event rates. The luminosity inversely depends on the transverse size of the colliding beams which restricts the beam sizes at the IP to the nanometer level. The strong focusing of the beams occurs in the final focus system (FFS), the most inner part of a linear collider, where the beams are focused at the IP by means of t...

  9. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended.

  10. Physics Reach with a Monochromatic Neutrino Beam from Electron Capture

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, J.; Espinoza, C.; Lindroos, M.

    2005-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments from different sources have demonstrated non-vanishing neutrino masses and flavour mixings. The next experiments have to address the determination of the connecting mixing U(e3) and the existence of the CP violating phase. Whereas U(e3) measures the strength of the oscillation probability in appearance experiments, the CP phase acts as a phase-shift in the interference pattern. Here we propose to separate these two parameters by energy dependence, using the novel idea of a monochromatic neutrino beam facility based on the acceleration of ions that decay fast through electron capture. Fine tuning of the boosted neutrino energy allows precision measurements able to open a window for the discovery of CP violation, even for a mixing as small as 1 degree

  11. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armesto, N., E-mail: nestor.armesto@usc.es [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Dainese, A. [INFN – Sezione di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); D' Enterria, D. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland); Masciocchi, S. [EMMI and GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Roland, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States); Salgado, C.A. [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Leeuwen, M. van [Nikhef, National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Subatomic Physics of Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wiedemann, U.A. [Physics Department, CERN, CH-1211 Genéve 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  12. Nuclear collisions at the Future Circular Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, N.; d'Enterria, D.; Masciocchi, S.; Roland, C.; Salgado, C.A.; van Leeuwen, M.; Wiedemann, U.A.

    2016-01-01

    The Future Circular Collider is a new proposed collider at CERN with centre-of-mass energies around 100 TeV in the pp mode. Ongoing studies aim at assessing its physics potential and technical feasibility. Here we focus on updates in physics opportunities accessible in pA and AA collisions not covered in previous Quark Matter contributions, including Quark-Gluon Plasma and gluon saturation studies, novel hard probes of QCD matter, and photon-induced collisions.

  13. Radiation Field in the Vicinity of the Collider Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, A. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-10-26

    The Collider Center and the adjoining cryogenic support building are unique among the buildings close to the collider tunnel because these are locations where the occupancy by non-radiation workers is high. This note describes calculations of the dose equivalent from local beam loss at both the nearest point of these buildings to the collider ring and on the berm in the vicinity of these buildings.

  14. Search for new physics in same-sign dilepton events in the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Muniz, Lana

    CMS results of the new physics search in same-sign dilepton events with b-tagged jets and missing transverse energy, / ET, are presented. These results cover the full 2012 dataset from the LHC at p s =8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb$^{-1}$. Isolated same-sign dilepton events are comparatively easy to detect efficiently. They are predicted to be produced in abundance in some supersymmetry models, but are rarely produced in the Standard Model (SM) processes. Hence, this channel provides a very clean, low background, search for new physics. Multiple search regions defined by the observables / ET, hadronic energy (HT), and number of b-tagged jets are considered. The yield of events in the data agrees with the SM prediction, therefore exclusion limits at 95% C.L. are presented for various simplified SUSY models.

  15. Radiation damage in the diamond based beam condition monitors of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne; De Boer, Wim; Stickland, David; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The Beam Condition Monitor (BCM) of the CMS detector at the LHC is a protection device similar to the LHC Beam Loss Monitor system. While the electronics used is the same, poly-crystalline Chemical Vapor Deposition (pCVD) diamonds are used instead of ionization chambers as the BCM sensor material. The main purpose of the system is the protection of the silicon Pixel and Strip tracking detectors by inducing a beam dump, if the beam losses are too high in the CMS detector. By comparing the detector current with the instantaneous luminosity, the BCM detector ef fi ciency can be monitored. The number of radiation-induced defects in the diamond, reduces the charge collection distance, and hence lowers the signal. The number of these induced defects can be simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-section for creating defects increases with decreasing energies of the impinging particles. This explains, why diamond sensors mounted close to heavy calorimeters experience more radiation damage, becaus...

  16. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Dubrovskiy, A; Syratchev, I; Ruber, R; Ziemann, V

    2011-01-01

    We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter reg...

  17. X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Adli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss X-band rf power production and deceleration in the two-beam test stand of the CLIC test facility at CERN. The rf power is extracted from an electron drive beam by a specially designed power extraction structure. In order to test the structures at high-power levels, part of the generated power is recirculated to an input port, thus allowing for increased deceleration and power levels within the structure. The degree of recirculation is controlled by a splitter and phase shifter. We present a model that describes the system and validate it with measurements over a wide range of parameters. Moreover, by correlating rf power measurements with the energy lost by the electron beam, as measured in a spectrometer placed after the power extraction structure, we are able to identify system parameters, including the form factor of the electron beam. The quality of the agreement between model and reality gives us confidence to extrapolate the results found in the present test facility towards the parameter regime of CLIC.

  18. From the Proton Synchrotron to the Large Hadron Collider: 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Directorate Office

    As a new era in particle physics approaches with the start of the LHC, a symposium to commemorate many significant events that have marked high-energy physics in the past 50 years will be held at CERN on 3-4 December 2009. The list of confirmed distinguished speakers reads like the Who’s Who of particle physics of the second half of the 20th Century, including the Nobel Laureates James Cronin, Jerome Friedman, Sheldon Glashow, David Gross, Gerardus ‘t Hooft, Leon Lederman, Burton Richter, Carlo Rubbia, Jack Steinberger, Samuel Ting, Martinus Veltman, Stephen Weinberg and Frank Wilczek. They will share with us memories of several landmark events that, over the past 50 years, have shaped our field of science. These events include the discovery of the J/ψ particle by Richter and Ting in the 1970s; the work of Glashow, Salam and Weinberg on the theory of the unified weak and electromagnetic interactions; the discovery of fundamental asymmetries in the K-meson sector by Cronin and Fitch...

  19. Beam Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, E

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '2 Beam Dynamics' with the content: 2 Beam Dynamics 2.1 Linear Transverse Beam Dynamics 2.2 Coupling 2.3 Liouville's Theorem 2.4 Momentum Dependent Transverse Motion 2.5 Longitudinal Motion

  20. MD 239 on Collide and Squeeze (part 2)

    CERN Document Server

    Gorzawski, Arkadiusz; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Wenninger, Jorg; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Colliding the beams during the squeeze to profit from Landau damping due to head--on beam-beam and beta--star leveling are two operational modes that may have to be used in a not so distant future at the LHC. This MD aimed at improving the orbit control during the squeeze with much improved handling of orbit feedback references and at evaluating instruments and techniques to maintain the beam in collisions with active feedback on luminosity or beam position. This MD also integrated for the first time synchronized collimator measurements. Comparison of the settings with the previous MD allowed a validation of the long term stability of collide and squeeze.