WorldWideScience

Sample records for colliding beam physics

  1. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-01-01

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e + e - collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two

  2. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (ie, photons). Often, they interact with each other (eg, in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (eg, in fixed targets, sychrotron radiation, neutron scattering, laser chemistry/physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams -- always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades -- nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and rf cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider praradigms, to name a few. We illustrate this progress with a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use -- the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We close with an outline of future oppotunities and outlook.

  3. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1994-11-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (ie, photons). Often, they interact with each other (eg, in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (eg, in fixed targets, sychrotron radiation, neutron scattering, laser chemistry/physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams -- always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades -- nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and rf cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider praradigms, to name a few. We illustrate this progress with a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use -- the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We close with an outline of future oppotunities and outlook

  4. Advances in beam physics and technology: Colliders of the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Swapan

    1996-02-01

    Beams may be viewed as directed and focussed flow of energy and information, carried by particles and electromagnetic radiation fields (i.e. photons). Often, they are brought into interaction with each other (e.g. in high energy colliders) or with other forms of matter (e.g. in fixed target physics, synchrotron radiation sciences, neutron scattering experiments, laser chemistry and physics, medical therapy, etc.). The whole art and science of beams revolve around the fundamental quest for, and ultimate implementation of, mechanisms of production, storage, control and observation of beams—always directed towards studies of the basic structures and processes of the natural world and various practical applications. Tremendous progress has been made in all aspects of beam physics and technology in the last decades—nonlinear dynamics, superconducting magnets and radio frequency cavities, beam instrumentation and control, novel concepts and collider paradigms, to name a few. We will illustrate this progress via a few examples and remark on the emergence of new collider scenarios where some of these progress might come to use—the Gamma-Gamma Collider, the Muon Collider, laser acceleration, etc. We will close with an outline of future opportunities and outlook.

  5. Colliding beam physics at Fermilab: interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.K. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the colliding beams experment department at Fermilab was to bring about collisions of the stored beams in the energy doubler/saver and main ring, and construct experimental areas with appropriate detectors. To explore the feasibility of using the main ring as a storage device, several studies were carried out to investigate beam growth, loss, and the backgrounds in detectors at possible intersection regions. This range of developments constituted the major topics at the 1977 Summer Study reported here. Emphasis in part one is on interaction regions, beam storage, antiproton cooling, production, and colliding. 40 papers from this part are included in the data base. (GHT)

  6. High resolution silicon detectors for colliding beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Bedeschi, F.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Raso, G.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.

    1984-01-01

    Resolution and linearity of the position measurement of Pisa multi-electrode silicon detectors are presented. The detectors are operated in slightly underdepleted mode and take advantage of their intrinsic resistivity for resistive charge partition between adjacent strips. 22 μm resolution is achieved with readout lines spaced 300 μm. Possible applications in colliding beam experiments for the detection of secondary vertices are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Overview of colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, J.C.; Month, M.

    1979-01-01

    A review is presented of the colliding beam facilities in existence today. The major high energy physics facilities around the world are described, and a view is presented of the beam collisions in which the instruments used to make the beams collide and those used to detect the products of particle interactions in the beam overlap region are described

  8. Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth Workshop on High Energy Physics Phenomenology (WHEPP-9) held at the Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar, India in January 2006. Some of the work subsequently done on these problems by the subgroups formed during the workshop is ...

  9. Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Zeppenfeld, D.

    1999-01-01

    These lectures are intended as a pedagogical introduction to physics at $e^+e^-$ and hadron colliders. A selection of processes is used to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of the different machines. The discussion includes $W$ pair production and chargino searches at $e^+e^-$ colliders, Drell-Yan events and the top quark search at the Tevatron, and Higgs searches at the LHC.

  10. A Future Linear Collider with Polarised Beams: Searches for New Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid

    2003-01-01

    There exists a world-wide consensus for a future e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range between √(s) =500-1000 GeV as the next large facility in HEP. The Linear Collider has a large physics potential for the discovery of new physics beyond the Standard Model and for precision studies of the Standard Model itself. It is well suited to complement and extend the physics program of the LHC. The use of polarised beams at a Linear Collider will be a powerful tool. In this paper we will summarize some highlights of high precision tests of the electroweak theory and of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model at a future Linear Collider with polarised e- and e+ beams

  11. A high luminosity superconducting mini collider for Phi meson production and particle beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.; Robin, D.; Cline, D.; Kolonko, J.; Anderson, C.; Barletta, W.; Chargin, A.; Cornacchia, M.; Dalbacka, G.; Halbach, K.; Lueng, E.; Kimball, F.; Madura, D.; Patterson, L.

    1991-01-01

    A 510MeV electron-positron collider has been proposed at UCLA to study particle beam physics and Phi-Meson physics, at luminosities larger than 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . The collider consists of a single compact superconducting storage ring (SMC), with bending field of 4 T and a current larger than 1 A. The authors discuss the main characteristics of this system and its major technical components: superconducting dipoles, RF, vacuum, injection

  12. On the physical problems of investigations on colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, S.B.; Zhuravlev, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    Physical problems planned for investigations with accelerating facilities at the 0.5-2 TeV energy of colliding hadrons (pp- or p anti p) and with e + e - storage rings with the total particle energy of 100-200 GeV in the center-of-mass system are briefly reviewed. The following prospective aspects of experimental investigations are discussed: electroweak interactions and properties of W- and Z-bosons (sector of vector calibration fields), Higgs mesons and their production (sector of scalar fields), production and disintegration of t-quarks and check-up of QCD statements in the e + e - reactions. Perspective trends in the theory development are considered. They are: the great unification theory, technicolor, supersymmetry, models of composite quarks and leptons. To perform all these fundamental investigations, accelerators of a new class are necessary. The authors consider their construction to be justified by the results expected

  13. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The μ + μ - collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged

  14. The Colliding Beams Sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Sequencer (CBS) is a computer program used to operate the pbar-p Collider by synchronizing the applications programs and simulating the activities of the accelerator operators during filling and storage. The Sequencer acts as a meta-program, running otherwise stand alone applications programs, to do the set-up, beam transfers, acceleration, low beta turn on, and diagnostics for the transfers and storage. The Sequencer and its operational performance will be described along with its special features which include a periodic scheduler and command logger. 14 refs., 3 figs

  15. The rise of colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1992-06-01

    It is a particular pleasure for me to have this opportunity to review for you the rise of colliding beams as the standard technology for high-energy-physics accelerators. My own career in science has been intimately tied up in the transition from the old fixed-target technique to colliding-beam work. I have led a kind of double life both as a machine builder and as an experimenter, taking part in building and using the first of the colliding-beam machines, the Princeton-Stanford Electron-Electron Collider, and building the most recent advance in the technology, the Stanford Linear Collider. The beginning was in 1958, and in the 34 years since there has been a succession of both electron and proton colliders that have increased the available center-of-mass energy for hard collisions by more than a factor of 1000. For the historians here, I regret to say that very little of this story can be found in the conventional literature. Standard operating procedure for the accelerator physics community has been publication in conference proceedings, which can be obtained with some difficulty, but even more of the critical papers are in internal laboratory reports that were circulated informally and that may not even have been preserved. In this presentation I shall review what happened based on my personal experiences and what literature is available. I can speak from considerable experience on the electron colliders, for that is the topic in which I was most intimately involved. On proton colliders my perspective is more than of an observer than of a participant, but I have dug into the literature and have been close to many of the participants

  16. Distinguishing new physics scenarios at a linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V.; Paver, N.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous nonstandard dynamics dominated by very high mass exchanges are described at current and future accelerator energies by appropriate contactlike effective interactions among the standard model particles. Correspondingly, they can manifest themselves only through deviations of the cross sections from the standard model predictions. If one such deviation were observed, it would be important to definitely identify, to a given confidence level, the actual source among the various possible nonstandard interactions that, in principle, can explain it. Here we estimate the identification reach on different new physics effective interactions, obtainable from angular distributions of lepton pair production processes at the planned electron-positron International Linear Collider with polarized beams. For each nonstandard model, such an identification reach defines the range in the relevant heavy mass scale parameter where it can be unambiguously distinguished from the other nonstandard models as the source of corrections to the standard model cross sections, in case these are observed. The effective interactions for which we estimate the expected identification reach are the interactions based on gravity in large extra dimensions, in TeV -1 extra dimensions and the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interactions. The availability of both beams polarized at the International Linear Collider turns out, in many cases, to dramatically enhance the identification sensitivity

  17. Distinguishing new physics scenarios at a linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A.A.; Paver, N.; Tsytrinov, A.V.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous non-standard dynamics are described by contact-like effective interactions that can manifest themselves only through deviations of the cross sections from the Standard Model predictions. If one such deviation were observed, it should be important to definitely identify, to a given confidence level, the actual source among the possible non-standard interactions that in principle can explain it. We here estimate the 'identification' reach on different New Physics effective interactions obtainable from angular distributions of lepton pair production processes at the planned International Linear Collider with polarized beams. The models for which we discuss the range in the relevant high mass scales where they can be 'identified' as sources of corrections from the Standard Model predictions, are the interactions based on gravity in large and in TeV -1 extra dimensions and the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interactions. The availability of both beams polarized in many cases plays an essential role in enhancing the identification sensitivity. (author)

  18. Physics at Future Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    1999-01-01

    After a brief review of the Big Issues in particle physics, we discuss the contributions to resolving that could be made by various planned and proposed future colliders. These include future runs of LEP and the Fermilab Tevatron collider, B factories, RHIC, the LHC, a linear electron-positron collider, an electron-proton collider in the LEP/LHC tunnel, a muon collider and a future larger hadron collider (FLHC). The Higgs boson and supersymmetry are used as benchmarks for assessing their capabilities. The LHC has great capacities for precision measurements as well as exploration, but also shortcomings where the complementary strengths of a linear electron-positron collider would be invaluable. It is not too soon to study seriously possible subsequent colliders.

  19. Colliding beam experiments in the Siberian Institute for Nuclear Physics (Present status and prospects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budker, G.I.

    1982-01-01

    Present status of construction of colliding (electron, positron, proton, antiproton and muon) beam facilities is described. Experiments conducted at the VEP-1 and VEPP-2 facilities in 1968-1970 are enumerated. The program of forthcoming investigations at the VAPP-NAP facility is described in brief

  20. Tevatron Collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.J.

    1990-02-01

    The physics of hadron colliders is briefly reviewed. Issues for further study are presented. Particular attention is given to the physics opportunities for a high luminosity (≥ 100 pb -1 /experiment/run) Upgrade of the Tevatron Collider. 25 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e + - e - colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II)

  2. QCD for Collider Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Skands, Peter

    2011-01-01

    These lectures are directed at a level suitable for graduate students in experimental and theoretical High Energy Physics. They are intended to give an introduction to the theory and phenomenology of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) as it is used in collider physics applications. The aim is to bring the reader to a level where informed decisions can be made concerning different approaches and their uncertainties. The material is divided into four main areas: 1) fundamentals, 2) perturbative QCD, ...

  3. Beam dynamics in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss some basic beam dynamics issues related to obtaining and preserving the luminosity of a next generation linear collider. The beams are extracted from a damping ring and compressed in length by the first bunch compressor. They are then accelerated in a preaccelerator linac up to an energy appropriate for injection into a high gradient linac. In many designs this pre-acceleration is followed by another bunch compression to reach a short bunch. After acceleration in the linac, the bunches are finally focused transversely to a small spot. 27 refs., 1 fig

  4. Physics goals of the next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Marciano, W.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Gunion, J. F. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)] [and others; NLC ZDR Design Group; NLC Physics Working Group

    1996-05-01

    We present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV-1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. 132 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs.

  5. Physics goals of the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlman, S.; Marciano, W.J.; Gunion, J. F.

    1996-05-01

    We present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV-1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. 132 refs., 54 figs., 14 tabs

  6. NOVOSIBIRSK/STANFORD: colliding linac beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Plans to use colliding beams from linear accelerators are being considered at Novosibirsk and Stanford. The VLEPP scheme proposed for Novosibirsk and the Stanford single pass collider scheme are described. (W.D.L.).

  7. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e + -e - collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2γ at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines

  8. Hadron collider physics 2005. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campanelli, M.; Clark, A.; Wu, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Hadron Collider Physics Symposia (HCP) are a new series of conferences that follow the merger of the Hadron Collider Conferences with the LHC Symposia series, with the goal of maximizing the shared experience of the Tevatron and LHC communities. This book gathers the proceedings of the first symposium, HCP2005, and reviews the state of the art in the key physics directions of experimental hadron collider research: - QCD physics - precision electroweak physics - c-, b-, and t-quark physics - physics beyond the Standard Model - heavy ion physics The present volume will serve as a reference for everyone working in the field of accelerator-based high-energy physics. (orig.)

  9. B meson physics with polarized electron beams at linear colliders running at the Z0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwood, W.B.

    1988-12-01

    The expected large cross section for e + e - → Z 0 and subsequent decay to b/bar b/ quarks makes the Z 0 an attractive placeto pursue B meson physics. The cross section for b-quark production at the Z 0 is compared to resonance production at the Υ/sub 4s/ and Υ/sub 5s/. In addition the big electroweak asymmetries, thought to exist in Z 0 decays to b/bar b/ quarks with polarized electron beams, provide an outstanding handle for observation of such effects as B 0 - /bar B/ 0 mixing. In this paper, the feasibility of such measurements is investigated and, with relatively small samples of Z 0 's (a few hundred thousand), both B/sub d/ and B/sub s/ meson mixing are shown to be measurable. The subject of CP violation in neutral B mesons is discussed last, but presently such measurements seem to be out of reach. 7 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Topics in Collider Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petriello, Frank J

    2003-08-27

    It is an exciting time for high energy physics. Several experiments are currently exploring uncharted terrain; the next generation of colliders will begin operation in the coming decade. These experiments will together help us understand some of the most puzzling issues in particle physics: the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and the generation of flavor physics. It is clear that the primary goal of theoretical particle physics in the near future is to support and guide this experimental program. These tasks can be accomplished in two ways: by developing experimental signatures for new models which address outstanding problems, and by improving Standard Model predictions for precision observables. We present here several results which advance both of these goals. We begin with a study of non-commutative field theories. It has been suggested that TeV-scale non-commutativity could explain the origin of CP violation in the SM. We identify several distinct signatures of non-commutativity in high energy processes. We also demonstrate the one-loop quantum consistency of a simple spontaneously broken non-commutative U(1) theory; this result is an important preface to any attempt to embed the SM within a non-commutative framework. We then investigate the phenomenology of extra-dimensional theories, which have been suggested recently as solutions to the hierarchy problem of particle physics. We first examine the implications of allowing SM fields to propagate in the full five-dimensional spacetime of the Randall-Sundrum model, which solves the hierarchy problem via an exponential ''warping'' of the Planck scale induced by a five-dimensional anti de-Sitter geometry. In an alternative extra-dimensional theory, in which all SM fields are permitted to propagate in flat extra dimensions, we show that properties of the Higgs boson are significantly modified. Finally, we discuss the next-to-next-to leading order QCD corrections to the dilepton

  11. Proton-antiproton collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    1989-01-01

    This volume reviews the physics studied at the CERN proton-antiproton collider during its first phase of operation, from the first physics run in 1981 to the last one at the end of 1985. The volume consists of a series of review articles written by physicists who are actively involved with the collider research program. The first article describes the proton-antiproton collider facility itself, including the antiproton source and its principle of operation based on stochastic cooling. The subsequent six articles deal with the various physics subjects studied at the collider. Each article descr

  12. Impact of polarized e- and e+ beams at a future Linear Collider and a Z-factory Part II - Physics beyond the Standard Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G

    2011-01-01

    Polarization of both beams at a future Linear Collider would be ideal for facing both expected and unforeseen challenges in searches for new physics: fixing the chirality of the couplings and enabling the higher precision for the polarization measurement itself as well as for polarization-dependent observables, it provides a powerful tool for studying new physics at the future Linear Collider, such as discovering new particles, analyzing signals model-independently and resolving precisely the underlying model. Techniques and engineering designs for a polarized-positron source are well advanced. Potential constraints concerning luminosity, commissioning and operating issues appear to be under control. This article mainly treats with the impact of polarized beams on physics beyond the Standard Model, whereas the fundamentals in polarization as well as the gain in electroweak precision physics are summarized in the corresponding part I.

  13. Physics at Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, U.; Parsons, J.; Albrow, M.; Denisov, D.; Han, T.; Kotwal, A.; Olness, F.; Qian, J.; Belyaev, S.; Bosman, M.; Brooijmans, G.; Gaines, I.; Godfrey, S.; Hansen, J.B.; Hauser, J.; Heintz, U.; Hinchliffe, I.; Kao, C.; Landsberg, G.; Maltoni, F.; Oleari, C.; Pagliarone, C.; Paige, F.; Plehn, T.; Rainwater, D.; Reina, L.; Rizzo, T.; Su, S.; Tait, T.; Wackeroth, D.; Vataga, E.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physics opportunities and detector challenges at future hadron colliders. As guidelines for energies and luminosities we use the proposed luminosity and/or energy upgrade of the LHC (SLHC), and the Fermilab design of a Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC). We illustrate the physics capabilities of future hadron colliders for a variety of new physics scenarios (supersymmetry, strong electroweak symmetry breaking, new gauge bosons, compositeness and extra dimensions). We also investigate the prospects of doing precision Higgs physics studies at such a machine, and list selected Standard Model physics rates.

  14. Physics and planning for future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Physics opportunities at future (not presently under construction) colliders are examined, particularly with reference to the motivations for building them. First a number of considerations involved in planning and choosing beams, energies, and luminosities are discussed. Higgs physics, which currently seems to be the central problem of particle physics, is emphasized, with detailed study of how to do WW scattering and how to detect effects of heavy Higgs bosons. Some new results are included. High energy hadron colliders dominate the discussion, but alternatives are examined for comparison and when they have unique capabilities

  15. Hadron collider physics at UCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kernan, A.; Shen, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the research work in high energy physics by the group at the University of California, Riverside. Work has been divided between hadron collider physics and e{sup +}-e{sup {minus}} collider physics, and theoretical work. The hadron effort has been heavily involved in the startup activities of the D-Zero detector, commissioning and ongoing redesign. The lepton collider work has included work on TPC/2{gamma} at PEP and the OPAL detector at LEP, as well as efforts on hadron machines.

  16. Introduction to colliding beams at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.

    1994-10-01

    The Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is currently the site of the world's highest center-of-mass energy proton-antiproton colliding beam accelerator, the Tevatron. The CDF and D OE detectors each envelop one of two luminous regions in the collider, and are thus wholly dependent on the accelerator for their success. The Tevatron's high operating energy, reliability, and record setting integrated luminosity have allowed both experiments to make world-class measurements and defined the region of physics that each can explore. The following sections are an overview of the highlights of the accelerator operation and are compiled from many sources. The major sources for each section are listed at the beginning of that section

  17. TRISTAN, electron-positron colliding beam project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    In this report e + e - colliding beam program which is now referred to as TRISTAN Project will be described. A brief chronology and outline of TRISTAN Project is given in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 of this article gives a discussion of physics objectives at TRISTAN. Chapter 3 treats the overall description of the accelerators. Chapter 4 describes design of each of the accelerator systems. In Chapter 5, detector facilities are discussed in some detail. A description of accelerator tunnels, experimental areas, and utilities are given in Chapter 6. In the Appendix, the publications on the TRISTAN Project are listed. (author)

  18. Proton-antiproton colliding beam electron cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derbenev, Ya.S.; Skrinskij, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    A possibility of effective cooling of high-energy pp tilde beams (E=10 2 -10 3 GeV) in the colliding mode by accompanying radiationally cooled electron beam circulating in an adjacent storage ring is studied. The cooling rate restrictions by the pp tilde beam interaction effects while colliding and the beam self-heating effect due to multiple internal scattering are considered. Some techniques permitting to avoid self-heating of a cooling electron beam or suppress its harmful effect on a heavy particle beam cooling are proposed. According to the estimations the cooling time of 10 2 -10 3 s order can be attained [ru

  19. Hadron collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-10-03

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs.

  20. QCD and collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, William James

    1991-12-01

    1. Some basic theory. 2. Two important applications: - e+ e- annihilation (LEPSLS) ; deep inelastic scattering (HERA). 3. Other applications..., large Pt jets, W and Z, heavy quark production..., (pp- colliders). In this lecture: some basic theory. 1. QCD as a non abelian gauge field theory. 2. Asymptotic freedom. 3. Beyond leading order - renormalisation schemes. 4. MS.

  1. Hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pondrom, L.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to the techniques of analysis of hadron collider events is presented in the context of the quark-parton model. Production and decay of W and Z intermediate vector bosons are used as examples. The structure of the Electroweak theory is outlined. Three simple FORTRAN programs are introduced, to illustrate Monte Carlo calculation techniques. 25 refs

  2. Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2014-01-01

    The idea of colliding two particle beams to fully exploit the energy of accelerated particles was first proposed by Rolf Wideröe, who in 1943 applied for a patent on the collider concept and was awarded the patent in 1953. The first three colliders — AdA in Italy, CBX in the US, and VEP-1 in the then Soviet Union — came to operation about 50 years ago in the mid-1960s. A number of other colliders followed. Over the past decades, colliders defined the energy frontier in particle physics. Different types of colliers — proton–proton, proton–antiproton, electron–positron, electron–proton, electron-ion and ion-ion colliders — have played complementary roles in fully mapping out the constituents and forces in the Standard Model (SM). We are now at a point where all predicted SM constituents of matter and forces have been found, and all the latest ones were found at colliders. Colliders also play a critical role in advancing beam physics, accelerator research and technology development. It is timel...

  3. Prospects for Future Collider Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-10-20

    One item on the agenda of future colliders is certain to be the Higgs boson. What is it trying to tell us? The primary objective of any future collider must surely be to identify physics beyond the Standard Model, and supersymmetry is one of the most studied options. it Is supersymmetry waiting for us and, if so, can LHC Run 2 find it? The big surprise from the initial 13-TeV LHC data has been the appearance of a possible signal for a new boson X with a mass ~750 GeV. What are the prospects for future colliders if the X(750) exists? One of the most intriguing possibilities in electroweak physics would be the discovery of non-perturbative phenomena. What are the prospects for observing sphalerons at the LHC or a future collider?

  4. Beam dynamics issues for linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this paper we discuss various beam dynamics issues for linear colliders. The emphasis is to explore beam dynamics effects which lead to an effective dilution of the emittance of the beam and thus to a loss of luminosity. These considerations lead to various tolerances which are evaluated for a particular parameter set

  5. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Drozhdin, A. I.

    2003-12-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occured at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section.

  6. Collider and Detector Protection at Beam Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  7. Collider and detector protection at beam accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Mokhov, N.V.; Drozhdin, A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Dealing with beam loss due to abort kicker prefire is considered for hadron colliders. The prefires occurred at Tevatron (Fermilab) during Run I and Run II are analyzed and a protection system implemented is described. The effect of accidental beam loss in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on machine and detector components is studied via realistic Monte Carlo calculations. The simulations show that beam loss at an unsynchronized beam abort would result in severe heating of conventional and superconducting magnets and possible damage to the collider detector elements. A proposed set of collimators would reduce energy deposition effects to acceptable levels. Special attention is paid to reducing peak temperature rise within the septum magnet and minimizing quench region length downstream of the LHC beam abort straight section

  8. Physics beyond Colliders Kickoff Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kickoff workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  9. Workshop on Physics Beyond Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to explore the opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex and infrastructure to get new insights into some of today's outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The focus is on fundamental physics questions that are similar in spirit to those addressed by high-energy colliders, but that may require different types of experiments. The kick-off workshop is intended to stimulate new ideas for such projects, for which we encourage the submission of abstracts.

  10. Physics at the SLC [SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-11-01

    The SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) was constructed in the years 1983--1987 for two principal reasons: to develop the accelerator physics and technology that are necessary for the construction of future linear electron-positron colliders; and to produce electron-positron collisions at the Z 0 pole and to study the physics of the weak neutral current. To date, the SLC program has been quite successful at achieving the first goal. The machine has produced and collided high energy electron and positron beams of three-micron transverse size. The problems of operating an open geometry detector in an environment that is more akin to those found in fixed-target experiments than in storage rings have largely been solved. As a physics producing venture, the SLC has been less successful than was originally hoped but more successful than is commonly believed. Some of the results that have been produced by the Mark II experiment with a very modest data sample are competitive with those that have been produced with much larger samples by the four LEP collaborations. At the current, time, SLAC is engaged in an ambitious program to upgrade the SLC luminosity and to exploit one of its unique features, a spin polarized electron beam. These lectures are therefore organized into three sections: a brief description of the SLC; a review of the physics results that have been achieved with the Mark II detector; a description of the SLC's future: the realization and use of a polarized electron beam

  11. Working group report: Collider Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    11KEK, Tsukuba, Japan. 12Cornell University ... This is summary of the activities of the working group on collider physics in the IXth ... In view of the requirements of the hour and the available skills and interests, it was decided to .... The actual computation, which is long and somewhat tedious, is currently under way and is ...

  12. Super High Energy Colliding Beam Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    This lecture presents a review of cyclic accelerators and their energy limitations. A description is given of the phase stability principle and evolution of the synchrotron, an accelerator without energy limitation. Then the concept of colliding beams emerged to yield doubling of the beam energy as in the Tevatron 2 trillion electron volts (TeV) proton collider at Fermilab and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) which is now planned as a 14-TeV machine in the 27 kilometer tunnel of the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN. Then presentation is given of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC), a giant accelerator complex with energy 40-TeV in a tunnel 87 kilometers in circumference under the country surrounding Waxahachie in Texas, U.S.A. These superhigh energy accelerators are intended to smash protons against protons at energy sufficient to reveal the nature of matter and to consolidate the prevailing general theory of elementary particle.

  13. Beam-beam limit in e+e- circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Cai, Y.; Qiang, J.

    2004-01-01

    Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be ξ∼0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns

  14. Colliding beam fusion reactor space propulsion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Binderbauer, Michl W.; Rostoker, Norman; Rahman, Hafiz Ur; O'Toole, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    We describe a space propulsion system based on the Colliding Beam Fusion Reactor (CBFR). The CBFR is a high-beta, field-reversed, magnetic configuration with ion energies in the range of hundreds of keV. Repetitively-pulsed ion beams sustain the plasma distribution and provide current drive. The confinement physics is based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equation, including a Fokker Planck collision operator and all sources and sinks for energy and particle flow. The mean azimuthal velocities and temperatures of the fuel ion species are equal and the plasma current is unneutralized by the electrons. The resulting distribution functions are thermal in a moving frame of reference. The ion gyro-orbit radius is comparable to the dimensions of the confinement system, hence classical transport of the particles and energy is expected and the device is scaleable. We have analyzed the design over a range of 10 6 -10 9 Watts of output power (0.15-150 Newtons thrust) with a specific impulse of, I sp ∼10 6 sec. A 50 MW propulsion system might involve the following parameters: 4-meters diameterx10-meters length, magnetic field ∼7 Tesla, ion beam current ∼10 A, and fuels of either D-He 3 ,P-B 11 ,P-Li 6 ,D-Li 6 , etc

  15. Physics goals of future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, G.L.

    1987-01-01

    These lectures describe some of the physics goals that future colliders are designed to achieve. Emphasis is on the SSC, but its capabilities are compared to those of other machines, and set in a context of what will be measured before the SSC is ready. Physics associated with the Higgs sector is examined most thoroughly, with a survey of the opportunities to find evidence of extended gauge theories

  16. Neutrino physics at a muon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.J.

    1998-02-01

    This paper gives an overview of the neutrino physics possibilities at a future muon storage ring, which can be either a muon collider ring or a ring dedicated to neutrino physics that uses muon collider technology to store large muon currents. After a general characterization of the neutrino beam and its interactions, some crude quantitative estimates are given for the physics performance of a muon ring neutrino experiment (MURINE) consisting of a high rate, high performance neutrino detector at a 250 GeV muon collider storage ring. The paper is organized as follows. The next section describes neutrino production from a muon storage rings and gives expressions for event rates in general purpose and long baseline detectors. This is followed by a section outlining a serious design constraint for muon storage rings: the need to limit the radiation levels produced by the neutrino beam. The following two sections describe a general purpose detector and the experimental reconstruction of interactions in the neutrino target then, finally, the physics capabilities of a MURINE are surveyed

  17. Beam Dynamics Challenges for Future Circular Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    Zimmermann, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The luminosity of hadron colliders rises with the beam intensity, until some limit is encountered, mostly due to head-on and long-range beam-beam interaction, due to electron cloud, or due to conventional impedance sources. Also beam losses caused by various mechanisms may affect the performance. The limitations can be alleviated, if not overcome, by a proper choice of beam parameters and by dedicated compensation schemes. Examples include alternating crossing at several interaction points, electromagnetic wires, super-bunches, electron lenses, clearing electrodes, and nonlinear collimation. I discuss such mitigating measures and related research efforts, with special emphasis on the LHC and its upgrade.

  18. Transverse equilibria in linear collider beam-beam collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Chen, Pisin

    1991-01-01

    It has been observed in simulations of the beam-beam interaction in linear colliders that a near equilibrium pinched state of the colliding beams develops when the disruption parameter is large (D much-gt 1). In this state the beam transverse density distributions are peaked at center, with long tails. The authors present here an analytical model of the equilibrium approached by the beams, that of a generalized Bennett pinch which develops through collisionless damping due to the strong nonlinearity of the beam-beam interaction. In order to calculate the equilibrium pinched beam size, an estimation of the rms emittance growth is made which takes into account the partial adiabaticity of the collision. This pinched beam size is used to derive the luminosity enhancement factors whose scaling is in agreement with the simulation results for both D and thermal factor A = σ z /β * large, and explains the previously noted cubic relationship between round and flat beam enhancement factors

  19. Beam instrumentation for the Tevatron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ronald S.; Jansson, Andreas; Shiltsev, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches and many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for future colliders.

  20. Stability diagram of colliding beams

    CERN Document Server

    Buffat, X; Mounet, N; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the beam-beam interactions on the stability of impedance mode is discussed. The detuning is evaluated by the means of single particle tracking in arbitrarily complex collision configurations, including lattice non-linearities, and used to numerically evaluate the dispersion integral. This approach also allows the effect of non-Gaussian distributions to be considered. Distributions modified by the action of external noise are discussed.

  1. Control of colliding ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salisbury, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a method and system for enhancing the power-producing capability of a nuclear fusion reactor, and more specifically to methods and structure for enhancing the ion density in a directed particle fusion reactor. In accordance with the invention, oppositely directed ion beams constrained to helical paths pass through an annular reaction zone. The object is to produce fusion reactions due to collisions between the ion beams. The reaction zone is an annulus as between an inner-cylindrical electrode and an outer-cylindrical coaxial electrode. The beams are enhanced in ion density at spaced points along the paths by providing spline structures protruding from the walls of the electrodes into the reaction zone. This structure causes variations in the electric field along the paths followed by the ion beams. Such fields cause the beams to be successively more and less concentrated as the beams traverse the reaction zone. Points of high concentration are the points at which fusion-producing collisions are most likely to take place

  2. Two-Beam Linear Colliders - Special Issues

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The path towards a multi-TeV e+e- linear collider proposed by the CLIC study is based on the Two-Beam Acceleration (TBA) scheme. Such a scheme is promising in term of efficiency, reliability and cost. The rationale behind the two-beam scheme is discussed in the paper, together with the special issues related to this technology and the R&D needed to demonstrate its feasibility.

  3. Polarized muon beams for muon collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skrinsky, A.N. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1996-11-01

    An option for the production of intense and highly polarized muon beams, suitable for a high-luminosity muon collider, is described briefly. It is based on a multi-channel pion-collection system, narrow-band pion-to-muon decay channels, proper muon spin gymnastics, and ionization cooling to combine all of the muon beams into a single bunch of ultimately low emittance. (orig.).

  4. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed

  5. Importance of beam-beam tune spread to collective beam-beam instability in hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Lihui; Shi Jicong

    2004-01-01

    In hadron colliders, electron-beam compensation of beam-beam tune spread has been explored for a reduction of beam-beam effects. In this paper, effects of the tune-spread compensation on beam-beam instabilities were studied with a self-consistent beam-beam simulation in model lattices of Tevatron and Large Hodron Collider. It was found that the reduction of the tune spread with the electron-beam compensation could induce a coherent beam-beam instability. The merit of the compensation with different degrees of tune-spread reduction was evaluated based on beam-size growth. When two beams have a same betatron tune, the compensation could do more harm than good to the beams when only beam-beam effects are considered. If a tune split between two beams is large enough, the compensation with a small reduction of the tune spread could benefit beams as Landau damping suppresses the coherent beam-beam instability. The result indicates that nonlinear (nonintegrable) beam-beam effects could dominate beam dynamics and a reduction of beam-beam tune spread by introducing additional beam-beam interactions and reducing Landau damping may not improve the stability of beams

  6. The charged beam dumps for the international linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R; Broome, T; Densham, C; Vincke, H

    2006-01-01

    The baseline configuration of the International Linear Collider requires 2 beam dumps per interaction region, each rated to 18MW of beam power, together with additional beam dumps for tuning purposes and machine protection. The baseline design uses high pressure moving water dumps, first developed for the SLC and used in the TESLA design, although a gas based dump is also being considered. In this paper we discuss the progress made by the international community on both physics and engineering studies for the beam dumps.

  7. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking

  8. Physics at hadron colliders: Experimental view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    The physics of the hadron-hadron collider experiment is considered from an experimental point of view. The problems encountered in determination of how well the standard model describes collider results are discussed. 53 refs., 58 figs

  9. Tau physics at p bar p colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments

  10. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and

  11. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.

    2001-01-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e + e - linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e + e - linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e + e - linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e + e - experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and built in a few years, it would make

  12. Impact of polarized e- and e+ beams at a future linear collider and a Z-factory. Pt. I. Fundamentals in polarization and electroweak precision physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid

    2010-12-01

    The main goal of new physics searches at a future Linear Collider is the precise determination of the underlying new physics model. The physics potential of the ILC as well as the multi-TeV option collider CLIC have to be optimized with regard to expected results from the LHC. The exploitation of spin effects plays a crucial role in this regard. After a short status report of the Linear Collider design and physics requirements, this article explains fundamentals in polarization and provides an overview of the impact of these spin effects in electroweak precision physics. (orig.)

  13. Equilibrium state of colliding electron beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Warnock

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available We study a nonlinear integral equation that is a necessary condition on the equilibrium phase-space distribution function of stored, colliding electron beams. It is analogous to the Haïssinski equation, being derived from Vlasov-Fokker-Planck theory, but is quite different in form. The equation is analyzed for the case of the Chao-Ruth model of the beam-beam interaction in 1 degree of freedom, a so-called strong-strong model with nonlinear beam-beam force. We prove the existence of a unique solution, for sufficiently small beam current, by an application of the implicit function theorem. We have not yet proved that this solution is positive, as would be required to establish existence of an equilibrium. There is, however, numerical evidence of a positive solution. We expect that our analysis can be extended to more realistic models.

  14. Beam-beam observations in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been operating since 2000. Over the past decade, thanks to the continuously increased bunch intensity and reduced β*s at the interaction points, the maximum peak luminosity in the polarized proton operation has been increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In this article, we first present the beam-beam observations in the previous RHIC polarized proton runs. Then we analyze the mechanisms for the beam loss and emittance growth in the presence of beam-beam interaction. The operational challenges and limitations imposed by beam-beam interaction and their remedies are also presented. In the end, we briefly introduce head-on beam-beam compensation with electron lenses in RHIC.

  15. Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup; Raychaudhari, Amitava

    2009-01-01

    In an epoch when particle physics is awaiting a major step forward, the Large Hydron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva will soon be operational. It will collide a beam of high energy protons with another similar beam circulation in the same 27 km tunnel but in the opposite direction, resulting in the production of many elementary particles some never created in the laboratory before. It is widely expected that the LHC will discover the Higgs boson, the particle which supposedly lends masses to all other fundamental particles. In addition, the question as to whether there is some new law of physics at such high energy is likely to be answered through this experiment. The present volume contains a collection of articles written by international experts, both theoreticians and experimentalists, from India and abroad, which aims to acquaint a non-specialist with some basic issues related to the LHC. At the same time, it is expected to be a useful, rudimentary companion of introductory exposition and technical expert...

  16. Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Lance

    2006-01-01

    In the coming decade, the search for the Higgs boson, and for new particles representing physics beyond the Standard Model, will be carried out by colliding protons at the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. A collision of two protons, each of which is made out of quarks and gluons, is inherently messy. Feynman likened it to smashing two Swiss watches together to figure out how they work. In recent decades, we have learned better how the Swiss watches work, using the theory of quark-gluon interactions, quantum chromodynamics. Armed with this knowledge, we can better predict the results of collisions at the Tevatron and the LHC, to see whether the Standard Model holds up or fails, or whether new particles are in the data. But a major bottleneck is simply in adding up Feynman diagrams, for which the rules are well known, yet there can be thousands of extremely complicated diagrams. In fact, the sum of all diagrams is often much simpler than the typical one, suggesting hidden symmetries and better ways to compute. In the past two years, spinoffs from a new theory, 'twistor string theory', have led to very efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams for making such predictions, as I will explain.

  17. CERN accelerator school: Antiprotons for colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.; Newman, S.

    1984-01-01

    This is a specialized course which addresses a wide spectrum of theoretical and technological problems confronting the designer of an antiproton facility for high-energy-physics research. A broad and profound basis is provided by the lecturers' substantial experience gained over many years with CERN's unique equipment. Topics include beam optics, special lattices for antiproton accumulation and storage rings, antiproton production, stochastic cooling, acceleration and storage, r.f. noise, r.f. beam manipulations, beam-beam interaction, beam stability due to ion accumulation, and diagnostics. The SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) panti p collider, LEAR (the Low Energy Antiproton Ring at CERN), antiprotons in the ISR (Intersecting Storage Rings), the new antiproton collector (ACOL) and gas jet targets are also discussed. A table is included listing the parameters of all CERN's accelerators and storage rings. See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  18. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2083092; Burkart, Florian; Schmidt, Rudiger; Shutov, A; Wollmann, Daniel; Piriz, A

    2016-01-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850  km/h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC...

  19. Particle physics experiments at high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2011-01-01

    Written by one of the detector developers for the International Linear Collider, this is the first textbook for graduate students dedicated to the complexities and the simplicities of high energy collider detectors. It is intended as a specialized reference for a standard course in particle physics, and as a principal text for a special topics course focused on large collider experiments. Equally useful as a general guide for physicists designing big detectors. (orig.)

  20. Linear collider accelerator physics issues regarding alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    The next generation of linear colliders will require more stringent alignment tolerances than those for the SLC with regard to the accelerating structures, quadrupoles, and beam position monitors. New techniques must be developed to achieve these tolerances. A combination of mechanical-electrical and beam-based methods will likely be needed

  1. Collider Physics an Experimental Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvezio Pagliarone, Carmine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews shortly a small part of the contents of a set of lectures, presented at the XIV International School of Particles and Fields in Morelia, state of Michoacan, Mexico, during November 2010. The main goal of those lectures was to introduce students to some of the basic ideas and tools required for experimental and phenomenological analysis of collider data. In particular, after an introduction to the scientific motivations, that drives the construction of powerful accelerator complexes, and the need of reaching high center of mass energies and luminosities, some basic concept about collider particle detectors will be discussed. A status about the present running colliders and collider experiments as well as future plans and research and development is also given.

  2. Beam induced hydrodynamic tunneling in the future circular collider components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A future circular collider (FCC has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80–100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t at a typical speed of 850  km/h. Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2 iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the “hydrodynamic tunneling.” These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  3. Beam Induced Hydrodynamic Tunneling in the Future Circular Collider Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    A future circular collider (FCC) has been proposed as a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator, to explore particle physics in unprecedented energy ranges. The FCC is a circular collider in a tunnel with a circumference of 80-100 km. The FCC study puts an emphasis on proton-proton high-energy and electron-positron high-intensity frontier machines. A proton-electron interaction scenario is also examined. According to the nominal FCC parameters, each of the 50 TeV proton beams will carry an amount of 8.5 GJ energy that is equivalent to the kinetic energy of an Airbus A380 (560 t) at a typical speed of 850 km /h . Safety of operation with such extremely energetic beams is an important issue, as off-nominal beam loss can cause serious damage to the accelerator and detector components with a severe impact on the accelerator environment. In order to estimate the consequences of an accident with the full beam accidently deflected into equipment, we have carried out numerical simulations of interaction of a FCC beam with a solid copper target using an energy-deposition code (fluka) and a 2D hydrodynamic code (big2) iteratively. These simulations show that, although the penetration length of a single FCC proton and its shower in solid copper is about 1.5 m, the full FCC beam will penetrate up to about 350 m into the target because of the "hydrodynamic tunneling." These simulations also show that a significant part of the target is converted into high-energy-density matter. We also discuss this interesting aspect of this study.

  4. Accelerator Physics Challenges for Future Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    1999-08-09

    At the present time, there are a number of future linear collider designs with a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV or more with luminosities in excess of 10{sup -34}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} . Many of these designs are at an advanced state of development. However, to attain the high luminosity, the colliders require very small beam emittances, strong focusing, and very good stability. In this paper, some of the outstanding issues related to producing and maintaining the small beam sizes are discussed. Although the different designs are based on very different rf technologies, many of these problems are common.

  5. Physics possibilities of lepton and hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peccei, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    After a brief introduction to lepton and hadron colliders presently being planned, I give some examples of the nice standard physics which is expected to be seen in them. The bulk of the discussion, however, is centered on signals for new physics. Higgs searches at the new colliders are discussed, as well as signatures and prospects for detecting effects of supersymmetry, compositeness and dynamical symmetry breakdown. (orig.)

  6. Collider physics: A theorist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, S.D.

    1986-06-01

    Recent experimental results from the CERN anti p p Collider are reviewed from a theorist's perspective. The conclusion is that the standard model is impressively verified and nothing else seems to be present. Some other relevant phenomenological and theoretical issues are also reviewed

  7. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (4/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  8. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  9. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  10. Physics at Hadronic Colliders (3/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Hadron colliders are often called "discovery machines" since they produce the highest mass particles and thus give often the best chance to discover new high mass particles. Currently they are particularly topical since the Large Hadron Collider will start operating later this year, increasing the centre-of-mass energy by a factor of seven compared to the current highest energy collider, the Tevatron. I will review the benefits and challenges of hadron colliders and review some of the current physics results from the Tevatron and give an outlook to the future results we are hoping for at the LHC. Prerequisite knowledge: Introduction to Particle Physics (F. Close), Detectors (W. Riegler, at least mostly) and The Standard Model (A. Pich)

  11. Flat beams in a 50 TeV hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peggs, S.; Harrison, M.; Pilat, F.; Syphers, M.

    1997-01-01

    The basic beam dynamics of a next generation 50 x 50 TeV hadron collider based on a high field magnet approach have been outlined over the past several years. Radiation damping not only produces small emittances, but also flat beams, just as in electron machines. Based on open-quotes Snowmass 96close quotes parameters, we investigate the issues associated with flat beams in very high energy hadron colliders

  12. Beam dynamics in the final focus section of the future linear collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)739431; TOMAS, Rogelio

    The exploration of new physics in the ``Tera electron-Volt''~(TeV) scale with precision measurements requires lepton colliders providing high luminosities to obtain enough statistics for the particle interaction analysis. In order to achieve design luminosity values, linear colliders feature nanometer beam spot sizes at the Interaction~Point~(IP).\\par In addition to several effects affecting the luminosity, three main issues to achieve the beam size demagnification in the Final Focus Section (FFS) of the accelerator are the chromaticity correction, the synchrotron radiation effects and the correction of the lattice errors.\\par This thesis considers two important aspects for linear colliders: push the limits of linear colliders design, in particular the chromaticity correction and the radiation effects at 3~TeV, and the instrumentation and experimental work on beam stabilization in a test facility.\\par The current linear collider projects, CLIC~\\cite{CLICdes} and ILC~\\cite{ILCdes}, have lattices designed using...

  13. Report of the group on beam-beam effects in circular colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furman, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    We present a summary of the discussions and conclusions of the working group on beam-beam effects for circular colliders. This group was part of the larger beam-beam dynamics group at the 7th ICFA Workshop on Beam Dynamics, on the subject ''Beam-Beam and Beam-Radiation Interactions,'' held at UCLA, May 13--16, 1991. 15 refs

  14. Preliminary design of the beam screen cooling for the Future Circular Collider of hadron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnig, C.; Tavian, L.

    2015-12-01

    Following recommendations of the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. This study considers an option for a very high energy (100 TeV) hadron-hadron collider located in a quasi-circular underground tunnel having a circumference of 80 to 100 km. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy hadron beam increases by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the LHC. To reduce the entropic load on the superconducting magnets’ refrigeration system, beam screens are indispensable to extract the heat load at a higher temperature level. After illustrating the decisive constraints of the beam screen's refrigeration design, this paper presents a preliminary design of the length of a continuous cooling loop comparing helium and neon, for different cooling channel geometries with emphasis on the cooling length limitations and the exergetic efficiency.

  15. Preliminary design of the beam screen cooling for the Future Circular Collider of hadron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kotnig, C

    2015-01-01

    Following recommendations of the recent update of the European strategy in particle physics, CERN has undertaken an international study of possible future circular colliders beyond the LHC. This study considers an option for a very high energy (100 TeV) hadron-hadron collider located in a quasi-circular underground tunnel having a circumference of 80 to 100 km. The synchrotron radiation emitted by the high-energy hadron beam increases by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the LHC. To reduce the entropic load on the superconducting magnets' refrigeration system, beam screens are indispensable to extract the heat load at a higher temperature level. After illustrating the decisive constraints of the beam screen's refrigeration design, this paper presents a preliminary design of the length of a continuous cooling loop comparing helium and neon, for different cooling channel geometries with emphasis on the cooling length limitations and the exergetic efficiency.

  16. Scintillation chamber of calorimeters for colliding beam detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested that the scintillation chamber, a technique first discussed almost thirty years ago, might find application in colliding beam detector systems, in particular as a means of efficiently extracting detailed spatial and energy information from a sampling calorimeter

  17. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e + e - interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL

  18. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  19. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABE, T.; DAWSON, S.; HEINEMEYER, S.; MARCIANO, W.; PAIGE, F.; TURCOT, A.S.; ET

    2001-01-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e + e - linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e + e - linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e + e - linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e + e - experiments can provide

  20. Physics and technology of the next linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The authors present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center-of-mass energy 0.5--1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. The physics goals discussed here are: Standard Model processes and simulation; top quark physics; Higgs boson searches and properties; supersymmetry; anomalous gauge boson couplings; strong WW scattering; new gauge bosons and exotic particles; e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, e{sup {minus}}{gamma}, and {gamma}{gamma} interactions; and precision tests of QCD.

  1. Physics and technology of the next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The authors present the prospects for the next generation of high-energy physics experiments with electron-positron colliding beams. This report summarizes the current status of the design and technological basis of a linear collider of center-of-mass energy 0.5--1.5 TeV, and the opportunities for high-energy physics experiments that this machine is expected to open. The physics goals discussed here are: Standard Model processes and simulation; top quark physics; Higgs boson searches and properties; supersymmetry; anomalous gauge boson couplings; strong WW scattering; new gauge bosons and exotic particles; e - e - , e - γ, and γγ interactions; and precision tests of QCD

  2. Mighty Murines: Neutrino Physics at very high Energy Muon Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    An overview is given of the potential for neutrino physics studies through parasitic use of the intense high energy neutrino beams that would be produced at future many-TeV muon colliders. Neutrino experiments clearly cannot compete with the collider physics. Except at the very highest energy muon colliders, the main thrust of the neutrino physics program would be to improve on the measurements from preceding neutrino experiments at lower energy muon colliders, particularly in the fields of B physics, quark mixing and CP violation. Muon colliders at the 10 TeV energy scale might already produce of order 10 8 B hadrons per year in a favorable and unique enough experimental environment to have some analytical capabilities beyond any of the currently operating or proposed B factories. The most important of the quark mixing measurements at these energies might well be the improved measurements of the important CKM matrix elements |V ub | and |V cb | and, possibly, the first measurements of |V td | in the process of flavor changing neutral current interactions involving a top quark loop. Muon colliders at the highest center-of-mass energies that have been conjectured, 100--1,000 TeV, would produce neutrino beams for neutrino-nucleon interaction experiments with maximum center-of-mass energies from 300--1,000 GeV. Such energies are close to, or beyond, the discovery reach of all colliders before the turn-on of the LHC. In particular, they are comparable to the 314 GeV center-of-mass energy for electron-proton scattering at the currently operating HERA collider and so HERA provides a convenient benchmark for the physics potential. It is shown that these ultimate terrestrial neutrino experiments, should they eventually come to pass, would have several orders of magnitude more luminosity than HERA. This would potentially open up the possibility for high statistics studies of any exotic particles, such as leptoquarks, that might have been previously discovered at these

  3. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Grojean, Christophe; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra; Peskin, Michael E.

    2015-06-01

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  4. Fundamentally new physics at the Tevatron Collider?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Hongmo; Nellen, L.; Tsou Sheungtsun

    1989-02-01

    A new dispersion relation analysis of present pp-bar scattering data suggests the existence by Tevatron Collider energies of a threshold, of such nature, as is unlikely to be explainable in terms of known physics or any of its standard projections. (author)

  5. Physics Case for the International Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Keisuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Grojean, Christophe; /DESY /ICREA, Barcelona; Peskin, Michael E.; Barklow, Tim; /SLAC; Gao, Yuanning; /Tsinghua U., Beijing, CHEP; Kanemura, Shinya; /Toyama U.; Kim, Hyungdo; /Seoul Natl U.; List, Jenny; /DESY; Nojiri, Mihoko; /KEK, Tsukuba; Perelstein, Maxim; /Cornell U., LEPP; Poeschl, Roman; /LAL, Orsay; Reuter, Juergen; /DESY; Simon, Frank; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Tanabe, Tomohiko; /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Yu, Jaehoon; /Texas U., Arlington; Wells, James D.; /Michigan U., MCTP; Murayama, Hitoshi; /UC, Berkeley /LBNL /Tokyo U., IPMU; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; /Tohoku U.

    2015-06-23

    We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.

  6. Accelerator physics and technology challenges of very high energy hadron colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir D.

    2015-08-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present, international particle physics community considers several options for a 100 TeV proton-proton collider as a possible post-LHC energy frontier facility. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but has slowed down considerably in its progress. This paper briefly reviews the accelerator physics and technology challenges of the future very high energy colliders and outlines the areas of required research and development towards their technical and financial feasibility.

  7. Beam-strahlung effects in e-p collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.

    1982-09-01

    The electromagnetic fields produced by one beam in an interaction point of a colliding-beam facility cause to the emission of synchrotron radiation by the other beam. This effect, the beam strahlung, for the e+e - colliders has been considered by several authors, and they have pointed out that the effect is very important consideration at very-high-energy e+e - colliders. At the first glance, the beam-strahlung effect can play an important role in the e-p collision due to the fact that the circulating currents in the collider are much higher than those of the e+e - machine. However the detailed study shows that is not the case because of the collision geometry involved. What follows in this note is the beam-strahlung derivations using the method previously used by Hofmann and Keil. The difference between this note and that of Hofman and Keil is that in the case of e+e - collider, equal mass particles are involved in the consideration and, in the e-p case, the electrons radiate and the protons provide the electromagnetic fields

  8. Beam dynamics verification in linacs of linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    The SLAC two-mile linac has been upgraded to accelerate high current, low emittance electron and positron beams to be used in the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). After the upgrade was completed, extensive beam studies were made to verify that the design criteria have been met. These tests involved the measurement of emittance, beam phase space orientation, energy dispersion, trajectory oscillations, bunch length, energy spectrum and wakefields. The methods, the systems and the data cross checks are compared for the various measurements. Implications for the next linear collider are discussed. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  9. 1st Large Hadron Collider Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Juste, A; Martínez, M; Riu, I; Sorin, V

    2013-01-01

    The conference is the result of merging two series of international conferences, "Physics at Large Hadron Collider" (PLHC2012) and "Hadron Collider Physics Symposium" (HCP2012). With a program devoted to topics such as the Standard Model and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Beauty and Heavy Ion Physics, the conference aims at providing a lively forum for discussion between experimenters and theorists of the latest results and of new ideas. LHCP 2013 will be hosted by IFAE (Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies) in Barcelona (Spain), and will take place from May 13 to 18, 2013. The venue will be the Hotel Catalonia Plaza, Plaza España (Barcelona). More information will be posted soon. For questions, please contact lhcp2013@ifae.es.

  10. Nonlinear interaction of colliding beams in particle storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, J.C.; Month, M.

    1979-01-01

    When two beams of high energy particles moving in opposite directions are brought into collision, a large amount of energy is available for the production of new particles. However to obtain a sufficiently high event rate for rare processes, such as the production of the intermediate vector boson (Z 0 and W +- ), large beam currents are also required. Under this circumstance, the high charge density of one beam results in a classical electromagnetic interaction on the particles in the other beam. This very nonlinear space charge force, caled the beam-beam force, limits the total circulating charge and, thereby, the ultimate performance of the colliding ring system. The basic nature of the beam-beam force is discussed, indicating how it is quite different in the case of continuous beams, which cross each other at an angle as compared to the case of bunched beams which collide head-on. Some experimental observations on the beam-beam interaction in proton-proton and electron-positron beams are then reviewed and interpreted. An important aspect of the beam-beam problem in storage rings is to determine at what point in the analysis of the particle dynamics is it relevant to bring in the concepts of stochasticity, slow diffusion, and resonance overlap. These ideas are briefly discussed

  11. Beauty physics at e+ e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormser, G.

    1989-09-01

    Beauty physics to be performed in the next decade at the resonances Y(4S) and Z 0 are compared. Large similarities are found in the physics program and the reconstruction techniques of Z 0 and asymmetric Y(4S) colliders. The physics potential of the latter is found to be superior at equal luminosity to a symmetric machine, provided a large enough boost (≥ 5). Z 0 machines will probably be the main source of the rich B S 0 physics during that period

  12. Physics at high luminosity muon colliders and a facility overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Physics potentials at future colliders including high luminosity μ + μ - colliders are discussed. Luminosity requirement, estimates for Muon collider energies of interest (0.1 TeV to 100 TeV) are calculated. Schematics and an overview of Muon Collider facility concept are also included

  13. Physics overview: Introduction to international linear collider physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Linear collider; Higgs boson; unified theory; dark matter. PACS Nos 29.17. ... to confidence that gauge symmetry is a guiding principle of the law of elementary ... physics beyond the standard model, and each model offers different scenario for.

  14. Beam dynamics issues of high-luminosity asymmetric collider rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    Machines for use in high-energy physics are advancing along two frontiers. First, there is the frontier of energy, currently being pressed by the Fermilab collider (p bar p), and SLC and LEP (e + e - ) and in the near future by HERA (ep), the LHC, and the SSC (pp). Second, there is the frontier of intensity, currently being pressed by a variety of low-energy machines and, at higher energies, by various linacs such as those at KEK. Fermilab, GSI, and LAMPF (p) and CEBAF (e - ). In the future there should be, along this frontier, various ''factories'' such as those for Kaons at TRIUMF, and those proposed for var-phi mesons, τ-charm particles, and B mesons. It is with the intensity frontier that these proceedings are concerned. The elementary particle motivation to study the nonconservation of PC in the B-stringB system (which topic is not covered in these Proceedings, but is treated extensively in the literature) has motivated the study of very high intensity asymmetric collider rings. It was for this purpose that a Workshop on Beam Dynamics Issues of High-Luminosity Asymmetric Collider Rings was held, in Berkeley, during February 12--16, 1990. A general introduction to the subject has been given in an article which is reprinted here as an Appendix. The nonexpert may wish to start there. The volume consists of four parts. The first part consists of Summaries; first an overall summary of the Workshop and then, second, more detailed summaries from each of the working groups. The second part consists of the Invited Talks at the workshop. The third part contains various Contributed Papers, most of which represent work that came out of the workshop. Finally, there are, in the fourth part, brief Summaries of the Various Proposed B-Factory Projects in the world

  15. Physics Opportunities at the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeck, Albert de

    2006-01-01

    In about two years time the LHC is scheduled to deliver its first pp collisions at a centre of mass energy of 14 TeV. The LHC is expected to open up the discovery of new physics at the TeV scale, and give the final answer on the Standard Model Higgs. The LHC will however also be a tool for precision physics. Furthermore LHC is also a pA and AA collider. This report summarizes some of the physics opportunities of the LHC

  16. Status of the SLC: Developments in Linear Collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejcik, P.

    1994-11-01

    This paper reviews the performance of the SLAC Linear Collider, both from the perspective of a machine delivering high luminosity polarized beams for physics, and as a test for future linear colliders. The development of the SLC taken place over a number of years and the steady improvements have been documented in previous review papers. As a review paper, the list references also serves as a bibliography, pointing to the work of the many people contributing to the upgrades and commissioning of the various SLC systems. The major upgrades for this present run have been an improved final focus optics, new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings and improved polarization from the electron source. The performance of the SLC is driven to some extent by its unique 3-beam operation in which the linac accelerates both the electron and positron bunches for collision, as well as the electron bunch to produce the positrons. The special attention required to maintain stable operation in the face of the interactions caused by beam loading from the bunches will (fortunately exclamation point) not be an issue in future linear colliders. They will deal instead with the problems associated with handling long bunch trains

  17. Investigation of beam self-polarization in the future e+e− circular collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075800

    2016-10-24

    The use of resonant depolarization has been suggested for precise beam energy measurements (better than 100 keV) in the eþe− Future Circular Collider (FCC-eþe−) for Z and WW physics at 45 and 80 GeV beam energy respectively. Longitudinal beam polarization would benefit the Z peak physics program; however it is not essential and therefore it will be not investigated here. In this paper the possibility of selfpolarized leptons is considered. Preliminary results of simulations in presence of quadrupole misalignments and beam position monitors (BPMs) errors for a simplified FCC-eþe− ring are presented.

  18. Investigation of beam self-polarization in the future e^{+}e^{-} circular collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gianfelice-Wendt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of resonant depolarization has been suggested for precise beam energy measurements (better than 100 keV in the e^{+}e^{-} Future Circular Collider (FCC-e^{+}e^{-} for Z and WW physics at 45 and 80 GeV beam energy respectively. Longitudinal beam polarization would benefit the Z peak physics program; however it is not essential and therefore it will be not investigated here. In this paper the possibility of self-polarized leptons is considered. Preliminary results of simulations in presence of quadrupole misalignments and beam position monitors (BPMs errors for a simplified FCC-e^{+}e^{-} ring are presented.

  19. Investigation of beam self-polarization in the future e+e- circular collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.

    2016-10-01

    The use of resonant depolarization has been suggested for precise beam energy measurements (better than 100 keV) in the e+e- Future Circular Collider (FCC-e+e-) for Z and W W physics at 45 and 80 GeV beam energy respectively. Longitudinal beam polarization would benefit the Z peak physics program; however it is not essential and therefore it will be not investigated here. In this paper the possibility of self-polarized leptons is considered. Preliminary results of simulations in presence of quadrupole misalignments and beam position monitors (BPMs) errors for a simplified FCC-e+e- ring are presented.

  20. Physics with e+e- Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklow, Timothy L

    2003-01-01

    We describe the physics potential of e + e - linear colliders in this report. These machines are planned to operate in the first phase at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, before being scaled up to about 1 TeV. In the second phase of the operation, a final energy of about 2 TeV is expected. The machines will allow us to perform precision tests of the heavy particles in the Standard Model, the top quark and the electroweak bosons. They are ideal facilities for exploring the properties of Higgs particles, in particular in the intermediate mass range. New vector bosons and novel matter particles in extended gauge theories can be searched for and studied thoroughly. The machines provide unique opportunities for the discovery of particles in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the spectrum of Higgs particles, the supersymmetric partners of the electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons, and of the matter particles. High precision analyses of their properties and interactions will allow for extrapolations to energy scales close to the Planck scale where gravity becomes significant. In alternative scenarios, like compositeness models, novel matter particles and interactions can be discovered and investigated in the energy range above the existing colliders up to the TeV scale. Whatever scenario is realized in Nature, the discovery potential of e + e - linear colliders and the high-precision with which the properties of particles and their interactions can be analyzed, define an exciting physics programme complementary to hadron machines

  1. Two gauge boson physics at future colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, R.N.

    1988-01-01

    Electroweak unification suggests that there should be WW and ZZ physics analogous to γγ physics. Indeed, WW and ZZ collisions will provide an opportunity to search for the Higgs boson at future high energy colliders. Cross sections in the picobarn range are predicted for Higgs boson production at the proposed 40-TeV SSC. While other states may be produced by WW and ZZ collisions, it is the Higgs boson that looms as the most attractive objective. 31 refs., 5 figs

  2. Physics at international linear collider (ILC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2007-01-01

    International Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with the initial center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV which is upgradable to about 1 TeV later on. Its goal is to study the physics at TeV scale with unprecedented high sensitivities. The main topics include precision measurements of the Higgs particle properties, studies of supersymmetric particles and the underlying theoretical structure if supersymmetry turns out to be realized in nature, probing alternative possibilities for the origin of mass, and the cosmological connections thereof. In many channels, Higgs and leptonic sector in particular, ILC is substantially more sensitive than LHC, and is complementary to LHC overall. In this short article, we will have a quick look at the capabilities of ILC. (author)

  3. Beam dynamics problems for next generation linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoya, Kaoru

    1990-01-01

    The most critical issue for the feasibility of high-energy e + e - linear colliders is obviously the development of intense microwave power sources. Remaining problems, however, are not trivial and in fact some of them require several order-of-magnitude improvement from the existing SLC parameters. The present report summarizes the study status of the beam dynamics problems of high energy linear colliders with an exaggeration on the beam-beam phenomenon at the interaction region. There are four laboratories having linear collider plans, SLAC, CERN, Novosibirsk-Protovino, and KEK. The parameters of these projects scatter in some range but seem to converge slowly if one recalls the status five years ago. The beam energy will be below 500GeV. The basic requirements to the damping ring are the short damping time and small equilibrium emittance. All the proposed designs make use of tight focusing optics and strong wiggler magnets to meet these requirements and seem to have no major problems at least compared with other problems in the colliders. One of the major problems in the linac is the transverse beam blow-up due to the wake field created by the head of the bunch and, in the case of multiple bunches per pulse, by the preceeding bunches. (N.K.)

  4. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group: Progress report, March 1, 1988--February 28, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    This report discusses work carried out by the High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group at the University of Maryland. Particular topics discussed are: OPAL experiment at LEP; deep inelastic muon interactions; B physics with the CLEO detector at CESR; further results from JADE; and search for ''small'' violation of the Pauli principle

  5. LINEAR COLLIDER PHYSICS RESOURCE BOOK FOR SNOWMASS 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ABE,T.; DAWSON,S.; HEINEMEYER,S.; MARCIANO,W.; PAIGE,F.; TURCOT,A.S.; ET AL

    2001-05-03

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments can provide.

  6. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E

    2001-06-05

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide.

  7. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Aaron Owen

    2011-01-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron

  8. Next generation of electron-positron colliding beam machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1979-03-01

    The contribution of electron-positron colliding beam experiments to high-energy physics in the 1970's has been prodigious. From the research done with the two highest-energy e + e - machines of the present generation of these devices, have come such things as the discovery and illumination of the properties of the psi family, charmed particles, a new heavy lepton, non-ambigious evidence for hadronic jets, etc. The rapid pace of new developments in physics from such machines comes about for two reasons. First, the electron-positron annihilation process at present energies is particularly simple and well understood, making the problem of determining the quantum numbers and properties of new particles particularly simple. Second, in electron-positron annihilation all final states are on a relatively equal footing, and small production cross sections are compensated for by a lack of confusing background. For example, the rate of production of charmed particles at the SPEAR storage ring at SLAC and the DORIS storage ring at DESY is 3 or 4 orders of magnitude less than the rate of production at FNAL and the SPS. Yet these particles were first found at the storage rings where the background cross sections are comparable to the signal cross section, and have not yet been observed directly by their hadronic decays at the proton machines where the background cross sections are 4 orders of magnitude larger than the signal cross sections. The machines PEP at SLAC and PETRA at DESY will soon be operating at 35 to 40 GeV cm to explore new regions of energy. Studies of electron-positron annihilation at much higher energies than presently planned have a great deal to teach, not only about particle structure and dynamics, but also about the nature of the weak interaction. Some of the physics which can be done with such machines is discussed with a view toward getting an idea of the minimum required energy for the new generation of colliding beam devices

  9. Electroweak physics at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aihara, H.

    1993-08-01

    Preliminary results on electroweak physics from the 1992--1993 run with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Tevatron collider are presented. New measurements of the ratio of the W and Z production cross sections times the branching fractions for subsequent decay into leptons are shown. The W width, Γ(W), and a limit on the top-quark mass independent of decay mode are extracted. The status of a measurement of the charge asymmetry of electrons from W decay is given. Also shown are a study of diboson (Wγ, Zγ and WZ) production and a search for a new neutral gauge boson (Z')

  10. Numerical Integration of the Vlasov Equation of Two Colliding Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Zorzano-Mier, M P

    2000-01-01

    In a circular collider the motion of particles of one beam is strongly perturbed at the interaction points by the electro-magnetic field associated with the counter-rotating beam. For any two arbitrary initial particle distributions the time evolution of the two beams can be known by solving the coupled system of two Vlasov equations. This collective description is mandatory when the two beams have similar strengths, as in the case of LEP or LHC. The coherent modes excited by this beam-beam interaction can be a strong limitation for the operation of LHC. In this work, the coupled Vlasov equations of two colliding flat beams are solved numerically using a finite difference scheme. The results suggest that, for the collision of beams with equal tunes, the tune shift between the $\\sigma$- and $\\pi$- coherent dipole mode depends on the unperturbed tune $q$ because of the deformation that the so-called dynamic beta effect induces on the beam distribution. Only when the unperturbed tune $q\\rightarrow 0.25$ this tun...

  11. Colliding-beams polarized ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trainor, T.A.; Douglas, J.G.; Badt, D.; Christiensen, C.; Herron, A.; Leach, D.; Olsen, J.; Osborne, J.L.; Zeps, V.

    1985-01-01

    This ion source was to be purchased from ANAC, Inc., a New Zealand-based supplier of beam optics hardware and atomic beam polarized ion sources in December 1982. Shortly before scheduled delivery ANAC went into receivership. During 1983 little work was done on the project as various steps were taken by us, first to get the ion source completed at ANAC, and then, failing that, to obtain the existing parts. In early 1984 we began work to finish the ion source in Seattle. The project is nearly complete, and this article presents progress to date. 2 refs

  12. QCD and panti p collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.

    1983-01-01

    The relevance for QCD of experiments at the SPS collider rests on the possibility they offer of testing parton dynamics in a new and highly non trivial configuration. For example, hadron-hadron interactions in the deep inelastic, large Psub(perpendicular to), region are non linear in parton densities. Also the relevant predictions cannot be derived by less committed formulations than the explicit QCD improved parton model, as for example light cone dominance and operator expansion. This complexity, which is important for providing qualitatively new testing grounds is however paid for by a loss of precision in predictive power. In addition to that, panti p collisions are also important as jet sources with an energy scale comparable to that of an e + e - ring with beam energy up to 50 GeV and more. (orig./HSI)

  13. The beam-beam limit in asymmetric colliders: Optimization of the B-factory parameter base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a general theory of the beam-beam limit in symmetric and asymmetric lepton ring colliders. It shows how the beam-beam limit in these accelerators affects the maximum attainable luminosity and presents a specific algorithm for parameter base optimization. It is shown that the special problems inherent in asymmetric colliders derive not from the asymmetry, but from the fact that the two beams must be in different rings. Computer simulation experiments are used to demonstrate the various phenomena discussed in the theory

  14. Scraping beam halo in {mu} {sup +} {mu} {sup minus} colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozhdin, A.; Mokhov, N.; Johnstone, C.; Wan, W.; Garren, A.

    1998-01-01

    Beam halo scraping schemes have been explored in the 50 x 50 GeV and 2 x 2 TeV {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} colliders using both absorbers and electrostatic deflectors. Utility sections have been specially designed into the rings for scraping. Results of realistic STRUCT- MARS Monte-Carlo simulations show that for the low-energy machine a scheme with a 5 m long steel absorber suppresses losses in the interaction region by three orders of magnitude. The same scraping efficiency at 2 TeV is achieved only by complete extraction of beam halo from the machine. The effect of beam-induced power dissipation in the collider superconducting magnets and detector backgrounds is shown both for the first few turns after injection and for the rest of the cycle.

  15. A DSP based data acquisition module for colliding beam accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, J.A.; Shea, T.J.

    1995-10-01

    In 1999, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory will accelerate and store two beams of gold ions. The ions will then collide head on at a total energy of nearly 40 trillion electron volts. Attaining these conditions necessitates real-time monitoring of beam parameters and for this purpose a flexible data acquisition platform has been developed. By incorporating a floating point digital signal processor (DSP) and standard input/output modules, this system can acquire and process data from a variety of beam diagnostic devices. The DSP performs real time corrections, filtering, and data buffering to greatly reduce control system computation and bandwidth requirements. We will describe the existing hardware and software while emphasizing the compromises required to achieve a flexible yet cost effective system. Applications in several instrumentation systems currently construction will also be presented

  16. Beam-Beam Effects in the SPS Proton-Anti Proton Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Cornelis, K.

    2014-01-01

    During the proton-anti proton collider run several experiments were carried out in order to understand the effect of the beam-beam interaction on backgrounds and lifetimes. In this talk a selection of these experiments will be presented. From these experiments, the importance of relative beam sizes and tune ripple could be demonstrated.

  17. Compensated linac beam colliding with a stored beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csonka, P.L.; Oregon Univ., Eugene

    1981-01-01

    The disruptive effect of a linac beam on a beam circulating in a storage ring can be reduced by compensating for the space charge of the linac beam with a beam which is oppositely charged, may have different bunchlength as well as lower energy, and need not be circulating in a storage ring. (orig.)

  18. Combined phenomena of beam-beam and beam-electron cloud interactionsin circular e^{+}e^{-} colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito Ohmi

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available An electron cloud causes various effects in high intensity positron storage rings. The positron beam and the electron cloud can be considered a typical two-stream system with a certain plasma frequency. Beam-beam interaction is another important effect for high luminosity circular colliders. Colliding two beams can be considered as a two-stream system with another plasma frequency. We study the combined phenomena of the beam-electron cloud and beam-beam interactions from a viewpoint of two complex two-stream effects with two plasma frequencies.

  19. A decade of colliding proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A description is given of the history of the CERN ISR. After the description of the performance including the application of superconducting magnets the physics studied with this storage ring are considered. (HSI).

  20. FIRST BEAM TESTS OF THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET TEST BEAM LINE AT THE AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, K.A.; GASSNER, D.; GLENN, J.W.; PRIGL, R.; SIMOS, N.; SCADUTO, J.; TSOUPAS, N.

    2001-01-01

    In this report we will describe the muon collider target test beam line which operates off one branch of the AGS switchyard. The muon collider target test facility is designed to allow a prototype muon collider target system to be developed and studied. The beam requirements for the facility are ambitious but feasible. The system is designed to accept bunched beams of intensities up to 1.6 x 10 13 24 GeV protons in a single bunch. The target specifications require beam spot sizes on the order of 1 mm, 1 sigma rms at the maximum intensity. We will describe the optics design, the instrumentation, and the shielding design. Results from the commissioning of the beam line will be shown

  1. Symmetrization of the beam-beam interaction in an asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.H.

    1990-07-01

    This paper studies the idea of symmetrizing both the lattice and the beams of an asymmetric collider, and discusses why this regime should be within the parametric reach of the design in order to credibly ensure its performance. Also examined is the effectiveness of a simple compensation method using the emittance as a free parameter and that it does not work in all cases. At present, when there are no existing asymmetric colliders, it seems prudent to design an asymmetric collider so as to be similar to a symmetric one (without relying on a particular theory of the asymmetric beam-beam interaction that has not passed tests of fidelity). Nevertheless, one must allow for the maximum possible flexibility and freedom in adjusting those parameters that affect luminosity. Such a parameter flexibility will be essential in tuning the collider to the highest luminosity

  2. Renormalization theory of beam-beam interaction in electron-positron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.H.

    1989-07-01

    This note is devoted to explaining the essence of the renormalization theory of beam-beam interaction for carrying out analytical calculations of equilibrium particle distributions in electron-positron colliding beam storage rings. Some new numerical examples are presented such as for betatron tune dependence of the rms beam size. The theory shows reasonably good agreements with the results of computer simulations. 5 refs., 6 figs

  3. Precise and fast beam energy measurement at the international linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viti, Michele

    2010-02-01

    The international Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with a center-of-mass energy between 200 and 500 GeV and a peak luminosity of 2 . 10 34 cm -2 s -1 . For the physics program at this machine, an excellent bunch-by-bunch control of the beam energy is mandatory. Several techniques are foreseen to be implemented at the ILC in order to achieve this request. Energy spectrometers upstream and downstream of the electron/positron interaction point were proposed and the present default option for the upstream spectrometer is a beam position monitor based (BPM-based) spectrometer. In 2006/2007, a prototype of such a device was commissioned at the End Station A beam line at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in order to study performance and reliability. In addition, a novel method based on laser Compton backscattering has been proposed, since as proved at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), complementary methods are necessary to cross-check the results of the BPM-based spectrometer. In this thesis, an overview of the experiment at End Station A is given, with emphasis on the performance of the magnets in the chicane and first energy resolution estimations. Also, the novel Compton backscattering method is discussed in details and found to be very promising. It has the potential to bring the beam energy resolution well below the requirement of ΔE b /E b =10 -4 . (orig.)

  4. 'TRISTAN'; a database for electron colliding beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Y.; Igarashi, M.; Nakazawa, N.; Oyanagi, Y.

    1982-01-01

    In this data base, the reference papers on the experiments of positron-electron colliding beam were collected for the purpose to utilize them for the TRISTAN project. The on-line retrieval of the references is possible. The number of the references is 289 during the period from January, 1974, to September, 1981. The collection of data will be continued hereafter. The terms retrievable are accelerator, incident beam, code, and radiation correction formula. The SC (name of the first author, year), incident energy, detector, luminocity, integrated luminosity, reaction, purpose and comments are also included as the data. The system is written in FORTRAN 77, and is portable. (Kato, T.)

  5. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: OPAL experiment at LEP; Dφ experiment at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon interactions at TEV II; CYGNUS experiment; final results from ν e -e elastic scattering; physics with CLEO detector at CESR; results from JADE at PETRA; rare kaon-decay experiment at BNL; search for top quark; and super conducting super collider activities

  6. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KING,B.J.

    2000-05-05

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and hadron colliders and three {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  7. PROSPECTS FOR COLLIDERS AND COLLIDER PHYSICS TO THE 1 PEV ENERGY SCALE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KING, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing the authors progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC--one each of e + e - and hadron colliders and three μ + μ - colliders--and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R and D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory

  8. Prospects for colliders and collider physics to the 1 PeV energy scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bruce J.

    2000-08-01

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing our progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC—one each of e+e- and hadron colliders and three μ+μ- colliders — and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R&D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory.

  9. MD 979: Beta-beating measurements on colliding beams

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves Jorge, Patrik; Pieloni, Tatiana; Buffat, Xavier; Carlier, Felix Simon; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Fol, Elena; Langner, Andy Sven; Medina Medrano, Luis Eduardo; Olexa, Jakub; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Valuch, Daniel; Wegscheider, Andreas; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The HL-LHC high brightness beams will give a large β-beating due to the head-on and long-range interactions since a beam-beam parameter of 0.01 per Interaction Point (IP) is expected. The β-heating induced by two head-on collision reaches 15%. A third IP, i.e. IP8, could bring the β-heating up to 24%. The aim of the Machine Development (MD) study was to test optics measurements with AC dipole and ADT on colliding beams at injection and to implement a correction of the β-heating due to to head-on collision in the two experiments IP1&5. Int his note, we summarize the first results of this test performed in the LHC.

  10. Electron-positron colliders: looking at future physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-12-15

    With research and development work underway throughout the world towards high energy electron-positron linear colliders, interest turns to the new physics these machines would open up. The first International Workshop on Physics and Experiments with Linear Colliders was held recently in Selkirk's in Finnish Lapland - some 300 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle.

  11. Electron-positron colliders: looking at future physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    With research and development work underway throughout the world towards high energy electron-positron linear colliders, interest turns to the new physics these machines would open up. The first International Workshop on Physics and Experiments with Linear Colliders was held recently in Selkirk's in Finnish Lapland - some 300 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle

  12. Intense beams at the micron level for the Next Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeman, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    High brightness beams with sub-micron dimensions are needed to produce a high luminosity for electron-positron collisions in the Next Linear Collider (NLC). To generate these small beam sizes, a large number of issues dealing with intense beams have to be resolved. Over the past few years many have been successfully addressed but most need experimental verification. Some of these issues are beam dynamics, emittance control, instrumentation, collimation, and beam-beam interactions. Recently, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) has proven the viability of linear collider technology and is an excellent test facility for future linear collider studies

  13. Beam-beam instability driven by wakefield effects in linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, R; Schulte, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The vertical beam profile distortions induced by wakefield effects in linear colliders (the so-called ``banana effect'') generate a beam-beam instability at the collision point when the vertical disruption parameter is large. We illustrate this effect in the case of the TESLA linear collider project. We specify the tolerance on the associated emittance growth, which translates into tolerances on injection jitter and, for a given tuning procedure, on structure misalignments. We look for possible cures based on fast orbit correction at the interaction point and using a fast luminosity monitor.

  14. Future e+e- linear colliders and beam-beam effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-05-01

    Numerous concepts, ranging from conventional to highly exotic, hae been proposed for the acceleration of electrons and positrons to very high energies. For any such concept to be viable, it must be possible to produce from it a set of consistent parameters for one of these ''benchmark'' machines. Attention is directed to the choice of parameters for a collider in the 300 GeV energy range, operating at a gradient on the order of 200 MV/m, using X-band power sources to drive a conventional disk-loaded accelerating structure. These rf power sources, while not completely conventional represent a reasonable extrapolation from present technology. The choice of linac parameters is strongly coupled to various beam-beam effects which take place when the electron and positron bunches collide. We summarize these beam-beam effects, and then return to the rf design of a 650 GeV center-of-mass collider. 14 refs

  15. Beam Optics for FCC-ee Collider Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Oide, Katsunobu; Aumon, S; Benedikt, M; Blondel, A; Bogomyagkov, A V; Boscolo, M; Burkhardt, H; Cai, Y; Doblhammer, A; Haerer, B; Holzer, B; Koop, I; Koratzinos, M; Jowett, John M; Levichev, E B; Medina, L; Ohmi, K; Papaphilippou, Y; Piminov, P A; Shatilov, D N; Sinyatkin, S V; Sullivan, M; Wenninger, J; Wienands, U; Zhou, D; Zimmermann, F

    2017-01-01

    A beam optics scheme has been designed [ 1 ] for the Future Circular Collider- e + e − (FCC-ee). The main characteristics of the design are: beam energy 45 to 175 GeV, 100 km circumference with two interaction points (IPs) per ring, horizontal crossing angle of 30 mrad at the IP and the crab-waist scheme [ 2 ] with local chromaticity correction. The crab-waist scheme is implemented within the local chromaticity correction system without additional sextupoles, by reducing the strength of one of the two sextupoles for vertical chromatic correction at each side of the IP. So- called “tapering" of the magnets is applied, which scales all fields of the magnets according to the local beam energy to compensate for the effect of synchrotron radiation (SR) loss along the ring. An asymmetric layout near the interaction region reduces the critical energy of SR photons on the incoming side of the IP to values below 100 keV, while matching the geometry to the beam line of the FCC proton collider (FCC-hh) [ 3 ] as clos...

  16. ISABELLE: a 200 + 200 GeV colliding beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.

    1977-01-01

    Plans are under way for the construction of a pair of intersecting storage rings providing for colliding beams of protons of energy at least 200 GeV. The rings (circumference 2.62 km) will contain superconducting magnets constructed with braided Nb--Ti filamentary wire, with a peak field of 4.0 T corresponding to an energy of 200 GeV. A current of 10 A of protons will be injected at 29 GeV from the existing AGS accelerator at Brookhaven, using the energy stacking technique similar to that employed at the CERN ISR; subsequently the stored beam will be accelerated gradually in the storage rings. Six intersection areas will be provided for experiments. They are designed to provide flexibility in beam characteristics for different experiments. The maximum luminosity at full energy is expected to be 1.0 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 , at 29 GeV it will be approximately 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . Recent work with prototype magnets indicates that fields of 5.0 T can be produced. This has led to an alternative design of somewhat larger rings (circumference 3.77 km) that should be capable of providing colliding beams at 400 + 400 GeV

  17. Physics of (very) high energy e+-e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1984-10-01

    I review the physics capabilities of e + e - colliders of hundred GeV to TeV center-of-mass energies, emphasizing issues relevant to the physics of symmetry breaking in the weak interactions. 24 references

  18. Controlling multibunch beam breakup in TeV linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.A.; Ruth, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    To obtain luminosities near 10 34 cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/ in a TeV linear collider, it will probably be essential to accelerate many bunches per RF fill in order to increase the energy transfer efficiency. In this paper we study the transverse dynamics of multiple bunches in a linac, and we examine the effects of several methods of controlling the beam blow-up that would otherwise be induced by transverse dipole wake fields. The methods we study are: damping the transverse modes, adjusting the frequency of the dominant transverse modes so that bunches may be placed near zero-crossings of the transverse wake, and bunch-to-bunch variation of the transverse focusing. We study the utility of these cures in the main linacs of an example of a TeV collider. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  19. The super collider transverse feedback system for suppression of the emittance growth and beam instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    A super collider transverse feedback system designed to suppress injection errors, emittance growth due to external noises, and beam instabilities is considered. It is supposed that the feedback system should consist of two circuits: an injection damper operating just after injection and a super damper. To damp the emittance growth, the superdamper has to operate with the ultimate decrement close to the revolution frequency. The physics of such a feedback system and its main limitations are discussed. 9 refs.; 21 figs.; 1 tab

  20. Beam tube vacuum in future superconducting proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, W.

    1994-10-01

    The beam tube vacuum requirements in future superconducting proton colliders that have been proposed or discussed in the literature -- SSC, LHC, and ELN -- are reviewed. The main beam tube vacuum problem encountered in these machines is how to deal with the magnitude of gas desorption and power deposition by synchrotron radiation while satisfying resistivity, impedance, and space constraints in the cryogenic environment of superconducting magnets. A beam tube vacuum model is developed that treats photodesorption of tightly bound H, C, and 0, photodesorption of physisorbed molecules, and the isotherm vapor pressure of H 2 . Experimental data on cold tube photodesorption experiments are reviewed and applied to model calculations of beam tube vacuum performance for simple cold beam tube and liner configurations. Particular emphasis is placed on the modeling and interpretation of beam tube photodesorpiion experiments at electron synchrotron light sources. The paper also includes discussion of the constraints imposed by beam image current heating, the growth rate of the resistive wall instability, and single-bunch instability impedance limits

  1. Beam Trajectory control of the future Compact LInear Collider beam

    CERN Document Server

    Balik, G; Bolzon, B; Brunetti, L; Caron, B; Deleglise, G; Jeremie, A; Le Breton, R; Lottin, J; Pacquet, L

    2011-01-01

    The future Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) currently under design at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) would create high-energy particle collisions between electrons and positrons, and provide a tool for scientists to address many of the most compelling questions about the fundamental nature of matter, energy, space and time. In accelerating structure, it is well-established that vibrations generated by the ground motion constitute the main limiting factors for reaching the luminosity of 10^34 cm-2s-1. Several methods have been proposed to counteract this phenomena and active vibration controls based on the integration of mechatronic systems into the machine structure is probably one of the most promising. This paper studies the strategy of the vibration suppression. Active vibration control methods, such as optimized parameter of a numerical compensator, adaptive algorithm with real time control are investigated and implemented in the simulation layout. The requirement couldn’t be achieved w...

  2. Quadrupole modes in linearized beam-beam interaction in e+e- colliding rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Shuji; Hirata, Kohji.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic-beta model is extended, incorporating the synchrotron radiation effects. The model yields dynamic-emittance effect. The steady-state envelope matrix is explicitly obtained. Both equal-beam and flip-flop solutions are found. The stability of the steady-state solutions are investigated by numerical calculations. The model illustrates some characteristic features of the beam-beam interaction at e + e - colliding rings in spite of containing some qualitatively unrealistic points. (author)

  3. Standard model Higgs physics at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this report we briefly review the experimental status and prospects to verify the Higgs mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. The focus is on the most relevant aspects of the phenomenology of the Standard Model Higgs boson at current (Tevatron) and future (Large Hadron Collider, LHC and International Linear Collider, ILC) particle colliders. We review the Standard Model searches: searches at the Tevatron, the program planned at the LHC and prospects at the ILC. Emphasis is put on what follows after a candidate discovery at the LHC: the various measurements which are necessary to precisely determine what the properties of this Higgs candidate are. (author)

  4. Beam dynamics in a TeV linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoya, Kaoru

    1984-01-01

    The author's group at KEK has investigated the feasibility of an electron-positron linear collider of 1x1 TeV region using the Lasertron. In this report, three major problems are discussed. That is, beam-beam interaction; beam instability in the linac; and the damping ring. As the most important parameter, the luminosity of the linear collider is analyzed, taking into account the pinch effect and the beamstrahlung. The problems in the development of final focusing system are also considered. As for the wake field in the linac, the transverse wake field is more important than the longitudinal one. The misalignment of cavity is discussed as a cause of inducing the transverse wake field. Finally, the design requirement for the damping ring is considered, and the values of some important design parameters are given: These include energy, radius, bending radius, number of bunch, transverse damping time, natural emittance, vertical-horizontal coupling, the time constant of extraction kicker, and the structure of the FODO cell. (Aoki, K.)

  5. Long-range beam-beam experiments in the relativistic heavy ion collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calaga, R; Fischer, W; Milas, N; Robert-Demolaize, G

    2014-01-01

    Long-range beam-beam effects are a potential limit to the LHC performance with the nominal design parameters, and certain upgrade scenarios under discussion. To mitigate long-range effects, current carrying wires parallel to the beam were proposed and space is reserved in the LHC for such wires. Two current carrying wires were installed in RHIC to study the effect of strong long-range beam-beam effects in a collider, as well as test the compensation of a single long-range interaction. The experimental data were used to benchmark simulations. We summarize this work

  6. Beam parameter measurements for the SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Blocker, C.; Breidenbach, M.

    1982-01-01

    A stable, closely-controlled, high-intensity, single-bunch beam will be required for the SLAC Linear Collider. The characteristics of short-pulse, low-intensity beams in the SLAC linac have been studied. A new, high-intensity thermionic gun, subharmonic buncher and S-band buncher/accelerator section were installed recently at SLAC. With these components, up to 10 11 electrons in a single S-band bunch are available for injection into the linac. the first 100-m accelerator sector has been modified to allow control of short-pulse beams by a model-driven computer program. Additional instrumentation, including a computerized energy analyzer and emittance monitor have been added at the end of the 100-m sector. The beam intensity, energy spectrum, emittance, charge distribution and the effect of wake fields in the first accelerator sector have been measured. The new source and beam control system will be described and the most recent results of the beam parameter measurements will be discussed

  7. Working group report: Collider and B physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The activities of the working group including some of the seminars are summarized. The written ... The search for supersymmetry at future colliders also received a lot of attention. It is believed that ..... Then the kinematic regions can be divided.

  8. Working group report: Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cally viable physics issues at two hadron colliders currently under operation, the p¯p collider ... corrections to different SM processes are very important. ... Keeping all these in mind and the available skills and interests of the ... relation involving the masses of the Standard Model particles as well as the masses of any.

  9. Neutrino and muon physics in the collider mode of future accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rujula, A. de; Rueckl, R.

    1984-01-01

    Extracted beams and fixed target facilities at future colliders (the SSC and the LHC) may be (respectively) impaired by economic and 'ecological' considerations. Neutrino and muon physics in the multi-TeV range would appear not to be an option for these machines. We partially reverse this conclusion by estimating the characteristics of the 'prompt' νsub(μ), νsub(e), νsub(tau) and μ beams necessarily produced (for free) at the pp or anti pp intersections. The neutrino beams from a high luminosity (pp) collider are not much less intense than the neutrino beam from the collider's dump, but require no muon shielding. The muon beams from the same intersections are intense and energetic enough to study μp and μN interactions with considerable statistics and a Q 2 -coverage well beyond the presently available one. The physics program allowed by these lepton beams is a strong advocate of machines with the highest possible luminosity: pp (not anti pp) colliders. (orig.)

  10. Study for a failsafe trigger generation system for the Large Hadron Collider beam dump kicker magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Rampl, M

    1999-01-01

    The 27 km-particle accelerator Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will be completed at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) in 2005, will work with extremely high beam energies (~334 MJ per beam). Since the equipment and in particular the superconducting magnets must be protected from damage caused by these high energy beams the beam dump must be able to absorb this energy very reliable at every stage of operation. The kicker magnets that extract the particles from the accelerator are synchronised with the beam by the trigger generation system. This thesis is a first study for this electronic module and its functions. A special synchronisation circuit and a very reliable electronic switch were developed. Most functions were implemented in a Gate-Array to improve the reliability and to facilitate modifications during the test stage. This study also comprises the complete concept for the prototype of the trigger generation system. During all project stages reliability was always the main determin...

  11. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics: OPAL experiment at LEP; D{phi} experiment at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon interactions at TEV II; CYGNUS experiment; final results from {nu}{sub e}{sup {minus}e} elastic scattering; physics with CLEO detector at CESR; results from JADE at PETRA; rare kaon-decay experiment at BNL; search for top quark; and super conducting super collider activities.

  12. Two Complementary Strategies for New Physics Searches at Lepton Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooberman, Benjamin Henry [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2009-07-06

    In this thesis I present two complementary strategies for probing beyond-the-Standard Model physics using data collected in e+e- collisions at lepton colliders. One strategy involves searching for effects at low energy mediated by new particles at the TeV mass scale, at which new physics is expected to manifest. Several new physics scenarios, including Supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness, may lead to observable rates for charged lepton-flavor violating processes, which are forbidden in the Standard Model. I present a search for lepton-flavor violating decays of the Υ(3S) using data collected with the BABAR detector. This study establishes the 90% confidence level upper limits BF(Υ(3S) → eτ) < 5.0 x 10-6 and BF(Υ(3S) → μτ) < 4.1 x 10-6 which are used to place constraints on new physics contributing to lepton-flavor violation at the TeV mass scale. An alternative strategy is to increase the collision energy above the threshold for new particles and produce them directly. I discuss research and development efforts aimed at producing a vertex tracker which achieves the physics performance required of a high energy lepton collider. A small-scale vertex tracker prototype is constructed using Silicon sensors of 50 μm thickness and tested using charged particle beams. This tracker achieves the targeted impact parameter resolution of σLP = (5⊕10 GeV/pT) as well as a longitudinal vertex resolution of (260 ± 10) μm, which is consistent with the requirements of a TeV-scale lepton collider. This detector research and development effort must be motivated and directed by simulation studies of physics processes. Investigation of a dark matter-motivated Supersymmetry scenario is presented, in which the dark matter is composed of Supersymmetric neutralinos. In this scenario, studies of the e+e- → H0A0 production process allow for

  13. Prospects for physics at e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, G.J.

    1988-03-01

    The present thinking on high-energy e/sup /plus//e/sup /minus// linear colliders is reviewed, stressing those points that have consequences for detector design and physics analyses. Detector requirements are discussed. Experimental aspects of the physics that can be done at these colliders are discussed: first the general physics environment, then a standard process, W/sup /plus// W/sup /minus// detection, and finally four examples of the discovery potential of these colliders /emdash/ heavy quarks, heavy leptons, standard Higgs bosons, and charged Higgs bosons. The conclusions of this study will be stated. 23 refs., 40 figs

  14. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather E; Nomerotski, Andrei; Perelstein, Maxim; Peskin, Michael E; Pöschl, Roman; Reuter, Jürgen; Riemann, Sabine; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Servant, Geraldine; Tait, Tim M P

    2013-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to incr...

  15. The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Barklow, Tim [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fujii, Keisuke [National Lab. for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tokai (Japan); Gao, Yuanning [Unlisted; Hoang, Andre [Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kanemura, Shinya [Univ. of Toyama (Japan); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Logan, Heather E. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Nomerotski, Andrei [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Perelstein, Maxim [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Peskin, Michael E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pöschl, Roman [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL); Reuter, Jürgen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Riemann, Sabine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Savoy-Navarro, Aurore [CNRS/IN2P3. Univ. Paris (France). Observatoire de Paris. AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC); Servant, Geraldine [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tait, Tim P. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2013-06-26

    The International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (TDR) describes in four volumes the physics case and the design of a 500 GeV centre-of-mass energy linear electron-positron collider based on superconducting radio-frequency technology using Niobium cavities as the accelerating structures. The accelerator can be extended to 1 TeV and also run as a Higgs factory at around 250 GeV and on the Z0 pole. A comprehensive value estimate of the accelerator is give, together with associated uncertainties. It is shown that no significant technical issues remain to be solved. Once a site is selected and the necessary site-dependent engineering is carried out, construction can begin immediately. The TDR also gives baseline documentation for two high-performance detectors that can share the ILC luminosity by being moved into and out of the beam line in a "push-pull" configuration. These detectors, ILD and SiD, are described in detail. They form the basis for a world-class experimental programme that promises to increase significantly our understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the evolution of the Universe.

  16. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S.; Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented

  17. Flat-beam Rf photocathode sources for linear collider applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Laser driven rf photocathodes represent a recent advance in high-brightness electron beam sources. The authors investigate here a variation on these devices, that obtained by using a ribbon laser pulse to illuminate the cathode, yielding a flat beam (σ x much-gt σ y ) which has asymmetric emittances at the cathode proportional to the beam size each transverse dimension. The flat-beam geometry mitigates space charge forces which lead to intensity dependent transverse and longitudinal emittance growth, thus limiting the beam brightness. The fundamental limit on achievable emittance and brightness is set by the transverse momentum distribution and peak current density of the photoelectrons (photon energy and cathode material dependent effects) and appears to allow, taking into account space charge and rf effects, normalized emittances ε x -5 m-rad and ε -6 m-rad, with Q = 5 nC and σ z = 1 mm. These source emittances are adequate for superconducting linear collider applications, and could preclude the use of a damping ring for the electrons in these schemes

  18. Magnetic fusion with high energy self-colliding ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostoker, N.; Wessel, F.; Maglich, B.; Fisher, A.

    1992-06-01

    Field-reversed configurations of energetic large orbit ions with neutralizing electrons have been proposed as the basis of a fusion reactor. Vlasov equilibria consisting of a ring or an annulus have been investigated. A stability analysis has been carried out for a long thin layer of energetic ions in a low density background plasma. There is a growing body of experimental evidence from tokamaks that energetic ions slow down and diffuse in accordance with classical theory in the presence of large non-thermal fluctuations and anomalous transport of low energy (10 keV) ions. Provided that major instabilities are under control, it seems likely that the design of a reactor featuring energetic self-colliding ion beams can be based on classical theory. In this case a confinement system that is much better than a tokamak is possible. Several methods are described for creating field reversed configurations with intense neutralized ion beams

  19. Magnetic fusion with high energy self-colliding ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restoker, N.; Wessel, F.; Maglich, B.; Fisher, A.

    1993-01-01

    Field-reversed configurations of energetic large orbit ions with neutralizing electrons have been proposed as the basis of a fusion reactor. Vlasov equilibria consisting of a ring or an annulus have been investigated. A stability analysis has been carried out for a long thin layer of energetic ions in a low density background plasma. There is a growing body of experimental evidence from tokamaks that energetic ions slow down and diffuse in accordance with classical theory in the presence of large non-thermal fluctuations and anomalous transport of low energy (10 keV) ions. Provided that major instabilities are under control, it seems likely that the design of a reactor featuring energetic self-colliding ion beams can be based on classical theory. In this case a confinement system that is much better than a tokamak is possible. Several methods are described for creating field reversed configurations with intense neutralized ion beams

  20. Multibunch beam breakup in high energy linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, K.A.; Ruth, R.D.

    1989-03-01

    The SLAC design for a next-generation linear collider with center-of-mass energy of 0.5 to 1.0 TeV requires that multiple bunches (/approximately/10) be accelerated on each rf fill. At the beam intensity (/approximately/10 10 particles per bunch) and rf frequency (11--17 GHz) required, the beam would be highly unstable transversely. Using computer simulation and analytic models, we have studied several possible methods of controlling the transverse instability: using damped cavities to damp the transverse dipole modes; adjusting the frequency of the dominant transverse mode relative to the rf frequency, so that bunches are placed near zero crossings of the wake; introducing a cell-to-cell spread in the transverse dipole mode frequencies; and introducing a bunch-to-bunch variation in the transverse focusing. The best cure(s) to use depend on the bunch spacing, intensity, and other features of the final design. 8 refs., 3 figs

  1. Collider detector beam line test table: a structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leininger, M.B.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus which sweeps calorimeter and endwall modules through the beam during testing is called a beam line test table. Because of rather stringent requirements for the physical positioning of the modules an analysis is done here to determine the modifications to the current test table design which will minimize deflections of the table under load

  2. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, R.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-21

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010--2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5--4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An un-controlled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multi-stage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the co...

  3. Review of linear collider beam-beam interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P.

    1989-01-01

    Three major effects from the interaction of e/sup +/e/sup /minus// beams---disruption, beamstrahlung, and electron-positron pair creation---are reviewed. For the disruption effects we discuss the luminosity enhancement factor, the maximum and rms disruption angles, and the ''kink instability''. All the results are obtained from computer simulations. Scaling laws for the numerical results and theoretical explanations of the computer acquired phenomena are offered wherever possible. For the beamstrahlung effects we concentrate only on the final electron energy spectrum resulting from multiple photon radiation process, and the deflection angle associated with low energy particles. For the effects from electron-positron pair creation, both coherent and incoherent processes of beamstrahlung pair creation are discussed. In addition to the estimation on total number of such pairs, we also look into the energy spectrum and the deflection angle. 17 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Review of linear collider beam-beam interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, P.

    1989-01-01

    Three major effects from the interaction of e + e/sup /minus// beams---disruption, beamstrahlung, and electron-positron pair creation---are reviewed. For the disruption effects we discuss the luminosity enhancement factor, the maximum and rms disruption angles, and the ''kink instability''. All the results are obtained from computer simulations. Scaling laws for the numerical results and theoretical explanations of the computer acquired phenomena are offered wherever possible. For the beamstrahlung effects we concentrate only on the final electron energy spectrum resulting from multiple photon radiation process, and the deflection angle associated with low energy particles. For the effects from electron-positron pair creation, both coherent and incoherent processes of beamstrahlung pair creation are discussed. In addition to the estimation on total number of such pairs, we also look into the energy spectrum and the deflection angle. 17 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab

  5. Collider physics for the late 1980's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-01-01

    Topics in the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions and how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders are discussed. Radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which can be carried out for it. Some features of quantum chromodynamics are discussed which are relevant to hadron colliders. Some of the problems which the Standard Model does not solve are discussed. 115 refs., 53 figs

  6. Physics and design issues of asymmetric storage ring colliders as B-factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    1989-08-01

    This paper concentrates on generic R ampersand D and design issues of asymmetric colliders via a specific example, namely a 9 GeV x 3 GeV collider based on PEP at SLAC. An asymmetric e + -e - collider at the Y(4s) and with sufficiently high luminosity (10 33 -10 34 cm -2 s -1 ) offers the possibility of studying mixing, rare decays, and CP violation in the B bar B meson system, as well as ''beautiful'' tau-charm physics, and has certain qualitative advantages from detection and machine design points of view. These include: the energy constraint; clean environment (∼25% B + B - , B 0 bar B 0 ); large cross section (1 nb); vertex reconstruction (from the time development of space-time separated B and bar B decays due to moving center-of-mass); reduced backgrounds; greatest sensitivity to CP violation in B → CP eigenstate; the possibility of using higher collision frequencies, up to 100 MHz, in a head-on colliding mode using magnetic separation. It is estimated that for B → ΨK s , an asymmetric collider has an advantage equivalent to a factor of five in luminosity relative to a symmetric one. There are, however, questions with regard to the physics of the asymmetric beam-beam coulomb interaction that may limit the intrinsic luminosity and the possibility of realizing the small beam pipes necessary to determine the vertices. 16 refs., 2 figs

  7. Physics possibilities at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Up to now the standard model (SM) has passed all accelerator-based experimental tests. .... Higgs sector and of the MSSM as well as for testing grand unification. ..... SPS1a scenario [33] for a coherent combination of LHC and linear collider.

  8. Higgs physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Higgs boson; Large Hadron Collider; electroweak symmetry; spin and CP of the Higgs boson ... I shall then give a short description of the pre-LHC constraints on the Higgs mass and the theoretical predictions for the LHC along with a discussion of the current experimental results, ending with prospects in the near future at ...

  9. New physics with the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard

    2001-01-01

    Investigating the 'strong' interactions between particles would be best investigated using a lepton-antilepton collider of energy 2 TeV or more. Plans for an accelerator of this type, called CLIC, have been underway at CERN for many years in collaboration with other accelerator laboratories (5 pages).

  10. Precise and fast beam energy measurement at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viti, Michele

    2010-02-15

    The international Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with a center-of-mass energy between 200 and 500 GeV and a peak luminosity of 2 . 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. For the physics program at this machine, an excellent bunch-by-bunch control of the beam energy is mandatory. Several techniques are foreseen to be implemented at the ILC in order to achieve this request. Energy spectrometers upstream and downstream of the electron/positron interaction point were proposed and the present default option for the upstream spectrometer is a beam position monitor based (BPM-based) spectrometer. In 2006/2007, a prototype of such a device was commissioned at the End Station A beam line at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in order to study performance and reliability. In addition, a novel method based on laser Compton backscattering has been proposed, since as proved at the Large Electron-Positron Collider (LEP) and the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), complementary methods are necessary to cross-check the results of the BPM-based spectrometer. In this thesis, an overview of the experiment at End Station A is given, with emphasis on the performance of the magnets in the chicane and first energy resolution estimations. Also, the novel Compton backscattering method is discussed in details and found to be very promising. It has the potential to bring the beam energy resolution well below the requirement of {delta}E{sub b}/E{sub b}=10{sup -4}. (orig.)

  11. Physics at a future collider beyond the LHC and a TeV class linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    After the LHC will have probed the physics at the TeV frontier, new generations of colliders capable of reaching into the multi-TeV energy domain will need to be considered. Concepts for both high energy e+e- linear colliders and muon storage rings have been proposed as well as hadron colliders. Highly challenging R&D programs are presently pursued to demonstrate their principles. The definition of a physics programme in the multi-TeV range still requires essential data that is likely to become available only after the first years of LHC operation and, possibly, also the results from a TeV-class linear collider. At present we have to envisage several possible scenarios for the fundamental questions to be addressed by collider experiments in the next decade, to guide the choices in the accelerator designs and parameters. After a brief review of the main accelerator projects and the present status of their R&D, I shall discuss the main signatures of the physics of possible relevance in relation to the e...

  12. Physics with linear colliders. e+e- linear colliders: Physics prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerwas, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the physics potential of e + e - linear colliders, expected in a first phase to operate in the energy range between 300 and 500 GeV. these machines will allow us to perform precision studies of the heavy particles in the Standard Model, the top quark and the electroweak bosons. They are ideal facilities for exploring the properties of Higgs particles in the intermediate mass range. New vector bosons and novel matter particles can be searched for and studied in detail. The machines provide unique opportunities for the investigation of supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the SUSY Higgs spectrum and the supersymmetric partners of electroweak gauge/Higgs bosons and non-colored matter particles. (orig.)

  13. SLAC linear collider: the machine, the physics, and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.

    1981-11-01

    The SLAC linear collider, in which beams of electrons and positrons are accelerated simultaneously, is described. Specifications of the proposed system are given, with calculated preditions of performance. New areas of research made possible by energies in the TeV range are discussed

  14. Beam trajectory acquisition system for the arcs of the Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrin, J.L.; Ross, M.C.; Scott, B.D.; Wilson, D.S.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes the beam position monitoring system of the collider arcs at the Stanford Linear Collider. This beam position monitoring system is different from others at SLAC in its large amount of hardware and its use of ungated, self-triggered electronics. All of the processing electronics are installed in the accelerator tunnel

  15. Beam measurements on Argonne linac for collider injector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavrogenes, G.; James, M.B.; Koontz, R.F.; Miller, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The 20 MeV electron linac at Argonne produces 5 x 10 10 electrons in a single bunch. This amount of charge per bunch is required for the proposed single pass collider at SLAC. For this reason the characteristics of the beam from this machine are of interest. The longitudinal charge distribution has been measured by a new technique. The technique is a variation on the deduction of bunch shape from a spectrum measurement. Under favorable conditions a resolution of about 1 0 of phase is possible, which is considerably better than can be achieved with streak cameras. The bunch length at 4.5 x 10 10 e - per bunch was measured to be 15 0 FWHM. The transverse emittance has also been measured using standard techniques. The emittance is 16 mm-mrad at 17.2 MeV. (Auth.)

  16. Optimum Choice of RF Frequency for Two Beam Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich

    2003-01-01

    Recent experimental results on normal conducting RF structures indicate that the scaling of the gradient limit with frequency is less favourable than what was believed. We therefore reconsider the optimum choice of RF frequency and iris aperture for a normal conducting, two-beam linear collider with E_CMS=3 TeV, a loaded accelerating gradient of 150 MV/m and a luminosity of 8 10^34 cm-^2 s^-1. The optimisation criterion is minimizing overall RF costs for investment and operation with constraints put on peak surface electric fields and pulsed heating of accelerating structures. Analytical models are employed where applicable, while interpolation on simulation program results is used for the calculation of luminosity and RF structure properties.

  17. Development of polarized e+ beams for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Endo, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have so far been carrying out systematic investigations to create polarized e + on the basis of two new methods. One method is to use β + decay of radioactive nuclei with short life-time produced with a proton cyclotron and the other method is to use e + e - pair creation from polarized γ beams made through backward Compton scattering of laser lights. Here we describe technical details on productions of polarized e + and measurements of the polarization. The experiments of producing polarized e + will soon start. Although the e + intensity is not sufficiently high, we will acquire lots of know-how for further development of polarized e + sources with high quality which will possibly be applied to future linear colliders. (author)

  18. Experimental support at proton--proton colliding beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, K.

    1977-01-01

    Proton--proton colliding beam facilities have a number of special features which increase the importance of support for experiments when compared to fixed target accelerators: (1) the laboratory system is very close to the center-of-mass system; this affects the geometry and general size of the experiments; (2) the primary p--p interaction is inaccessible, that is, it takes place in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber; and (3) the experiment detection system is necessarily inside the machine structure and becomes very closely linked to it in many respects. An overall picture is given of experimental support based on experience at the CERN ISR under the following headings: Experimental Areas, Scheduling, Intersection Vacuum Chambers, Machine Background, and Magnets for Experiments. The first two of these topics concern the requirements in space and time of an experiment, while the last three are all related to the close interaction between experiment and machine

  19. Helium refrigeration system for BNL colliding beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.P.; Farah, Y.; Gibbs, R.J.; Schlafke, A.P.; Schneider, W.J.; Sondericker, J.H.; Wu, K.C.

    1983-01-01

    A Helium Refrigeration System which will supply the cooling required for the Colliding Beam Accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory is under construction. Testing of the compressor system is scheduled for late 1983 and will be followed by refrigerator acceptance tests in 1984. The refrigerator has a design capacity of 24.8 kW at a temperature level near 4K while simultaneously producing 55 kW for heat shield loads at 55K. When completed, the helium refrigerator will be the world's largest. Twenty-five oil-injected screw compressors with an installed total of 23,250 horsepower will supply the gas required. One of the unique features of the cycle is the application of three centrifugal compressors used at liquid helium temperature to produce the low temperatures (2.5K) and high flow rates (4154 g/s) required for this service

  20. Beam-beam interaction in high energy linear electron-positron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.

    1985-04-01

    The interaction of high energy electron and positron beams in a linear collider has been investigated using a macroparticle Monte Carlo method based on a Cloud-In-Cells plasma simulation scheme. Density evolutions, luminosities, energy and angular distributions for electrons (positrons) and synchrotron photons are calculated. Beside beams with a symmetric transverse profile also flat beams are considered. A reasonably good agreement to alternative computer calculations as well as to an analytical approximation for the energy spectrum of synchrotron photons has been obtained. (author)

  1. ISABELLE: a 400 x 400 GeV proton--proton colliding beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design report is presented for the construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE, to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At this major research facility beams of protons with energies up to 400 GeV will be collided in six experimental areas. At each area particle physicists will install detector apparatus to study the interaction and reaction products for such very high energy collisions. The proposal results from several years of study and development work on such a facility. Topics discussed include: (1) introduction and summary of the proposal; (2) physics at ISABELLE (including physics objectives and typical experiments and detectors); description of ISABELLE (overview; magnetic ring structure and lattice characteristics; performance; beam transfer, stacking, and acceleration; magnet system; refrigeration system; vacuum system; power supplies, instrumentation, and control system; physical plant and experimental halls; and operation and safety); and (3) cost estimate and schedule

  2. ISABELLE: a 400 x 400 GeV proton--proton colliding beam facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual design report is presented for the construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE, to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At this major research facility beams of protons with energies up to 400 GeV will be collided in six experimental areas. At each area particle physicists will install detector apparatus to study the interaction and reaction products for such very high energy collisions. The proposal results from several years of study and development work on such a facility. Topics discussed include: (1) introduction and summary of the proposal; (2) physics at ISABELLE (including physics objectives and typical experiments and detectors); description of ISABELLE (overview; magnetic ring structure and lattice characteristics; performance; beam transfer, stacking, and acceleration; magnet system; refrigeration system; vacuum system; power supplies, instrumentation, and control system; physical plant and experimental halls; and operation and safety); and (3) cost estimate and schedule.

  3. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    Gian Giudice; Ellis, Nick; Jakobs, Karl; Mage, Patricia; Seymour, Michael H; Spiropulu, Maria; Wilkinson, Guy; CERN-FNAL Summer School; Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    2007-01-01

    For the past few years, experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider have once again been exploring uncharted territory at the current energy frontier of particle physics. With CERN's LHC operations to start in 2007, a new era in the exploration of the fundamental laws of nature will begin. In anticipation of this era of discovery, Fermilab and CERN are jointly organizing a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", whose main goal is to offer a complete picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of hadron collider physics. Preparing young researchers to tackle the current and anticipated challenges at hadron colliders, and spreading the global knowledge required for a timely and competent exploitation of the LHC physics potential, are concerns equally shared by CERN, the LHC host laboratory, and by Fermilab, the home of the Tevatron and host of CMS's LHC Physics Center in the U.S. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is targeted particularly at young postdocs in exp...

  4. Physics at TeV e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is presented of the physics opportunities at TeV e + e - linear colliders. Examples are given of physics that might emerge in e + e - collisions and in γγ collisions using the back-scattered laser technique, including γγ → ZZ scattering as a probe of ultraheavy quanta. The second portion of the talk focuses on physics that must emerge at or below the TeV scale--the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. In particular a very rough estimate is presented of the most challenging possible signal of symmetry breaking, strong WW scattering, as a function of collider energy. A subtheme, made explicit in the concluding section, is the continuing complementarity of e + e - and pp colliders in the domain of TeV physics

  5. High energy collider physics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchti, R.C.; Biswas, N.N.; Wayne, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    With the demise of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) Project, there was great concern that the technological developments for that accelerator and its associated detectors might well be lost in the aftermath. In the case of scintillating fiber tracking, such as not been the case. During the period 1990--1993, several tracking technologies were under development for SDC, including Scintillating Fiber Tracking, Straw-tubes, and Microstrip Gas Chambers. In summer 1990, several members of the Fiber Tracking Group (FTG) proposed the use of Scintillating Fiber Tracking to the D0 experiment at Fermilab. This proposal was accepted, and D0 now is building a 75,000 fiber channel tracking detector with readout via Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPC) which were devices pioneered by the SDC Fiber Tracking Group. In addition, all the preshower detectors for D0 also make use of fiber readout (in this case waveshifting fibers) and VLPC for photosensing. In February 1993, a full 7 months prior to cancellation of the SSC project by Congress, the SDC experiment rejected scintillating fiber tracking for further development. Fortunately for all concerned, the D0 experiment had already embraced this technology, so this important detector concept could be further developed, refined, and utilized for physics experimentation. In early 2000, data will be taken with the D0 fiber tracker to study Top Quarks, Beauty Particles, Electroweak Physics, QCD phenomena, and to search for new phenomena. The University of Notre Dame has played a fundamental and seminal role in the development and implementation of this detector technology. R. Ruchti has served as cospokesman of the Fiber Tracking Group since its inception in 1989, and has been a pioneer of fiber tracking technology since 1980. In addition, at least one other experiment at Fermilab, E835, has utilized scintillating fibers with VLPC readout to study Charmonium in proton-antiproton collisions using a gas-jet target in the Tevatron

  6. R&D for Collider Beauty Physics at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose an R&D program for the development of a Beauty trigger and innovative elements of the associated spectrometer. The program builds on the success of the recent S$\\bar{p}$pS collider run of the P238 Collaboration, in which clean signals from beam-beam interactions were observed in a large silicon strip microvertex detector running 1.5~mm from the circulating beams. A continuing successful R&D program of the type proposed could ultimately lead to a collider experiment at the LHC to study CP-violation and rare B decays. \\\\ \\\\ We request a fixed target run during late 1992 in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of a heavy flavour trigger which uses real time digital calculations on silicon strip data, implemented with a data driven processor.

  7. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, R.; Assmann, R. W.; Boccone, V.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cauchi, M.; Cerutti, F.; Deboy, D.; Ferrari, A.; Lari, L.; Marsili, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Mirarchi, D.; Quaranta, E.; Redaelli, S.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Rossi, A.; Salvachua, B.; Skordis, E.; Tambasco, C.; Valentino, G.; Weiler, T.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wollmann, D.

    2014-08-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010-2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5-4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  8. Simulations and measurements of beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bruce

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to collide proton beams of unprecedented energy, in order to extend the frontiers of high-energy particle physics. During the first very successful running period in 2010–2013, the LHC was routinely storing protons at 3.5–4 TeV with a total beam energy of up to 146 MJ, and even higher stored energies are foreseen in the future. This puts extraordinary demands on the control of beam losses. An uncontrolled loss of even a tiny fraction of the beam could cause a superconducting magnet to undergo a transition into a normal-conducting state, or in the worst case cause material damage. Hence a multistage collimation system has been installed in order to safely intercept high-amplitude beam protons before they are lost elsewhere. To guarantee adequate protection from the collimators, a detailed theoretical understanding is needed. This article presents results of numerical simulations of the distribution of beam losses around the LHC that have leaked out of the collimation system. The studies include tracking of protons through the fields of more than 5000 magnets in the 27 km LHC ring over hundreds of revolutions, and Monte Carlo simulations of particle-matter interactions both in collimators and machine elements being hit by escaping particles. The simulation results agree typically within a factor 2 with measurements of beam loss distributions from the previous LHC run. Considering the complex simulation, which must account for a very large number of unknown imperfections, and in view of the total losses around the ring spanning over 7 orders of magnitude, we consider this an excellent agreement. Our results give confidence in the simulation tools, which are used also for the design of future accelerators.

  9. Physics Perspectives for a Future Circular Collider: FCC-ee

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The lectures will briefly discuss the parameters of a Future Circular Collider, before addressing in detail the physics perspectives and the challenges for the experiments and detector systems. The main focus will be on ee and pp collisions, but opportunities for e—p physics will also be covered. The FCC physics perspectives will be presented with reference to the ongoing LHC programme, including the physics potential from future upgrades to the LHC in luminosity and possibly energy.  

  10. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium in Evian

    CERN Multimedia

    Ludwik Dobrzynski and Emmanuel Tsesmelis

    The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian from 16 to 20 November 2009. The Hadron Collider Physics Symposium series has been a major forum for presentations of physics at the Tevatron over the past two decades. The merger of the former Topical Conference on Hadron Collider Physics with the LHC Symposium in 2005 brought together the Tevatron and LHC communities in a single forum. The 20th Hadron Collider Physics Symposium took place in Evian, on the shores of Lake Geneva, from 16-20 November 2009, some 17 years after the historic ECFA-CERN Evian meeting in March 1992 when Expressions of Interest for LHC detectors were presented for the first time. The 2009 event was organized jointly by CERN and the French high-energy physics community (CNRS-IN2P3 and CEA-IRFU). More than 170 people registered for this symposium. This year’s symposium was held at an important time for both the Tevatron and the LHC. It stimulated the completion of analyses for a significant Tevatron data sam...

  11. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Applications are now open for the 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, which will take place at CERN from 6 to 15 June 2007. The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic program and application procedure. The application deadline is 9 March 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be given on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be  supported by in-depth discussion sess...

  12. Top physics at high-energy lepton colliders. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, M.

    2016-04-01

    A summary is presented of the workshop ''top physics at linear colliders'' that was held at IFIC Valencia from the 30"t"h of June to the 3"r"d July 2015. We present an up-to-date status report of studies into the potential for top quark physics of lepton colliders with an energy reach that exceeds the top quark pair production threshold, with a focus on the linear collider projects ILC and CLIC. This summary shows that such projects can offer very competitive determinations of top quark properties (mass, width) and its interactions with other Standard Model particles, in particular electroweak gauge bosons and the Higgs boson. In both areas the prospects exceed the LHC potential significantly - often by an order of magnitude.

  13. Hadron Collider Physics with Real Time Trajectory Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annovi, Alberto [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

    2005-01-01

    During last century experiments with accelerators have been extensively used to improve our understanding of matter. They are now the most common tool used to search for new phenomena in high energy physics. In the process of probing smaller distances and searching for new particles the center of mass energy has been steadily increased. The need for higher center of mass energy made hadron colliders the natural tool for discovery physics. Hadron colliders have a major drawback with respect to electron-positron colliders. As shown in fig. 1 the total cross section is several orders of magnitude larger than the cross section of interesting processes such as top or Higgs production. This means that, in order to observe interesting processes, it’s necessary to have collisions at very high rates and it becomes necessary to reject on-line most of the “non-interesting” events. In this thesis I have described the wide range of SVT applications within CDF.

  14. Accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in very large hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bauer et al.

    2002-12-05

    The following presents a study of the accelerator physics and technology limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in very large hadron colliders (VLHCs). The main accelerator physics limitations to ultimate energy and luminosity in future energy frontier hadron colliders are synchrotron radiation (SR) power, proton-collision debris power in the interaction regions (IR), number of events-per-crossing, stored energy per beam and beam-stability [1]. Quantitative estimates of these limits were made and translated into scaling laws that could be inscribed into the particle energy versus machine size plane to delimit the boundaries for possible VLHCs. Eventually, accelerator simulations were performed to obtain the maximum achievable luminosities within these boundaries. Although this study aimed at investigating a general VLHC, it was unavoidable to refer in some instances to the recently studied, [2], 200 TeV center-of-mass energy VLHC stage-2 design (VLHC-2). A more thorough rendering of this work can be found in [3].

  15. Highlights of the SLD Physics Program at the SLAC Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willocq, Stephane

    2001-01-01

    Starting in 1989, and continuing through the 1990s, high-energy physics witnessed a flowering of precision measurements in general and tests of the standard model in particular, led by e + e - collider experiments operating at the Z 0 resonance. Key contributions to this work came from the SLD collaboration at the SLAC Linear Collider. By exploiting the unique capabilities of this pioneering accelerator and the SLD detector, including a polarized electron beam, exceptionally small beam dimensions, and a CCD pixel vertex detector, SLD produced a broad array of electroweak, heavy-flavor, and QCD measurements. Many of these results are one of a kind or represent the world's standard in precision. This article reviews the highlights of the SLD physics program, with an eye toward associated advances in experimental technique, and the contribution of these measurements to our dramatically improved present understanding of the standard model and its possible extensions

  16. Highlights of the SLD Physics Program at the SLAC Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willocq, Stephane

    2001-09-07

    Starting in 1989, and continuing through the 1990s, high-energy physics witnessed a flowering of precision measurements in general and tests of the standard model in particular, led by e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments operating at the Z{sup 0} resonance. Key contributions to this work came from the SLD collaboration at the SLAC Linear Collider. By exploiting the unique capabilities of this pioneering accelerator and the SLD detector, including a polarized electron beam, exceptionally small beam dimensions, and a CCD pixel vertex detector, SLD produced a broad array of electroweak, heavy-flavor, and QCD measurements. Many of these results are one of a kind or represent the world's standard in precision. This article reviews the highlights of the SLD physics program, with an eye toward associated advances in experimental technique, and the contribution of these measurements to our dramatically improved present understanding of the standard model and its possible extensions.

  17. Linear beam-beam tune shift calculations for the Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.

    1989-01-01

    A realistic estimate of the linear beam-beam tune shift is necessary for the selection of an optimum working point in the tune diagram. Estimates of the beam-beam tune shift using the ''Round Beam Approximation'' (RBA) have over estimated the tune shift for the Tevatron. For a hadron machine with unequal lattice functions and beam sizes, an explicit calculation using the beam size at the crossings is required. Calculations for various Tevatron lattices used in Collider operation are presented. Comparisons between the RBA and the explicit calculation, for elliptical beams, are presented. This paper discusses the calculation of the linear tune shift using the program SYNCH. Selection of a working point is discussed. The magnitude of the tune shift is influenced by the choice of crossing points in the lattice as determined by the pbar ''cogging effects''. Also discussed is current cogging procedures and presents results of calculations for tune shifts at various crossing points in the lattice. Finally, a comparison of early pbar tune measurements with the present linear tune shift calculations is presented. 17 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Vector mesons in reactions with colliding electron-positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekalo, M.P.; Gakh, G.I.

    1980-01-01

    Polarization phenomena in the processes of vector meson production in reactions with colliding electron-positron beams e + e - → V+X, where V is a vector meson, X is a nondetected set of particles are investigated. For the one-photon mechanism of the process, where V and X are hadrons, the mutually unambiguous correspondence between the structural functions is found. The dependence of the e + e - → VX differential cross section upon the electron and positron polarizations is calculated using the virtual photon density matrix in the helicity basis. This formalism permits to take explicitly into account the P-invariance consequences for the angular distribution of the V-meson decay products. For the processes e + e - → πA 1 , and e + e - → rho + rho - the structural functions are calculated in terms of the corresponding electromagnetic form factors. It is noted that six functions out ten real structural functions describing the e + e - → VX reaction can be determined by means of investigation of the angular distribution of the V-meson decay products which is produced in collisions of unpolarized leptons. To study the collision of polarized leptons one more structural function can be determined. The formation of the X system with definite values of parity and spin is characterized by seven structural functions, five of which can be found while studying the angular distribution of the V-meson decay products produced in e + e - collisions with unpolarized (polarized) particles. If the spin of the X state is 1, in experiments with polarized beams all structural functions can be determined while investigating the angular distribution of the V-meson decay products

  19. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001, 3 Studies of Exotic and Standard Model Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Asner, D.; Baer, H.; Bagger, J.; Balazs, C.; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Barron, J.; Baur, U.; Beach, R.; Bellwied, R.; Bigi, I.; Blochinger, C.; Boege, S.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.; Brau, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Burke, D.; Burrows, P.; Butler, J.N.; Chakraborty, D.; Cheng, H.C.; Chertok, M.; Choi, S.Y.; Cinabro, D.; Corcella, G.; Cordero, R.K.; Danielson, N.; Davoudiasl, H.; Dawson, S.; Denner, A.; Derwent, P.; Diaz, M.A.; Dima, M.; Dittmaier, S.; Dixit, M.; Dixon, L.; Dobrescu, B.; Doncheski, M.A.; Duckwitz, M.; Dunn, J.; Early, J.; Erler, J.; Feng, J.L.; Ferretti, C.; Fisk, H.E.; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, D.; Gibbons, L.; Godbole, R.; Godfrey, S.; Goodman, E.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Gronberg, J.; Gunion, J.; Haber, H.E.; Han, T.; Hawkings, R.; Hearty, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Heusch, C.; Hewett, J.; Hikasa, K.; Hiller, G.; Hoang, A.; Hollebeek, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Jacobsen, R.; Jaros, J.; Juste, A.; Kadyk, J.; Kalinowski, J.; Kalyniak, P.; Kamon, T.; Karlen, D.; Keller, L.; Koltick, D.; Kribs, G.; Kronfeld, A.; Leike, A.; Logan, H.E.; Lykken, J.; Macesanu, C.; Magill, S.; Marciano, W.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Martin, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matchev, K.; Moenig, K.; Montgomery, H.E.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Moreau, G.; Mrenna, S.; Murakami, B.; Murayama, H.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Newman, B.; Nojiri, M.; Orr, L.H.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Pathak, S.; Peskin, M.E.; Plehn, T.; Porter, F.; Potter, C.; Prescott, C.; Rainwater, D.; Raubenheimer, T.; Repond, J.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, T.; Ronan, M.; Rosenberg, L.; Rosner, J.; Roth, M.; Rowson, P.; Schumm, B.; Seppala, L.; Seryi, A.; Siegrist, J.; Sinev, N.; Skulina, K.; Sterner, K.L.; Stewart, I.; Su, S.; Tata, X.; Telnov, V.; Teubner, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, A.S.; van Bibber, K.; van Kooten, R.; Vega, R.; Wackeroth, D.; Wagner, D.; Waite, A.; Walkowiak, W.; Weiglein, G.; Wells, J.D.; W. Wester, III; Williams, B.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, R.; Winn, D.; Woods, M.; Wudka, J.; Yakovlev, O.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 3 reviews the possible experiments on that can be done at a linear collider on strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking, exotic particles, and extra dimensions, and on the top quark, QCD, and two-photon physics. It also discusses the improved precision electroweak measurements that this collider will make available.

  20. Physics at the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka

    2017-01-01

    This paper (based on an invited talk at the 18th Lomonosov Conference on Elementary Particle Physics) provides an overview of the physics program at CLIC, including updates on the ongoing studies on t-quark precision observables, massive vector-boson scattering and di-photon processes at high energies.

  1. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams (ν factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both ± μ. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider

  2. NEUTRINO FACTORY BASED ON MUON-STORAGE-RINGS TO MUON COLLIDERS: PHYSICS AND FACILITIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PARSA,Z.

    2001-06-18

    Intense muon sources for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu} factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multi-turn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and developments, and will briefly be discussed here. A muon collider requires basically the same number of muons as for the muon storage ring neutrino factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-} {mu}. We present some physics possibilities, muon storage ring based neutrino facility concept, site specific examples including collaboration feasibility studies, and upgrades to a full collider.

  3. Steady state distribution for unbunched beams colliding in a drift space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheifets, S.; Chao, A.W.

    1979-12-01

    A self-consistent time-independent solution of the system of coupled equations for the distribution of two colliding unbunched beams of opposite charges is found. The solution for each beam contains an arbitrary constant which characterizes the lateral size of the beam. On the other hand, the angular divergence is uniquely determined by the line charge density of the opposite beam in case the beams have cylindrical symmetry. The possible implications of this solution for a linac collider are discussed. Further work on the stability of this solution is needed. 6 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Realization of beam polarization at the linear collider and its application to EW processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco-Sollova, F.

    2006-07-15

    The use of beam polarization at the future ILC e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will benefit the physics program significantly. This thesis explores three aspects of beam polarization: the application of beam polarization to the study of electroweak processes, the precise measurement of the beam polarization, and finally, the production of polarized positrons at a test beam experiment. In the first part of the thesis the importance of beam polarization at the future ILC is exhibited: the benefits of employing transverse beam polarization (in both beams) for the measurement of triple gauge boson couplings (TGCs) in the W-pair production process are studied. The sensitivity to anomalous TGC values is compared for the cases of transverse and longitudinal beam polarization at a center of mass energy of 500 GeV. Due to the suppressed contribution of the t-channel {nu} exchange, the sensitivity is higher for longitudinal polarization. For some physics analyses the usual polarimetry techniques do not provide the required accuracy for the measurement of the beam polarization (around 0.25% with Compton polarimetry). The second part of the thesis deals with a complementary method to measure the beam polarization employing physics data acquired with two polarization modes. The process of single-W production is chosen due to its high cross section. The expected precision for 500 fb{sup -1} and W{yields}{mu}{nu} decays only, is {delta}P{sub e{sup -}}/P{sub e{sup -}}=0.26% and {delta}P{sub e{sup +}}/P{sub e{sup +}}=0.33%, which can be further improved by employing additional W-decay channels. The first results of an attempt to produce polarized positrons at the E-166 experiment are shown in the last part of the thesis. The E-166 experiment, located at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC's LINAC employs a helical undulator to induce the emission of circularly polarized gamma rays by the beam electrons. These gamma rays are converted into longitudinally polarized electron

  5. Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160109; Støvneng, Jon Andreas

    2017-08-15

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strength of the beam-beam interactions will be higher after the upgrade to the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, and also in the next generation of machines, as the Future Circular Hadron Collider. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and drives resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. For this thesis, a new code named CABIN (Cuda-Accelerated Beam-beam Interaction) has been developed to study the limitations caused by the impact of strong beam-beam interactions. In particular, the evolution of the beam emittance and beam intensity has been monitored to study the impact quantitatively...

  6. Academic Training: Physics at e+e- linear collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November 2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Physics at e+e- linear collider K. DESCH / Desy, Hamburg, D Future e+e- Linear Colliders offer the potential to explore new physics at the TeV scale to very high precision. The lecture series introduces the possibilities of a TeV linear collider (the International Linear Collider, ILC) in the fields of Higgs physics, alternative Electro-weak Symmetry Breaking scenarios, Supersymmetry, Extra Dimensions, and more exotic models. Also the prospects for highly improved measurements of SM parameters such as the top quark mass and electro-weak gauge boson properties are discussed. The implications for the design of an appropriate detector are outlined and current R&D developments are explained. Particular emphasis will be given to the complementarity and intimate interplay of physics at the LHC and the ILC. The additional benefit of multi-TeV e+e- collisions as envisaged i...

  7. p anti p collider physics: summary talk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    Progress is very briefly summarized in these areas: Drell-Yan production of W and Z; inclusive spectra of jets; angular distribution of two jet final states; Dalitz plot analysis of three jet final states; interior structure of jets; minijets; issues and relevent data in soft-collision physics; structure of the pomeron; W, Z, and electroweak theory; heavy quark physics; extinct exotica; extant exotica, including monojets, the top quark, and possibly anomalous same-sign isolated dimuons. Future directions are anticipated for the Sp anti pS, Tevatron I, instrumentation and detectors, group theory, and the physics at SSC energies. 39 refs., 18 figs

  8. and collider physics: Working group report

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theory Group, Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad 380 ... One such is anomaly mediation, wherein there is no tree level coupling ..... The role of the spectator quarks effect in the inclusive beauty decays were studied.

  9. High energy density physics issues related to Future Circular Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2017-07-01

    A design study for a post-Large Hadron Collider accelerator named, Future Circular Collider (FCC), is being carried out by the International Scientific Community. A complete design report is expected to be ready by spring 2018. The FCC will accelerate two counter rotating beams of 50 TeV protons in a tunnel having a length (circumference) of 100 km. Each beam will be comprised of 10 600 proton bunches, with each bunch having an intensity of 1011 protons. The bunch length is of 0.5 ns, and two neighboring bunches are separated by 25 ns. Although there is an option for 5 ns bunch separation as well, in the present studies, we consider the former case only. The total energy stored in each FCC beam is about 8.5 GJ, which is equivalent to the kinetic energy of Airbus 380 (560 t) flying at a speed of 850 km/h. Machine protection is a very important issue while operating with such powerful beams. It is important to have an estimate of the damage caused to the equipment and accelerator components due to the accidental release of a partial or total beam at a given point. For this purpose, we carried out numerical simulations of full impact of one FCC beam on an extended solid copper target. These simulations have been done employing an energy deposition code, FLUKA, and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic code, BIG2, iteratively. This study shows that although the static range of a single FCC proton and its shower is about 1.5 m in solid copper, the entire beam will penetrate around 350 m into the target. This substantial increase in the range is due to the hydrodynamic tunneling of the beam. Our calculations also show that a large part of the target will be converted into high energy density matter including warm dense matter and strongly coupled plasmas.

  10. The beam energy measurement system for the Beijing electron-positron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abakumova, E.V.; Achasov, M.N.; Blinov, V.E.; Cai, X.; Dong, H.Y.; Fu, C.D.; Harris, F.A.; Kaminsky, V.V.; Krasnov, A.A.; Liu, Q.; Mo, X.H.; Muchnoi, N.Yu.; Nikolaev, I.B.; Qin, Q.; Qu, H.M.; Olsen, S.L.; Pyata, E.E.; Shamov, A.G.; Shen, C.P.; Todyshev, K.Yu.

    2011-01-01

    The beam energy measurement system (BEMS) for the upgraded Beijing electron-positron collider BEPC-II is described. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. The relative systematic uncertainty of the electron and positron beam energy determination is estimated as 2×10 -5 . The relative uncertainty of the beam's energy spread is about 6%.

  11. High Energy Accelerator and Colliding Beam User Group. Progress report, March 1, 1992--October 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, G.A.; Skuja, A.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: the study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions; Hadron collider physics at Fermilab; fixed target physics and particle physics of general interest; and, the solenoidal detector collaboration at SSCL.

  12. International Linear Collider Physics and detectors: 2011 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Fuster, Juan [IFIC- Valencia (Spain); Hesla, Leah [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Illenseer, Monika [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Royole-Degieux, Perrine [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Caen (France). Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds (GANIL); Takahashi, Rika [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Warmbein, Barbara [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yamada, Sakue [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Zhang, Min [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP)

    2012-08-29

    The studies of physics and detectors for the International Linear Collider are an important parallel element to the effort for the ILC Technical Design Report. The studies comprise the physics opportunities, detector requirements, and detector development to achieve the challenging high performance demanded by the physics, as well as integration of detectors into the accelerator. The current phase of this effort began with a call for Letters of Intent (LOIs) in 2007 and will lead to the submission of Detailed Baseline Design (DBD) report together with the ILC Technical Design Report at the end of 2012. Here we summarise the current status of this process, review what it has accomplished and identify the work that still needs to be completed. This report, titled International Linear Collider Physics and Detectors: 2011 Status Report, does just this.

  13. Pushing the precision frontier in Collider Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The interplay between precise theory predictions and experimental measurements has written a success story in particle physics. After a brief journey into history we will review recent developments which have led  to "revolutions" with regard to precision calculations and to new insights into the structure of quantum field theory. The second part of the talk will focus on phenomenology, especially on Higgs boson pair production as a window to physics beyond the Standard Model, manifesting itself in a modification of those Higgs couplings which are still to a large extent unconstrained, in particular the Higgs boson self-coupling.

  14. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  15. B physics at electron-positron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coignet, G.

    1986-10-01

    The physics of B mesons that has already been achieved and is expected to be achieved in the near future is quickly reviewed. Emphasis is put on the problems that could be left over and the case for an improved b factory machine is advocated

  16. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    June 6-15, 2007, CERN The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007 The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, extensively covered the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis t...

  17. Physics at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1990-08-01

    This introductory talk contains a brief discussion of future experiments at RHIC related to physics of superdense matter. In particular, we consider the relation between space-time picture of the collision and spectra of the observed secondaries. We discuss where one should look for QGP signals and for possible manifestation of the phase transition. We pay more attention to a rather new topic: hadron modification in the gas phase, which is interesting by itself as a collective phenomenon, and also as a precursor indicating what happens with hadrons near the phase transition. We briefly review current understanding of the photon physics, dilepton production, charm and strangeness and J/ψ suppression. At the end we try to classify all possible experiments. 47 refs., 3 figs

  18. Physics at the FCC-hh, a 100 TeV pp collider

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    A 100 TeV pp collider is under consideration, by the high-energy physics community, as an important step for the future development of our field, following the completion of the LHC and High-luminosity LHC physics programmes. In particular, CERN is considering 100 TeV pp collisions as the key target of a Future Circular Collider facility, built around a 100 km tunnel and designed to deliver pp, e+e- and ep collisions, in addition to a programme with heavy ion beams and with the injector complex. CERN is coordinating an international study tasked with the completion, by the end of 2018, of a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for this facility. This document presents the first results of the assessment of the physics potential of the hadronic part of this research programme (FCC-hh).

  19. Revealing the large extra dimension effective interaction at an e+e- collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pankov, A. A.; Tsytrinov, A. V.; Paver, N.

    2007-01-01

    Several types of new physics scenarios are represented by contactlike effective interactions. An example is the exchange of nonstandard quanta of very large mass scales, beyond the kinematical limit for direct production set by the available collider energy. This kind of interactions can be revealed only through deviations of observables from the standard model predictions. If such deviations were observed, the relevant source should be identified among the possible models that could explain them. Here, we assess the expected 'identification reach' on the ADD model of gravity in large compactified extra dimensions, against the compositeness-inspired four-fermion contact interaction. As basic observables we take the differential cross sections for fermion-pair production at a 0.5-1 TeV electron-positron linear collider with both beams longitudinally polarized. For the four-fermion contact interaction, we assume a general linear combination of the individual models with definite chiralities, with arbitrary coupling constants. In this sense, the estimated identification reach on the ADD model can be considered as 'model independent'. In the analysis, we give estimates also for the expected ''discovery reaches'' on the various scenarios. We emphasize the substantial role of beams polarization in enhancing the sensitivity to the contactlike interactions under consideration

  20. Physics at the e+e- Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Baer, H.; Battaglia, M.

    2015-04-01

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e + e - Linear Collider in the energy range of √(s)=92 GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

  1. arXiv Physics at the e+ e- Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Battaglia, M.; Belanger, G.; Fujii, K.; Kalinowski, J.; Heinemeyer, S.; Kiyo, Y.; Olive, K.; Simon, F.; Uwer, P.; Wackeroth, D.; Zerwas, P.M.; Arbey, A.; Asano, M.; Bechtle, P.; Bharucha, A.; Brau, J.; Brummer, F.; Choi, S.Y.; Denner, A.; Desch, K.; Dittmaier, S.; Ellwanger, U.; Englert, C.; Freitas, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godfrey, S.; Greiner, N.; Grojean, C.; Grunewald, M.; Heisig, J.; Hocker, A.; Kanemura, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kogler, R.; Krawczyk, M.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Kroseberg, J.; Liebler, S.; List, J.; Mahmoudi, F.; Mambrini, Y.; Matsumoto, S.; Mnich, J.; Monig, K.; Muhlleitner, M.M.; Poschl, R.; Porod, W.; Porto, S.; Rolbiecki, K.; Schmitt, M.; Serpico, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Stal, O.; Stefaniak, T.; Stockinger, D.; Weiglein, G.; Wilson, G.W.; Zeune, L.; Moortgat, F.; Xella, S.; Bagger, J.; Ellis, J.; Komamiya, S.; Kronfeld, A.S.; Peskin, M.; Schlatter, D.; Wagner, A.; Yamamoto, H.

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e- Linear Collider in the energy range of sqrt{s}=92 GeV--3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

  2. Present and future colliding beam facilities at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1977-07-01

    In April 1972, the 3-GeV electron positron storage ring, SPEAR, was put into operation at the end of the linear accelerator at Stanford. By the recent discoveries in high energy physics the value of electron-positron storage rings for high energy physics has been clearly demonstrated. This development certainly encouraged the relatively early funding of the new electron-positron storage ring, PEP, at SLAC. In addition to its role as a particle physics research tool, SPEAR has been and remains a priceless model or prototype for larger storage rings like PEP. A few of the recent observations in SPEAR which have important implications to the design of PEP are described. Although the PEP design follows closely the SPEAR concept in many respects, it has its own distinctive and important features which are discussed in detail. Topics discussed include synchrotron-betatron resonances, beam losses, beam bunching, PEP design luminosity and energy, chromaticity correction in PEP, and the high energy cabability of PEP

  3. 3rd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at ...

  4. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN, Physics, Machine, Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Adolphson, C

    2011-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new electron-hadron collider, the LHeC, in which electrons of $60$ to possibly $140$\\,GeV collide with LHC protons of $7000$\\,GeV. With an $ep$ design luminosity of about $10^{33}$\\,cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, the Large Hadron Electron Collider exceeds the integrated luminosity collected at HERA by two orders of magnitude and the kinematic range by a factor of twenty in the four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements. These are projected to solve a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The LHeC thus becomes the world's cleanest high resolution microscope, designed to continue the path of deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering into unknown areas of physics and kinematics. The physics ...

  5. 12th CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the twelfth edition, from 28th August to 6th September 2017. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of their thesis project, in both Experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology. Other schools, such as the CERN European School of High Energy Physics, may provide more appropriate training for students in experimental HEP who are still working towards their PhDs. Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2017, when CERN will welcome students to the twelfth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School. The School will include nine days of lectures and discussions, and one free day in the middle of the period. Limited scholarship ...

  6. SEARCHING FOR HIGGS BOSONS AND NEW PHYSICS AT HADRON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung Kao

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of research activities in particle theory are predicting the production cross section and decay branching fractions of Higgs bosons and new particles at hadron colliders, developing techniques and computer software to discover these particles and to measure their properties, and searching for new phenomena and new interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The results of our project could lead to the discovery of Higgs bosons, new particles, and signatures for new physics, or we will be able to set meaningful limits on important parameters in particle physics. We investigated the prospects for the discovery at the CERN Large Hadron Collider of Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles. Promising results are found for the CP-odd pseudoscalar (A 0 ) and the heavier CP-even scalar (H 0 ) Higgs bosons with masses up to 800 GeV. Furthermore, we study properties of the lightest neutralino (χ 0 ) and calculate its cosmological relic density in a supersymmetric U(1)(prime) model as well as the muon anomalous magnetic moment a μ = (g μ -2)/2 in a supersymmetric U(1)(prime) model. We found that there are regions of the parameter space that can explain the experimental deviation of a μ from the Standard Model calculation and yield an acceptable cold dark matter relic density without conflict with collider experimental constraints. Recently, we presented a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion (b(bar b) to hh) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model and the minimal supersymmetric model. We plan to predict the Higgs pair production rate and to study the trilinear coupling among the Higgs bosons. In addition, we have made significant contributions in B physics, single top production, charged Higgs search at the Fermilab as well as in grid computing for both D0 and ATLAS

  7. p-bar p collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.

    1989-01-01

    This note encompasses a set of six lectures given at the summer school held at Campos do Jordao on January of 1989 near Sao Paulo, Brazil. The intent of the lectures was to describe the physics of p-bar p at CERN and Fermilab. Particular attention has been paid to make a self contained presentation to a prospective audience of graduate students. Since large Monte Carlo codes might not be available to all members of this audience, great reliance was placed on back of the envelope estimates. Emphasis was also placed on experimental data rather than theoretical speculation, since predictions for, for example, supersymmetric particle production are easily obtained by transcription of formulae already obtained. (author)

  8. /bar p/p collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.

    1989-03-01

    This note encompasses a set of six lectures given at the summer school held at Campos Do Jordao in January of 1989 near Sao Paulo, Brazil. The intent of the lectures was to describe the physics of /bar p/p at CERN and Fermilab. Particular attention has been paid to making a self contained presentation to a prospective audience of graduate students. Since large Monte Carlo codes might not be available to all members of this audience, great reliance was placed on ''back of the envelope estimates.'' Emphasis was also placed on experimental data rather than theoretical speculation, since predictions for, for example, supersymmetric particle production are easily obtained by transcription of formulae already obtained. 9 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs

  9. B-physics in hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.T.

    1993-01-01

    A program of producing > 10 10 detectable B's is conservatively achievable within this decade. This offers an excellent conventional physics program of ∼ 10 9 B→D * ell ν decays and ∼10 5 B→ρ ell ν decays, allowing a determination of V cb ± 3% and V ub ± 20%. This also probes the quantities such as √B(f B ) and f B s with high statistics. The resonances of the B-system and the prospects for flavor and kinematic tagging will emerge within the next few years. New states such as B c will be surveyed, and the list of B s and B c decay modes will grow. CP-violation with conventional or bachelor pion tagging may be first observed in the ψK S asymmetry within such a 10 10 program. B S bar B S mixing looks difficult, though x s approx-lt 20 may be probed. Rare and radiative dacays will be subject to their first probative examination

  10. Beam-based alignment and tuning procedures for e+e- collider final focus systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Odian, A.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto, N.

    1991-05-01

    For future linear colliders, with very small emittances and beam sizes and demanding tolerances on final focus system alignment and magnet errors, it becomes increasingly important to use the beam as a diagnostic tool. We report here procedures we have identified and will be implemented in the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC incorporating (1) quadrupole strength changes, (2) central orbit modifications, (3) spot size measurements, and (4) beam stability monitoring. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Beam-based alignment and tuning procedures for e+e- collider final focus systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Burke, D.; Helm, R.; Irwin, J.; Odian, A.; Roy, G.; Ruth, R.; Yamamoto

    1991-01-01

    For future linear colliders, with very small emittances and beam sizes and demanding tolerances on final focus system alignment and magnet errors, it becomes increasingly important to use the beam as a diagnostic tool. The authors report here procedures they have identified and will be implemented in the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC incorporating (1) quadrupole strength changes, (2) central orbit modifications, (3) spot size measurements, and (4) beam stability monitoring

  12. Measured and simulated heavy-ion beam loss patterns at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, P. D.; Bruce, R.; Jowett, J. M.; Redaelli, S.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.; Valentino, G.; Wollmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN pushes forward to new regimes in terms of beam energy and intensity. In view of the combination of very energetic and intense beams together with sensitive machine components, in particular the superconducting magnets, the LHC is equipped with a collimation system to provide protection and intercept uncontrolled beam losses. Beam losses could cause a superconducting magnet to quench, or in the worst case, damage the hardware. The collimation system, which is optimized to provide a good protection with proton beams, has shown a cleaning efficiency with heavy-ion beams which is worse by up to two orders of magnitude. The reason for this reduced cleaning efficiency is the fragmentation of heavy-ion beams into isotopes with a different mass to charge ratios because of the interaction with the collimator material. In order to ensure sufficient collimation performance in future ion runs, a detailed theoretical understanding of ion collimation is needed. The simulation of heavy-ion collimation must include processes in which 82 + 208Pb ions fragment into dozens of new isotopes. The ions and their fragments must be tracked inside the magnetic lattice of the LHC to determine their loss positions. This paper gives an overview of physical processes important for the description of heavy-ion loss patterns. Loss maps simulated by means of the two tools ICOSIM [1,2] and the newly developed STIER (SixTrack with Ion-Equivalent Rigidities) are compared with experimental data measured during LHC operation. The comparison shows that the tool STIER is in better agreement.

  13. Theory Overview of Electroweak Physics at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, John M. [Fermilab

    2016-09-03

    This contribution summarizes some of the important theoretical progress that has been made in the arena of electroweak physics at hadron colliders. The focus is on developments that have sharpened theoretical predictions for final states produced through electroweak processes. Special attention is paid to new results that have been presented in the last year, since LHCP2015, as well as on key issues for future measurements at the LHC.

  14. The beam energy measurement system for the Beijing electron-positron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.Y.; Abakumova, E.V.; Achasov, M.N.; Blinov, V.E.; Cai, X.; Dong, H.Y.; Fu, C.D.; Harris, F.A.; Kaminsky, V.V.; Krasnov, A.A.; Liu, Q.; Mo, X.H.; Muchnoi, N.Yu.; Nikolaev, I.B.; Qin, Q.; Qu, H.M.; Olsen, S.L.; Pyata, E.E.; Shamov, A.G.; Shen, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    The beam energy measurement system (BEMS) for the upgraded Beijing electron-positron collider BEPC-II is described. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. The relative systematic uncertainty of the electron and positron beam energy determination is estimated as 2⋅10 -5 .

  15. General formulae of luminosity for various types of colliding beam machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshio.

    1976-07-01

    Summarized are the formulae of luminosity for proton-proton, electron-positron and electron-proton colliding beam machines. Both coasting and bunched proton beams are considered. The expressions are derived from the first principle. These formulae will be useful for the design of an intersecting storage accelerator such as TRISTAN. (auth.)

  16. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  17. Ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  18. Straw man 900-1000 GeV crystal extraction test beam for Fermilab collider operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A design for a 900-1000 GeV, 100 khz parasitic test beam for use during collider operations has been developed. The beam makes use of two bent crystals, one for extraction and the other one for redirecting the beam in to the present Switchyard beam system. The beam requires only a few modifications in the A0 area and largely uses existing devices. It should be straight-forward to modify one or two beam lines in the fixed target experimental areas to work above 800 GeV. Possibilities for improvements to the design,to operate at higher fluxes are discussed

  19. Beam-Based Nonlinear Optics Corrections in Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Malitsky, Nikolay; Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed to measure and correct operationally the non-linear effects of the final focusing magnets in colliders, which gives access to the effects of multi-pole errors by applying closed orbit bumps, and analyzing the resulting tune and orbit shifts. This technique has been tested and used during 3 years of RHIC (the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL) operations. I will discuss here the theoretical basis of the method, the experimental set-up, the correction results, the present understanding of the machine model, the potential and limitations of the method itself as compared with other non linear correction techniques.

  20. Impact of detector simulation in particle physics collider experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Elvira, V.

    2017-06-01

    Through the last three decades, accurate simulation of the interactions of particles with matter and modeling of detector geometries has proven to be of critical importance to the success of the international high-energy physics (HEP) experimental programs. For example, the detailed detector modeling and accurate physics of the Geant4-based simulation software of the CMS and ATLAS particle physics experiments at the European Center of Nuclear Research (CERN) Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was a determinant factor for these collaborations to deliver physics results of outstanding quality faster than any hadron collider experiment ever before. This review article highlights the impact of detector simulation on particle physics collider experiments. It presents numerous examples of the use of simulation, from detector design and optimization, through software and computing development and testing, to cases where the use of simulation samples made a difference in the precision of the physics results and publication turnaround, from data-taking to submission. It also presents estimates of the cost and economic impact of simulation in the CMS experiment. Future experiments will collect orders of magnitude more data with increasingly complex detectors, taxing heavily the performance of simulation and reconstruction software. Consequently, exploring solutions to speed up simulation and reconstruction software to satisfy the growing demand of computing resources in a time of flat budgets is a matter that deserves immediate attention. The article ends with a short discussion on the potential solutions that are being considered, based on leveraging core count growth in multicore machines, using new generation coprocessors, and re-engineering HEP code for concurrency and parallel computing.

  1. Semiconductor devices as track detectors in high energy colliding beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.

    1980-01-01

    In considering the design of experiments for high energy colliding beam facilities one quickly sees the need for better detectors. The full exploitation of machines like ISABELLE will call for detector capabilities beyond what can be expected from refinements of the conventional approaches to particle detection in high energy physics experiments. Over the past year or so there has been a general realization that semiconductor device technology offers the possibility of position sensing detectors having resolution elements with dimensions of the order of 10 microns or smaller. Such a detector could offer enormous advantages in the design of experiments, and the purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the possibilities and some of the problems

  2. Semiconductor devices as track detectors in high energy colliding beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, T

    1980-01-01

    In considering the design of experiments for high energy colliding beam facilities one quickly sees the need for better detectors. The full exploitation of machines like ISABELLE will call for detector capabilities beyond what can be expected from refinements of the conventional approaches to particle detection in high energy physics experiments. Over the past year or so there has been a general realization that semiconductor device technology offers the possibility of position sensing detectors having resolution elements with dimensions of the order of 10 microns or smaller. Such a detector could offer enormous advantages in the design of experiments, and the purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the possibilities and some of the problems.

  3. Physics with the collider detectors at RHIC and the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Hallman, T.

    1995-01-01

    On January 8, 1995, over 180 participants gathered to hear the QM95 preconference workshop on 'Physics with the Collider Detectors at RHIC and the LHC'. The goal was to bring together the experimentalists from a wide community of hadron and heavy ion collider detector collaborations. The speakers were encouraged to present the current status of their detectors, with all the blemishes, and the audience was encouraged to share their successes and failures in approaching similar detector design issues. The presentations were excellent and the discussions were lively and stimulating. The editors hope that the reader will find these proceedings to be equally stimulating. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database from articles in this report

  4. Physics with the collider detectors at RHIC and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.; Hallman, T. [eds.

    1995-07-15

    On January 8, 1995, over 180 participants gathered to hear the QM95 preconference workshop on `Physics with the Collider Detectors at RHIC and the LHC`. The goal was to bring together the experimentalists from a wide community of hadron and heavy ion collider detector collaborations. The speakers were encouraged to present the current status of their detectors, with all the blemishes, and the audience was encouraged to share their successes and failures in approaching similar detector design issues. The presentations were excellent and the discussions were lively and stimulating. The editors hope that the reader will find these proceedings to be equally stimulating. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the energy database from articles in this report.

  5. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  6. Spin Transparency Mode in the NICA Collider with Solenoid Siberian Snakes for Proton and Deuteron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2017-12-01

    Two solenoid Siberian Snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in spin transparency mode of the NICA collider. The snake solenoids with a total field integral of 2×50 T·m are placed into the straight sections of the NICA collider. It allows one to control polarization of protons and deuterons up to 13.5 GeV/c and 4 GeV/c respectively. The snakes introduce a strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Snakes are presented.

  7. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BIGI, I.; BOLTON, T.; FORMAGGIO, J.; HARRIS, D.; MORFIN, J.; SPENTZOURIS, P.; YU, J.; KAYSER, B.; KING, B.J.; MCFARLAND, K.; PETROV, A.; SCHELLMAN, H.; VELASCO, M.; SHROCK, R.

    2000-01-01

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters

  8. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  9. An introduction to beam physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berz, Martin; Wan, Weishi

    2015-01-01

    The field of beam physics touches many areas of physics, engineering, and the sciences. In general terms, beams describe ensembles of particles with initial conditions similar enough to be treated together as a group so that the motion is a weakly nonlinear perturbation of a chosen reference particle. Particle beams are used in a variety of areas, ranging from electron microscopes, particle spectrometers, medical radiation facilities, powerful light sources, and astrophysics to large synchrotrons and storage rings such as the LHC at CERN. An Introduction to Beam Physics is based on lectures given at Michigan State University’s Department of Physics and Astronomy, the online VUBeam program, the U.S. Particle Accelerator School, the CERN Academic Training Programme, and various other venues. It is accessible to beginning graduate and upper-division undergraduate students in physics, mathematics, and engineering. The book begins with a historical overview of methods for generating and accelerating beams, high...

  10. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  11. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-01-01

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. (bar P)), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g. ).

  12. Beam-based alignment technique for the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider] linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolphsen, C.E.; Lavine, T.L.; Atwood, W.B.

    1989-03-01

    Misalignment of quadrupole magnets and beam position monitors (BPMs) in the linac of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) cause the electron and positron beams to be steered off-center in the disk-loaded waveguide accelerator structures. Off-center beams produce wakefields which limit the SLC performance at high beam intensities by causing emittance growth. Here, we present a general method for simultaneously determining quadrupole magnet and BPM offsets using beam trajectory measurements. Results from the application of the method to the SLC linac are described. The alignment precision achieved is approximately 100 μm, which is significantly better than that obtained using optical surveying techniques. 2 refs., 4 figs

  13. Online beam energy measurement of Beijing electron positron collider II linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Iqbal, M.; Liu, R.; Chi, Y.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes online beam energy measurement of Beijing Electron Positron Collider upgraded version II linear accelerator (linac) adequately. It presents the calculation formula, gives the error analysis in detail, discusses the realization in practice, and makes some verification. The method mentioned here measures the beam energy by acquiring the horizontal beam position with three beam position monitors (BPMs), which eliminates the effect of orbit fluctuation, and is much better than the one using the single BPM. The error analysis indicates that this online measurement has further potential usage such as a part of beam energy feedback system. The reliability of this method is also discussed and demonstrated in this paper.

  14. Polarization effects in the reaction of charm baryon production on colliding electron-positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekalo, M.P.; Korzh, A.P.; Barannik, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    To calculate energy and angular distributions of various decay products of charm baAyons, which are prodUced in reactions on colliding e + e - beams, it is necessary to know the differential cross sections of the e + e - → C+anti C process which correspond to different polarized states of produced C and anti C (C - charm baryon). These differential cross sections are calculated for a single-photon mechanism with respect to the contribution of the anapole and electric dipole form factors of C-baryon. Polarizations of colliding electron-positron beams are taken into account in a full volume

  15. Minimax: Multiparticle physics at the TeVatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The author and two dozen others are engaged in a small test/experiment in the Fermilab Tevatron collider. It is called Minimax, and its purpose is to explore large-cross-section physics in the forward direction. The primary goal of Minimax is search for events containing the residue of disoriented chiral condensate (dcc) produced in the primary collision. The theoretical ideas are very speculative. But if they are right, they could provide an interpretation of the Centauro/anti-Centauro anomalies claimed to have been seen in cosmic-ray events. In this paper, the history and status of Minimax is described

  16. Higgs physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, H; Abusleme, A; Afanaciev, K; Alipour Tehrani, N; Balázs, C; Benhammou, Y; Benoit, M; Bilki, B; Blaising, J-J; Boland, M J; Boronat, M; Borysov, O; Božović-Jelisavčić, I; Buckland, M; Bugiel, S; Burrows, P N; Charles, T K; Daniluk, W; Dannheim, D; Dasgupta, R; Demarteau, M; Díaz Gutierrez, M A; Eigen, G; Elsener, K; Felzmann, U; Firlej, M; Firu, E; Fiutowski, T; Fuster, J; Gabriel, M; Gaede, F; García, I; Ghenescu, V; Goldstein, J; Green, S; Grefe, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Kačarević, G; Kalinowski, J; Kananov, S; Klempt, W; Kopec, M; Krawczyk, M; Krupa, B; Kucharczyk, M; Kulis, S; Laštovička, T; Lesiak, T; Levy, A; Levy, I; Linssen, L; Lukić, S; Maier, A A; Makarenko, V; Marshall, J S; Martin, V J; Mei, K; Milutinović-Dumbelović, G; Moroń, J; Moszczyński, A; Moya, D; Münker, R M; Münnich, A; Neagu, A T; Nikiforou, N; Nikolopoulos, K; Nürnberg, A; Pandurović, M; Pawlik, B; Perez Codina, E; Peric, I; Petric, M; Pitters, F; Poss, S G; Preda, T; Protopopescu, D; Rassool, R; Redford, S; Repond, J; Robson, A; Roloff, P; Ros, E; Rosenblat, O; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Sailer, A; Schlatter, D; Schulte, D; Shumeiko, N; Sicking, E; Simon, F; Simoniello, R; Sopicki, P; Stapnes, S; Ström, R; Strube, J; Świentek, K P; Szalay, M; Tesař, M; Thomson, M A; Trenado, J; Uggerhøj, U I; van der Kolk, N; van der Kraaij, E; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M; Vila, I; Vogel Gonzalez, M; Vos, M; Vossebeld, J; Watson, M; Watson, N; Weber, M A; Weerts, H; Wells, J D; Weuste, L; Winter, A; Wojtoń, T; Xia, L; Xu, B; Żarnecki, A F; Zawiejski, L; Zgura, I-S

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future [Formula: see text] collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to [Formula: see text], providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper is the first comprehensive presentation of the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating at three energy stages: [Formula: see text], 1.4 and [Formula: see text]. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung ([Formula: see text]) and [Formula: see text]-fusion ([Formula: see text]), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width [Formula: see text], and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at [Formula: see text] provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through [Formula: see text]-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of the precision achievable with Higgs measurements at CLIC and describes the interpretation of these measurements in a global fit.

  17. Higgs physics at the CLIC electron-positron linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramowicz, H.; Benhammou, Y.; Borysov, O.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Levy, I.; Rosenblat, O. [Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abusleme, A.; Diaz Gutierrez, M.A.; Vogel Gonzalez, M. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Afanaciev, K.; Makarenko, V.; Shumeiko, N. [Belarusian State University, National Scientific and Educational Centre of Particle and High Energy Physics, Minsk (Belarus); Alipour Tehrani, N.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Grefe, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hynds, D.; Klempt, W.; Kulis, S.; Linssen, L.; Maier, A.A.; Muenker, R.M.; Muennich, A.; Nikiforou, N.; Nuernberg, A.; Perez Codina, E.; Petric, M.; Pitters, F.; Poss, S.G.; Redford, S.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Schulte, D.; Sicking, E.; Simoniello, R.; Stapnes, S.; Stroem, R.; Strube, J.; Weber, M.A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Balazs, C.; Charles, T.K. [Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); Benoit, M.; Vicente Barreto Pinto, M. [Universite de Geneve, Departement de Physique Nucleaire et Corpusculaire (DPNC), Geneva (Switzerland); Bilki, B.; Demarteau, M.; Repond, J.; Weerts, H.; Xia, L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Blaising, J.J. [Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Boland, M.J.; Felzmann, U.; Rassool, R. [University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Boronat, M.; Fuster, J.; Garcia, I.; Ros, E.; Vos, M. [CSIC-University of Valencia, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Kacarevic, G.; Lukic, S.; Milutinovic-Dumbelovic, G.; Pandurovic, M. [University of Belgrade, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Buckland, M.; Vossebeld, J. [University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Bugiel, S.; Dasgupta, R.; Firlej, M.; Fiutowski, T.; Idzik, M.; Kopec, M.; Moron, J.; Swientek, K.P. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Crakow (Poland); Burrows, P.N. [Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Daniluk, W.; Krupa, B.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lesiak, T.; Moszczynski, A.; Pawlik, B.; Sopicki, P.; Wojton, T.; Zawiejski, L. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Crakow (Poland); Eigen, G.; Kraaij, E. van der [University of Bergen, Department of Physics and Technology, Bergen (Norway); Firu, E.; Ghenescu, V.; Neagu, A.T.; Preda, T.; Zgura, I.S. [Institute of Space Science, Bucharest (Romania); Gabriel, M.; Simon, F.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Kolk, N. van der; Weuste, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Gaede, F. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Goldstein, J. [University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Green, S.; Marshall, J.S.; Mei, K.; Thomson, M.A.; Xu, B. [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hawkes, C.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Watson, M.; Watson, N.; Winter, A. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Kalinowski, J.; Krawczyk, M.; Zarnecki, A.F. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Lastovicka, T. [Institute of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Martin, V.J. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Moya, D.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Vila, I. [CSIC-University of Cantabria, IFCA, Santander (Spain); Peric, I. [Institut fuer Prozessdatenverarbeitung und Elektronik (IPE), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Protopopescu, D.; Robson, A. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Trenado, J. [University of Barcelona, Barcelona (ES); Uggerhoej, U.I. [Aarhus University, Aarhus (DK); Wells, J.D. [University of Michigan, Physics Department, Ann Arbor, MI (US)

    2017-07-15

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at centre-of-mass energies up to 3 TeV, providing sensitivity to a wide range of new physics phenomena and precision physics measurements at the energy frontier. This paper is the first comprehensive presentation of the Higgs physics reach of CLIC operating at three energy stages: √(s) = 350 GeV, 1.4 and 3 TeV. The initial stage of operation allows the study of Higgs boson production in Higgsstrahlung (e{sup +}e{sup -} → ZH) and WW-fusion (e{sup +}e{sup -} → Hν{sub e} anti ν{sub e}), resulting in precise measurements of the production cross sections, the Higgs total decay width Γ{sub H}, and model-independent determinations of the Higgs couplings. Operation at √(s) > 1 TeV provides high-statistics samples of Higgs bosons produced through WW-fusion, enabling tight constraints on the Higgs boson couplings. Studies of the rarer processes e{sup +}e{sup -} → t anti tH and e{sup +}e{sup -} → HHν{sub e} anti ν{sub e} allow measurements of the top Yukawa coupling and the Higgs boson self-coupling. This paper presents detailed studies of the precision achievable with Higgs measurements at CLIC and describes the interpretation of these measurements in a global fit. (orig.)

  18. Thoughts of fast beam aborts for the international linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattison, T.

    2006-01-01

    The ILC beam is potentially very destructive, and a fast beam abort system is useful as part of the machine-protection strategy. Scaling laws for kicker pulse power and length optimization are presented. Kicker reference designs for the ILC with full linac aperture, and limited aperture, are presented. Power levels are of order 10 8 W for 100 nsec filling times, and length scales are of order 100 m. Design issues for beam transport to a dump are considered. Separation of the beams at the defining obstruction and energy bandwidth force either a long drift after the septum bend or long quads with large apertures for dispersion control. (author)

  19. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research

  20. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, Peter Gregory [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  1. 4. topical workshop on proton-antiproton collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenni, H.; Schacher, J.

    1984-01-01

    The most exciting topic at this Workshop was clearly the experimental hint for new unexpected phenomena, reported by the UA1 and UA2 Collaborations: At the CERN SPS Collider (vs = 540 GeV), a few events were observed with high missing transverse energy in association with an isolated electromagnetic cluster or one or more hard jets (UA1) or an isolated electron and one or two hard jets (UA2). Due to the enhanced data sample, the discovery of the intermediate vector bosons W and Z in 1983 was undoubtedly confirmed, and the nice agreement of their properties with the predictions of the electroweak theory was shown. In addition, many new results on experimental and theoretical jet physics were presented. The Tevatron Collider project and its planned experiments at Fermilab were discussed, and there were contributions about the possible future developments in theory (compositeness, supersymmetry) as well as in experimental high energy physics (Supercollider, Juratron). See hints under the relevant topics. (orig./HSI)

  2. Proceedings of the 2. International Linear Collider Test-beam workshop - LCTW'09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wormser, G.; Poeschl, R.; Takeshi, M.; Yu, J.; Hauptman, J.; Jeans, D.; Velthuis, J.; Repond, J.; Stanitzki, M.; Chefdeville, M.; Pauletta, G.; Hauptman, J.; Kulis, S.; Charpy, A.; Rivera, R.; Turchetti, M.; Vos, M.; Dehmelt, K.; Settles, R.; Decotigny, D.; Killenberg, M.; Haas, D.; Gaede, F.; Graf, N.; Wing, M.; Gaede, F.; Karstensen, S.; Meyners, N.; Hast, C.; Vrba, V.; Takeshita, T.; Kawagoe, K.; Linssen, L.; Ramberg, E.; Demarteau, M.; Fisk, H.E.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Videau, H.; Boudry, V.; Hauptman, J.; Lipton, R.; Nelson, T.

    2009-01-01

    At this workshop detector and simulation experts have described and discussed the necessary ILC (International Linear Collider) detector research and development program in view of its need for test beams. This workshop has provided an opportunity to evaluate the capabilities and shortcomings of existing facilities in the context of planned test beam activities. This document gathers together the slides of the presentations. The presentations have been classified into 4 topics: -) plans of sub-detectors - calorimetry, silicon and gaseous tracking, -) data acquisition, -) test beam facilities, and -) resources and infrastructure for future test beams

  3. Fast and Precise Beam Energy Measurement using Compton Backscattering at e+e- Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminskiy, V V; Muchnoi, N Yu; Zhilich, V N

    2017-01-01

    The report describes a method for a fast and precise beam energy measurement in the beam energy range 0.5-2 GeV and its application at various e+e- colliders. Low-energy laser photons interact head-on with the electron or positron beam and produce Compton backscattered photons whose energy is precisely measured by HPGe detector. The method allows measuring the beam energy with relative accuracy of ∼2-5.10-5. The method was successfully applied at VEPP-4M, VEPP-3, VEPP-2000 (BINP, Russia) and BEPC-II (IHEP, China).

  4. Beam dynamics aspects of crab cavities in the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y P; Barranco, J; Tomás, R; Weiler, T; Zimmermann, F; Calaga, R; Morita, A

    2009-01-01

    Modern colliders bring into collision a large number of bunches to achieve a high luminosity. The long-range beam-beam effects arising from parasitic encounters at such colliders are mitigated by introducing a crossing angle. Under these conditions, crab cavities (CC) can be used to restore effective head-on collisions and thereby to increase the geometric luminosity. Such crab cavities have been proposed for both linear and circular colliders. The crab cavities are rf cavities operated in a transverse dipole mode, which imparts on the beam particles a transverse kick that varies with the longitudinal position along the bunch. The use of crab cavities in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may not only raise the luminosity, but it could also complicate the beam dynamics, e.g., crab cavities might not only cancel synchrobetatron resonances excited by the crossing angle but they could also excite new ones, they could reduce the dynamic aperture for off-momentum particles, they could influence the aperture and orbit...

  5. Operation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector with colliding beams at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell'Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Grieco, G.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Ristori, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F.; Bailey, M.W.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Kruse, M.C.; Shaw, N.M.; Carithers, W.C.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Yao, W.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.R.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Skarha, J.; Snider, F.D.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S.; Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.F.; Song, T.Y.; Dunn, A.; Gold, M.; Matthews, J.; Bacchetta, N.; Azzi, P.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Castro, A.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Tipton, P.; Watts, G.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the main features of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) and discuss its performance during actual colliding beam operation at the Fermilab Tevatron. Details on S/N ratio, alignment, resolution and efficiency are given

  6. Physics prospects at a linear e+e− collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of various theories, there is need for a high luminosity e+e− collider ... International Technology Recommendation Panel took a decision that the collider ..... the presence of phases can affect the determination of the range of MSSM pa-.

  7. The hunt for new physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AbdusSalam, S.; Adam-Bourdarios, C.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Allanach, B.; Altunkaynak, B.; Wagner, C.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory to test the hypothesis of TeV scale strings and D brane models. An overview of these possibilities is presented in the spirit that it will serve as a companion to the Technical Design Reports (TDRs) by the particle detector groups ATLAS and CMS to facilitate the test of the new theoretical ideas at the LHC. Which of these ideas stands the test of the LHC data will govern the course of particle physics in the subsequent decades.

  8. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  9. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities

  10. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Searching for New Physics (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    This is the second lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This second lecture discusses techniques important for analyses searching for new physics using the CDF B_s --> mu+ mu- search as a specific example. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  11. The Nuclotron-based Ion Collider Facility Project. The Physics Programme for the Multi-Purpose Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraksiev, N. S.; MPD Collaboration

    2018-05-01

    The Nuclotron-based Ion Collider fAcility (NICA) is a new accelerator complex being constructed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR). The general objective of the project is to provide beams for the experimental study of hot and dense strongly interacting QCD matter. The heavy ion programme includes two planned detectors: BM@N (Baryonic Matter at Nuclotron) a fixed target experiment with extracted Nuclotron beams; and MPD (MultiPurpose Detector) a collider mode experiment at NICA. The accelerated particles can range from protons and light nuclei to gold ions. Beam energies will span\\sqrt{s}=12-27 GeV with luminosity L ≥ 1 × 1030 cm‑2s‑1 and \\sqrt{{s}NN}=4-11 GeV and average luminosity L = 1 × 1027cm‑2 s ‑1(for 197Au79+), respectively. A third experiment for spin physics is planned with the SPD (Spin Physics Detector) at the NICA collider in polarized beams mode. A brief overview of the MPD is presented along with several observables in the MPD physics programme.

  12. B+ L violation at colliders and new physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdeño, David G.; Reimitz, Peter; Sakurai, Kazuki; Tamarit, Carlos

    2018-04-01

    Chiral electroweak anomalies predict baryon ( B) and lepton ( L) violating fermion interactions, which can be dressed with large numbers of Higgs and gauge bosons. The estimation of the total B + L-violating rate from an initial two-particle state — potentially observable at colliders — has been the subject of an intense discussion, mainly centered on the resummation of boson emission, which is believed to contribute to the cross-section with an exponential function of the energy, yet with an exponent (the "holy-grail" function) which is not fully known in the energy range of interest. In this article we focus instead on the effect of fermions beyond the Standard-Model (SM) in the polynomial contributions to the rate. It is shown that B + L processes involving the new fermions have a polynomial contribution that can be several orders of magnitude greater than in the SM, for high centre-of-mass energies and light enough masses. We also present calculations that hint at a simple dependence of the holy grail function on the heavy fermion masses. Thus, if anomalous B + L violating interactions are ever detected at high-energy colliders, they could be associated with new physics.

  13. Relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator as a power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider: A systems study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Deadrick, F.

    1994-10-01

    A physics, engineering, and costing study has been conducted to explore the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator system as a power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. We present a point design example which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. Preliminary ''bottom-up'' cost estimate yields the full power source system at less than 1 billion dollars. The overall efficiency for rf production is estimated to be 36%

  14. Physics perspectives for a Future Circular Collider: FCC-hh/eh - Physics-Perspectives

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The lectures will briefly discuss the parameters of a Future Circular Collider, before addressing in detail the physics perspectives and the challenges for the experiments and detector systems. The main focus will be on ee and pp collisions, but opportunities for e—p physics will also be covered. The FCC physics perspectives will be presented with reference to the ongoing LHC programme, including the physics potential from future upgrades to the LHC in luminosity and possibly energy.

  15. The Hunt for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Pran; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dutta, Bhaskar; Feldman, Daniel; Liu, Zuowei; Han, Tao; Langacker, Paul; Mohapatra, Rabi; Valle, Jose; Pilaftsis, Apostolos; Zerwas, Dirk; AbdusSalam, Shehu; Adam-Bourdarios, Claire; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Allanach, Benjamin; Altunkaynak, B; Anchordoqui, Luis A; Baer, Howard; Bajc, Borut; Buchmueller, O; Carena, M; Cavanaugh, R; Chang, S; Choi, Kiwoon; Csaki, C; Dawson, S; de Campos, F; De Roeck, A; Duhrssen, M; Eboli, O J.P; Ellis, J R; Flacher, H; Goldberg, H; Grimus, W; Haisch, U; Heinemeyer, S; Hirsch, M; Holmes, M; Ibrahim, Tarek; Isidori, G; Kane, Gordon; Kong, K; Lafaye, Remi; Landsberg, G; Lavoura, L; Lee, Jae Sik; Lee, Seung J; Lisanti, M; Lust, Dieter; Magro, M B; Mahbubani, R; Malinsky, M; Maltoni, Fabio; Morisi, S; Muhlleitner, M M; Mukhopadhyaya, B; Neubert, M; Olive, K A; Perez, Gilad; Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Plehn, T; Ponton, E; Porod, Werner; Quevedo, F; Rauch, M; Restrepo, D; Rizzo, T G; Romao, J C; Ronga, F J; Santiago, Jose; Schechter, J; Senjanovic, G; Shao, J; Spira, M; Stieberger, S; Sullivan, Zack; Tait, Tim M P; Tata, Xerxes; Taylor, T R; Toharia, M; Wacker, J; Wagner, C E.M; Wang, Lian-Tao; Weiglein, G; Zeppenfeld, D; Zurek, K

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory ...

  16. Angular distributions as a probe of anomalous ZZH and γZH interactions at a linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindani, Saurabh D.; Sharma, Pankaj

    2009-01-01

    We examine the contribution of general Z*ZH and γ*ZH three-point interactions arising from new physics to the Higgs production process e + e - →HZ. From Lorentz covariance, each of these vertices may be written in terms of three (complex) form factors, whose real and imaginary parts together make six independent couplings. We take into account possible longitudinal or transverse beam polarization likely to be available at a linear collider. We show how partial cross sections and angular asymmetries in suitable combinations with appropriate beam polarizations can be used to disentangle various couplings from one another. A striking result is that using transverse polarization, one of the γZH couplings, not otherwise accessible, can be determined independently of all other couplings. Transverse polarization also helps in the independent determination of a combination of two other couplings, in contrast to a combination of four accessible with unpolarized or longitudinally polarized beams. We also obtain the sensitivity of the various observables in constraining the new-physics interactions at a linear collider operating at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV with longitudinal or transverse polarization.

  17. The Physics of Beams: The Andrew Sessler Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.

    1996-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Andrew Sessler Symposium held at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in honor of Andrew Sessler close-quote s over forty years of major scientific contributions to accelerator and beam physics as well as in celebration of his 65th birthday. The symposium was sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. The topics discussed include linear colliders, past history and future speculations, ELOISATRON at 100 TeV beam, manipulating charged particle beams by means of plasma and collective instabilities in accelerator and storage rings. There were 10 papers presented and 8 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  18. Calculation of integrated luminosity for beams stored in the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    A model for calculating the integrated luminosity of beams stored in the Tevatron collider will be presented. The model determines the instantaneous luminosity by calculating the overlap integral of bunched beams passing through the interaction region. The calculation accounts for the variation in beam size due to the beta functions and also for effects due to finite longitudinal emittance and non-zero dispersion in the interaction region. The integrated luminosity is calculated for the beams as they evolve due to processes including collisions and intrabeam scattering. The model has been applied to both the extant and upgraded Tevatron collider, but is not limited to them. The original motivation for developing the computer model was to determine the reduction in luminosity due to beams with non-zero longitudinal emittances. There are two effects: the transverse beam size is increased where the dispersion is non-zero; the finite length of the beam bunch combined with an increasing β function results in an increased transverse beam size at the ends of the bunch. The derivation of a sufficiently useful analytic expression for the luminosity proved to be intractable. Instead, a numerical integration computer program was developed to calculate the luminosity in the presence of a finite longitudinal emittance. The program was then expanded into a model which allows the luminosity to vary due to changes in emittances and reduction in bunch intensities. At that point, it was not difficult to calculate the integrated luminosity. 5 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Constraining new physics with collider measurements of Standard Model signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, Jonathan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Grellscheid, David [IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University,Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Krämer, Michael; Sarrazin, Björn [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University,Sommerfeldstr. 16, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Yallup, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-14

    A new method providing general consistency constraints for Beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) theories, using measurements at particle colliders, is presented. The method, ‘Constraints On New Theories Using Rivet’, CONTUR, exploits the fact that particle-level differential measurements made in fiducial regions of phase-space have a high degree of model-independence. These measurements can therefore be compared to BSM physics implemented in Monte Carlo generators in a very generic way, allowing a wider array of final states to be considered than is typically the case. The CONTUR approach should be seen as complementary to the discovery potential of direct searches, being designed to eliminate inconsistent BSM proposals in a context where many (but perhaps not all) measurements are consistent with the Standard Model. We demonstrate, using a competitive simplified dark matter model, the power of this approach. The CONTUR method is highly scaleable to other models and future measurements.

  20. The HEB at flat top: Arranging for the HEB to collider beam transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    The flat top for the High Energy Booster (HEB) is planned to last for only 6.5 seconds, yet during this time the beam must be made to: (1) have the correct central momentum; (2) have the correct bunch-to-bunch spacing; (3) have the correct central phase; and (4) have the correct momentum spread and longitudinal length. All of these attributes must match what the Collider expects or unwanted emittance growth will occur. This paper outlines the techniques necessary to achieve a proper HEB-to-Collider beam transfer within the 6.5 s time constraint. A novel means for cogging is proposed and evaluated. The hardware necessary to implement the beam manipulation and to achieve the four goals is specified, and tolerances on the hardware are evaluated

  1. International linear collider physics and detectors. 2011 status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, James E. [Oregon Univ., OR (United States); Fuster, Juan [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Hesla, Leah [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States). NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center; Illenseer, Monika; Warmbein, Barbara [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Royole-Degieux, Perrine [CNRS/IN2P3, Paris (France); Takahashi, Rika [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Yamada, Sakue [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Yamamoto, Hitoshi [Tohoku Gakuin Univ., Sendai (Japan); Min, Zhang (eds.) [IHEP, Beijing (China)

    2011-07-01

    The studies of physics and detectors for the International Linear Collider are an important parallel element to the effort for the ILC Technical Design Report. The studies comprise the physics opportunities, detector requirements, and detector development to achieve the challenging high performance demanded by the physics, as well as integration of detectors into the accelerator. The current phase of this effort began with a call for Letters of Intent (LOIs) in 2007 and will lead to the submission of Detailed Baseline Design (DBD) report together with the ILC Technical Design Report at the end of 2012. Here we summarise the current status of this process, review what it has accomplished and identify the work that still needs to be completed. This report, titled International Linear Collider Physics and Detectors: 2011 Status Report, does just this. This report begins with a discussion of the outstanding issues in physics that motivate the construction of the ILC. It describes the organisation of the LOI process, the validation of the LOIs by the International Detector Advisory Group, and the results of R and D carried out to support the detector designs. The details of the concept detectors have already been published in the LOIs, which were completed in 2009. This report will, in a complementary way, describe the status of the detector R and D for each individual detector component and the status of the physics simulation infrastructure that has been built for the detector design process. Much of this work is carried out in cooperation between the two detector concept groups. This report describes the five common task groups and two working groups that have organised these cooperative activities. Many members of the detector concept groups and the common task groups have contributed to this report. Many more people have carried out the actual work that is reviewed. The complete list of members of each detector concept group can be found from the author lists of

  2. Orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Siberian snakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A D; Butenko, A V; Kekelidze, V D; Mikhaylov, V A; Kondratenko, M A; Filatov, Yu N; Kondratenko, A M

    2016-01-01

    Two solenoid Siberian snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in the “spin transparency” mode of the NICA collider. The field integrals of the solenoid snakes for protons and deuterons at maximum momentum of 13.5 GeV/c are equal to 2×50 T·m and 2×160 T·m respectively. The snakes introduce strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in NICA collider with solenoid snakes are presented. (paper)

  3. Effective models of new physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llodra-Perez, J.

    2011-07-01

    With the start of the Large Hadron Collider runs, in 2010, particle physicists will be soon able to have a better understanding of the electroweak symmetry breaking. They might also answer to many experimental and theoretical open questions raised by the Standard Model. Surfing on this really favorable situation, we will first present in this thesis a highly model-independent parametrization in order to characterize the new physics effects on mechanisms of production and decay of the Higgs boson. This original tool will be easily and directly usable in data analysis of CMS and ATLAS, the huge generalist experiments of LHC. It will help indeed to exclude or validate significantly some new theories beyond the Standard Model. In another approach, based on model-building, we considered a scenario of new physics, where the Standard Model fields can propagate in a flat six-dimensional space. The new spatial extra-dimensions will be compactified on a Real Projective Plane. This orbifold is the unique six-dimensional geometry which possesses chiral fermions and a natural Dark Matter candidate. The scalar photon, which is the lightest particle of the first Kaluza-Klein tier, is stabilized by a symmetry relic of the six dimension Lorentz invariance. Using the current constraints from cosmological observations and our first analytical calculation, we derived a characteristic mass range around few hundred GeV for the Kaluza-Klein scalar photon. Therefore the new states of our Universal Extra-Dimension model are light enough to be produced through clear signatures at the Large Hadron Collider. So we used a more sophisticated analysis of particle mass spectrum and couplings, including radiative corrections at one-loop, in order to establish our first predictions and constraints on the expected LHC phenomenology. (author)

  4. ISABELLE: a proton-proton colliding beam facility. [Proposal for the construction of ISABELLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-04-01

    A proposal is presented for the construction of an Intersecting Storage Accelerator, ISABELLE, to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. At this major research facility, colliding beams of protons will be produced and studied by particle physicists. This proposal combines the interests of these particle physicists in exploring a new energy regime with the challenge of building a new research instrument. The proposal results from several years of considering such devices in parallel with extensive developmental work. The proposal is divided into several major parts. Following an introduction is an overall summary of the proposal covering its highlights. Part II contains a thorough discussion of the physics objectives that can be addressed by the storage ring. It begins with an explanation of current theoretical concepts that occupy the curiosity of high energy physicists. Then follows a brief discussion of possible experiments that might be assembled at the interaction regions to test these concepts. The third part of the proposal goes into the details of the design of the intersecting storage accelerators. It begins with a description of the entire facility and the design of the magnet ring structure. The processes of proton beam accumulation and acceleration are thoroughly described. The discussion then turns to the design of the components and subsystems for the accelerator. The accelerator elements are described followed by a description of the physical plant. The cost estimate and time scales are displayed in Part IV. Here the estimate has been based on the experience gained from working with the prototype units at the laboratory. The appendices are an important part of the proposal. The parameter list for the 200 x 200 GeV ISABELLE is carefully documented. An example of a possible research program can be found in an appendix. The performance of prototype units is documented in one of the appendices.

  5. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  6. Beam dynamics of the interaction region solenoid in a linear collider due to a crossing angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tenenbaum

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Future linear colliders may require a nonzero crossing angle between the two beams at the interaction point (IP. This requirement in turn implies that the beams will pass through the strong interaction region solenoid with an angle, and thus that the component of the solenoidal field perpendicular to the beam trajectory is nonzero. The interaction of the beam and the solenoidal field in the presence of a crossing angle will cause optical effects not observed for beams passing through the solenoid on axis; these effects include dispersion, deflection of the beam, and synchrotron radiation effects. For a purely solenoidal field, the optical effects which are relevant to luminosity exactly cancel at the IP when the influence of the solenoid’s fringe field is taken into account. Beam size growth due to synchrotron radiation in the solenoid is proportional to the fifth power of the product of the solenoidal field, the length of the solenoid, and the crossing angle. Examples based on proposed linear collider detector solenoid configurations are presented.

  7. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Previtali, Valentina [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bruce, Roderik [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Redaelli, Stefano [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Rossi, Adriana [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salvachua Ferrando, Belen [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-26

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. We are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were checked to ensure that undesired effects were suppressed. Hardware specifications were based on the Tevatron devices and on preliminary engineering integration studies in the LHC machine. Required resources and a possible timeline were also outlined, together with a brief discussion of alternative halo-removal schemes and of other possible uses of electron lenses to improve the performance of the LHC.

  8. Conceptual design of hollow electron lenses for beam halo control in the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio; Valishev, Alexander; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Rossi, Adriana; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen

    2014-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is a technique for halo control in high-power hadron beams. It is based on an electron beam (possibly pulsed or modulated in intensity) guided by strong axial magnetic fields which overlaps with the circulating beam in a short section of the ring. The concept was tested experimentally at the Fermilab Tevatron collider using a hollow electron gun installed in one of the Tevatron electron lenses. Within the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and the European FP7 HiLumi LHC Design Study, we are proposing a conceptual design for applying this technique to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. A prototype hollow electron gun for the LHC was built and tested. The expected performance of the hollow electron beam collimator was based on Tevatron experiments and on numerical tracking simulations. Halo removal rates and enhancements of halo diffusivity were estimated as a function of beam and lattice parameters. Proton beam core lifetimes and emittance growth rates were check...

  9. Collider physics within the standard model a primer

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    2017-01-01

    With this graduate-level primer, the principles of the standard model of particle physics receive a particular skillful, personal and enduring exposition by one of the great contributors to the field. In 2013 the late Prof. Altarelli wrote: The discovery of the Higgs boson and the non-observation of new particles or exotic phenomena have made a big step towards completing the experimental confirmation of the standard model of fundamental particle interactions. It is thus a good moment for me to collect, update and improve my graduate lecture notes on quantum chromodynamics and the theory of electroweak interactions, with main focus on collider physics. I hope that these lectures can provide an introduction to the subject for the interested reader, assumed to be already familiar with quantum field theory and some basic facts in elementary particle physics as taught in undergraduate courses. “These lecture notes are a beautiful example of Guido’s unique pedagogical abilities and scientific vision”. From...

  10. Report of the Review Committee on the BNL colliding beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) proposal by BNL for a pp collider of 400 GeV /times/ 400 GeV with a maximum luminosity /Brit pounds/ = 2 /times/ 10 33 was reviewed by a DOE team, including consultants, on April 11--15, 1983. No major flaws were found that would prevent, in principle, the proposed collider from reaching its design goals. BNL has made sufficient progress in their superconducting magnet RandD program that, although there is not yet a magnet of the CBA baseline design, the Committee believes the design can be achieved. However, to ensure prompt completion of the project, substantial RandD needs to be carried out in short order, particularly on the timely and cost-effective production of magnets, reliability of quench protection, and determination of cryogenic heat loads

  11. Minimal interference beam size/profile measurement techniques applicable to the Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nexsen, W.; Dutt, S.; Kauffmann, S.; Lebedev, V.; Maschke, A.; Mokhov, N.; Richardson, R.; Tsyganov, E.; Zinchenko, A.

    1993-05-01

    The imaging of synchrotron radiation (SR) has been suggested as a technique for providing a continuous, non-interfering monitor of the beam profile in the Collider rings at the Superconducting Super Collider. A closer examination has raised questions concerning the applicability of SR imaging in this case because of the diffraction broadening of the image, the requirements for axial space and location in the lattice, and the complexity of the system. We have surveyed the known, alternative, minimal interference techniques for measuring beam size and have evaluated them for possible Collider usage. We conclude that of the approaches that appear feasible, all require at least some development for our usage and that the development of an electron beam probe offers the best promise. We recommend that flying wires be used for cross-checking and calibrating the electron beam probe diagnostic and for luminosity measurements when the highest accuracy is required, but flying wires should not be used as the primary diagnostic because of their limited lifetime

  12. Higgs physics at a future e+e- linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, M.

    2001-01-01

    This letter reviews the potential of a high luminosity e + e - linear collider (LC) in the precision study of the Higgs boson profile. The complementarity with the large hadron collider (LHC) Higgs physics program is briefly discussed. At the LC the Higgs mass can be best measured exploiting the kinematics in the Higgs-strahlung process: e + e - → Z → ZH. Spin, parity and charge-conjugation quantum numbers of the Higgs boson can be determined in a model-independent way. At the LC the Higgs boson production and decay rates can be used to measure the Higgs couplings to gauge bosons and fermions. Several extensions of the SM model introduce additional Higgs doublets and singlets. A no loose theorem guarantees that in a general supersymmetric model embedded in a GUT scenario at least one Higgs boson will be observable at √s = 500 GeV with L = 500 fb -1 . At the LHC the SM Higgs boson or at least one Higgs boson in the MSSM will be observed. Beyond its discovery a limited number of measurements of Higgs boson properties can be carried out at the LHC (mass, total width for a heavy Higgs boson, some ratios of couplings). The complementary of LC over LHC concerning the Higgs sector is threefold: first the accuracy of these measurements will be increased, secondly the absolute measurements of all the relevant Higgs boson couplings, including the Higgs self coupling, will be possible only at LC, and finally extended Higgs sector scenarios can be observed at LC closing the loopholes of a possible non-discovery at the LHC

  13. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira Fernandez, J.L.; Akay, A.N.; Aksakal, H.; Albacete, J.L.; Alekhin, S.; Allport, P.; Andreev, V.; Appleby, R.B.; Arikan, E.; Armesto, N.; Azuelos, G.; Bai, M.; Barber, D.; Bartels, J.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Belyaev, A.S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Bernard, N.; Bertolucci, S.; Bettoni, S.; Biswal, S.; Blumlein, J.; Bottcher, H.; Bogacz, A.; Bracco, C.; Brandt, G.; Braun, H.; Brodsky, S.; Buning, O.; Bulyak, E.; Buniatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Cakir, I.T.; Cakir, O.; Calaga, R.; Cetinkaya, V.; Ciapala, E.; Ciftci, R.; Ciftci, A.K.; Cole, B.A.; Collins, J.C.; Dadoun, O.; Dainton, J.; De Roeck, A.; d'Enterria, D.; Dudarev, A.; Eide, A.; Enberg, R.; Eroglu, E.; Eskola, K.J.; Favart, L.; Fitterer, M.; Forte, S.; Gaddi, A.; Gambino, P.; Garcia Morales, H.; Gehrmann, T.; Gladkikh, P.; Glasman, C.; Godbole, R.; Goddard, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Guffanti, A.; Guzey, V.; Gwenlan, C.; Han, T.; Hao, Y.; Haug, F.; Herr, W.; Herve, A.; Holzer, B.J.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jeanneret, B.; Jimenez, J.M.; Jowett, J.M.; Jung, H.; Karadeniz, H.; Kayran, D.; Kilic, A.; Kimura, K.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kluge, T.; Kocak, F.; Korostelev, M.; Kosmicki, A.; Kostka, P.; Kowalski, H.; Kramer, G.; Kuchler, D.; Kuze, M.; Lappi, T.; Laycock, P.; Levichev, E.; Levonian, S.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Lombardi, A.; Maeda, J.; Marquet, C.; Mellado, B.; Mess, K.H.; Milanese, A.; Moch, S.; Morozov, I.I.; Muttoni, Y.; Myers, S.; Nandi, S.; Nergiz, Z.; Newman, P.R.; Omori, T.; Osborne, J.; Paoloni, E.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pascaud, C.; Paukkunen, H.; Perez, E.; Pieloni, T.; Pilicer, E.; Pire, B.; Placakyte, R.; Polini, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pupkov, Y.; Radescu, V.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Rinol, L.; Rohini, R.; Rojo, J.; Russenschuck, S.; Sahin, M.; Salgado, C.A.; Sampei, K.; Sassot, R.; Sauvan, E.; Schneekloth, U.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schulte, D.; Senol, A.; Seryi, A.; Sievers, P.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Smith, W.; Spiesberger, H.; Stasto, A.M.; Strikman, M.; Sullivan, M.; Sultansoy, S.; Sun, Y.P.; Surrow, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Taels, P.; Tapan, I.; Tasci, T.; Tassi, E.; Ten Kate, H.; Terron, J.; Thiesen, H.; Thompson, L.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomas Garcia, R.; Tommasini, D.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuckmantel, J.; Turkoz, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tywoniuk, K.; Unel, G.; Urakawa, J.; VanMechelen, P.; Variola, A.; Veness, R.; Vivoli, A.; Vobly, P.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Wallon, S.; Watt, G.; Weiss, C.; Wiedemann, U.A.; Wienands, U.; Willeke, F.; Xiao, B.W.; Yakimenko, V.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Zhang, Z.; Zimmermann, F.; Zlebcik, R.; Zomer, F.

    2012-01-01

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ ran...

  14. Present and future colliding beam facilities at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Present state of the 4.1 GeV electron-positron storage ring SPEAR is described. The most important limitations on performance in SPEAR, such as synchrotron-betatron resonances, higher-order mode losses are outlined. Active bunch lengthener was outstalled in SPEAR to reduce the losses. Experiments on the bunch lengthening observed in SPEAR showed that the lengthening mechanism results from bunch instabilities due to the bunch interaction with the environment. SPEAR performance experience provided with effective prototype for directing the design of PEP-the 18 GeV positron-electron storage ring with designed luminosity of 10 32 cm -2 s -1 . Procurements and construction of PEP components are in full swing. The first beam is expeted to go around in the storage ring by October 1979

  15. Simulation of beam instabilities in a superconducting linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aune, B.; Mosnier, A.; Napoly, O.

    1992-01-01

    Some results on the short range and long range wakefields effects due to the SC cavities on a beam emerging from a TESLA linac are presented. First, the intrabunch energy spread is estimated after the usual linac phase optimisation. Next, multibunch transverse instability is studied with several schemes of constant beta FODO focusing. In both cases, the parameters of a realistic 1.3 Ghz TESLA cavity and the parameters of the two machines 'Top-Factory' and '1/2 TESLA' are considered. It is concluded that the longitudinal wake effect is not a problem in both machines and that a rather weak focusing scheme is sufficient to keep the emittance at the 10 -6 m rad design value. (author) 6 refs.; 9 figs.; 3 tabs

  16. Electron cloud buildup driving spontaneous vertical instabilities of stored beams in the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Romano

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the 2016 run, an anomalous beam instability was systematically observed at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC. Its main characteristic was that it spontaneously appeared after beams had been stored for several hours in collision at 6.5 TeV to provide data for the experiments, despite large chromaticity values and high strength of the Landau-damping octupole magnet. The instability exhibited several features characteristic of those induced by the electron cloud (EC. Indeed, when LHC operates with 25 ns bunch spacing, an EC builds up in a large fraction of the beam chambers, as revealed by several independent indicators. Numerical simulations have been carried out in order to investigate the role of the EC in the observed instabilities. It has been found that the beam intensity decay is unfavorable for the beam stability when LHC operates in a strong EC regime.

  17. Intense γ-ray generation for a polarized positron beam in a linear collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Miyahara

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available γ-ray generation by Compton backscattering in an optical lens series with periodic focal points is considered to produce a polarized positron beam for a linear collider. The lens series is composed of 20 unit cells with a length of 210 mm. Each lens has a hole to pass an electron beam with an energy of 5.8 GeV and the generated γ rays. It is shown by diffraction analysis that laser beam loss in the series is very small, and the beam size is periodically reduced to 26 μm. Electron beam size is reduced to 34 μm in a superconducting solenoid with a field of 15 T. To get a required γ-ray yield of 7×10^{15} γ/s, only one circularly polarized CO_{2} laser source with a power of 24 kW is needed.

  18. Lattice design and beam optics calculations for the new large-scale electron-positron collider FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Haerer, Bastian; Prof. Dr. Schmidt, Ruediger; Dr. Holzer, Bernhard

    Following the recommendations of the European Strategy Group for High Energy Physics, CERN launched the Future Circular Collider Study (FCC) to investigate the feasibility of large-scale circular colliders for future high energy physics research. This thesis presents the considerations taken into account during the design process of the magnetic lattice in the arc sections of the electron-positron version FCC-ee. The machine is foreseen to operate at four different centre-of-mass energies in the range of 90 to 350 GeV. Different beam parameters need to be achieved for every energy, which requires a flexible lattice design in the arc sections. Therefore methods to tune the horizontal beam emittance without re-positioning machine components are implemented. In combination with damping and excitation wigglers a precise adjustment of the emittance can be achieved. A very first estimation of the vertical emittance arising from lattice imperfections is performed. Special emphasis is put on the optimisation of the ...

  19. 10th joint CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools are targeted particularly at young postdocs and senior PhD students working towards the completion of ther thesis project, in both experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) and phenomenology.

  20. A positron beam for the linear collider scheme of a B-meson factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, R.

    1988-02-01

    An approach for a conventional positron source intended to a BantiB linear collider scheme is here given. Optical matching devices between the source and the accelerator are considered and some comparisons are made regarding the maximum acceptance and the positron beam qualities. Focusing in the preaccelerator and in the main linac are also considered. Heating and radiation problems which may introduce severe limitations are only partly examined

  1. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams generating high-energy-density matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N A; Schmidt, R; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic responses of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/ c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. These data have been used as input to a sophisticated two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1 m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy deposition region will extend to a length of about 35 m over the beam duration. This is due to the fact that first few tens of bunches deposit sufficient energy that leads to high pressure that generates an outgoing radial shock wave. Shock propagation leads to continuous reduction in the density at the target center that allows the protons delivered in subsequent bunches to penetrate deeper and deeper into the target. This phenomenon has also been seen in case of heavy-ion heated targets [N. A. Tahir, A. Kozyreva, P. Spiller, D. H. H. Hoffmann, and A. Shutov, Phys. Rev. E 63, 036407 (2001)]. This effect needs to be considered in the design of a sacrificial beam stopper. These simulations have also shown that the target is severely damaged and is converted into a huge sample of high-energy density (HED) matter. In fact, the inner part of the target is transformed into a strongly coupled plasma with fairly uniform physical conditions. This work, therefore, has

  2. Les Houches 2011: Physics at TeV Colliders New Physics Working Group Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooijmans, G.; et al.

    2012-03-01

    We present the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 30 May-17 June, 2011). Our report includes new agreements on formats for interfaces between computational tools, new tool developments, important signatures for searches at the LHC, recommendations for presentation of LHC search results, as well as additional phenomenological studies.

  3. The e+, e- background at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) generated by beam crossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoades-Brown, M.J.; Ludlam, T.; Wu, J.; Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.

    1990-01-01

    At the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), fully stripped heavy ions will circulate in each of two rings up to beam energies of 250 (Z/A) GeV/u. During the beam crossing, the peripheral electromagnetic interaction between the heavy ions is sufficient to induce copious production of di-lepton pairs. These pairs are a potential source of background for the detectors at RHIC. In this paper we discuss the expected number of e + ,e - pairs, given the accepted initial luminosity value L of the collider. More importantly, we also calculate the differential cross sections for the angle, energy, rapidity and momentum distribution of the leptons. Using the luminosity L of the collider, these differential cross sections are normalized to the expected number of leptons per second. We restrict ourselves to e + ,e - production, a discussion of μ + ,μ - and τ + τ - distributions will be published later. The results are presented for the expected worst case, namely 197 Au 79+ ions at a beam kinetic energy of 100 GeV/u. This is forseen to be the heaviest ion for high luminosity experiments at RHIC. We note for a given energy, the cross section for e + ,e - production scales as Z 4 , where Z is the atomic number of the ions

  4. Electron-positron annihilation at high luminosity colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, G.V.; Khodzhamiryan, A.Yu.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments are discussed, which can be carried out at the electron-positron storage rings with increased luminosity (up to 10 34 cm -2 sec -1 ) and corresponding improvement of detectors at total energy region up to 10 GeV. This improvement of the experimental conditions may provide valuable physical information from the theoretical point of view. The comparison is made with analogous experimental possibilities of the projected high energy e + e - storage rings with luminosity up to 10 32 cm -2 sec -1

  5. Development of the SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] trim coil beam tube assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaritka, J.; Kelly, E.; Schneider, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider uses ≅9600 dipole magnets. The magnets have been carefully designed to exhibit minimal magnetic field harmonics. However, because of superconductor magnetization effects, iron saturation and conductor/coil positioning errors, certain harmonic errors are possible and must be corrected by use of multipole correctors called trim coils. For the most efficient use of axial space in the magnet, and lowest possible current, a distributed internal correction coil design is planned. The trim coil assembly is secured to the beam tube, a uhv tube with special strength, size, conductivity and vacuum. The report details the SSC trim coil/beam tube assembly specifications, history, and ongoing development

  6. Beam-related machine protection for the CERN Large Hadron Collider experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Appleby

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva stores 360 MJ per beam of protons at the top machine energy. This amount of energy storage presents a considerable challenge to the machine protection systems designed to protect both the machine and the six LHC experiments. This paper provides an overview of the machine protection systems relevant to the protection of the experiments, and demonstrates their operation and level of protection through a series of injection and stored beam failure scenarios. We conclude that the systems provide sufficient coverage for the protection of the experiments as far as reasonably possible.

  7. Thermomechanical response of Large Hadron Collider collimators to proton and ion beam impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to accelerate and bring into collision high-energy protons as well as heavy ions. Accidents involving direct beam impacts on collimators can happen in both cases. The LHC collimation system is designed to handle the demanding requirements of high-intensity proton beams. Although proton beams have 100 times higher beam power than the nominal LHC lead ion beams, specific problems might arise in case of ion losses due to different particle-collimator interaction mechanisms when compared to protons. This paper investigates and compares direct ion and proton beam impacts on collimators, in particular tertiary collimators (TCTs, made of the tungsten heavy alloy INERMET® 180. Recent measurements of the mechanical behavior of this alloy under static and dynamic loading conditions at different temperatures have been done and used for realistic estimates of the collimator response to beam impact. Using these new measurements, a numerical finite element method (FEM approach is presented in this paper. Sequential fast-transient thermostructural analyses are performed in the elastic-plastic domain in order to evaluate and compare the thermomechanical response of TCTs in case of critical beam load cases involving proton and heavy ion beam impacts.

  8. Physics with e sup + e sup - Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Barklow, T

    2003-01-01

    We describe the physics potential of e sup + e sup - linear colliders in this report. These machines are planned to operate in the first phase at a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, before being scaled up to about 1 TeV. In the second phase of the operation, a final energy of about 2 TeV is expected. The machines will allow us to perform precision tests of the heavy particles in the Standard Model, the top quark and the electroweak bosons. They are ideal facilities for exploring the properties of Higgs particles, in particular in the intermediate mass range. New vector bosons and novel matter particles in extended gauge theories can be searched for and studied thoroughly. The machines provide unique opportunities for the discovery of particles in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, the spectrum of Higgs particles, the supersymmetric partners of the electroweak gauge and Higgs bosons, and of the matter particles. High precision analyses of their properties and interactions will allow for extrapola...

  9. New physics hints in Β decays and collider outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, George W.S.

    2006-01-01

    There are currently two hints for new physics involving CP violation in b →s transitions: ΔS ≡ S f - S J/ ψK ≠ 0, and difference in direct CP asymmetry ΔA Kπ ≡ A K + π 0 - A K + π - ≠0. We explore the two scenarios with a large and unique new CP phase in b s transitions. Motivated by ΔS ≠ 0, we update on the right-handed strange beauty squark sb 1R at TeV scale. Motivated by ΔA Kπ ≠ 0, we explore sequential fourth generation t and b quarks. Both scenarios can survive constraints such as SM level b→sγ, sll and Β s mixing, and predict sizable CP violation in Β s mixing. The fourth generation picture predicts sizable K L → π 0 νν. Direct search for sb R , b' and t' at hadronic colliders, such as Tevatron Run II and LHC, can complement further CP violation studies at these machines, as well as at the future Super Β factory. (author)

  10. Les Houches 2015: Physics at TeV colliders - new physics working group report

    CERN Document Server

    Brooijmans, G.; Delgado, A.; Englert, C.; Falkowski, A.; Fuks, B.; Nikitenko, S.; Sekmen, S.; Barducci, D.; Bernon, J.; Bharucha, A.; Brehmer, J.; Brivio, I.; Buckley, A.; Burns, D.; Cacciapaglia, G.; Cai, H.; Carmona, A.; Carvalho, A.; Chalons, G.; Chen, Y.; Chivukula, R.S.; Conte, E.; Deandrea, A.; De Filippis, N.; Desai, N.; Flacke, T.; Frigerio, M.; Garcia-Pepin, M.; Gleyzer, S.; Goudelis, A.; Goertz, F.; Gras, P.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hewett, J.L.; Ittisamai, P.; Katz, A.; Kopp, J.; Kraml, S.; Krauss, M.E.; Kulkarni, S.; Laa, U.; Lacroix, S.; Lane, K.; Majumder, D.; Martin, A.; Mawatari, K.; Mohan, K.; Morse, D.M.; Mimasu, K.; Mühlleitner, M.; Nardecchia, M.; No, J.M.; Orlando, R.D.; Pani, P.; Papucci, M.; Polesello, G.; Pollard, C.; Porod, W.; Prosper, H.B.; Quirós, M.; Rizzo, T.; Sakurai, K.; Santiago, J.; Sanz, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schmeier, D.; Sengupta, D.; Shao, H.-S.; Simmons, E.H.; Sonneveld, J.; Spieker, T.; Spira, M.; Tattersall, J.; Unel, G.; Vega-Morales, R.; Waltenberger, W.; Weiler, A.; You, T.; Zapata, O.A.; Zerwas, D.

    2016-01-01

    We present the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 1-19 June, 2015). Our report includes new physics studies connected with the Higgs boson and its properties, direct search strategies, reinterpretation of the LHC results in the building of viable models and new computational tool developments. Important signatures for searches for natural new physics at the LHC and new assessments of the interplay between direct dark matter searches and the LHC are also considered.

  11. Beam Collimation and Machine-Detector Interface at the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Mokhov, Nikolai V; Kostin, Mikhail A

    2005-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation, spray from the dumps and extraction lines, beam-gas and beam halo interactions with collimators and other components in the ILC beam delivery system create fluxes of muons and other secondaries which can exceed the tolerable levels at a detector by a few orders of magnitude. It is shown that with a multi-stage collimation system, magnetized iron spoilers which fill the tunnel and a set of masks in the detector, one can hopefully meet the design goals. Results of modeling with the STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss and energy deposition effects are presented in this paper. We concentrate on collimation system and mask design and optimization, short- and long-term survivability of the critical components (spoilers, absorbers, magnets, separators, dumps), dynamic heat loads and radiation levels in magnets and other components, machine-related backgrounds and damage in collider detectors, and environmental aspects (prompt dose, ground-water and air activation).

  12. Probing space–time structure of new physics with polarized beams ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. At the international linear collider large beam polarization of both the elec- tron and positron beams will enhance the signature of physics due to interactions that are beyond the standard model. Here we review our recently obtained results on a general model-independent method of determining for an arbitary ...

  13. Prospects for heavy flavor physics at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    The role of hadron colliders in the observation and study of CP violation in B decays is discussed. We show that hadron collider experiments can play a significant role in the early studies of these phenomena and will play an increasingly dominant role as the effort turns towards difficult to measure decays, especially those of the B s meson, and sensitive searches for rare decays and subtle deviations from Standard Model predictions. We conclude with a discussion of the relative merits of hadron collider detectors with 'forward' vs 'central' rapidity coverage

  14. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of √ s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of √ s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  15. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Cullinan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC requires beam position monitors (BPMs with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3 at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2/3  ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  16. Long bunch trains measured using a prototype cavity beam position monitor for the Compact Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullinan, F. J.; Boogert, S. T.; Farabolini, W.; Lefevre, T.; Lunin, A.; Lyapin, A.; Søby, L.; Towler, J.; Wendt, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires beam position monitors (BPMs) with 50 nm spatial resolution for alignment of the beam line elements in the main linac and beam delivery system. Furthermore, the BPMs must be able to make multiple independent measurements within a single 156 ns long bunch train. A prototype cavity BPM for CLIC has been manufactured and tested on the probe beam line at the 3rd CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN. The transverse beam position is determined from the electromagnetic resonant modes excited by the beam in the two cavities of the pickup, the position cavity and the reference cavity. The mode that is measured in each cavity resonates at 15 GHz and has a loaded quality factor that is below 200. Analytical expressions for the amplitude, phase and total energy of signals from long trains of bunches have been derived and the main conclusions are discussed. The results of the beam tests are presented. The variable gain of the receiver electronics has been characterized using beam excited signals and the form of the signals for different beam pulse lengths with the 2 /3 ns bunch spacing has been observed. The sensitivity of the reference cavity signal to charge and the horizontal position signal to beam offset have been measured and are compared with theoretical predictions based on laboratory measurements of the BPM pickup and the form of the resonant cavity modes as determined by numerical simulation. Finally, the BPM was calibrated so that the beam position jitter at the BPM location could be measured. It is expected that the beam jitter scales linearly with the beam size and so the results are compared to predicted values for the latter.

  17. Physics with polarized electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    As a distinct field, elementary particle physics is now approximately forty years old. In all that time, only a few of the thousands of experiments that have been performed have made use of spin polarized particle beams (with apologies to those who have studied neutrino interactions, polarized beam are defined to refer to the case in which the experimenter has control over the polarization direction). If the discussion is restricted to spin polarized electron beams, the number of experiments becomes countable with the fingers of one hand (with several to spare). There are two reasons for this lack of interest. The first is that spin polarized beams are difficult to produce, accelerate, and transport. The second reason is that any physical process that can occur during the collision of a polarized particle with another (polarized or not) can also occur during the collision of unpolarized particles. One might ask then, why has any effort been expended on the subject. The answer, at least in the case of polarized electron beams, is that electron accelerators and storage rings have in recent years achieved sufficient energy to begin to probe the weak interaction directly. The weak interaction distinguishes between left- and right-handed fermionic currents. Left-handed particles interact in a fundamentally different way than their right-handed counterparts. If the experimenter wishes to explore or exploit this difference, he (or she) must either prepare the spin state of the incident particles or analyze the spin state of outgoing particles. For reasons of genearlity and improved statistical precision, the former is usually preferable to the latter. The first of these lectures will review some of the techniques necessary for the production, transport, and monitoring of polarized electron (or positron) beams. The second lecture will survey some of the physics possibilities of polarized electron-positron collisions

  18. Dijet physics with CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... Hadron Collider, at a proton–proton collision energy of. √ ... generator predicts less azimuthal decorrelation than observed in data [8]. ... The dijet mass spectrum predicted by quantum chromodynamics (QCD) falls smoothly.

  19. Theoretical perspective on RHIC [relativistic heavy ion collider] physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.

    1990-10-01

    We discuss the status of the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) project at Brookhaven, and assess some key experiments which propose to detect the signatures of a transient quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase in such collisions. 24 refs

  20. BTEV: a dedicated B physics detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.

    1996-11-01

    The capabilities of future Dedicated Hadron Collider B Physics experiments are discussed and compared to experiments that will run in the next few years. The design for such an experiment at the Tevatron Collider is presented and an evolutionary path for developing it is outlined. 9 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  1. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001, 2 Higgs and Supersymmetry Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Asner, David Mark; Baer, H.; Bagger, Jonathan A.; Balazs, Csaba; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Barron, J.; Baur, Ulrich J.; Beach, R.; Bellwied, R.; Bigi, Ikaros I.Y.; Blochinger, C.; Boege, S.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.; Brau, James E.; Breidenbach, Martin; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Burke, David L.; Burrows, Philip N.; Butler, Joel N.; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Chertok, Maxwell Benjamin; Choi, Seong-Youl; Cinabro, David; Corcella, Gennaro; Cordero, R.K.; Danielson, N.; Davoudiasl, Hooman; Dawson, S.; Denner, Ansgar; Derwent, P.; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Dima, M.; Dittmaier, Stefan; Dixit, M.; Dixon, Lance J.; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; Doncheski, M.A.; Duckwitz, M.; Dunn, J.; Early, J.; Erler, Jens; Feng, Jonathan L.; Ferretti, C.; Fisk, H.Eugene; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, David W.; Gibbons, L.; Godbole, R.; Godfrey, S.; Goodman, E.; Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Graf, N.; Grannis, Paul D.; Gronberg, Jeffrey Baton; Gunion, John F.; Haber, Howard E.; Han, Tao; Hawkings, Richard; Hearty, Christopher; Heinemeyer, Sven; Hertzbach, Stanley S.; Heusch, Clemens A.; Hewett, JoAnne L.; Hikasa, K.; Hiller, G.; Hoang, Andre H.; Hollebeek, Robert; Iwasaki, M.; Jacobsen, Robert Gibbs; Jaros, John Alan; Juste, A.; Kadyk, John A.; Kalinowski, J.; Kalyniak, P.; Kamon, Teruki; Karlen, Dean; Keller, L; Koltick, D.; Kribs, Graham D.; Kronfeld, Andreas Samuel; Leike, A.; Logan, Heather E.; Lykken, Joseph D.; Macesanu, Cosmin; Magill, Stephen R.; Marciano, William Joseph; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Martin, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matchev, Konstantin Tzvetanov; Monig, Klaus; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Moreau, G.; Mrenna, Stephen; Murakami, Brandon; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nauenberg, Uriel; Neal, H.; Newman, B.; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Orr, Lynne H.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Pathak, S.; Peskin, Michael E.; Plehn, Tilman; Porter, F.; Potter, C.; Prescott, C.; Rainwater, David Landry; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Repond, J.; Riles, Keith; Rizzo, Thomas Gerard; Ronan, Michael T.; Rosenberg, L.; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Roth, M.; Rowson, Peter C.; Schumm, Bruce Andrew; Seppala, L.; Seryi, Andrei; Siegrist, J.; Sinev, N.; Skulina, K.; Sterner, K.L.; Stewart, I.; Su, S.; Tata, Xerxes Ramyar; Telnov, Valery I.; Teubner, Thomas; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, Andre S.; van Bibber, Karl A.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vega, R.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Wagner, D.; Waite, Anthony P.; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Weiglein, Georg; Wells, James Daniel; Wester, William Carl, III; Williams, B.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, R.; Winn, D.; Woods, M.; Wudka, J.; Yakovlev, Oleg I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, Hai Jun

    2001-01-01

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 2 reviews the possible experiments on Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles that can be done at a linear collider.

  2. Summary of the very large hadron collider physics and detector workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, G.; Berger, M.; Brandt, A.; Eno, S.

    1997-01-01

    One of the options for an accelerator beyond the LHC is a hadron collider with higher energy. Work is going on to explore accelerator technologies that would make such a machine feasible. This workshop concentrated on the physics and detector issues associated with a hadron collider with an energy in the center of mass of the order of 100 to 200 TeV

  3. Effects of rf breakdown on the beam in the Compact Linear Collider prototype accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Palaia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the effects of rf breakdown in high-gradient accelerator structures on the accelerated beam is an extremely relevant aspect in the development of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC and is one of the main issues addressed at the Two-beam Test Stand at the CLIC Test Facility 3 at CERN. During a rf breakdown high currents are generated causing parasitic magnetic fields that interact with the accelerated beam affecting its orbit. The beam energy is also affected because the power is partly reflected and partly absorbed thus reducing the available energy to accelerate the beam. We discuss here measurements of such effects observed on an electron beam accelerated in a CLIC prototype structure. Measurements of the trajectory of bunch trains on a nanosecond time scale showed fast changes in correspondence of breakdown that we compare with measurements of the relative beam spots on a scintillating screen. We identify different breakdown scenarios for which we offer an explanation based also on measurements of the power at the input and output ports of the accelerator structure. Finally we present the distribution of the magnitude of the observed changes in the beam position and we discuss its correlation with rf power and breakdown location in the accelerator structure.

  4. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  5. Curating the collider: using place to engage museum visitors with particle physics

    OpenAIRE

    Alison Boyle; Dr Harry Cliff

    2014-01-01

    CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle physics facility, provides museological opportunities and challenges. Visitor interest in cutting-edge physics, with its high media profile, is tempered by anxiety about understanding complex content. The topic does not readily lend itself to traditional museum showcase-dominated displays: the technology of modern particle physics is overwhelmingly large, while the phenomena under investigation are invisible. For Collider, a major tem...

  6. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of γϵx = 3x10-6 m-rad and γϵy = 3x10-8 m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ``fundamental`` limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  7. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of {gamma}{epsilon}{sub x} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}6} m-rad and {gamma}{epsilon}{sub y} = 3{times}10{sup {minus}8} m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future.

  8. The generation and acceleration of low emittance flat beams for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1991-11-01

    Many future linear collider designs call for electron and positron beams with normalized rms horizontal and vertical emittances of γε x = 3x10 -6 m-rad and γε y = 3x10 -8 m-rad; these are a factor of 10 to 100 below those observed in the Stanford Linear Collider. In this dissertation, we examine the feasibility of achieving beams with these very small vertical emittances. We examine the limitations encountered during both the generation and the subsequent acceleration of such low emittance beams. We consider collective limitations, such as wakefields, space charge effects, scattering processes, and ion trapping; and also how intensity limitations, such as anomalous dispersion, betatron coupling, and pulse-to-pulse beam jitter. In general, the minimum emittance in both the generation and the acceleration stages is limited by the transverse misalignments of the accelerator components. We describe a few techniques of correcting the effect of these errors, thereby easing the alignment tolerances by over an order of magnitude. Finally, we also calculate ''fundamental'' limitations on the minimum vertical emittance; these do not constrain the current designs but may prove important in the future

  9. Methods for evaluating physical processes in strong external fields at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. Furry picture and quasi-classical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, Stefano [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Hartin, Anthony [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Future linear colliders designs, ILC and CLIC, are expected to be powerful machines for the discovery of Physics Beyond the Standard Model and subsequent precision studies. However, due to the intense beams (high luminosity, high energy), strong electromagnetic fields occur in the beam-beam interaction region. In the context of precision high energy physics, the presence of such strong fields may yield sensitive corrections to the observed electron-positron processes. The Furry picture of quantum states gives a conceptually simple tool to treat physics processes in an external field. A generalization of the quasi-classical operator method (QOM) as an approximation is considered too.

  10. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center's mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993

  11. Low emittance design of the electron gun and the focusing channel of the Compact Linear Collider drive beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dayyani Kelisani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available For the Compact Linear Collider project at CERN, the power for the main linacs is extracted from a drive beam generated from a high current electron source. The design of the electron source and its subsequent focusing channel has a great impact on the beam dynamic considerations of the drive beam. We report the design of a thermionic electron source and the subsequent focusing channels with the goal of production of a high quality beam with a very small emittance.

  12. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Guaglio, Gianluca; Santoni, C

    2004-01-01

    The employment of superconducting magnets, in the high energies colliders, opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standar...

  13. Beam delivery system tuning and luminosity monitoring in the Compact Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dalena

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Emittance preservation in the beam delivery system (BDS is one of the major challenges in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC. The fast detuning of the final focus optics requires an on-line tuning procedure in order to keep luminosity close to the maximum. In this paper we discuss different tuning techniques to mitigate the displacement of magnets in the CLIC BDS and in particular in the final focus system. Some of them require a fast luminosity measurement. Here we study the possibility to use beam-beam background processes at CLIC 3 TeV c.m. energy as a fast luminosity signal. In particular, the hadron multiplicity in the detector region is investigated.

  14. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  15. Towards a Muon Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichten, E.

    2011-01-01

    A multi TeV Muon Collider is required for the full coverage of Terascale physics. The physics potential for a Muon Collider at ∼3 TeV and integrated luminosity of 1 ab -1 is outstanding. Particularly strong cases can be made if the new physics is SUSY or new strong dynamics. Furthermore, a staged Muon Collider can provide a Neutrino Factory to fully disentangle neutrino physics. If a narrow s-channel resonance state exists in the multi-TeV region, the physics program at a Muon Collider could begin with less than 10 31 cm -2 s -1 luminosity. Detailed studies of the physics case for a 1.5-4 TeV Muon Collider are just beginning. The goals of such studies are to: (1) identify benchmark physics processes; (2) study the physics dependence on beam parameters; (3) estimate detector backgrounds; and (4) compare the physics potential of a Muon Collider with those of the ILC, CLIC and upgrades to the LHC.

  16. Asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Colestock, P.; Goderre, G.; Johnson, D.; Martin, P.; Holt, J.; Kaplan, D.

    1993-01-01

    The study of CP violation in beauty decay is one of the key challenges facing high energy physics. Much work has not yielded a definitive answer how this study might best be performed. However, one clear conclusion is that new accelerator facilities are needed. Proposals include experiments at asymmetric electron-positron colliders and in fixed-target and collider modes at LHC and SSC. Fixed-target and collider experiments at existing accelerators, while they might succeed in a first observation of the effect, will not be adequate to study it thoroughly. Giomataris has emphasized the potential of a new approach to the study of beauty CP violation: the asymmetric proton collider. Such a collider might be realized by the construction of a small storage ring intersecting an existing or soon-to-exist large synchrotron, or by arranging collisions between a large synchrotron and its injector. An experiment at such a collider can combine the advantages of fixed-target-like spectrometer geometry, facilitating triggering, particle identification and the instrumentation of a large acceptance, while the increased √s can provide a factor > 100 increase in beauty-production cross section compared to Tevatron or HERA fixed-target. Beams crossing at a non-zero angle can provide a small interaction region, permitting a first-level decay-vertex trigger to be implemented. To achieve large √s with a large Lorentz boost and high luminosity, the most favorable venue is the high-energy booster (HEB) at the SSC Laboratory, though the CERN SPS and Fermilab Tevatron are also worth considering

  17. Detectors and Physics at a Future Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2090240

    An electron-positron linear collider is an option for future large particle accelerator projects. Such a collider would focus on precision tests of the Higgs boson properties. This thesis describes three studies related to the optimisation of highly granular calorimeters and one study on the sensitivity of Higgs couplings at CLIC. Photon reconstruction algorithms were developed for highly granular calorimeters of a future linear collider detector. A sophisticated pattern recognition algorithm was implemented, which uses the topological properties of electromagnetic showers to identify photon candidates and separate them from nearby particles. It performs clustering of the energy deposits in the detector, followed by topological characterisation of the clusters, with the results being considered by a multivariate likelihood analysis. This algorithm leads to a significant improvement in the reconstruction of both single photons and multiple photons in high energy jets compared to previous reconstruction softwar...

  18. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  19. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Cauchi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC. However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  20. Comparison of forward collider vertex detectors for B physics at hadron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harr, R.F.; Karchin, P.E.; Kennedy, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Two silicon vertex detector designs have been proposed for a forward collider B physics experiment at the SSC: in one the silicon system is put outside the beampipe (like in the forward part of the proposed BCD detector); and in the other the silicon system is put inside the beampipe, close to the circulating beams, with the use of open-quote roman pots close-quote (as in the COBEX proposal). In what follows these will be referred to as the inside and outside designs. The two designs are significantly different in their construction and impact on the rest of the experiment. The authors would like to understand how the designs compare for doing B physics and what are the factors that most greatly influence the results. Two measurements relying on the vertex detector and of particular importance for B physics are the reconstructed vertex position and B mass. They have analyzed the resolution achievable in these 2 quantities for open-quote models close-quote of the two forward collider vertex detector designs. The design parameters - beampipe radius and thickness, silicon position and resolution, etc. - have been varied about their normal values to observe their effect on these resolutions. They find very little difference between the two designs; both give nearly the same decay length error, impact parameter error, and reconstructed B mass error, for a large range of geometrical parameters. The design parameter having the most significant impact on the errors of B decay vertices is found to be the point resolution of the silicon detectors

  1. Physics with polarized electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, M.L.

    1988-06-01

    As a distinct field, elementary particle physics is now approximately forty years old. In all that time, only a few of the thousands of experiments that have been performed have made use of spin polarized particle beams. There are two reasons for this lack of interest. The first is that spin polarized beams are difficult to produce, accelerate, and transport. The second reason is that any physical process that can occur during the collision of a polarized particle with another (polarized or not) can also occur during the collision of unpolarized particles. One might ask then, why has any effort been expended on the subject? The answer, at least in the case of polarized electron beams, is that electron accelerators and storage rings have in recent years achieved sufficient energy to begin to probe the weak interaction directly. The weak interaction distinguishes between left- and right-handed fermionic currents. Left-handed particles interact in a fundamentally different way than their right-handed counterparts. If the experimenter wishes to explore or exploit this difference, he (or she) must either prepare the spin state of the incident particles or analyze the spin state of outgoing particles. For reasons, of generality and improved statistical precision, the former is usually preferable to the latter. The first of these lectures will review some of the techniques necessary for the production, transport, and monitoring of polarized electron (or positron) beams. The second lecture will survey some of the physics possibilities of polarized electron--positron collisions. 33 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs

  2. Physics at a 100 TeV pp Collider: Standard Model Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangano, M. L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zanderighi, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Aguilar Saavedra, J. A. [Univ. of Granada (Spain); Alekhin, S. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Inst. for High Energy Physics (IHEP), Moscow (Russian Federation); Badger, S. [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bauer, C. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Becher, T. [Univ. Bern (Switzerland); Bertone, V. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Bonvini, M. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Boselli, S. [Univ. of Pavia (Italy); Bothmann, E. [Gottingen Univ. (Germany); Boughezal, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cacciari, M. [Univ. Paris Diderot (France); Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Carloni Calame, C M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Caola, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Campbell, J. M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Carrazza, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Chiesa, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Cieri, L. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Cimaglia, F. [Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Febres Cordero, F. [Physikalisches Inst., Freiburg (Germany); Ferrarese, P. [Gottingen Univ. (Germany); D' Enterria, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Ferrera, G. [Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Garcia i Tormo, X. [Univ. Bern (Switzerland); Garzelli, M. V. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Germann, E. [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hirschi, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Han, T. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ita, H. [Physikalisches Inst., Freiburg (Germany); Jager, B. [Univ. of Tubingen (Germany); Kallweit, S. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany); Karlberg, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Kuttimalai, S. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Krauss, F. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Larkoski, A. J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Lindert, J. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Luisoni, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Maierhofer, P. [Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Mattelaer, O. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Martinez, H. [Univ. of Pavia (Italy); Moch, S. [Univ. of Hamburg (Germany); Montagna, G. [Univ. of Pavia (Italy); Moretti, M. [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Nason, P. [Univ. of Milano (Italy); Nicrosini, O. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Oleari, C. [Univ. of Milano (Italy); Pagani, D. [Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Papaefstathiou, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Petriello, F. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Piccinini, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Pierini, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Pierog, T. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Technology (KIT) (Germany); Pozzorini, S. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Re, E. [National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), Annecy-le-Vieux (France). Lab. of Annecy-le-Vieux for Theoretical Physics (LAPTh); Robens, T. [Technische Universitat Dresden (Germany); Rojo, J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Ruiz, R. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Sakurai, K. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom); Salam, G. P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Salfelder, L. [Univ. of Tubingen (Germany); Schonherr, M. [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy); Schulze, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Schumann, S. [Univ. Gottingen (Germany); Selvaggi, M. [Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Shivaji, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Pavia (Italy); Siodmok, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS), Krakow (Poland); Skands, P. [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Torrielli, P. [Univ. of Torino (Italy); Tramontano, F. [Univ. of Napoli (Italy); Tsinikos, I. [Univ. Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Tweedie, B. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Vicini, A. [Univ. degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Westhoff, S. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany); Zaro, M. [Sorbonne Univ., Paris (France); Zeppenfeld, D. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-06-22

    This report summarises the properties of Standard Model processes at the 100 TeV pp collider. We document the production rates and typical distributions for a number of benchmark Standard Model processes, and discuss new dynamical phenomena arising at the highest energies available at this collider. We discuss the intrinsic physics interest in the measurement of these Standard Model processes, as well as their role as backgrounds for New Physics searches.

  3. SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, B.; Bell, R.A.; Brown, K.L.

    1980-06-01

    The SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER is designed to achieve an energy of 100 GeV in the electron-positron center-of-mass system by accelerating intense bunches of particles in the SLAC linac and transporting the electron and positron bunches in a special magnet system to a point where they are focused to a radius of about 2 microns and made to collide head on. The rationale for this new type of colliding beam system is discussed, the project is described, some of the novel accelerator physics issues involved are discussed, and some of the critical technical components are described

  4. Compensation of head-on beam-beam induced resonance driving terms and tune spread in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fischer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A head-on beam-beam compensation scheme was implemented for operation in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 264801 (2015PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.115.264801]. The compensation consists of electron lenses for the reduction of the beam-beam induced tune spread, and a lattice for the minimization of beam-beam generated resonance driving terms. We describe the implementations of the lattice and electron lenses, and report on measurements of lattice properties and the effect of the electron lenses on the hadron beam.

  5. Physics prospects at a linear e+e- collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindani, Saurabh D.

    2006-01-01

    The talk described the prospects of studying standard model parameters as well as scenarios beyond the standard model, like the minimal supersymmetric standard model, theories with extra dimensions and theories with extra neutral gauge bosons, at a future linear e + e - collider. (author)

  6. Two Methods For Simulating the Strong-Strong Beam-Beam Interaction in Hadron Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnock, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    We present and compare the method of weighted macro particle tracking and the Perron-Frobenius operator technique for simulating the time evolution of two beams coupled via the collective beam-beam interaction in 2-D and 4-D (transverse) phase space. The coherent dipole modes, with and without lattice nonlinearities and external excitation, are studied by means of the Vlasov-Poisson system

  7. SLAC-Linac-Collider (SLC) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1981-02-01

    The proposed SLAC Linear Collider Project (SLC) and its features are described in this paper. In times of ever increasing costs for energy the electron storage ring principle is about to reach its practical limit. A new class of colliding beam beam facilities, the Linear Colliders, are getting more and more attractive and affordable at very high center-of-mass energies. The SLC is designed to be a poineer of this new class of colliding beam facilities and at the same time will serve as a valuable tool to explore the high energy physics at the level of 100 GeV in the center-of-mass system

  8. Spin physics with polarized electrons at the SLC [Stanford Linear Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffeit, K.C.

    1990-11-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider was designed to accommodate polarized electron beams. A gallium arsenide-based photon emission source will provide a beam of longitudinally polarized electrons of about 40 percent polarization. A system of bend magnets and a superconducting solenoid will be used to rotate the spins so that the polarization is preserved while the 1.21 GeV electrons are stored in the damping ring. Another set of bend magnets and two superconducting solenoids orient the spin vectors so that longitudinal polarization of the electrons is achieved at the collision point with the unpolarized positions. A system to monitor the polarization based on Moeller and Compton scattering will be used. Spin physics with longitudinally polarized electrons uses the measurement of the left-right asymmetry to provide tests of the Standard Model. The uncertainty in the measurement is precise enough to be sensitive to the effects of particles which can not be produced directly in the machines we have today. 5 refs

  9. Ions for LHC Beam Physics and Engineering Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, Stephan; Baggiolini, Vito; Beuret, Andre; Blas, Alfred; Borburgh, Jan; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Carli, Christian; Chanel, Michel; Fowler, Tony; Gilardoni, S S; Gourber-Pace, Marine; Hancock, Steven; Hill, Charles E; Hourican, Michael; Jowett, John M; Kahle, Karsten; Kuchler, Detlef; Mahner, Edgar; Manglunki, Django; Martini, Michel; Paoluzzi, Mauro M; Pasternak, Jaroslaw; Pedersen, Flemming; Raich, Uli; Rossi, Carlo; Royer, Jean Pierre; Schindl, Karlheinz; Scrivens, Richard; Sermeus, Luc; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Tranquille, Gerard; Vretenar, Maurizio; Zickler, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The first phase of the heavy ion physics program at the LHC aims to provide lead-lead collisions at energies of 5.5 TeV per colliding nucleon pair and ion-ion luminosity of 1027 cm-2s-1. The transformation of CERN’s ion injector complex (Linac3-LEIR-PS-SPS) presents a number of beam physics and engineering challenges, which are described in this paper. In the LHC itself, there are fundamental performance limitations due to various beam loss mechanisms. To study these without risk of damage there will be an initial period of operation with a reduced number of nominal intensity bunches. While reducing the work required to commission the LHC with ions in 2008, this will still enable early physics discoveries.

  10. RF Beam control system for the Brookhaven relativistic heavy ion collider, RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; Delong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency

  11. Generation of multi-branch beam with thermionic gun for the Japan linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, T.; Akemoto, M.; Matsumonto, H.; Urakawa, J.; Yoshioka, M.; Akiyama, H.

    1992-01-01

    We report on the development of a thermionic gun that is capable of producing multi-bunch beam to be used at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility for the Japan Linear Collider project. Two types of grid pulse generators have been developed. One is an avalanche pulse generator. A Y-646E cathode was successfully operated to generate double-bunch beam with a pulse width shorter than 700 ps, bunch spacing 1.4 ns, and a peak current 4.3 A. The other grid pulse generator is a fast ECL circuit with an RF power amplifier. Generation of 20-pulse trains with 2.1 ns time spacing has been demonstrated. (Author) 4 refs., 6 figs

  12. RF beam control system for the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, J.M.; Campbell, A.; DeLong, J.; Hayes, T.; Onillon, E.; Rose, J.; Vetter, K.

    1998-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, is two counter-rotating rings with six interaction points. The RF Beam Control system for each ring will control two 28 MHz cavities for acceleration, and five 197 MHz cavities for preserving the 5 ns bunch length during 10 hour beam stores. Digital technology is used extensively in: Direct Digital Synthesis of rf signals and Digital Signal Processing for, the realization of state-variable feedback loops, real-time calculation of rf frequency, and bunch-by-bunch phase measurement of the 120 bunches. DSP technology enables programming the parameters of the feedback loops in order to obtain closed-loop dynamics that are independent of synchrotron frequency

  13. Beam Delivery System Dogleg Design and Integration for the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, J

    2010-01-01

    It is proposed to investigate the option of moving the positron source to the end of the main linac as a part of the central integration in the International Linear Collider(ILC) project. The positron source incorporates an undulator at the end of the main linac and the photons generated in the undulator are transported to the target, located at a distance of around 400 m. The dogleg design has been optimised to provide the required transverse offset at the location of the target and to give minimum emittance growth at 500 GeV. The design of the dogleg, the layout changes and the tolerances on beam tuning as a result of locating this dogleg in the beginning of the beam delivery system (BDS) are presented.

  14. Linear acoustic waves induced in a cylindrical solid target by particle beam in e--e+ colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeyemi, Olufemi Segun

    2015-06-01

    A future high energy lepton collider will demand high luminosities to achieve its physics goals. For the electron-positron linear collider, the generation of the desired amount of positrons is a non-trivial problem: the positron production target has to survive huge amounts of energy deposited by the bombardment of intense beams of electrons or photons. This causes a rapid increase of the temperature in the target within a very short time period. The resulting deformation due to the induced pressure waves can substantially shorten the operating life-span of the target material. In this work, we study linear effects of induced stress in a solid target through pressure acoustic waves using continuum mechanics. We derived analytical solutions for different cases and imposed different boundary conditions. The application of the model to the SLC positron target gave us the results which are in agreement with the existing literature. In a similar manner, we investigated the effect of single and multiple photon bunches on the conversion target for ILC.

  15. Future Linear Colliders: Detector R&D, Jet Reconstruction and Top Physics Potential

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2098729; Ros Martinez, Eduardo

    During the 20th century, discoveries and measurements at colliders, combined with progress in theoretical physics, allowed us to formulate the Standard Model of the in- teractions between the constituents of matter. Today, there are two advanced projects for a new installation that will collide electrons and positrons covering an energy range from several hundreds of GeV to the multi-TeV scale, the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). These Future Linear Colliders give the opportunity to study the top quark with unprecedented precision. Measurements of top quark properties are of special interest, as the top quark is the heaviest ele- mentary particle of the SM. Precision measurements of top quark properties at e+e colliders promise therefore to be highly sensitive to physics beyond the SM. This thesis has three complementary parts. The first is dedicated to the R&D of the ILD detector concept for future e+e- colliders, more precisely, the innermost region of the de...

  16. Analytical researches on the accelerating structures, wakefields, and beam dynamics for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.

    1996-01-01

    The research works presented in this memoir are oriented not only to the R and D programs towards future linear colliders, but also to the pedagogic purposes. The first part of this memoir (from Chapter 2 to Chapter 9) establishes an analytical framework of the disk-loaded slow wave accelerating structures with can be served as the advanced courses for the students who have got some basic trainings in the linear accelerator theories. The analytical formulae derived in this part describe clearly the properties of the disk-loaded accelerating structures, such as group velocity, shunt impedance, coupling coefficients κ and β, loss factors, and wake fields. The second part (from Chapter 11 to Chapter 13) gives the beam dynamics simulations and the final proposal of an S-Band Superconducting Linear Collider (SSLC) which is aimed to avoid the dark current problem in TESLA project. This memoir has not included all the works conducted since April 1992, such as beam dynamics simulations for CLIC Test Facility (CFT-2) and the design of High Charge Structures (HCS) (11π/12 mode) for CFT-2, in order to make this memoir more harmonious, coherent and continuous. (author)

  17. Physics and guitars collide to make a big bang in schools

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Rock guitars, superstrings, 11 dimensions and the world's largest and highest energy particle accelerator are the lead instruments for the Institute of Physics' loudest schools lecture to date. "Rock in 11 dimensions: where physics and guitars collide" is an exciting, interactive and inspiring free talk for school students throughout the UK, building on everyday physics to explain groundbreaking research.

  18. Physics and guitars collide to make a big bang in schools

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Rock guitars, superstrings, 11 dimensions and the world's largest and highest energy particle accelerator are the lead instruments for the Institute of Physics' loudest schools lecture to date. 'Rock in 11 dimensions: where physics and guitars collide' is an exciting, interactive and inspiring free talk for school students throughout the UK, building on everyday physics to explain groundbreaking research.

  19. Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.

    1994-08-01

    These lectures discuss a selection of QCD and Electroweak results from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Proton-Antiproton Collider. Results are presently based on data samples of about 20 pb -1 at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. Results discussed include jet production, direct photon production, W mass and width measurements, the triboson coupling, and most exciting of all, evidence for top quark production

  20. International Linear Collider Accelerator Physics R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollin, George D.; Davidsaver, Michael; Haney, Michael J.; Kasten, Michael; Chang, Jason; Chodash, Perry; Dluger, Will; Lang, Alex; Liu, Yehan

    2008-01-01

    to an event at the beginning of the run. We determined that the device installed in our beam, which was instrumented with an 8-bit 500 MHz ADC, could measure the beam timing to an accuracy of 0.4 picoseconds. Simulations of the device showed that an increase in ADC clock rate to 2 GHz would improve measurement precision by the required factor of four. As a result, we felt that a device of this sort, assuming matters concerning dynamic range and long-term stability can be addressed successfully, would work at the ILC. Cost effective operation of the ILC will demand highly reliable, fault tolerant and adaptive solutions for both hardware and software. The large numbers of subsystems and large multipliers associated with the modules in those subsystems will cause even a strong level of unit reliability to become an unacceptable level of system availability. An evaluation effort is underway to evaluate standards associated with high availability, and to guide ILC development with standard practices and well-supported commercial solutions. One area of evaluation involves the Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA) hardware and software. We worked with an ATCA crate, processor monitors, and a small amount of ATCA circuit boards in order to develop a backplane 'spy' board that would let us watch the ATCA backplane communications and pursue development of an inexpensive processor monitor that could be used as a physics-driven component of the crate-level controls system. We made good progress, and felt that we had determined a productive direction to extend this work. We felt that we had learned enough to begin designing a workable processor monitor chip if there were to be sufficient interest in ATCA shown by the ILC community. Fault recognition is a challenging issue in the crafting a high reliability controls system. With tens of thousands of independent processors running hundreds of thousands of critical processes, how can the system identify that a problem has

  1. Physics with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.; Tanihata, I.

    1992-01-01

    Recently developed facilities allow a wide range of new investigations of the reactions and properties of short-lived nuclei. These studies may help to solve puzzles of nuclear structure and the Big Bang. The purpose of nuclear physics is to measure properties of specific nuclides and infer from them global properties common to all nuclides. One goal, for example, is to understand nuclear sizes and matter distributions in terms of basic nuclear forces. Another is to understand the variation throughout the periodic table of the dominant quantum states, which are known as the open-quotes nuclear shell modelclose quotes states and are characterized, much as are atomic states, by a principal quantum number and by orbital and total angular momentum quantum numbers. In turn other nuclear phenomena, such as the collective excitations known as giant resonances, can be understood in terms of the shell-model configurations and basic nuclear parameters. Radioactive nuclear beam studies of reactions of short-lived nuclides have already yielded results with important ramifications in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Nuclear physicists expect unstable nuclides to exhibit unusual structures or features that may test their understanding of known nuclear phenomena at extreme conditions, and perhaps even to reveal previously unknown nuclear phenomena, Astrophysicists, for their part, have known for several decades that processes in both Big Bang nucleosynthesis and stellar nucleosynthesis involve short-lived nuclides. Indeed, the original motivation for developing radioactive nuclear beams was astrophysical. 25 refs., 7 figs

  2. Physics with radioactive nuclear beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, R.N.

    1995-01-01

    Recently developed facilities allow a wide range of new investigations of the reactions and properties of short-lived nuclei. These studies may help to solve puzzles of nuclear structure and the Big Bang. The purpose of nuclear physics is to measure properties of specific nuclides and infer from them global properties common to all nuclides, for example, is to understand nuclear sizes and matter distributions in terms of basic nuclear forces. Another is to understand the variation throughout the periodic table of the dominant quantum states, which are known as the open-quotes nuclear shell model close quotes states and are characterized, much as are atomic states, by a principal quantum number and by orbital and total angular momentum quantum numbers. In turn other nuclear phenomena, such as the collective excitations known as giant resonances, can be understood in terms of the shell-model configurations and basic nuclear parameters. Radioactive nuclear beam studies of reactions of short-lived nuclides have already yielded results with important ramifications in both nuclear physics and astrophysics. Nuclear physicists expect unstable nuclides to exhibit unusual structures or features that may test their understanding of known nuclear phenomena at extreme conditions, and perhaps even to reveal previously unknown nuclear phenomena, Astrophysicists, for their part, have known for several decades that processes in both Big Bang nucleosynthesis and stellar nucleosynthesis involve short-lived nuclides. Indeed, the original motivation for developing radioactive nuclear beams was astrophysical. (author). 25 refs., 7 figs

  3. Reliability of the Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Guaglio, G; Santoni, C

    2005-01-01

    The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out....

  4. Final implementation, commissioning, and performance of embedded collimator beam position monitors in the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Valentino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During Long Shutdown 1, 18 Large Hadron Collider (LHC collimators were replaced with a new design, in which beam position monitor (BPM pick-up buttons are embedded in the collimator jaws. The BPMs provide a direct measurement of the beam orbit at the collimators, and therefore can be used to align the collimators more quickly than using the standard technique which relies on feedback from beam losses. Online orbit measurements also allow for reducing operational margins in the collimation hierarchy placed specifically to cater for unknown orbit drifts, therefore decreasing the β^{*} and increasing the luminosity reach of the LHC. In this paper, the results from the commissioning of the embedded BPMs in the LHC are presented. The data acquisition and control software architectures are reviewed. A comparison with the standard alignment technique is provided, together with a fill-to-fill analysis of the measured orbit in different machine modes, which will also be used to determine suitable beam interlocks for a tighter collimation hierarchy.

  5. Performance Modeling and Optimization of a High Energy CollidingBeam Simulation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Qiang, Ji; Bailey, David H.; Yelick, Kathy

    2006-06-01

    An accurate modeling of the beam-beam interaction is essential to maximizing the luminosity in existing and future colliders. BeamBeam3D was the first parallel code that can be used to study this interaction fully self-consistently on high-performance computing platforms. Various all-to-all personalized communication (AAPC) algorithms dominate its communication patterns, for which we developed a sequence of performance models using a series of micro-benchmarks. We find that for SMP based systems the most important performance constraint is node-adapter contention, while for 3D-Torus topologies good performance models are not possible without considering link contention. The best average model prediction error is very low on SMP based systems with of 3% to 7%. On torus based systems errors of 29% are higher but optimized performance can again be predicted within 8% in some cases. These excellent results across five different systems indicate that this methodology for performance modeling can be applied to a large class of algorithms.

  6. Performance Modeling and Optimization of a High Energy Colliding Beam Simulation Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Qiang, Ji; Bailey, David H.; Yelick, Kathy

    2006-01-01

    An accurate modeling of the beam-beam interaction is essential to maximizing the luminosity in existing and future colliders. BeamBeam3D was the first parallel code that can be used to study this interaction fully self-consistently on high-performance computing platforms. Various all-to-all personalized communication (AAPC) algorithms dominate its communication patterns, for which we developed a sequence of performance models using a series of micro-benchmarks. We find that for SMP based systems the most important performance constraint is node-adapter contention, while for 3D-Torus topologies good performance models are not possible without considering link contention. The best average model prediction error is very low on SMP based systems with of 3% to 7%. On torus based systems errors of 29% are higher but optimized performance can again be predicted within 8% in some cases. These excellent results across five different systems indicate that this methodology for performance modeling can be applied to a large class of algorithms

  7. Final implementation, commissioning, and performance of embedded collimator beam position monitors in the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Gianluca; Baud, Guillaume; Bruce, Roderik; Gasior, Marek; Mereghetti, Alessio; Mirarchi, Daniele; Olexa, Jakub; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Valloni, Alessandra; Wenninger, Jorg

    2017-08-01

    During Long Shutdown 1, 18 Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimators were replaced with a new design, in which beam position monitor (BPM) pick-up buttons are embedded in the collimator jaws. The BPMs provide a direct measurement of the beam orbit at the collimators, and therefore can be used to align the collimators more quickly than using the standard technique which relies on feedback from beam losses. Online orbit measurements also allow for reducing operational margins in the collimation hierarchy placed specifically to cater for unknown orbit drifts, therefore decreasing the β* and increasing the luminosity reach of the LHC. In this paper, the results from the commissioning of the embedded BPMs in the LHC are presented. The data acquisition and control software architectures are reviewed. A comparison with the standard alignment technique is provided, together with a fill-to-fill analysis of the measured orbit in different machine modes, which will also be used to determine suitable beam interlocks for a tighter collimation hierarchy.

  8. B-physics results from the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-17

    Nov 17, 2012 ... beam during data taking. It is followed by a tracking system located in a dipole magnet, ... the trigger and keep the event multiplicity low, the LHCb experiment is not operating at ... by (laterally) displacing the proton beams in real time. The ATLAS .... B mass difference [23] since the soft photon from. Pramana ...

  9. Effect of μe universality violation in muon pair production on colliding electron-positron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guliev, N.A.; Dzhafarov, I.G.; Mekhtiev, B.I.

    1981-01-01

    The muonic pair production in colliding electron-positron beams is treated assuming the electron and muon weak interaction constants to be different. General formulae for the differential and total cross sections applicable at arbitrary energies of the colliding beams are obtained taking simultaneously into account arbitrary polarizations of the incident particles and longitudinal polarization of the muon (μ - ). It is shown that study of some polarization characteristics of a given reaction allows to distinguish possible weak interaction μe universality breaking effects. The revealing effects are analysed in the framework of unified gauge SU(2)xU(1) models, of weak and electromagnetic interactions [ru

  10. Developments in perturbative QCD? challenges from collider physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeppenfeld, Dieter [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica]. E-mail: dieter@phenom.physics.wisc.edu

    1996-07-01

    The search for new phenomena at hadron colliders requires a good understanding of QCD processes. The analysis of multi-jet signatures in the top quark search at the Tevatron is one example, forward jet tagging and rapidity gap techniques in the analysis of weak boson scattering events at the LH C will be another important application. These topics are discussed in the context of multi-parton/multi-jet QCD processes. Also described are some of the calculation tools, like amplitude techniques and automatic code generation for tree level processes. (author)

  11. Developments in perturbative QCD? challenges from collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    1996-01-01

    The search for new phenomena at hadron colliders requires a good understanding of QCD processes. The analysis of multi-jet signatures in the top quark search at the Tevatron is one example, forward jet tagging and rapidity gap techniques in the analysis of weak boson scattering events at the LH C will be another important application. These topics are discussed in the context of multi-parton/multi-jet QCD processes. Also described are some of the calculation tools, like amplitude techniques and automatic code generation for tree level processes. (author)

  12. Design study of beam dynamics issues for 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.; Sessler, A.; Yu, S.; Houck, T.; Westenskow, G.

    1994-11-01

    A design study has recently been conducted for exploring the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a rf power source for a 1 TeV linear collider. The author present, in this paper, the beam dynamics part of this study. They have achieved in their design study acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties for the resulting high efficiency and low cost RK-TBA

  13. Initial performance studies of a general-purpose detector for multi-TeV physics at a 100 TeV pp collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S. V.; Beydler, M.; Kotwal, A. V.; Gray, L.; Sen, S.; Tran, N. V.; Yu, S. -S.; Zuzelski, J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes simulations of detector response to multi-TeV physics at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) or Super proton-proton Collider (SppC) which aim to collide proton beams with a centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. The unprecedented energy regime of these future experiments imposes new requirements on detector technologies which can be studied using the detailed GEANT4 simulations presented in this paper. The initial performance of a detector designed for physics studies at the FCC-hh or SppC experiments is described with an emphasis on measurements of single particles up to 33 TeV in transverse momentum. The reconstruction of hadronic jets has also been studied in the transverse momentum range from 50 GeV to 26 TeV. The granularity requirements for calorimetry are investigated using the two-particle spatial resolution achieved for hadron showers.

  14. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group. Progress report, March 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Topics covered in this research summary include: status of the OPAL collaboration at LEP, CERN; two-photon physics at PLUTO; search for new particles at JADE; neutrinoless double beta decay at DESY; Fermilab jet experiment; neutrino deuterium experiment in the 15 foot bubble chamber at Fermilab; deep inelastic muon experiment at Fermilab; new experiments at the proton-antiproton collider; neutrino-electron scattering at Los Alamos; parity violation in proton-proton scattering; an upgrade of laboratory and computer facilities; and a study of bismuth germanate as a durable scintillation crystal

  15. New Physics at the LHC: A Les Houches Report. Physics at Tev Colliders 2007 - New Physics Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooijmans, Gustaaf H.; /Columbia U.; Delgado, A.; /Notre Dame U.; Dobrescu, Bogdan A.; /Fermilab; Grojean, C.; /CERN /Saclay, SPhT; Narain, Meenakshi; /Brown U.; Alwall, Johan; /SLAC; Azuelos, Georges; /Montreal U. /TRIUMF; Black, K.; /Harvard U.; Boos, E.; /SINP, Moscow; Bose, Tulika; /Brown U.; Bunichev, V.; /SINP, Moscow; Chivukula, R.S.; /Michigan State U.; Contino, R.; /CERN; Djouadi, A.; /Louis Pasteur U., Strasbourg I /Orsay, LAL; Dudko, Lev V.; /Durham U.; Ferland, J.; /Montreal U.; Gershtein, Yuri S.; /Florida State U.; Gigg, M.; /Durham U.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Herquet, M.; /Louvain U.; Hirn, J.; /Yale U. /Brown U. /Boston U. /Annecy, LAPTH /INFN, Turin /Valencia U., IFIC /Yale U. /Arizona U. /Louis Pasteur U., Strasbourg I /Orsay, LAL /KEK, Tsukuba /Moscow State U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /CERN /Durham U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Sao Paulo, IFT /Fermilab /Zurich, ETH /Boston U. /DESY /CERN /Saclay, SPhT /Durham U. /Cambridge U. /Michigan State U. /Louis Pasteur U., Strasbourg I /Orsay, LAL /Annecy, LAPTH /Fermilab /CERN /Arizona U. /Northwestern U. /Argonne /Kyoto U. /Valencia U., IFIC /UC, Berkeley /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-12-05

    We present a collection of signatures for physics beyond the standard model that need to be explored at the LHC. The signatures are organized according to the experimental objects that appear in the final state, and in particular the number of high p{sub T} leptons. Our report, which includes brief experimental and theoretical reviews as well as original results, summarizes the activities of the 'New Physics' working group for the 'Physics at TeV Colliders' workshop (Les Houches, France, 11-29 June, 2007).

  16. Development of polarized beam conversion system for the linear collider complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viilleval'd, G.S.; Vsevolozhskaya, T.A.; Karasyuk, V.N.; Sil'vestrov, G.I.; Chernyakin, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    Results of development of the polarized beam conversion system for the 150 GeV linear collider aiming at the linear collider operation with a high repetition rate (approximately 10 Hz), are presented. It is shown, that the conversion can be realized by means of ondulator radiation. Structurally, the spiral ondulator is two identical solenoids, inserted in each other in such a way, that their winding turns are alternating in the direction along the axis and they are supplied by countercurrents. The main parameters of the ondulator are as follows : winding pitch -0.7 cm, the ondulator length 150 m. For generation a field of the intensity 5 kOe it has been suggested that solenoids should be supplied by sinusoidal pulse current of duration approximately 200 μs. It is shown, that the introduction of iron into solenoid increases the efficiency by a factor of 2.1 and 2.7 in the ondulator with iron only in interloop gaps and with the addition of iron locking magnetic counterflow

  17. Jet Physics with A Large Ion Collider Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Jochen

    In the presence of the strongly-interacting medium created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, highly energetic partons from hard interactions lose energy through scattering and radiating. This effect, referred to as jet quenching, is observed as a suppression of particles with large momenta transverse to the beam axis (high-$p_\\perp$). To study the impact of the medium evolution on the energy loss modelling in the Monte Carlo event generator JEWEL, we compare results obtained for different scenarios of Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200~\\mathrm{GeV}$. For this purpose, JEWEL was extended to use the output of relativistic hydrodynamic calculations in the OSCAR2008H format. We find the modelling of common observables, e.g. the nuclear modification factor, to be rather insensitive to the details of the medium evolution, for which the analytically accessible Bjorken expansion can thus be considered adequate. The OSCAR interface now allows further studies also at LHC energies. Jets of large transve...

  18. Physics Accomplishments and Future Prospects of the BES Experiments at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Roy A.; Harris, Frederick A.; Mitchell, Ryan E.

    2016-10-01

    The cornerstone of the Chinese experimental particle physics program is a series of experiments performed in the τ-charm energy region. China began building e+e- colliders at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Beijing more than three decades ago. Beijing Electron Spectrometer (BES) is the common root name for the particle physics detectors operated at these machines. We summarize the development of the BES program and highlight the physics results across several topical areas.

  19. Physics Perspectives for a Future Circular Collider: FCC-hh - Accelerator & Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The lectures will briefly discuss the parameters of a Future Circular Collider, before addressing in detail the physics perspectives and the challenges for the experiments and detector systems. The main focus will be on ee and pp collisions, but opportunities for e—p physics will also be covered. The FCC physics perspectives will be presented with reference to the ongoing LHC programme, including the physics potential from future upgrades to the LHC in luminosity and possibly energy.

  20. Dual branch high voltage pulse generator for the beam extraction of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Bonthond, J; Ducimetière, L; Jansson, U; Vossenberg, Eugène B

    2002-01-01

    The LHC beam extraction kicker system, MKD, is composed of 15 fast kicker magnets per beam to extract the particles in one turn from the collider and to dispose them, after dilution, on an external absorber. Each magnet is powered by a separate pulse generator. The original single branch generator consisted of a discharge capacitor in series with a solid state closing switch left bracket 1 right bracket operating at 30 kV. In combination with a parallel freewheel diode stack this generator produced a current pulse of 2.7 mus rise time, 18.5 kA amplitude and about 1.8 ms fall time, of which only about 90 mus are needed to dump the beam. The freewheel diode circuit is equipped with a flat top current droop compensation network, consisting of a low voltage, low stray inductance, high current discharge capacitor. Extensive reliability studies have meanwhile suggested to further increase the operational safety of this crucial system by equipping each generator with two parallel branches. This paper presents the re...

  1. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2004-11-01

    The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration.

  2. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitors System for the Large Hadron Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2004-01-01

    The employment of superconducting magnets in high energy colliders opens challenging failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole system protection. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particle losses, while at medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data have been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis ranges from the components data to the system configuration

  3. Physics results from the first electron-proton collider HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeck, A de

    1995-03-01

    After two years of experimenting at the new ep collider HERA many new results have been obtained. In this report we have presented results on interactions of high energy photons with matter, and showed that similar to hadronic interactions, hard scattering is observed in these collisions. The different photoproduction processes have been isolated, and a first attempt was made to measure the structure of the photon at HERA. A new region has been explored for deep inelastic scattering interactions. The proton structure is probed to very small values of Bjorken-x, showing a large increase of with decreasing x. Events with a large rapidity gap have been observed and are identified as diffractive scattering. The first electroweak results became available by studying the production of charged current events. Searches for new, exotic phenomena were made, but no evidence for the breakdown of the standard model has been found. (orig.)

  4. Unique heavy lepton signature at e+e- linear collider with polarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Osland, P.; Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V.

    2013-03-01

    We explore the effects of neutrino and electron mixing with exotic heavy leptons in the process e + e - →W + W - within E 6 models. We examine the possibility of uniquely distinguishing and identifying such effects of heavy neutral lepton exchange from Z-Z' mixing within the same class of models and also from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to very similar experimental signatures at the e + e - International Linear Collider (ILC) for √(s)=350, 500 GeV and 1 TeV. Such clear identification of the model is possible by using a certain double polarization asymmetry. The availability of both beams being polarized plays a crucial role in identifying such exotic-lepton admixture. In addition, the sensitivity of the ILC for probing exotic-lepton admixture is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the produced W ± bosons is considered.

  5. Pair production of exotic particles at pp(p-barp) colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, G.V.; Pirogov, Yu.F.; Rudakov, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    A complete set of differential cross sections has been obtained in Born approximation for pair production of exotic particles with various spins J=0, 1/2, 1 and quantum numbers (colored and colorless) both in qq-bar and gg-collisions. The connection of the unitarity of vector boson processes with gauge invariance, factorization properties of non-Abelian gauge amplitudes and the presence of kinematic zeros is used. Besides, the problem of admissibility of massless limit for these processes is being discussed. The yield of exotic particle pairs at pp(p-barp) colliding beams in TeV energy range have been calculated and limits for the accessible mass range have been found

  6. Transverse and Longitudinal Beam Collimation in a High-Energy Proton Collider (LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Catalan-Lasheras, N

    1998-01-01

    In the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), particles from the beam halo might potentially impinge on the vacuum chamber, effecting harmful transitions of the superconducting magnets ("quenches"). This can be prevented by the collimation system which confines the particle losses to special, non superconducting sections of the machine. Due to the high energy and intensity of the LHC, any removal system must attain an unprecedented efficiency. The cleaning system was designed on the basis of purely geometric and optical models which neglect non linear effects and assume perfectly absorbing materials. In a second step, true scattering in matter is considered. A series of machine developments (MD) were carried out in 1996-7 with the principal aim of validating the design assumptions. A collimation system comparable to that of the LHC was employed. The predictions of the numerical model used to compute the LHC collimation system efficiency were compared with the data acquired during the measurement sessions. The experimen...

  7. Colliding druthers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Johnson, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    Recommendations are made to maximize the usefulness of the colliding beam facility of the Main Ring and Energy Doubler at the Fermilab accelerator. The advantages of the transposed crossing geometry over the kissing geometry are pointed out

  8. Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, W.F.

    1996-01-01

    Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized

  9. Les Houches guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobbs, Matt A.; Frixione, Stefano; Laenen, Eric; Tollefson, Kirsten

    2004-01-01

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool

  10. Les Houches guidebook to Monte Carlo generators for hadron collider physics

    CERN Document Server

    Dobbs, M.A.; Laenen, Eric; Tollefson, K.; Baer, H.; Boos, E.; Cox, B.; Engel, R.; Giele, W.; Huston, J.; Ilyin, S.; Kersevan, B.; Krauss, F.; Kurihara, Y.; Lonnblad, L.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.; Odaka, S.; Richardson, P.; Ryd, A.; Sjostrand, T.; Skands, Peter Z.; Was, Z.; Webber, B.R.; Zeppenfeld, D.

    2005-01-01

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  11. Physics and technology of the Next Linear Collider a report submitted to Snowmass '96

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhlman, S; Aiello, R; Akemoto, M; Alley, R; Assmann, R W; Baer, Howard W; Baltay, C; Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag; Barakat, B; Barker, A; Barklow, Timothy L; Barletta, W A; Bauer, D A; Bertolini, L R; Bharadwaj, V K; Bogart, J R; Bowden, G B; Bower, G; Brau, J E; Breidenbach, M; Brown, K L; Burke, D L; Burrows, P N; Byrd, J M; Cai, Y; Caryotakis, G; Cassel, R L; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, P; Clark, S L; Cleaver, G B; Clem, D; Clendenin, J E; Corlett, J N; Corvin, C; Couture, G; Cuypers, F; Danielson, M; Deadrick, F J; Decker, Franz Josef; Donaldson, A R; Dragt, A J; Dubois, R; Early, R A; Ecklund, S D; Eichner, J; Einhorn, Martin B; Emma, P; Eppley, K R; Eriksson, L; Fahey, S; Farkas, Z D; Fawley, W M; Feng, J L; Fero, M J; Fisher, A S; Foundoulis, C; Fowkes, W R; Frey, R E; Frisch, J; Fuller, R W; Furman, M A; Genova, L F; Gintner, M; Giordano, G; Gluckstern, R L; Godfrey, S; Gold, S; Goluboff, M; Gross, G; Gunion, J F; Haber, Howard E; Han, T; Hanna, S; Hartman, S; Heifets, S A; Helm, R H; Hendrickson, L; Henestroza, E; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hewett, J L; Higashi, K; Higo, T; Hoag, H A; Hodgson, J; Hollebeek, R J; Holt, J A; Houck, T L; Humphrey, J W; Humphrey, R; Irwin, J; Jackson, A; Jacobsen, R A; Jaros, J A; Jobe, R Keith; Jones, R M; Kalyniak, P A; Kane, G L; Keller, L P; Kim, K J; Klem, D E; Ko, K; Koontz, R F; Kraft, E; Krejcik, P; Kroll, N M; Kubo, K; Kulikov, A; Lavine, T L; Li, H; Li, Z; Lidia, S M; Linebarger, W A; Loew, G A; Loewen, R J; Maeshima, K; Manly, S L; Marciano, W J; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; Mattison, T S; McDonald, K F; McKee, B; Messner, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Miller, R H; Minkowski, Peter; Minty, Michiko G; Moshammer, W; Munro, M H; Munroe, R; Murayama, H; Nantista, C D; Nauenberg, U; Nelson, E M; Nelson, H; Nelson, W R; Ng, C K; Nosochkov, Yu M; Ohgaki, T; Oide, K; Paige, Frank E; Palmer, D; Palmer, R B; Paterson, J M; Pearson, C; Perry, M; Peskin, Michael E; Phillips, R M; Phinney, N; Pope, R S; Raja, R; Raubenheimer, T O; Reginato, L; Rifkin, J; Riles, K; Rimmer, R A; Rinolfi, Louis; Rizzo, T; Robin, D; Rokni, S H; Ronan, Michael T; Rosenzweig, J; Ross, M C; Rowson, P C; Ruland, R E; Ruth, Ronald D; Saab, A; Sawyer, L; Schumm, B; Schwarz, H; Scott, B; Sessler, Andrew M; Sheppard, J C; Shoaee, H; Smith, S; Spence, W L; Spencer, C M; Spencer, J E; Sprehn, D; Strom, D; Stupakov, G; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, K; Tang, H; Tantawi, S G; Tata, Xerxes; Telnov, V I; Tenenbaum, P G; Thomas, S; Thompson, K A; Tian, F; Turner, J; Usher, T; Van Bibber, K; Van Kooten, R; Vanecek, D L; Vlieks, A E; Wagner, D L; Walz, D R; Wang, J W; Ward, B F L; Weidemann, A W; Westenskow, G A; White, T; Whittum, D H; Wilson, P B; Wilson, Z; Woodley, M; Woods, M; Wudka, J; Wurtele, J S; Xie, M; Yan, Y T; Yeremian, A D; Yokoya, K; Yu, S S; Zholents, A A; Zimmermann, Frank

    1996-01-01

    We present the current expectations for the design and physics program of an e+e- linear collider of center of mass energy 500 GeV -- 1 TeV. We review the experiments that would be carried out at this facility and demonstrate its key role in exploring physics beyond the Standard Model over the full range of theoretical possibilities. We then show the feasibility of constructing this machine, by reviewing the current status of linear collider technology and by presenting a precis of our `zeroth- order' design.

  12. Physics goals for the planned next linear collider engineering test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, C.; Michelotti, L.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Syphers, M.; Bluem, H.; Todd, A.; Gai, W.; Power, J.; Simpson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.

    2001-01-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) Collaboration is planning to construct an Engineering Test Facility (ETF) at Fermilab. As presently envisioned, the ETF would comprise a fundamental unit of the NLC main linac to include X-band klystrons and modulators, a delay-line power-distribution system (DLDS), and NLC accelerating structures that serve as loads. The principal purpose of the ETF is to validate stable operation of the power-distribution system, first without beam, then with a beam having the NLC pulse structure. This paper concerns the possibility of configuring and using the ETF to accelerate beam with an NLC pulse structure, as well as of doing experiments to measure beam-induced wakefields in the rf structures and their influence back on the beam

  13. Physics Goals for the Planned Next Linear Collider Engineering Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor O

    2001-01-01

    The Next Linear Collider (NLC) Collaboration is planning to construct an Engineering Test Facility (ETF) at Fermilab. As presently envisioned, the ETF would comprise a fundamental unit of the NLC main linac to include X-band klystrons and modulators, a delay-line power-distribution system (DLDS), and NLC accelerating structures that serve as loads. The principal purpose of the ETF is to validate stable operation of the power distribution system, first without beam, then with a beam having the NLC pulse structure. This paper concerns the possibility of configuring and using the ETF to accelerate beam with an NLC pulse structure, as well as of doing experiments to measure beam-induced wakefields in the rf structures and their influence back on the beam

  14. Reliability of the beam loss monitors system for the large hadron collider at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guaglio, G.

    2005-12-01

    The energy stored in the Large Hadron Collider is unprecedented. The impact of the beam particles can cause severe damage on the superconductive magnets, resulting in significant downtime for repairing. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) detects the secondary particles shower of the lost beam particles and initiates the extraction of the beam before any serious damage to the equipment can occur. This thesis defines the BLMS specifications in term of reliability. The main goal is the design of a system minimizing both the probability to not detect a dangerous loss and the number of false alarms generated. The reliability theory and techniques utilized are described. The prediction of the hazard rates, the testing procedures, the Failure Modes Effects and Criticalities Analysis and the Fault Tree Analysis have been used to provide an estimation of the probability to damage a magnet, of the number of false alarms and of the number of generated warnings. The weakest components in the BLMS have been pointed out. The reliability figures of the BLMS have been calculated using a commercial software package (Isograph.). The effect of the variation of the parameters on the obtained results has been evaluated with a sensitivity analysis. The reliability model has been extended by the results of radiation tests. Design improvements, like redundant optical transmission, have been implemented in an iterative process. The proposed system is compliant with the reliability requirements. The model uncertainties are given by the limited knowledge of the thresholds levels of the superconductive magnets and of the locations of the losses along the ring. The implemented model allows modifications of the system, following the measuring of the hazard rates during the LHC life. It can also provide reference numbers to other accelerators which will implement similar technologies. (author)

  15. Physics with very high energy e+e- colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilleri, L.; Cundy, D.; Darriulat, P.; Ellis, J.; Field, J.; Fischer, H.; Gabathuler, E.; Gaillard, M.K.; Hoffmann, H.; Johnson, K.; Keil, E.; Palmonari, F.; Preparata, G.; Richter, B.; Rubbia, C.; Steinberger, J.; Willis, W.; Winter, K.; Wiik, B.

    1976-01-01

    This report consists of a collection of documents produced by a Study Group on Large Electron-Positron Storage Rings (LEP). The reactions of interest in the weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions are discussed. The technical feasibility of the relevant experiments is investigated by attempting, in each case, the design of an experimental set-up. Event rates are estimated using currently prevailing theoretical models and by extrapolation of results at present accelerators. A number of technical reports previously issued by members of the LEP Design Study Group are included as appendices. (author)

  16. CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School 2013 open for applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Mark your calendar for 28 August - 6 September 2013, when CERN will welcome students to the eighth CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School.   Experiments at hadron colliders will continue to provide our best tools for exploring physics at the TeV scale for some time. With the completion of the 7-8 TeV runs of the LHC, and the final results from the full Tevatron data sample becoming available, a new era in particle physics is beginning, heralded by the Higgs-like particle recently discovered at 125 GeV. To realize the full potential of these developments, CERN and Fermilab are jointly offering a series of "Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools", to prepare young researchers for these exciting times. The school has alternated between CERN and Fermilab, and will return to CERN for the eighth edition, from 28 August to 6 September 2013. The CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School is an advanced school which particularly targets young postdocs in exper...

  17. Polarized e-e+ physics in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, C.Y.

    1980-11-01

    Electroweak interactions at high energies are expected to be dominated by spin-dependent forces. Recent advances in the production of polarized electron beams in linear machines provide the opportunity for studying these spin-dependent effects. Polarized e - e + annihilation at the Z 0 pole can provide precise measurements of neutral current parameters and the best experimental challenge to the standard model of electroweak interactions

  18. Large Hadron Collider at CERN: Beams Generating High-Energy-Density Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, IV; Piriz, A R; Hoffmann, D H H; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations that have been carried out to study the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic response of a solid copper cylindrical target that is facially irradiated along the axis by one of the two Large Hadron Collider (LHC) 7 TeV/c proton beams. The energy deposition by protons in solid copper has been calculated using an established particle interaction and Monte Carlo code, FLUKA, which is capable of simulating all components of the particle cascades in matter, up to multi-TeV energies. This data has been used as input to a sophisticated two--dimensional hydrodynamic computer code, BIG2 that has been employed to study this problem. The prime purpose of these investigations was to assess the damage caused to the equipment if the entire LHC beam is lost at a single place. The FLUKA calculations show that the energy of protons will be deposited in solid copper within about 1~m assuming constant material parameters. Nevertheless, our hydrodynamic simulations have shown that the energy de...

  19. Magnetic field measurements of superconducting magnets for the colliding beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, J.; Kirk, H.; Prodell, A.; Willen, E.

    1983-01-01

    An important aspect of the development and production of superconducting magnets for the Colliding Beam Accelerator is the measurement of the magnetic field in the aperture of these magnets. The measurements have the three-fold purpose of determining the field quality as compared to the lattice requirements of the CBA, of obtaining the survey data necessary to position the magnets in the CBA tunnel, and lastly, of characterizing the magnetic fields for use in initial and future orbit studies of the CBA proton beams. Since for a superconducting storage accelerator it is necessary to carry out these detailed measurements on many (approx. 1000) magnets and at many current values (approx. 1000), we have chosen, in agreement with previous experience, to develop a system which Fourier analyses the voltages induced in a number of rotating windings and thereby obtains the multipole field components. The important point is that such a measuring system can be fast and precise. It has been used for horizontal measurements of the CBA ring dipoles

  20. Proposed method to produce a highly polarized e+ beam for future linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okugi, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Masami; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    1996-01-01

    We propose a method to produce a spin-polarized e + beam using e + e - pair-creation by circularly polarized photons. Assuming Compton scattering of an unpolarized e - beam and circularly polarized laser light, scattered γ-rays at the high end of the energy spectrum are also circularly polarized. If those γ-rays are utilized to create e ± pairs on a thin target, the spin-polarization is preserved for e + 's at the high end of their energy spectrum. By using the injector linac of Accelerator Test Facility at KEK and a commercially available Nd:YAG pulse laser, we can expect about 10 5 polarized e + 's per second with a degree of polarization of 80% and a kinetic energy of 35-80 MeV. The apparatus for creation and measurement of polarized e + 's is being constructed. We present new idea for possible application of our method to future linear colliders by utilizing a high-power CO 2 laser. (author)

  1. Physics at the CERN collider using a ''minimum bias'' trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnison, G.; Astbury, A.; Grayer, G.; Haynes, W.J.; Nandi, A.K.; Roberts, C.; Scott, W.; Shah, T.P.; Bezaguet, A.; Boeck, R.; Calvetti, M.; Carroll, T.; Cennini, P.; Centro, S.; Ceradini, F.; Cittolin, S.; Demoulin, M.; DiBitinto, D.; Ellis, N.; Hoffmann, H.; Jank, W.; Jorat, G.; Kowalski, H.; Kryn, D.; Lacava, F.; Markiewicz, T.; Maurin, G.; Muirhead, H.; Muller, F.; Naumann, L.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, G.; Placci, A.; Revol, J.P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rohlf, J.; Rossi, P.; Rubbia, C.; Sadoulet, B.; Schinzel, D.; Tao, C.; Timmer, J.; Meer, S. van der; Vialle, J.P.; Vuillemin, V.; Xie, G.Y.; Zurfluh, E.; Cochet, C.; DeBeer, M.; Denegri, D.; Givernaud, A.; Laugier, J.P.; Leveque, A.; Locci, E.; Loret, M.; Malosse, J.J.; Rich, J.; Sass, R.; Saudraix, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spiro, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Fontaine, G.; Geer, S.; Ghesquiere, C.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Mendiburu, J.P.; Orkin-Lecourtois, A.; Sajot, G.; Vrana, J.; Bacci, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Corden, M.; Dallman, D.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Dowell, J.D.; Edwards, M.; Eggert, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Erhard, P.; Faissner, H.; Frey, R.; Fruehwirth, R.; Garvey, J.; Giboni, K.L.; Gibson, W.R.; Gutierrez, P.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hodges, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.; Kalmus, P.I.P.; Karimaeki, V.; Keeler, R.; Kenyon, I.; Kernan, A.; Kinnunen, R.; Kozanecki, W.; Lehmann, H.; Leuchs, K.; McMahon, T.; Moricca, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Piano Mortari, G.; Pimiae, M.; Radermacher, E.; Ransdell, J.; Reithler, H.; Salvi, G.; Salvini, G.; Strauss, J.; Sumorok, K.; Szoncso, F.; Smith, D.; Thompson, G.; Tscheslog, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Wahl, H.D.; Watkins, P.; Wilson, J.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper the physics of the events collected using this ''minimum bias trigger'' is described. After a brief description of the detector, I present results concerning particle production (pseudorapidity distributions, multiplicity and KNO scaling). Transverse energy distributions, long and short range correlations, and finally high psub(t) physics and jets. (orig./HSI)

  2. Preliminary design report of a relativistic-Klystron two-beam-accelerator based power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass next linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Henestroza, E.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary point design for an 11.4 GHz power source for a 1 TeV center-of-mass Next Linear Collider (NLC) based on the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam-Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is presented. The present report is the result of a joint LBL-LLNL systems study. consisting of three major thrust areas: physics, engineering, and costing. The new RK-TBA point design, together with our findings in each of these areas, are reported

  3. There’s more to particle physics at CERN than colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    CERN’s scientific programme must be compelling, unique, diverse, and integrated into the global landscape of particle physics. One of the Laboratory’s primary goals is to provide a diverse range of excellent physics opportunities and to put its unique facilities to optimum use, maximising the scientific return.   In this spirit, we have recently established a Physics Beyond Colliders study group with a mandate to explore the unique opportunities offered by the CERN accelerator complex to address some of today’s outstanding questions in particle physics through projects complementary to high-energy colliders and other initiatives in the world. The study group will provide input to the next update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. The process kicked off with a two-day workshop at CERN on 6 and 7 September, organised by the study group conveners: Joerg Jaeckel (Heidelberg), Mike Lamont (CERN) and Claude Vallée (CPPM Marseille and DESY). Its purpo...

  4. Large Hadron Collider Physics (LHCP2017) conference | 15-20 May 2017 | Shanghai

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The fifth Annual Large Hadron Collider Physics will be held in Shanghai and hosted by Shanghai Jiao Tong University in the period of May 15-20, 2017. The main goal of the conference is to provide intense and lively discussions between experimenters and theorists in such research areas as the Standard Model Physics and Beyond, the Higgs Boson, Supersymmetry, Heavy Quark Physics and Heavy Ion Physics as well as to share a recent progress in the high luminosity upgrades and future colliders developments.     The LHCP2017 website: http://lhcp2017.physics.sjtu.edu.cn/ Event date: 15 - 20 May 2017 Location: Shanghai, China

  5. High energy accelerator and colliding beam user group. Progress report 1978/1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, G.

    1979-12-01

    The High Energy Physics Group at the U. of Maryland engaged in a substantial number of different types of particle physics experiments. The largest and most important experiment is that on e + e - interactions. Three experiments were carried out to search for exotic particles or interactions: a heavy neutral lepton, muonium to antimuonium transitions, axions produced by an intense electron beam. No evidence for any of these phenomena was obtained, and the corresponding limitations on relevant parameters were deduced. 10 figures

  6. The Large Hadron Collider project: organizational and financial matters (of physics at the terascale)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, J.

    2012-01-01

    n this paper, I present a view of organizational and financial matters relevant for the successful construction and operation of the experimental set-ups at the Large Hadron Collider of CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva. Construction of these experiments was particularly

  7. Summary of the Very Large Hadron Collider Physics and Detector subgroup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisov, D.; Keller, S.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the activity of the Very Large Hadron Collider Physics and Detector subgroup during Snowmass 96. Members of the group: M. Albrow, R. Diebold, S. Feher, L. Jones, R. Harris, D. Hedin, W. Kilgore, J. Lykken, F. Olness, T. Rizzo, V. Sirotenko, and J. Womersley. 9 refs

  8. Gas delivery system and beamline studies for the test beam facility of the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, H.G. III.

    1987-12-01

    A fixed-target test beam facility has been designed and constructed at the Meson Test (MT) site to support studies of components of the Collider Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (CDF). I assisted in the design and constuction of the test beam facility gas delivery system, and I conducted the initial studies to document the ability of the MT beamline to meet the needs of CDF. Analysis of the preliminary performance data on MT beamline components and beam tunes at required particle energies is presented. Preliminary studies show that the MT beamline has the necessary flexibility to satisfy most CDF requirements now

  9. Experimental W boson physics at future e+e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barklow, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    The study of triple and quartic gauge boson vertices will be the centerpiece of experimental W boson physics at the next generation e + e - linear collider. We examine the sensitivity of a √ bar s = 500 GeV e + e - linear collider to anomalous structure in the W + W - γ and W + W - Z vertices. These vertices are tested by observing the reactions e - γ → νW - , γγ → W + W - , and e +- → W + W - . We also look at W + W - rescattering in e + e - → W + W - as a means to study W + W - → W + W -

  10. Higgs Bosons, Electroweak Symmetry Breaking, and the Physics of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, a 7 + 7 TeV proton-proton collider under construction at CERN (the European Laboratory for Particle Physics in Geneva), will take experiments squarely into a new energy domain where mysteries of the electroweak interaction will be unveiled. What marks the 1-TeV scale as an important target? Why is understanding how the electroweak symmetry is hidden important to our conception of the world around us? What expectations do we have for the agent that hides the electroweak symmetry? Why do particle physicists anticipate a great harvest of discoveries within reach of the LHC?

  11. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, David

    1995-01-01

    The increasing interest in the possibility of positive-negative muon colliders was reflected in the second workshop on the Physics Potential and Development of Muon Colliders, held in Sausalito, California, from 16-19 November, with some 60 attendees. It began with an overview of the particle physics goals, detector constraints, the muon collider and mu cooling, and source issues. The major issue confronting muon development is the possible luminosity achievable. Two collider energies were considered: 200 + 200 GeV and 2 + 2 TeV. The major particle physics goals are the detection of the higgs boson(s) for the lower energy collider, together with WW scattering and supersymmetric particle discovery. At the first such workshop, held in Napa, California, in 1992, it was estimated that a luminosity of some 10 30 and 3 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1 for the low and high energy collider might be achieved (papers from this meeting were published in the October issue of NIM). This was considered a somewhat conservative estimate at the time. At the Sausalito workshop the goal was to see if a luminosity of 10 32 to 10 34 for the two colliders might be achievable and usable by a detector. There were five working groups - physics, 200 + 200 GeV collider, 2 + 2 TeV collider, detector design and backgrounds, and muon cooling and production methods. Considerable progress was made in all these areas at the workshop.

  12. Collider Physics: SDC/SSC liquified fiber calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.T.; Huson, F.R.

    1992-01-01

    Most effort was directed toward the D-Zero experiment at Fermilab. Over 3 pb -1 of high-quality physics data have been obtained. Analysis of the results (wino-zino physics, squark physics), D-zero data acquisition systems efforts, and level-1 and level-2 trigger work are described. Other work concerned detector development for use at the SSC. This technology consists of using liquid scintillator-filled tubes as scintillating fibers for a ''calorimeter.'' The key issues were to demonstrate that the liquid fibers were sufficiently rad-hard and to demonstrate that fibers with sufficiently long attenuation length could be found to satisfy the resolution requirements; both constraints could be satisfied

  13. Electroweak and b-physics at the Tevatron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, K.

    1994-04-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments have collected integrated luminosities of 21 pb -1 and 16 pb -1 , respectively, in the 1992--1993 run (Run Ia) at the Fermilab Tevatron. Preliminary results on electroweak physics are reported from both experiments: the W mass, the leptonic branching ratios Τ(W → ell ν), the total W width, gauge boson couplings, W decay asymmetry and W'/Z' search. Preliminary new results on b physics are presented: B o - bar B o mixing from D0, and masses and lifetimes of B-mesons from CDF

  14. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Schmidt, R; Piriz, A R

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding...

  15. Beam losses from ultraperipheral nuclear collisions between ^{208}Pb^{82+} ions in the Large Hadron Collider and their alleviation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bruce

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interactions between colliding heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN will give rise to localized beam losses that may quench superconducting magnets, apart from contributing significantly to the luminosity decay. To quantify their impact on the operation of the collider, we have used a three-step simulation approach, which consists of optical tracking, a Monte Carlo shower simulation, and a thermal network model of the heat flow inside a magnet. We present simulation results for the case of ^{208}Pb^{82+} ion operation in the LHC, with focus on the ALICE interaction region, and show that the expected heat load during nominal ^{208}Pb^{82+} operation is 40% above the quench level. This limits the maximum achievable luminosity. Furthermore, we discuss methods of monitoring the losses and possible ways to alleviate their effect.

  16. New physics hints in B decays and collider outlook

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There are currently two hints for new physics involving CP violation in → transitions: ≡ - / ≠ 0, and difference in direct CP asymmetry Δ A K π ≡ A K + π 0 − A K + π ≠ 0 . We explore the two scenarious with a large and unique new CP phase in ← tansitions. Motivated by ≠ 0, we update on the ...

  17. The large electron positron collider (LEP) for particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landshoff, P.

    1981-01-01

    The 12 member states of the European high energy physics laboratory CERN are considering the construction of a huge new accelerator. This article outlines present understanding of the fundamental forces of nature and the subnuclear structure of matter, and describes the accelerator that will enable some of their mysteries to be explained. (author)

  18. The large electron positron collider (LEP) for particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Landshoff, Peter V

    1981-01-01

    The 12 member states of the European high energy physics laboratory CERN are considering the construction of a huge new accelerator. The author outlines the understanding of the fundamental forces of nature and the subnuclear structure of matter, and describes the accelerator that will enable some of their mysteries to be explained. (6 refs).

  19. Dijet physics with CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The measurements of the dijet mass spectra, centrality ratio, azimuthal decorrelation and angular distribution are shown. Sensitivity of the phenomenological parameters used to model different event generators is also investigated. Prospects for observing evidence for new physics in these distributions are presented.

  20. GPU-Powered Modelling of Nonlinear Effects due to Head-On Beam-Beam Interactions in High-Energy Hadron Colliders.

    CERN Document Server

    Furuseth, Sondre

    2017-01-01

    The performance of high-energy circular hadron colliders, as the Large Hadron Collider, is limited by beam-beam interactions. The strongly nonlinear force between the two opposing beams causes diverging Hamiltonians and resonances, which can lead to a reduction of the lifetime of the beams. The nonlinearity makes the effect of the force difficult to study analytically, even at first order. Numerical models are therefore needed to evaluate the overall effect of different configurations of the machines. This report discusses results from an implementation of the weak-strong model, studying the effects of head-on beam-beam interactions. The assumptions has been shown to be valid for configurations where the growth and losses of the beam are small. The tracking has been done using an original code which applies graphic cards to reduce the computation time. The bunches in the beams have been modelled cylindrically symmetrical, based on a Gaussian distribution in three dimensions. This choice fits well with bunches...

  1. 2nd CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer School, June 6-15, 2007, CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 9 MARCH 2007. The results of the selection process will be announced shortly thereafter. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The first school in the series, held last summer at Fermilab, covered extensively the physics at the Tevatron collider experiments. The second school, to be held at CERN, will focus on the technology and physics of the LHC experiments. Emphasis will be placed on the first years of data-taking at the LHC and on the discovery potential of the programme. The series of lectures will be supported by in-depth discussion sessions and will include the theory and phenomenology of hadron collisions, discovery physics topics, detector and analysis techniques and tools...

  2. Beam tomography or ART in accelerator physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, J.S.

    1978-11-01

    Projections of charged particle beam current density have been used for many years as a measure of beam position and size. The conventional practice of obtaining only two projections, usually in the horizontal and vertical planes, puts a severe limit on the detail that can be recovered from the projections. A third projection provides sufficient improvement to justify the addition of a wire to the conventional wire scanner in certain cases. A group of programs using algebraic reconstruction techniques was written to reconstruct beam current density from beam projections obtained at three or more specific or arbitrary angles around the beam. A generalized program, which makes use of arbitrary 2 x 2 transfer matrices between projections, can be used to reconstruct transverse or longitudinal emittance from appropriate projections. Reconstruction examples of beam current density and transverse and longitudinal emittance using experimental data from the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator beam are given

  3. New Physics at the LHC. A Les Houches Report Physics at TeV Colliders 2009 - New Physics Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Brooijmans, G; Kribs, G D; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C; Agashe, K; Basso, L; Belanger, G; Belyaev, A; Black, K; Bose, T; Brunelière, R; Cacciapaglia, G; Carrera, E; Das, S P; Deandrea, A; De Curtis, S; Etienvre, A -I; Espinosa, J R; Fichet, S; Gauthier, L; Gopalakrishna, S; Gray, H; Gripaios, B; Guchait, M; Harper, S J; Henderson, C; Jackson, J; Karagöz, M; Kraml, S; Lane, K; Lari, T; Lee, S J; Lessard, J R; Maravin, Y; Martin, A; McElrath, B; Moreau, G; Moretti, S; Morrissey, D E; Mühlleitner, M; Poland, D; Pruna, G M; Pukhov, A; Raklev, A R; Robens, T; Rosenfeld, R; Rzehak, H; Salam, G P; Sekmen, S; Servant, G; Singh, R K; Smith, B C; Spira, M; Strassler, M J; Tomalin, I; Tytgat, M; Vos, M; Wacker, J G; Weitershausen, P v; Zurek, K M

    2010-01-01

    We present a collection of signatures for physics beyond the standard model that need to be explored at the LHC. First, are presented various tools developed to measure new particle masses in scenarios where all decays include an unobservable particle. Second, various aspects of supersymmetric models are discussed. Third, some signatures of models of strong electroweak symmetry are discussed. In the fourth part, a special attention is devoted to high mass resonances, as the ones appearing in models with warped extra dimensions. Finally, prospects for models with a hidden sector/valley are presented. Our report, which includes brief experimental and theoretical reviews as well as original results, summarizes the activities of the "New Physics" working group for the "Physics at TeV Colliders" workshop (Les Houches, France, 8-26 June, 2009).

  4. PARTICLE PHYSICS: CERN Collider Glimpses Supersymmetry--Maybe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seife, C

    2000-07-14

    Last week, particle physicists at the CERN laboratory in Switzerland announced that by smashing together matter and antimatter in four experiments, they detected an unexpected effect in the sprays of particles that ensued. The anomaly is subtle, and physicists caution that it might still be a statistical fluke. If confirmed, however, it could mark the long-sought discovery of a whole zoo of new particles--and the end of a long-standing model of particle physics.

  5. Physics with linear colliders in the tev CM energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.; Cook, V.; Hinchliffe, I.; Lane, K.; Pellet, D.; Perl, M.; Seiden, A.; Wiedemann, H.

    1982-01-01

    It may well be that the e/sup +/e/sup -/ physics beyond PEP and PETRA and up to 200 GeV CM energy will deal primarily with the verification of the standard model (SM) of weak and electromagnetic interactions. Various theoretical and experimental studies at workshops for contemplated accelerators (SLC, LEP I, Z 0 ) have assumed this. Beyond 200 GeV the picture is less clear. The absence of theoretical models with strong predictions comparable to the SM adds to the difficulty. In addition, the experimental verification of the SM itself is yet to come, and one is forced to make certain assumptions about the outcome. The following assumptions are made: Z 0 , W/sup +-/, light higgs (if M/sub H/ < 100 GeV) have all been discovered. The t quark has been discovered if its mass is < 100 GeV. QCD is basically the correct theory of the strong interactions. With these assumptions, the authors have produced an updated table of possible physics in the TeV region. This table was used as the basis for the study of specific physics. It contains best estimates of cross-section, promising signatures for final states, and some helpful comments

  6. High energy colliders as black hole factories: The end of short distance physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giddings, Steven B.; Thomas, Scott

    2002-01-01

    If the fundamental Planck scale is of order of a TeV, as is the case in some extra-dimension scenarios, future hadron colliders such as the CERN Large Hadron Collider will be black hole factories. The nonperturbative process of black hole formation and decay by Hawking evaporation gives rise to spectacular events with up to many dozens of relatively hard jets and leptons with a characteristic ratio of hadronic to leptonic activity of roughly 5:1. The total transverse energy of such events is typically a sizable fraction of the beam energy. Perturbative hard scattering processes at energies well above the Planck scale are cloaked behind a horizon, thus limiting the ability to probe short distances. The high energy black hole cross section grows with energy at a rate determined by the dimensionality and geometry of the extra dimensions. This dependence therefore probes the extra dimensions at distances larger than the Planck scale

  7. Unique heavy lepton signature at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider with polarized beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Osland, P. [Univ. Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics and Technology; Pankov, A.A.; Tsytrinov, A.V. [Technical Univ. Gomel (Belarus). Abdus Salam ICTP Affliated Centre

    2013-03-15

    We explore the effects of neutrino and electron mixing with exotic heavy leptons in the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} within E{sub 6} models. We examine the possibility of uniquely distinguishing and identifying such effects of heavy neutral lepton exchange from Z-Z' mixing within the same class of models and also from analogous ones due to competitor models with anomalous trilinear gauge couplings (AGC) that can lead to very similar experimental signatures at the e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) for {radical}(s)=350, 500 GeV and 1 TeV. Such clear identification of the model is possible by using a certain double polarization asymmetry. The availability of both beams being polarized plays a crucial role in identifying such exotic-lepton admixture. In addition, the sensitivity of the ILC for probing exotic-lepton admixture is substantially enhanced when the polarization of the produced W{sup {+-}} bosons is considered.

  8. Curating the collider: using place to engage museum visitors with particle physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Boyle

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, the world’s largest particle physics facility, provides museological opportunities and challenges. Visitor interest in cutting-edge physics, with its high media profile, is tempered by anxiety about understanding complex content. The topic does not readily lend itself to traditional museum showcase-dominated displays: the technology of modern particle physics is overwhelmingly large, while the phenomena under investigation are invisible. For Collider, a major temporary exhibition, the Science Museum adopted a ‘visit to CERN’ approach, recreating several of the laboratory’s spaces. We explore the effectiveness of this approach, at a time when historical studies of scientific laboratories and museum reconstructions of spaces are subject to renewed interest.

  9. Prospects for new physics in τ→lμμ at current and future colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hays, Chris [Department of Physics, Oxford University,Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mitra, Manimala [Department of Physics,Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali (IISER Mohali),Sector 81, SAS Nagar, Manauli 140306 (India); Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Department of Physics, Durham University,South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Spannowsky, Michael; Waite, Philip [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Department of Physics, Durham University,South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-03

    The discovery of lepton flavour violating interactions will be striking evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. Focusing on the three decays τ{sup ∓}→μ{sup ±}μ{sup ∓}μ{sup ∓}, τ{sup ∓}→e{sup ±}μ{sup ∓}μ{sup ∓} and τ{sup ∓}→e{sup ∓}μ{sup ∓}μ{sup ±}, we evaluate the discovery potential of current and future high-energy colliders to probe lepton flavour violation in the τ sector. Based on this potential we determine the expected constraints on parameters of new physics in the context of the Type-II Seesaw Model, the Left-Right Symmetric Model, and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. The existing and ongoing 13 TeV run of the Large Hadron Collider has the potential to produce constraints that outperform the existing e{sup +}e{sup −} collider limits for the τ{sup ∓}→μ{sup ±}μ{sup ∓}μ{sup ∓} decay and achieve a branching fraction limit of ≲10{sup −8}. With a future circular e{sup +}e{sup −} collider, constraints on the τ→lμμ branching fractions could reach as low as a few times 10{sup −12}.

  10. New Physics Signatures in Dijets at Hadron Colliders

    OpenAIRE

    Gounaris, G. J.; Papadamou, D. T.; Renard, F. M.

    1997-01-01

    We show how to detect and disentangle at the upgraded Tevatron and at LHC, the effects of the three purely gluonic $dim=6$ $SU(3)\\times SU(2) \\times U(1)$ CP-conserving and CP-violating gauge invariant operators $\\ol{\\O}_{DG}$, $\\O_G$ and $\\wtil{\\O}_{G}$. These operators are inevitably generated by New Physics (NP), if the heavy particles responsible for it are coloured. We establish the relations between their coupling constants and the corresponding NP scales defined through the unitarity r...

  11. Collider Aspects of Flavour Physics at High Q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Aguila, F.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Allanach, B.C.; Alwall, J.; Andreev, Yu.; Aristizabal Sierra, D.; Bartl, A.; Beccaria, M.; Bejar, S.; Benucci, L.; Bityukov, S.; Borjanovic, I.; Bozzi, G.; Burdman, G.; Carvalho, J.; Castro, N.; Clerbaux, B.; de Campos, F.; de Gouvea, A.; Dennis, C.; Djouadi, A.; /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Louvain U., CP3 /Moscow, INR /Valencia U. /Vienna U. /Salento U. /INFN, Lecce /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Barcelona, IFAE /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Karlsruhe U. /Sao Paulo U. /LIP, Coimbra /Brussels U. /Sao Paulo U., Guaratingueta /Northwestern U. /Oxford U. /Orsay, LPT /Athens U. /Lisbon U.

    2008-03-07

    This chapter of the report of the 'Flavour in the era of LHC' workshop discusses flavor related issues in the production and decays of heavy states at LHC, both from the experimental side and from the theoretical side. We review top quark physics and discuss flavor aspects of several extensions of the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry, little Higgs model or models with extra dimensions. This includes discovery aspects as well as measurement of several properties of these heavy states. We also present public available computational tools related to this topic.

  12. Collider aspects of flavor physics at high Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, T.; Pape, L.; Moortgat, F.; Porod, W.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aguila, F. del; Illana, J.; Allanach, B.C.; Raklev, A.R.; Burdman, G.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Castro, N.; Carvalho, J.; Onofre, A.; Veloso, F.; Klasen, M.; Fuks, B.; Herrmann, B.; Krasnikov, N.; Andreev, Y.; Bityukov, S.; Gninenko, S.; Matveev, V.; Toropin, A.; Krauss, F.; Weiglein, G.; Polesello, G.; Tricomi, A.; Uenel, G.; Alwall, J.; Frederix, R.; Gerard, J.M.; Giammanco, A.; Herquet, M.; Kalinin, S.; Kou, E.; Lemaitre, V.; Maltoni, F.; Sierra, D.A.; Hirsch, M.K.; Valle, J.W.F.; Villanova del Moral, A.; Bartl, A.; Hohenwarter-Sodek, K.; Kernreiter, T.; Beccaria, M.; Ventura, A.; Bejar, S.; Benucci, L.; Palla, F.; Borjanovic, I.; Bozzi, G.; Clerbaux, B.; Campos, F. de; Gouvea, A. de; Gopalakrishna, S.; Dennis, C.; Uenel, M.K.; Tseng, J.; Djouadi, A.; Ellwanger, U.; Moreau, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Roupas, Z.; Ferreira, P.M.; Santos, R.; Goto, T.; Grzadkowski, B.; Guasch, J.; Hahn, T.; Hollik, W.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Muentel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Hidaka, K.; Hou, G.W.S.; Hurth, T.; Ibarra, A.; Karafasoulis, C.; Kyriakis, A.; Vermisoglou, G.; Kirsanov, M.M.; Kraml, S.; Macorini, G.; Panizzi, L.; Verzegnassi, C.; Magro, M.B.; Majerotto, W.; Mehdiyev, R.; Misiak, M.; Muehlleitner, M.; Oezcan, E.; Penaranda, S.; Pittau, R.; Pukhov, A.; Renard, F.M.; Restrepo, D.; Schumann, S.; Siegert, F.; Servant, G.; Skands, P.; Slavich, P.; Sola, J.; Spira, M.; Sultansoy, S.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter of the ''Flavor in the era of LHC'' workshop report discusses flavor-related issues in the production and decays of heavy states at the LHC at high momentum transfer Q, both from the experimental and the theoretical perspective. We review top quark physics, and discuss the flavor aspects of several extensions of the standard model, such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models or models with extra dimensions. This includes discovery aspects, as well as the measurement of several properties of these heavy states. We also present publicly available computational tools related to this topic. (orig.)

  13. Physics opportunities at asymmetric e+e- collider at Υ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yoshihide

    1993-01-01

    The prospects of various physics are discussed for an Asymmetric e + e - B-Factory, which is considered as a next project after TRISTAN at KEK. The potential reach of CP asymmetry measurements are presented for various decay modes based on the Monte Carlo simulation studies. Combining various decay modes, the angles in the unitarity triangle of the CKM-matrix could be measured with precisions of δsin2φ 1 ∼ 0.05, δsin2φ 2 ∼ 0.07, and δφ 3 ∼ 13 degrees with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb -1

  14. Physics at the e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G., E-mail: gudrid.moortgat-pick@desy.de [II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Hamburg, 22761, Hamburg (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, 22603, Hamburg (Germany); Baer, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 73019, Norman, OK (United States); Battaglia, M. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Belanger, G. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (LAPTh), Université Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, B.P.110, 74941, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Fujii, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); and others

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider in the energy range of √s=92 GeV–3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  15. Physics at the e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; DESY Hamburg (Germany); Baer, H. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Battaglia, M. [California Santa Cruz Univ., CA (United States). Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics; and others

    2015-04-15

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear Collider in the energy range of √(s)=92 GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low energy as well as astroparticle physics.The report focuses in particular on Higgs boson, Top quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the Standard Model physics such as Supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analyzed as well.

  16. Physics at the e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moortgat-Pick, G.; Liebler, S. [University of Hamburg, II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hamburg (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Baer, H. [University of Oklahoma, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Norman, OK (United States); Battaglia, M.; Stefaniak, T. [University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Belanger, G.; Serpico, P. [Universite Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (LAPTh), B.P.110, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Fujii, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organisation (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Kalinowski, J.; Krawczyk, M. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Heinemeyer, S. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Kiyo, Y. [Juntendo University, Department of Physics, Inzai, Chiba (Japan); Olive, K. [University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Simon, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Uwer, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Berlin (Germany); Wackeroth, D. [SUNY at Buffalo, Department of Physics, Buffalo, NY (United States); Zerwas, P.M.; List, J.; Mnich, J.; Moenig, K.; Stanitzki, M.; Weiglein, G.; Mnich, J. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Arbey, A.; Mahmoudi, F. [Universite de Lyon, Villeurbonne Cedex (France); Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5574, Saint-Genis Laval Cedex (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Asano, M. [Universitaet Bonn, Physikalisches Institut and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany); Bagger, J.; Bagger, J. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baltimore, MD (United States); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bechtle, P.; Desch, K.; Kroseberg, J. [University of Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Bharucha, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department T31, Garching (Germany); CNRS, Aix Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, Marseille (France); Brau, J.; Brau, J. [University of Oregon, Department of Physics, Eugene, OR (United States); Bruemmer, F. [LUPM, UMR 5299, Universite de Montpellier II et CNRS, Montpellier (France); Choi, S.Y. [Chonbuk National University, Department of Physics, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Denner, A.; Porod, W. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dittmaier, S. [Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Ellwanger, U.; Mambrini, Y. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physique, UMR 8627, CNRS, Orsay (France); Englert, C. [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Freitas, A. [University of Pittsburgh, PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ginzburg, I. [Sobolev Institute of Mathematics and Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Godfrey, S. [Carleton University, Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Department of Physics, Ottawa (Canada); Greiner, N. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Grojean, C. [ICREA at IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Gruenewald, M. [University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Heisig, J. [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, Aachen (Germany); Hoecker, A.; Moortgat, F.; Schlatter, D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Kanemura, S. [University of Toyama, Department of Physics, Toyama (Japan); Kawagoe, K.; Kawagoe, K. [Kyushu University, Department of Physics, Fukuoka (Japan); Kogler, R. [University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Kronfeld, A.S.; Kronfeld, A.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Advanced Study, Garching (Germany); Matsumoto, S. [The University of Tokyo, Kavli IPMU (WPI), Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Muehlleitner, M.M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Poeschl, R. [Laboratoire de L' accelerateur Lineaire (LAL), CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (FR); Porto, S. [University of Hamburg, II. Institute of Theoretical Physics, Hamburg (DE); Rolbiecki, K. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (PL); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (ES); Schmitt, M. [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Evanston, IL (US); Staal, O. [Stockholm University, The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Physics, Stockholm (SE); Stoeckinger, D. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, TU Dresden, Dresden (DE); Wilson, G.W. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (US); Zeune, L. [ITFA, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (NL); Xella, S. [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute, Kobenhavn (DK); Ellis, J. [CERN, Geneva (CH); King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, Strand, London (GB); Komamiya, S. [The University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, and International Center for Elementary Particle Physics, Tokyo (JP); Peskin, M. [SLAC, Stanford University, CA (US); Wagner, A. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg und Zeuthen, Hamburg (DE); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (DE); Yamamoto, H. [Tohoku University, Department of Physics, Sendai, Miyagi (JP)

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider in the energy range of √(s) = 92 GeV-3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well. (orig.)

  17. Muon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Skrinsky, A.

    1996-01-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should thus be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV and 0.5 TeV high luminosity micro + micro - colliders, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate the muons and proceeding through muon cooling, acceleration and storage in a collider ring. Problems of detector background are also discussed

  18. 3rd CERN-Fermilab HadronCollider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    EP Department

    2008-01-01

    August 12-22, 2008, Fermilab The school web site is http://cern.ch/hcpss with links to the academic programme and the application procedure. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS 29 FEBRUARY 2008. The goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers in high-energy physics a concentrated syllabus on the theory and experimental challenges of hadron collider physics. The third session of the summer school will focus on exposing young post-docs and advanced graduate students to broader theories and real data beyond what they’ve learned at their home institutions. Experts from across the globe will lecture on the theoretical and experimental foundations of hadron collider physics, host parallel discussion sessions and answer students’ questions. This year’s school will also have a greater focus on physics beyond the Standard Model, as well as more time for questions at the end of each lecture. The 2008 School will be held at Fermilab. Further enquiries should ...

  19. For Information: CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Applications are Now Open for the CERN-Fermilab2006 Hadron Collider Physics Summer School August 9-18, 2006 Please go to the school web site http://hcpss.fnal.gov/ and follow the links to the Application process. The APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 8, 2006. Successful applicants and support awards will be announced shortly thereafter. Also available on the web is the tentative academic program of the school. The main goal of the CERN-Fermilab Hadron Collider Physics Summer Schools is to offer students and young researchers a broad picture of both the theoretical and experimental aspects of hadron collider physics. The emphasis of the first school will be on the physics potential of the first years of data taking at the LHC, and on the experimental and theoretical tools needed to exploit that potential. A series of lectures and informal discussions will include an introduction to the theoretical and phenomenological framework of hadron collisions, and current theoretical models of frontier physics, as...

  20. Aspects of two-photon physics at linear e+e- colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drees, M.; Godbole, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss various reactions at future e + e - and γγ colliders involving real (beamstrahlung or backscattered laser) or quasi-real (bremsstrahlung) photons in the initial state and hadrons in the final state. The production of two central jets with large transverse momentum p T is described in some detail; we give distributions for the rapidity and p T of the jets as well as the di-jet invariant mass, and discuss the relative importance of various initial state configurations and the uncertainties that arise from the at present rather poor knowledge of the parton content of the photon. We also present results for 'mono-jet' production where one jet goes down a beam pipe, for the production of charm, bottom and top quarks, and for single production of W and Z bosons. Where appropriate, the two-photon processes are compared with annihilation reactions leading to similar final states. We also argue that the behaviour of the total inelastic γγ cross section at high energies will probably have little impact on the severity of background problems caused by soft and semi-hard ('minijet') two-photon reactions. We find very large differences in cross sections for all two-photon processes between existing designs for future e + e - colliders, due to the different beamstrahlung spectra; in particular, both designs with >1 events per bunch crossing exist. The number of hardronic two-photon events is expected to rise quickly with the beam energy. Hadronic backgrounds will be even worse if the e + e - collider is converted into a γγ collider. (orig.)

  1. Probing anomalous Higgs couplings at an eγ collider using unpolarized beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, Debajyoti; Mamta

    2007-01-01

    We examine the sensitivity of e γ colliders (based on e + e - linear colliders of c.m. energy 500 GeV) to the anomalous couplings of the Higgs to W-boson via the process e - γ → νWH. This has the advantage over e + e - collider in being able to dissociate WWH vertex from ZZH. We are able to construct several dynamical variables which may be used to constrain the various couplings in the WWH vertex. (author)

  2. Modelling of the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of the Two-Beam Module for the Compact Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Raatikainen, Riku; Österberg, K; Lehtovaara, A; Pajunen, S

    2011-01-01

    To fulfil the mechanical requirements set by the luminosity goals of the compact linear collider, the 2-m long two-beam modules, the shortest repetitive elements in the main linear accelerator, have to be controlled at micrometer level. At the same time these modules are exposed to high power dissipation that varies while the accelerator is ramped up to nominal power and when the mode of the accelerator operation is modified. These variations will give rise to inevitable temperature transients driving mechanical distortions in and between different module components. Therefore, the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the module is of a high importance. This thesis describes a finite element method model for the two-beam compact linear collider module. The components are described in detail compared to earlier models, which should result in a realistic description of the module. Due to the complexity of the modules, the modelling is divided into several phases from geometrical simplification and modification to the...

  3. Polarized proton colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roser, T.

    1995-01-01

    High energy polarized beam collisions will open up the unique physics opportunities of studying spin effects in hard processes. This will allow the study of the spin structure of the proton and also the verification of the many well documented expectations of spin effects in perturbative QCD and parity violation in W and Z production. Proposals for polarized proton acceleration for several high energy colliders have been developed. A partial Siberian Snake in the AGS has recently been successfully tested and full Siberian Snakes, spin rotators, and polarimeters for RHIC are being developed to make the acceleration of polarized beams to 250 GeV possible. This allows for the unique possibility of colliding two 250 GeV polarized proton beams at luminosities of up to 2 x 10 32 cm -2 s -1

  4. Impact of the resistive wall impedance on beam dynamics in the Future Circular e^{+}e^{-} Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Migliorati

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Future Circular Collider study, which aims at designing post-LHC particle accelerator options, is entering in the final stage, which foresees a conceptual design report containing the basic requirements for a hadron and a lepton collider, as well as options for an electron-proton machine. Due to the high beam intensities of these accelerators, collective effects have to be carefully analyzed. Among them, the finite conductivity of the beam vacuum chamber represents a major source of impedance for the electron-positron collider. By using numerical and analytical tools, a parametric study of longitudinal and transverse instabilities caused by the resistive wall is performed in this paper for the case of the Future Circular Collider lepton machine, by taking into account also the effects of coating, used to fight the electron cloud build up. It will be proved that under certain assumptions the coupling impedance of a two layer system does not depend on the conductivity of the coating and this property represents an important characteristic for the choice of the material itself. The results and findings of this study have an impact on the machine design in several aspects. In particular the quite low threshold of single bunch instabilities with respect to the nominal beam current and the not negligible power losses due to the resistive wall are shown, together with the necessity of a new feedback system to counteract the fast transverse coupled bunch instability. The importance of a round vacuum chamber to avoid the quadrupolar tune shift is also discussed. Finally the crucial importance of the beam pipe material coating and thickness choice for the above results is underlined.

  5. Impact of the resistive wall impedance on beam dynamics in the Future Circular e+e- Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, M.; Belli, E.; Zobov, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Future Circular Collider study, which aims at designing post-LHC particle accelerator options, is entering in the final stage, which foresees a conceptual design report containing the basic requirements for a hadron and a lepton collider, as well as options for an electron-proton machine. Due to the high beam intensities of these accelerators, collective effects have to be carefully analyzed. Among them, the finite conductivity of the beam vacuum chamber represents a major source of impedance for the electron-positron collider. By using numerical and analytical tools, a parametric study of longitudinal and transverse instabilities caused by the resistive wall is performed in this paper for the case of the Future Circular Collider lepton machine, by taking into account also the effects of coating, used to fight the electron cloud build up. It will be proved that under certain assumptions the coupling impedance of a two layer system does not depend on the conductivity of the coating and this property represents an important characteristic for the choice of the material itself. The results and findings of this study have an impact on the machine design in several aspects. In particular the quite low threshold of single bunch instabilities with respect to the nominal beam current and the not negligible power losses due to the resistive wall are shown, together with the necessity of a new feedback system to counteract the fast transverse coupled bunch instability. The importance of a round vacuum chamber to avoid the quadrupolar tune shift is also discussed. Finally the crucial importance of the beam pipe material coating and thickness choice for the above results is underlined.

  6. Inclusive large mass muon pair production in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions for colliding beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    For colliding beams of several species of ions we compare thermal to perturbative quantum chromodynamic contributions for inclusive large mass muon pair production by using a hydrodynamic model to estimate the temperatures of the quark-gluon plasma produced by each species. The production of high energy dimuons with M ≅-4 GeV, will be favored energetically by the quark-gluon plasma. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Ringing in the new physics: The politics and technology of electron colliders in the United States, 1956--1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Elizabeth

    The ``November Revolution'' of 1974 and the experiments that followed consolidated the place of the Standard Model in modern particle physics. Much of the evidence on which these conclusions depended was generated by a new type of tool: colliding beam storage rings, which had been considered physically unfeasible twenty years earlier. In 1956 a young experimentalist named Gerry O'Neill dedicated himself to demonstrating that such an apparatus could do useful physics. The storage ring movement encountered numerous obstacles before generating one of the standard machines for high energy research. In fact, it wasn't until 1970 that the U.S. finally broke ground on its first electron-positron collider. Drawing extensively on archival sources and supplementing them with the personal accounts of many of the individuals who took part, Ringing in the New Physics examines this instance of post-World War II techno-science and the new social, political and scientific tensions that characterize it. The motivations are twofold: first, that the chronicle of storage rings may take its place beside mathematical group theory, computer simulations, magnetic spark chambers, and the like as an important contributor to a view of matter and energy which has been the dominant model for the last twenty-five years. In addition, the account provides a case study for the integration of the personal, professional, institutional, and material worlds when examining an episode in the history or sociology of twentieth century science. The story behind the technological development of storage rings holds fascinating insights into the relationship between theory and experiment, collaboration and competition in the physics community, the way scientists obtain funding and their responsibilities to it, and the very nature of what constitutes ``successful'' science in the post- World War II era.

  8. A systems study of an RF power source for a 1 TeV next linear collider based upon the relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.; Goffeney, N.; Deadrick, F.

    1994-11-01

    A systems study, including physics, engineering and costing, has been conducted to assess the feasibility of a relativistic-klystron two-beam-accelerator (RK-TBA) system as a RF power source candidate for a 1 TeV linear collider. Several key issues associated with a realizable RK-TBA system have been addressed, and corresponding schemes have been developed and examined quantitatively. A point design example has been constructed to present a concrete conceptual design which has acceptable transverse and longitudinal beam stability properties. The overall efficiency of RF production for such a power source is estimated to be 36%, and the cost of the full system is estimated to be less than 1 billion dollars

  9. The international linear collider. Technical design report. Vol. 2. Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, Howard; Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we have surveyed the range of physics topics that will be addressed by the ILC. Our primary emphasis has been on the study of a Standard Model-like Higgs boson. The discovery of a new boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments has vaulted the question of its properties of the top of the list of questions in high energy physics. We have argued that the ILC is perfectly matched to this problem. The ILC will be able to deliver a precise description of the properties of this new particle. The ability of the ILC to operate at several different energies plays an important role in its ability to study the Higgs boson. We have described three phases of the Higgs boson program. First, at √(s) = 250 GeV, one may expect the precision measurement of the Higgs mass and its major branching fractions and the search for invisible and exotic modes. Second, at √(s) = 500 GeV, we anticipate precision measurements of the Higgs coupling to the W boson and the higher statistics study of modes with small branching fractions. Finally, at √(s) = 1 TeV, for the measurement of the Higgs couplings to the top quark and the muon, and the Higgs self-coupling can be made. The suite of measurements at these three energies combines to provide a complete picture of the interactions of the Higgs particle and an incisive test of its role in the generation of mass for all elementary particles. We have also emphasized the ability of the ILC to carry out precision measurements of the properties of the W and Z bosons and the top quark, and of elementary e + e - → 2 fermion reactions. In addition, we have shown that the ILC has excellent capabilities to study new color-singlet particles that might be present in the mass range of a few hundred GeV. The nature of the Higgs boson and the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking remains a central and puzzling problem. The traditional approaches to this problem either involve strong coupling in the Higgs sector, building the Higgs boson as a

  10. Impact of large beam-induced heat loads on the transient operation of the beam screens and the cryogenic plants of the Future Circular Collider (FCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Rodrigues, H.; Tavian, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Future Circular Collider (FCC) under study at CERN will produce 50-TeV high-energy proton beams. The high-energy particle beams are bent by 16-T superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K and distributed over a circumference of 80 km. The circulating beams induce 5 MW of dynamic heat loads by several processes such as synchrotron radiation, resistive dissipation of beam image currents and electron clouds. These beam-induced heat loads will be intercepted by beam screens operating between 40 and 60 K and induce transients during beam injection. Energy ramp-up and beam dumping on the distributed beam-screen cooling loops, the sector cryogenic plants and the dedicated circulators. Based on the current baseline parameters, numerical simulations of the fluid flow in the cryogenic distribution system during a beam operation cycle were performed. The effects of the thermal inertia of the headers on the helium flow temperature at the cryogenic plant inlet as well as the temperature gradient experienced by the beam screen has been assessed. Additionally, this work enabled a thorough exergetic analysis of different cryogenic plant configurations and laid the building-block for establishing design specification of cold and warm circulators.

  11. 6th International Conference on the Physics Opportunities at an ElecTron-Ion Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Sabatié, F; POETIC6

    2015-01-01

    POETIC6, the 6th edition of the International Conference on the "Physics Opportunities at an ElecTron-Ion Collider", will take place at Ecole Polytechnique in Palaiseau, France from Monday, September 7th to Friday, September 11th 2015, a few weeks before the National Science Advisory Committee recommends a new Long Range Plan to the United States' DOE and NSF. In the midst of this much-anticipated report, and following earlier workshops at Stellenbosch, Bloomington, Valparaiso, Jyvaskyla and Yale, it is timely for the POETIC series to become an international conference. The primary goal will remain to continue the advancement of the field of electron-ion collider physics. While the central theme of the conference will be the physics of a future electron-ion collider, the workshop will also cover strongly-related physics in the CEBAF, RHIC, and LHC experimental programs. The conference will aim primarily at developments on the theory/phenomenology side, but the latest accelerator and experimental developments ...

  12. Proposal of 99.99%-aluminum/7N01-Aluminum clad beam tube for high energy booster of Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Hajime

    1994-01-01

    Proposal of 99.99% pure aluminum/7N01 aluminum alloy clad beam tube for high energy booster in Superconducting Super Collider is described. This aluminum clad beam tube has many good performances, but a eddy current effect is large in superconducting magnet quench collapse. The quench test result for aluminum clad beam tube is basically no problem against magnet quench collapse. (author)

  13. Feasibility study of aluminum beam tube for the collider: An option for no-coating and no-liner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, W.

    1994-07-01

    This report proposes to use a single-layer beam tube made of high strength, high resistivity aluminum alloy (such as 7039-T61 or A7N01) to replace the double-layer copper coated stainless steel tube in the SSC Collider. The main reasons are: (1) a potential saving of about $23 million which is basically the baseline cost of the copper coating and (2) the use of an extruded aluminum tube consisting of a beam chamber and a pumping chamber may solve the vacuum problem without any liner

  14. Electromagnetic Design and Optimization of Directivity of Stripline Beam Position Monitors for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Draskovic, Drasko; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Lefèvre, Thibaut; Wendt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary electromagnetic design of a stripline Beam Position Monitor (BPM) for the High Luminosity program of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN. The design is fitted into a new octagonal shielded Beam Screen for the low-beta triplets and is optimized for high directivity. It also includes internal Tungsten absorbers, required to reduce the energy deposition in the superconducting magnets. The achieved broadband directivity in wakefield solver simulations presents significant improvement over the directivity of the current stripline BPMs installed in the LHC.

  15. End-of-Fill Diffusion and Halo Population Measurements with Physics Beams at 6.5 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, Gianluca; Gorzawski, Arkadiusz; Redaelli, Stefano; Trad, Georges; Wagner, Joschka; Xu, Chen; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    Beam halo measurements at 6.5 TeV in the LHC were conducted with a full physics beam via collimator scrapings in end-of-fill MDs carried out in May and July 2016. From the time evolution of the beam losses in a collimator scan, it is possible to extract information on the halo diffusion and population. In the first MD, six scans were performed with two collimators in the vertical and horizontal planes in B1 and B2 respectively. The scans were done with squeezed colliding beams, with and without a gentle continuous transverse blow-up with the ADT (transverse damper) on a non-colliding bunch train. In the second MD, four scans were performed with the same collimators with squeezed colliding beams. The beam losses observed with the standard ionization chamber BLMs are compared to the diamond BLMs, and parametric fits of the diffusion model are applied to temporal loss patterns from colliding and non-colliding bunch trains. The results presented in this note also include the particle escape times and frequency an...

  16. Analysis of test-beam data with hybrid pixel detector prototypes for the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) vertex detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pequegnot, Anne-Laure

    2013-01-01

    The LHC is currently the most powerful accelerator in the world. This proton-proton collider is now stoppped to increase significantly its luminosity and energy, which would provide a larger discovery potential in 2014 and beyond. A high-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider, such as CLIC, is an option to complement and to extend the LHC physics programme. Indeed, a lepton collider gives access to additional physics processes, beyond those observable at the LHC, and therefore provides new discovery potential. It can also provide complementary and/or more precise information about new physics uncovered at the LHC. Many essential features of a detector are required to deliver the full physics potential of this CLIC machine. In this present report, I present my work on the vertex detector R\\&D for this future linear collider, which aims at developping highly granular and ultra-thin position sensitive detection devices with very low power consumption and fast time-stamping capability. We tested here thin silicon pixel...

  17. The physics of crystalline beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    It seems that the time has come in the pursuit of lower and lower beam temperatures to start focusing more detailed attention to the reality of storage rings--conventional cooling techniques and measures of temperature are generally not the appropriate ones at the lowest temperatures. Finding solutions to these serious problems does not appear to be impossible, but these considerations must be kept in mind in designing new storage rings with the aim to approach the regime of ordered three-dimensional beams. In particular, such rings will have to: Use calculations of the lattice with the full effects of space charge included. (N.B. averaged over time, space charge exactly cancels the focusing fields for a cold beam and therefore must be explicitly included.) Find technical solutions and incorporate several of; cooling to introduce a longitudinal velocity gradient and favor constant angular velocity; high multiplicity in bending and focusing elements; stronger focusing (high betatron tune); and high symmetry in the ring design. Finally, simulations should try to incorporate as much realism as possible, with larger repeating cells and more detailed descriptions of the lattice

  18. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Making Measurements (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    This is the third lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This third lecture discusses techniques important for analyses making a measurement (e.g. determining a cross section or a particle property such as its mass or lifetime) using some CDF top-quark analyses as specific examples. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  19. Future Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Eberhard

    1998-01-01

    Plans for future hadron colliders are presented, and accelerator physics and engineering aspects common to these machines are discussed. The Tevatron is presented first, starting with a summary of the achievements in Run IB which finished in 1995, followed by performance predictions for Run II which will start in 1999, and the TeV33 project, aiming for a peak luminosity $L ~ 1 (nbs)^-1$. The next machine is the Large Hadron Collider LHC at CERN, planned to come into operation in 2005. The last set of machines are Very Large Hadron Colliders which might be constructed after the LHC. Three variants are presented: Two machines with a beam energy of 50 TeV, and dipole fields of 1.8 and 12.6 T in the arcs, and a machine with 100 TeV and 12 T. The discussion of accelerator physics aspects includes the beam-beam effect, bunch spacing and parasitic collisions, and the crossing angle. The discussion of the engineering aspects covers synchrotron radiation and stored energy in the beams, the power in the debris of the p...

  20. Polarized electronic sources for future e+/e- linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, H.; Alley, R.K.; Clendenin, J.E.

    1997-05-01

    Polarized electron beams will play a crucial role in maximizing the physics potential for future e + /e - linear colliders. We will review the SLC polarized electron source (PES), present a design for a conventional PES for the Next Linear Collider (NLC), and discuss the physics issues of a polarized RF gun

  1. Superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limon, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider is to be a 20 TeV per beam proton-proton accelerator and collider. Physically the SCC will be 52 miles in circumference and slightly oval in shape. The use of superconducting magnets instead of conventional cuts the circumference from 180 miles to the 52 miles. The operating cost of the SCC per year is estimated to be about $200-250 million. A detailed cost estimate of the project is roughly $3 billion in 1986 dollars. For the big collider ring, the technical cost are dominated by the magnet system. That is why one must focus on the cost and design of the magnets. Presently, the process of site selection is underway. The major R and D efforts concern superconducting dipoles. The magnets use niobium-titanium as a conductor stabilized in a copper matrix. 10 figures

  2. The physics of high current beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.D.

    1988-05-01

    An outline is presented of paraxial charged particle optics in the presence of self-fields arising from the space-charge and current carried by the beam. Solutions of the envelope equations for beams with finite emittance are considered for a number of specific situations, with the approximation that the density profile of the beam is uniform with a sharp edge, so that the focusing remains linear. More realistic beams are then considered, and the problems of matching, emittance growth and stability are discussed. An attempt is made to emphasize physical principles and physical ideas rather than to present the detailed mathematical techniques required for specific problems. The approach is a tutorial one, and several 'exercises' are included in the text. Most of the material is treated in more depth in the author's forthcoming book. (author)

  3. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Tahir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Large Hadron Collider (LHC is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%–20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect. It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS, to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle

  4. Impact of high energy high intensity proton beams on targets: Case studies for Super Proton Synchrotron and Large Hadron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Sancho, J. Blanco; Shutov, A.; Schmidt, R.; Piriz, A. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is designed to collide two proton beams with unprecedented particle energy of 7 TeV. Each beam comprises 2808 bunches and the separation between two neighboring bunches is 25 ns. The energy stored in each beam is 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is very important when working with such powerful beams. An accidental release of even a very small fraction of the beam energy can result in severe damage to the equipment. The machine protection system is essential to handle all types of possible accidental hazards; however, it is important to know about possible consequences of failures. One of the critical failure scenarios is when the entire beam is lost at a single point. In this paper we present detailed numerical simulations of the full impact of one LHC beam on a cylindrical solid carbon target. First, the energy deposition by the protons is calculated with the FLUKA code and this energy deposition is used in the BIG2 code to study the corresponding thermodynamic and the hydrodynamic response of the target that leads to a reduction in the density. The modified density distribution is used in FLUKA to calculate new energy loss distribution and the two codes are thus run iteratively. A suitable iteration step is considered to be the time interval during which the target density along the axis decreases by 15%-20%. Our simulations suggest that the full LHC proton beam penetrates up to 25 m in solid carbon whereas the range of the shower from a single proton in solid carbon is just about 3 m (hydrodynamic tunneling effect). It is planned to perform experiments at the experimental facility HiRadMat (High Radiation Materials) at CERN using the proton beam from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), to compare experimental results with the theoretical predictions. Therefore simulations of the response of a solid copper cylindrical target hit by the SPS beam were performed. The particle energy in the SPS beam is 440

  5. First Considerations on Beam Optics and Lattice Design for the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider FCC

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany Fernandez, R

    2014-01-01

    The present document explains the steps carried out in order to make the first design of the Future Hadron-Hadron Collider (FCC-hh) following the base line parameters that can be found in [1]. Two lattice layouts are presented, a ring collider with 12 arcs and 12 straight sections, four of them designed as interaction points, and a racetrack like collider with two arcs and two straight sections, each of them equipped with two interaction points. The lattice design presented in the paper is modular allowing the same modules be used for both layouts. The present document addresses as well the beta star reach at the interaction points.

  6. Pre-Town Meeting on spin physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, Elke-Caroline; Bland, Leslie; Huang, Jin; Tarasov, Andrey [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Balitsky, Ian; Radyushkin, Anatoly [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States); Burkardt, Matthias [New Mexico State University, Department of Physics, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Burkert, Volker; Chen, Jian-Ping; Kubarovsky, Valery; Melnitchouk, Wally; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Richards, David [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, SUNY, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gamberg, Leonard [Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Grosse Perdekamp, Matthias [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Hyde, Charles [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Ji, Xiangdong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Department of Physics, and Shanghai Key Lab for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Shanghai (China); Peking University, Center for High-Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Jiang, Xiaodong; Liu, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kang, Zhong-Bo [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Mani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lajoie, John [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Liu, Keh-Fei [University of Kentucky, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Center for Computational Sciences, Lexington, KY (United States); Liuti, Simonetta [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mulders, Piet [VU University Amsterdam, Nikhef and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Prokudin, Alexei [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Sichtermann, Ernst; Yuan, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner [Tuebingen University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center-of-mass energy √(s) ∝ 20 to ∝ 100 GeV (upgradable to ∝ 150 GeV) and a luminosity up to ∝ 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini-review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper (A. Accardi et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 52, 268 (2016)). (orig.)

  7. Particle accelerators, colliders, and the story of high energy physics. Charming the cosmic snake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, Raghavan

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic mythological Cosmic Serpent, Ouroboros, is said to be coiled in the depths of the sea, surrounding the Earth with its tail in its mouth. In physics, this snake is a metaphor for the Universe, where the head, symbolizing the largest entity - the Cosmos - is one with the tail, symbolizing the smallest - the fundamental particle. Particle accelerators, colliders and detectors are built by physicists and engineers to uncover the nature of the Universe while discovering its building blocks. ''Charming the Cosmic Snake'' takes the readers through the science behind these experimental machines: the physics principles that each stage of the development of particle accelerators helped to reveal, and the particles they helped to discover. The book culminates with a description of the Large Hadron Collider, one of the world's largest and most complex machines operating in a 27-km circumference tunnel near Geneva. That collider may prove or disprove many of our basic theories about the nature of matter. The book provides the material honestly without misrepresenting the science for the sake of excitement or glossing over difficult notions. The principles behind each type of accelerator is made accessible to the undergraduate student and even to a lay reader with cartoons, illustrations and metaphors. Simultaneously, the book also caters to different levels of reader's background and provides additional materials for the more interested or diligent reader. (orig.)

  8. Particle accelerators, colliders, and the story of high energy physics. Charming the cosmic snake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, Raghavan

    2012-07-01

    The Nordic mythological Cosmic Serpent, Ouroboros, is said to be coiled in the depths of the sea, surrounding the Earth with its tail in its mouth. In physics, this snake is a metaphor for the Universe, where the head, symbolizing the largest entity - the Cosmos - is one with the tail, symbolizing the smallest - the fundamental particle. Particle accelerators, colliders and detectors are built by physicists and engineers to uncover the nature of the Universe while discovering its building blocks. ''Charming the Cosmic Snake'' takes the readers through the science behind these experimental machines: the physics principles that each stage of the development of particle accelerators helped to reveal, and the particles they helped to discover. The book culminates with a description of the Large Hadron Collider, one of the world's largest and most complex machines operating in a 27-km circumference tunnel near Geneva. That collider may prove or disprove many of our basic theories about the nature of matter. The book provides the material honestly without misrepresenting the science for the sake of excitement or glossing over difficult notions. The principles behind each type of accelerator is made accessible to the undergraduate student and even to a lay reader with cartoons, illustrations and metaphors. Simultaneously, the book also caters to different levels of reader's background and provides additional materials for the more interested or diligent reader. (orig.)

  9. CLIC: Physics potential of a high-energy e+e- collider

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a future electron-positron collider under study. It foresees e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies ranging from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. The CLIC study is an international collaboration hosted by CERN. The lectures provide a broad overview of the CLIC project, covering the physics potential, the particle detectors and the accelerator. An overview of the CLIC physics opportunities is presented. These are best exploited in a staged construction and operation scenario of the collider. The detector technologies, fulfilling CLIC performance requirements and currently under study, are described. The accelerator design and performance, together with its major technologies, are presented in the light of ongoing component tests and large system tests. The status of the optimisation studies (e.g. for cost and power) of the CLIC complex for the proposed energy staging is included. One lecture is dedicated to the use of CLIC technologies in free electron lasers and other ...

  10. Particle accelerators, colliders, and the story of high energy physics charming the cosmic snake

    CERN Document Server

    Jayakumar, Raghavan

    2012-01-01

    The Nordic mythological Cosmic Serpent, Ouroboros, is said to be coiled in the depths of the sea, surrounding the Earth with its tail in its mouth. In physics, this snake is a metaphor for the Universe, where the head, symbolizing the largest entity – the Cosmos – is one with the tail, symbolizing the smallest – the fundamental particle. Particle accelerators, colliders and detectors are built by physicists and engineers to uncover the nature of the Universe while discovering its building blocks. “Charming the Cosmic Snake” takes the readers through the science behind these experimental machines: the physics principles that each stage of the development of particle accelerators helped to reveal, and the particles they helped to discover. The book culminates with a description of the Large Hadron Collider, one of the world’s largest and most complex machines operating in a 27-km circumference tunnel near Geneva. That collider may prove or disprove many of our basic theories about the nature of matt...

  11. Potential and challenges of the physics measurements with very forward detectors at linear colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božović Jelisavčić, Ivanka; Kačarević, G.; Lukić, S.; Poss, S.; Sailer, A.; Smiljanić, I.; FCAL Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The instrumentation of the very forward region of a detector at a future linear collider (ILC, CLIC) is briefly reviewed. The status of the FCAL R&D activity is given with emphasis on physics and technological challenges. The current status of studies on absolute luminosity measurement, luminosity spectrum reconstruction and high-energy electron identification with the forward calorimeters is given. The impact of FCAL measurements on physics studies is illustrated with an example of the σHWW ṡBR (H →μ+μ-) measurement at 1.4 TeV CLIC.

  12. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  13. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center's mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center's program include addressing R ampersand D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R ampersand D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R ampersand D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP's outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997

  14. Simulation study of electron cloud induced instabilities and emittance growth for the CERN Large Hadron Collider proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, Elena; Schulte, Daniel; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The electron cloud may cause transverse single-bunch instabilities of proton beams such as those in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We simulate these instabilities and the consequent emittance growth with the code HEADTAIL, which models the turn-by-turn interaction between the cloud and the beam. Recently some new features were added to the code, in particular, electric conducting boundary conditions at the chamber wall, transverse feedback, and variable beta functions. The sensitivity to several numerical parameters has been studied by varying the number of interaction points between the bunch and the cloud, the phase advance between them, and the number of macroparticles used to represent the protons and the electrons. We present simulation results for both LHC at injection and SPS with LHC-type beam, for different electron-cloud density levels, chromaticities, and bunch intensities. Two regimes with qualitatively different emittance growth are observed: above th...

  15. Final Focus Systems in Linear Colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raubenheimer, Tor

    1998-01-01

    In colliding beam facilities, the ''final focus system'' must demagnify the beams to attain the very small spot sizes required at the interaction points. The first final focus system with local chromatic correction was developed for the Stanford Linear Collider where very large demagnifications were desired. This same conceptual design has been adopted by all the future linear collider designs as well as the SuperConducting Supercollider, the Stanford and KEK B-Factories, and the proposed Muon Collider. In this paper, the over-all layout, physics constraints, and optimization techniques relevant to the design of final focus systems for high-energy electron-positron linear colliders are reviewed. Finally, advanced concepts to avoid some of the limitations of these systems are discussed

  16. The development of colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1993-02-01

    Don Kerst, Gersh Budker, and Bruno Touschek were the individuals, and the motivating force, which brought about the development of colliders, while the laboratories at which it happened were Stanford, MURA, the Cambridge Electron Accelerator, Orsay, Frascati, CERN, and Novosibirsk. These laboratories supported, during many years, this rather speculative activity. Of course, many hundreds of physicists contributed to the development of colliders but the men who started it, set it in the right direction, and forcefully made it happen, were Don, Gersh, and Bruno. Don was instrumental in the development of proton-proton colliders, while Bruno and Gersh spearheaded the development of electron-positron colliders. In this brief review of the history, I will sketch the development of the concepts, the experiments, and the technological developments which made possible the development of colliders. It may look as if the emphasis is on theoretical concepts, but that is really not the case, for in this field -- the physics of beams -- the theory and experiment go hand in hand; theoretical understanding and advances are almost always motivated by the need to explain experimental results or the desire to construct better experimental devices

  17. Sensitivities of Prospective Future e+e- Colliders to Decoupled New Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-01-01

    We explore the indirect sensitivities to decoupled new physics of prospective precision electroweak measurements, triple-gauge-coupling measurements and Higgs physics at future $e^+e^-$ colliders, with emphasis on the ILC250 and FCC-ee. The Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) is adopted as a model-independent approach for relating experimental precision projections to the scale of new physics, and we present prospective constraints on the Wilson coefficients of dimension-6 operators. We find that in a marginalised fit ILC250 EWPT measurements may be sensitive to new physics scales $\\Lambda = \\mathcal{O}(10)$~TeV, and FCC-ee EWPT measurements may be sensitive to $\\Lambda = \\mathcal{O}(30)$~TeV. The prospective sensitivities of Higgs and TGC measurements at the ILC250 (FCC-ee) are to $\\Lambda = \\mathcal{O}(1)$~TeV ($\\Lambda = \\mathcal{O}(2)$~TeV).

  18. Sensitivities of prospective future e"+e"− colliders to decoupled new physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, John; You, Tevong

    2016-01-01

    We explore the indirect sensitivities to decoupled new physics of prospective precision electroweak measurements, triple-gauge-coupling measurements and Higgs physics at future e"+e"− colliders, with emphasis on the ILC250 and FCC-ee. The Standard Model effective field theory (SM EFT) is adopted as a model-independent approach for relating experimental precision projections to the scale of new physics, and we present prospective constraints on the Wilson coefficients of dimension-6 operators. We find that in a marginalised fit ILC250 EWPT measurements may be sensitive to new physics scales Λ=O(10) TeV, and FCC-ee EWPT measurements may be sensitive to Λ=O(30) TeV. The prospective sensitivities of Higgs and TGC measurements at the ILC250 (FCC-ee) are to Λ=O(1) TeV (Λ=O(2) TeV).

  19. Photonuclear physics with low intensity photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments in photonuclear physics are discussed that require a low intensity photon beam and large acceptance detectors. This combination is especially suitable for the investigation of photoprocesses on nucleons and light nuclei. A specific experimental setup for the electron stretcher ring ELSA is presented. (orig.)

  20. Technical Challenges and Scientific Payoffs of Muon BeamAccelerators for Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-09-25

    Historically, progress in particle physics has largely beendetermined by development of more capable particle accelerators. Thistrend continues today with the recent advent of high-luminosityelectron-positron colliders at KEK and SLAC operating as "B factories,"the imminent commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and theworldwide development effort toward the International Linear Collider.Looking to the future, one of the most promising approaches is thedevelopment of muon-beam accelerators. Such machines have very highscientific potential, and would substantially advance thestate-of-the-art in accelerator design. A 20-50 GeV muon storage ringcould serve as a copious source of well-characterized electron neutrinosor antineutrinos (a Neutrino Factory), providing beams aimed at detectorslocated 3000-7500 km from the ring. Such long baseline experiments areexpected to be able to observe and characterize the phenomenon ofcharge-conjugation-parity (CP) violation in the lepton sector, and thusprovide an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in science,namely, why the matter-dominated universe in which we reside exists atall. By accelerating muons to even higher energies of several TeV, we canenvision a Muon Collider. In contrast with composite particles likeprotons, muons are point particles. This means that the full collisionenergy is available to create new particles. A Muon Collider has roughlyten times the energy reach of a proton collider at the same collisionenergy, and has a much smaller footprint. Indeed, an energy frontier MuonCollider could fit on the site of an existing laboratory, such asFermilab or BNL. The challenges of muon-beam accelerators are related tothe facts that i) muons are produced as a tertiary beam, with very large6D phase space, and ii) muons are unstable, with a lifetime at rest ofonly 2 microseconds. How these challenges are accommodated in theaccelerator design will be described. Both a Neutrino Factory and a MuonCollider