WorldWideScience

Sample records for college student health

  1. Everyday Health Communication Experiences of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Leslie; Egbert, Nichole; Ho, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined college students' day-to-day health communication experiences. Participants: A convenience sample of 109 midwestern university students participated in the study. Methods: The participants completed health communication diaries for 2 weeks, generating 2,185 records. Frequent health topics included nutrition and…

  2. Community College Student Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel Seth; Davison, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study explores community college student mental health by comparing the responses of California community college and traditional university students on the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II). Using MANOVA, we compared community college and traditional university students, examining…

  3. Mental health of dubai medical college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Galal Ahmed, Mohammed; Ali Bayoumi, Fatehia; Abdul Moneenum, Abeer; Alshawa, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Considering the association between medical school dropout and psychiatric distress, we aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric distress among medical students at Dubai Medical College. One hundred and three medical students were chosen randomly and were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). The mean age for the students was 18.85 year (Minimum: 17, Maximum: 22), and 90.3% were between 18 and 20 years old. The mean of GHQ score was 16.46. Of the participants, 47 (45.6%) were found to be in normal range (GHQ mean College students reported a significant level of psychiatric distress, however, it should not be underestimated, and actions should be taken to encourage Dubai Medical College students to get help from for psychiatric services for their emotional problems. The risk factors as well as the protective factors must be identified in nation-wide studies to promote mental health of medical students.

  4. The state ob the college students health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vovchenko I.I.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the problem of health worsening among people suffering from many different diseases. Young people make up risk group. The article highlights the health conditions of pedagogical and medical college students. Medical groups have been determined as well as the increasing tendency within special medical group.

  5. Mental Health of Dubai Medical College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Galal Ahmed, Mohammed; Ali Bayoumi, Fatehia; Abdul Moneenum, Abeer; Alshawa, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Considering the association between medical school dropout and psychiatric distress, we aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric distress among medical students at Dubai Medical College. Methods: One hundred and three medical students were chosen randomly and were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Results: The mean age for the students was 18.85 year (Minimum: 17, Maximum: 22), and 90.3% were between 18 and 20 years old. The mean of GHQ score was 16.46. Of the participants, 47 (45.6%) were found to be in normal range (GHQ mean students reported evidence of psychiatric distress. Only 23 (22.3%) were found to have severe psychiatric distress. Conclusions: Early detection of psychiatric distress is important to prevent psychiatric morbidity and its unwanted effects on medical students and young doctors. Our results reveals that although a low percentage of Dubai Medical College students reported a significant level of psychiatric distress, however, it should not be underestimated, and actions should be taken to encourage Dubai Medical College students to get help from for psychiatric services for their emotional problems. The risk factors as well as the protective factors must be identified in nation-wide studies to promote mental health of medical students. PMID:24644486

  6. Sexual and Reproductive Health Behaviors of California Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Sang Leng; Bratton, Sally; Marshak, Helen Hopp

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the sexual and reproductive health behaviors of students from 13 community college campuses in California. Participants: Heterosexual college students, ages 18 to 24, who have had sexual intercourse (N = 4,487). Methods: The American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) survey was…

  7. Predictors of health behaviours in college students.

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    Von Ah, Diane; Ebert, Sheryl; Ngamvitroj, Anchalee; Park, Najin; Kang, Duck-Hee

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports a study examining the direct effects of perceived stress, perceived availability of and satisfaction with social support, and self-efficacy, and examines the intermediary roles of perceived threat (perceived susceptibility x perceived severity), benefits, and barriers on alcohol behaviour, smoking behaviour, physical activity and nutrition behaviour, general safety behaviour and sun-protective behaviour in college students. Health behaviours formed during young adulthood may have a sustaining impact on health across later life. Entering college can be an exciting, yet stressful event for many adolescents and young adults as they face trying to adapt to changes in academic workloads, support networks, and their new environment. Coupled with these changes and new-found responsibilities, they have greater freedom and control over their lifestyles than ever before. However, researchers have shown globally that many college students engage in various risky health behaviours. A cross-sectional sample of 161 college students enrolled in an introductory psychology course completed self-report questionnaires regarding stress; social support; self-efficacy; and components of the Health Belief Model including perceived threat, perceived benefits, perceived barriers; and common health behaviours. Step-wise multiple regression analysis was conducted and significant predictors were retained as modifiers in the path analysis. Self-efficacy significantly predicted alcohol and smoking behaviour, physical activity and nutrition protective behaviour, general safety protective behaviour and sun-protective behaviour. Under high-perceived threat, self-efficacy was mediated by perceived barriers for binge drinking and moderated by perceived barriers for physical activity and nutrition behaviours. In addition, under high-perceived threat, self-efficacy was moderated by perceived threat for alcohol use at 30 days and 6 months. Under low threat, self-efficacy was mediated

  8. Mental Health of Dubai Medical College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Galal Ahmed, Mohammed; Ali Bayoumi, Fatehia; Abdul Moneenum, Abeer; Alshawa, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Considering the association between medical school dropout and psychiatric distress, we aimed to assess the prevalence of psychiatric distress among medical students at Dubai Medical College. Methods: One hundred and three medical students were chosen randomly and were assessed by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Results: The mean age for the students was 18.85 year (Minimum: 17, Maximum: 22), and 90.3% were between 18 and 20 years old. The mean of GHQ score was 16.46. Of th...

  9. Mental Health Issues Facing a Diverse Sample of College Students: Results from the College Student Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soet, Johanna; Sevig, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been increased attention given to mental health issues on college and university campuses across the country. However, few research efforts have been conducted to systematically investigate the mental health of college students. The College Student Mental Health Survey was undertaken as a first step towards gaining…

  10. Mental Health and Career Development of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelman, Jeanne M.; Luzzo, Darrell Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Little has been written about the reciprocal effects of the mental health and the career development of college students. Nevertheless, college students seeking services in college career and counseling centers often present both types of issues simultaneously. Service providers must, therefore, be cognizant of these potentially interactive…

  11. Applying the Health Belief Model to college students' health behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hak-Seon; Ahn, Joo; No, Jae-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate how university students' nutrition beliefs influence their health behavioral intention. This study used an online survey engine (Qulatrics.com) to collect data from college students. Out of 253 questionnaires collected, 251 questionnaires (99.2%) were used for the statistical analysis. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) revealed that six dimensions, "Nutrition Confidence," "Susceptibility," "Severity," "Barrier," "Benefit," "Behavioral Intention...

  12. Institutional characteristics and the connection to college student health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, Sara B; Lederer, Alyssa M; Schrader, Lisa T

    2015-07-01

    To examine whether 6 institutional characteristics were associated with health behavior and outcomes among college students. Chisquare statistics and ANOVAs were used to determine relationships between institutional characteristics and health issues among undergraduate participants (N = 81,242) for the spring 2011 American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II. Most institutional characteristics were significantly associated with all health issues. However, Cramer's V and eta 2 were frequently weak. Relationships between institutional characteristics and health outcomes were complex with few clear patterns. This exploratory study provides insight into environmental influences specific to college health. Future research should consider individual student differences and campus offerings to improve understanding of how the environment affects college student health.

  13. HEALTH PROMOTING BEHAVIOR AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS IN CHANDIGARH, INDIA

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    Suraj Senjam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: India faces multiple threats of diseases. The increasing trend of lifestyle related health problems is becoming a serious issue in India. The best strategy to tackle this changing health concern is adoption of healthy lifestyle and health promotion activities. Objectives: To determine the level of involvement in health promoting behaviors of college students in Chandigarh. Material & Methods: This college based cross sectional study was conducted in four randomly selected colleges of Chandigarh during September 2007 to June 2008. Results: Two hundred students (F=100, M=100 were studied by using self administered health promoting lifestyle profile (HPLP questionnaires. Mean HPLP score was 138.69 (M=137.98, F=139.39. Female students were more likely to have better health promoting practices than their counterpart male students, but difference was not significant. Female students showed more sense of health responsibility than male students (p=0.00, whereas male students were significantly more involved in physical activities than female students (p=0.02. Overall, only few students (18.5% searched health related article from the internet; 26% went for normal health check up in the last year; 13.5% students practiced yoga regularly; 24.5% of them tried to choose diet with low fat content; 30% of them skipped meals regularly, and 25.5% of them ate processed food regularly. Conclusion: The study results showed that college students in Chandigarh had reasonably good orientation towards health promoting practices.

  14. Russia's College Students: Work and Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, L. Iu.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the effect of secondary employment on the sense of well-being of students in full-time education shows that the degree of fatigue and emotional stress on the job is affected by gender, the students' assessment of their own health, and their disposition to take care of their health.

  15. College Students: Mental Health Problems and Treatment Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyer, Maren; Yeung, Albert; Zulauf, Courtney; Wilens, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Attending college can be a stressful time for many students. In addition to coping with academic pressure, some students have to deal with the stressful tasks of separation and individuation from their family of origin while some may have to attend to numerous work and family responsibilities. In this context, many college students experience the first onset of mental health and substance use problems or an exacerbation of their symptoms. Given the uniqueness of college students, there is a need to outline critical issues to consider when working with this population. In this commentary, first, the prevalence of psychiatric and substance use problems in college students and the significance of assessing age of onset of current psychopathology are described. Then, the concerning persistent nature of mental health problems among college students and its implications are summarized. Finally, important aspects of treatment to consider when treating college students with mental health problems are outlined, such as the importance of including parents in the treatment, communicating with other providers, and employing of technology to increase adherence. It is concluded that, by becoming familiar with the unique problems characteristic of the developmental stage and environment college students are in, practitioners will be able to better serve them. PMID:25142250

  16. College Students: Mental Health Problems and Treatment Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrelli, Paola; Nyer, Maren; Yeung, Albert; Zulauf, Courtney; Wilens, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    Attending college can be a stressful time for many students. In addition to coping with academic pressure, some students have to deal with the stressful tasks of separation and individuation from their family of origin while some may have to attend to numerous work and family responsibilities. In this context, many college students experience the first onset of mental health and substance use problems or an exacerbation of their symptoms. Given the uniqueness of college students, there is a need to outline critical issues to consider when working with this population. In this commentary, first, the prevalence of psychiatric and substance use problems in college students and the significance of assessing age of onset of current psychopathology are described. Then, the concerning persistent nature of mental health problems among college students and its implications are summarized. Finally, important aspects of treatment to consider when treating college students with mental health problems are outlined, such as the importance of including parents in the treatment, communicating with other providers, and employing of technology to increase adherence. It is concluded that, by becoming familiar with the unique problems characteristic of the developmental stage and environment college students are in, practitioners will be able to better serve them.

  17. Health promotion needs of students in a college environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, C; Nies, M A

    1996-04-01

    A significant amount of the mortality and morbidity experienced by Americans of all ages today is preventable. Research directed toward the identification of health promotion needs of traditional students in college environments may contribute to the development and implementation of programs and activities that assist students to adopt healthy lifestyle behaviors throughout their life spans. The purpose of this descriptive survey study was to identify the health promotion needs of traditional students in a college environment. More specifically, the research question was: What are the health promotion needs of traditional students in a college environment? Subjects were male and female students, 18-21 years of age, and enrolled in a full-time (minimum of 12 hours) program of study at one of two college campuses in a metropolitan southern city. One of these was a 2-year state-affiliated community college and the other was a private 4-year coeducation university. A randomized sample of 148 subjects was computed. Results of this study emphasize the distinctive individual and group health promotion needs of traditional students in a college environment. Identification of the health promotion needs of this population will enable health care providers to develop interventions to assist students in developing healthy lifestyle behaviors.

  18. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: Case Presentation to a College Student Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotts, P. Hunter

    2017-01-01

    The author describes a case of spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) in a 19-year-old man presenting to a college student health clinic. The author also provides a review on SPM, including clinical manifestations, diagnostic evaluation, and management.

  19. Determinants of college students' health-promoting lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larouche, R

    1998-01-01

    This descriptive study of 151 university students in Boston, Massachusetts, was undertaken to determine the relationships of their perceived health status, sex, grade point average, and health and nonhealth majors to their health-promoting lifestyles, using the Health Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP) II, based on Pender's model. Students' perceived health status was significantly predictive of total HPLP II, exercise, stress management, and spiritual growth. College women practiced significantly better nutrition, interpersonal relationships, health responsibility, and total HPLP II than men. The whole sample scored lower in stress management than any previous group studied. Male students, those reporting poor health, and all students are targeted for intervention and research in their deficient areas. Guidelines for nursing practice are derived from the HPLP II questionnaire. These clinically significant findings may guide nurse practitioners to intervene in the health awareness and practices of college students.

  20. [College students social anxiety associated with stress and mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhen; Gao, Jing; Hu, Weipeng

    2007-03-01

    To explore the mediator effects of social anxiety on college students' life stress and mental health. 1430 college students were tested by revised Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Check List (ASLEC), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12) and social anxiety scale chose from Self-Consciousness Scale. 1. Social anxiety was the mediator variable between stress and mental health. 2. Female students were easily suffered from higher losing stress and human relationship stress in comparision with male. 3. Non-only child Students got a higher score in social anxiety and lower GHQ in comparision with only child. It may be helpful to improve the stress management and mental health of college students by testing and intervening their social anxiety perception.

  1. College students' responses to mental health status updates on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Katie G; Koff, Rosalind N; Moreno, Megan A

    2013-01-01

    Facebook is widely used by the college population, and previous research has shown that mental health references on Facebook are common. Focus groups of college students were held to determine their views of mental health references seen in their peers' Facebook profiles. Students' views of mental health references varied from being serious calls for help, to being jokes or attention-seeking behavior. Responses to mental health references depended on the participants' offline relationship with the poster. Students would contact close friends through a phone call or in-person conversation, but would not approach acquaintances. The prevalence of mental health references on Facebook, and the awareness of these references by college students, may present opportunities for future peer intervention efforts.

  2. Measuring Environmental Health Perception among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnapradipa, Dhitinut; Brown, Stephen L.; Middleton, Wendi K.; Wodika, Alicia B.

    2011-01-01

    One's knowledge, perception, and attitude are fundamental in determining how one behaves regarding environmental hazards. While science has made great strides in promoting environmental health, threats still exist, largely due to individual actions in response to potential health hazards. Undergraduate students (n = 395) enrolled in an…

  3. Factors influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Vitti; Chan, Fong; Chan, Jacob Yui-Chung; Lee, June Ka Yan; Sung, Connie; H Wilson, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Transition from high school to college can be particularly difficult and stressful for Chinese college students because of parent expectations. The purpose of this study was to examine therapist variables influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals using conjoint analysis. Two hundred fifty-eight community college students in Hong Kong were asked to rate the profile of 55 mental health professionals representing a combination of therapist characteristics (i.e., gender, age, race/ethnicity, professional background, and training institutions) from the most to least preferred therapist from whom to seek psychological counselling. Results indicated that students' preference formation was based largely on professional background and training institution of the mental health professionals. Clinical psychologists and clinical social workers were preferred over educational psychologists (school psychologists), counsellors, and psychiatrists. Mental health professionals who received training from more prestigious schools were preferred over those trained at less prestigious schools. Understanding clients' preference formation for choosing mental health professionals could be the first step to gain insights for developing effective educational and outreach strategies to promote help seeking behavior and mental health service utilization among Chinese college students.

  4. Introduction to the special issue on college student mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Linda G; Schwartz, Seth J

    2013-04-01

    This article provides an introduction to the special issue on college student mental health. It gives an overview of the establishment of the Multi-Site University Study of Identity and Culture (MUSIC) collaborative by a group of national experts on culture and identity. Information about the procedures used to collect a nationally represented sample of college students are provided. Data were collected from 30 university sites across the United States. The sample comprised 10,573 undergraduate college students, of which 73% were women, 63% White, 9% African American/Black, 14% Latino/Hispanic, 13% Asian American, and 1% Other. The special issue comprises a compilation of 8 studies that used the dataset specifically created to examine the issues of emerging adults, culture, and identity. Student mental health problems are a growing concern on college campuses. Studies covered in this special issue have implications for policy development regarding college alcohol use and traumatic victimization, include attention to underrepresented minority and immigrant groups on college campuses, and focus on positive as well as pathological aspects of the college experience. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Psychosocial Dynamics of College Students' Use of Mental Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Beth Spenciner; Wilson, William Cody

    2016-01-01

    The authors present and empirically test a multivariate model of the use of mental health counseling services. Use of such services by 1st-year college students is directly a result of need for these services and willingness to use them. Beliefs about mental health services and demographic characteristics are not directly related to use, but…

  6. Reframing the Conversation on College Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Philip J.; Liebert, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The expression "mental health" has become ubiquitous when discussing college students' lived experiences. While effective, this expression has not, problematically, been deconstructed. In this article, we explore what "mental health" means. Through doing so we identify three unintended effects embedded within its usage: (a)…

  7. Facets of Dispositional Mindfulness and Health Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenlos, Jamie S; Wells, Stephanie Y; Noonan, Marleah; Mayrsohn, Aubreyanne

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between the facets of trait mindfulness with psychological and physical health while controlling for health behaviors in college students. 310 students from a small, private college in the Northeastern United States. Students completed self-report measures, including the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-14), the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Medical Outcomes Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Rutgers Alcohol Problems Index (RAPI). After controlling for other health behaviors, the observation facet of mindfulness was negatively associated with physical health. Both acting with awareness and nonjudging facets were positively associated with emotional well-being. For social functioning, nonjudging was a significant positive facet for this domain of health. Tailoring mindfulness-based interventions to enhance these facets may be beneficial to young adults.

  8. College Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  9. The Health Challenges of Urban Latino College Students as Revealed through Student Journaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Amy L.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the unique health risks faced by the Hispanic population and the notoriously poor health habits of college students, this study examines the health challenges faced by Latino college students enrolled at an urban commuter institution. A thematic analysis reveals the top themes for males and females as healthy eating, weight management,…

  10. Predictors of mental health amongst Ladakhi college students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    , with opportunities to study at colleges and universities outside Ladakh. As a result, a large number of young Ladakhis pursue higher education outside Ladakh, while dealing with intense competition, heightened expectations and academic demands. This paper explores the links between one’s background and mental health......, amongst Ladakhi college students studying in Leh and Delhi. Statistical analysis reveals that gender and parental level of education are significant predictors of anxiety and depression levels....

  11. Somatic health, adaptable potential, physical condition and biological age of students of pedagogical college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanchishin O.N.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Comparative characteristic of health indicators of students of Pedagogical College. Conducted and measurement indicators somatometric and physiometric 545 students 2-4 courses of Pedagogical College. Identification of "dangerous" level indicators of the health of students. Confirmed that the level of physical health and physical mill male students than students. Found that over the years, the College has deteriorated somatic health students, adaptive capacity and physical well-being of students

  12. Psychiatry's Next Generation: Teaching College Students About Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatkin, Jess P; Diamond, Ursula

    2015-10-01

    The authors describe an integrated area of study for undergraduate college students that targets an increase in knowledge of mental health issues in children, adolescents, and emerging adults; encourages mental health service utilization on college campuses; and exposes young minds to the possibilities of working with children and adolescents in the mental health field. An overview of the program is provided, including the resources required to oversee and manage the program, student requirements, a description of the role that clinicians and researchers play as the program faculty, and an explanation of the tuition model. The program currently includes 40 courses with an annual enrollment of over 3000 students, resulting in departmental revenues that currently exceed $11 million per year. Student evaluations of the courses are very positive, and in a program survey students reported that their participation in the program had a positive impact on their life (84.2%) and impacted their career choice (60.2%). The benefits of the program include a valuable outreach to college students regarding the importance of seeking help for mental health issues, a positive influence on early career decision-making, opportunities for clinical and research educators to develop their scholarly areas of interest, and a significant source of departmental discretionary revenues.

  13. Committed dating relationships and mental health among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Sarah W; Weitbrecht, Eliza M; Kuryluk, Amanda D; Bruner, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether involvement in committed dating relationships is associated with university students' mental health (depressive symptoms and problem alcohol use, including binge drinking), and whether these associations differ by gender. A sample of 889 undergraduate students aged 18 to 25. Self-report measures of dating relationship status, depression, and problematic alcohol use were collected via an online survey from August to December 2010. Involvement in a committed relationship, compared with being single, was associated with fewer depressive symptoms for college women but not for men. Committed relationship involvement was also associated with less problematic alcohol use for both genders. Findings suggest that involvement in committed relationships may be protective to college student mental health, and highlight the potential of healthy relationship programming to benefit student well-being.

  14. Aspects of Suicidal Behavior, Depression, and Treatment in College Students: Results from the Spring 2000 National College Health Assessment Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, Jeremy; Leino, E. Victor; Silverman, Morton M.

    2005-01-01

    The National College Health Assessment Survey (NCHA), sponsored by the American College Health Association, measured depression, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts among 15,977 college students in the academic year 1999? 2000. Similar to the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey, conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and…

  15. Determinants of adoption of smartphone health apps among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehee; Quinlan, Margaret M; Park, Dongjin; Noh, Ghee-Young

    2014-11-01

    To examine the effects of cognitive and contingent factors on the adoption of smartphone health apps, focusing on the technology acceptance model (TAM). American college students (N = 422), who currently owned smartphones but were not using health apps, completed an online survey. Results from a path analysis mostly supported the proposed hypotheses, showing that subjective norm, health consciousness, health information orientation, and Internet health information use efficacy significantly affected the main components of TAM. Study findings provide scholars and practitioners with an empirical model of explaining the cognitive and micro-mechanisms of determining the adoption of health apps, especially among younger populations.

  16. The Relationship of Depression to Health Risk Behaviors and Health Perceptions in Korean College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Oksoo

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the relationship of depression to health risk behaviors and health perceptions in Korean college students. The level of students' depression predicted alcohol consumption, symptom pattern, and physical health. Students who were more depressed reported more symptoms and perceived their health as worse than those who were less…

  17. Social Smoking and Mental Health Among Chinese Male College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Long-Biao; Xu, Fang-Rong; Cheng, Qing-Zhou; Zhan, Jian; Xie, Tao; Ye, Yong-Ling; Xiong, Shang-Zhi; McCarthy, Kayne; He, Qi-Qiang

    2017-05-01

    China has a high prevalence of smoking, but the characteristics of social smoking in Chinese college students have not been investigated. We examined the pattern of social smoking and explored the association between social smoking and personal cessation efforts and mental health factors among Chinese male college students. Study design was a cross-sectional survey. P. R. China was the setting of the study. Participants were a random sample of 1327 male college students. All participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that examined their smoking behaviors and a group of specific mental health factors (loneliness, self-harm, suicide, depression, and anxiety). Analysis was conducted using descriptive statistics, χ2 analysis, and multivariate logistic regression. Of a total of 207 current smokers, 102 (49.3%) were identified as social smokers. Compared with nonsmokers, social smokers had increased risks for depression (odds ratio, 1.74; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.65). Among daily smokers, social smokers were less likely to have an intention to quit smoking than nonsocial smokers (odds ratio, .08; 95% confidence interval, .01-.57). This study reveals unique psychologic characteristics related to social smoking. College students are a particular group of interest because unhealthy behaviors initiated during adolescence may continue through adulthood. Our findings provide evidence for future tobacco control intervention among this population.

  18. Mental Health Problems and Related Factors in Ecuadorian College Students.

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    Torres, Claudia; Otero, Patricia; Bustamante, Byron; Blanco, Vanessa; Díaz, Olga; Vázquez, Fernando L

    2017-05-15

    Although the mental health problems of college students have been the subject of increasing research, there are no studies about its prevalence in Ecuadorian college students. The aim of this study was to determine the mental health problems and their associated factors in Ecuadorian freshmen university students. A sample of 1092 students (53.7% women; mean age = 18.3 years) were recruited from the Technical Particular University of Loja (Ecuador). Socio-demographic, academic, and clinical characteristics were gathered, as well as information on the participants' mental health through a number of mental health screens. Prevalence of positive screens was 6.2% for prevalence of major depressive episodes, 0.02% for generalized anxiety disorders, 2.2% for panic disorders, 32.0% for eating disorders, 13.1% for suicidal risk. Mental health problems were significantly associated with sex, area of study, self-esteem, social support, personality and histories of mental health problems. The findings offer a starting point for identifying useful factors to target prevention and intervention strategies aimed at university students.

  19. Mental Health Problems and Related Factors in Ecuadorian College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Torres

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the mental health problems of college students have been the subject of increasing research, there are no studies about its prevalence in Ecuadorian college students. The aim of this study was to determine the mental health problems and their associated factors in Ecuadorian freshmen university students. A sample of 1092 students (53.7% women; mean age = 18.3 years were recruited from the Technical Particular University of Loja (Ecuador. Socio-demographic, academic, and clinical characteristics were gathered, as well as information on the participants’ mental health through a number of mental health screens. Prevalence of positive screens was 6.2% for prevalence of major depressive episodes, 0.02% for generalized anxiety disorders, 2.2% for panic disorders, 32.0% for eating disorders, 13.1% for suicidal risk. Mental health problems were significantly associated with sex, area of study, self-esteem, social support, personality and histories of mental health problems. The findings offer a starting point for identifying useful factors to target prevention and intervention strategies aimed at university students.

  20. Alcohol use, related problems and psychological health in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Bilesha; Torabi, Mohammad; Kay, Noy S

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of alcohol use, alcohol-related problems, psychological distress, anxiety and depression mood and the relationship between these variables in a sample of 534 college students in the USA. In college men, 91% were current alcohol users (those who use alcohol at least once a month) and in college women 80% were current alcohol users (p alcohol use. Beer was more popular among moderate users than heavy users in both sexes. Over 90% of both moderate and heavy users in both men and women had used hard liquor in the 30-day period preceding the survey. College men had more alcohol-related problems than did college women. Blackouts, getting into fights and not being able to meet school responsibilities were the common alcohol-related adverse outcomes reported by the participants. No associations were found between alcohol use and distress and between alcohol use and depressive mood. Mean values of the anxiety scores, however, were higher in moderate users in the male sample compared to that of the female sample. The findings have implications for theories of alcohol-related psychological health in college students.

  1. African American College Students' Health Behaviors and Perceptions of Related Health Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Denyce S.; Goode, Carolyn R.

    1994-01-01

    A study of African American college students compared students' health-related behaviors with their perceptions of corresponding health issues. Students had low smoking rates but higher alcohol consumption. Most students did not practice good nutrition or daily physical activity. Over half managed stress well, and three-quarters were sexually…

  2. Mental Health Symptoms Among Student Service Members/Veterans and Civilian College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Sandi D; Branscum, Adam J; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if and to what extent student service members/veterans differ from civilian college students in the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of poor mental health. The Fall 2011 implementation of the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment included 27,774 respondents from 44 colleges and universities. Participants were matched using propensity scores, and the prevalence of symptoms was compared using logistic regression and zero-inflated negative binomial regression models. The odds of feeling overwhelmed in the last 12 months were significantly lower among student service members/veterans with a history of hazardous duty (odd ratio [OR] = 0.46, adjusted p value students. Military service, with and without hazardous duty deployment, was not a significant predictor of the total number of symptoms of poor mental health. Current student service members/veterans may not be disproportionately affected by poor psychological functioning.

  3. Cigarette smoking among college students: longitudinal trajectories and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Kimberly M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M; Vincent, Kathryn B; Pickworth, Wallace B; Arria, Amelia M

    2012-07-01

    Light and intermittent patterns of cigarette smoking are prevalent among U.S. college-aged individuals. It is unclear whether intermittent smokers maintain their use over time or are transitioning to daily use or nonuse, and whether they experience more adverse health outcomes than nonsmokers. This study examined the trajectories of tobacco cigarette smoking, their predictors, and health outcomes among students (N = 1,253) assessed during their first year of college (Y(1)) and annually thereafter (Y(2), Y(3), and Y(4)). In Y(1), 3.4% smoked daily and 4.1% exhibited signs of dependence (first cigarette within 30 min of waking). Growth curve modeling identified five distinct smoking trajectories. After stable nonsmokers (71.5%(wt)), the low-stable smoking trajectory was the most common (13.3%(wt)), outnumbering both low-increasing (6.5%(wt)) and high-stable smokers (5.5%(wt)) by 2:1 and high-decreasing smokers (3.2%(wt)) by 4:1. The likelihood of maintaining a low level of smoking over time was inversely related to Y(1) smoking frequency. Few demographic, smoking, and alcohol use characteristics measured in Y(1) distinguished low-increasers from low-stable smokers or high-decreasers from high-stable smokers. By Y(4), high-stable smokers rated their health significantly worse than all others except low-increasers. High-stable smokers had the most Y(4) health problems (i.e., provider visits for health problems and days of illness-related impairment), but only among nonWhites. Many college students smoke, but few smoke daily or are nicotine dependent. Intermittent smoking patterns are often stable throughout college and are associated with adverse health outcomes. Prevention strategies should be designed to mitigate the possible long-term health consequences of light and intermittent smoking.

  4. Social support and mental health among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    This study is the first, to our knowledge, to evaluate the relationship between mental health and social support in a large, random sample of college students. A Web-based survey was administered at a large, public university, with 1,378 students completing the measures in this analysis (response rate = 57%). The results support our hypothesis that students with characteristics differing from most other students, such as minority race or ethnicity, international status, and low socioeconomic status, are at greater risk of social isolation. In addition, the authors found that students with lower quality social support, as measured by the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, were more likely to experience mental health problems, including a sixfold risk of depressive symptoms relative to students with high quality social support. These results may help administrators and health providers to identify more effectively the population of students at high risk for mental illness and develop effective interventions to address this significant and growing public health issue. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. College Health Surveillance Network: Epidemiology and Health Care Utilization of College Students at US 4-Year Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James C; Keller, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    This description of the College Health Surveillance Network (CHSN) includes methodology, demography, epidemiology, and health care utilization. Twenty-three universities representing approximately 730,000 enrolled students contributed data from January 1, 2011, through May 31, 2014. Participating schools uploaded de-identified electronic health records from student health services monthly. During this study, just over 800,000 individuals used the health centers, comprising 4.17 million patient encounters. Sixty percent of visits included primary care, 13% mental health, 9% vaccination, and 31% other miscellaneous services. The 5 most common specific diagnostic categories (with annual rates per 100 enrolled students) were preventive (16); respiratory (12); skin, hair, and nails; infectious non-sexually transmitted infection (5 each); and mental health (4). Utilization and epidemiologic trends are identified among subpopulations of students. CHSN data establish trends in utilization and epidemiologic patterns by college students and the importance of primary and behavioral health care services on campuses.

  6. Mental Health Beliefs Amongst Emirati Female College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Darmaki, Fatima; Thomas, Justin; Yaaqeib, Saad

    2016-02-01

    Recent epidemiological data from Arabian Gulf nations suggest that mental health problems such as depression and anxiety have a relatively high prevalence, particularly amongst women. However, despite the widespread morbidity, treatment seeking for mental health problems is low. Mental health beliefs amongst female Emirati college students were explored. A questionnaire exploring perceptions about the causes, consequences and best forms of intervention for mental health problems was administered to 70 participants. Data revealed that social and environmental factors were given the most weight in terms of etiology. Social stigma was the most frequently identified barrier to help seeking. Religious practices were commonly reported as an approach to cope with mental health problems and to maintain good psychological health. Most participants reported willingness to seek help from a healthcare professional. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for improving the quality and accessibility of mental health services in the gulf region.

  7. Payoffs for California College Students and Taxpayers from Investing in Student Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwood, J Scott; Stein, Bradley D; Briscombe, Brian; Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Woodbridge, Michelle W; May, Elizabeth; Seelam, Rachana; Burnam, M Audrey

    2016-05-09

    Reports results of a survey to assess the impact of CalMHSA's investments in mental health programs at California public colleges and estimates the return on investment in terms of student use of treatment, graduation rates, and lifetime earnings.

  8. Critical health literacy in American deaf college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushalnagar, Poorna; Ryan, Claire; Smith, Scott; Kushalnagar, Raja

    2017-05-24

    This study investigates the relationship between critical health literacy (CHL) and discussion of health information among college deaf students who use American Sign Language. CHL is crucial in making appropriate health-related decisions for oneself and aiding others in making good health-choices. Research on general youth population shows that frequent health-related discussions with both friends and family is associated with higher health literacy. However, for our sample of deaf college-aged students who might have had less access to communication at home, we hypothesize that health-related discussions with same-age peers may be more important for critical health literacy. We asked two questions to assess the frequency of health-related discussions with friends and families: "How often do you discuss health-related information with your friends" and "How often do you discuss your family medical history with your family?". Participants rated their experience on a scale from 1-5 (1=never, 5=always). To assess CHL, 38 deaf and 38 hearing participants were shown a short scenario that showed a woman confiding in her friend after finding a lump in her breast. Participants were then asked what the friend should say. Responses were scored by a team of 3 raters using a CHL rubric. As predicted, results showed a strong relationship between discussion of health-related information with friends and CHL in both deaf and hearing samples. Discussion with family was linked to CHL only for hearing participants, but not deaf participants in our study. These findings underscore the importance of socializing with health-literate, accessible peers to improve the health literacy and health outcomes of all deaf people. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. [Correlation analysis of sub-health status and health-related risk behaviors in college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, De-qin; Yao, Rong-ying; Yuan, Chang-jiang; Hu, Lan

    2011-01-01

    To study the sub-health status in college students in relation to health-related risk behaviors. Using convenient sampling method, 6176 college students (3285 male and 2891 female students) were surveyed with questionnaires for general demographical data, sub-health state and health-risk behaviors. The reported rate of sub-health state was 10.2%. The reported rate of physical sub-health was 11.7%, and the rate was 21.7%, 13.9% and 15.0% for inadequate physical activities, poor physical function and poor immunity, respectively. The reported rate of psychological sub-health was 10.5%, with a rate of 14.7%, 22.6% and 7.3% for emotional problems, behavioral problems and social adaptation difficulties, respectively. The risk factors for college students included insufficient sleeping, inadequate sport activities, missing breakfast, partial dietary, smoking and drinking (Pcollege students.

  10. Population-based initiatives in college mental health: students helping students to overcome obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Daniel J; Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie L; Morse, Charles; Ellison, Marsha L; Doerfler, Leonard A; Riba, Michelle B

    2014-12-01

    College students' need for mental health care has increased dramatically, leaving campus counseling and mental health centers struggling to meet the demand. This has led to the investigation and development of extra-center, population-based interventions. Student-to-student support programs are but one example. Students themselves are a plentiful, often-untapped resource that extends the reach of mental health services on campus. Student-to-student programs capitalize on students' natural inclination to assist their peers. A brief review of the prevalence and effects of mental disorders in the college population is provided, followed by a broad overview of the range of peer-to-peer programs that can be available on college campuses. Two innovative programs are highlighted: (1) a hospital- and community-based program, the College Mental Health Program (CMHP) at McLean Hospital, and 2) the Student Support Network (SSN) at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The subsequent section reviews the literature on peer-to-peer programs for students with serious and persistent mental illness for which there is a small but generally positive body of research. This lack of an empirical basis in college mental health leads the authors to argue for development of broad practice-research networks.

  11. College student mental health and quality of workplace relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Allison A; Drake, Richard R; Haydock, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effect of quality of workplace relationships on the mental health of employed undergraduates, with work-related variables as a potential mechanism. Participants were 170 employed students (76% female, average age = 19.9) recruited in March 2011. Most worked part-time and had been at their jobs over a year. Students were recruited from an undergraduate introductory psychology course and completed online surveys about the quality of workplace relationships, mental health (ie, somatic stress symptoms, depression, anxiety, and life satisfaction), and work-related variables (ie, job satisfaction, support, turnover and burnout). Students who reported having workplace relationships with co-occurring positivity and negativity had worse self-reported mental health outcomes than students reporting having wholly positive relationships. The relationship between workplace relationship quality and mental health was mediated by negative work-related variables. Workplace relationships-even in part-time employment settings-influence college students' mental health.

  12. eHealth Literacy and Health Behaviors Affecting Modern College Students: A Pilot Study of Issues Identified by the American College Health Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Rebecca Katherine; Collins, William Bart; Wilson, Kari; Linnemeier, Georgiann; Englebert, Andrew Mark

    2017-12-19

    The eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) has been widely adopted by researchers to understand how eHealth literacy can be put into context. eHealth researchers need to know how to promote positive health behavior changes across college students, given the importance of the Internet to acquire and use health information. The American College Health Association identified a set of key health issues that affect college students today. By understanding how eHEALS might be related to college students' maintenance of their health and their use of online health resources, researchers will be provided with a better understanding of eHealth literacy and its pragmatic implications for health campaigns and future interventions. The goal of the study was to examine what eHEALS reveals about college student health behaviors identified by the American College Health Association. To understand college student current health maintenance and their intentions to maintain their health and use online resources, the theory of planned behavior was used as the theoretical framework for the study. Data were collected via a survey of 422 college students that included the eHEALS measure and questions about health issues based on the recommendations of the American College Health Association. These questions asked about college student current health, subsequent use of online health resources, and their intention to maintain their health and make use of such resources in the future. eHEALS was positively and significantly associated with all 8 areas of health issues identified by the American College Health Association for college student current maintenance of health and use of online health resources and for future intention of health maintenance and use of online resources. Key issues that emerged with eHealth literacy were maintaining safe sex practices and seeking out related information, seeking out information on an exercise regime, information on vaccinations, and maintaining a balanced

  13. College Students' Use of Social Media for Health in the USA and Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sanghee; Kim, Soojung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This exploratory study aims to understand college students' use and perception of social media for health information by comparing college students in the USA and Korea. Method. This study surveyed 342 college students from two state-level universities in the USA and Korea (one from each country) using a convenience sample. Analysis:…

  14. The Mental Health Status of Single-Parent Community College Students in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Divya P; Lee, Christine; Trieu, Sang Leng

    2016-01-01

    Single-parenting students face unique challenges that may adversely affect their mental health, which have not been explored in community college settings. The authors conducted secondary analysis of Spring 2013 data from the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment to examine difficulties facing single-parent community college students and the association between single parenting and negative mental health (depression, self-injury, suicide attempt). Participants were 6,832 California community college students, of whom 309 were single parents. Demographic and mental health data were characterized using univariate descriptive analyses. Bivariate analyses determined whether single parents differed from other students regarding negative mental health or traumatic/difficult events. Finances, family, and relationship difficulties disproportionally affected single parents, who reported nearly twice as many suicide attempts as their counterparts (5.3% vs. 2.7%; p students face a higher prevalence of mental health stressors than other community college students.

  15. Cigarette smoking among college students with disabilities: National College Health Assessment II, Fall 2008-Spring 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Traci; Pignataro, Rose M

    2013-07-01

    People with disabilities are 1.5 times more likely to smoke than their peers without disabilities, intensifying risk of health related disparities and further loss of function. When compared with the general population, college students also have a higher smoking prevalence. This study explores smoking rates among college students with disabilities. College students with disabilities have an increased likelihood of smoking, as compared with students without disabilities. Type of disability also influences smoking rates. This study explores the association between smoking and disability using multiple regression analyses and data from the National College Health Assessment II (NCHA II), Fall 2008-Spring 2009 (N = 79,915). People with disabilities comprised 15.6% of the total sample: 3.4% reported a physical disability, 8.3% reported a mental disability, 2.5% reported a sensory disability, and 3.7% reported a learning disability. Smoking prevalence among those reporting disabilities was 23.1% versus 15% in those without disabilities. Those reporting mental disabilities had the highest rates (29.9%), followed by those with learning disabilities (23.7%), sensory disabilities (19.8%), and physical disabilities (16.4%). Students with disabilities were 1.23 times more likely to report current smoking than those without any disabilities, controlling for other factors (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16-1.30). Results are consistent with previous research regarding the general adult population. Epidemiologic data demonstrating differences in risk behaviors for young adults with disabilities are important in allocation of resources. Findings of this study highlight the need for tailored smoking cessation programs for college students with disabilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating the Relationship of Resilience to Academic Persistence in College Students with Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the relationships between measures of inter- and intrapersonal resilience and mental health were examined with respect to academic persistence in college students with mental health issues. A sample of 121 undergraduate students with mental health issues was recruited from campus mental health offices offering college counseling,…

  17. Body Dissatisfaction and Mental Health Outcomes Among Korean College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sukkyung; Shin, Kyulee

    2016-06-01

    For many years, body dissatisfaction and mental health were thought of as Western phenomena and were studied mostly in Caucasian women. Recent studies, however, suggest that these issues are also present in men and in other ethnic groups. This study examined the association between body dissatisfaction and mental health outcomes, with personality traits and neuroticism playing possible predictive roles, using a Korean sample. A total of 545 college students, from five private universities in South Korea, completed assessment measures for depression, self-esteem, neuroticism, and body esteem scales. After controlling for covariates including body mass index and exercise time, body dissatisfaction was seen to play a mediating role between neuroticism and mental health outcomes. Differences between the sexes were also found in this relationship. For men, body dissatisfaction acted as a mediator between neuroticism and depression. For women, body dissatisfaction acted as a mediator between neuroticism and both depression and self-esteem. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Associations between the Five-Factor Model of Personality and Health Behaviors among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Douglas A.; Levine, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In fall 2006, the authors examined associations between the five-factor model of personality and several key health behaviors. Methods: College students (N = 583) completed the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment and the International Personality Item Pool Big Five short-form questionnaire. Results:…

  19. Mental health of college students and their non-college-attending peers: results from a large French cross-sectional survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Leray, Emmanuelle; Denis, Laure; Husky, Mathilde; Pitrou, Isabelle; Bodeau-Livinec, Florence

    2016-01-01

    .... To compare mental health status of college students and their non-college-attending peers whether working, attending a secondary school, or non-college-attending peers who are neither employed nor students or trainees (NENST...

  20. College Health Surveillance Network: Epidemiology and Health Care Utilization of College Students at US 4-Year Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James C.; Keller, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This description of the College Health Surveillance Network (CHSN) includes methodology, demography, epidemiology, and health care utilization. Participants: Twenty-three universities representing approximately 730,000 enrolled students contributed data from January 1, 2011, through May 31, 2014. Methods: Participating schools uploaded…

  1. Treat and Teach Our Students Well: College Mental Health and Collaborative Campus Communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Downs, Nancy S; Alderman, Tracy; Schneiber, Katharina; Swerdlow, Neal R

    2016-01-01

    .... College mental health services are delivered in a specialized milieu, designed to address many of the unique needs of college students and to support their successful scholastic advancement and graduation...

  2. A study on some psychological health effects of cell-phone usage amongst college going students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Acharya, Indranil; Acharya, Jayanti P; Waghrey, Divya

    2013-01-01

    .... on rampant users like college-goers. This study focused on certain psychological or mental health effects of cell phone usage amongst students pursuing professional courses in colleges in a big city...

  3. Relationship of Work Hours with Selected Health Behaviors and Academic Progress among a College Student Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kim; Danner, Fred; Staten, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 57% of college students work while attending school. Health risks related to working while in college have not been widely studied. Objective: The authors' purpose in this study was to determine associations between hours worked, binge drinking, sleep habits, and academic performance among a college student cohort. Participants and…

  4. A STUDY OF MENTAL HEALTH OF PROFESSIONAL COLLEGE STUDENTS IN MADURAI DISTRICT

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. M. Thirumalaichamy

    2017-01-01

    The study examined the mental health of professional college students. The sample of the study consisted of 300 professional college students 187 were boys and 113 were girls studying in I.T.I, Diploma and B.E. in Madurai District, Tamilnadu. Data was collected with the help of Mental Health Inventory by Peter Beckar (1987). There results of the study indicated that professional college students samples such as gender, location of institution, nature of institution, professional degree, pare...

  5. Mental disorders among college students in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, R P; Alonso, J; Axinn, W G; Cuijpers, P; Ebert, D D; Green, J G; Hwang, I; Kessler, R C; Liu, H; Mortier, P; Nock, M K; Pinder-Amaker, S; Sampson, N A; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S; Al-Hamzawi, A; Andrade, L H; Benjet, C; Caldas-de-Almeida, J M; Demyttenaere, K; Florescu, S; de Girolamo, G; Gureje, O; Haro, J M; Karam, E G; Kiejna, A; Kovess-Masfety, V; Lee, S; McGrath, J J; O'Neill, S; Pennell, B-E; Scott, K; Ten Have, M; Torres, Y; Zaslavsky, A M; Zarkov, Z; Bruffaerts, R

    2016-10-01

    Although mental disorders are significant predictors of educational attainment throughout the entire educational career, most research on mental disorders among students has focused on the primary and secondary school years. The World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys were used to examine the associations of mental disorders with college entry and attrition by comparing college students (n = 1572) and non-students in the same age range (18-22 years; n = 4178), including non-students who recently left college without graduating (n = 702) based on surveys in 21 countries (four low/lower-middle income, five upper-middle-income, one lower-middle or upper-middle at the times of two different surveys, and 11 high income). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence and age-of-onset of DSM-IV anxiety, mood, behavioral and substance disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). One-fifth (20.3%) of college students had 12-month DSM-IV/CIDI disorders; 83.1% of these cases had pre-matriculation onsets. Disorders with pre-matriculation onsets were more important than those with post-matriculation onsets in predicting subsequent college attrition, with substance disorders and, among women, major depression the most important such disorders. Only 16.4% of students with 12-month disorders received any 12-month healthcare treatment for their mental disorders. Mental disorders are common among college students, have onsets that mostly occur prior to college entry, in the case of pre-matriculation disorders are associated with college attrition, and are typically untreated. Detection and effective treatment of these disorders early in the college career might reduce attrition and improve educational and psychosocial functioning.

  6. Associations of mental health problems with waterpipe tobacco and cigarette smoking among college students

    OpenAIRE

    Primack, Brian A.; Land, Stephanie R.; Fan, Jieyu; Kim, Kevin H.; Rosen, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Associations between the emerging trend of waterpipe tobacco smoking and mental health among college students have not been sufficiently explored. This study analyzed data collected from 152 academic institutions that participated in the National College Health Assessment during the 2008–2009 academic year to examine associations between mental health and waterpipe tobacco smoking among college students (N=100,891). For comparison, cigarette smoking was also examined. Associations with mental...

  7. Sense of coherence and hardiness as predictors of the mental health of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj; Kanekar, Amar; Atri, Ashutosh

    Psychological distress has a deleterious impact on the mental health of college students. The purpose of this study was to specify a theoretical, sense of coherence, and hardiness-based regression model to predict the mental health of college students. The instruments employed to build the model included the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale K-6, the Sense of Coherence-29, and the College Student Hardiness Measure. Data were collected from a sample of college students (n = 220) attending a Midwestern university. Each of the theoretical predictors regressed on mental health was deemed significant. Collectively, the significant predictors produced an R2 adjusted value of 0.434 (p mental health in the sample of participants. Qualitative cut-points were developed for each scale to aid in measurement of health promotion and education interventions designed to improve the mental health of college students.

  8. Health and academic success: A look at the challenges of first-generation community college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Deanna L H

    2016-04-01

    Community colleges in the United States serve more than six million students and are the gateway to postsecondary education for individuals from typically underserved populations such as low-income, ethnic minorities, and first-generation college students. First-generation college students are defined as students whose adoptive or natural parents' highest level of education was a high school diploma or less. Postsecondary education has the potential to reduce both health and socioeconomic disparities. First-generation community college students face significant economic, social, and cultural barriers to academic success and are the most at risk for "dropping-out." The purpose of this brief report was to explore what is known about social, psychological, and physical factors that impede first-generation community college students' academic success. Little is known about potential health and psychological barriers experienced by first-generation community college students that impact academic achievement. Advanced practice nurses (APNs) on community college campuses are in the ideal position to identify and treat health issues, and conduct much-needed research into these areas. College health centers are an important practice setting for APNs to provide direct care to students as well as influence college policies that improve student health, well-being, and promote academic success. ©2016 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  9. A Needs Assessment, Development, and Formative Evaluation of a Health Promotion Smartphone Application for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tiffany; Chandler, Laura; Mouttapa, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately half of college students who completed the National College Health Assessment 2013 indicated a greater need for health-related information. University-based smartphone applications may help students better access this information. Purpose: This study describes the needs assessment, development, and formative evaluation of…

  10. College Students' Perceptions of Fast Food Restaurant Menu Items on Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Susan; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Background: Examining the beliefs about fast food and health, especially the consequences of fast food intake (FFI) on health, among college students will be a crucial factor in turning the tide on current morbidity and mortality statistics. Purpose: This article examines the results of a survey among Midwestern college-aged students about their…

  11. Social Networks, Substance Use, and Mental Health in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michael J.; Zaharakis, Nikola; Benotsch, Eric G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The relationship between social network risk (alcohol-using close friends), perceived peer closeness, substance use, and psychiatric symptoms was examined to identify risk and protective features of college students' social context. Participants: Six hundred and seventy undergraduate students enrolled in a large southeastern…

  12. Learning and living health: college students' experiences with an introductory health course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmens, Donna; Engler, Arthur; Chinn, Peggy L

    2004-07-01

    Despite the Healthy People 2010 initiative and the national focus on promoting healthy lifestyle strategies, studies indicate that U.S. citizens are becoming more obese, and that rates of depression, diabetes, hypertension, homicide, and suicide are increasing. The college campus provides a microcosm of the health issues facing the nation, with college students' reports of increased risk behaviors evident in higher rates of smoking and binge drinking. Faculty in schools of nursing are in an ideal position to develop and provide health promotion and illness prevention programs, both for their own nursing students and for a broader campus-wide student population. This article describes a research study that course faculty conducted during the first year of implementation, designed to evaluate the extent to which participation in the "Introduction to Health" coursework and related activities influenced students' health-related behaviors.

  13. Factors Affecting Mental Health Service Utilization Among California Public College and University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Woodbridge, Michelle W; Mendelsohn, Joshua; D'Amico, Elizabeth J; Osilla, Karen Chan; Jaycox, Lisa H; Eberhart, Nicole K; Burnam, Audrey M; Stein, Bradley D

    2016-08-01

    Unmet need for mental health treatment among college students is a significant public health issue. Despite having access to campus mental health providers and insurance to cover services, many college students do not receive necessary services. This study examined factors influencing college students' use of mental health services. Online survey data for 33,943 students and 14,018 staff and faculty at 39 college campuses in California were analyzed by using logistic regressions examining the association between students' use of mental health services and student characteristics, campus environment, and the presence of a formal network of campus mental health clinics. Nineteen percent of students reported current serious psychological distress in the past 30 days, and 11% reported significant mental health-related academic impairment in the past year. Twenty percent reported using mental health services while at their current college, 10% by using campus services and 10% off-campus services. Students on campuses with a formal network of mental health clinics were more likely than students at community colleges to receive mental health services (odds ratio [OR] range=1.68-1.69), particularly campus services (OR=3.47-5.72). Students on campuses that are supportive of mental health issues were more likely to receive mental health services (OR=1.22), particularly on campus (OR=1.65). Students with active (versus low) coping skills were consistently more likely to use mental health services. Establishing more campus mental health clinics, fostering supportive campus environments, and increasing students' coping skills may reduce unmet need for mental health services among college students.

  14. Payoffs for California College Students and Taxpayers from Investing in Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwood, J. Scott; Stein, Bradley D.; Briscombe, Brian; Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Woodbridge, Michelle W.; May, Elizabeth; Seelam, Rachana; Burnam, M. Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reports results of a survey to assess the impact of CalMHSA's investments in mental health programs at California public colleges and estimates the return on investment in terms of student use of treatment, graduation rates, and lifetime earnings. PMID:28083421

  15. The impact of a developmental science course on college success for underprepared health science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Candace A.

    Developmental education for the academically underprepared college student has been aimed at helping students succeed in college. However, developmental education courses have traditionally focused on reading, writing and math. This quantitative study examined the relationship between a developmental science course for underprepared health science students on grades achieved in college level medical terminology courses. The effect was measured by analyzing student grades retrieved from a college database of official school records through the use of correlation research methodology during a previous 2-year academic period at a selected independent 4-year right-to-try college. The results yielded a weakly positive correlation, but not statistically significant coefficient of 0.325 between grades for students who successfully completed the developmental science course and their subsequent success in a college-level science course. The study added to the gap in knowledge in terms of the effect a developmental science course has on grades in college-level science courses.

  16. Mental Health and Academic Performance of First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tammy Jordan; Oswalt, Sara B.; Ochoa, Yesenia

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of mental health issues are increasing among college students, and such issues pose a threat to health and academic performance. Purpose: The primary purpose of the study is to examine differences in mental health diagnoses and their related academic impact with a special focus on classification year in college.…

  17. Perceptions and knowledge toward mobile-health among the college going students in Coastal South India

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parthaje, Prasanna Mithra; Unnikrishnan, Bhaskaran; Thapar, Rekha; Kumar, Nithin; Panikulam, Elizabeth Josy; Geroge, Elina; Pai, Prajwal; Kulkarni, Vaman; Holla, Ramesh; Darshan, Bhagwan Bhagyamma; Kumar, Avinash; Mehta, Rohil; Jay, Ratna

    2016-01-01

    .... Optimum utilization of mHealth is possible only through adequate awareness. Hence, we aimed to study the perceptions and knowledge about mHealth among college going students in Mangalore, India...

  18. [Risk behaviors to health in Brazilian college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Thiago Ferreira; José, Helma Pio Mororó; Barbosa, Aline Rodrigues

    2013-12-01

    The scope of this study was to estimate the prevalence and associated factors of lower levels of leisure-time physical activities, insufficient consumption of fruit and vegetables, alcohol consumption and smoking among college students from a public university in the northeastern region of Brazil. The sample was stratified in accordance with the academic program, period of study and year of admission to the university. The negative health-related behaviors were analyzed in relation to socio-demographic and program affiliation indicators by means of Prevalence Ratios. The most prevalent negative health-related behaviors were insufficient consumption of fruit and vegetables, lowers levels of leisure-time physical activities and alcohol consumption. Insufficient consumption of fruit, smoking and alcohol consumption were more prevalent among men. Furthermore, insufficient consumption of vegetables was higher among younger, unmarried, men after three years at the university, whose fathers failed to complete elementary school. Lower levels of leisure-time physical activities were higher among older women, who evaluated relationships with colleagues negatively and whose fathers failed to complete elementary school.

  19. Correlates and Predictors of Depression in College Students: Results from the Spring 2000 National College Health Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leino, E. Victor; Kisch, Jeremy

    2005-01-01

    The present analyses used depression-related items and co-factors from the National College Health Assessment (NCHA), Spring 2000. The results indicate 10.3 % of college students (6.2% male and 12.6% female) reported ever having been diagnosed with depression. Of those ever diagnosed with depression, 39% were diagnosed in the last year, 27% were…

  20. Cigarette smoking among Asian American and Pacific Islander college students: implications for college health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Devan R; Pulvers, Kim

    2013-09-01

    Asian Americans (AA) and Pacific Islanders (PI) are an understudied population for health and tobacco use, which is alarming for a fast growing U.S. population. Research in smoking among AA and PI college students is limited, despite 50% of AA and 20% of PI having obtained a college degree. A cross-sectional tobacco survey was administered in a large racially diverse Southern California university (N = 490) that examined smoking behavior, psychosocial, and perceptual factors related to smoking among AA and PI compared with Caucasians. Overall, 19% of participants were smokers. The prevalence of current smoking by race was 26% PI, 19% AA, and 17% Caucasian. AA and PI are light, infrequent smokers who smoke mainly for social reasons and in social locations. Most AA and PI made quit attempts and reported intention to quit smoking. Low to moderate risk perceptions for addiction, disease and difficulty in quitting were observed. Social norms center on family influences, therefore it is recommended that cessation approaches target cigarette smoking norms within this social environment to increase perceptual risks of smoking. Smoking cessation should be placed in college health outreach programs based on culturally tailored approaches for AA and PI that target their unique smoking characteristics.

  1. Vitamin D Status of College Students: Implications for Health Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Eileen McKenna

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is considered to be a pandemic with implications for compromised bone health and other chronic diseases. Few studies have examined vitamin D status in college-aged individuals where prevention of future health consequences is still possible. Serum vitamin D 25(OH)D status and vitamin D intake were examined in 98 college…

  2. Students with Mental Health Needs: College Counseling Experiences and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzer, Alan M.; Moss, Catherine B.; Pribesh, Shana L.; St. John, Dan J.; Burnett, Dana D.; Thompson, Lenora H.; Foss, Jennifer J.

    2018-01-01

    This study examined college counseling experiences and academic outcomes. About 10% of college students seek counseling for mental health needs, and many would be unable to persist without support. Building on previous research, the research found that participating in counseling was beneficial to academic success. Students who visited the…

  3. Relationship of Health Behaviors to Alcohol and Cigarette Use by College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Marilyn A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined health behaviors in college students (n=20,721) collected over a 10-year period. Found gender differences and a negative relationship between alcohol and cigarette use. Found drinking was a frequent behavior among college students and more common among men than women. Cigarette smoking was more commonly reported by women than by men. (ABL)

  4. Acculturation, Enculturation, and Asian American College Students' Mental Health and Attitudes toward Seeking Professional Psychological Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew J.; Yang, Minji; Hui, Kayi; Choi, Na-Yeun; Lim, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we tested a theoretically and empirically derived partially indirect effects acculturation and enculturation model of Asian American college students' mental health and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help. Latent variable path analysis with 296 self-identified Asian American college students supported the…

  5. School Adjustment, Social Support, and Mental Health of Mainland Chinese College Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Raymond Chi-Fai; Chan, Chi-Keung

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the relationship of school adjustment and social support with the mental health of mainland Chinese college students studying in Hong Kong. During the spring semester in 2011, 384 mainland Chinese college students across the postsecondary institutions in Hong Kong completed a questionnaire. Results showed that better school…

  6. College Students' Uses and Perceptions of Social Networking Sites for Health and Wellness Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study explores college students' use of social networking sites for health and wellness information and their perceptions of this use. Method: Thirty-eight college students were interviewed. Analysis: The interview transcripts were analysed using the qualitative content analysis method. Results: Those who had experience using…

  7. Food Insecurity, Self-Rated Health, and Obesity among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knol, Linda L.; Robb, Cliff A.; McKinley, Erin M.; Wood, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of food insecurity among college students ranges from 14% to 59%. Most of the research to date has examined the determinants of food insecurity. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between food insecurity and self-rated health and obesity among college students living off campus. Methods:…

  8. Acculturation, adaptation, and mental health among Ladakhi college students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The Indian region of Ladakh has recently undergone comprehensive sociocultural changes through the process of acculturation. The present study employs an acculturation psychological framework to assess how two groups of Ladakhi college students navigate through different degrees of exposure to ac...

  9. Associations between multiple health risk behaviors and mental health among Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong-ling; Wang, Pei-gang; Qu, Geng-cong; Yuan, Shuai; Phongsavan, Philayrath; He, Qi-qiang

    2016-01-01

    Although there is substantial evidence that health risk behaviors increase risks of premature morbidity and mortality, little is known about the multiple health risk behaviors in Chinese college students. Here, we investigated the prevalence of multiple health risk behaviors and its relation to mental health among Chinese college students. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Wuhan, China from May to June 2012. The students reported their health risk behaviors using self-administered questionnaires. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the self-rating depression scale and self-rating anxiety scale, respectively. A total of 2422 college students (1433 males) aged 19.7 ± 1.2 years were participated in the study. The prevalence of physical inactivity, sleep disturbance, poor dietary behavior, Internet addiction disorder (IAD), frequent alcohol use and current smoking was 62.0, 42.6, 29.8, 22.3, 11.6 and 9.3%, respectively. Significantly increased risks for depression and anxiety were found among students with frequent alcohol use, sleep disturbance, poor dietary behavior and IAD. Two-step cluster analysis identified two different clusters. Participants in the cluster with more unhealthy behaviors showed significantly increased risk for depression (odds ratio (OR): 2.21; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.83, 2.67) and anxiety (OR: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.85, 2.92). This study indicates that a relatively high prevalence of multiple health risk behaviors was found among Chinese college students. Furthermore, the clustering of health risk behaviors was significantly associated with increased risks for depression and anxiety.

  10. ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE TOWARDS ROAD TRAFFIC REGULATIONS AMONG STUDENTS OF HEALTH SCIENCES COLLEGE IN ASEER REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Khaldi, Yahia M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of male students at the Health Science College in Abha, towards road traffic regulations. Material and Methods: This study was carried out during the second semester of the academic year 2002G among the students studying at the Health Science College for Boys in Abha, Aseer Region, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire of 28 different questions was distributed to all available students and responded to under...

  11. Analysis of eHealth Search Perspectives Among Female College Students in the Health Professions Using Q Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Stellefson, Michael; Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J. Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    Background The current “Millennial Generation” of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. Objective To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHeal...

  12. Body Composition, Fitness Status, and Health Behaviors upon Entering College: An Examination of Female College Students from Diverse Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda A. Price

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although poor health-related behaviors that impact development of chronic diseases begin much earlier than when actual disease is evident, few studies have examined health behaviors in college students, who may be at an important transitional period where early intervention could prevent development of chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine health-related factors in female college students ( N = 61 by race/ethnicity and weight status. We found significant differences in health profiles between non-Hispanic White (White and African American students, including greater physical fitness and healthier diets among White students. Overweight/obese students had worse health profiles than healthy BMI students. Furthermore, weight status was significantly associated with cardiovascular fitness. This supports a focus on PA promotion for interventions in the period of emerging adulthood, alongside the other healthy behaviors, to elicit improvements in weight status and potential reduction of chronic disease risks.

  13. Associations between Cultural Stressors, Cultural Values, and Latina/o College Students' Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Rosalie; Rodríguez, Vivian M; McDonald, Shelby E; Velazquez, Efren; Rodríguez, Adriana; Fuentes, Vanessa E

    2017-01-01

    Latina/o college students experience cultural stressors that negatively impact their mental health, which places them at risk for academic problems. We explored whether cultural values buffer the negative effect of cultural stressors on mental health symptoms in a sample of 198 Latina/o college students (70 % female; 43 % first generation college students). Bivariate results revealed significant positive associations between cultural stressors (i.e., acculturative stress, discrimination) and mental health symptoms (i.e., anxiety, depressive, psychological stress), and negative associations between cultural values of familismo, respeto, and religiosity and mental health symptoms. Several cultural values moderated the influence of cultural stressors on mental health symptoms. The findings highlight the importance of helping Latina/o college students remain connected to their families and cultural values as a way of promoting their mental health.

  14. Hookah and Cigarette Smoking among African American College Students: Implications for Campus Risk Reduction and Health Promotion Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brittni D.; Cunningham-Williams, Renee M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify individual and institutional risks and protections for hookah and cigarette smoking among African American (AA) college students. Participants: AA college students (N = 1,402; mean age = 20, range = 18-24 years; 75% female) who completed the Fall 2012 American College Health Association--National College Health Assessment…

  15. Understanding College Students' Problems: Dysfunctional Thinking, Mental Health, and Maladaptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracchia, Jon T.; Pendleton, Shandrea

    2015-01-01

    Many college students experience mental health problems and engage in risky behavior. These problems perpetuate negative outcomes such as poor academic performance and health problems, which may ultimately result in dropping out of college. Maladaptive cognitions, such as criminogenic thinking, have been established as an important contributor to…

  16. Sexual and Reproductive Health Behaviors of Asian Pacific Islander Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieu, Sang Leng; Marshak, Helen Hopp; Bratton, Sally I.

    2013-01-01

    Analyzed were the sexual and reproductive health behaviors of Asian Pacific Islander (API) California community college students who took the National College Health Assessment (NCHA) survey. This was done to identify characteristics related to sexual behavior and choice of birth control and examine the association between condom use and history…

  17. Associations between Physical Activity and Health-Related Factors in a National Sample of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Mary K.; Brittain, Danielle R.; Hutchinson, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine associations between meeting the current moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) recommendation and health-related factors in a national sample of college students. Participants: Participants (N = 67,861) completed the National College Health Assessment II during the Fall 2008/Spring 2009 academic year. Methods:…

  18. Weight gain in freshman college students and perceived health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Paul; Hanck, Christoph; Neisingh, Marjolein; Prak, Dennis; Groen, Henk; Faas, Marijke M

    2015-01-01

    We determined body weight increase in first year Dutch college students. We had the objective to determine whether the awareness of the unhealthy lifestyle raised concerns and willingness to change habits. Body weight, heartbeat, BMI, body fat percentages, and blood pressure values were collected from 1095 students. Comprehensive statistical analysis was performed on the data. The students had a mean weight gain of 1.1 kg and an average BMI gain of 0.35. Members of a student corps gained significantly more weight (1.6 ± 3.1 kg) than non-members (1.0 ± 2.5 kg), while students who are living independently gained an average of 0.5 kg more than students living with their parents (p < 0.05). Approximately 40% of the students changed their eating patterns and 30.7% of the students consumed more alcohol. Students experienced hindrance in physical exercise and mental well-being. Students with a high BMI without irregular eating habits were willing to change their lifestyle. However, students who had irregular lifestyles exhibited the lowest willingness to change their eating behaviors and to lose weight. Our study provides insight into means by which adolescents at high risk for weight gain can be approached to improve experienced quality of life.

  19. Weight gain in freshman college students and perceived health

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Paul; Hanck, Christoph; Neisingh, Marjolein; Prak, Dennis; Groen, Henk; Faas, Marijke M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We determined body weight increase in first year Dutch college students. We had the objective to determine whether the awareness of the unhealthy lifestyle raised concerns and willingness to change habits. Methods Body weight, heartbeat, BMI, body fat percentages, and blood pressure values were collected from 1095 students. Comprehensive statistical analysis was performed on the data. Results The students had a mean weight gain of 1.1 kg and an average BMI gain of 0.35. Members of a student corps gained significantly more weight (1.6 ± 3.1 kg) than non-members (1.0 ± 2.5 kg), while students who are living independently gained an average of 0.5 kg more than students living with their parents (p students changed their eating patterns and 30.7% of the students consumed more alcohol. Conclusions Students experienced hindrance in physical exercise and mental well-being. Students with a high BMI without irregular eating habits were willing to change their lifestyle. However, students who had irregular lifestyles exhibited the lowest willingness to change their eating behaviors and to lose weight. Our study provides insight into means by which adolescents at high risk for weight gain can be approached to improve experienced quality of life. PMID:26844076

  20. The health status of African American college students: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, C

    1994-03-01

    African American college students represent 1.3 million of the 14 million students currently enrolled in postsecondary institutions in the United States, but research specifically investigating or addressing the health status of these young people is rare. The author reviews the literature that has examined components of the social, mental, and physical health of African American college students. This literature review indicates a need for more information and for further research that specifically addresses health behaviors and practices of African American and other minority students. Health educators must recognize the importance of knowing about and understanding the mechanisms that support unhealthy as well as healthy behaviors in different cultural and ethnic groups.

  1. Assessment of occupational health and safety hazard exposures among working college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanay, Jo Anne G; Adesina, Adepeju; Kearney, Gregory D; Richards, Stephanie L

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults have higher injury rates than their adult counterparts in similar jobs. This study used the working college student population to assess health and safety hazards in the workplace, characterize related occupational diseases and injuries, and describe worker health/safety activities provided by employers. College students (≥17 years old) were assessed via online surveys about work history, workplace exposure to hazards, occupational diseases/injuries, and workplace health/safety activities. Approximately half (51%) of participants (n = 1,147) were currently employed at the time of the survey or had been employed while enrolled in college. Restaurants (other than fast food) were the most frequently reported work setting. The most reported workplace hazards included noise exposure and contact with hot liquids/surfaces. Twenty percent of working students experienced injury at work; some injuries were severe enough to limit students' normal activities for >3 days (30%) or require medical attention (44%). Men had significantly higher prevalence of injuries (P = 0.05) and near-misses (P college students may be achieved by implementing occupational health and safety (OHS) strategies including incorporation of OHS in the college curriculum, promotion of OHS by university/college student health services, and improving awareness of OHS online resources among college students, employers, and educators. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Precollege and in-college bullying experiences and health-related quality of life among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ying; Huang, Jiun-Hau

    2015-01-01

    Bullying is a commonly occurring problem behavior in youths that could lead to long-term health effects. However, the impact of school bullying experiences on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among college students has been relatively underexplored. This study aimed to describe school bullying experiences and to empirically examine their associations with HRQOL among college students in Taiwan. Self-administered survey data (response rate 84.2%) were collected from 1452 college students in 2013 by using proportional stratified cluster sampling. Different types of bullying experiences (ie, physical, verbal, relational, and cyber) before and in college, for bullies and victims, were measured. HRQOL was assessed by the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) Taiwan version. College students with cyber bullying-victimization experiences before college (β 0.060) reported significantly higher HRQOL in physical health. Regarding social relationships, those with verbal (β -0.086) and relational (β -0.056) bullying-victimization experiences, both before and in college, reported significantly lower HRQOL, whereas those with verbal (β 0.130) and relational (β 0.072) bullying-perpetration experiences in both periods reported significantly higher HRQOL. Students with cyber bullying-victimization experiences in college (β 0.068) reported significantly higher HRQOL in the environment domain. Last, the effects of verbal and relational bullying-victimization experiences on psychological HRQOL could be mediated and manifested through depression. Various types of bullying experiences occurring before and in college were differentially associated with HRQOL in different domains. These findings underscore the importance of developing school policies and health education initiatives to prevent school bullying and ameliorate its short-term and long-term effects on HRQOL. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Comparing Japanese International College Students' and U.S. College Students' Mental-Health-Related Stigmatizing Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akihiko; Hayes, Steven C.; Twohig, Michael P.; Lillis, Jason; Fletcher, Lindsay B.; Gloster, Andrew T.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined differences between Japanese international college students and U. S. college students on stigma toward people with psychological disorders, stigma tolerance in help seeking, and self-concealment. Japanese international students had greater stigma toward individuals with psychological disorders than did their U.S. counterparts.…

  4. Promoting Physical and Mental Health among College Students: A Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezyak, Jill; Clark, Alena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct an initial needs assessment of physical and mental health behavior among college students to improve understanding of physical and mental health needs among future helping professionals. Method: A sample of 24 undergraduate students was used to provide a description of mental health, physical activity, and healthy eating…

  5. Associations of mental health problems with waterpipe tobacco and cigarette smoking among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A; Land, Stephanie R; Fan, Jieyu; Kim, Kevin H; Rosen, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Associations between the emerging trend of waterpipe tobacco smoking and mental health among college students have not been sufficiently explored. This study analyzed data collected from 152 academic institutions that participated in the National College Health Assessment during the 2008-2009 academic year to examine associations between mental health and waterpipe tobacco smoking among college students (N = 100,891). For comparison, cigarette smoking was also examined. Associations with mental health variables were very strong for cigarette smoking but only moderate for waterpipe smoking. Study implications and limitations are noted.

  6. Physiological health parameters among college students to promote chronic disease prevention and health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David R; Coster, Daniel C; Paige, Samantha R

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to provide physiologic health risk parameters by gender and age among college students enrolled in a U.S. Midwestern University to promote chronic disease prevention and ameliorate health. A total of 2615 college students between 18 and 25 years old were recruited annually using a series of cross-sectional designs during the spring semester over an 8-year period. Physiologic parameters measured included body mass index (BMI), percentage body fat (%BF), blood serum cholesterol (BSC), and systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure. These measures were compared to data from NHANES to identify differences in physiologic parameters among 18-25 year olds in the general versus college-enrolled population. A quantitative instrument assessed health behaviors related to physical activity, diet, and licit drug use. Results suggest that average physiologic parameters from 18 to 25 year olds enrolled in college were significantly different from parameters of 18-25 year olds in the general population. Generally, men reported higher percentiles for BMI, SBP, and DBP than women, but lower %BF and BSC percentiles than women at each age. SBP and DBP significantly increased with age and alcohol use. Students in the lowest (5th) and highest percentiles (95th and 75th), for most age groups, demonstrated DBP, BMI, and %BF levels potentially problematic for health and future development of chronic disease based on percentiles generated for their peer group. Newly identified physiologic parameters may be useful to practitioners serving college students 18-25 years old from similar institutions in determining whether behavior change or treatment interventions are appropriate.

  7. Treat and Teach Our Students Well: College Mental Health and Collaborative Campus Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nancy S; Alderman, Tracy; Schneiber, Katharina; Swerdlow, Neal R

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a selective review of best practices for the psychiatric care of college student populations. It describes psychiatric advances in evidence-based practice for college students and offers a brief compendium for college health practitioners. College mental health services are delivered in a specialized milieu, designed to address many of the unique needs of college students and to support their successful scholastic advancement and graduation. Practical steps for implementing these best practices within the college community setting are identified, with a focus on the initial student evaluation, risk assessment, treatment planning and goal setting, and steps to optimize academic functioning during psychopharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment. At the center of these practices is the use of a collaborative team and psychoeducation that engages students to actively learn about their mental health. By applying common sense and evidence-based practices within interdisciplinary and student-centered services, college communities can effectively meet the mental health needs of their students and empower them to reach their educational goals.

  8. Sexual-Reproductive Health Belief Model of college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Simbar

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Sexual- reproductive health of youth is one of the most unknown aspects of our community, while the world, including our country is faced with the risk of AIDS spreading. The aim of this study was to describe Health Belief Model (HBM of the students about sexual-reproductive health behaviors and evaluate the ability of the model in predicting related behaviors. By using quota sampling, 1117 male and female students of Qazvin Medical Science and International universities were included in the study in 1991. A self-completed questionnaire was prepared containing close questions based on HBM components including perceived threats (susceptibility and severity of related diseases, perceived reproductive benefits and barriers and self efficacy of youth about reproductive health. A total of 645 of participants were female and 457 were male (Mean age 21.4±2.4 and 22.7±3.5, respectively. The Health Belief Model of the students showed that they perceived a moderate threat for AIDS and venereal diseases and their health outcomes. Most of them perceived the benefits of reproductive health behaviors. They believed that the ability of youth in considering reproductive health is low or moderate. However, they noted to some barriers for spreading of reproductive health in youth including inadequacy of services. Boys felt a higher level of threat for acquiring the AIDS and venereal diseases in compare to girls, but girls had a higher knowledge about these diseases and their complications. The Health Belief Model of the students with premarital intercourse behavior was not significantly different with the students without this behavior (Mann-Withney, P<0.05. Female students and the students without the history of premarital intercourse had significantly more positive attitude towards abstinence, comparing to male students and students with the history of premarital intercourse, respectively (Mann-Withney, P<0.05. Seventy five percent of students believed in

  9. Internet Use for Health Information among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; Miner, Kathleen R.; Adame, Daniel D.; Butler, Susan; McCormick, Laura; Mendell, Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Use of the Internet to retrieve health information is increasingly common. The authors surveyed 743 undergraduate students at 2 academic institutions to examine their Internet use, health-seeking behaviors, and attitudes related to the use of the Internet to obtain health information. Fifty-three percent of the respondents indicated that they…

  10. College Student Suicide: How Students at Risk Use Mental Health Services and Other Sources of Support and Coping

    OpenAIRE

    Rice, Jennifer Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    College suicide rates are stable, but up to 10% of students experience suicidal ideation each year, and most do not access mental health services. Little is known about campus mental health service structure and delivery. In a mixed model, quantitative-to-qualitative design, this study examined the link between suicidal ideation, mental health service use, and suicide attempt using archival survey data of over 25,000 college students from 70 campuses, collected in 2006 by the UT Austin-based ...

  11. An examination of ecological predictors of health literacy in black college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Carrie; Modeste, Naomi; Dos Santos, Hildemar; Handysides, Daniel; Gamboa-Maldonado, Thelma; Boyd, Kendal

    2017-06-15

    Health literacy is a determinant of health, but disparities in health literacy persist. This study examined the influence of ecological factors on college students' health literacy. During January 2016 a nonrandom sample of black undergraduate students (n = 298) aged 18-24 were recruited from enrollment lists at two urban universities in the Southeastern United States. Information on health literacy as well as numerous intrapersonal, social, and cultural-environment factors was obtained using an electronic questionnaire and then statistically modeled. Ecological factors accounted for 28.7% of the variance in health literacy. In particular, reappraisal (B = 0.323, p literacy. Although intrapersonal factors influence health literacy, the sociocultural environment of college can also foster or hinder college students' health literacy.

  12. African American college students' health behaviors and perceptions of related health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, D S; Goode, C R

    1994-03-01

    The authors identify specific health-related behaviors of African American college students and compare them with the students' perceptions of corresponding health issues. Among students surveyed, the rate of cigarette smoking (4%) was very low compared with smoking rates found in a national survey (14%); but alcohol consumption was relatively high (63%), although lower than the national average of 91%. More men than women smoked, but more women than men reported they drank alcoholic beverages. Most students (90.2%) said they did not usually eat breakfast, 73.6% reported that their diets were not nutritionally balanced, and the majority (55.4%) were not involved in daily physical activity. More than half (63%) of the students reported satisfactorily handling stress, and 74.1% indicated that they were sexually active. Respondents perceived the most important health issues facing college students as HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), birth control, date rape, stress management, suicide, and alcohol and other drugs.

  13. Complementary relationships between traditional media and health apps among american college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jaehee; Lee, H Erin; Quinlan, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the potential relationships between existing media and health apps for health information among college students. This study collected and analyzed a total of 408 surveys from students of 7 universities across the United States. In order to explore the research questions and test the hypotheses, quantitative data from the online survey were analyzed through hierarchical regression analyses. Results from the hierarchical regression analyses indicated that the perceived credibility of health information from traditional mass media was positively and significantly associated with college students' perception of health apps. However, there was no significant effect in regards to online media. This study's consideration of the relationships between existing media and health apps may guide health practitioners in their strategic approaches to improve the well-being of college students.

  14. Beyond Depression and Suicide: The Mental Health of Transgender College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara B. Oswalt

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research studies examining the mental health of transgender individuals often focus on depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation through the use of clinic samples. However, little is known about the emerging adult (18–26 years old transgender population and their mental health. The current study seeks to fill that gap by using a national dataset of college students (N = 547,727 to examine how transgender college students (n = 1143 differ from their cisgender peers regarding 12 different mental health conditions. Chi-square and regression analyses were conducted. Results demonstrate that transgender students have approximately twice the risk for most mental health conditions compared to female students. A notable exception is schizophrenia, in which transgender individuals have about seven times the risk compared to females. While these were significant findings, regression analyses indicate that being non-heterosexual is a greater predictor for mental health concerns. Implications for mental health practitioners at colleges and universities are discussed.

  15. Health-related quality of life among heavy-drinking college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Christopher J; Bracken-Minor, Katherine L; McCausland, Claudia M; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E; Murphy, James G

    2012-03-01

    To examine unique contributions of depression, alcohol consumption, and alcohol-related consequences on functional health outcomes in college students. Participants were heavy-drinking undergraduate students (N = 207) who completed self-report questionnaires. For men and women, depression predicted overall general health and mental health ratings. For women, depression predicted number of days of role limitations due to poor physical or mental health and number of days of not getting enough sleep or rest. Findings suggest that depression may have a more pervasive association with HRQOL than alcohol misuse or alcohol-related consequences in college students.

  16. Sexual Behaviour and Interest in Using a Sexual Health Mobile App to Help Improve and Manage College Students' Sexual Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Alice R.; Webb, Monica C.; Brinkley, Jason; Martin, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Many US college students are reported to engage in risky sexual behaviour. Smartphone applications are a popular way to provide users with information in real time. We explored the potential for mobile technology to be used in promoting the sexual health of college students. Using findings from an online survey among a random sample of 5000…

  17. [Beijing college students' self-consciousness: its level, structure and relationship with mental health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhiwei; He, Shuchang

    2013-11-01

    To investigate Beijing college students' self-consciousness and its relationship with mental health. Convenient samples of 928 college students from five universities in Beijing were inquired and assessed with the self-consciousness scale and the Kessler 10 psychological distress scale. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to analyze the data. College students' scores of self-consciousness did not differ in sex, age, grade and major type. 83.5% of the participants had relatively low scores (10-24) of psychological distress, but those of the students of liberal arts were higher (P college students' self-consciousness is relatively high and has a relatively complex structure. While self-reflectiveness and style consciousness have negative effects, internal state awareness is good for mental health.

  18. A Health Communication Intervention to Reduce High-Risk Drinking among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Tavis; Haughton, Noela; Wohlwend, Jennifer; Roberts, Stephen; Jordan, Timothy; Yingling, Faith; Blavos, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the effect of a health communication intervention on the alcohol consumption patterns of first-year college students. Researchers employed a quasi-experimental design consisting of students in three residence halls at two Midwestern universities. Between-group comparisons revealed students receiving the intervention…

  19. Effects of exercise dependence on psychological health of Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menglong; Nie, Jingsong; Ren, Yujia

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise dependence on the psychological health of Chinese college students. A total of 1601 college students from three universities in Hunan, China, were selected as research subjects. Several measurement scales, including the Exercise Addiction Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the Subjective Well-being Scale, were used to survey the psychological health problem of these students and to analyze the effects of exercise dependence on their psychological health. Exercise dependence, based on the structural equation model analysis, can positively influence state anxiety (Pstudents. By contrast, exercise dependence negatively influences students' self-satisfaction (Phealth of college students. Further research using multi-dimensional exercise addiction scales should be conducted to identify all the negative effects of exercise addiction factors on psychological health.

  20. Development of a Health Literacy Assessment for Young Adult College Students: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Raquel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a comprehensive health literacy assessment tool for young adult college students. Participants: Participants were 144 undergraduate students. Methods: Two hundred and twenty-nine questions were developed, which were based on concepts identified by the US Department of Health and Human Services,…

  1. An Association between College Students' Health Promotion Practices and Perceived Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lindsey, Billie J.

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken to gain a better understanding of health promotion practices among college students and the relationship of stress and the practice of various health behaviors. Method: In Fall 2008, 319 students from a mid-size university participated in a cross-sectional survey utilizing the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Health…

  2. Individual, Interpersonal, and Institutional Level Factors Associated with the Mental Health of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, DeAnnah R.; McKinney, Kristen J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the individual, interpersonal, and institutional level factors that are associated with overall mental health among college students. Participants: Data are from an online cross-sectional survey of 2,203 students currently enrolled at a large public university. Methods: Mental health was ascertained using a…

  3. Digital Health Education for the Fully Online College Student: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Shelley N.; Burcin, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Just because more online degree programs are available does not mean that each university has the support services to provide health services to their online students. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether health-related services are provided to fully online students based on the American College Health…

  4. Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Screening and Expedited Partner Therapy (EPT) Practices of College Student Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, Sara B.; Eastman-Mueller, Heather P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine college student health centers' (SHCs) practices related to sexually transmitted disease (STD) screening and treatment over a 5-year period. Participants: College SHCs that completed the ACHA Pap and STI Survey between 2010 and 2014. Methods: Chi-square tests were conducted with Cramer's V providing a measure of association.…

  5. College Students' Health Information Activities on Facebook: Investigating the Impacts of Health Topic Sensitivity, Information Sources, and Demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syn, Sue Yeon; Kim, Sung Un

    2016-07-01

    College students tend to lack access to health information. Because social networking sites (SNSs) are popularly adopted by college students, SNSs are considered to be good media channels for college students to obtain health-related information. This study examines the factors that influence college students' health information-seeking and -sharing activities on Facebook. An online survey was distributed to college students between the ages of 18 and 29 to determine intentions pertaining to health information activities according to the factors identified for the study. The factors included both contextual factors (such as health topic sensitivity and health information sources) as well as user factors (such as demographics). Our findings showed that college students are willing to read and post health-related information on Facebook when the health topic is not sensitive. In addition, there are clear differences in preferences between professional sources and personal sources as health information sources. It was found that most user factors, except gender, have no influence on health information activities. The impacts of SNS contexts, awareness of information sources, types of interlocutors, and privacy concerns are further discussed.

  6. Health discussions between college students and parents: results of a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, D A; O'Toole, T P; Kanu, A J

    1997-11-01

    College students' perspectives on health discussions with parents were examined in a survey of students from 5 US universities. Topics important for promoting students' and parents' health as well as guidelines for promoting productive discussions between college students and their parents were identified, using the Delphi technique to reach consensus. Sex, drugs, alcohol, and HIV/AIDS ranked as the most important discussion topics related to students' health; family relationships, physical fitness, and stress management ranked as most important topics dealing with parental health. Guidelines for profitable discussion were that the individual be honest, open, respectful of others' opinions, and a good listener. Parent education, health education activities that promote student-parent discussion, and further research on the topic are suggested.

  7. EFFECTS OF EXERCISE DEPENDENCE ON PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH OF CHINESE COLLEGE STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Menglong; Nie, Jingsong; Ren, Yujia

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exercise dependence on the psychological health of Chinese college students. Subjects and methods: A total of 1601 college students from three universities in Hunan, China, were selected as research subjects. Several measurement scales, including the Exercise Addiction Inventory, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the Subjective Well-being Scale, were used...

  8. Facebook for Health Promotion: Female College Students' Perspectives on Sharing HPV Vaccine Information Through Facebook

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ni; Tsark, JoAnn; Campo, Shelly; Teti, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Facebook, a social network site, has been widely used among young adults. However, its potential to be used as a health promotion medium has not been fully examined. This study explored Facebook's potential for sharing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine information among female college students in Hawai‘i. Culturally tailored flyers and handouts were developed and distributed at one large university in Hawai‘i to recruit female college students between the age of 18 and 26 having an active Fa...

  9. Using Mobile Health Clinics to Reach College Students: A National Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Reginald; Escue, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Background: The mobile health unit (MHU) was a grant-funded national initiative to explore the utilization of a mobile clinic to provide health promotion and clinical services for college students in the United States. Purpose: In 2010 and 2011, a 38-foot mobile clinic tested the feasibility of utilizing the clinic to deliver health promotion and…

  10. Domestic and International College Students: Health Insurance Information Seeking and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackert, Michael; Koh, Hyeseung E.; Mabry-Flynn, Amanda; Champlin, Sara; Beal, Anna

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore perceived barriers to using health insurance and identify discriminant factors between health insurance information seekers and non-seekers. A total of 615 domestic and international college students from a large university in the Southwest completed a cross-sectional survey. Findings imply that campus health providers…

  11. [Benefit of network education to college students' knowledge about sexual and reproductive health in Ningbo city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-yao; Ji, Yun-xin; Ding, Hui-qing; Gui, Zhong-bao; Liang, Xiao-ming; Fu, Jian-fei; Cheng, Yue

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how network education can improve college students' knowledge on sexual and reproductive health in Ningbo city. From December 2012 to June 2013, we conducted a questionnaire investigation among college students in Ningbo city about the effects of network education on their knowledge about sexual psychology, sexual physiology, sexual ethics, and reproductive health. A total of 7 362 college students accomplished the investigation, of whom 2 483 (42.1% males and 57.9% females) received network education, while the other 4 879 (24.1% males and 75.9% females) did not. Approximately 47.1% of the male and 28.0% of the female students acquired sexual and reproductive knowledge via network education. Reproductive health-related network education significantly enriched the students' knowledge about the reproductive system and sex, pubertal development, sexual physiology, conception and embryonic development, methods of contraception, sexual psychology, sexually transmitted diseases and their prevention, pregnancy care and eugenics, and environment- and occupation-related reproductive health (P reproductive health knowledge (P reproductive health-related network education showed a significantly higher rate of masturbation (P reproductive health education among college students and improve their sexual experience and health.

  12. Trends in Marijuana and Other Illicit Drug Use among College Students: Results from 4 Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study Surveys--1993-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohler-Kuo, Meichun; Lee, Jae Eun; Wechsler, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The authors examined changes in college students' illicit drug use, patterns of polydrug use, and the relationship between students' ages of initiation of substance use and later use of marijuana and other illicit drugs between 1993 and 2001. Data from 119 US colleges and universities in the Harvard School of Public Health College Alcohol Study…

  13. The Impact of Spiritual Intelligence, Gender and Educational Background on Mental Health Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Naveen; Srivastava, S K

    2017-11-30

    The present study is conducted on 300 PG-level college students in Haridwar, Uttarakhand (India). The aim of the present study is to examine the level of spiritual intelligence and mental health, to observe relationship between these two variables and also to identify the difference in spiritual intelligence and mental health across gender and educational background (arts and science). The purposive sampling technique is used to select 300 college students of both disciplines of arts and science from the four different government degree colleges/campuses in Haridwar. Integrated Spiritual Intelligence Scale and Mithila Mental Health Status Inventory are used to observe the level of these variables among college students. In the present study, correlational design is employed. All the statistical analyses are done with the help of computer software SPSS. To observe relationship Pearson correlation and to identify the difference t test are used. Findings of the study revealed that spiritual intelligence and mental health relate significantly among arts students, and male and female arts students separately have significant relationship between spiritual intelligence and mental health. Spiritual intelligence and mental health relate significantly among science students, and male and female science students separately have significant relationship between spiritual intelligence and mental health. No significant difference is found between male and female students in terms of spiritual intelligence. No significant difference is found between arts and science students in terms of spiritual intelligence. No significant difference is found between male and female students in terms of mental health. No significant difference is found between arts and science students in terms of mental health.

  14. College Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Facts for Families - Vietnamese College Students with ADHD No. 111; Updated December 2013 Many students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) attend college. College students with ADHD face ...

  15. College Student Mental Health and Quality of Workplace Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Allison A.; Drake, Richard R.; Haydock, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to examine the effect of quality of workplace relationships on the mental health of employed undergraduates, with work-related variables as a potential mechanism. Participants: Participants were 170 employed students (76% female, average age = 19.9) recruited in March 2011. Most worked part-time and had been…

  16. Committed Dating Relationships and Mental Health among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Sarah W.; Weitbrecht, Eliza M.; Kuryluk, Amanda D.; Bruner, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether involvement in committed dating relationships is associated with university students’ mental health (depressive symptoms and problem alcohol use, including binge drinking), and whether these associations differ by gender. Participants: A sample of 889 undergraduate students aged 18 to 25. Methods: Self-report measures…

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life among Heavy-Drinking College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Christopher J.; Bracken-Minor, Katherine L.; McCausland, Claudia M.; McDevitt-Murphy, Meghan E.; Murphy, James G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine unique contributions of depression, alcohol consumption, and alcohol-related consequences on functional health outcomes in college students. Methods: Participants were heavy-drinking undergraduate students (N = 207) who completed self-report questionnaires. Results: For men and women, depression predicted overall general…

  18. Perceived Barriers to Mental Health Services: A Mixed-Method Study with Ukrainian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaka, V.; Churakova, I.; Aavik, O. A.; Goldstein, D.

    2014-01-01

    We examined perceived barriers to professional help among Ukrainian college students, psychologists and psychiatrists. Students from eight universities and psychologists participated in qualitative stage. A survey of barriers to mental health treatment was developed based on qualitative data and used with psychiatrists to validate understanding of…

  19. The Young and the Stressed: Stress, Impulse Control, and Health in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppink, Eric W; Odlaug, Brian L; Lust, Katherine; Christenson, Gary; Grant, Jon E

    2016-12-01

    High levels of stress are common among young adults, particularly those enrolled in college. These degrees of stress have shown numerous deleterious effects across both academic and health variables. Findings regarding the role of stress in the presentation of impulse control disorders, particular among college students, are limited. This study examined potential associations between perceived stress, academic achievement, physical/mental health, and impulse control disorders in young adults. A total of 1805 students completed an online survey and were included in the analysis. Responders were grouped by their overall score on the Perceived Stress Scale into mild, moderate, or severe. Severe perceived stress was associated with worse academic achievement and worse physical health, as well as higher rates of psychiatric and impulsive disorders. These findings may suggest associations between stress and numerous aspects of mental/physical health in young adults, which could be an important consideration for individuals working with college students.

  20. The Theory of Planned Behavior as It Predicts Potential Intention to Seek Mental Health Services for Depression among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Lisa M.; Cotter, Kelly A.; Kravitz, Richard L.; Cello, Philip C.; Fernandez y Garcia, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background: Between 9.5% and 31.3% of college students suffer from depression ("American college health association national college health assessment II: reference group executive summary spring 2013." "Amer. Coll. Health Assoc." 2013; Eagan K, Stolzenberg EB, Ramirez JJ, Aragon, MC, Suchard, RS, Hurtado S. "The American…

  1. Psychological, cognitive, and personal variables that predict college academic achievement among health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaideh, Shaher H; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M

    2014-05-01

    There are many factors that affect college academic achievement among health sciences students. The aim of this study was to examine selected psychological, cognitive, and personal variables that affect students' academic achievement among health sciences college students in Saudi Arabia. A correlational descriptive cross-sectional design was employed to collect data on the studied variables from 510 health sciences students (Medicine, Nursing, Respiratory Therapy, and Pharmacy Doctor) employing self-administered questionnaire. Results showed that students experienced low level of self-esteem and low level of student-faculty interaction; and high level of achievement motivation and satisfaction with life. Also, they reported mild levels of depression and stress and a moderate level of anxiety. Female students reported higher level of achievement motivation, depression, anxiety, and stress; while male students reported a higher level of self-esteem. Results also showed that achievement motivation, mothers' educational level, working besides studying, gender, aptitude test score, and depression level were the best predictors of academic achievement and accounting for 43% of the total variance. Several psychological, cognitive, and personal variables were found to affect college academic achievement among health sciences students. Recommendations and implications to enhance students' academic achievement are discussed. © 2013.

  2. High school to college transition: a profile of the stressors, physical and psychological health issues that affect the first-year on-campus college student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Terence; Heastie, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to profile identified stressors, physical and psychological health issues that affect first-year campus college students as they transition from high school to college. The Health Behaviors, Self-Rated Health and Quality of Life (QOL) questionnaire was administered to 514 university college students. Results from this study determined that there were significant differences among student life stressors and physical and psychological health status between first-year on-campus and first-year off-campus college students. Most importantly this study documented compelling information regarding selection of roommate, poor housing, chronic and temporary diseases, injury and prescription medicine among college students attending a university in North Carolina. Implications for university health administrators, student affairs personnel, counselors and faculty are discussed.

  3. Health, Dietary Habits, and Achievement Motivation in College Students With Self-Reported ADHD Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkt, Julia; Gawrilow, Caterina

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate aspects of health and motivation in a subpopulation of college students with ADHD. Seventy-seven college students with self-reported ADHD (49 women; M age = 25.82, SD = 4.62) and 120 college students without ADHD (65 women; M age = 25.17, SD = 5.41) participated in an online survey assessing their health, dietary habits, and achievement motivation. College students with ADHD showed impairment in psychological functioning, impairment in their mental health, and reported more ambition and less self-control. Furthermore, we found gender differences: Women with ADHD reported worse psychological functioning, and the gender differences in obsessive-compulsive behavior and compensatory effort were mediated by the timing of diagnosis. College students, especially women, with ADHD struggle with health-related issues. Some of these gender differences might be due to under diagnosis of girls in childhood. Differences in achievement motivation might indicate compensatory mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Understanding weight management perceptions in first-year college students using the health belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bhibha M; Evans, Ellen M

    2014-01-01

    To examine weight management barriers, using the Health Belief Model, in first-year college students. First-year college students (n = 45), with data collected in April, May, and November 2013. Nominal group technique sessions (n = 8) were conducted. First-year students recognize benefits to weight management beyond physical attractiveness to quality-of-life domains, including social (eg, bonding opportunities and energy to socially engage) and mental health (eg, stress management). Men believe that weight management is important for career/financial reasons, whereas women voiced that it will allow them to live a full, independent life with a high level of multitasking. Men believed that their barriers were external (eg, campus resources/programs), whereas females perceived their barriers to be internal (eg, poor time management). College students are challenged by weight management and want the institution to provide resources, including curriculum, to help them manage their physical activity and nutrition behaviors.

  5. Analysis of ehealth search perspectives among female college students in the health professions using Q methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-04-27

    The current "Millennial Generation" of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHealth search practices. Q methodology was used to examine subjective perspectives regarding personal eHealth search practices among allied health students majoring in a health education degree program. Thirteen (n = 13) undergraduate students were interviewed about their attitudes and experiences conducting eHealth searches. From the interviews, 36 statements were used in a structured ranking task to identify clusters and determine which specific perceptions of eHealth search practices discriminated students into different groups. Scores on an objective measure of eHealth literacy were used to help categorize participant perspectives. Q-technique factor analysis of the rankings identified 3 clusters of respondents with differing views on eHealth searches that generally coincided with participants' objective eHealth literacy scores. The proficient resourceful students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.56-0.80) described themselves as using multiple resources to obtain eHealth information, as opposed to simply relying on Internet search engines. The intermediate reluctant students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.75-0.90) reported engaging only Internet search engines to locate eHealth information, citing undeveloped evaluation skills when considering sources of information located on the Internet. Both groups of advanced students reported not knowing how to use Boolean operators to conduct Internet health searches. The basic hubristic students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0

  6. Variations in Student Mental Health and Treatment Utilization across US Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchen Lipson, Sarah; Gaddis, S. Michael; Heinze, Justin; Beck, Kathryn; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: On US college campuses, mental health problems are highly prevalent, appear to be increasing, and are often untreated. Concerns about student mental health are well documented, but little is known about potential variations across the diversity of institutions of higher education. Participants: Participants were 43,210 undergraduates at…

  7. A Study of the Relationship between Parental Involvement and Mental Health of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake Payne, Ruthanna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of parental involvement and mental health in a sample of traditionally aged college students and investigate the variance parental involvement predicts in mental health. Five hundred and eighty-eight freshmen at a large research university responded to a 97 question survey. Parental…

  8. The Role of Perceived Stress and Health Beliefs on College Students' Intentions to Practice Mindfulness Meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizer, Carol Ann; Fagan, Mary Helen; Kilmon, Carol; Rath, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding why individuals decide to participate in mindfulness-based practices can aid in the development of effective health promotion outreach efforts. Purpose: This study investigated the role of health beliefs and perceived stress on the intention to practice mindfulness meditation among undergraduate college students. Methods:…

  9. Underutilization of Mental Health Services among College Students: An Examination of System-Related Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Carey N.; Wilcoxon, S. Allen

    2015-01-01

    Despite the documented benefits of counseling and mental health services on academic performance and degree attainment, only about 10% of psychologically distressed college students ever seek professional help. This investigation examined mental health care system-related barriers that might distinguish help seekers from nonhelp seekers among…

  10. Testing Theoretical Relationships: Factors Influencing Positive Health Practices (PHP) in Filipino College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Cynthia; Mahat, Ganga; Atkins, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine variables influencing the positive health practices (PHP) of Filipino college students to gain a better understanding of health practices in this ethnic/racial group. Cross-sectional study tested theoretical relationships postulated among (a) PHP, (b) social support (SS), (c) optimism, and (d) acculturation. Participants: A…

  11. Mental Health Service Utilization Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Questioning or Queer College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Michael S; Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Ramchand, Rajeev; Seelam, Rachana; Stein, Bradley D

    2017-09-01

    College students are at high risk for mental health problems, yet many do not receive treatment even when services are available. Treatment needs may be even higher among sexual minority students, but little is known about how these students differ from heterosexual peers in terms of mental health needs and service utilization. A total of 33,220 California college students completed an online survey on mental health needs (e.g., current serious psychological distress and mental health-related academic impairment) and service utilization. Using logistic regressions, we examined differences in student characteristics, mental health service use, and perceived barriers to using on-campus services by sexual minority status. Approximately 7% of students self-identified as sexual minorities. Compared with heterosexual students, sexual minority students endorsed higher rates of psychological distress (18% vs. 26%, p mental health-related academic impairment (11% vs. 17%, p mental health services. Sexual minority students were also more likely to report using off-campus services and to endorse barriers to on-campus service use (e.g., embarrassed to use services and uncertainty over eligibility for services). Sexual minority individuals represent a sizeable minority of college students; these students use mental health services at higher rates than heterosexual peers but have high rates of unmet treatment need. Efforts to address commonly reported barriers to on-campus service use, foster sexual minority-affirmative campus environments, and promote awareness of campus services may help reduce unmet treatment need in this population. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Association between psychological and self-assessed health status and smartphone overuse among Korean college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Min, Jin-Young; Kim, Hye-Jin; Min, Kyoung-Bok

    2017-09-04

    Several studies suggest that subjective health status is closely related to various behavioral addictions, but there are few studies on smartphone overuse. This study investigated the associations between psychological and subjective health conditions and smartphone overuse in Korean college students. A total of 608 college students participated in this study. We investigated the perceived psychological factors, such as stress, depression symptoms and suicidal ideation. Overall health status was evaluated with self-assessed items, including usual health condition and EuroQol-visual analog scales (EQ-VAS) score. Smartphone overuse was evaluated as the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale. Students with psychotic anxiety (i.e. stress, depression and suicidal ideation) showed significant associations with smartphone overuse, indicating an approximately twofold increased risk compared to those without psychological anxiety (all p Students who reported feeling that their usual health is not good were more likely to overuse smartphones than those who are in good health (OR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.22-3.21). The EQ-VAS score, which indicates current self-assessed health status, also showed a similar result with general health status (OR = 2.14; 95% CI = 1.14-4.02). Negative conditions in self-perceived emotional or overall health condition are associated with the increased likelihood of smartphone overuse in Korean college students.

  13. Mental disorders among college students in the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Randy P.; Alonso, Jordi; Axinn, William G.; Cuijpers, Pim; Ebert, David D.; Green, Jennifer Greif; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C.; Liu, Howard; Mortier, Philippe; Nock, Matthew K.; Pinder-Amaker, Stephanie; Sampson, Nancy A.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Andrade, Laura H.; Benjet, Corina; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Elie G.; Kiejna, Andrzej; Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Lee, Sing; McGrath, John J.; O’Neill, Siobhan; Pennell, Beth-Ellen; Scott, Kate; ten Have, Margreet; Torres, Yolanda; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Zarkov, Zahari; Bruffaerts, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Background Although mental disorders are significant predictors of educational attainment throughout the entire educational career, most research on mental disorders among students has focused on the primary and secondary school years. Methods The World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys were used to examine the associations of mental disorders with college entry and attrition by comparing college students (n = 1,572) and nonstudents in the same age range (18–22; n = 4,178), including nonstudents who recently left college without graduating (n = 702) based on surveys in 21 countries (4 low/lower-middle income, 5 upper middle-income, 1 lower-middle or upper-middle at the times of two different surveys, and 11 high income). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence and age-of-onset of DSM-IV anxiety, mood, behavioural and substance disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Results One-fifth (20.3%) of college students had 12-month DSM-IV/CIDI disorders. 83.1% of these cases had pre-matriculation onsets. Disorders with pre-matriculation onsets were more important than those with post-matriculation onsets in predicting subsequent college attrition, with substance disorders and, among women, major depression the most important such disorders. Only 16.4% of students with 12-month disorders received any 12-month healthcare treatment for their mental disorders. Conclusions Mental disorders are common among college students, have onsets that mostly occur prior to college entry, in the case of pre-matriculation disorders are associated with college attrition, and are typically untreated. Detection and effective treatment of these disorders early in the college career might reduce attrition and improve educational and psychosocial functioning. PMID:27484622

  14. Sexual harassment of college students: implications for campus health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, J S; Schmieler, C R; Parascenzo, L C; Ambrosio, N

    1994-07-01

    The authors examined students' perceptions, attitudes, and experiences of sexual harassment by faculty members at a state university, using a sample of 1,139 graduate and undergraduate students. Twenty-six percent (292) of those in the sample responded. The instrument used in the study, adapted from a survey previously used at the University of Iowa, operationally defined eight categories of behavior: sexist comments, undue attention, verbal sexual advances, body language, invitations, physical advances, explicit sexual propositions, and sexual bribery. As many as 8% of the respondents indicated they had experienced the three most extreme forms of harassment--physical advances, explicit sexual propositions, and sexual bribery. Although most students thought they would report sexual harassment, only three incidents of the most extreme forms of sexual harassment were actually reported. Those who experienced harassment indicated that it generally came from one rather than from several faculty members and that it came from both male and female faculty. Twenty-three percent of the men reported experiencing sexist comments, and 5 male students reported they had experienced at least one of the three most extreme forms of sexual harassment. Recommendations for policy revisions and campus health promotion programming that were made following the survey are discussed.

  15. Vigorous physical activity, mental health, perceived stress, and socializing among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankim, Nicole A; Nelson, Toben F

    2013-01-01

    To examine cross-sectional associations between vigorous physical activity, mental health, perceived stress, and socializing among 4-year college students. A national cross-sectional sample of 4-year colleges in the United States. Ninety-four 4-year colleges in the United States. A total of 14,804 undergraduate students. Self-report vigorous physical activity, perceived stress (measured using the Cohen Perceived Stress Scale), mental health (measured using the SF-36), and socializing (assessed using self-report number of friends and hours spent socializing). Logistic regression models accounting for clustering within schools were estimated to examine the association between vigorous physical activity, mental health, perceived stress, and socializing. Adjusted models included high school vigorous physical activity and sociodemographic characteristics. Students who met vigorous physical activity recommendations were less likely to report poor mental health (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: .79; 95% confidence interval [CI]: .69, .90) and perceived stress (adjusted OR: .75; 95% CI: .67, .83) than students who did not meet recommendations. In addition, socializing partially mediated the relationship between vigorous physical activity, mental health, and perceived stress; however, race and sex did not moderate the relationship. Interventions aiming to improve mental well-being of college students should also consider promoting physical activity. At least some of the positive benefits of physical activity may arise from social interactions.

  16. Nutrition Education to Minimize Health Risk: Approaches for Teaching College Students and Female High School Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Katie Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of increased control over food choices and dietary practices. Participating in high school sports or attending college presents unique nutritional concerns and health risks. Some female high school athletes have low energy availability (consuming inadequate calories to compensate for exercise energy expenditure), which can result in menstrual dysfunction, bone loss, and injury, also known as the female athlete triad (Triad). College students who consume diets low in frui...

  17. Health Status during College Students' Transition to Adulthood: Health Behaviors, Negative Experiences, and the Mediating Effects of Personal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzig, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    University attendance includes various activities and experiences that can have a unique impact on psychosocial development and adult health behaviors, and can influence life course outcomes such as short- and long-term health and quality of life. College attendance and health are cyclical and reinforcing factors. Healthier students do better…

  18. [Dietary life style of Japanese college students: relationship between dietary life, mental health and eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yuji; Nouchi, Rui; Takano, Haruka; Kojima, Akiko; Sato, Shinichi

    2009-10-01

    A scale was constructed to investigate the dietary life style of Japanese college students relating to dietary life, mental health, and eating disorders. Exploratory factor analysis found four factors, termed "dietary mood," "dietary regulation," "dietary stress avoidance behavior," and "food safety." Cluster analysis revealed four typical dietary habits of Japanese college students: "deprecating food safety," "dietary regulation oriented and infrequent dietary stress avoidance behavior," "deprecating dietary moods," and "frequent dietary stress avoidance behavior." Regarding eating disorders, a high percentage of the moderate eating disorder group exhibited frequent dietary stress avoidance behavior. Regarding mental health, a high percentage of the healthy group showed dietary regulation orientation and infrequent dietary stress avoidance behavior. A high percentage of the neurotic-level participants deprecated dietary moods. These results suggest that dietary regulation and deprecatory mood and infrequent dietary stress avoidance behavior lead to college students having a healthy dietary life.

  19. Oral Health Status and Normative Needs of College Students in Mangalore, Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalithambigai G

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Community-oriented oral health promotion programmes can be efficiently targeted by assessing the oral health status comprehensively. Aim: To investigate oral health status and normative needs of college students in Mangalore, Karnataka. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study was done among 720, 18–20-year-old students attending degree colleges in Mangalore using multi-stage random sampling. Oral health status was recorded as per World Health Organization oral health assessment form. The data were coded and analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 11.5 version software. Results: Overall dental caries prevalence accounted to 68.1%, with a mean Decayed, Missed and Filled teeth (DMFT of 1.94 [males had higher DMFT score (2.06 than females (1.82], and majority of the students required one surface restoration. Periodontal status of the students as measured by Community Periodontal Index (CPI showed that majority of the study participants (34.9% had calculus necessitating the need for oral prophylaxis. Conclusion: Oral health status of the age groups not traditionally studied gives the complete picture of the oral disease burden, indicating the need of oral heath preventive measures among college students in India.

  20. The role of personality traits and barriers to mental health treatment seeking among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Kristen S; Goguen, Kandice N; Britt, Thomas W; Jeffirs, Stephanie M; Wilkes, Jack R; Brady, Ashley R; Pittman, Rebecca A; DiMuzio, Danielle J

    2017-11-01

    Many college students experience a mental health problem yet do not seek treatment from a mental health professional. In the present study, we examined how perceived barriers (stigma perceptions, negative attitudes about treatment, and perceptions of practical barriers), as well as the Big Five personality traits, relate to treatment seeking among college students reporting a current mental health problem. The sample consisted of 261 college students, 115 of which reported experiencing a current problem. Results of a series of logistic regressions revealed that perceived stigma from others (OR = .32), self-stigma (OR = .29), negative attitudes about treatment (OR = .27), and practical barriers (OR = .34) were all associated with a lower likelihood of having sought treatment among students experiencing a problem. Of the five-factor model personality traits, only Neuroticism was associated with a higher likelihood of having sought treatment when experiencing a mental health problem (OR = 2.71). When we considered all significant predictors in a final stepwise conditional model, only self-stigma, practical barriers, and Neuroticism remained significant unique predictors. Implications for addressing barriers to treatment and encouraging treatment seeking among college students are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Permissive parenting and mental health in college students: Mediating effects of academic entitlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alison L; Hirsch, Jameson K

    2016-01-01

    Student mental health may suffer due to unreasonable expectations associated with academic entitlement; permissive parenting may be one source of these expectations. The authors examined the role of academic entitlement as a mediator of the relationship between permissive parenting and psychological functioning. Participants were 524 undergraduate students at a single institution (52% female; age range = 18-22). Data collection was completed in May 2011. Cross-sectional design. Participants completed online self-report measures of parenting styles, academic entitlement, stress, depressive symptoms, and well-being. Permissive parenting was associated with greater academic entitlement and, in turn, to more perceived stress and poorer mental health. Mother/father differences were found in some cases. Academic entitlement may partially explain why permissive parenting is detrimentally related to mental health for college students. Implications for academic affairs and counseling include helping students develop an appreciation of the role of self-regulation in college success.

  2. The Associations Among Individual Factors, eHealth Literacy, and Health-Promoting Lifestyles Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-Ching; Luo, Yi-Fang; Chiang, Chia-Hsun

    2017-01-10

    eHealth literacy is gaining importance for maintaining and promoting health. Studies have found that individuals with high eHealth literacy are more likely to adopt healthy eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. In addition, previous studies have shown that various individual factors (eg, frequency of seeking information on health issues, degree of health concern, frequency of eating organic food, and students' college major) are associated with eHealth literacy and health-promoting lifestyles. Nevertheless, few studies have explored the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health-promoting lifestyles among college students. Moreover, there is a lack of studies that focus on eHealth literacy as a predictor of psychological health behaviors. To examine the associations among various individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health-promoting lifestyles. The eHealth Literacy Scale is a 12-item instrument designed to measure college students' functional, interactive, and critical eHealth literacy. The Health-promoting Lifestyle Scale is a 23-item instrument developed to measure college students' self-actualization, health responsibility, interpersonal support, exercise, nutrition, and stress management. A nationally representative sample of 556 valid college students in Taiwan was surveyed. A questionnaire was administered to gather the respondents' background information, including the frequency of seeking information on health issues, the frequency of eating organic food, the degree of health concern, and the students' major. We then conducted a multiple regression analysis to examine the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health-promoting lifestyles. The study found that factors such as medical majors (t550=2.47-7.55, Pcollege students' 4-6 health-promoting lifestyle dimensions and the 3 dimensions of eHealth literacy. Moreover, critical eHealth literacy positively predicted all 6 health-promoting lifestyle

  3. Using the WHO-5 Well-Being Index to Identify College Students at Risk for Mental Health Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Andrew; Boucher, Laura A.; Campbell, Duncan G.; Polyakov, Anita

    2017-01-01

    There is a clear need for colleges to do a better job of identifying students who may benefit from treatment and encouraging those students to actually seek help (Hunt & Eisenberg, 2010). Indeed, research suggests that population-based screening can encourage college students who are at risk for mental health problems to seek treatment (Kim,…

  4. Political Activism and Mental Health Among Black and Latinx College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Elan C; Velez, Gabriel; Offidani-Bertrand, Carly; Keels, Micere; Durkee, Myles I

    2017-06-26

    The current study investigates the utility of political activism as a protective factor against experiences of racial/ethnic (R/E) discrimination that negatively affect stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms among Black and Latinx college freshmen at predominately White institutions. Data come from the Minority College Cohort Study, a longitudinal investigation of Black and Latinx college students (N = 504; 44% Black). We conducted multiple regression analyses for each mental health indicator and tested for interaction effects. For Black and Latinx students, the relationship between R/E microaggressions and end of freshman year stress varied by political activism. For Black students, the relationship between R/E microaggressions and end of the year anxiety varied by political activism. There was a significant interaction effect for depressive symptoms among Latinx students. Political activism serves as a protective factor to mitigate the negative effect of R/E discrimination on stress and depressive symptoms for Latinx students. For Black students, higher levels of political activism may exacerbate experiences of R/E microaggressions and relate to more stress and anxiety compared with Black students who are less politically involved. Findings point to the need for a deeper understanding of phenomenological variation in experiences of microaggressions among R/E minorities and how students leverage political activism as an adaptive coping strategy to mitigate race-related stress during college. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Psychological health among Chinese college students: a rural/urban comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Qi, Qing; Delprino, Robert P

    2017-09-01

    The literature on suicide among the Chinese indicates that younger individuals from rural areas are at higher risk of suicide than their urban counterparts. While earlier studies have investigated the relationship between psychological health and major demographic variables, the relationship of psychological health as it relates to suicide by those from urban and rural areas have been rare. Studying the psychological health of college students from rural China in comparison with students who originate from urban areas may shed light on the mental health disparities of the two populations. This study examined the relationship of psychological health and rural/urban origins of college students in China. Data was obtained from 2 400 college students who completed a survey questionnaire while in attendance at a key university in Beijing China in 2013. Four standardised psychological health scales were administered to obtain measures of participants' self-esteem, depression, social support, and suicide ideation. Findings indicated that urban students had significantly higher scores than their rural counterparts on self-esteem and social support. However, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups on measures of depression and suicide ideation.

  6. African American College Students' Perceptions of Psychosocial Factors Influencing Racial Disparities in Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekeri, Andrew A.; Habtemariam, Tsegaye

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study examined African American college students' perceptions of psychosocial factors that influence racial disparities in health. Methods: We conducted focus groups in two Alabama Black Belt Counties from June to August 2005. Data were collected using a standardized discussion guide, augmented by prompts for clarification.…

  7. Applicability of the Dual-Factor Model of Mental Health for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Katie; Dowdy, Erin; Jones, Camille; Furlong, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the utility of a dual-factor model of mental health in which the concepts of mental illness and mental wellness are integrated. Life satisfaction, emotional symptoms, personal adjustment, and clinical symptoms were assessed with a sample of 240 college students. Participants were organized into four groups based on levels of…

  8. Mental Health and Latino/a College Students: A Psychological Perspective and New Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pilar, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    This psychologically oriented study examined the use of mental health services by Latino/a college students. Significant differences were found between Latinos/as and non-Latinos/as on four variables: Latinos/as tended to live at home, have more children, be foreign born, and have past depression. Because the data for the Latino/a students…

  9. Depressive Symptoms and Mental Health Treatment in an Ethnoracially Diverse College Student Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Steve; Archambeau, Olga G.; Deliramich, Aimee N.; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Chiu, Pearl H.; Frueh, B. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To study (a) the prevalence of depressive symptoms and (b) the utilization of mental health treatment in an ethnoracially diverse sample consisting primarily of Asian Americans, European Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Participants: Five hundred eighty-nine college students. Method: A questionnaire packet that…

  10. Perceived Academic Control: Mediating the Effects of Optimism and Social Support on College Students' Psychological Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthig, Joelle C.; Haynes, Tara L.; Stupnisky, Robert H.; Perry, Raymond P.

    2009-01-01

    The first year of college presents numerous challenges experienced as overwhelming by some freshmen who may become overly stressed and depressed. This longitudinal study examined perceived academic control (PAC) as a mediator of optimism and social support's buffering effects on freshman students' psychological health. Multiple regressions…

  11. Stress, Health Risk Behaviors, and Weight Status among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jennifer E.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Laska, Melissa N.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the relationship between stress, weight-related health risk behaviors (e.g., eating behaviors, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep, cigarette smoking, and binge drinking), and weight status using cross-sectional data on 2-year community college students enrolled in a randomized controlled weight…

  12. Typologies of Childhood Exposure to Violence: Associations with College Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Graff, Laura E.; Howell, Kathryn H.; Martinez-Torteya, Cecilia; Hunter, Erin C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study examined typologies of childhood violence exposure (CVE) and the associations of profiles with current demographic characteristics and mental health in emerging adulthood. Participants: The study evaluated a sample of college students from 2 US geographic regions (Midwest, n = 195; Southeast, n = 200). Methods: An online…

  13. The Influence of Psychological Symptoms on Mental Health Literacy of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin E.; Saw, Anne; Zane, Nolan

    2015-01-01

    Psychological problems, such as depression and anxiety, are common among college students, but few receive treatment for it. Mental health literacy may partially account for low rates of mental health treatment utilization. We report two studies that investigated mental health literacy among individuals with varying degrees of psychological symptoms, using cross-sectional online survey methodology. Study 1 involved 332 college students, of which 32% were categorized as high depressed using an established measure of depression, and mental health literacy for depression was assessed using a vignette. Logistic regression results showed that high depressed individuals were less likely to recognize depression compared to low depressed individuals, and depression recognition was associated with recommendations to seek help. Study 2 replicated and extended findings of Study 1 using a separate sample of 1,321 college students with varying degrees of psychological distress (32% no/mild distress, 55% moderate distress, and 13% serious distress) and examining mental health literacy for anxiety in addition to depression. Results indicated that compared to those with no/mild distress, those with moderate distress had lower recognition of depression, and those with moderate and serious distress were less likely to recommend help-seeking. In contrast, there were no differences in mental health literacy for anxiety, which was low across all participants. These findings suggest that psychological symptoms can impact certain aspects of mental health literacy, and these results have implications for targeting mental health literacy to increase mental health services utilization among individuals in need of help. PMID:26052815

  14. Knowledge of memory aging and Alzheimer's disease in college students and mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Erin M; Cherry, Katie E; Smitherman, Emily A; Hawley, Karri S

    2008-03-01

    In this study, college students and mental health professionals completed the Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire, Alzheimer's Disease Knowledge Test and the Fraboni Scale of Ageism before and after a lecture on normal and pathological memory issues in adulthood. Results confirmed that professionals were more knowledgeable about memory aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and less ageist than college students. Analyses of pre- and post-lecture response accuracy yielded comparable benefits in memory aging and AD knowledge for both groups. Correlation analyses provided modest evidence for the influence of ageist attitudes on the knowledge measures. Implications for memory education programs and psychology curriculum are considered.

  15. The Effects of a Lifetime Physical Fitness (LPF) Course on College Students? Health Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    QUARTIROLI, ALESSANDRO; MAEDA, HOTAKA

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine motivational constructs and the effect of physical activity engagement on health behaviors in college students who were required to take a 15-week lifetime physical fitness (LPF) course for graduation. A total of fifty-eight first and second year college students aged between 17 and 23 years (M=18.72; SD=1.09). Paper and pencil questionnaires were anonymously administered at the beginning and at the end of the 15-week long spring 2012 semester. Analysi...

  16. Gateway health behaviors in college students: investigating transfer and compensation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Claudio Renato; Lee, Hye-ryeon; Hubbard, Amy E; Min-Sun, Kim

    2009-01-01

    There is a dearth of studies on the mechanisms of multiple risk behaviors, even though these behaviors are significant public health issues. The authors investigated whether health behavior interventions have transfer or compensatory effects on other health behaviors. The authors looked at transfer and compensation effects of 3 health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, and physical activity) in a sample of college students aged 18 to 25 years (N = 973; 84% born in the United States; 50% female; 25% Japanese, 19% Caucasian, 16% mixed). The study revealed the following evidence for transfer effects: (1) nonsmokers consume less alcohol, (2) regularly active people smoke less, and (3) nondrinkers smoke less. The authors also found the following compensation effects: (1) regularly active people consume alcohol more frequently; and (2) alcohol drinkers are more active. Interventions involving college students' smoking, alcohol use, and physical activity need to take into account both transfer and compensation considerations to maximize health impacts.

  17. The Effects of a Lifetime Physical Fitness (LPF) Course on College Students' Health Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartiroli, Alessandro; Maeda, Hotaka

    The purpose of this study was to examine motivational constructs and the effect of physical activity engagement on health behaviors in college students who were required to take a 15-week lifetime physical fitness (LPF) course for graduation. A total of fifty-eight first and second year college students aged between 17 and 23 years (M=18.72; SD=1.09). Paper and pencil questionnaires were anonymously administered at the beginning and at the end of the 15-week long spring 2012 semester. Analysis of the differences between the beginning and the end of the semester was completed. Physical activity behaviors and Behavioral Regulations variables did not change across time (p > .05). Appearance (d = -0.34, p = .013) and fitness (d = -0.37, p = .006) reasons for participating in physical activity and all Theory of Planned Behavior variables decreased over time (d = -0.32 to - 0.41, p college students.

  18. Analysis of eHealth Search Perspectives Among Female College Students in the Health Professions Using Q Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanik, Bruce; Chaney, J. Don; Tennant, Bethany

    2012-01-01

    Background The current “Millennial Generation” of college students majoring in the health professions has unprecedented access to the Internet. Although some research has been initiated among medical professionals to investigate the cognitive basis for health information searches on the Internet, little is known about Internet search practices among health and medical professional students. Objective To systematically identify health professional college student perspectives of personal eHealth search practices. Methods Q methodology was used to examine subjective perspectives regarding personal eHealth search practices among allied health students majoring in a health education degree program. Thirteen (n = 13) undergraduate students were interviewed about their attitudes and experiences conducting eHealth searches. From the interviews, 36 statements were used in a structured ranking task to identify clusters and determine which specific perceptions of eHealth search practices discriminated students into different groups. Scores on an objective measure of eHealth literacy were used to help categorize participant perspectives. Results Q-technique factor analysis of the rankings identified 3 clusters of respondents with differing views on eHealth searches that generally coincided with participants’ objective eHealth literacy scores. The proficient resourceful students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.56-0.80) described themselves as using multiple resources to obtain eHealth information, as opposed to simply relying on Internet search engines. The intermediate reluctant students (pattern/structure coefficient range 0.75-0.90) reported engaging only Internet search engines to locate eHealth information, citing undeveloped evaluation skills when considering sources of information located on the Internet. Both groups of advanced students reported not knowing how to use Boolean operators to conduct Internet health searches. The basic hubristic students

  19. The effect of individual factors on health behaviors among college students: the mediating effects of eHealth literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, WanChen; Chiang, ChiaHsun; Yang, ShuChing

    2014-12-12

    College students' health behavior is a topic that deserves attention. Individual factors and eHealth literacy may affect an individual's health behaviors. The integrative model of eHealth use (IMeHU) provides a parsimonious account of the connections among the digital divide, health care disparities, and the unequal distribution and use of communication technologies. However, few studies have explored the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors, and IMeHU has not been empirically investigated. This study examines the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors using IMeHU. The Health Behavior Scale is a 12-item instrument developed to measure college students' eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. The eHealth Literacy Scale is a 12-item instrument designed to measure college students' functional, interactive, and critical eHealth literacy. A nationally representative sample of 525 valid college students in Taiwan was surveyed. A questionnaire was administered to collect background information about participants' health status, degree of health concern, major, and the frequency with which they engaged in health-related discussions. This study used Amos 6.0 to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to identify the best measurement models for the eHealth Literacy Scale and the Health Behavior Scale. We then conducted a multiple regression analysis to examine the associations among individual factors, eHealth literacy, and health behaviors. Additionally, causal steps approach was used to explore indirect (mediating) effects and Sobel tests were used to test the significance of the mediating effects. The study found that perceptions of better health status (t520=2.14-6.12, Pliteracy and adoption of healthy eating, exercise, and sleep behaviors. Moreover, eHealth literacy played an intermediary role in the association between individual factors and health behaviors (Sobel test=2.09-2.72, Pcritical eHealth

  20. Promoting Mental Health Help-Seeking Behavior Among First-Year College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Kristin; Silk, Kami; Nazione, Samantha; Fournier, Laura; Collins-Eaglin, Jan

    2016-12-15

    Awareness and utilization of mental health services on college campuses is a salient issue, particularly for first-year students as they transition into college life. The current study uses focus groups and surveys to test help-seeking messages for first-year students. In this formative research, Phase 1 focus-group participants (N = 47) discussed four message concepts related to awareness of symptoms of mental health problems and services available to students. Phase 2 participants (N = 292) viewed one of three message concepts and then completed items that measured their perceptions of the message. Focus-group results helped prioritize likely effectiveness of messages based on responses to message features and provided an understanding of mental health help-seeking perceptions among college students. The quantitative results indicate the messages have potential for increasing awareness of mental health issues, as well as promoting availability of campus resources. Implications for tailoring campaign messages to first-year students are discussed.

  1. Health risk behaviors of black male college students: seat belt use, smoking, and obesity status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajibade, Phoebe Butler

    2010-01-01

    This paper examined health behaviors (seatbelt use, tobacco use, and obesity status) of 127 black male college students using data obtained from the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey. The majority of the participants were freshmen and sophomores (70%), full time students (95%), and lived on campus (85%). The results indicated that black males often failed to use seatbelts while riding as a passenger (69%) or driving (48%). Although 15% of the students smoked, 1/3 of the smokers began smoking during college. Approximately 50% of the students were overweight or obese; among students attempting to lose weight, exercise versus nutrient intake was used as a means to lose weight. The study recommendations included the need to increase educational efforts to alert black males to their risks for a premature death, and to provide programming/mentoring initiatives to assist males in dealing with stress and discrimination that may impact their health-related decision making. The implications of this study suggest that even educated black males are at risk for premature disease and disability as a result of their health behaviors.

  2. Mental health and professional help-seeking among college students with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coduti, Wendy A; Hayes, Jeffrey A; Locke, Benjamin D; Youn, Soo Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Research has demonstrated that providing appropriate supports and services on campus can improve both mental health and academic outcomes for students with disabilities (Emerson, Honey, Madden, & Llewellyn, 2009; Stumbo, Martin, & Hedrick, 2009), but little is known about the specific mental health needs of this population. The purpose of this exploratory study, therefore, was to identify the mental health needs of college students with various types of disabilities. Researchers analyzed data, collected by the Center for Collegiate Mental Health, of 5,696 students with, and without, disabilities who utilized counseling services on campuses in the 2013-14 academic year. A nonclinical (students not in counseling) sample of 1,620 students with, and without, disabilities was also explored. Compared to students without disabilities, students with disabilities report more anxiety and academic-related distress, as well as higher rates of suicide ideation, suicide attempts, and nonsuicidal self-injury among both students in counseling and not in counseling. Although in certain areas students with disabilities show similar levels of distress as students without disabilities, students with disabilities have higher levels of distress in areas which could impact their academic success. Self-harming tendencies are higher for students with disabilities overall, but more so for specific disability types. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Weight gain in freshman college students and perceived health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Vos, Paul; Hanck, Christoph; Neisingh, Marjolein; Prak, Dennis; Groen, Henk; Faas, Marijke M

    2015-01-01

    ... important to identify predictors and susceptible periods of weight gain ( Lowe et al., 2006 ). The freshman period at university or college has been identified as a period of high risk for weight gain ( Boujut and Bruchon-Schweitzer, 2009; Crombie et al., 2009; Crombie et al., 2012; Economos et al., 2008; Freedman, 2010; Gropper et al., 2012a, 2012b; Gropper et al., 2009...

  4. The Healthy College Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Adams O’Connell PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the impact of health behaviors on morbidity often focus on the limited impact of a single behavior or a limited group of behaviors. In this study, we examine college student behaviors and investigate the link of these behaviors with a 2-week illness profile. Through self-reported surveys, we measure acute illness and a general illness burden, a cumulative measure of major and minor ailments. We explore how daily routines correlate with these illness measures. Eighty-four students from a random sample of 90 students attending a small liberal arts school completed the survey for a response rate of 93%. Living arrangements, exercise, sleep patterns, eating preferences and habits, and “social” behaviors were all significantly associated with illness burden. Students living in “singles” and those who got regular exercise and an average of 7 hr of sleep per night reported less illness. Most interesting is the effect of social behaviors. Students who greet others with a handshake reported higher illness rates, as did students who share food and/or drinks. While we can conceptualize why these behaviors would lead to a greater illness burden, students who engaged more frequently in these behaviors also reported being “happier.” In trying to reduce illness among college students, we might suggest less handshaking and food and beverage sharing, but these actions are ways in which college students express and maintain friendships. College administrators are challenged to discover ways to reduce illness while maintaining the positive aspects of local student culture. This study begins to explore some ways to balance health and camaraderie.

  5. College students' barriers and enablers for healthful weight management: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaney, Mary L; Less, Faith D; White, Adrienne A; Dayton, Sarah F; Riebe, Deborah; Blissmer, Bryan; Shoff, Suzanne; Walsh, Jennifer R; Greene, Geoffrey W

    2009-01-01

    To identify barriers and enablers for healthful weight management among college students. Sixteen on-line focus groups, homogeneous by sex and university. Eight universities in 8 states. College students (N = 115; 55% female; mean age 19.7 +/- 1.6). Qualitative software, Nvivo version 2 (QSR International, Victoria, Australia, 2002), was used; similar codes were grouped together and categorized using an ecological model. Males and females cited the same barriers to weight management: intrapersonal (eg, temptation and lack of discipline); interpersonal (social situations); and environmental (eg, time constraints, ready access to unhealthful food). Similar enablers were identified by sex: intrapersonal (eg, regulating food intake, being physically active); interpersonal (social support); and environmental (eg, university's environment supports physical activity). More barriers than enablers were given, indicating that these college students were more sensitive to barriers than the enablers for weight management. Factors viewed by some students as barriers to weight management were viewed as enablers by others. When designing weight management interventions for college students, sex specificity may not be as important as considering that a barrier for one student may be an enabler for another. From an ecological perspective, individually focused interventions must be implemented in conjunction with environmental-level interventions to facilitate behavior change.

  6. Emotional well-being of college students in health courses with and without an exercise component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Susan M; Dennis, Dixie L; Gorrow, Teena

    2006-12-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of exercise on indices of emotional well-being of 584 college students enrolled in either a lecture-only health course or one of six health-fitness courses, each using a different mode of exercise including cross-training, aerobics, yoga, circuit weight training, swimming, and walk/jog. Each participant completed the Self-perception Profile for College Students developed by Neeman and Harter. Analysis yielded significant differences on five indices of emotional well-being (Global Self-worth, Appearance, Romantic Relationships, Social Acceptance, and Athletic Competence) between pre- and posttest scores of participants enrolled in the health-fitness courses, while no differences were found between pre-and posttest scores of participants enrolled in the lecture-only health course. Of the seven subscales examined, a significant interaction effect was found between sex/time and Romantic Relationships/Athletic Competence, with women reporting greater gains than men.

  7. Pilot Study of a Sleep Health Promotion Program for College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, J C; Miller, E; Hafer, B; Reidell, M F; Buysse, D J; Franzen, P L

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a pilot study of a sleep health promotion program for college students. The aims of the study were to 1) determine the feasibility of the program, and 2) explore changes in sleep knowledge and sleep diary parameters. Open trial of a sleep health promotion program for college students. A small liberal arts university in southwestern Pennsylvania. University students (primarily female). Active intervention components included individualized email feedback based on each participant's baseline sleep diary and an in-person, group format presentation on sleep health. Participants completed online questionnaires and sleep diaries before and after the health promotion intervention. Online questionnaires focused on sleep knowledge and attitudes toward sleep, as well as Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) sleep and psychosocial assessments. Of participants who completed some aspect of the study, 89% completed at least one intervention component (in-person lecture and/or sleep diary). Participants reported significant improvement in sleep knowledge and changes in sleep diary parameters (decreased sleep onset latency and time spent in bed, resulting in greater sleep efficiency). Sleep duration also increased by 30 minutes among short sleepers who obtained sleep at baseline. Preliminary evaluation of a brief program to promote sleep health suggests that it is feasible and acceptable to implement, and that it can favorably alter sleep knowledge and behaviors reported on the sleep diary in college students. Controlled trials are warranted.

  8. Mental health of college students and their non-college-attending peers: results from a large French cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Leray, Emmanuelle; Denis, Laure; Husky, Mathilde; Pitrou, Isabelle; Bodeau-Livinec, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Background The great majority of mental disorders begin during adolescence or early adulthood, although they are often detected and treated later in life. To compare mental health status of college students and their non-college-attending peers whether working, attending a secondary school, or non-college-attending peers who are neither employed nor students or trainees (NENST) will allow to focus on high risk group. Methods Data were drawn from a large cross-sectional survey conducted by pho...

  9. Health belief structural equation model predicting sleep behavior of employed college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Adequate sleep comprising 7 to 8 hours per day is vital for health and effective functioning for all adults. The purpose of this study was to specify a health belief model to measure and predict the sleep behavior of employed college students. A 52-item instrument was developed with acceptable validity and reliability. A cross-sectional, convenience sample of 188 students was recruited for this study. Structural equation modeling was used to build models. The health belief model explained 34% of the variance in sleep behavior, with perceived severity, perceived barriers, cues to action, and self-efficacy identified as significant predictors.

  10. A study on some psychological health effects of cell-phone usage amongst college going students

    OpenAIRE

    Jayanti P Acharya, Indranil Acharya, Divya Waghrey

    2013-01-01

    Cell phones have come to stay. Their use without any knowledge of their harmful effects like cancers and other health effects is not ‘quite’ safe. Studies on cancers due to electromagnetic radiations from cell phones are available but there is a need to research on the detrimental physical and psychological effects esp. on rampant users like college-goers. This study focused on certain psychological or mental health effects of cell phone usage amongst students pursuing professional courses in...

  11. Weight gain in freshman college students and perceived health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul de Vos

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Students experienced hindrance in physical exercise and mental well-being. Students with a high BMI without irregular eating habits were willing to change their lifestyle. However, students who had irregular lifestyles exhibited the lowest willingness to change their eating behaviors and to lose weight. Our study provides insight into means by which adolescents at high risk for weight gain can be approached to improve experienced quality of life.

  12. Mental Health Issues among College Students: Who Gets Referred for Psychopharmacology Evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Daniel J.; Doerfler, Leonard A.; Truong, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe diagnostic and psychotropic medication prescription characteristics among college students referred by college counseling centers for psychopharmacologic evaluation. Participants: Participants were 540 college students referred by 6 college counseling centers in Massachusetts between November 2005 and May 2011. Methods:…

  13. IDENTIFYING FACTORS INFLUENCING MENTAL HEALTH DEVELOPMENT OF COLLEGE STUDENTS IN CHINA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tao, Chen; Yongyi, Bi; Zongfu, Mao; Rappe, Paula; Edwards, Glen D; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2002-01-01

    ...” have a significant correlation with the psychological adaptation of college students in China. Asignificant relationship was found between fathers' education and occupation and college students' levels of anxiety and depression...

  14. Community College Students' Awareness of Risk Factors for Mental Health Problems and Referrals to Facilitative and Debilitative Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkbrenner, Mike; Hernández, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of school shootings and other campus violence incidents have called attention to the increasing number of college students who are living with Mental Health Disorders (MHDs). There is a substantial amount of literature on MHDs among college students who are attending 4-year universities. However, the literature is lacking research…

  15. Survey of college students on iPod use and hearing health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauer, Jeffrey L; Johnson, Carole E; Byrd, Anne; DeGood, Laura; Meuel, Caitlin; Pecile, Angela; Koch, Lindsey L

    2009-01-01

    The popularity of personal listening devices (PLDs) including iPods has increased dramatically over the past decade. PLDs allow users to listen to music uninterrupted for prolonged periods and at levels that may pose a risk for hearing loss in some listeners, particularly those using earbud earphones that fail to attenuate high ambient noise levels and necessitate increasing volume for acoustic enjoyment. Earlier studies have documented PLD use by teenagers and adults, but omitted college students, which represent a large segment of individuals who use these devices. This study surveyed college students' knowledge about, experiences with, attitudes toward, and practices and preferences for hearing health and use of iPods and/or other PLDs. The study was designed to help determine the need, content, and preferred format for educational outreach campaigns regarding safe iPod use to college students. An 83-item questionnaire was designed and used to survey college students' knowledge about, experiences with, attitudes toward, and practices/preferences for hearing health and PLD use. The questionnaire assessed Demographics and Knowledge of Hearing Health, iPod Users' Practices and Preferences, Attitudes toward iPod Use, and Reasons for iPod Use. Generally, most college students were knowledgeable about hearing health but could use information about signs of and how to prevent hearing loss. Two-thirds of these students used iPods, but not at levels or for durations that should pose excessive risks for hearing loss when listening in quiet environments. However, most iPod users could be at risk for hearing loss given a combination of common practices. Most of these college students should not be at great risk of hearing loss from their iPods when used conscientiously. Some concern is warranted for a small segment of these students who seemed to be most at risk because they listened to their iPods at high volume levels for long durations using earbuds, and reported that

  16. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), Stress and Mental Health in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatekin, Canan

    2017-05-16

    The goal of this short-term longitudinal study was to examine whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) could be used to identify college students at risk for mental health problems and whether current level of stress mediates the relationship between ACEs and mental health. Data on ACEs and mental health (depression, anxiety and suicidality) were collected at the beginning of the semester, and data on current stressors and mental health were collected toward the end of the semester (n = 239). Findings indicated that ACEs predicted worsening of mental health over the course of a semester and suggested current number of stressors as a mediator of the relationship between ACEs and mental health. Results suggest that screening for ACEs might be useful to identify students at high risk for deterioration in mental health. Results further suggest that stress-related interventions would be beneficial for students with high levels of ACEs and point to the need for more research and strategies to increase help-seeking in college students. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Dietary habits contributing to the cancer prevention among health college students in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogay, Nalan Hakime; Akinci, Ayse Cil; Sert, Havva; Kurtulus, Zeynep; Gedik, Selda

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive study was made to evaluate the dietary habits contributing to cancer prevention of 319 health college students. Data collection form included questions about demographic characteristics and 33 statements which evaluate dietary habits contributing to cancer prevention. Among the students, 56.1% consumed fast food outside the home/dormitory twice a week or more and 47% never exercised. Moreover, 63.9% of the students reported that their dietary habits changed negatively and 69% stated that their fruit and vegetable consumption decreased after starting the health college. The students mostly paid attention to preserving food and water consumption while they paid least attention to maintaining healthy weight and whole grain consumption. Female students, those who paid attention to the amount and calorie of the food they consumed, students who did not consume fast food, and students who exercised twice a week or three times a week had better dietary habits contributing to cancer prevention (pfast food consumption and increase fruit and vegetable consumption and exercising in university students should be implemented. For this purpose, appropriate conditions for preparing and preserving healthy food should be provided as well as increasing the frequency of vegetable containing meals and providing fruits and salads in every meal at school cafeterias.

  18. Substance use behaviors, mental health problems, and use of mental health services in a probability sample of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, James A; Eisenberg, Daniel; Serras, Alisha M

    2009-02-01

    This research examined 1) the prevalence of substance use behaviors in college students, 2) gender and academic level as moderators of the associations between mental health problems and substance use, and 3) mental health service use among those with co-occurring frequent binge drinking and mental health problems. As part of the Healthy Minds Study, a probability sample of 2843 college students completed an Internet survey on mental health problems, substance use behaviors, and utilization of mental health care. Response propensity weights were used to adjust for differences between respondents and non-respondents. Major depression, panic disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder were positively associated with cigarette smoking. Frequent binge drinking was negatively associated with major depression and positively associated with generalized anxiety disorder, and these associations were significantly stronger for males than females. Among students with co-occurring frequent binge drinking and mental health problems, 67% perceived a need for mental health services but only 38% received services in the previous year. There may be substantial unmet needs for treatment of mental health problems and substance use among college students.

  19. Facebook addiction among Turkish college students: the role of psychological health, demographic, and usage characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Mustafa; Gulyagci, Seval

    2013-04-01

    This study explored Facebook addiction among Turkish college students and its behavioral, demographic, and psychological health predictors. The Facebook Addiction Scale (FAS) was developed and its construct validity was assessed through factor analyses. A total of 447 students reported their personal information and Facebook usage and completed the FAS and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). The results revealed that weekly time commitment, social motives, severe depression, and anxiety and insomnia positively predicted Facebook addiction. Neither demographic variables nor the interactions of gender by usage characteristics were found to be significant predictors.

  20. Mental health service utilization among college students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Daniel; Hunt, Justin; Speer, Nicole; Zivin, Kara

    2011-05-01

    We aimed to provide the most comprehensive picture, to date, of service utilization and help-seeking behavior for mental health problems among college students in the United States. We conducted online surveys in 2007 and 2009 of random samples of students in 26 campuses nationwide. Among students with an apparent mental health problem (32% of the weighted sample), 36% received any treatment in the previous year. The prevalence of psychotherapy and medication use was approximately equal. Treatment prevalence varied widely across campuses, with some campuses having prevalence 2 to 3 times higher than those of others. Apparent barriers to help-seeking included skepticism on treatment effectiveness and a general lack of perceived urgency. Overall, the findings indicate that help-seeking for mental health varies substantially across student characteristics and across campuses. Strategies to address the low prevalence of treatment will need to be responsive to this diversity.

  1. Mental Health Service Providers: College Student Perceptions of Helper Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Ashley M.; Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael W; Poindexter, Dawn C.; Pujara, Amita L.

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate perceptions of the overall effectiveness of six types of mental health service providers (MHSPs) were obtained with a survey. Although many mental health services are available to consumers in the United States, research has indicated that these services are underutilized. Perceptions have been linked to therapeutic outcomes and may…

  2. Psychological health among Chinese college students: a rural/urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The literature on suicide among the Chinese indicates that younger individuals from rural areas are at higher risk of suicide than their urban counterparts. While earlier studies have investigated the relationship between psychological health and major demographic variables, the relationship of psychological health as it ...

  3. How health information affects college students' inclination toward variety-seeking tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien-Huang, Lin; Hung-Chou, Lin

    2010-12-01

    College students often consume too much snacks (e.g. potato chips) and such high-fat snacks are found to be related to obesity. This paper seeks to explore the effect of health-related information on the relationship of mood states and variety seeking (VS) behavior among enjoyable snacks. Health warnings and nutritional labeling are used to examine the moderating effects on this relationship. Consistent with our hypotheses, the results indicate that the presence of health warnings attenuates the influence of mood states on VS, so that happy and sad students tend to converge to similar levels of VS. However, in the absence of health warnings, sad students tend to incorporate significantly more VS than happy students. Similarly, the presence of nutritional labeling attenuates the influence of mood states on VS, so that happy and sad students tend to converge to similar levels of VS. However, in the absence of nutritional labeling, sad students tend to incorporate significantly more VS than happy students. The results provide evidence that making health warnings and nutritional labeling more salient might be a good way to decrease students' VS tendency for high-fat snacks. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2010 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  4. An Interpretivism Perspective of Institutional Practices on Allied Health Program Student Retention at Public Community Colleges in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaus, Frances Gayle

    2017-01-01

    Over the past four decades there has been a great amount of research on retention of students in higher education institutions (Tinto, 2006); however, few studies have examined the effect of what institutions provide for student support, regarding retention, specifically allied health program students. Retention of community college students in…

  5. Persistence of mental health problems and needs in a college student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivin, Kara; Eisenberg, Daniel; Gollust, Sarah E; Golberstein, Ezra

    2009-10-01

    Cross-sectional studies indicate a high prevalence of mental health problems among college students, but there are fewer longitudinal data on these problems and related help-seeking behavior. We conducted a baseline web-based survey of students attending a large public university in fall 2005 and a two-year follow-up survey in fall 2007. We used brief screening instruments to measure symptoms of mental disorders (anxiety, depression, eating disorders), as well as self-injury and suicidal ideation. We estimated the persistence of these mental health problems between the two time points, and determined to what extent students with mental health problems perceived a need for or used mental health services (medication or therapy). We conducted logistic regression analyses examining how baseline predictors were associated with mental health and help-seeking two years later. Over half of students suffered from at least one mental health problem at baseline or follow-up. Among students with at least one mental health problem at baseline, 60% had at least one mental health problem two years later. Among students with a mental health problem at both time points, fewer than half received treatment between those time points. Mental health problems are based on self-report to brief screens, and the sample is from a single university. These findings indicate that mental disorders are prevalent and persistent in a student population. While the majority of students with probable disorders are aware of the need for treatment, most of these students do not receive treatment, even over a two-year period.

  6. The Role of Social Emotional Health on Academic Achievement of College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intan Shabrina Yansaputri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Research on positive psychology has widely grown since its emergence.  The strength of the human becomes a key point of positive psychology to explore, such as self-efficacy, optimism, self-control, etc.  This research applied positive psychology to evaluate the role of social-emotional health on the academic achievement of college students. There were 107 first year psychology students of the Islamic University of Indonesia participating this study.  Data were collected using the Social Emotional Health Survey System (SEHS-S developed by Jones, You, and Furlong (2012 and Grade Point Average (GPA of students. Data analysis showed that Social Emotional Health was correlated with GPA. Three domains within Social Emotional Health Survey System such as belief in self, emotional competence, and engaged living were positively correlated with GPA. However, belief in others does not correlate with GPA.

  7. Health Belief Model Offers Opportunities for Designing Weight Management Interventions for College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Laura H; Riggs, Alysse; Uribe, Franchesca; Spaulding, Trent J

    2017-10-30

    Identify weight-related beliefs of college students and test the predictive power of the Health Belief Model for body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional online survey with beliefs measured on 5-point scales. University in North Carolina. Undergraduates (n = 516; 91.9%), females (n = 399; 71.3%), white non-Hispanic students (n = 507; 86.2%), and 20.3% of overweight or obese status. Perceived severity, susceptibility, barriers, benefits, and internal and external cues to action. One-way ANOVA and regression. Significance was P external cues, barriers, and benefits predicted BMI. Several beliefs were identified that could serve as the basis for weight-related interventions addressing specific concerns, needs, and goals of college students. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acculturation, enculturation, and Asian American college students' mental health and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew J; Yang, Minji; Hui, Kayi; Choi, Na-Yeun; Lim, Robert H

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, we tested a theoretically and empirically derived partially indirect effects acculturation and enculturation model of Asian American college students' mental health and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help. Latent variable path analysis with 296 self-identified Asian American college students supported the partially indirect effects model and demonstrated the ways in which behavioral acculturation, behavioral enculturation, values acculturation, values enculturation, and acculturation gap family conflict related to mental health and attitudes toward seeking professional psychological help directly and indirectly through acculturative stress. We also tested a generational status moderator hypothesis to determine whether differences in model-implied relationships emerged across U.S.- (n = 185) and foreign-born (n = 107) participants. Consistent with this hypothesis, statistically significant differences in structural coefficients emerged across generational status. Limitations, future directions for research, and counseling implications are discussed.

  9. Work-school conflict and health outcomes: beneficial resources for working college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngah; Sprung, Justin M

    2013-10-01

    This study extends prior college student employment research by examining health as an outcome variable. Using 2-wave data from a sample of 216 student workers, this study examined work-school conflict as a predictor of psychological and physical health among working college students. Additionally, 3 resource-providing variables--work-school facilitation, supervisor work-school support, and personal fulfillment at work--were tested for buffering effects in the relation between work-school conflict and health. Results demonstrated that work-school conflict was a significant predictor of psychological health but not physical health. All 3 resource-providing variables ameliorated the negative relation between work-school conflict and psychological health, whereas only personal fulfillment weakened the positive relation between work-school conflict and physical symptoms. These findings suggest the benefits of work-school facilitation, supervisor work-school support, and personal fulfillment in minimizing the detrimental effects of work-school conflict on health outcomes. Theoretical and practical implications for researchers, educational institutions, and organizations are discussed.

  10. Current Methods in Health Behavior Research Among U.S. Community College Students: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Pallav; Little, Melissa A; Herzog, Thaddeus A

    2014-06-01

    The majority of health behavior research involving college students in the United States has focused on 4-year college students. Two-year or community college students have been less studied, although a significant proportion of U.S. undergraduates, primarily those from disadvantaged socioeconomic and/or racial/ethnic background, are enrolled in community colleges. Thus, there is a need to enhance health behavior and health promotion research among community college students. This study systematically reviewed 42 published, peer-reviewed health behavior studies conducted among U.S. community college students in order to determine the current state of research in the area with regard to behaviors studied, research designs used, recruitment and data collection strategies practiced, rates of student participation, and characteristics of the participants represented. Findings identified the methodological limitations of current research and suggested optimal recruitment and data collection methods suitable for various research needs. Findings are discussed in the context of enhancing health behavior research among U.S. community college students. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Facts About: College Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

    Facts about college mental health are presented in response to frequently asked questions. Areas of concern include common conditions interfering with student effectiveness, why students seek help and where they can get it, the frequency of severe mental illness in college students, the suicide problem, the limitations of nonprofessional help, the…

  12. The Relationship of Trait Mindfulness and Positive Mental and Physical Health Among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Potts, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness engagement has become increasingly popular in therapeutic settings and is promising in terms of possibly reducing physical and mental health symptoms among a wide variety of clients (including college students) presenting diverse diagnoses. While a number of studies suggest that mindfulness interventions increase mindfulness ability, this assertion has not been validated because many researchers utilizing a mindfulness intervention fail to include measures assessing change in trai...

  13. Stress, Health Risk Behaviors, and Weight Status among Community College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Pelletier, Jennifer E.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Laska, Melissa N.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the relationship between stress, weight-related health risk behaviors (e.g., eating behaviors, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep, cigarette smoking and binge drinking), and weight status using cross-sectional data on 2-year community college students enrolled in a randomized controlled weight gain prevention trial. Modified Poisson regression and linear regression were used to examine crude and adjusted cross-sectional associations. Highe...

  14. The influence of psychological symptoms on mental health literacy of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin E; Saw, Anne; Zane, Nolan

    2015-11-01

    Psychological problems, such as depression and anxiety, are common among college students, but few receive treatment for it. Mental health literacy may partially account for low rates of mental health treatment utilization. We report 2 studies that investigated mental health literacy among individuals with varying degrees of psychological symptoms, using cross-sectional online survey methodology. Study 1 involved 332 college students, of which 32% were categorized as high depressed using an established measure of depression, and mental health literacy for depression was assessed using a vignette. Logistic regression results showed that high depressed individuals were less likely to recognize depression compared to low depressed individuals, and depression recognition was associated with recommendations to seek help. Study 2 replicated and extended findings of Study 1 using a separate sample of 1,321 college students with varying degrees of psychological distress (32% no/mild distress, 55% moderate distress, and 13% serious distress) and examining mental health literacy for anxiety in addition to depression. Results indicated that compared to those with no/mild distress, those with moderate distress had lower recognition of depression, and those with moderate and serious distress were less likely to recommend help-seeking. In contrast, there were no differences in mental health literacy for anxiety, which was low across all participants. These findings suggest that psychological symptoms can impact certain aspects of mental health literacy, and these results have implications for targeting mental health literacy to increase mental health services utilization among individuals in need of help. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Sleep hygiene and sleep quality as predictors of positive and negative dimensions of mental health in college students

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah Peach; Gaultney, Jane F.; Gray, David D.

    2016-01-01

    College students are one of the top at-risk groups for chronic sleep loss and poor sleep quality, which can yield deleterious effects on health. The college population is also notorious for poor sleep hygiene, or modifiable behaviors that promote sufficient sleep quantity and quality. Research suggests sleep can impact both positive and negative aspects of college mental health, but few studies have examined the effects of sleep on both subjective well-being and depression within one model. F...

  16. Stress Carry-Over and College Student Health Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Daphne E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Using a stress carry-over perspective, this study examines the relationship between stress stemming from school and family domains and physical and mental health outcomes. Methods: The study sample included 268 undergraduate men and women from a Midwestern university. Participants completed an anonymous online questionnaire. OLS…

  17. A Study of the Perception of Health Risks among College Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenggang; Fan, Jingbo

    2013-01-01

    The present survey was designed to investigate the perception of health risks among college students in China. The data are the responses of a sample of 3,069 college students at one university to surveys that include measures of several dimensions of public judgments about fifteen specific hazards. Chinese college students conveyed their concerns as falling into three broad categories: Environmental (e.g., global warming, natural catastrophes, the ozone hole, air pollution, chemical pollution, pesticides in food), Technological (e.g., nuclear power stations, thermal power, genetically modified food, medical X-rays), and Social (cigarette smoking, drinking alcohol, overtime study or work, mental stress, motor vehicle accidents). The data were collected with a self-report questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to illustrate the levels of perceived risk according to the percent of “high risk” responses as well as the mean response values. Generally, the hazards that were perceived as posing the greatest health risk were those belonging to the social health risks; items related to technology risks received the lowest percentage of “high health risk” rankings. Traditional environmental risks such as natural catastrophes, pollution issues (chemical pollution, air pollution), and pesticides in food were ranked as being relatively high risks. The respondents were less concerned about new emerging issues and long-term environmental risks (global warming). In this survey, motor vehicle accidents were considered to be a “high health risk” by the greatest percentage of respondents. Generally speaking, the female respondents’ degree of recognition of health risks is higher than that of male respondents. Only for the item of smoking was the male respondents’ degree higher than that of females. There is also a geographic imbalance in the health risk perceptions. The degree of recognition of health risks from respondents in municipalities is generally

  18. A study of the perception of health risks among college students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenggang; Fan, Jingbo

    2013-05-27

    The present survey was designed to investigate the perception of health risks among college students in China. The data are the responses of a sample of 3,069 college students at one university to surveys that include measures of several dimensions of public judgments about fifteen specific hazards. Chinese college students conveyed their concerns as falling into three broad categories: Environmental (e.g., global warming, natural catastrophes, the ozone hole, air pollution, chemical pollution, pesticides in food), Technological (e.g., nuclear power stations, thermal power, genetically modified food, medical X-rays), and Social (cigarette smoking, drinking alcohol, overtime study or work, mental stress, motor vehicle accidents). The data were collected with a self-report questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to illustrate the levels of perceived risk according to the percent of "high risk" responses as well as the mean response values. Generally, the hazards that were perceived as posing the greatest health risk were those belonging to the social health risks; items related to technology risks received the lowest percentage of "high health risk" rankings. Traditional environmental risks such as natural catastrophes, pollution issues (chemical pollution, air pollution), and pesticides in food were ranked as being relatively high risks. The respondents were less concerned about new emerging issues and long-term environmental risks (global warming). In this survey, motor vehicle accidents were considered to be a "high health risk" by the greatest percentage of respondents. Generally speaking, the female respondents' degree of recognition of health risks is higher than that of male respondents. Only for the item of smoking was the male respondents' degree higher than that of females. There is also a geographic imbalance in the health risk perceptions. The degree of recognition of health risks from respondents in municipalities is generally lower than that of

  19. A Study of the Perception of Health Risks among College Students in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenggang Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present survey was designed to investigate the perception of health risks among college students in China. The data are the responses of a sample of 3,069 college students at one university to surveys that include measures of several dimensions of public judgments about fifteen specific hazards. Chinese college students conveyed their concerns as falling into three broad categories: Environmental (e.g., global warming, natural catastrophes, the ozone hole, air pollution, chemical pollution, pesticides in food, Technological (e.g., nuclear power stations, thermal power, genetically modified food, medical X-rays, and Social (cigarette smoking, drinking alcohol, overtime study or work, mental stress, motor vehicle accidents. The data were collected with a self-report questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to illustrate the levels of perceived risk according to the percent of “high risk” responses as well as the mean response values. Generally, the hazards that were perceived as posing the greatest health risk were those belonging to the social health risks; items related to technology risks received the lowest percentage of “high health risk” rankings. Traditional environmental risks such as natural catastrophes, pollution issues (chemical pollution, air pollution, and pesticides in food were ranked as being relatively high risks. The respondents were less concerned about new emerging issues and long-term environmental risks (global warming. In this survey, motor vehicle accidents were considered to be a “high health risk” by the greatest percentage of respondents. Generally speaking, the female respondents’ degree of recognition of health risks is higher than that of male respondents. Only for the item of smoking was the male respondents’ degree higher than that of females. There is also a geographic imbalance in the health risk perceptions. The degree of recognition of health risks from respondents in municipalities

  20. Relation of Mental Health to Alcohol and Substance Use Among Texas College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Alan B; Koenig, Jessica A; Becker, Emilie A

    2017-04-01

    We examined the effect of mental health problems and difficulties on alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use among college students by using the 2013 Texas College Survey of Substance Use (n=11,216), which includes the K6 screening scale for severe mental illness (SMI). Students' K6 scores were used to classify them into 3 groups: those likely to have SMI (9% with scores ≥ 13), those with some mental health problems (36%), and those without mental health issues (55% with scores ≤ 4). Questions regarding ATOD use were analyzed using these 3 groups. Alcohol use was not significantly associated with K6 scores, although problematic alcohol behaviors as measured by the CAGE test were. Higher cigarette use was significantly associated with higher K6 scores. Finally, both higher marijuana and higher drug use (across 9 other individual drugs) were significantly associated with higher K6 scores. Although higher K6 scores were associated with higher rates of drug use, most students with high K6 scores did not use drugs. However, given the higher level of risk, drug and alcohol interventions should be made available for those students who receive mental health counseling.

  1. An analysis of health promotion and risk behaviors of freshman college students in a rural southern setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmus, Cathy L; Evans, Retta; Wysochansky, Mary; Mixon, Diane

    2005-02-01

    This study described health promotion and risk behaviors of entering college students in a rural southern setting. A sample of 251 students completed the Health Promotion and Health Risk Survey during a testing period that included other academic surveys. Results indicated that participants believe they are in control of their health. In addition, participants reported that happiness and health were the most important personal values for them. When compared with the National College Health Risk Behavior data, participants in this study were significantly lower in many of the health risk behaviors.

  2. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in southwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, X.; Hawk, S.T.; Winter, S.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward

  3. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in Southwest China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi, Xinli; Hawk, Skyler T; Winter, Sam; Meeus, Wim|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070442215

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward

  4. Web-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Mental Health Problems in College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Michael E.; Haeger, Jack A.; Pierce, Benjamin G.; Twohig, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    There are significant challenges in addressing the mental health needs of college students. The current study tested an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), web-based self-help program to treat a broad range of psychological problems students struggle with. A sample of 79 college students was randomized to web-based ACT or a waitlist condition, with assessments at baseline and posttreatment. Results indicated adequate acceptability and program engagement for the ACT website. Relative to w...

  5. Typologies of Childhood Exposure to Violence: Associations With College Student Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Graff, Laura E; Howell, Kathryn H; Martinez-Torteya, Cecilia; Hunter, Erin C

    2015-01-01

    This study examined typologies of childhood violence exposure (CVE) and the associations of profiles with current demographic characteristics and mental health in emerging adulthood. The study evaluated a sample of college students from 2 US geographic regions (Midwest, n = 195; Southeast, n = 200). An online questionnaire (collected 2013-2014) assessed CVE and current mental health. Latent class analysis was used to identify typologies of CVE. Follow-up analyses were conducted to distinguish differences between typologies in demographic characteristics and mental health. Four distinct profiles emerged: High-Exposed, Domestic-Exposed, Community-Exposed, and Low-Exposed. High- and Domestic-Exposed groups were more likely to be first-generation college students and to experience symptoms of psychopathology. This study offers a unique presentation of CVE profiles and a nuanced interpretation of their differential relationship to current demographic characteristics and mental health. It may befit university mental health initiatives to engage first-generation students and utilize comprehensive assessments of previous victimization.

  6. Screening for high-risk drinking in a college student health center: characterizing students based on quantity, frequency, and harms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaus, James F; Sole, Mary Lou; McCoy, Thomas P; Mullett, Natalie; Bolden, Jennifer; Sivasithamparam, Janani; O'Brien, Mary Claire

    2009-07-01

    This study examined characteristics of students who presented to a college health center and screened positive for the 5/4 definition of high-risk drinking (five or more drinks in a row for men, or four or more drinks in a row for women, on at least one occasion in the past 2 weeks) and analyzed the students' data according to their reporting of alcohol-related harms. Secondary analysis of data obtained for an intervention study to reduce high-risk drinking in college students was used. Data on alcohol use and alcohol-related harms were obtained from Web-based Healthy Lifestyle Questionnaires and 30-day alcohol recall diaries (Timeline Followback calendar). Students (N = 363; 52% female) were classified as nonheavy, heavy, and heavy and frequent drinkers, based on their self-reported alcohol use. Alcohol-related harms were measured using the Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index and eight additional items derived from the Drinker Inventory of Consequences-2L. Students in the nonheavy, heavy, and heavy and frequent groups had mean Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index scores of 10, 14, and 23, respectively. The heavy-and-frequent drinking group comprised 20% of the sample but experienced 31% of the total harms. The 5/4 screening question accurately identified college students presenting to a college health center who were already experiencing significant alcohol-related harms. The addition of a frequency question (drinking 3 or more days per week) to the 5/4 screening question provided a simple method for identifying those students at highest risk and in greatest need of intervention.

  7. Credit card debt, stress and key health risk behaviors among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Melissa C; Lust, Katherine; Story, Mary; Ehlinger, Ed

    2008-01-01

    To examine cross-sectional associations between credit card debt, stress, and health risk behaviors among college students, focusing particularly on weight-related behaviors. Random-sample, mailed survey. Undergraduate and graduate students (n = 3206) attending a large public university. Self-reported health indicators (e.g., weight, height, physical activity, diet, weight control, stress, credit card debt). More than 23% of students reported credit card debt > or = $1000. Using Poisson regression to predict relative risks (RR) of health behaviors, debt of at least $1000 was associated with nearly every risk indicator tested, including overweight/obesity, insufficient physical activity, excess television viewing, infrequent breakfast consumption, fast food consumption, unhealthy weight control, body dissatisfaction, binge drinking, substance use, and violence. For example, adjusted RR [ARR] ranged from 1.09 (95% Confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.17) for insufficient vigorous activity to 2.17 (CI: 0.68-2.82) for using drugs other than marijuana in the past 30 days. Poor stress management was also a robust indicator of health risk. University student lifestyles may be characterized by a variety of coexisting risk factors. These findings indicate that both debt and stress were associated with wide-ranging adverse health indicators. Intervention strategies targeting at-risk student populations need to be tailored to work within the context of the many challenges of college life, which may serve as barriers to healthy lifestyles. Increased health promotion efforts targeting stress, financial management, and weight-related health behaviors may be needed to enhance wellness among young adults.

  8. The Association between Mental Health and Violence among a Nationally Representative Sample of College Students from the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A Schwartz

    Full Text Available Recent violent attacks on college campuses in the United States have sparked discussions regarding the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and the perpetration of violence among college students. While previous studies have examined the potential association between mental health problems and violent behavior, the overall pattern of findings flowing from this literature remain mixed and no previous studies have examined such associations among college students.The current study makes use of a nationally representative sample of 3,929 college students from the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC to examine the prevalence of seven violent behaviors and 19 psychiatric disorder diagnoses tapping mood, anxiety, personality, and substance use disorders. Associations between individual and composite psychiatric disorder diagnoses and violent behaviors were also examined. Additional analyses were adjusted for the comorbidity of multiple psychiatric diagnoses.The results revealed that college students were less likely to have engaged in violent behavior relative to the non-student sample, but a substantial portion of college students had engaged in violent behavior. Age- and sex-standardized prevalence rates indicated that more than 21% of college students reported at least one violent act. In addition, more than 36% of college students had at least one diagnosable psychiatric disorder. Finally, the prevalence of one or more psychiatric disorders significantly increased the odds of violent behavior within the college student sample.These findings indicate that violence and psychiatric disorders are prevalent on college campuses in the United States, though perhaps less so than in the general population. In addition, college students who have diagnosable psychiatric disorders are significantly more likely to engage in various forms of violent behavior.

  9. The Association between Mental Health and Violence among a Nationally Representative Sample of College Students from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph A; Beaver, Kevin M; Barnes, J C

    2015-01-01

    Recent violent attacks on college campuses in the United States have sparked discussions regarding the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and the perpetration of violence among college students. While previous studies have examined the potential association between mental health problems and violent behavior, the overall pattern of findings flowing from this literature remain mixed and no previous studies have examined such associations among college students. The current study makes use of a nationally representative sample of 3,929 college students from the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) to examine the prevalence of seven violent behaviors and 19 psychiatric disorder diagnoses tapping mood, anxiety, personality, and substance use disorders. Associations between individual and composite psychiatric disorder diagnoses and violent behaviors were also examined. Additional analyses were adjusted for the comorbidity of multiple psychiatric diagnoses. The results revealed that college students were less likely to have engaged in violent behavior relative to the non-student sample, but a substantial portion of college students had engaged in violent behavior. Age- and sex-standardized prevalence rates indicated that more than 21% of college students reported at least one violent act. In addition, more than 36% of college students had at least one diagnosable psychiatric disorder. Finally, the prevalence of one or more psychiatric disorders significantly increased the odds of violent behavior within the college student sample. These findings indicate that violence and psychiatric disorders are prevalent on college campuses in the United States, though perhaps less so than in the general population. In addition, college students who have diagnosable psychiatric disorders are significantly more likely to engage in various forms of violent behavior.

  10. Regular Sleep Makes for Happier College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166856.html Regular Sleep Makes for Happier College Students When erratic snoozers improve shut-eye habits, ... Health and Human Services. More Health News on College Health Healthy Sleep Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics College ...

  11. Facebook for Health Promotion: Female College Students' Perspectives on Sharing HPV Vaccine Information Through Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ni; Tsark, JoAnn; Campo, Shelly; Teti, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    Facebook, a social network site, has been widely used among young adults. However, its potential to be used as a health promotion medium has not been fully examined. This study explored Facebook's potential for sharing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine information among female college students in Hawai'i. Culturally tailored flyers and handouts were developed and distributed at one large university in Hawai'i to recruit female college students between the age of 18 and 26 having an active Facebook account. Three focus group meetings were conducted to gather student perspectives about how information about HPV vaccine may be best shared via Facebook. We found that students believed Facebook is a good awareness tool but they needed more knowledge about the HPV vaccine to feel comfortable sharing the information. Participants preferred forwarding information to chatting about HPV. Some participants expressed concern that their Facebook friends would think the HPV vaccine information they forwarded on Facebook is spam. Participants suggested prefacing the posted HPV vaccine information with a personal note in their own words to make the message more interesting and relevant to their Facebook friends. Future interventions using Facebook to promote HPV vaccine could provide students with HPV vaccine information from credible sources and ask students to attach personal testimonials or endorsements while forwarding the information on Facebook.

  12. Effect of westernization on oral health among college students of Udaipur City, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujara, Piyush; Sharma, Neeraj; Parikh, Rujul Jayeshkumar; Shah, Maitri; Parikh, Shachi; Vadera, Vivek; Kaur, Manpreet; Makkar, Isha; Parmar, Mayur; Rupakar, Pratik; Patel, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that periodontal disease and dental caries affect the majority of populations and that western culture and lifestyle may have a profound influence on oral health, especially in adults. The present study was performed to determine the effect of westernization on the oral health of college students of Udaipur City, Rajasthan. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among students attending various professional and non-professional bachelor's degree colleges of Udaipur City, Rajasthan, India, from March 2013 to May 2013. Eight hundred students were selected based on a two-stage random sampling procedure. Westernization was assessed by a self-administered structured questionnaire. Periodontal status, dental caries status and malocclusion were assessed according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria (1997). Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square and Multivariate logistic regression. The confidence level and level of significance were set at 95 and 5 %, respectively. The present study suggested that adverse habits, listening to English music and preferring English food had a significant association with dental caries and periodontal diseases. Malocclusion also showed a significant relationship with consuming English food for snacks and desserts. Multivariate analysis revealed a significantly greater odds ratio (OR) for periodontal disease and dental caries among those who preferred English food for lunch. Based on the results of the present study, there is an association between westernization and oral health.

  13. College Students' Alcohol Use and Their Adherence to Health Principles: Optimism, Values, Self-Care, Relationships, Community, Nature, and Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, April

    2009-01-01

    Prevention of high-risk use of alcohol by college students has been studied for over 20 years. Most prevention methodology has focused on reducing supply to students rather than addressing the root causes that students use alcohol in self-abusive manner. One holistic health approach that addresses the root causes of alcohol abuse promotes the…

  14. Improving physical health international students enrolled in a technical college in Baikal region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokoltsev M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to improve the physical health of foreign students enrolled in a technical college Baikal region using an extended motor mode. Material : in the experiment participated 57 students attending the training of South-East Asia, 74 - from Central Asia and 455 - Slavs, natives of the Irkutsk region. Results : it was found poor fitness and low functional performance among foreign students. For this purpose they had used advanced motoring. It included, besides training curriculum additional group activities in the form of sports, participating in sports events and guided independent study physical education. Conclusion : the end of follow foreign students involved in the extended motor mode, significantly outperform their peers engaged on normal functional parameters (heart rate, a test with 20 squats, the recovery time after exercise, dynamometry hands, breath tests, adaptive capacity as well as motor qualities.

  15. Attitude and practice towards road traffic regulations among students of health sciences college in aseer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaldi, Yahia M

    2006-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of male students at the Health Science College in Abha, towards road traffic regulations. This study was carried out during the second semester of the academic year 2002G among the students studying at the Health Science College for Boys in Abha, Aseer Region, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire of 28 different questions was distributed to all available students and responded to under the direct supervision of the heads of the six departments of the college. The questionnaire consisted of three main parts; the first was about the socio-demographic and scientific data of the students; the second on the knowledge of road traffic regulations and the third dealt with attitudes and practice of driving and the use of seat belts. Two hundred thirty eight out of 297 students (80%) responded to the questionnaire in this study. The mean age of the participants was 21 years, 47% lived in cities, 70% and 72% had cars and driving licenses respectively. More than half of the students had been involved in road traffic accidents (RTAs), 22% of these had been injured in these RTAs and 13% admitted to hospital for an average of nine days. High speed was the main cause of their RTAs. The mean speed at which the students drove their cars within and outside the city boundaries were 81 KM/h and 127 KM/h respectively. The degree of knowledge of road traffic regulation was moderate to high in more than 75% of the students, while more than 90% of them believed in the importance of the use of seat belts. More than 75% of the participants mentioned that they had problems with the use of seat belts, the most common of which were forgetfulness and anxiety. This study revealed that many students had been involved in RTAs as a result of driving at high speed. Most of the students had good attitudes towards the use of seat belts. The rate of compliance to the use of seat belts increased with the legislation on its use

  16. Association of Stress, General Health, and Alcohol Use with Poor Sleep Quality among U.S. College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Teresa D.; Kim, Myoung Jin; Sexton-Radek, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor sleep among college students is a major, growing problem associated with lower academic performance, higher rates of health and emotional problems, and development of chronic sleep disorders. Purpose: Though previous studies have focused on individual colleges, our study purpose was to reveal the association of behaviors and…

  17. Influence of asthma or allergies on the utilization of health care resources and quality of life of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolicoeur, L M; Boyer, J G; Reeder, C E; Turner, J

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the treatment regimens of college students with asthma or allergies, to determine how asthma or allergies affect the lives of college students, and to evaluate the health care resources utilized by college students with asthma or allergies. A mail survey was sent to 275 students who received treatment for asthma or allergies at the Thomson Student Health Center at The University of South Carolina (TSHC-USC) during the fall 1991 semester. This survey, consisting of 46 questions, covered three key areas: current asthma or allergy management, class and work days missed, and utilization of health care resources. Students with "asthma and allergy" missed on average 2.4 days of class during the fall semester, whereas those with "asthma only" and "allergy only" missed on average 0.8 day and 1.5 days of class, respectively. Students with "allergy only" appeared to have a greater interference in their daily class and academic activities than students with "asthma and allergy" and "asthma only." In conclusion, students reported interference in their college activities and reported missing days of work and school because of asthma or allergies. This study also showed that a majority of these college students have not received asthma or allergy patient education nor utilized appropriate asthma or allergy management skills.

  18. How leaky is the health career pipeline? Minority student achievement in college gateway courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Charles; Chen, Eric; Grumbach, Kevin

    2009-06-01

    To determine whether underrepresented minority (URM) students receive lower grades than do non-URM students in college prehealth gateway courses; the extent to which lower grade performance might be explained by the differences in precollege academic achievement; and whether URM students are less likely than non-URM students to persist in completing at least four gateway courses. Administrative data were obtained from six California colleges on 15,000 college students who matriculated in the 1999-2000 or 2000-2001 academic years and enrolled in at least one college course required for application to medical or dental school ("gateway" courses). Students were compared across ethnic groups in gateway course grade performance and persistence in completing at least four gateway courses, using regression methods to control for students' college admission test scores and caliber of high school attended. URM students received significantly lower grades on average in gateway courses than did white students. This gap persisted after adjusting for measures of prior academic performance. However, URM students were nearly as likely as white students to persist in completing at least four gateway courses. After accounting for the lower grades of URM students in their initial classes, URM students were more likely than white students to complete four or more gateway courses. URM students experienced academic challenges, but many persist in their prehealth courses despite these challenges. Interventions at the college level to support URM student performance in gateway courses are particularly important for increasing the diversity of medical and dental schools.

  19. Mental health problems and interest in marijuana treatment among marijuana-using college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Julia D; Ecker, Anthony H; Cohen, Alex S

    2010-09-01

    There is growing recognition that marijuana use among college students is associated with marijuana-related problems. Yet little work has examined whether use is associated with mental health problems and whether there is a dose effect such that individuals engaging in more frequent use evince relatively greater psychiatric impairments. Further, little is known about factors related to interest in marijuana treatment among students experiencing marijuana-related problems. The current study examined academic and psychiatric functioning as well as interest in marijuana treatment among undergraduates (N=1,689). Approximately 29% acknowledged marijuana use, with 9.8% using weekly or more. More frequent marijuana use was related to more academic difficulties. Marijuana use (among both weekly and less frequent users) was related to greater psychiatric impairment. Interest in marijuana treatment was examined among students with 2+ marijuana-related problems (n=251). Of those, 22.7% expressed interest in marijuana treatment. Factors positively related to treatment interest included: marijuana use frequency, use-related problems, friends' marijuana use, age, employment status, and some types of mental health problems. Marijuana use among college students is associated with academic, psychiatric, and marijuana-related impairments. However, there is some interest in treatment to manage marijuana use among undergraduates, particularly among those with more frequent and more problematic marijuana use. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ill effects of smoking on general and oral health: Awareness among college going students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yash Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This cross-sectional study assessed smoking-related behaviors, experiences, beliefs, knowledge, and prevalence among a sample of college going students. It helped to inform them about the different nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs available for the cessation of the habit. Materials and Methods: After gaining informed consent, 500 college going students (18-25 years age group of Swami Devi Dyal Group of Colleges, who are smokers and also willing to participate in the study were surveyed regarding their awareness about and prevalence of ill effects of smoking. The survey was conducted by employing a uniform questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed about the tobacco use, no of cigarettes they smokes every day, what form of smoking do they prefer, early smoking experiences and sensations, factors that might motivate a quit attempt, ill effects of smoking on oral health, other psychosocial variables associated with adolescent smoking and about the different NRTs available. The feedback hence obtained was condensed in the form of objective results, which were analyzed to arrive at meaningful conclusions. Results and Conclusion: According to the study as many as about 90% of the students have reasonably good chances of succeeding in quitting smoking. However, the overwhelming majority (96% had no idea about different NRTs. This shows a stark lack of awareness as to the means that can help them quit the habit. Thus, we get a clear vision as to the direction of our efforts and feel optimistic as to the outcome too.

  1. Using Market Research to Characterize College Students and Identify Potential Targets for Influencing Health Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla J.; Ling, Pamela M.; Guo, Hongfei; Windle, Michael; Thomas, Janet L.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; An, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    Marketing campaigns, such as those developed by the tobacco industry, are based on market research, which defines segments of a population by assessing psychographic characteristics (i.e., attitudes, interests). This study uses a similar approach to define market segments of college smokers, to examine differences in their health behaviors (smoking, drinking, binge drinking, exercise, diet), and to determine the validity of these segments. A total of 2,265 undergraduate students aged 18–25 years completed a 108-item online survey in fall 2008 assessing demographic, psychographic (i.e., attitudes, interests), and health-related variables. Among the 753 students reporting past 30-day smoking, cluster analysis was conducted using 21 psychographic questions and identified three market segments – Stoic Individualists, Responsible Traditionalists, and Thrill-Seeking Socializers. We found that segment membership was related to frequency of alcohol use, binge drinking, and limiting dietary fat. We then developed three messages targeting each segment and conducted message testing to validate the segments on a subset of 73 smokers representing each segment in spring 2009. As hypothesized, each segment indicated greater relevance and salience for their respective message. These findings indicate that identifying qualitatively different subgroups of young adults through market research may inform the development of engaging interventions and health campaigns targeting college students. PMID:25264429

  2. Patterns of safer sex practices among allied health students at historically black colleges and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Peggy A; Wright, Denise L; Henley, Garnett L

    2003-01-01

    With high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and STD transmission rates among African American young adults, there is a need to study the patterns of risk behaviors among this group for effective HIV prevention strategies. Many studies point to the problem of what is termed the knowledge-behavior gap, as a contributing factor for high transmission rates. In this phenomenon, the risks for HIV transmission are known, yet this knowledge does not translate into safer sex practices. It is unclear if this phenomenon applies to all young adults. This study examined sexual behaviors, risks for HIV infection, condom use, and HIV testing practices among allied health students. A sample of 614 respondents voluntarily completed questionnaires. The respondents were from seven historically black colleges and universities and four predominantly African American physician assistant programs. The significant findings reflect that this sample of mature and informed allied health students engaged in safer sex practices. There was a higher rate of condom use among African Americans compared with other racial and ethnic groups and significant differences for gender, race, and antibody testing. The outcomes of the study have implications for using allied health students as role models in designing effective prevention programs on college campuses and in African American communities to address knowledge-behavior gap issues.

  3. Health risk perceptions predict smoking-related outcomes in Greek college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, John D; Catley, Delwyn; Lee, Hyoung S; Harrar, Solomon W; Harris, Kari Jo

    2014-09-01

    Health risk perception in smoking behavior was prospectively evaluated in a cluster-randomized trial for smoking cessation in Greek college students. Perceived Vulnerability (PV), Precaution Effectiveness, Optimistic Bias, and smoking behavior measures (quit attempts and cessation) were assessed in college-aged Greek student smokers at baseline, end of treatment (3 months), and follow-up (6 months). Using generalized estimating equations, baseline risk perception variables and change in risk perception variables between baseline and end of treatment were examined as predictors of the dichotomous smoking outcome variables. Results revealed that higher baseline PV [OR = 1.42 (1.21, 1.68)] predicted a greater likelihood of a quit attempt (n = 267). An increased likelihood of cessation [OR = 1.41 (1.15, 1.72)] was also predicted by an increase in PV from baseline to end of treatment (n = 243). Overall results suggested that PV was the strongest predictor of smoking behavior change, supporting further examination of health risk perceptions in promoting smoking cessation among Greek college smokers.

  4. College Student Self-Care Diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jerrold S.; Dintiman, George B.

    The purpose of this docoment is to help college students maintain health by keeping a weekly diary of health related behaviors including diet, exercise, and stress levels. In addition each weekly entry presents a self-care tip for health improvement. Discussions of the college student and health, health and lifestyle, instructions on use of the…

  5. Training the Next Generation: Developing Health Education Skills in Undergraduate Public Health Students at a Historically Black College and University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista Mincey

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the looming workforce crisis, undergraduate public health students could be an important link in filling this demand. As public health continues to face challenges in the future, it is important that the future workforce is not only diverse but also trained in a manner that exposes them to real-world experiences that give them an opportunity to apply coursework to solve problems. This article outlines how a health program planning course was taught at a Historically Black College and University using assignments that promote active learning. Students were assessed on their ability to plan and implement a health activity based on a developed metric. Student and instructor reflections were collected from final assessments of the health programs by both groups. All elements of the course are discussed from course design, structure, assignments, and outcomes along with student and instructor reflections and lessons learned. Results suggest that including assignments focused on active learning are beneficial to helping students learn course material. As public health continues to change, more work needs to focus on teaching pedagogies that better prepare students to address future public health issues.

  6. Training the Next Generation: Developing Health Education Skills in Undergraduate Public Health Students at a Historically Black College and University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincey, Krista; Gross, Tyra

    2017-01-01

    With the looming workforce crisis, undergraduate public health students could be an important link in filling this demand. As public health continues to face challenges in the future, it is important that the future workforce is not only diverse but also trained in a manner that exposes them to real-world experiences that give them an opportunity to apply coursework to solve problems. This article outlines how a health program planning course was taught at a Historically Black College and University using assignments that promote active learning. Students were assessed on their ability to plan and implement a health activity based on a developed metric. Student and instructor reflections were collected from final assessments of the health programs by both groups. All elements of the course are discussed from course design, structure, assignments, and outcomes along with student and instructor reflections and lessons learned. Results suggest that including assignments focused on active learning are beneficial to helping students learn course material. As public health continues to change, more work needs to focus on teaching pedagogies that better prepare students to address future public health issues.

  7. The Association between Mental Health and Acute Infectious Illness among a National Sample of 18- To 24-Year-Old College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Troy B.; Wharton, Christopher M.; Quilter, Lyndsay; Hirsch, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    Poor mental health is associated with physical illness, but this association is poorly characterized among college students. Objective and Participants: Using American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment data, the authors characterized poor mental health (depression, anxiety, negative affect) and examined the relationship…

  8. Do socio-cultural factors influence college students' self-rated health status and health-promoting lifestyles? A cross-sectional multicenter study in Dalian, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolokote, Sainyugu; Hidru, Tesfaldet Habtemariam; Li, Xiaofeng

    2017-05-19

    An unhealthy lifestyle of college students is an important public health concern, but few studies have been undertaken to examine the role of socio-cultural differences. For this cross-sectional comparative study, data on college students' health-promoting lifestyles (HPL), as measured using the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLP-II) scale, and self-rated health status (SRH) as measured by Sub-Optimal Health Measurement Scale (SHMS V1.0) were collected from 829 college students. The sample of 829 college students included 504 (60.8%) Chinese and 325 (39.2%) international students. Chinese students had higher scores in overall health-promoting lifestyle (HPL) (P student's major, age and level of education in the international group. Body mass index (BMI) and financial status emerged as predictors of the three subscales of SHMS V1.0 in the Chinese group and also of physiological and psychological subscales in the international group. Gender was associated with psychological health in both groups. Smoking status was a predictor of psychological health in both groups and also of social health in the international group. The level of education emerged as a predictor of social health in the international group. Regression analyses revealed a significant association between health status and healthy lifestyle (P college students.

  9. Impact of an online healthful eating and physical activity program for college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Geoffrey W; White, Adrienne A; Hoerr, Sharon L; Lohse, Barbara; Schembre, Susan M; Riebe, Deborah; Patterson, Jill; Kattelmann, Kendra K; Shoff, Suzanne; Horacek, Tanya; Blissmer, Bryan; Phillips, Beatrice W

    2012-01-01

    To identify impact of an online nutrition and physical activity program for college students. Randomized, controlled trial using online questionnaires and on-site physical and fitness assessments with measurement intervals of 0 (baseline), 3 (postintervention), and 15 months (follow-up). Online intervention delivered to college students; a centralized Web site was used for recruitment, data collection, data management, and intervention delivery. College students (18-24 years old, n = 1689), from eight universities (Michigan State University, South Dakota State University, Syracuse University, The Pennsylvania State University, Tuskegee University, University of Rhode Island, University of Maine, and University of Wisconsin). A 10-lesson curriculum focusing on healthful eating and physical activity, stressing nondieting principles such as size acceptance and eating competence (software developer: Rainstorm, Inc, Orono, Maine). Measurements included anthropometrics, cardiorespiratory fitness, fruit/vegetable (FV) intake, eating competence, physical activity, and psychosocial stress. Repeated measures analysis of variance for outcome variables. Most subjects were white, undergraduate females (63%), with 25% either overweight or obese. Treatment group completion rate for the curriculum was 84%. Over 15 months, the treatment group had significantly higher FV intake (+.5 cups/d) and physical activity participation (+270 metabolic equivalent minutes per week) than controls. For both groups, anthropometric values and stress increased, and fitness levels decreased. Gender differences were present for most variables. First-year males and females gained more weight than participants in other school years. A 10-week online nutrition and physical activity intervention to encourage competence in making healthful food and eating decisions had a positive, lasting effect on FV intake and maintained baseline levels of physical activity in a population that otherwise experiences

  10. Brief multiple behavior interventions in a college student health care clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werch, Chudley E Chad; Bian, Hui; Moore, Michele J; Ames, Steve; DiClemente, Carlo C; Weiler, Robert M

    2007-12-01

    This study examined the effects of brief image-based interventions, including a multiple behavior health contract, a one-on-one tailored consultation, and a combined consultation plus contract intervention, for impacting multiple health behaviors of students in a university health clinic. A total of 155 college students attending a major southern university were recruited to participate in a study evaluating a health promotion program titled Project Fitness during the fall 2005 and spring 2006. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three treatments as they presented at the clinic: 1) a multiple behavior health contract, 2) a one-on-one tailored consultation, or 3) a combined consultation plus contract intervention. Baseline and 1-month post-intervention data were collected using computer-assisted questionnaires in a quiet office within the student health clinic. Omnibus repeated-measures analyses of variance were significant for drinking driving behaviors, F(2,136) = 4.43, p = .01, exercise behaviors, F(5,140) = 6.12, p = .00, nutrition habits, F(3,143) = 5.37, p = .00, sleep habits, F(2,144) = 5.03, p = .01, and health quality of life, F(5,140) = 3.09, p = .01, with improvements on each behavior across time. Analysis of group-by-time interaction effects showed an increase in the use of techniques to manage stress, F(2,144) = 5.48, p = .01, and the number of health behavior goals set in the last 30 days, F(2,143) = 5.35, p = .01, but only among adolescents receiving the consultation, or consultation plus contract. Effect sizes were consistently larger across health behaviors, and medium in size, when both consult and contract were used together. Brief interventions using a positive goal image of fitness, and addressing a number of health habits using a contract and consultation strategy alone, or in combination, have the potential to influence positive changes in multiple health behaviors of college students attending a university primary health care clinic.

  11. College Students' Perceived and Personal Mental Health Stigma: The Influence on Help-Seeking Attitudes and Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeo, Alyson

    2014-01-01

    Despite being vulnerable to mental health problems, college students are a population that is especially influenced by perceptions of peer mental health stigmatization (Quinn, Wilson, MacIntyre, & Tinklin, 2009), a known barrier to seeking mental health services (Corrigan, 2004a; Komiya, Good, & Sherrod, 2000; Vogel, Wade, & Haake,…

  12. Mental health in American colleges and universities: variation across student subgroups and across campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Daniel; Hunt, Justin; Speer, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    We estimated the prevalence and correlates of mental health problems among college students in the United States. In 2007 and 2009, we administered online surveys with brief mental health screens to random samples of students at 26 campuses nationwide. We used sample probability weights to adjust for survey nonresponse. A total of 14,175 students completed the survey, corresponding to a 44% participation rate. The prevalence of positive screens was 17.3% for depression, 4.1% for panic disorder, 7.0% for generalized anxiety, 6.3% for suicidal ideation, and 15.3% for nonsuicidal self-injury. Mental health problems were significantly associated with sex, race/ethnicity, religiosity, relationship status, living on campus, and financial situation. The prevalence of conditions varied substantially across the campuses, although campus-level variation was still a small proportion of overall variation in student mental health. The findings offer a starting point for identifying individual and contextual factors that may be useful to target in intervention strategies.

  13. Does yoga shape body, mind and spiritual health and happiness: Differences between yoga practitioners and college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monk-Turner Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To assess the body, mind and spirit differences between yoga students compared with college students. Materials and Methods: Mind, body and spirit survey instruments administered to the two groups. Results: Five indicators to measure mental wellness were significantly different between yoga practitioners and college students. On three of these five measures, college students reported more mental wellness than yoga practitioners - in other words, the relationship was the inverse of what was expected. College students reported maintaining stability in their life more often than yoga practitioners as well as more often experiencing satisfying interpersonal relationships. College students were also more likely than yoga practitioners to report being tolerant of others, whether or not they approved of their behavior or beliefs. Yoga practitioners were more likely than college students to report having strong morals and healthy values as well as the ability to express their feelings and consider the feelings of others. We found differences between yoga practitioners and college students on more than half of our spirit items (five of nine. Yoga practitioners were more likely than college students to report expressing their spirituality appropriately and in healthy ways, recognizing the positive contribution faith could make to the quality of life (significant at the 0.07 level, routinely undertaking new experiences to enhance spiritual health and having a positive outlook on life. Further, we found support for the proposition that yoga practitioners were more likely to report experiencing happiness within. Conclusions: Significant differences between yoga and college students were found on the body, mind and spirit measurement instrument. Further work needs to address the complexities of these relationships.

  14. Does yoga shape body, mind and spiritual health and happiness: Differences between yoga practitioners and college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk-Turner, Elizabeth; Turner, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims: To assess the body, mind and spirit differences between yoga students compared with college students. Materials and Methods: Mind, body and spirit survey instruments administered to the two groups. Results: Five indicators to measure mental wellness were significantly different between yoga practitioners and college students. On three of these five measures, college students reported more mental wellness than yoga practitioners – in other words, the relationship was the inverse of what was expected. College students reported maintaining stability in their life more often than yoga practitioners as well as more often experiencing satisfying interpersonal relationships. College students were also more likely than yoga practitioners to report being tolerant of others, whether or not they approved of their behavior or beliefs. Yoga practitioners were more likely than college students to report having strong morals and healthy values as well as the ability to express their feelings and consider the feelings of others. We found differences between yoga practitioners and college students on more than half of our spirit items (five of nine). Yoga practitioners were more likely than college students to report expressing their spirituality appropriately and in healthy ways, recognizing the positive contribution faith could make to the quality of life (significant at the 0.07 level), routinely undertaking new experiences to enhance spiritual health and having a positive outlook on life. Further, we found support for the proposition that yoga practitioners were more likely to report experiencing happiness within. Conclusions: Significant differences between yoga and college students were found on the body, mind and spirit measurement instrument. Further work needs to address the complexities of these relationships. PMID:21170230

  15. The effects of social and health consequence framing on heavy drinking intentions among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, John H; Gibbons, Frederick X; Gerrard, Meg

    2015-02-01

    Many interventions targeting college student drinking have focused on negative health effects of drinking heavily; however, some research suggests that social factors may have a stronger influence on the drinking behaviour of young people. Moreover, few studies have examined message framing effects in the context of alcohol consumption. This study investigated the effects of social and health consequence framing on college students' intentions to engage in heavy drinking. This study used a 2 × 2 experimental design with an appended control condition. One hundred and twenty-four college students (74 women; M(age) = 18.9) participated in this study for course credit. Participants read vignettes that were ostensibly written by a recent graduate from the university, who described an episode of drinking in which he or she experienced either social or health consequences. These consequences were framed as either a gain (i.e., positive consequences of not drinking heavily) or a loss (i.e., negative consequences of drinking heavily). After reading the vignette, participants completed a measure of heavy drinking intentions. Regression analyses revealed that social consequences were associated with lower heavy drinking intentions when framed as a loss and that health consequences were associated with lower heavy drinking intentions when framed as a gain. These effects were stronger among those who reported higher (vs. lower) levels of previous drinking. Results suggest that interventions that focus on the negative health effects of heavy drinking may be improved by instead emphasizing the negative social consequences of drinking heavily and the positive health consequences of avoiding this behaviour. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Previous studies have shown that gain frames are more effective than loss frames when highlighting the health consequences of health risk behaviours, such as heavy drinking. The heavy drinking behaviour of young

  16. Mental Health Service Utilization among Students and Staff in 18 Months Following Dawson College Shooting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Miquelon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate service utilization by students and staff in the 18 months following the September 13, 2006, shooting at Dawson College, Montreal, as well as the determinants of this utilization within the context of Canada’s publicly managed healthcare system. Methods A sample of 948 from among the college’s 10,091 students and staff agreed to complete an adapted computer or web-based standardized questionnaire drawn from the Statistics Canada 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 1.2 on mental health and well-being. Results In the 18 months following the shooting, there was a greater incidence and prevalence not only of PTSD, but also of other anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse. Staff and students were as likely to consult a health professional when presenting a mental or substance use disorder, with females more likely to do so than males. Results also indicated that there was relatively high internet use for mental health reasons by students and staff (14% overall. Conclusions Following a major crisis event causing potential mass trauma, even in a society characterized by easy access to public, school and health services and when the population involved is generally well educated, the acceptability of consulting health professionals for mental health or substance use problems represents a barrier. However, safe internet access is one way male and female students and staff can access information and support and it may be useful to further exploit the possibilities afforded by web-based interviews in anonymous environments.

  17. A comparison of self-reported physical health and health conditions of American Indian/Alaskan Natives to other college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZile-Tamsen, Carol; Black, Jessica; Billiot, Shanondora M.; Tovar, Molly

    2013-01-01

    American Indian/Alaska Natives comprise a small portion of the general college student population, but often have the poorest health and wellness, as well as the highest dropout rates compared to any other race or ethnicity. Despite the well-documented issues this group faces in higher education, they are often ignored in studies due to their status as the minority within the minority, comprising only 0.8% of all college students in the US. This study examines the differences in college students’ overall ratings of health across racial and ethnic groups, focusing specifically on the health and wellness of AI/AN students compared to their counterparts. This paper also investigates the physical health issues students experienced in the past 12 months and the health issues’ impact on their academic achievement. Results showed that AI/AN students reported the lowest overall health ratings and the most health issues in the past year. PMID:23800957

  18. Do our medical colleges inculcate health-promoting lifestyle among medical students: a pilot study from two medical colleges from southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majra, Jp

    2013-04-01

    Behavioral risk factors are responsible for a substantial portion of chronic disease. Educating patients is a professional responsibility of medical practitioners. However, it has been observed that physicians did not practice what they preach. To study whether medical colleges inculcate health-promoting lifestyle among medical students during their stay in medical colleges. A cross-sectional study conducted in two conveniently selected medical colleges in southern India. Fourth year MBBS students were included in the study. A pre-tested self-administered multiple choice type questionnaire was used to collect data. Information was sought on the behavioral factors, namely smoking, alcohol use, junk food consumption, and physical activity, before joining the medical college and at the time of the study. SPSS version 10.0 was used to analyze the data. Frequencies, proportions, chi-square test. Out of 176 respondents, 94 (53%) were males and 82 (47%) were females. The number of smokers had increased from 24 (13.6%) to 46 (26.1%) and the number of alcohol consumers from 34 (19.3%) to 77 (43.8%) since they joined medical college. The number of students doing any physical activity declined from 76 (43.2%) to 43 (24.4%) and their food habits became unhealthier during the same period. The study reported an increase in health-risking behavior and a decline in health-promoting behavior among medical students during their stay in medical college.

  19. Social media: the key to health information access for 18- to 30-year-old college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prybutok, Gayle; Ryan, Sherry

    2015-04-01

    This work examines where 18- to 30-year-old college students seek health information on the Internet and how they determine site and message credibility. Using a qualitative methodology, five focus groups were conducted with 18- to 30-year-old college students, and transcripts were analyzed with MaxQDA text analysis software. The study revealed that 18- to 30-year-old college students have Internet health information source preferences, reasons for seeking health information on the Internet, and message design factors that improve their perception of site and message credibility. We conclude that the Internet and social media show great promise as effective health communication channels for 18- to 30-year-old college students and confirm that preferred Internet/social media sites can be utilized by health educators to present important risk management/disease prevention information to 18- to 30-year-old college students. In addition, message design factors can lend credibility to both sites and the health information delivered there.

  20. The use of prescription stimulants to enhance academic performance among college students in health care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Lawrence; Shtayermman, Oren; Aksnes, Brittany; Anzalone, Michelle; Cormerais, Andre; Liodice, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Prescription stimulant use as academic performance enhancers is increasingly widespread among college students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of prescription stimulant use among health care students attending a university in the northeastern United States. The study investigated the specific stimulants being used and the frequency of usage. It also examined the rates of nicotine, alcohol, and drug abuse versus dependence. A web-based survey was administered to medical and health profession students regarding prescription stimulant use for nonprescribed purposes. Tobacco, alcohol, and recreational drug use were also surveyed. Approximately 10.4% (32) of students surveyed have either used a stimulant or are currently using prescription stimulants illegally. The most common reason for stimulant use was to focus and concentrate during studying (93.5%). Of the 308 students, 45.2% were female, 83.9% were Caucasian, and amphetamine-dextroamphetamine was the most commonly abused stimulant (71.4%). Results from this study are consistent with previous research of undergraduate students regarding prescription stimulant use for nonprescribed purposes, specifically for academic performance enhancement. Data from the study support that alcohol abuse and dependence among students is a pertinent concern, suggesting that substance abuse in general must be addressed. Substance abuse and awareness programs combined with stress management programs in an overall substance-abuse reduction strategy, including the use of prescription stimulant use beyond the originally intended purpose, may be beneficial. Because of the lack of research focusing on graduate health care students, further investigations should use similar populations.

  1. Loneliness among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzetti, James J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews empirical research concerning loneliness among college students to sensitize family life specialists to the importance of loneliness within this age group. Presents a profile of the lonely college student from research findings which relate loneliness to personal attributes, interpersonal behaviors, and social network conditions. Discusses…

  2. Using online interventions to deliver college student mental health resources: Evidence from randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Feng, Viann N; Greer, Christiaan S; Frazier, Patricia

    2017-11-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of Internet-based stress management programs for college students. This approach is particularly fitting for students owing to a lack of mental health resources on campus and to high levels of Internet use among students. Because a history of interpersonal trauma (IPT) is associated with more distress and poorer academic performance, IPT history was assessed as a moderator of intervention efficacy. Students (N = 365) were randomly assigned to a mindfulness plus present control intervention, a mindfulness only intervention, or a stress management information condition that served as an active comparison. Prior research has supported the efficacy of the mindfulness plus present control intervention (Nguyen-Feng et al., 2015). Outcome measures were self-report measures of stress, anxiety, depression, and perceived stress completed online at preintervention, postintervention, and 2 follow-ups (2-3 weeks and 4-5 weeks postintervention). Linear mixed modeling was used to assess change over time. Participants in all 3 groups reported significant decreases on all primary outcomes. All time-by-intervention group interaction effects were nonsignificant, suggesting that the 3 conditions were equally effective. When examining IPT history as a moderator, the mindfulness plus present control and stress management conditions were both more effective for IPT survivors than the mindfulness only intervention. Results suggested that Internet-based interventions are effective for lowering distress among college students and that specific approaches may be differentially effective for certain subgroups of students. They also suggested that providing students with stress management information without providing training in 1 specific skill may also be helpful. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Alcohol screening and brief intervention in a college student health center: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaus, James F; Sole, Mary Lou; McCoy, Thomas P; Mullett, Natalie; O'Brien, Mary Claire

    2009-07-01

    This study tested the effectiveness of brief primary care provider interventions delivered in a college student health center to a sample of college students who screened positive for high-risk drinking. Between November 2005 and August 2006, 8,753 students who presented as new patients to the health service at a large public university were screened for high-risk drinking, and 2,484 students (28%) screened positive on the 5/4 gender-specific high-risk drinking question (i.e., five or more drinks per occasion for men and four or more for women). Students who screened positive for high-risk drinking and consented to participate (N= 363; 52% female) were randomly assigned either to a control group (n = 182) or to an experimental group (n = 181). Participants in the experimental group received two brief intervention sessions that were founded in motivational interviewing techniques and delivered by four specially trained providers within the student health center. Data on alcohol use and related harms were obtained from a Web-based Healthy Lifestyle Questionnaire, 30-day Timeline Followback alcohol-use diaries, the Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (RAPI), and eight items from the Drinker Inventory of Consequences-2L. Repeated measures analysis showed that, compared with the control group (C), the intervention group (I) had significant reductions in typical estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) (C = .071 vs I = .057 at 3 months; C = .073 vs I = .057 at 6 months), peak BAC (C = . 142 vs I = .112 at 3 months; C = .145 vs I = .108 at 6 months), peak number of drinks per sitting (C = 8.03 vs I = 6.87 at 3 months; C = 7.98 vs I = 6.52 at 6 months), average number of drinks per week (C = 9.47 vs I = 7.33 at 3 months; C = 8.90 vs I = 6.16 at 6 months), number of drunk episodes in a typical week (C = 1.24 vs I = 0.85 at 3 months; C = 1.10 vs I = 0.71 at 6 months), number of times taken foolish risks (C = 2.24 vs I = 1.12 at 3 months), and RAPI sum scores (C = 6.55 vs I = 4

  4. The History of College Health Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crihfield, Connie; Grace, Ted W.

    2011-01-01

    Almost from the beginning of formal college health programs in the second half of the 19th century, college health nurses were there to care for students in college and university settings. By the end of the 20th century, the role of college health nurses had evolved with the nursing field in general, but with enough unique features for the…

  5. Hope and Mental Health in Young Adult College Students: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Stephanie

    2017-02-01

    One in five young adults are diagnosed with a mental illness and many experience psychological distress during their first year of college due to new pressures in academia. The purpose of the current integrative review was to describe and synthesize hope and mental health in young adults in college. PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched for articles published in peer-reviewed journals from 2011-2016. Twenty empirical works were selected for inclusion and five themes emerged: (a) Hope is Associated With Improved Coping, (b) Hope is Associated With Improved Well-Being, (c) Hope is a Moderator Between Depression and Negative Life Events, (d) Hope is a Protective Factor in Suicide, and (e) Hope is a Factor in Healthy Behavior Engagement. Hope may be a protective factor in suicide and negative, self-deprecatory thinking. Further research is needed to determine if increasing hope in young adult college students will decrease the risk of suicide and non-suicidal self-injury, increase healthy behavior engagement, and improve coping and well-being. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(2), 28-35.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. A Health Assessment Survey of Veteran Students: Utilizing a Community College-Veterans Affairs Medical Center Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra-Hebert, Anita D; Santurri, Laura; DeChant, Richard; Watts, Brook; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Aron, David C

    2015-10-01

    To assess health status among student veterans at a community college utilizing a partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college. Student veterans at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio, in January to April 2013. A health assessment survey was sent to 978 veteran students. Descriptive analyses to assess prevalence of clinical diagnoses and health behaviors were performed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess for independent predictors of functional limitations. 204 students participated in the survey (21% response rate). Self-reported depression and unhealthy behaviors were high. Physical and emotional limitations (45% and 35%, respectively), and pain interfering with work (42%) were reported. Logistic regression analyses confirmed the independent association of self-reported depression with functional limitation (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.8, p student veterans at a community college. A partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college can be utilized to help understand the health needs of veteran students. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Formative Research to Identify Perceptions of E-Cigarettes in College Students: Implications for Future Health Communication Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Kathleen; Crook, Brittani; Lazard, Allison; Mackert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This formative study examined perceptions of e-cigarettes in college students with the goal of informing future health communication campaigns. Differences between e-cigarette users and nonusers were also examined. Participants: Thirty undergraduate students were recruited from a large southwestern public university (15 users, 15…

  8. Polyvictimization by dating partners and mental health among U.S. college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabina, Chiara; Straus, Murray A

    2008-01-01

    Studies on mental health effects of partner violence often ignore multiple victimizations or polyvictimization. The current study had several objectives: (a) examine the rate of physical, psychological, and sexual victimization and combinations of them (polyvictimization) among a sample of students at 19 U.S. colleges; (b) examine the association between victimization and depressive symptoms and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms; and (c) examine the relation of polyvictimization to these mental health effects. A substantial number were polyvictims. As predicted, polyvictimization in almost all analyses was the strongest predictor of PTS symptoms for both men and women. Polyvictimization was a significant predictor of depressive symptoms for women. These findings highlight the importance of including polyvictimization in future work on the mental health effects of partner violence.

  9. The Theory of Planned Behavior as it predicts potential intention to seek mental health services for depression among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Lisa M; Cotter, Kelly A; Kravitz, Richard L; Cello, Philip C; Fernandez Y Garcia, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Between 9.5% and 31.3% of college students suffer from depression (American college health association national college health assessment II: reference group executive summary spring 2013. Amer. Coll. Health Assoc. 2013; Eagan K, Stolzenberg EB, Ramirez JJ, Aragon, MC, Suchard, RS, Hurtado S. The American freshman: national norms fall 2014. Higher Educ. Res. Inst.; 2015). Universities need to understand the factors that relate to care-seeking behavior. Across 3 studies, to relate attitudes, social norms, and perceived behavioral control to intention to seek mental health services, and to investigate barriers to care-seeking. University college students (N = 845, 64% female, 26% male, and 10% unspecified). New measures were created in Studies 1 and 2, and were examined using structural equation modeling in Study 3. Partially consistent with the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, I, Fishbein, M. Understanding Attitudes and Predicting Social Behavior. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall; 1980), a model with an excellent fit revealed that more positive attitudes about care and higher perceived behavioral control directly predicted higher intention to seek mental health services. Educating college students about mental health disorders and treatments, enhancing knowledge about available services, and addressing limited access to long-term care might improve treatment rates for students suffering from depression.

  10. Effects of Sleep Quality on the Association between Problematic Mobile Phone Use and Mental Health Symptoms in Chinese College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shuman; Wu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Yukun; Zhang, Shichen; Tong, Shilu; Tao, Fangbiao

    2017-02-14

    Problematic mobile phone use (PMPU) is a risk factor for both adolescents' sleep quality and mental health. It is important to examine the potential negative health effects of PMPU exposure. This study aims to evaluate PMPU and its association with mental health in Chinese college students. Furthermore, we investigated how sleep quality influences this association. In 2013, we collected data regarding participants' PMPU, sleep quality, and mental health (psychopathological symptoms, anxiety, and depressive symptoms) by standardized questionnaires in 4747 college students. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess independent effects and interactions of PMPU and sleep quality with mental health. PMPU and poor sleep quality were observed in 28.2% and 9.8% of participants, respectively. Adjusted logistic regression models suggested independent associations of PMPU and sleep quality with mental health (p sleep quality may play a more significant role in increasing the risk of mental health problems in students with PMPU than in those without PMPU.

  11. Mindfulness and Psychological Health Outcomes: A Latent Profile Analysis among Military Personnel and College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Adrian J; Pearson, Matthew R; Kelley, Michelle L

    2018-02-01

    Previous research on trait mindfulness facets using person-centered analyses (e.g., latent profile analysis [LPA]) has identified four distinct mindfulness profiles among college students: a high mindfulness group (high on all facets of the Five-Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire [FFMQ]), a judgmentally observing group (highest on observing, but low on non-judging of inner experience and acting with awareness), a non-judgmentally aware group (high on non-judging of inner experience and acting with awareness, but very low on observing), and a low mindfulness group (low on all facets of the FFMQ). In the present study, we used LPA to identify distinct mindfulness profiles in a community based sample of U.S. military personnel (majority veterans; n = 407) and non-military college students ( n = 310) and compare these profiles on symptoms of psychological health outcomes (e.g., suicidality, PTSD, anxiety, rumination) and percentage of participants exceeding clinically significant cut-offs for depressive symptoms, substance use, and alcohol use. In the subsample of college students, we replicated previous research and found four distinct mindfulness profiles; however, in the military subsample we found three distinct mindfulness profiles (a combined low mindfulness/judgmentally observing class). In both subsamples, we found that the most adaptive profile was the "high mindfulness" profile (i.e., demonstrated the lowest scores on all psychological symptoms and the lowest probability of exceeding clinical cut-offs). Based on these findings, we purport that the comprehensive examination of an individual's mindfulness profile could help clinicians tailor interventions/treatments that capitalize on individual's specific strengths and work to address their specific deficits.

  12. The simultaneous presence of health risk behaviors in freshman college students in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Diego Augusto Santos; Petroski, Edio Luiz

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and factors associated with simultaneous health risk behaviors in freshmen college students enrolled in a Brazilian university. We interviewed 738 students (59.2% men) with average age of 20.1 years (CI 95%: 19.8-20.5). The risk behaviors assessed were smoking habit, alcohol use, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. Independent variables were sex, age, employment, marital status, maternal education, study shift and socioeconomic level. It was found that 8.7% were smokers, 45.9% showed alcohol abuse, 59.4% had inadequate diet and 18.5% were physically inactive. Of the students, 20.2% showed no risk behavior, 39.1% one behavior, 29.0% two risk behaviors and 11.7% three and/or four risk behaviors. Males (OR: 2.04, CI 95%: 1.13-3.67) and night shift students (OR: 1.83, CI 95%: 1.01-3.33) were more likely to have three and/or four risk behaviors. Health promotion interventions focusing simultaneous behavior changes should be employed at the university.

  13. Sexual orientation and differences in mental health, stress, and academic performance in a national sample of U.S. college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswalt, Sara B; Wyatt, Tammy J

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships of mental health issues and sexual orientation in a national sample of college students. Using the Fall 2009 American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment, responses from heterosexual, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and unsure students (N = 27,454) relating to mental health issues and impact of these issues on academics were examined. The findings indicate that gay, lesbian, bisexual, and unsure students consistently reported higher levels of mental health issues and a more frequent impact on academics because of these issues than heterosexual students. Bisexuals frequently reported higher levels than students identifying as gay, lesbian, and unsure.

  14. College Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enough sleep Get regular physical activity Maintain your health with checkups and vaccinations If you decide to have sex, practice safe sex Make smart choices about alcohol and drugs Get help if ...

  15. Gender differences in the relationships among parenting styles and college student mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alison L; Kirtley, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Levels of student depression may increase as stress increases; parenting styles may be one indirect source of stress. The authors examined the role of parenting style in relationship to student stress, anxiety, and depression, with focused attention on gender differences. Participants were 290 undergraduate students (58% female, mean age = 19). Cross-sectional design. Participants completed surveys containing measures of parenting styles, college stress, anxiety, and depression. Anxiety and stress acted as mediators between some maternal parenting styles and female student depression. No mediational relationships were found for male student ratings. Daughters may be more susceptible to the influences of maternal parenting styles, which can either prepare or fail to prepare them for management and avoidance of stressors that are encountered during the college transition. College counseling centers and student affairs personnel may wish to focus attention on the instruction of self-management and problem-solving skills for incoming students.

  16. Results of a Pilot Study to Investigate Community College Student Perceptions of the Value of an Online Health-Risk Reduction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Elizabeth; Hernandez, Jack; Chiauzzi, Emil; DasMahapatra, Pronabesh; Achilles, Tyler; Hemm, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Health is associated with academic success. Universal, web-based interventions to reduce risks associated with alcohol and other drug use have been found to be effective at changing four-year college students' health behaviors. An online health program may also be well-suited to a community college population, as it can reach students off campus…

  17. Self-evaluation of contact lens wearing and care by college students and health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Paulo Ricardo; Temporini-Nastari, Edméa Rita; Ruiz Alves, Milton; Kara-José, Newton

    2003-07-01

    To identify perceptions related to the wear and care and of contact lenses and self-evaluation of the knowledge regarding their cleaning and disinfection. A survey was conducted by interviewing contact lens wearers among health care workers at a university hospital. Two hundred one contact lens wearers were interviewed. The average age was 23.5 years; 69.2% were female and 71.1% were college students. Approximately 55% did not consider themselves good wearers and declared as the main reason the inadequate maintenance of the contact lenses and their cases. Regarding contact lens care, 79.1% of respondents admitted not performing it correctly. Although the interviewees were health care workers, their self-evaluation regarding contact lens care showed unsatisfactory knowledge and practices related to the use and care of contact lenses.

  18. An online learning module focused on smoking education and prevention for college students: implications for college health instructors and allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Marinaro, Laura Marie; Fiala, Kelly Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to pilot-test the effectiveness of an online learning module focused on smoking for an undergraduate general education fitness and wellness course. Students enrolled in a required fitness and wellness course were given the opportunity to participate. Participants (n = 510) completed a brief demographic questionnaire and a 10-question pretest about the effects of smoking before viewing a 15-minute presentation about the effects of smoking and completing the same 10 questions as a post-test. Repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate knowledge gains. An overall time effect was observed (pretest score 4.9 +/- 1.3, post-test score 7.2 +/- 2.1). Significantly greater knowledge gains were found in nonsmokers (2.1 +/- 2.2) than in smokers (1.1 +/- 2.2). Females (2.3 +/- 2.3) had significantly greater knowledge gains than males (1.5 +/- 2.2). Evidence supporting the effectiveness of the online learning module included significant knowledge gains for both smokers and nonsmokers, and the participants who smoked agreed the online learning module encouraged them to quit. In this research, students were also grouped by major (health-related majors vs non-health-related). There were 118 health-related majors in the sample, with 110 of those students completing the entire learning module. In this research, a learning module for college students was developed, but practical applications are provided not only for college health instructors but also for allied health professionals.

  19. American College Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a robust series of courses leading to a brand new certification – the College Health and Wellness Professional ( ... future college health and wellness professionals, and strengthen awareness of the profession and association. Each month we' ...

  20. Self-Reported Mental Disorders and Distress by Sexual Orientation: Results of the Minnesota College Student Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przedworski, Julia M; VanKim, Nicole A; Eisenberg, Marla E; McAlpine, Donna D; Lust, Katherine A; Laska, Melissa N

    2015-07-01

    Sexual minority college students (i.e., those not identifying as heterosexual, or those reporting same-sex sexual activity) may be at increased risk of poor mental health, given factors such as minority stress, stigma, and discrimination. Such disparities could have important implications for students' academic achievement, future health, and social functioning. This study compares reports of mental disorder diagnoses, stressful life events, and frequent mental distress across five gender-stratified sexual orientation categories. Data were from the 2007-2011 College Student Health Survey, which surveyed a random sample of college students (N=34,324) at 40 Minnesota institutions. Data analysis was conducted in 2013-2014. The prevalence of mental disorder diagnoses, frequent mental distress, and stressful life events were calculated for heterosexual, discordant heterosexual, gay or lesbian, bisexual, and unsure students. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate the association between sexual orientation and mental health outcomes. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students were more likely to report any mental health disorder diagnosis than were heterosexual students (pstudents were significantly more likely to report frequent mental distress compared to heterosexual students (OR range, 1.6-2.7). All sexual minority groups, with the exception of unsure men, had significantly greater odds of experiencing two or more stressful life events (OR range, 1.3-2.8). Sexual minority college students experience worse mental health than their heterosexual peers. These students may benefit from interventions that target the structural and social causes of these disparities, and individual-level interventions that consider their unique life experiences. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Future's Learning Environments in Health Education: The Effects of Smart Classrooms on the Academic Achievements of the Students at Health College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevindik, Tuncay

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of smart classrooms on the academic achievement of the nursing students. The sample of the research included 66 Health College students in Elazig. The sampling group was randomly chosen from second year students of Nursing and Midwife Education. The research was carried out with experimental…

  2. Behavioral Health and Adjustment to College Life for Student Service Members/Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Lawrence; Braue, Lawrence A.; Stire, Sheryl; Gum, Amber M.; Cross, Brittany L.; Brown, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Increasing numbers of student service members/veterans (SSM/Vs) are enrolling in college. However, little is known about how their previous military experience affects their adjustment to this new role. The present study tested the hypothesis that SSM/Vs who report adjustment problems in college have a higher incidence of posttraumatic…

  3. College and Career Ready: Preparing Students in Fitness and Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskist, Connie; Reilly, Erin; Walker, Andria; Bourke, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English language arts have been adopted by many states across the country in an effort to prepare students for life after high school, whether that be going to college or joining the work force. The anchor standards of the CCSS, known as the College and Career Ready Standards, describe the literacy skills…

  4. Substance Use Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Chloe R; Kaufman, Erin A; Crowell, Sheila E

    2016-10-01

    Emerging adulthood has heightened risk for substance use. College students experience unique challenges, making them prone to use of alcohol, marijuana, and nonmedical use of prescription drugs. This article reviews rates of college students' substance use, risk factors, and populations at elevated risk. Consequences include legal, academic, and mental health problems; engagement in other risky behaviors; increased rates of injury; and death. Researchers, clinicians, and university administrators must identify those at greatest risk and provide prevention and intervention programs. Despite broad evidence supporting such programs, many students fail to access appropriate treatment. Future research should elucidate treatment barriers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Sleep Quality on the Association between Problematic Mobile Phone Use and Mental Health Symptoms in Chinese College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Shuman Tao; Xiaoyan Wu; Yukun Zhang; Shichen Zhang; Shilu Tong; Fangbiao Tao

    2017-01-01

    Problematic mobile phone use (PMPU) is a risk factor for both adolescents’ sleep quality and mental health. It is important to examine the potential negative health effects of PMPU exposure. This study aims to evaluate PMPU and its association with mental health in Chinese college students. Furthermore, we investigated how sleep quality influences this association. In 2013, we collected data regarding participants’ PMPU, sleep quality, and mental health (psychopathological symptoms, anxiety, ...

  6. Experiences of Health Related Lifestyles in High Body Fat but Non-obese Female College Students in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongsoo

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and understand the lifestyles of non-obese female college students with high body fat (HBF). The interview data were collected from 18 female students [body mass index (BMI) stressors, and perceived unbalance in health. This study describes non-obese female university students' experiences with HBF and their lifestyles. The findings have important implications for health promotion for non-obese female university students with HBF and must be considered when developing education courses for preparing adults.

  7. The impact of perceived racial discrimination on the mental health of Asian American and Latino college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wei-Chin; Goto, Sharon

    2008-10-01

    The authors examined the impact of perceived racial discrimination on various mental health outcomes for Asian American and Latino college students within an emic and etic framework. Results indicate that Asian American and Latino college students experienced similar exposure and reactions to various kinds of discrimination. However, Latino students were more likely than Asian American students to have been accused of doing something wrong, such as cheating and breaking the law, and more likely to appraise these experiences as stressful. Asian Americans evidenced higher risk for trait anxiety. Regardless of ethnicity, perceived racial discrimination was associated with several negative mental health outcomes, including higher psychological distress, suicidal ideation, state anxiety, trait anxiety, and depression. Findings highlight the need to address discrimination across multiple social and professional settings and to understand the broad array of mental health outcomes.

  8. Mental health issues among college students: who gets referred for psychopharmacology evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Daniel J; Doerfler, Leonard A; Truong, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    To describe diagnostic and psychotropic medication prescription characteristics among college students referred by college counseling centers for psychopharmacologic evaluation. Participants were 540 college students referred by 6 college counseling centers in Massachusetts between November 2005 and May 2011. Students completed self-report measures of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation and attempts, and substance use. Information regarding DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition) diagnosis, previous history of medication prescription, and current psychotropic medication(s) prescribed by the consulting psychiatrist was obtained from medical records. Depression, anxiety, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were the most common psychiatric problems identified in students. Half of these students had been prescribed mediation prior to evaluation. Antidepressant medication was the most frequently prescribed medication. A large proportion of students reported previous thoughts of suicide, and 12% had made at least 1 suicide attempt. Depression, anxiety, and ADHD are common among students referred by college counseling centers for medication evaluation and treatment.

  9. Examining attachment to God and health risk-taking behaviors in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Karissa D; Ellison, Christopher G; Loukas, Alexandra; Downey, Darcy L; Barrett, Jennifer B

    2012-06-01

    Drawing on insights from attachment theory, this study examined whether three types of attachment to God--secure, avoidant, and anxious--were associated with health-risk behaviors, over and above the effects of religious attendance, peer support, and demographic covariates, in a sample of 328 undergraduate college students. Contrary to prior theory, secure attachment to God is not inversely associated with recent alcohol or marijuana use, or substance use prior to last sexual intercourse. Instead, avoidant and anxious attachment to God are associated with higher levels of drinking; anxious attachment to God is associated with marijuana use; and avoidant attachment to God is associated with substance use prior to last sexual intercourse. These patterns are gender-specific; problematic attachment to God is linked with negative outcomes solely among men.

  10. mHealth text messaging for physical activity promotion in college students: a formative participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Alice F; Stevens, Patricia; Wang, Youfa; Weinhardt, Lance; Holt, Cheryl L; O'Connor, Carrie; Feller, Tiffany; Xie, Hui; Luelloff, Sara

    2015-05-01

    To develop mobile-based physical activity promotion text messages, understand users' preferences, and assess feasibility and acceptability in a college student sample. Five focus groups (N = 33) were conducted using a participatory approach. An Audience Response System was adopted for data collection to ensure confidentiality and for directing the discussion foci. A framework analysis of transcribed focus group discussions was conducted. Atlas. ti qualitative analysis software was used to manage the data. Participants were uniformly enthusiastic about a text message-based intervention to encourage regular physical activity. They also preferred positive, supportive personally tailored messages. Participants placed a high value on messages related to establishing and monitoring realistic and achievable goals. mHealth text messaging was well received. The results support the feasibility and acceptance of such an intervention.

  11. College Students' Physical Activity and Health-Related Quality of Life: An Achievement Goal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Xiang, Ping; Gu, Xiangli; Rose, Melanie

    2016-06-01

    The 2 × 2 achievement goal model, including the mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goal orientations, has recently been used to explain motivational outcomes in physical activity. This study attempted to examine the relationships among 2 × 2 achievement goal orientations, physical activity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in college students. Participants were 325 students (130 men and 195 women; Mage = 21.4 years) enrolled in physical activity classes at a Southern university. They completed surveys validated in previous research assessing achievement goal orientations, physical activity, and HRQOL. Path analyses revealed a good fit between the model and data (root mean square error of approximation = .06; Comparative Fit Index = .99; Bentler-Bonett Nonnormed Fit Index = .98; Incremental Fit Index = .99), but the model explained small variances in the current study. Mastery-approach and performance-approach goal orientations only had low or no relationships with physical activity. Mastery-approach goal orientation and physical activity also had low positive relationships with HRQOL, but mastery-avoidance and performance-avoidance goal orientations had low negative relationships with HRQOL. The hypothesized mediational role of physical activity in the relationship between mastery-approach and performance-approach goal orientations and HRQOL was not supported in this study. Although the data fit the proposed model well, only small variance was explained by the model. The relationship between physical activity and HRQOL of the college students and other related correlates should be further studied.

  12. The center for collegiate mental health: studying college student mental health through an innovative research infrastructure that brings science and practice together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Benjamin D; Bieschke, Kathleen J; Castonguay, Louis G; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    Available information about college student mental health has largely been anecdotal or based on information drawn from a single institution. This review examines ten studies published within the past 20 years that focused on college student mental health using data collected from multisite college or university counseling center clients or staff. This subset of research on college student mental health is important in view of the increased demands on counseling centers and the increased emphasis on evidence-based practice. Collectively, these studies suggest that the presenting concerns of college students are changing, that those in treatment are more distressed than those who are not, that clients who identify as ethnic minorities appear to evidence slightly more distress than their white counterparts, that matching client and counselors relative to ethnicity does not appear to improve outcome, and that counseling services seem to improve outcome. While each study makes a unique contribution to the literature, this body of literature suffers from a common set of limitations that stem from the difficulties associated with multisite research, research taking place in active clinical work, and the time-limited nature of data sets. Through our review and critique of these studies, we discuss the importance of establishing an infrastructure that helps researchers to elucidate trends, effective treatments, and risk factors that will be useful to clinicians treating this population. The Center for Collegiate Mental Health, a practice-research network focused on college student mental health, is described and preliminary findings from this entity are presented.

  13. Reduced health-related quality of life among Japanese college students with visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Iguchi

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown detrimental effects of visual impairment on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), they were primarily conducted on elderly individuals with visual impairment. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate if HRQOL is impaired in young college students with visual impairment and to explore the relationships between HRQOL and other factors. It was hypothesized that visual impairment is not influential enough to lower the HRQOL of young people due to their better physical fitness and more flexible mentality. A total of 21 college students (mean age = 25 years old) with varying degrees of visual impairment completed the short form (SF)-36 health survey and questionnaires on daily physical activities. Subjects were grouped depending on the type of visual impairment: blind (n = 11) or severely impaired (n = 10). In addition, grip strength and single-leg standing balance were assessed. No between-group differences were found in the SF-36 scores. However, compared to the general Japanese standards (50.0 ± 10.0), the Vitality scores of the blind group were lower (41.9 ± 7.2, p = 0.004) and the Physical Function scores of the severely impaired group were higher (55.3 ± 2.4, p = 0.001). In addition, a negative correlation was found between standing balance (variability of foot center of pressure) and the Physical Component Summary score of the SF-36 (r(2) = 0.35, p = 0.005). These findings suggest that even among young people severe visual impairment leads to reductions in some components of HRQOL.

  14. A study to assess the knowledge about sexual health among male students of junior colleges of an urban area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant Ramchandra Kalkute

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sexuality is an important part of personality of adolescents. The age of sexual debut is falling globally. The subject of adolescent sexuality is taboo in most societies. Since 2007 sexual health education program has been banned in six states including Maharashtra and Karnataka. This may lead to misconceptions about sexual heath knowledge and practices among young people. Objective: The aim was to assess the knowledge about sexual health among male students of junior colleges of an urban area and to evaluate the change in their knowledge after imparting sexual health education. Settings and Design: Pre-post-intervention study. Materials and Methods: All 245 male students of 11 th standard of all three educational streams of two junior colleges were included in the study. The data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences 18. Results: Science students had "adequate" knowledge about sexual health when compared to arts and commerce students (P = 0.004. Students whose parents were unskilled and semiskilled by occupation had "inadequate" knowledge about sexual health when compared with students whose parents were skilled by occupation (P < 0.05. Education of parents had positive effect on the knowledge about sexual health of students (P = 0.062. In posttest, the knowledge about sexual health of students was found to have increased significantly when compared to pretest. The mean posttest score was 12.61 (standard deviation [SD] 3.12, which was significantly higher than the mean pretest score of 6.34 (SD 3.23 (P < 0.001. Students from nuclear families had "adequate" knowledge about sexual health when compared to students from joint families (P = 0.158 Conclusion: Imparting knowledge about sexual health in adolescent age will be beneficial to the students in avoiding risky sexual behavior. Such educational programs must be given due importance to achieve desirable behavior change among them.

  15. Help seeking and mental health service utilization among college students with a history of suicide ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arria, Amelia M; Winick, Emily R; Garnier-Dykstra, Laura M; Vincent, Kathryn B; Caldeira, Kimberly M; Wilcox, Holly C; O'Grady, Kevin E

    2011-12-01

    This study examined help seeking among 158 college students with a lifetime history of suicide ideation. Students were interviewed about episodes of psychological distress, formal treatment, and informal help seeking during adolescence and college. Of the 151 students reporting any lifetime episodes of distress, 62% experienced the first episode in adolescence, and 54% had episodes in both adolescence and young adulthood. Overall, 87% received informal help, 73% received formal treatment, and 61% received both. Among the 149 who ever sought help or treatment, the most commonly reported sources of help were family (65%), friends (54%), psychiatrists (38%), and psychologists (33%). Of the 94 individuals who experienced suicide ideation in college, 44% did not seek treatment during young adulthood. Treatment barriers reflected ambivalence about treatment need or effectiveness, stigma, and financial concerns. Most students had some contact with treatment, but family and friends might be important gatekeepers for facilitating treatment access.

  16. Marijuana: College Students' Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumstein, Regina

    1980-01-01

    Focused on college students' expectations about marijuana. Undergraduates (N=210) expected marijuana to have sedating effects; they largely discounted psychological consequences. Students considered marijuana to be an educational issue and favored decriminalization of the drug. Users, occasional users, and nonusers differed significantly in…

  17. Body Image, Self-Esteem, and Health-Related Behaviors among Male and Female First Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Sarah E.; Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson; Befort, Christie; Blanks, Elva Hull; Sollenberger, Sonja; Nicpon, Megan Foley; Huser, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among self-esteem, body image, and health-related behaviors of 267 female and 156 male first-year college students. Data were collected in 23 classrooms. Instruments included a demographic sheet, the Objectified Body Consciousness Scale, the Weight and Appearance Visual Analogue Scales, the Contour Drawing…

  18. Brief Screening and Intervention for Alcohol and Drug Use in a College Student Health Clinic: Feasibility, Implementation, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Hortensia; Reed, Elizabeth; Rowe, Erin; Picci, Jennifer; Mantella, Philomena; Prado, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evaluation of the Brief Alcohol Screen and Intervention in College Students (BASICS) in a university primary care setting. Participants/Methods: Undergraduates (N = 449) participated in BASICS and electronic surveys assessing frequency/quantity of alcohol and drug use, psychosocial and mental health outcomes, and demographic…

  19. Comparison of US and Indian College Students' Health Behaviors That Contribute to the Development of Chronic Diseasess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Darson; Kramer, Alaina; Whitlock, Alyssa; Cox, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and respiratory diseases are the leading chronic diseases worldwide. For American college students, specifically, behavioral risk factors for chronic disease include: insufficient sleep, inactivity, unhealthy eating habits, poor mental health, substance abuse, unhealthy relationships, and unsafe sexual…

  20. Self-evaluation of tobacco exposure by allied health students in a community college setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Geiser

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tobacco education is among the initiatives encouraged for health professionals to help them appreciate the significance of addressing tobacco use among their patients. In this pilot study, a nicotine biomarker (cotinine study was introduced to an applied microbiology course required of all allied health students. Participants assessed their own smoking status in the previous 24 h using a two-dimensional experimental design of a questionnaire and rapid urinary cotinine immunoassay. The study goals were >90% participation of the home-administered assay and high correlation of the results to cotinine standards. Allied health students (medical assistants, respiratory therapists, surgical technicians were selected as the initial test group. Methods: The study was initiated 10 months after the college became 100% tobacco free. Participants were initially trained on the use and interpretation of the rapid cotinine test using three cotinine standards (0, 400, and 2000 ng/mL urine. Participants subsequently tested their own first-morning urine sample at home and then answered a questionnaire about their tobacco smoke (and/or nicotine exposure in the previous 24-h period. Results: The cotinine laboratory was offered to a total of 161 students (88% female over 24 months. Participants who reported no exposure to a nicotine product in any venue made up 55% of the group. Daily smokers made up 17% of the study participants as confirmed by their elevated cotinine levels (greater than 100 ng/mL urine. The remaining participants (28% either resided with smokers and/or rode in an automobile with an individual smoking in the previous 24 h. Their cotinine levels were moderately elevated in some cases, particularly if they had ridden in a car with a smoker. Conclusion: The pilot study met our objectives of >90% participation and high correlation of urinary cotinine levels with questionnaire self-reports.

  1. Student Suicide and Colleges' Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert B.; Fleming, Dana L.

    2007-01-01

    Virginia recently became the first state to pass legislation that bars public colleges and universities from punishing or expelling students "solely for attempting to commit suicide, or seeking mental-health treatment for suicidal thoughts or behaviors." While well intentioned, the law adds nothing to current law and will, in fact, make…

  2. ADHD in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyandt, Lisa L; DuPaul, George

    2006-08-01

    According to the American Psychiatric Association, 3% to 7% of the school-age population has ADHD and many children continue to display significant symptoms throughout adolescences and adulthood. Relative to the childhood literature, less is known about ADHD in adults, especially college students with ADHD. The principle purpose of this review articles is to summarize the major research findings concerning ADHD in the college student population with regard to prevalence of symptoms, neuropsychological and psychological functioning. Overall, findings suggest that college students with ADHD are at greater risk for academic and psychological difficulties, and they perform similar to non-ADHD controls on many neuropsychological tasks. These findings are preliminary, however, and are tempered by the small number of studies that have been conducted as well as the methodological limitations of these studies. Future research using larger sample sizes, rigorous assessment criteria, and a longitudinal design is needed to better understand the psychological, academic, and neuropsychological functioning of college students with ADHD. Studies are also needed to elucidate the effects of pharmacological and nonpharmacological effects of treatment on the functioning of college students with this disorder.

  3. Stress, Health Risk Behaviors, and Weight Status Among Community College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jennifer E; Lytle, Leslie A; Laska, Melissa N

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the relationship between stress, weight-related health risk behaviors (e.g., eating behaviors, physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep, cigarette smoking, and binge drinking), and weight status using cross-sectional data on 2-year community college students enrolled in a randomized controlled weight gain prevention trial. Modified Poisson regression and linear regression were used to examine crude and adjusted cross-sectional associations. Higher stress was associated with higher prevalence of overweight/obesity (crude prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI: 1.01, 1.09]), though the relationship was no longer statistically significant after controlling for a wide range of weight-related health risk behaviors (adjusted PR = 1.04; 95% CI [1.00, 1.08]). Stress levels were significantly associated with meal skipping and being a current smoker. Future research should investigate the mechanisms through which stress is related to obesity risk and examine the causes of stress among this understudied population to inform the design of appropriate interventions. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  4. Prevalence and Mental Health Treatment of Suicidal Ideation and Behavior Among College Students Aged 18-25 Years and Their Non-College-Attending Peers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Beth; Compton, Wilson M; Eisenberg, Daniel; Milazzo-Sayre, Laura; McKeon, Richard; Hughes, Art

    2016-06-01

    College students have been the focus of many studies on suicidal ideation with or without suicidal behavior. Little attention has been given to their non-college-attending peers on these issues. We examined the 12-month prevalence and mental health treatment of suicidal ideation with or without suicidal behavior among college students aged 18-25 years and their non-college-attending peers in the United States. We assessed data from 135,300 persons aged 18-25 years who participated in the 2008-2013 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Descriptive analyses and multivariate logistic regression models were applied. Compared with full-time college students, high school students, those not enrolled in a school or college, and part-time college students were more likely to attempt suicide with a plan (model-adjusted prevalence = 0.67% vs 1.09%, 1.06%, and 1.07%, respectively). The mental health treatment rate among full-time college students with suicidal ideation with or without suicidal behavior was similar to the rates among the other 3 counterparts. The effects of race/ethnicity and serious mental illness on receipt of mental health treatment were significantly larger among those who did not perceive unmet treatment need than among those who perceived unmet treatment need (P = .019 and P = .001, respectively). Compared to full-time college students, non-college-attending young adults and part-time college students were at higher risk for attempting suicide with a plan. Suicide prevention and intervention strategies should emphasize increasing access to mental health treatment among both college students with suicidal ideation with or without suicidal behavior and their non-college-attending peers (particularly among minorities and those who seem to be at low risk because they are without serious mental illness and report no need for mental health treatment). © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  5. Influencing Factors of Radiological Technologist Image of Allied Health College Students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Jong Kwon; Shin, Seong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Dong A University Medical Center, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Perception level and social position of radiological technologist influence satisfaction level of their job. This study aims to use foundational data to improve perception level and social position of radiological technologists. We conducted interviews and a fill-out survey with 233 students who have been majoring in health-related fields at five universities and colleges located in Busan and who finished internship programs. The study analyzed 233 answer sheets excluding 17 inadequate answer sheets using T-test, ANOVA and multiple regression analysis with SAS9.1. The mean score of perception level was 3.33{+-}0.56. The personal image of radiological technologist showed the best score(3.43{+-}0.56) whereas the social image showed the worst(3.12{+-}0.79). According to the classification of the subject, the answer, 'radiological technologist is specialized job', showed the best score(3.99{+-}0.79). The answer 'radiological technologist suffered from less stress and workload than others when they work usually' showed the worst score(2.88{+-}0.98). According to the classification of each health-related major, the mean score of students who are a major in the department of the radiological technologist was the best(3.46{+-}0.46) and the students who are major in department of the physical therapy was the worst(3.24{+-}0.40). The radiological technologist have to effort to make positive image in the hospital. It is possible to be developed their knowledge and professionalism by cooperating between school and hospital as well as advertising with mass madia.

  6. Sleep hygiene and sleep quality as predictors of positive and negative dimensions of mental health in college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Peach

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available College students are one of the top at-risk groups for chronic sleep loss and poor sleep quality, which can yield deleterious effects on health. The college population is also notorious for poor sleep hygiene, or modifiable behaviors that promote sufficient sleep quantity and quality. Research suggests sleep can impact both positive and negative aspects of college mental health, but few studies have examined the effects of sleep on both subjective well-being and depression within one model. Further, little research has tested sleep hygiene as a modifiable risk factor for positive and mental aspects of health. The present study tested structural equation models in which sleep quality either partially or fully mediated the effects of sleep hygiene behaviors on depression and poor subjective well-being. A partial mediation model (CFI = .98, TLI = .94, RMSEA = .08 suggested a very good-fitting model, and sleep hygiene yielded significant direct and indirect effects on both depression and subjective well-being. Findings suggest intervention efforts targeting the improvement of sleep hygiene and sleep quality among college students may yield effects on student well-being, which can improve mental health among this at-risk population.

  7. Racial microaggressions, cultural mistrust, and mental health outcomes among asian american college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul Youngbin; Kendall, Dana L; Cheon, Hee-Sun

    2017-01-01

    The present study is an empirical investigation of cultural mistrust as a mediator in the association between racial microaggressions and mental health (anxiety, depression, and well-being) in a sample of Asian American college students. In addition, we explored the role of cultural mistrust as a mediator in the association between racial microaggressions and attitudes toward seeking professional help. Asian American participants (N = 156) were recruited from 2 institutions located in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Participants filled out an online survey consisting of measures assessing the study variables. Bootstrapped results indicated that cultural mistrust was a significant mediator in the relation between microaggressions and well-being, such that racial microaggressions was significantly and positively associated with cultural mistrust, which, in turn, was significantly and inversely related to well-being. Mediation models involving anxiety, depression, and help-seeking attitudes as outcome variables were nonsignificant. The significant mediation finding (microaggressions → mistrust → well-being) has implications for improved understanding of Asian American students' reactions to modern day racism and how it relates to their sense of well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos Kontoangelos; Sofia Tsiori; Kalliopi Koundi; Xenia Pappa; Pavlos Sakkas; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI)...

  9. Physical and mental health conditions of young college students with different Traditional Chinese Medicine constitutions in Zhejiang Province of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Heli; Zhu, Li; Chen, Zhiqiang; Jin, Huijuan; Jin, Lei

    2015-12-01

    To investigate Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) constitutions of youths in colleges, and their physical and mental health conditions of different TCM constitutions, so as to provide a theoretical basis for the TCM way to improve young people's physical and mental health. The Standard TCM Constitutions' Classification and Determination Questionnaire was used to measure the body health condition, and the Symptom Checklist 90 Questionnaire and the Questionnaire of the National Student Physical Health Standards were used to determine mental and physical health conditions respectively in 1421 young participants validly answering the questionnaires in Zhejiang Province. The participants had a mean age of 19.96 years (SD = 0.95 years) with the majority of females (55.10%). One fourth of the 1421 participants were the Ping-he constitution and others were the tendency constitutions. Participants with Pinghe module (which has characteristics of moderate posture, rosy, energetic and is a healthy condition in TCM) were healthier than those with tendency constitutions in physical and mental health, with 65.81 ± 7.83 (men) and 77.99 ± 7.24 (women) scores in the physical test and around 1.25 scores in the mental health test. College students with combined biased constitutions were more likely suffer force, sensitive, depression and anxiety. Most of college students have a tendency or biased constitution which could be more likely to suffer suboptimal health status and diseases. Youths in college themselves and health providers should pay more attention to their potential health issues and make proper healthcare plan according to their own TCM constitution.

  10. Social support, acculturation, and optimism: understanding positive health practices in Asian American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Cynthia G; Mahat, Ganga

    2012-07-01

    This study developed and tested a theory to better understand positive health practices (PHP) among Asian Americans aged 18 to 21 years. It tested theoretical relationships postulated between PHP and (a) social support (SS), (b) optimism, and (c) acculturation, and between SS and optimism and acculturation. Optimism and acculturation were also tested as possible mediators in the relationship between SS and PHP. A correlational study design was used. A convenience sample of 163 Asian college students in an urban setting completed four questionnaires assessing SS, PHP, optimism, and acculturation and one demographic questionnaire. There were statistically significant positive relationships between SS and optimism with PHP, between acculturation and PHP, and between optimism and SS. Optimism mediated the relationship between SS and PHP, whereas acculturation did not. Findings extend knowledge regarding these relationships to a defined population of Asian Americans aged 18 to 21 years. Findings contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge base regarding health practices among Asian Americans. The theoretical and empirical findings of this study provide the direction for future research as well. Further studies need to be conducted to identify and test other mediators in order to better understand the relationship between these two variables.

  11. Prevalence and Predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use among Ivy League College Students: Implications for Student Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versnik Nowak, Amy L.; DeGise, Joe; Daugherty, Amanda; O'Keefe, Richard; Seward, Samuel, Jr.; Setty, Suma; Tang, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Determine prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used and test the significance of demographics and social cognitive constructs as predictors of CAM use in a college sample. Secondary purpose was to guide the integration of CAM therapies into college health services. Participants: Random,…

  12. Web-Based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Mental Health Problems in College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael E; Haeger, Jack A; Pierce, Benjamin G; Twohig, Michael P

    2016-07-20

    There are significant challenges in addressing the mental health needs of college students. The current study tested an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), web-based self-help program to treat a broad range of psychological problems students struggle with. A sample of 79 college students was randomized to web-based ACT or a waitlist condition, with assessments at baseline and posttreatment. Results indicated adequate acceptability and program engagement for the ACT website. Relative to waitlist, participants receiving ACT improved on overall distress, general anxiety, social anxiety, depression, academic concerns, and positive mental health. There were no between-group effects on eating concerns, alcohol use, or hostility, or on some key ACT process of change measures. ACT participants improved more on mindful acceptance and obstruction to valued living, both of which mediated treatment outcomes. Results are discussed in the context of lessons learned with the website prototype, and areas for further research are presented. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. [Influence of mediating/moderating effects of health skills on the relation between knowledge and behaviors in health, among college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Jinsong; Zhao, Shuying; Wu, Dan; Luo, Jiayou; Yin, Xunqiang; Gong, Wenjie

    2014-02-01

    To study the influence of mediating/moderating effects of health skills on the relations between health knowledge and health behaviors in college students. Stratified cluster random sampling was used among 2 181 students, selected in several colleges in Changsha, Hunan province. EpiData 3.0 was adopted to establish the database. Correlation and regression analyses were performed by SPSS 17.0. Positive correlations were seen on: 1) Knowledge and skills on health (r = 0.592, P health (r = 0.647, P Health skills and health behaviors(r = 0.629, P effect of health skills on the relations between health knowledge and health behaviors was significant (34.55%). The interaction effect of "health skill × (times) related knowledge" was significant (β = -0.093, t = - 5.212, P = 0.000). New variables that were produced by the interaction also reached significant level (Δ R(2) = 0.006, P = 0.000), resulted in increasing the explanation function to health behaviors by 0.6%. Health skills could partially mediate the effects and moderate the relationship between health knowledge and health behaviors among college students.

  14. Using self-determination theory to describe the academic motivation of allied health professional-level college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmann, Jodi M; Mueller, Jill J

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the various reasons that allied health students believe they are currently attending college. The Academic Motivation Scale was administered to a convenience sample of 222 upperclassmen and graduate-level students (162 women, 46 men). The Academic Motivation Scale proposes various reasons for continued engagement in academic pursuits that may be characteristic of personal and current reasons for persistence in a subject's particular academic program. The results showed that students portrayed themselves as currently attending college for both intrinsically and extrinsically motivated reasons. The most frequently endorsed motivational styles were identified (autonomous) extrinsic motivation and externally regulated (nonautonomous) extrinsic motivation. This study showed that this sample of professional-level college students was not completely self-determined in their end-stage academic pursuits. One conclusion that may be drawn from this study is that allied health programs that provide students with an educational context that supports self-determination may encourage future allied health professionals to develop the ability to support the self-determination of their future clients.

  15. The roles of identity formation and moral identity in college student mental health, health-risk behaviors, and psychological well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Sam A; Francis, Stephen W; Zamboanga, Byron L; Kim, Su Yeong; Anderson, Spencer G; Forthun, Larry F

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the roles of identity formation and moral identity in predicting college student mental health (anxiety and depressive symptoms), health-risk behaviors (hazardous alcohol use and sexual risk taking), and psychological well-being (self-esteem and meaning). The sample comprised 9,500 college students (aged 18-25 years, mean = 19.78, standard deviation = 1.61; 73% female; 62% European American), from 31 different universities, who completed an online self-report survey. Structural equation models found that identity maturity (commitment making and identity synthesis) predicted 5 of the health outcomes (except sexual risk taking), and moral identity predicted all of the health outcomes. In most cases identity maturity and moral identity also interacted in predicting mental health and psychological well-being, but not health-risk behaviors. The maturity and specific contents of identity may both play unique and often interactive roles in predicting college student health. Thus, college student health might be bolstered by helping them establish appropriate identity commitments. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Exploring Perceptions about and Behaviors Related to Mental Illness and Mental Health Service Utilization among College Students Using the Health Belief Model (HBM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobiling, Brandye D.; Maykrantz, Sherry Azadi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mental health service is underutilized in the United States. Adolescent and young adults, including college students, are especially unlikely to seek professional help for mental illness. This issue presents a concern, because signs and symptoms commonly appear during this part of growth and development. Purpose: The Health Belief…

  17. The effect of comprehensive sexual education program on sexual health knowledge and sexual attitude among college students in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xinli; Hawk, Skyler T; Winter, Sam; Meeus, Wim

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a comprehensive sexual education program for college students in Southwest China (a) improved sexual health knowledge in reproduction, contraception, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, and HIV; (b) increased accepting attitudes toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transsexual individuals; and (c) altered participants' attitudes toward premarital sex and monogamy. The program used diverse teaching methods, providing 6 sessions over a period of 9 weeks about sexual health knowledge and sexual attitudes to college students (age 18-26 years) in Southwest China. Sexual health knowledge and sexual attitudes of 80 comprehensive sexual education class students (education group) and 92 general mental health education class students (control group) were measured at baseline, the end of course (posttest), and 3 weeks after the end of course (follow-up). There were significant effects of the program on (a) sexual health knowledge, including reproductive health, contraception, condom use, and HIV/AIDS and (b) positive attitudes toward sexual minorities, although these changes may require further reinforcement. In contrast, the program did not alter students' attitudes about premarital sex or monogamy. The results are discussed in terms of recommendations of sex education in China and future directions for research. © 2013 APJPH.

  18. Impact of disability and other physical health issues on academic outcomes among American Indian and Alaskan Native college students: an exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson Silver Wolf Adelv Unegv Waya, David A; Vanzile-Tamsen, Carol; Black, Jessica; Billiot, Shanondora M; Tovar, Molly

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether self-identified disabilities among American Indian and Alaskan Native college students impact academic performance and persistence to graduation and explored the differences in health and academic grades between American Indian and Alaskan Native students and students of other racial and ethnic identities using the National College Health Assessment. Findings indicate that American Indian or Alaskan Native students have significantly lower grades than White and Asian students, and American Indian and Alaskan Native women report the highest incidence of health problems of any demographic group. Exploratory results point to future research to determine the full impact of disabilities and poor health on academic success.

  19. Risky behavior of adolescent college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Nancy R

    2009-04-01

    Nurses who provide care to adolescent college students are challenged to meet their diverse health care needs. Recent national survey data on American college students indicate that many participate in risky behaviors, which can have detrimental effects on their physical and psychosocial health. These data also reveal that college students rank health educators and health center medical staff as the most believable sources of health-related information. Thus, nurses are in key positions to screen for and educate about stress, coping styles, and mental health issues. In addition to decreasing barriers to access, nurses can inform students on the kinds of resources available and their locations. This article also describes interventions that may be effective on college campuses for the reduction of risks and the promotion of positive coping and health outcomes in this population.

  20. The Benefits of Dispositional Mindfulness in Physical Health: A Longitudinal Study of Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Megan J.; Mermelstein, Liza C.; Edwards, Katie M.; Gidycz, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the relationship between dispositional mindfulness, health behaviors (e.g., sleep, eating, and exercise), and physical health. Participants: Participants included 441 college women. Methods: Women completed self-report surveys at the beginning and end of a 10-week academic quarter. The study was conducted over 5…

  1. Lifestyle and Mental Health Correlates of Psychological Distress in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hackman, Christine L.; Sharma, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Objective: College students are at an increased risk of mental distress. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mental and lifestyle factors differed according to self-reported levels of psychological distress. Design and setting: A self-report questionnaire comprising the Kessler-6 Psychological Distress Scale, Revised Life…

  2. College Student's Health, Drinking and Smoking Patterns: What Has Changed in 20 Years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Desiree; Todd, Katherine Leigh; Engs, Ruth C.

    2014-01-01

    Problem: Institutes of higher learning are increasingly trying to address the issue of problem drinking. The purpose of this study was to determine how patterns in alcohol use and smoking by college students, as well as their illness patterns, have changed over 20 years. Methods: A cross-sectional serial survey design was used for this descriptive…

  3. A comprehensive examination of the health knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of students attending historically black colleges and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brenda D; Holliday, Rhonda Conerly; Wade, Bruce H; Trawick, Cynthia; Hodge, Michael; Caplan, Lee; Younge, Sinead; Quarshie, Alexander; Satcher, David

    2009-05-01

    There is limited information about African American students attending Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in the areas of health behavior, health knowledge, and attitudes. To fill this gap, a comprehensive examination offirst-year students was undertaken at a consortium of HBCUs. A non-random sample of 1115 freshmen were administered a survey that assessed several domains including: (1) demographics, (2) general health, (3) smoking habits, (4) disease risk, (5) weight perception, (6) physical activity, (7) perceived stress, (8) eating habits, (9) social support, (10) personal/family medical history, (11) leadership, (12) domestic violence, (13) substance use, and (14) sexual behavior. In general, most students knew about health behaviors and disease risk. Areas that warrant further exploration include physical activity, sexual behavior, and drug use. The analyses provide key information for health education and prevention.

  4. College Students Talk Politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, John A.; Harwood, Richard C.

    This volume reports on a study undertaken to determine views of college students themselves on civic life and politics and also follows four related studies and action research projects on the relationship between citizens and the political process. The central study was a series of 10 campus discussions in the focus group format, with college…

  5. Mental Health among College Students: Do Those Who Need Services Know about and Use Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorgason, Jeremy B.; Linville, Deanna; Zitzman, Bryan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine connections between university students' mental health and their knowledge and use of campus mental health services. Participants and Methods: In March 2001, a sample of undergraduate students (N = 266) completed a Web-based questionnaire, providing information related to their mental health,…

  6. Screening for chest disease in college students: policies of student health services regarding the use of routine screening chest radiographs and tuberculin skin tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fager, S.S.; Slap, G.B.; Kitz, D.S.; Eisenberg, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    A survey of college health services was conducted to determine their policies regarding the use of screening chest radiographs and tuberculin skin tests. Pre-enrollment chest radiographs are prescribed for all incoming students by 24% of the 531 respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 20%, 19%, and 6%, respectively. Periodic chest radiography is conducted for all students by 7% of the respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 22%, 16%, and 8%, respectively. Pre-enrollment tuberculin skin tests are prescribed for all incoming students by 52% of the respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 48%, 29%, and 9%, respectively. Periodic tuberculin skin testing is conducted for all students by 27% of the respondents and for health professions students, foreign students, and intercollegiate athletes only by an additional 48%, 23%, and 16%, respectively. It is estimated from these data that 723,000 incoming students in the United States received screening chest radiographs in 1979 with estimated charges totaling between $7 million and $27 million. There may be 0.05 to 0.33 induced cases of lung cancer, leukemia, thyroid cancer, and female breast cancer over a 20-year period among this group of students exposed to ionizing radiation.

  7. Handwashing among female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drankiewicz, Danielle; Dundes, Lauren

    2003-04-01

    Handwashing has been recognized as a critical factor in infection control policies. Whereas handwashing compliance among health care workers and school-aged students has been previously documented, practices among college students remain relatively unknown. The objective of this study was to determine handwashing compliance of female college students after using the bathroom. A researcher situated in a toilet stall unobtrusively observed handwashing compliance among 100 female students. Most students (63%) washed their hands, 38% used soap, 32% washed with soap for 5 or more seconds, but only 2% washed their hands with soap for 10 or more seconds. Fewer students left without handwashing when someone else was present in the sink area (9%) than when they were alone (45%) (P =.002). Substantial bacterial colony counts were found on a female bathroom sink faucet and toilet seat confirming the need for programs to increase handwashing compliance. Potential strategies to optimize infection control include harnessing the influence of peer pressure on handwashing and the installation of motion-activated faucets, disposable seat covers, and exit doors that can be pushed open. These results should be confirmed in a larger study that includes both male and female college students.

  8. Happiness and health behaviours in Chilean college students: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Straten Annemieke

    2011-06-01

    importance of that some healthy behaviours and person's cognitive appraisal of stress are integrated into their lifestyle for college students. Additionally, highlight the importance of taking into account these variables in the design of strategies to promote health education in university setting.

  9. Happiness and health behaviours in Chilean college students: A cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    behaviours and person's cognitive appraisal of stress are integrated into their lifestyle for college students. Additionally, highlight the importance of taking into account these variables in the design of strategies to promote health education in university setting. PMID:21649907

  10. Happiness and health behaviours in Chilean college students: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueras, José A; Kuhne, Walter; Vera-Villarroel, Pablo; van Straten, Annemieke; Cuijpers, Pim

    2011-06-07

    appraisal of stress are integrated into their lifestyle for college students. Additionally, highlight the importance of taking into account these variables in the design of strategies to promote health education in university setting.

  11. Polytobacco Use Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Karen M; Ickes, Melinda J; Rayens, Mary Kay; Wiggins, Amanda T; Hahn, Ellen J

    2016-02-01

    Use of more than one tobacco product among college students is increasing in popularity, leading to nicotine addiction and additional health risks. The study (1) examined polytobacco use patterns among college students who had ever used tobacco; and (2) assessed the sociodemographic and personal factors associated with current polytobacco use, compared to current single product use and former tobacco use among college students. Of 10,000 randomly selected college students from a large public university in the Southeast, a sample of 1593 students age 18 or older completed an online survey assessing tobacco use and attitudes. Ever tobacco users were included in this study (n = 662, or 41.6% of survey completers). About 15% of ever users reported current polytobacco use, and more than 70% of polytobacco users smoked cigars, little cigars, or clove cigarettes in combination with one or more products. Cigarettes were the most commonly-used product among single users, followed by hookah. Males, underclassmen, and students with greater acceptance of cigarette use were more likely to be polytobacco users. Race/ethnicity was marginally related to polyuse status, with white/non-Hispanics 28% less likely to be polytobacco users versus single product users. Polytobacco users were more likely than single users to consume emerging tobacco products, (ie, hookah and electronic cigarettes). Males, underclassmen, and racial/ethnic minorities were more at risk for polytobacco use. As young people are particularly prone to nicotine addiction, there is a need to further investigate polytobacco use among college students. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Mental Health and Substance Use of Sexual Minority College Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroshus, Emily; Davoren, Ann Kearns

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assess the mental health and substance use of sexual minority collegiate student-athletes in the United States, as compared with heterosexual college students and heterosexual student-athletes. Participants: Undergraduate students (N = 196,872) who completed the American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment…

  13. Cultural factors impacting student motivation at a health sciences college in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Lutfi Abdul Razzak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a reflection on students’ levels and types of motivation at a college of health sciences in Saudi Arabia and highlights the social and cultural factors possibly contributing to the differences in motivation among those students. The results of this study, which followed a mixed-methods approach, indicate a multiplicity of contributing factors and values, namely: gender stereotyping, appreciation of early graduation, stereotypes regarding career status, family background, and parents’ educational levels, value attributed to education, ultra-conservatism, and social image and prestige. From these factors, a number of key implications and recommendations are deduced, some of which are general while others are more college specific.

  14. Addressing the Mental Health Problems of Chinese International College Students in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirong Liu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies unique mental health problems experienced by Chinese international students in the United States. The uniqueness of these problems suggests the need to address them independently from other Chinese and international student communities. First, an overview of the common sources of mental health problems and specific stressors these students face is provided. This article then develops culturally sensitive programming recommendations to improve collaborative efforts between health providers, mental health social workers, faculty, and academic staff within universities to serve these students more effectively.

  15. How College Affects Student Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Hamilton, Mary F.; Sina, Julie A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how college affects student athletes. Research cited includes studies using theories of student development and results from the National Study on Student Learning that describe the desired outcomes of college for student athletes. Discusses implications for policies and practices that address the critical needs of student athletes.…

  16. Effects of Sleep Quality on the Association between Problematic Mobile Phone Use and Mental Health Symptoms in Chinese College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuman Tao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Problematic mobile phone use (PMPU is a risk factor for both adolescents’ sleep quality and mental health. It is important to examine the potential negative health effects of PMPU exposure. This study aims to evaluate PMPU and its association with mental health in Chinese college students. Furthermore, we investigated how sleep quality influences this association. In 2013, we collected data regarding participants’ PMPU, sleep quality, and mental health (psychopathological symptoms, anxiety, and depressive symptoms by standardized questionnaires in 4747 college students. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess independent effects and interactions of PMPU and sleep quality with mental health. PMPU and poor sleep quality were observed in 28.2% and 9.8% of participants, respectively. Adjusted logistic regression models suggested independent associations of PMPU and sleep quality with mental health (p < 0.001. Further regression analyses suggested a significant interaction between these measures (p < 0.001. The study highlights that poor sleep quality may play a more significant role in increasing the risk of mental health problems in students with PMPU than in those without PMPU.

  17. The prevalence of and factors associated with current smoking among College of Health Sciences students, Mekelle University in northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eticha, Tadele; Kidane, Feven

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is one of the greatest causes of preventable morbidity and mortality globally, and is responsible for many causes of untimely deaths. This survey was aimed to determine prevalence and factors associated with current smoking among the students of College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was employed using a structured self-administered questionnaire among College of Health Sciences students in March 2013. A stratified random sampling method was employed to select study participants. Data were entered and analysed using of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. Of the 193 students, 57 (29.5%) of the students were current smokers. Most of the current smokers (89.4%) smoked between 1-10 sticks of cigarette per day. The two main reasons cited for smoking cigarettes were peer pressure (43.9%) and to relieve stress (36.8%). Being female (adjusted OR [AOR] = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.95) and Tigre by ethnicity (AOR = 0.32; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.74) were significantly less associated with current smoking. On the other hand, being second year students (AOR = 3.84; 95% CI: 1.41, 10.46), khat chewing (AOR = 8.36; 95% CI: 2.60, 26.85) and taking illicit drugs (AOR = 10.59; 95% CI: 2.77, 40.51) were positively associated with current smoking cigarettes. The current smoking prevalence among students in College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University is high and therefore, effective smoking prevention and cessation intervention programs are required to reduce smoking among university students.

  18. The prevalence of and factors associated with current smoking among College of Health Sciences students, Mekelle University in northern Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadele Eticha

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoking is one of the greatest causes of preventable morbidity and mortality globally, and is responsible for many causes of untimely deaths. This survey was aimed to determine prevalence and factors associated with current smoking among the students of College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Ethiopia.A cross-sectional study was employed using a structured self-administered questionnaire among College of Health Sciences students in March 2013. A stratified random sampling method was employed to select study participants. Data were entered and analysed using of Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0.Of the 193 students, 57 (29.5% of the students were current smokers. Most of the current smokers (89.4% smoked between 1-10 sticks of cigarette per day. The two main reasons cited for smoking cigarettes were peer pressure (43.9% and to relieve stress (36.8%. Being female (adjusted OR [AOR] = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.95 and Tigre by ethnicity (AOR = 0.32; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.74 were significantly less associated with current smoking. On the other hand, being second year students (AOR = 3.84; 95% CI: 1.41, 10.46, khat chewing (AOR = 8.36; 95% CI: 2.60, 26.85 and taking illicit drugs (AOR = 10.59; 95% CI: 2.77, 40.51 were positively associated with current smoking cigarettes.The current smoking prevalence among students in College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University is high and therefore, effective smoking prevention and cessation intervention programs are required to reduce smoking among university students.

  19. The Bidirectional Relationship between Positive Mental Health and Social Rhythm in College Students:A Three-Year Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Cai; Meixia Zhu; Muyu Lin; Xiao Chi Zhang; Jürgen Margraf

    2017-01-01

    Social rhythm refers to the general regularity of engaging in basic social activities during the week, and was found to be associated with individuals’ positive mental health. The present study investigated the relationship between social rhythm and emotional well-being in a cohort of 2,031 college students over 3 years with a cross-lagged longitudinal panel design. Results revealed that regularity of social rhythm positively predicted emotional well-being in the following year, and vice vers...

  20. Assessing the Personal Negative Impacts of Hooking Up Experienced by College Students: Gender Differences and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napper, Lucy E; Montes, Kevin S; Kenney, Shannon R; LaBrie, Joseph W

    2016-09-01

    Hooking up is a normative behavior among college students that is associated with a range of positive and negative consequences. While previous research has primarily focused on women's negative experiences of hooking up, the current study explored the relationships among hooking up behaviors, psychological distress, and a broad range of negative effects of hooking up in both male and female college students. Using a multisite sample of college students, we developed the 14-item Negative Impact of Hookups Inventory (NIHI) to assess negative health outcomes, emotional responses, and social consequences associated with hooking up. Unprotected sex and having more hookup partners were associated with greater negative experiences of hooking up. Contrary to expectations, there were no gender differences in the total number of negative hookup effects, although men reported more frequent hookups. In addition, negative impacts of hooking up were positively associated with psychological distress regardless of gender. The NIHI may offer a useful tool to assess the negative impacts of hooking up. Understanding students' hookup experiences is an important step toward developing targeted health interventions related to hooking up behavior in young adult populations.

  1. Intake and blood concentrations of folate and their association with health-related behaviors in Korean college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Han-Byul; Han, Young-Hee; Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Kim, Heon; Hyun, Taisun

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess folate intake, and serum and red blood cell (RBC) folate concentrations, and investigate the association between folate status and health-related behaviors among Korean college students. A total of 169 students, aged between 18 and 27 years, participated in this study. Dietary intake data were collected by trained interviewers using a 24-hour recall method for three non-consecutive days in 2009. Information on health-related behaviors was obtained by a self-administered questionnaire. Serum and RBC folate concentrations were measured by microbiological assay. The average intakes of folate were 456 µgDFE and 347 µgDFE in male and female students, respectively. While the average serum folate concentration was significantly lower in male students (8.9 ng/mL) compared to female students (12.5 ng/mL), RBC concentrations were not significantly different between male (398.6 ng/mL) and female students (405.3 ng/mL). In male students, low serum folate concentrations were associated with total folate intake less than the Estimated Average Requirement, non-use of folic acid supplements, smoking, alcohol drinking at least once a week and low physical activity. In female students, low serum folate concentrations were associated with smoking and alcohol drinking at least two drinks at a time and BMI ≥ 25. Alcohol drinking and low physical activity were also associated with low RBC folate concentrations in both male and female students. In order to improve folate nutritional status of college students, the practice of desirable health-related behaviors, such as non-smoking, moderate alcohol drinking, regular physical activity, and maintenance of healthy BMI should be encouraged along with consumption of folate-rich foods and supplements.

  2. Gender Differences in the Relationships Among Major Depressive Disorder, Heavy Alcohol Use, and Mental Health Treatment Engagement Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrelli, Paola; Borsari, Brian; Lipson, Sarah Ketchen; Heinze, Justin E; Eisenberg, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Although major depressive disorder (MDD) and heavy episodic drinking (HED, 4+/5+ drinks in a single sitting for women/men) are common among young adults in college, the relationship between the two remains unclear. This study examined the association between MDD and HED in this population, the effect of gender on this association, and whether comorbid MDD and heavy alcohol use are associated with higher rates of mental health treatment engagement. The study comprised 61,561 (65.3% female) undergraduate students who answered an online survey on depression, alcohol use, and treatment engagement in the past year. Hierarchical linear regressions examined the association between MDD and alcohol use (HED and peak blood alcohol concentration [pBAC]) and whether gender moderated these associations. Logistic regressions were then conducted to examine the influence of MDD, heavy alcohol use, and gender on treatment engagement. Students with MDD reported more frequent HED and higher pBAC than did students without MDD; this was especially true for female students. Rates of treatment engagement were higher among women than men, among students with MDD than students without MDD, and among female students with HED than women without HED. The presence of an association between MDD and heavy alcohol use suggests the need for systematic screenings of both conditions. Low rates of treatment engagement in college students with MDD and heavy alcohol use calls for the development of strategies to engage this high-risk group in treatment.

  3. Relationship between Sleep Quality and Health Risk Behaviors in Undergraduate College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail-Smith, Karen; Felts, W. Michael; Becker, Craig

    2009-01-01

    The Sleep Quality Index (SQI) and the Centers for Disease Control's National College Health Risk Survey (NCHRS) were administered to 859 undergraduates at a large southeastern university. Results indicated that 76.6% reported occasional sleep problems and 11.8 % experienced poor sleep quality. Among the problems reported, "general morning…

  4. Disordered Eating-Related Cognition and Psychological Flexibility as Predictors of Psychological Health among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akihiko; Price, Matthew; Anderson, Page L.; Wendell, Johanna W.

    2010-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study investigated the relation among disordered eating-related cognition, psychological flexibility, and poor psychological outcomes among a nonclinical college sample. As predicted, conviction of disordered eating-related cognitions was positively associated with general psychological ill-health and emotional distress…

  5. Addressing the Mental Health Problems of Chinese International College Students in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Meirong Liu

    2009-01-01

    This article identifies unique mental health problems experienced by Chinese international students in the United States. The uniqueness of these problems suggests the need to address them independently from other Chinese and international student communities. First, an overview of the common sources of mental health problems and specific stressors these students face is provided. This article then develops culturally sensitive programming recommendations to improve collaborative efforts betw...

  6. Obstetric complications and mother's age at delivery are predictors of eating disorder symptoms among Health Science college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofrano-Prado, Mara Cristina; Prado, Wagner Luiz do; Barros, Mauro Virgilio Gomes de; Tenório, Thiago Ricardo dos Santos; Souza, Sandra Lopes de

    2015-01-01

    To identify the association between perinatal/neonatal factors and symptoms of eating disorders among college students. Four hundred and eight college students (283 women), aged 18 to 23 years old, enrolled in the first semester of a Bachelor of Health Science degree program were included in the sample. Eating disorder symptoms and body image dissatisfaction were assessed with the Eating Attitudes Test and Bulimic Investigatory Test of Edinburgh. Information regarding birth weight, breastfeeding, obstetric complications, mother's age at delivery, type of delivery, and birth order were self-reported by the volunteers after consulting their parents. Association between perinatal and neonatal factors and symptoms of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were assessed by binary logistic regression adjusted for sex, age, and body mass index. The likelihood of presenting with symptoms of anorexia nervosa was 0.5 time lower for those students born from the oldest mothers (odds ratio - OR=0.37; 95% confidence interval - 95%CI: 0.17-0.83). Relative to bulimia nervosa, the risk was higher among students who reported obstetric complications (OR=2.62; 95%CI: 1.03-6.67). We observed the association between perinatal and neonatal factors with symptoms of eating disorders in college students.

  7. The moderating role of centrality on associations between ethnic identity affirmation and ethnic minority college students' mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittian, Aerika S; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Lee, Richard M; Zamboanga, Byron L; Kim, Su Yeong; Weisskirch, Robert S; Castillo, Linda G; Whitbourne, Susan Krauss; Hurley, Eric A; Huynh, Que-Lam; Brown, Elissa J; Caraway, S Jean

    2013-01-01

    Prior literature has shown that ethnic affirmation, one aspect of ethnic identity, is positively associated with mental health. However, the associations between ethnic affirmation and mental health may vary depending how much importance individuals place on their ethnic group membership (ie, centrality). Using path analysis, the current study examined the relations between ethnic affirmation and indices of mental health problems (ie, anxiety and depressive symptoms), and tested whether the process was moderated by ethnic centrality among 3,659 college students representing 3 ethnic groups (41% Latino/a, 35% Asian American, and 24% African American) who participated in a large, multisite university study. Results suggested that the associations between ethnic affirmation and mental health were stronger for Latino/a and Asian American students who reported higher levels of ethnic centrality. For African Americans, higher levels of ethnic affirmation predicted better mental health, but this association did not vary as a function of ethnic centrality.

  8. Dietary behaviors and body image recognition of college students according to the self-rated health condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Joung; Lim, Ye Rom; Kwak, Ho Kyung

    2008-01-01

    This study was done to investigate the relationship between the perception of body image, body weight satisfaction or dietary behavior and self-rated health status in Korean college students. Subjects, 285 college students, were divided into three groups (healthy, normal, and unhealthy) according to the answer for the self-rated health question. Information about demographic status, self-rated health condition, height and weight, perception of body image, satisfaction of body weight, concern for body weight control, dietary behavior, nutritional knowledge, and health-related characteristics collected by a self-reported questionnaire. The proportion of men and women in each group was not significantly different. The academic year, major, experience of nutritional education, and type of residence were not significantly related with self-rated health but the pocket money range was significantly associated (pbody image perception and body weight satisfaction levels of healthy group was significantly higher than those of unhealthy group (pbody weight control in healthy subjects was significantly lower than that in unhealthy subjects (pcollege students have tended to have a better perception of health when they have better body image perception, body weight satisfaction and dietary behaviors.

  9. The influence of occupational stress factors on nicotine dependence among students of health and nonhealth care professional colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Amandeep; Lakhanpal, Manav; Gupta, Nidhi; Suri, Varun; Kaur, Gurwant; Bhudhiraja, Swati

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationship between perceived job stress measured using Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) scale and nicotine dependence using Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) scale among students of health and nonhealth care professional colleges. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried on convenient sample of 408 health and nonhealth care professional who were current smokers. Nicotine dependence was measured using the FTND. The extent of the stress factors experienced at work was assessed using the ERI. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used for the statistical analysis. Occupational stress factors are actually associated with higher levels of nicotine dependence (odds ratio = 4.523). The degree of nicotine dependence and stress imbalance was found to be more among health care professional students as compared to nonhealth care professional students (P stress and being nonhealth care professional have a significant effect on the prevention of nicotine dependence.

  10. Freshman year mental health symptoms and level of adaptation as predictors of Internet addiction: a retrospective nested case-control study of male Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bin; Han, Wei; Zeng, Lingxia; Guo, Xiong

    2013-12-15

    A retrospective nested case-control study was designed to explore whether freshman year mental health status and level of adaptation are predictors of Internet addiction. The study cohort was 977 college students at a university in northwest China. In the first college year, the students' mental health status and adaptation level were assessed using the Chinese College Student Mental Health Scale (CCSMHS) and the Chinese College Student Adjustment Scale (CCSAS). In the following 1-3 years, 62 Internet-addicted subjects were identified using Young's 8-item diagnostic questionnaire. Controls were matched for demographic characteristics. Using logistic regression analysis, freshman year mental health status, including factors such as somatization, anxiety, depression and self-contempt, and freshman year adaptive problems were found to be causal factors and predictors of Internet addiction. Freshman with features of depression, learning maladaptation and dissatisfaction could be an important target-intervention population for reducing Internet addiction. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of culture on oral health attitudes, behaviour and values among the dental students of two dental colleges in Chennai city- a cross sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    N Naveen; Nimisha Gopal; J Avinash; M A Adil Ahmed; D Prabu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify similarities and differences in oral health attitudes, behavior and values among 1 st year dental students studying in two dental colleges of Chennai city. Materials & Method...

  12. Female college student awareness of exposures to environmental toxins in personal care products and their effect on preconception health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lisa M; Chalupka, Stephanie M; Barrett, Roseann

    2015-02-01

    This research study investigated college women's usage of personal care products and their views on health effects from exposures during the preconception period. Many personal care products and cosmetics contain chemical ingredients that have been known to disrupt human endocrine and neurological systems, and contribute to infertility and adverse birth outcomes. Seventy-two female college students from a single, medium-sized university campus completed a researcher-developed questionnaire. Findings provide insight into the daily exposures young women experience during their reproductive years. Results can inform occupational and environmental health nurses about the personal daily exposures of young women when conducting risk assessments in the workplace or at a school, and can aid in developing interventions that support the environmental health of employees or future employees. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Assessment of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to physical activity among health college students, south-western Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadalla, N J; Aboelyazed, A E; Hassanein, M A; Khalil, S N; Aftab, R; Gaballa, I I; Mahfouz, A A

    2014-10-20

    Physical inactivity is a public health problem in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was carried out to evaluate the pattern of physical activity, predictors of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to physical activity among health college students in King Khalid University. A total of 1257 students (426 males and 831 females) were recruited. The Arabic short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used. Overall, 58.0% of the students were physically inactive. Only 13.4% of the students performed vigorous physical activity, 14.8% moderate-intensity physical activity and 29.9% walking activities which met World Health Organization criteria of health-enhancing physical activities. The prevalence of inactive leisure time was 47.5%. The independent predictors of physical inactivity were non-membership of sports clubs and being a medical student. The top reported barrier to physical activity among inactive students was time limitations (51.3%). Overcoming perceived barriers may increase physical activity among students.

  14. Mental health and health-related quality of life of Chinese college students who were the victims of dating violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Edmond P H; Wong, Janet Y H; Fong, Daniel Y T

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the mental health and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of Chinese college students who were the victims of dating violence. Six hundred and fifty-two subjects were included in the data analysis. Subjects completed a structured questionnaire containing the Woman Abuse Screening tool, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the 10-item version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Instrument (WHOQOL-BREF). Analysis by independent t test suggested that victims of dating violence had more severe depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms and poorer HRQOL than non-victims. Multiple linear regression models found that more severe dating violence victimization was associated with more severe depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms. The mediation analysis found that after simultaneously controlling for the degree of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms, the direct effect between dating violence severity and HRQOL, as measured by overall HRQOL and the global health, physical and environment domains of the WHOQOL-BREF, was statistically insignificant, supporting a full-mediation model. The relationship between dating violence severity and the social domain of HRQOL was partially mediated by the degree of depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms. Victims of dating violence had poorer mental health and HRQOL than non-victims. The study findings affirm the importance of assessing depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms in victims and the need to improve their depressive, anxiety and stress symptoms to diminish the negative effects of dating violence, which are apparent in their HRQOL.

  15. Compulsive use of alcohol among college students

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrelli, Paola; Bentley, Kate; Vitali, Mario; Clain, Alisabet J.; Nyer, Maren; Fava, Maurizio; Farabaugh, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    Among college students alcohol consumption is associated with other high-risk behaviors that can lead to short- and long-term negative health consequences. Identification of college students consuming alcohol who are at high risk for problems may have important public health implications. This study examines the ability of the CHQ compulsive use of alcohol item to detect high-risk behaviors relative to other screening measures and its association with different dimensions of compulsive drinki...

  16. Young adult sexual health: current and prior sexual behaviors among non-Hispanic white U.S. college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Jenny A.; Trussell, James; Moore, Nelwyn B.; Davidson, J. Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Objective Less is known about the sexual health of young adults compared to adolescents, despite 20-24 year olds' greater risk of unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. This paper provides information on college students' prior and current sexual practices, including oral sex, vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, and masturbation. Methods We analyzed data from a cross-sectional sexuality survey of students from two university campuses in the USA, one Midwestern and one Southwestern (N=1504). The sample consisted of non-Hispanic white, never-married students who identified as heterosexual. Results Of 16 possible combinations of four sexual activities (solitary masturbation, oral sex, vaginal intercourse, and anal intercourse), only four contained more than 5% of respondents: masturbation, oral sex, and vaginal intercourse (37%); oral sex and vaginal intercourse only (20%); all four (14%); and none (8%). Twenty percent had ever engaged in anal intercourse. Women were significantly less likely than men to have ever masturbated (48% versus 92%). Analyses exhibited several sexual health challenges, including lack of verbal sexual consent, alcohol use proximal to sex, and lack of contraceptive use. Conclusions Although few young adults are substituting it for vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse is increasingly common, and safer sex efforts should encourage condom use during both sexual activities. Masturbation should be encouraged as an alternative to higher risk sexual practices and an essential aspect of sexual well-being. Finally, practitioners should continue to address specific threats to college students' sexual health, including alcohol use and nonverbal consent. PMID:20152094

  17. College students and the flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/007446.htm College students and the flu To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Every year, the flu spreads across college campuses nationwide. Close living quarters, ...

  18. Mental health of college students and their non-college-attending peers: results from a large French cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Leray, Emmanuelle; Denis, Laure; Husky, Mathilde; Pitrou, Isabelle; Bodeau-Livinec, Florence

    2016-04-21

    The great majority of mental disorders begin during adolescence or early adulthood, although they are often detected and treated later in life. To compare mental health status of college students and their non-college-attending peers whether working, attending a secondary school, or non-college-attending peers who are neither employed nor students or trainees (NENST) will allow to focus on high risk group. Data were drawn from a large cross-sectional survey conducted by phone in 2005 in four French regions in a randomly selected sample of 22,138 adults. Analyses were restricted to the college-age subsample, defined as those aged 18 to 24 (n = 2424). Sociodemographic, educational, and occupational status were determined. In addition, respondents were administered standardized instruments to assess mental health and well-being (CIDI-SF, SF-36, Sheehan Disability Scale, CAGE), mastery, social support, and isolation. The four occupational groups were compared. All analyses were stratified by gender. Mental health disorders were more prevalent among the NENST group, with significant differences among men for anxiety disorders including phobias, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and panic disorder, impairing at least one role in their daily life. This was also true among women except for panic disorder. The NENST group also reported the lowest level of mastery and social support for both genders and the highest level of social isolation for women only. After adjustment, occupational status remained an independent correlate of PTSD (OR = 2.92 95 % CI = 1.4-6.1), agoraphobia (OR = 1.86 95 % CI 1.07-3.22) and alcohol dependence (OR = 2.1 95 % CI = 1.03-4.16). Compared with their peers at work or in education/training, the prevalence of certain common mental health disorders was higher among college-aged individuals in the NENST group. Efforts should be made to help young adults in the transition between school or academic contexts and joining the workforce. It is also

  19. Spiritual health of students in government medical colleges of Kolkata and their coping skills in a crisis situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Shibotosh; Pal, Dipak; Hazra, Suprakas; Pandey, Girish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The status of spiritual health of the population of India at large including that of young medical undergraduates who are the caregivers of the future and its association, if any, with coping skills in crisis situations is yet to be explored. To measure the spiritual health status of the study population, describe the coping skills used by them in crisis situations, identify the sociodemographic factors associated with their spiritual health, and to determine the association of spiritual health status of the study population and their coping skills. An institution-based cross-sectional study was performed among the third semester medical students in government medical colleges of Kolkata, West Bengal, India. The study was conducted among 362 medical students by the survey questionnaire method. The Spiritual Health Scale 2011 (SHS 2011) and the Brief COPE Scale were used to measure the spiritual health and coping status, respectively. Of all the respondents, 75.7% had refined spiritual health. The mean spiritual health score of the female students was significantly higher than that of the males. Of all the students, 66.1% showed good coping scores. Of all the respondents, 86.2% and 24.5% had higher adaptive and maladaptive coping scores, respectively. Refined spiritual categories were seen more among those students whose fathers had higher education and whose families arranged rituals at their homes. The spiritual health, self-evolution, and self-actualization scores of the respondents were significantly related to the adaptive coping scores and the fathers' education. The coping skills and hence, the spiritual health of the medical students were greatly influenced by the education of the father and cultural factor(s) like arranging annual rituals at home.

  20. Internet-delivered physical activity intervention for college students with mental health disorders: a randomized pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailey, Emily L; Wójcicki, Thomas R; Motl, Robert W; Hu, Liang; Strauser, David R; Collins, Kimberly D; McAuley, Edward

    2010-12-01

    The prevalence of mental health disorders among college students is rising and the increasing rates of anxiety and depression have important societal implications. Physical activity has been proposed as an adjuvant to traditional treatment approaches (i.e. psychotherapy or pharmacotherapy), and the internet is a potentially useful means of delivering physical activity information to the college-aged population. This randomized pilot trial examined the effects of an internet-based physical activity intervention on physical activity, self-efficacy, depression, and anxiety in college students (n = 47) receiving mental health counseling. Physical activity, depression, anxiety, exercise self-efficacy, and barriers self-efficacy were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. There was a significant time effect for physical activity, with both groups increasing their physical activity levels across the 10-week intervention but with a larger increase in the intervention condition (d = 0.68) than the control condition (d = 0.05). Exercise and barriers self-efficacy declined across the intervention, but more so in the control than intervention condition. Effects on depression and anxiety were nonsignificant. Finally, correlation analyses showed increases in physical activity were associated with increases in exercise self-efficacy (r = 0.62) and barriers self-efficacy (r = 0.63) and decreases in depression (r = -0.44) in the intervention condition, but not in the control condition. These results suggest that an internet-delivered physical activity intervention may be a promising approach to promoting physical activity among college students undergoing mental health counseling.

  1. Protective Factors, Campus Climate, and Health Outcomes among Sexual Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Michael R.; Kulick, Alex; Atteberry, Brittanie

    2015-01-01

    Heterosexism on campus can create a chilly climate for sexual minority students. Research has documented the negative impacts of campus climate on sexual minority students' health; however, little research has examined the role of potential protective factors among this population. Drawing on data collected from self-identified sexual minority…

  2. "Klebsiella Pneumonia" Liver Abscess Syndrome: Case Presentation to a College Student Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, Christopher; Spotts, P. Hunter

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a case of "Klebsiella pneumoniae" liver abscess (KPLA) in a student presenting to a university student health center. The authors also provide a review of KPLA and invasive "Klebsiella pneumoniae" liver abscess syndrome (IKPLAS), including epidemiology, common clinical manifestations, standard diagnostic…

  3. [Mental health of college students: experience of the university psychiatric outpatient clinic of Hospital de São João].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Celeste; Norton, Andreia; Brandão, Isabel; Roma-Torres, António

    2011-12-01

    The mental health of college students has been raising major awareness, due to the increased prevalence and severity of psychiatric disorders in this population. Higher education is associated with significant stressors that contribute to the development of mental health disturbances, and most college students are in the high-risk age group for the emergence of symptoms of major psychiatric disorders. Early diagnosis and treatment of these disorders in college students are important areas of effort, since they pose a high impact at the educational, economic, and social levels. Thus, specifically planned mental health services play a major role in the management of this population, should be specialized and have easy accessibility. The purpose of this study is to describe and characterize the College Students' psychiatric outpatient clinic of the Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de São João.

  4. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Mental Health Care Utilization among U.S. College Students: Applying the Institution of Medicine Definition of Health Care Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Justin B; Eisenberg, Daniel; Lu, Liya; Gathright, Molly

    2015-10-01

    The authors apply the Institute of Medicine's definition of health care disparities to college students. The analysis pools data from the first two waves of the Healthy Minds Study, a multicampus survey of students' mental health (N = 13,028). A probit model was used for any past-year service utilization, and group differences in health status were adjusted by transforming the entire distribution for each minority population to approximate the white distribution. Disparities existed between whites and all minority groups. Compared to other approaches, the predicted service disparities were greater because this method included the effects of mediating SES variables. Health care disparities persist in the college setting despite improved access and nearly universal insurance coverage. Our findings emphasize the importance of investigating potential sources of disparities beyond geography and coverage.

  5. Sociodemographic, Psychosocial, and Health Behavior Risk Factors Associated with Sexual Risk Behaviors among Southeastern US College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla J; Lowe, Kincaid; Stratton, Erin; Goodwin, Sherell Brown; Grimsley, Linda; Rodd, Jan; Williams, Catherine; Mattox, Cheri; Foster, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    We examined correlates of 1) being a virgin; 2) drug or alcohol use prior to the last intercourse; and 3) condom use during the last intercourse in a sample of college students. We recruited 24,055 students at six colleges in the Southeast to complete an online survey, yielding 4840 responses (20.1% response rate), with complete data from 4514. Logistic regression indicated that correlates of virginity included being younger (p attending a four-vs. two-year school (p attendance (p marijuana use (p = 0.002), and less frequentdrinking (p attending a four-year college (p marijuana use (p attending a two-year school (p = 0.04), being single/never married (p = 0.005), being homosexual or bisexual (p = 0.04), and a more frequent drinking (p = 0.001). Four-year college attendees were more likely to be a virgin but, if sexually active, reported higher sexual risk behaviors. These nuances regarding sexual risk may provide targets for sexual health promotion programs and interventions.

  6. Strength That Silences: Learning from the Experiences of Black Female College Students with Mental Health Concerns at a Predominantly White Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caesar-Richardson, Nadia Monique

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examines first person accounts of college experiences provided by Black female college students with mental health concerns at a predominantly White institution. Utilizing the theoretical frameworks of disability studies and critical race feminism to develop the study and analyze the collected data, this study considers the…

  7. Promoting Wellness for Thai College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanasiripong, Paul; Rodriguez, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    There are few in-depth studies of Thai college student health and mental health behaviors that focus on the cultural influences that shape such behaviors. Thus, the purposes of this study are: (1) to conduct the needs assessment survey on health and mental health issues at a public university in Thailand in order to better understand the issues…

  8. The influences of cultural values, ethnic identity, and language use on the mental health of Korean American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovey, Joseph D; Kim, Sheena E; Seligman, Laura D

    2006-09-01

    Little research has examined ethnic identity, cultural values, and native language maintenance as predictors of mental health in Korean Americans. The authors explored the influences of ethnic identity, maintenance of Asian cultural values, and maintenance of Korean language usage on self-esteem, anxiety, and depression in Korean American college students (N = 133). Findings indicated that Korean American men reported relatively high levels of state and trait anxiety and that the overall sample reported a relatively high level of depression. Whereas language and ethnic identity had a minimal influence on the mental health of students, greater cultural value maintenance was associated with decreased self-esteem and increases in state anxiety, trait anxiety, and depression. The positive relationship between cultural values and mental health problems may be indicative of being caught in an ethnic bind, in which the clash of traditional and modern values contributes to psychological distress. The authors discuss clinical implications of the findings.

  9. A latent class analysis of weight-related health behaviors among 2- and 4-year college students and associated risk of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Charu; Stigler, Melissa; Lust, Katherine; Laska, Melissa

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the complex patterning of weight-related health behaviors in 2- and 4-year college students. The objective of this study was to identify and describe unique classes of weight-related health behaviors among college students. Latent class analysis was used to identify homogenous, mutually exclusive classes of nine health behaviors that represent multiple theoretically/clinically relevant dimensions of obesity risk among 2- versus 4-year college students using cross-sectional statewide surveillance data (N = 17,584). Additionally, differences in class membership on selected sociodemographic characteristics were examined using a model-based approach. Analysis was conducted separately for both college groups, and five and four classes were identified for 2- and 4-year college students, respectively. Four classes were similar across 2- and 4-year college groups and were characterized as "mostly healthy dietary habits, active"; "moderately high screen time, active"; "moderately healthy dietary habits, inactive"; and "moderately high screen time, inactive." "Moderately healthy dietary habits, high screen time" was the additional class unique to 2-year college students. These classes differed on a number of sociodemographic characteristics, including the proportion in each class who were classified as obese. Implications for prevention scientists and future intervention programs are considered. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  10. Indoor tanning, mental health, and substance use among college students: the significance of gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Catherine E; Danoff-Burg, Sharon

    2010-09-01

    This study examined relations among indoor tanning frequency, symptoms of depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, and substance use. A total of 421 college students (68% female) completed self-report measures on one occasion. Among men, indoor tanning was positively associated with symptoms of anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder, whereas indoor tanning was unrelated to these symptoms among women. Among women, indoor tanning was positively associated with the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other substances. Further research is needed to explore contextual and coping processes that may underlie these gender differences.

  11. Effects of Text Messaging on College Students' Perceptions of Personal Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Heather K.; Bliss, Kadi R.; Fetro, Joyce V.

    2012-01-01

    Four focus groups of undergraduate students (n = 32) were conducted to elicit perceptions regarding how text messaging affects personal health. Participant responses were coded and themed into five health dimensions: physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual. Results of focus groups showed several main themes linked each dimension of…

  12. French mental health first aid guidelines for eating disorders: an exploration of user characteristics and usefulness among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melioli, Tiffany; Rispal, Magali; Hart, Laura M; Chabrol, Henri; Rodgers, Rachel F

    2016-08-31

    The literature has highlighted that strategies to increase appropriate and timely treatment seeking for eating disorders (EDs) are needed. The aim of this study was to use the Internet to disseminate guidelines for providing first aid to individuals suffering from ED among college students. Users were invited to complete two surveys: an initial one assessing user characteristics and, 28 days later, a questionnaire assessing the perceived usefulness of the guidelines. A sample of 651 college students (M age  = 22, standard deviation (SD) = 3.9) responded to the first questionnaire and 50 completed the second questionnaire (M age  = 22.2, SD = 2.6). The guidelines were downloaded 1174 times and 56% of users reported finding them useful. College students might be particularly interested in learning more about ED and the guidelines could be valuable to address the gap in available resources for ED-related mental health literacy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms as a Risk Factor for Suicidality in U.S. College Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huz, Ilana; Nyer, Maren; Dickson, Claire; Farabaugh, Amy; Alpert, Jonathan; Fava, Maurizio; Baer, Lee

    2016-01-01

    ...) with suicide risk among college students. Subjects were 474 college students who attended mental health screenings at two private universities and completed multiple self-report questionnaires...

  14. Factors influencing healthy eating habits among college students: an application of the health belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sameer; Basil, Michael D; Basil, Debra Z

    2009-01-01

    Poor eating habits are an important public health issue that has large health and economic implications. Many food preferences are established early, but because people make more and more independent eating decisions as they move through adolescence, the transition to independent living during the university days is an important event. To study the phenomenon of food selection, the heath belief model was applied to predict the likelihood of healthy eating among university students. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate the validity of the health belief model (HBM) among 194 students, followed by gender-based analyses. The data strongly supported the HBM. Social change campaign implications are discussed.

  15. The patient health questionnaire-15 and its abbreviated version as screening tools for depression in Korean college and graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyoo, Younghyun C; Ju, Sejin; Kim, Eunjung; Kim, Jieun E; Lee, Junghyun H

    2014-04-01

    Over half of all suicides worldwide occur in Asia. Given the close association between suicide and depression, it is quite unexpected that depression is least frequently diagnosed in Asia. This is, in part, due to the fact that Asians somatize depression. Young adults including college and graduate students are no exceptions. Therefore, a somatic symptom-focused screening tool would be useful in detecting depression in Asian college and graduate students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15) in screening for depression among Korean college and graduate students. In addition, we developed an abbreviated version of the PHQ-15 (aPHQ-15) and studied validity measures. Three-hundred and fifty Korean college and graduate students were screened with the PHQ-15. Of all participants, 176 were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV to diagnose major depressive episode, while the other 174 were evaluated with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (IDS-SR). Reliability and validity measures including the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and criterion, convergent, and divergent validity were tested. Principal component analysis was used in developing the abbreviated version of the PHQ-15. The PHQ-15 showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.82, intra-class correlation coefficient 0.87). The optimal cut-off point for detecting depression was estimated to be 8. There were strong correlations between the PHQ-15 total scores and self-report measures of depressive symptom severity (BDI-II: r=0.69 and pdepression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Perceptions of Heavy-Drinking College Students About a Sleep and Alcohol Health Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucito, Lisa M; DeMartini, Kelly S; Hanrahan, Tess H; Whittemore, Robin; Yaggi, H Klar; Redeker, Nancy S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to describe the sleep and psychological characteristics of heavy-drinking college students, their perceptions of sleep and sleep/alcohol interactions, and their reactions to a proposed integrated sleep and alcohol Web-based intervention. Students (N = 24) completed standardized surveys and participated in semistructured focus group interviews. Participants reported a high degree of sleep disturbance, sleep obstacles, and sleep-related consequences, which were validated by both quantitative and qualitative investigations. Sleep disturbance and sleep-related impairment were associated with more frequent drinking and greater risks from drinking. Participants perceived that alcohol has positive and negative effects on sleep latency, continuity, and quality. They expressed overall enthusiasm for the intervention but had specific content and format preferences.

  17. Perceptions of Heavy Drinking College Students about a Sleep and Alcohol Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMartini, Kelly S.; Hanrahan, Tess; Whittemore, Robin; Yaggi, Henry Klar; Redeker, Nancy S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to describe the sleep and psychological characteristics of heavy drinking college students, their perceptions of sleep and sleep/alcohol interactions, and their reactions to a proposed integrated sleep and alcohol internet-based intervention. Students (N = 24) completed standardized surveys and participated in semi-structured focus group interviews. Participants reported a high degree of sleep disturbance, sleep obstacles, and sleep-related consequences, which were validated by both quantitative and qualitative investigations. Sleep disturbance and sleep-related impairment were associated with more frequent drinking and greater risks from drinking. Participants perceived that alcohol has positive and negative effects on sleep latency, continuity, and quality. They expressed overall enthusiasm for the intervention but had specific content and format preferences. PMID:24924956

  18. Family and College Environmental Exposures Mediate the Relationship between Parental Education and Depression among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Zhai; Lu Chen; Yanjie Yang; Hailian Sun; Hui Pan; Jincai He; Xiongzhao Zhu; Hong Sui; Wenbo Wang; Xiaohui Qiu; Zhengxue Qiao; Xiuxian Yang; Jiarun Yang; Yunmiao Yu; Bo Ban

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a major health concern for college students due to its substantial morbidity and mortality. Although low parental education has been identified as a factor in depression in college students, the mechanisms through which parental educational achievement affects students? depression are not well understood. We tested whether adverse family and college environments mediate the relationship between parental educational level and depression among Chinese college students. ...

  19. An Evaluation of an eHealth Tool Designed to Improve College Students' Label-Reading Skills and Feelings of Empowerment to Choose Healthful Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lisa M Soederberg; Sutter, Carolyn A; Wilson, Machelle D; Bergman, Jacqueline J; Beckett, Laurel A; Gibson, Tanja N

    2017-01-01

    College students are at risk for poor dietary choices. New skills can empower individuals to adopt healthful behaviors, yet eHealth tools designed to develop food-choice skills, such as label-reading skills, are uncommon. We investigated the effects of web-based label-reading training on college students' perceptions of healthful food-choice empowerment. Students completed label-reading training in which they practiced selecting the more healthful food using nutrition labels. We examined improvements in label-reading accuracy (correct healthfulness decisions) and perceptions of empowerment, using a 6-item scale. Repeated measures ANOVAs and paired-samples t-tests were used to examine changes in accuracy and empowerment across the training session. In addition to increases in label-reading accuracy with training, we found increases in healthful food-choice empowerment scores. Specifically, the proportion of correct (i.e., more healthful) food choices increased across the three blocks of practice (p = 0.04) and food-choice empowerment scores were about 7.5% higher on average after training (p reading training was associated with increased feelings of empowerment associated with making healthful food choices. Skill focused eHealth tools may offer an important avenue for motivating behavior change through skill development.

  20. Intimate partner violence-related experiences and mental health among college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Akiko; Nourian, Maziar M; Assasnik, Nushean; Franchek-Roa, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health threat that contributes to a wide range of mental and physical health problems for victims. The purpose of this study was to examine IPV-related experiences and mental health outcomes among college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. The data were obtained from the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), the International Dating Violence Study (IDVS) 2001-2006 (ICPSR 29583; N = 981; Japan n = 207; Singapore n = 260; South Korea n = 256; Taiwan n = 258). Co-experience of physical IPV victimization and perpetration was associated with borderline personality traits and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but not with depression. Childhood sexual abuse, gender hostility and violence socialization were significant predictors of borderline personality traits, depression and PTSD. While country and gender variations in mental health are noted, there are two specific populations that may need special attention for mental health interventions: Taiwanese women especially for borderline personality traits and PTSD, and Japanese men especially for depression. IPV victimization and perpetration, childhood sexual abuse, gender hostility and violence socialization have a significant impact on the mental health of college students in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan. Since IPV and mental health are significant public health issues, research on IPV and mental health consequences of IPV victimization and perpetration in these countries should be further expanded in order to better understand the interventions that will be effective in treating victims, perpetrators and victim/perpetrators of IPV. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Psychological distress in French college students: demographic, economic and social stressors. Results from the 2010 National Health Barometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïas, Thomas; du Roscoät, Enguerrand; Véron, Laurentine; Guignard, Romain; Richard, Jean-Baptiste; Legleye, Stéphane; Sauvade, Fanny; Kovess, Viviane; Beck, François

    2014-03-17

    Psychological distress (PD) in students is under-investigated, since its prevalence can be high in certain subgroups of students and it has been seen to be associated with other mental health issues and academic achievement. In a sample of French college students, this study investigated factors associated with PD, and looked more closely at the impact of social and interpersonal variables. Data were extracted from the 2010 French "National Health Barometer". 946 students were interviewed. Mental health was assessed using the MH-5 five-item scale. The PD rate in this sample was 13.8% (7.2% in males, 19.5% in females). Low income, nonsexual assault in the last 12 months, studying law and low social participation were associated with PD in multivariate analyses. French students show specific characteristics that are discussed in order to explain the relatively low rate of PD observed. The impact of loneliness and social isolation are a major focus for preventive policies based on community resources and early detection of the symptoms of PD.

  2. Mental Health Symptomatology and Exposure to Non-Fatal Suicidal Behavior: Factors That Predict Vulnerability and Resilience among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Jamison S; Abrutyn, Seth; Smigelsky, Melissa A; Neimeyer, Robert A

    2017-11-07

    Despite efforts to identify risk factors following exposure to completed suicide, research has paid less attention to the associations between exposure to non-fatal suicide behavior (NFSB) and mental health symptomatology-factors that may underlie one's susceptibility to future suicidal thoughts and behaviors. This study examined differences in mental health symptomatology among 192 college students exposed to NFSB and 202 exposed to general stressors. Results indicated that students exposed to NFSB had significantly higher levels of depression and anxiety compared to those exposed to a variety of other stressors but not NFSB. Furthermore, among those exposed, a number of risk and protective factors emerged in relation to psychological sequelae, such as emotional stability, social support and the quality of the relationship between the exposed and suicidal individual. These findings highlight the importance of enhancing provisions of support for those exposed to NFSB.

  3. The effect of meditation on physical and mental health in junior college students: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke-Ping; Su, Whei-Ming; Huang, Chen-Kuan

    2009-12-01

    Physical stress and mental stress are increasingly common phenomena in our rapidly changing and stressful modern society. Research has found meditation to produce positive and demonstrable stress reduction effects on brain and immune functions. This study is grounded in traditional Chinese philosophical mores that teach a process summarized by the keynote activities of "calm, still, quiet, consider, and get" and the potential of this process to reduce stress in adolescents. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of meditation on the physical and mental health of junior college students. This research employed a quasi-experimental design. Participants included 242 freshmen from a junior college in Taiwan selected using a convenience sampling technique. Participants were then randomly separated into experimental (n = 119) and control (n = 123) groups. The project duration was 18 weeks, during which the experimental group received 2 hours of meditation treatment per week, for a total of 36 hours. Both groups completed pretest and posttest Life Adaptation Scale forms, which included questionnaires addressing information on physical and mental distress and positive and negative coping strategies. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance. Findings showed that the effect of the experiment treatment was significant when student physical and mental distress pretest scores were controlled. Physical and mental symptoms in the experimental group were lower than those in the control group. Meditation can help students to adapt to life stressors. This study also provides support for traditional Chinese wisdom, which promotes meditation as one way to improve health.

  4. Sexual Health Transformation among College Student Educators in an Arts-Based HIV Prevention Intervention: A Qualitative Cross-Site Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Shannon L.; Taboada, Arianna; Merino, Yesenia; Heitfeld, Suzanne; Gordon, Robert J.; Gere, David; Lightfoot, Alexandra F.

    2017-01-01

    We examined the sexual health change process experienced by 26 college student sexual health educators from three geographic regions of the United States who participated in a multisite arts-based sexual health prevention program. We conducted eight focus groups and used a phenomenological approach to analyze data. We drew from social cognitive…

  5. Health Insurance: Most College Students Are Covered through Employer-Sponsored Plans, and Some Colleges and States Are Taking Steps to Increase Coverage. Report to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, U.S. Senate. GAO-08-389

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, John E.

    2008-01-01

    College students face challenges obtaining health insurance: they may not have access to insurance through an employer, and as they get older, they may lose dependent coverage obtained through a parent's plan. Federal law ensures continued access to health insurance for some, but not all, such students. Without health insurance, college students…

  6. Stress and mental health problems in 1st year medical students: a survey of two medical colleges in Kanpur, India

    OpenAIRE

    Shivendra Jena; Harish Chandra Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Incidence of stress among medical students has been reported to be between high and very high. Medical students in pre-clinical phase are more likely to develop psychological distress than medical students in clinical phase. It may affect academic performance and lead to anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Methods: First year students of one government medical college and one private medical college of Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India, were surveyed to find out stress and men...

  7. Availability and Accessibility of Student-Specific Weight Loss Programs and Other Risk Prevention Health Services on College Campuses

    OpenAIRE

    Lynch, Sarah; Hayes, Sharon; Napolitano, Melissa; Hufnagel, Katrina

    2016-01-01

    Background More than one third of college students who are overweight or obese are in need of weight loss programs tailored to college students. However, the availability and accessibility of these programs is unknown. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the availability and ease of access to weight loss programs for students at 10 universities with the largest undergraduate enrollment. Methods The 10 public universities with the largest student bodies with a mean (SD) undergraduate...

  8. Use of cell phones and computers for health promotion and tobacco cessation by American Indian college students in Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Jo Ann W; Nelson, Lonnie A; Young, Sara L; Buchwald, Dedra; Roll, John

    2017-01-01

    Cell phones and personal computers have become popular mechanisms for delivering and monitoring health information and education, including the delivery of tobacco cessation education and support. Tobacco smoking is prevalent among American Indians (AIs) and Alaska Natives (ANs), with 26% AI/AN adult men smoking compared to 19% of Caucasian adult males and 22% of African American adult males. Smoking is even more prevalent in Northern Plains AI populations, with 42% of men and women reporting current smoking. The literature on the availability and use of cell phones and computers, or the acceptability of use in health promotion among AIs and ANs, is scant. The authors report findings from a survey of AI students regarding their cell phone and computer access and use. The survey was conducted to inform the development and implementation of a text messaging smoking cessation intervention modeled on a program developed and used in Australia. A 22-item paper and pencil survey was administered to students at tribal colleges in rural Montana. The survey questions included cell phone ownership and access to service, use of cell phones and computers for health information, demographics, tobacco use habits, and interest in an intervention study. The study was reviewed and determined exempt by the institutional review boards at the tribal colleges and the lead research university. The study was conducted by researchers at the tribal colleges. Survey respondents received $10 when the survey was completed and returned. Data analysis was performed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. Among 153 AI respondents, the mean age was 29 years, range was 18-64 years. Overall, 40% reported smoking cigarettes with a mean age of 16 years at initiation. A total of 131 participants (86%) had cell phones and, of those, 122 (93%) had unlimited text messaging. A total of 104 (68%) had smart phones (with internet access), although 40% of those with smart phones reported that

  9. Alcohol Use and Strenuous Physical Activity in College Students: A Longitudinal Test of 2 Explanatory Models of Health Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Heather A.; Riley, Elizabeth N.; Smith, Gregory T.; Milich, Richard; Burris, Jessica L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To help clarify the effect of gender on the bidirectional relationship between alcohol use and strenuous physical activity in college students. Participants: Five hundred twenty-four (52% female) college students recruited in August 2008 and 2009 and followed up in April 2009 and April 2011, respectively. Methods: Participants reported…

  10. Subthreshold psychotic symptom distress, self-stigma, and peer social support among college students with mental health concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denenny, Danielle; Thompson, Elizabeth; Pitts, Steven C; Dixon, Lisa B; Schiffman, Jason

    2015-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to explore the potential moderating effect of social support on the relation between distress caused by psychosis risk symptoms and self-stigma among college students with mental health diagnoses. Participants were young adult college students who endorsed having a past or present mental health diagnosis (n = 63). Self-report data were examined from the Prodromal Questionnaire-Brief, a measure of subthreshold psychosis risk symptoms; the Self-Concurrence/Application subscale of the Self-Stigma of Mental Illness Scale, a measure of self-stigma; and the Friendships subscale of the Lubben Social Network Scale-Revised, a measure of social support from peers. There was a modest direct relation between distress associated with psychosis risk symptoms and self-stigma. There was a larger relation between distress from risk symptoms and self-stigma for those with low social support compared to those with mean and high social support. Although causality cannot be determined based on this study, a strong relation between symptom distress and stigma was found among those reporting low peer social support. Interventions that target both self-stigma and social support might be relevant for young adults with a history of mental health concerns who currently endorse subthreshold psychotic symptoms. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Suicidal Risk among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Mary; And Others

    Although the suicide rate of young adults has increased dramatically, few empirical studies examine suicide in the normal population. To examine suicidal thinking and behavior in a college student sample, 43 female and 23 male college students responded to an adverse life event scenario and then filled out an extended questionnaire regarding…

  12. College Student Depression: Counseling Billy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, A. Keith

    2008-01-01

    A substantial portion of the college student population experiences affective disorders. This case study presents the conceptualization, course of treatment, and outcomes for a male college student presenting for counseling with depression. A review of Adlerian, cognitive-behavioral, and Gestalt techniques is provided. (Contains 1 figure.)

  13. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  14. Efficacy of a health-promotion intervention for college students: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulla Díez, Sara M; Fortis, Adriana Pérez; Franco, Soledad Franco

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a leading cause of death in Mexico. Research has shown that encouraging healthy behaviors, especially among younger people, is an effective way to reduce chronic illnesses such as diabetes and the related morbidity and mortality from these diseases. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief health-promotion intervention in encouraging a health-promoting lifestyle in university students. A 2-group randomized controlled experimental design was used. Seventy-three freshman Mexican students (31 in the experimental group and 42 in the control group) participated in the study. The experimental group attended a7-session program, with a duration of 2 hours per session. Lifestyle was measured using the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile-II questionnaire. Repeated-measures and factorial analysis of variance were computed. There was a significant main effect of the intervention in all dependent health profile variables, F(2, 138) = 3.46-14.45, p stress management, F(2, 138) = 8.71, p Students attending the intervention presented a healthier lifestyle than did students in the control group. These results offer interesting experimental evidence to establish guidelines for the design of healthier universities.

  15. Permissive Parenting and Mental Health in College Students: Mediating Effects of Academic Entitlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alison L.; Hirsch, Jameson K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Student mental health may suffer due to unreasonable expectations associated with academic entitlement; permissive parenting may be one source of these expectations. The authors examined the role of academic entitlement as a mediator of the relationship between permissive parenting and psychological functioning. Participants:…

  16. Mental health of college students and their non-college-attending peers: results from the National Epidemiologic Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Carlos; Okuda, Mayumi; Wright, Crystal; Hasin, Deborah S; Grant, Bridget F; Liu, Shang-Min; Olfson, Mark

    2008-12-01

    Although young adulthood is often characterized by rapid intellectual and social development, college-aged individuals are also commonly exposed to circumstances that place them at risk for psychiatric disorders. To assess the 12-month prevalence of psychiatric disorders, sociodemographic correlates, and rates of treatment among individuals attending college and their non-college-attending peers in the United States. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (N = 43,093). Analyses were done for the subsample of college-aged individuals, defined as those aged 19 to 25 years who were both attending (n = 2188) and not attending (n = 2904) college in the previous year. Sociodemographic correlates and prevalence of 12-month DSM-IV psychiatric disorders, substance use, and treatment seeking among college-attending individuals and their non-college-attending peers. Almost half of college-aged individuals had a psychiatric disorder in the past year. The overall rate of psychiatric disorders was not different between college-attending individuals and their non-college-attending peers. The unadjusted risk of alcohol use disorders was significantly greater for college students than for their non-college-attending peers (odds ratio = 1.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.50), although not after adjusting for background sociodemographic characteristics (adjusted odds ratio = 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.44). College students were significantly less likely (unadjusted and adjusted) to have a diagnosis of drug use disorder or nicotine dependence or to have used tobacco than their non-college-attending peers. Bipolar disorder was less common in individuals attending college. College students were significantly less likely to receive past-year treatment for alcohol or drug use disorders than their non-college-attending peers. Psychiatric disorders, particularly alcohol use disorders, are common

  17. Greek college students and psychopathology: new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Koundi, Kalliopi; Pappa, Xenia; Sakkas, Pavlos; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C

    2015-04-29

    College students' mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. To investigate Greek college students' psychopathology. During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). State anxiety and trait anxiety were correlated, to a statistically significant degree, with the family status of the students (p = 0.024) and the past visits to the psychiatrist (p = 0.039) respectively. The subscale of psychoticism is significantly related with the students' origin, school, family status and semester. The subscale of neuroticism is significantly related with the students' school. The subscale of extraversion is significantly related with the students' family psychiatric history. Students, whose place of origin is Attica, have on average higher scores in somatization, phobic anxiety and paranoid ideation than the other students. Students from abroad have, on average, higher scores in interpersonal sensitivity and psychoticism than students who hail from other parts of Greece. The majority of the students (79.7%) do not suffer from depression, according to the Beck's depression inventory scale. Anxiety, somatization, personality traits and depression are related with the students' college life.

  18. Facebook use and its effects on the life of health science students in a private medical college of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Rajesh Kumar; Shah, Dev Kumar; Basnet, Sangharshila; Paudel, Keshab Raj; Sah, Phoolgen; Sah, Ajit Kumar; Adhikari, Kishor

    2016-08-02

    Facebook, a popular social networking site, has been used by people of different ages and professions for various purposes. Its use in the field of medical education is increasing dramatically. At the same time, the pros and cons of facebook use among the health science students has attracted the attention of educators. The data regarding its use and the effect on the life of Nepalese health science students has not yet been documented. Therefore, this study is carried out to evaluate the effect of facebook use on social interactions, behaviour, academics, and the health of students in a medical college of Nepal. A cross-sectional descriptive study conducted among medical, dental, nursing and allied health science students using self-administered questionnaire. The study showed that 98.2 % of participants were facebook users. Among 452 respondents, 224 and 228 were male and female respectively, with a mean age of 20.2 ± 1.2 years. The main reason for using facebook was to remain in contact with family and friend (32 %), while its use for the academic purpose was only 5 %. However, 80.8 % of students acknowledged ease in acquiring academic materials from others, through facebook. One-fourth of the students acknowledged that they are using facebook late at night on a regular basis, while surprisingly 4.2 % of the students admitted accessing facebook during the classroom lectures. Almost two-third of the users, further admitted that facebook has had a negative impact on their studies. Burning eyes (21 %), disturbed sleep (19 %), and headache (16 %) were the most common adverse health effects reported by the facebook users. Many students (71.4 %) tried and most of them (68.7 %) succeeded, in reducing time spent on facebook, to allow for increased time devoted to their studies. The widespread use of facebook among the health science students, was found to have both positive and negative effects on their academics, social life, and health.

  19. Differences in health-related behaviors between middle school, high school, and college students in Jiangsu province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weina; He, Mike Z; Wang, Yunle; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Yonglin; Wu, Ming; Tang, Zhen; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Baojun; Zhen, Shiqi; Cheskin, Lawrence J

    Increasing rates of obesity among Chinese adolescents has become a major public health concern in recent years. Studies have shown that factors such as food choices, physical activity, and screen time play important roles in fostering obesity. We examined a number of biological and social determinants that influence these factors. To determine whether dietary behavior, physical activity, and screen time varied among students in different stages of their education. Students in 13 cities across Jiangsu Province completed an anonymous survey assessing demographics and various health-related behaviors in a controlled setting. The survey population ranged from middle school students to undergraduates. 55,361 surveys were returned, and 46,611 (84.2%) were usable for the analysis. Multiple linear regression models were used to investigate the relationship between four behavioral factors (dietary behavior, screen time, physical activity, and moderate exercise) and seven predictors (gender, age, BMI, mother's education, nearsightedness, allowance, and geographic region). Baseline characteristics of the survey population analyzed by education level (middle school, high school, college and beyond) showed moderate differences in demographics among the three groups. Physical activity, moderate exercise, and dietary behavior decreased with educational level, while screen time increased. All predictors in the four considered regression models were statistically significant. This unique, large-scale survey of Chinese students in a region of contrasting economic development revealed numerous relationships between health-related diet and physical-activity, region, and education level. These findings can inform the development of measures to counteract the rise of obesity in China.

  20. The Relationship of Level of Positive Mental Health with Current Mental Disorders in Predicting Suicidal Behavior and Academic Impairment in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Corey L. M.; Eisenberg, Daniel; Perry, Geraldine S.; Dube, Shanta R.; Kroenke, Kurt; Dhingra, Satvinder S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether level of positive mental health complements mental illness in predicting students at risk for suicidal behavior and impaired academic performance. Participants: A sample of 5,689 college students participated in the 2007 Healthy Minds Study and completed an Internet survey that included the Mental Health…

  1. Medical student in the family health strategy on the first years of college: perception of graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Maria Paula Ferreira; Marin, Maria José Sanches; Otani, Marcia Aparecida Padovan; Marin, Marina Sanches

    2014-12-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the effective value of the experience gained by medical students who participate in the Family Health Strategy (Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF)) during the early stages of their medical training. This teaching strategy is based on learning by experiencing the problems that exist in real life. This study proposed to understand the value of this teaching strategy from the viewpoint of the students who had participated, after their graduation. The method adopted was a qualitative study conducted through interviews with students who graduated in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. The data analysis used the hermeneutic dialectic technique as its model. The graduates considered that this experience enabled them to understand the organization and functioning of the health service and the context of the daily life of the users. This experience facilitated the doctor patient relationship, the development of clinical reasoning and the bond with the user. However the students emphasized that a lack of maturity prevented them gaining a higher level of benefit from the experience. Therefore, although the structure of the course is permeated by advances and challenges, it was concluded that this experience contributed to the student's learning of certain essential elements of medical training.

  2. MEDICAL STUDENT IN THE FAMILY HEALTH STRATEGY ON THE FIRST YEARS OF COLLEGE: PERCEPTION OF GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paula Ferreira Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of knowledge about the effective value of the experience gained by medical students who participate in the Family Health Strategy (Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF during the early stages of their medical training. This teaching strategy is based on learning by experiencing the problems that exist in real life. This study proposed to understand the value of this teaching strategy from the viewpoint of the students who had participated, after their graduation. The method adopted was a qualitative study conducted through interviews with students who graduated in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. The data analysis used the hermeneutic dialectic technique as its model. The graduates considered that this experience enabled them to understand the organization and functioning of the health service and the context of the daily life of the users. This experience facilitated the doctor patient relationship, the development of clinical reasoning and the bond with the user. However the students emphasized that a lack of maturity prevented them gaining a higher level of benefit from the experience. Therefore, although the structure of the course is permeated by advances and challenges, it was concluded that this experience contributed to the student's learning of certain essential elements of medical training.

  3. Prevalence of health-risk behaviours among Canadian post-secondary students: descriptive results from the National College Health Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kwan, Matthew Y W; Faulkner, Guy E J; Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly P; Cairney, John

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of the current study was to determine the prevalence of a broad range of health-risk behaviours among post-secondary students from across Canada, and to determine whether institutional...

  4. Serious health consequences associated with alcohol use among college students: demographic and clinical characteristics of patients seen in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James C; Shu, Jianfen

    2004-03-01

    Heavy episodic alcohol use has been associated with numerous consequences among college students. However, neither the incidence nor the demographic and clinical characteristics of serious health consequences have been clearly defined in this population. This study is conducted to better understand clinical outcomes associated with alcohol use in college students. In a prospective observational study, medical records of students presenting to a large university medical center emergency department were examined. Demographic and clinical features of alcohol-related visits were gathered on patients who were enrolled as undergraduates at a 4-year public institution during 2 academic years from July 2000 through June 2002. Enrollment was approximately 12,500 undergraduates per year. Of all emergency visits, 13% were alcohol related; and of all undergraduate students, 0.7% presented with alcohol-related medical conditions each year. Injuries accounted for 53% of all visits, and acute intoxication accounted for 34%. Nine of 185 patients were hospitalized. Men aged 21 years and older had the highest odds of visiting the emergency department. Trauma occurred more frequently among men, students > 18 years of age and white students. Accidents (84%) and fights (16%) were the sources of injuries. Acute intoxication occurred more frequently among women, students students. Alcohol use contributes to a small yet significant proportion of emergency room visits for college students. Distinctive subgroups of college students, including legal-age drinkers, experience patterns of serious health consequences as a result of problem use of alcohol.

  5. Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences, Stress, and Social Support on the Health of College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatekin, Canan; Ahluwalia, Rohini

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the study was to describe the nature of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) reported by undergraduates and to examine the effect of ACEs, perceived stress, and perceived social support on their health. Although respondents ( N = 321) had parents with relatively high levels of education and indicated generally high levels of social support, results nevertheless showed a relatively high level of mental health problems and rates of ACEs that were similar to those in the general population in the state. Those with higher levels of ACEs had greater levels of stress and lower levels of social support. ACEs, social support, and stress explained more than half the variance in mental health scores, with stress making the greatest contribution. Despite the fact that we used different measures and an independent sample, findings generally replicated a previous study. Results point to a need to increase awareness of the association between ACEs and health on college campuses, to examine the effects of ACEs in more detail, and to design ACE-informed programs for this population.

  6. Impediments to academic performance of bisexual college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nicole Aydt; Dudley, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate health-related impediments to academic success for bisexual college students. Respondents to the Fall 2011 American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II) survey who self-identified as bisexual, heterosexual, gay, or lesbian. Secondary analyses of the ACHA-NCHA II data were conducted to compare the experiences of bisexual students with both each other (bisexual men and bisexual women) and those of their nonbisexual counterparts (heterosexual and gay/lesbian students). Bisexual college students are a large and distinct sexual minority group. On all measures with the exception of discrimination, bisexual college students reported the strongest threats to academic success of all sexual orientations. Given the unique impediments for bisexual students, college health professionals should consider specifically addressing needs for bisexual students, bisexual women in particular.

  7. Managing Helicobacter pylori in college health, with special considerations for international students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, James Randolph; Kashup, Suman

    2016-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. This paper will make specific recommendations for a diagnostic and treatment strategy tailored to the international student population. This paper is a case report and narrative review based on recent international epidemiologic studies and consensus conference recommendations identified in MEDLINE. In the nations (mostly Asian) that send the largest number of students to the United States, the prevalence of H. pylori is generally 60% to 80%, whereas the prevalence in the United States is about 25%. The patterns of antibiotic resistance in those countries are also different than that in the general US population. Health care providers should have a higher index of suspicion for Helicobacter infection among international students with dyspepsia and need to use a different treatment regimen than is standard for the general US population.

  8. [Oral health state in dentistry students of Medical College, Jagiellonian University in Cracow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stypułkowska, Jadwiga; Łyszczarz, Robert; Wichliński, Jarosław; Pawłowska, Katarzyna; Solska-Kuczerek, Aleksandra

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the oral health status of the fourth and fifth year dentistry students of Collegium Medicum of the Jagiellonian University in Cracow. The data were collected using the anonymous questionnaire concerning the general health, using medications, dietary habits, smoking and drinking alcohol, present and previous oral complaints and selected health behaviour patterns (follow-up examination of oral cavity, teeth brushing and other hygienic procedures, using dental floss). The oral cavity status was estimated by clinical examination conducted with the use of artificial lighting and basic diagnostic set: dental probe and dental mirror. The data for 120 persons were analysed: 75 (62.5%) fourth year students and 45 (37.5%) fifth year students aged 21-27 years (mean age 23.2). Among the examined persons 84.2% descended from cities and 15.8% from the villages. During the medical review it was stated that among chronic diseases allergies (27.5%) were on the first position, cardio-vascular diseases (8.33%) were on the second and respiratory system diseases were on the third position. The review about smoking and drinking alcohol stated that 71.7% never smoked cigarettes, 10% gave up smoking and 18.3% were daily smokers, 81.7% of students occasionally drink alcohol, mainly beer. The dental history stated that all of examined students (100%) were subjected to teeth caries treatment, 48.7% had endodontic treatment, 38.1% extraction (mainly for orthodontic reasons), 5.9% prosthetic, 3.9% apicoectomy, 0.8% had dental implant. The estimation of oral cavity hygiene (API index) and frequency of decay (DMF index-Decayed Missing Filling) was included in the examination. The mean value of DMF was 13.56, API 22.51 in the whole examined group. The assessment of periodontal tissues was made with the support of treatment needs: 60.0% of examined persons don't need any periodontal treatment, 14.17% need to improve their oral cavity hygiene and 25.83% require

  9. Hookah use among college students: prevalence, drug use, and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Renee D; Grinberg, Alice; Shapiro, Jack; Keith, Diana; McNeil, Michael P; Taha, Farah; Jiang, Bianca; Hart, Carl L

    2014-08-01

    There is consistent evidence that hookah use is as, if not more, harmful than cigarette use. Yet, hookah users underestimate the potential deleterious effects of hookah use. This study examined the rates of hookah use and associated demographic characteristics in a sample of undergraduates at a small Northeastern university. This study also examined the relationships between hookah use and other substance use, mental health problems, and perceived levels of stress. Data were drawn from the Spring 2009 American Health Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) at one small, Northeastern university (N=1799). The relationships between hookah use and other substance use, mental health problems, and perceived stress levels were examined using logistic regression analyses. Hookah use (in the past month) was reported among 14.1% (253/1799) of this sample of undergraduates. Hookah users were more likely to use other substances, including cigarettes, cannabis, alcohol, cocaine, and amphetamines. The strongest associations emerged between hookah use and alcohol and cigarette use. There were no significant associations found between hookah use and any mental health problems or perceived stress levels. Hookah users are significantly more likely to use other substances, including alcohol, cigarettes, cannabis, cocaine, and amphetamines compared with non-hookah users. In contrast to cigarette smoking, hookah use does not appear to be associated with mental health problems or perceived stress levels in this sample of undergraduates. Further investigation into the prevalence and correlates of hookah use is needed in representative population samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Conceptions of a Good College Student, Parent-Student Communication About College, First-Year Grades, and College Retention Among First- and Non-First-Generation College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Palbusa, Julienne Marie Alipio

    2016-01-01

    This study examined conceptions of a good college student, parent-student communication about college, academic achievement, college student retention, and college generation status among first-year college students. 344 undergraduates described the characteristics and skills of a good college student. In addition, they reported the frequency, perceived helpfulness, and quality (instrumental and emotional support) of parent-student communication about college. Student GPA and second year rete...

  11. Effectiveness of Tai Chi on Physical and Psychological Health of College Students: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Zheng

    Full Text Available To investigate the effectiveness and safety of Tai Chi Chuan (TCC on physical and psychological health of college students.Two hundred six college students were recruited and randomly allocated to a control group or a TCC exercise group in an equal ratio. Participants in the control group were instructed to maintain their original activity level and those in the TCC exercise group received 12 weeks of TCC exercise training based on their original activity level. Physical and psychological outcomes were evaluated at baseline, 13 weeks and 25 weeks. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed for the above outcomes.Compared with the control group, the TCC exercise group showed significant improvements at the end of the 12-week intervention period for flexibility (length of Sit and Reach (cm: TCC group 14.09±7.40 versus control 12.88±6.57, P = 0.039 adjusted for its baseline measures using a general linear model and balance ability (open eyes perimeter: TCC group 235.6(191~314 versus control 261(216~300; closed eyes perimeter: TCC group 370.5 (284~454 versus control 367 (293~483; P = 0.0414, 0.008, respectively, adjusted for corresponding baseline measures using a general linear model. No significant changes in other physical and mental outcomes were found between the two groups. No adverse events were reported during the study period.TCC exercise was beneficial in college students for improving flexibility and balance capability to some extent, compared with usual exercise.Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-13003328.

  12. American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment Spring 2008 Reference Group Data Report (Abridged): The American College Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of American College Health, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Assessing and understanding the health needs and capacities of college students is paramount to creating healthy campus communities. The American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) is a survey that ACHA developed in 1998 to assist institutions of higher education in achieving this goal. The…

  13. Prevalence of substance abuse among regular degree health science students in Sheba University College in Mekelle Town, Tigray - Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagos, Esietu Gebregazabher; Asfeha, Gebrekidan Gebregzabher; Berihu, Birhane Alem

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse (SA) refers to the harmful or hazardous use of psychoactive substances, including alcohol and illicit drugs. The most common substances which are usually abused are alcohol and tobacco. Herein, we assessed the prevalence of SA among regular degree health science students of the Sheba University College (SUC). A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 1076 SUC students using self-administered structured questionnaire. The simple sampling technique was used to select students. Descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate analysis were done. The overall prevalence of "ever used substance" for at least one was 45.5%. The most commonly used drugs in descending order were alcohol (25.1%), cigarette (11.4%), and khat (9.2%). Male participants, urban setting, peer pressure, personal pleasure, and academic dissatisfaction and pocket money were highly associated with SA. This study showed a lower magnitude (45.6% ever use and 21% still using) of SA among students' compared to other studies. Even if a considerable decrease in SA among study subjects, the creation of awareness and health education should be continued to fully combat the problem of abuse.

  14. Prevalence of substance abuse among regular degree health science students in Sheba University College in Mekelle Town, Tigray - Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esietu Gebregazabher Hagos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance abuse (SA refers to the harmful or hazardous use of psychoactive substances, including alcohol and illicit drugs. The most common substances which are usually abused are alcohol and tobacco. Herein, we assessed the prevalence of SA among regular degree health science students of the Sheba University College (SUC. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 1076 SUC students using self-administered structured questionnaire. The simple sampling technique was used to select students. Descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate analysis were done. Results: The overall prevalence of “ever used substance” for at least one was 45.5%. The most commonly used drugs in descending order were alcohol (25.1%, cigarette (11.4%, and khat (9.2%. Male participants, urban setting, peer pressure, personal pleasure, and academic dissatisfaction and pocket money were highly associated with SA. Conclusion: This study showed a lower magnitude (45.6% ever use and 21% still using of SA among students' compared to other studies. Even if a considerable decrease in SA among study subjects, the creation of awareness and health education should be continued to fully combat the problem of abuse.

  15. Assessing Psychological Symptoms and Well-Being: Application of a Dual-Factor Mental Health Model to Understand College Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antaramian, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A dual-factor mental health model includes measures of positive psychological well-being in addition to traditional indicators of psychopathology to comprehensively determine mental health status. The current study examined the utility of this model in understanding the psychological adjustment and educational functioning of college students. A…

  16. An Examination of the Impact of Racial and Ethnic Identity, Impostor Feelings, and Minority Status Stress on the Mental Health of Black College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Shannon; Beasley, Samuel T.; Jones, Bianca; Awosogba, Olufunke; Jackson, Stacey; Cokley, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This study examined ethnic identity, racial centrality, minority status stress, and impostor feelings as predictors of mental health in a sample of 218 Black college students. Ethnic identity was found to be a significant positive predictor of mental health, whereas minority status stress and impostor feelings were significant negative predictors.…

  17. One Hundred Years of College Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Although the first student health service is credited to Amherst College in 1861, almost 50 years passed before Princeton University established the first mental health service in 1910. At that time, a psychiatrist was hired to help with student personality development. Although other schools subsequently established such services, the first 50…

  18. Does ethno-cultural betrayal in trauma affect Asian American/Pacific Islander college students' mental health outcomes? An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Jennifer M

    2017-06-15

    Interpersonal trauma has deleterious effects on mental health, with college students experiencing relatively high rates of lifetime trauma. Asian American/Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) have the lowest rate of mental healthcare utilization. According to cultural betrayal trauma theory, societal inequality may impact within-group violence in minority populations, thus having implications for mental health. In the current exploratory study, between-group (interracial) and within-group (ethno-cultural betrayal) trauma and mental health outcomes were examined in AAPI college students. Participants (N = 108) were AAPI college students from a predominantly white university. Data collection concluded in December 2015. Participants completed online self-report measures. A multivariate analysis of variance revealed that when controlling for interracial trauma, ethno-cultural betrayal trauma significantly impacted dissociation, hallucinations, posttraumatic stress symptoms, and hypervigilance. The results have implications for incorporating identity, discrimination, and ethno-cultural betrayal trauma victimization into assessments and case conceptualizations in therapy.

  19. Health-related fitness profile of college students attending physical education classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Nahas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess health-related fitness (HRPF of college students at Federal University of Santa Catarina. Subjects were 438 students (249 males and 189 females, with ages ranging from 17 to 29 years. The test battery included measures of body mass index, muscular endurance and strength, flexibility and cardiorespiratory fitness. The analyses were performed with the SPSS statistical package (version 11.5. Descriptive statistics and the tests Kolmogorov-Smirnov, U-Mann-Whitney and Chi-square(χ². The level of significance was set at p RESUMO O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar o perfil da aptidão física relacionada à saúde AFRS dos universitários que freqüentam as aulas de Educação Física Curricular (EFC, da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina. Participaram da amostra 438 alunos (249 homens e 189 mulheres, com idade entre 17 e 29 anos. A bateria de testes incluiu a medida do Índice de Massa Corporal, flexibilidade, resistência e força muscular e de aptidão cardiorrespiratória. A análise foi realizada no programa Statiscal Package for the Social Science versão 11.5, e incluiu estatística descritiva, os testes de Kolmogorov Smirnov, U-Mann-Whitney e do Qui-quadrado (χ². O nível de significância adotado foi de p<0,05. A variável em que se observou maior proporção de universitários com baixa aptidão, em ambos os sexos, foi a condição cardiorrespiratória. Os homens apresentaram maior prevalência de excesso de peso do que as mulheres, sendo esta diferença estatisticamente significativa. Também maior proporção de homens foi classificada com baixa aptidão na variável flexão e extensão de braços. Nas demais variáveis foi verificada maior proporção de mulheres com baixa aptidão, sendo observada diferença significativa para o teste abdominal e na condição cardiorrespiratória. A maior parte dos universitários apresentava dois ou três componentes da AFRS, considerados em n

  20. Racial/ethnic variation in mental health correlates of substance use among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumstine, Stephanie; Cruz, Sheena; Schroeder, Cassandra; Takeda, Summer; Bavarian, Niloofar

    2017-04-03

    This study investigated mental health indicators, substance use, and their relationships, by race/ethnicity. A probability sample of 1,053 students at two California universities self-reported their frequency of substance use and rated their experience with indicators of mental health. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square tests, and multivariate censored regression models were estimated to examine which indicators of mental health were associated with each substance use form by race/ethnicity. Results from the one-way ANOVA and chi-square tests showed differences in substance use prevalence and mental health by race/ethnicity. For example, students who identified as White demonstrate a higher prevalence for every form of substance use in comparison to the Asian, Latino, and "All other" categories. Results from the regression showed, among Whites, inattention was associated with prescription stimulant misuse, and psychological distress was associated with marijuana use. Among Latinos, inattention was associated with cocaine and prescription stimulant use. Among Asians, psychological distress was associated with tobacco use and the misuse of prescription painkillers. Findings highlight the need to ensure subpopulations receive needed services.

  1. A qualitative study of college student responses to conflicting messages in advertising: anti-binge drinking public service announcements versus wine promotion health messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ho-Young; Wu, Lei; Kelly, Stephanie; Haley, Eric

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how college students deal with conflicting health messages in advertising regarding binge drinking and wine promotion. Phenomenological in-depth long interviews were conducted beyond the point of redundancy (N = 16). The results of this study indicated that students' meaning making regarding the conflicting messages relied greatly upon how consistent either message was with their prior beliefs about alcohol. Additionally, not all students perceived the messages to be contradictory; these students saw the messages as being constructed for different purposes and as such incomparable. Overall, students who perceived conflict responded to the topic with apathy fueled by advertising skepticism. Employing qualitative methodology to understand how college students respond to conflicting messages will assist health promotion practitioners develop more effective alcohol abuse prevention messages and provide suggestions for researchers for studying this phenomenon from other perspectives in the future. Implications are further discussed within.

  2. Binge-Drinking Attitudes and Behaviors among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic College Students: Suggestions for Tailoring Health Campaign Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Julie Delaney; Archiopoli, Ashley M.; Bentley, Joshua M.; Weiss, David; Hoffmann, Jeffrey; White, Judith McIntosh; Sharp, Mercedes Kelsey; Hong, Zhibin; Kimura, Miwa

    2016-01-01

    This study explores binge-drinking behaviors and attitudes among Hispanic and non-Hispanic college students. The authors surveyed students at the same large Hispanic-serving university used in a 1999 study by Bennett et al., partially replicating that earlier research. While the percentage of students who reported binge drinking in the present…

  3. A study of regarding the health and physical fitness of technical college students : Focusing on the sports test in the fiscal year 2001

    OpenAIRE

    内山, 了治; 児玉, 英樹; 塚田, 修三; 岩崎, 秀子

    2002-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to clarify the characteristics of health and physical fitness of N college of technology students. Physical fitness and motor performance were measured by a new sports test developed by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The main result were as follows: 1) Student of the fatness trend is many to the male students of 3 and 4th. year students and losing weight the trend is many to the female students of 2,4,and 5th. year students. 2) ...

  4. Readiness to Act: Use of the Health Belief Model in Understanding Parental Communication about Alcohol for Incoming College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neifeld Wheeler, Wendy S.

    2010-01-01

    Harmful and detrimental effects associated with college student alcohol use have been well documented in scholarly research, the popular press, numerous government- produced reports and by medical associations. Despite the fact that parental involvement in the college experience has increased significantly in the last 20 years, the literature on…

  5. Health impact of bioaccessible metal in lip cosmetics to female college students and career women, northeast of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Liu, Sa; Zhang, Zhaohan; Meng, Ping; Lin, Nan; Lu, Binyu; Cui, Fuyi; Feng, Yujie; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-02-01

    Actual measure-based studies have estimated ingestion rate of moderate and high daily use to female college students and career women in northeast of China. Sequential extraction analyses showed that total bioaccessible metals concentration in lipstick ranged from 2.103 to 31.103 μg/g and in lip balm ranged from 0.100 to 3.716 μg/g. The relationship between total bioaccessible metal concentrations and the cost of lip cosmetics showed a negative correlation. Lead was detected in all 30 products (100%), with an average concentration of 0.346 for lip balm and 0.407 μg/g for lipstick. With the exception of chromium content in three lipsticks, the estimated exposure in female college students and career women to target metals via lipstick and lip balm ingestion (calculated for moderate and high use) were much lower than the acceptable reference limits. The findings strongly emphasize the need to focus on the health risk of lip balm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. College Students' Attitudes Toward Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, James, Jr.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined perceptions of wellness among college students (N=3,190) from 11 different colleges using Hettler's six wellness dimensions (physical, emotional, spiritual, occupational, social, and intellectual). Found support for belief that the dimensions had an effect on overall wellness. Rated physical dimension most important, followed closely by…

  7. Dating Violence among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconis, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dating violence is a significant problem on college campuses. More than one-fifth of the undergraduate dating population are physically abused by their dating partners and an even greater percentage are psychologically abused. Researchers have identified risk factors for college student dating violence. Preventive interventions are strongly…

  8. Compulsive use of alcohol among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrelli, Paola; Bentley, Kate; Vitali, Mario; Clain, Alisabet J; Nyer, Maren; Fava, Maurizio; Farabaugh, Amy H

    2013-01-30

    Among college students alcohol consumption is associated with other high-risk behaviors that can lead to short- and long-term negative health consequences. Identification of college students consuming alcohol who are at high risk for problems may have important public health implications. This study examines the ability of the CHQ compulsive use of alcohol item to detect high-risk behaviors relative to other screening measures and its association with different dimensions of compulsive drinking. Three hundred thirty-two college students completed measures on compulsive drinking and hazardous behaviors. Results showed that among male students the CHQ compulsive use of alcohol item was not sensitive to detect hazardous alcohol consumption but co-occurred with the use of illicit drugs. Among female students it was sensitive to detect heavy drinking but not alcohol or drug problems. Among college students compulsive use of alcohol corresponds to an urge to consume alcohol that may be associated with use of illicit drugs in male students, with heavy drinking in female students and with substance use problems. This study suggest that the CHQ compulsive use of alcohol item should not be used as a stand-alone screening for alcohol or drug problems but it could be considered a marker for at-risk behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Health Beliefs, Behaviors, and Environmental Factors related to Diet and Physical Activity among College Students and their Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalewska, Agata O.

    2010-01-01

    Diet and physical activity behaviors may be influenced by internal and external factors that may change over time, in response to personal development and changes in environments. The current literature does not explore specifically how the different factors and particularly Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) constructs, affect behaviors of college students. This project, aimed to compare the influence of SCT constructs between college students and parents in healthier foods (HF) and physical a...

  10. Learning approach among health sciences students in a medical college in Nepal: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dev Kumar; Yadav, Ram Lochan; Sharma, Deepak; Yadav, Prakash Kumar; Sapkota, Niraj Khatri; Jha, Rajesh Kumar; Islam, Md Nazrul

    2016-01-01

    Many factors shape the quality of learning. The intrinsically motivated students adopt a deep approach to learning, while students who fear failure in assessments adopt a surface approach to learning. In the area of health science education in Nepal, there is still a lack of studies on learning approach that can be used to transform the students to become better learners and improve the effectiveness of teaching. Therefore, we aimed to explore the learning approaches among medical, dental, and nursing students of Chitwan Medical College, Nepal using Biggs's Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) after testing its reliability. R-SPQ-2F containing 20 items represented two main scales of learning approaches, deep and surface, with four subscales: deep motive, deep strategy, surface motive, and surface strategy. Each subscale had five items and each item was rated on a 5-point Likert scale. The data were analyzed using Student's t-test and analysis of variance. Reliability of the administered questionnaire was checked using Cronbach's alpha. The Cronbach's alpha value (0.6) for 20 items of R-SPQ-2F was found to be acceptable for its use. The participants predominantly had a deep approach to learning regardless of their age and sex (deep: 32.62±6.33 versus surface: 25.14±6.81, Papproach among medical students (33.26±6.40) was significantly higher than among dental (31.71±6.51) and nursing (31.36±4.72) students. In comparison to first-year students, deep approach among second-year medical (34.63±6.51 to 31.73±5.93; Papproach significantly increased (25.55±8.19 to 29.34±6.25; P=0.023) among second-year dental students compared to first-year dental students. Medical students were found to adopt a deeper approach to learning than dental and nursing students. However, irrespective of disciplines and personal characteristics of participants, the primarily deep learning approach was found to be shifting progressively toward a surface approach after

  11. Preparing Students for College: Lessons Learned from the Early College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Arshavsky, Nina; Lewis, Karla; Thrift, Beth; Unlu, Fatih; Furey, Jane

    2017-01-01

    This article utilizes mixed methods--a lottery-based experimental design supplemented by qualitative data--to examine college readiness within an innovative high school setting: early college high schools. Early colleges are small schools that merge the high school and college experiences and are targeted at students underrepresented in college.…

  12. Validação do National College Health Risk Behavior Survey para utilização com universitários brasileiros Validation of National College Health Risk Behavior Survey to be use with Brazilian college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina da Franca

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo é traduzir, adaptar e validar o National College Health Risk Behavior Survey para utilização com universitários brasileiros. Participaram do estudo 208 universitários da UFPE e UPE. A validação foi realizada em cinco etapas: (1 tradução; (2 retrotradução; (3 correção e adaptação semântica (transculturalização; (4 validação de face; (5 teste e reteste. A tradução e retrotradução não apresentaram muitas discordâncias, tendo sido feitas as adaptações necessárias. Após a validação de face, o questionário foi reduzido de 96 para 52 questões. A reprodutibilidade foi avaliada através do teste de Kappa. Dos onze tópicos analisados, a maioria apresentou Kappa bom a perfeito: segurança e violência (Kappa=0,89; suicídio (Kappa=1,00; uso do tabaco (Kappa=0,90; bebida alcoólica (Kappa=0,78; consumo de cocaína e outras drogas (Kappa=0,70; comportamento sexual (Kappa=0,88 e peso corporal (Kappa=0,89. Apenas o tópico sobre alimentação apresentou Kappa fraco (Kappa = 0,26 e o tópico sobre informações em saúde apresentou Kappa moderado (Kappa=0,56. O Kappa médio para todos os tópicos foi 0,76, classificado como bom. A versão reduzida do instrumento pode ser considerada validada na língua portuguesa com nível de reprodutibilidade aceitável.The objective of this article is to translate, to adapt and to validate the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey to apply at Brazilian college students. 208 college students from the Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE and University of Pernambuco (UPE participated in the study. The validation was carried through in five stages: (1 translation; (2 retrotranslation; (3 correction and semantic adaptation (cultural adaptation; (4 face validation; (5 test-retest. Adaptations were done to deal with any semantic disagreements found between translation and retrotranslation. After face validation, the questionnaire was reduced from 96 to 52

  13. The Health Effects of Attending College for Latina Undergraduate Students and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Jill Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective. Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in the U.S. and by 2050 they are estimated to become one quarter of the population, yet only one in ten has a college degree. More Latino women (Latinas) are currently attending college than Latino men. To date research has focused on their experiences and where they obtain support…

  14. The moderating role of ethnicity in the relation between religiousness and mental health among ethnically diverse college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokley, Kevin; Garcia, Daniel; Hall-Clark, Brittany; Tran, Kimberly; Rangel, Azucena

    2012-09-01

    Many studies have documented the links between dimensions of religiousness with mental health (e.g., Hackney and Sanders 2003; Mofidi et al. 2006). However, very little is known about whether these links differ across ethnic groups. This study examined the contribution of dimensions of religiousness to the prediction of mental health in an ethnically diverse sample of 413 college students (167 European Americans, 83 African Americans, 81 Asian Americans, and 82 Latino Americans). Results indicated significant ethnic differences across dimensions of religiousness. African Americans were significantly higher on religious engagement and religious conservatism than the other ethnic groups and significantly lower on religious struggle than European Americans. Moderated multiple regressions revealed that increases in religious struggle was associated with poorer mental health for African Americans and Latino Americans, while increases in religious engagement and ecumenical worldview were associated with better mental health for African Americans. The findings indicate that ethnicity is an important factor to consider when examining the link between religiousness and mental health.

  15. Classroom Texting in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Terry F.; Frazier, Erik; Rieser, Elizabeth; Vaughn, Nicholas; Hupp-Wilds, Bobbi

    2015-01-01

    A 21-item survey on texting in the classroom was given to 235 college students. Overall, 99.6% of students owned a cellphone and 98% texted daily. Of the 138 students who texted in the classroom, most texted friends or significant others, and indicate the reason for classroom texting is boredom or work. Students who texted sent a mean of 12.21…

  16. Situational analysis of teaching and learning of medicine and nursing students at Makerere University College of Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiguli Juliet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS in Uganda is undergoing a major reform to become a more influential force in society. It is important that its medicine and nursing graduates are equipped to best address the priority health needs of the Ugandan population, as outlined in the government’s Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP. The assessment identifies critical gaps in the core competencies of the MakCHS medicine and nursing and ways to overcome them in order to achieve HSSP goals. Methods Documents from the Uganda Ministry of Health were reviewed, and medicine and nursing curricula were analyzed. Nineteen key informant interviews (KII and seven focus group discussions (FGD with stakeholders were conducted. The data were manually analyzed for emerging themes and sub-themes. The study team subsequently used the checklists to create matrices summarizing the findings from the KIIs, FGDs, and curricula analysis. Validation of findings was done by triangulating information from the different data collection methods. Results The core competencies that medicine and nursing students are expected to achieve by the end of their education were outlined for both programs. The curricula are in the process of reform towards competency-based education, and on the surface, are well aligned with the strategic needs of the country. But implementation is inadequate, and can be changed: • Learning objectives need to be more applicable to achieving competencies. • Learning experiences need to be more relevant for competencies and setting in which students will work after graduation (i.e. not just clinical care in a tertiary care facility. • Student evaluation needs to be better designed for assessing these competencies. Conclusion MakCHS has made a significant attempt to produce relevant, competent nursing and medicine graduates to meet the community needs. Ways to make them more effective though deliberate efforts to

  17. Situational analysis of teaching and learning of medicine and nursing students at Makerere University College of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguli, Sarah; Baingana, Rhona; Paina, Ligia; Mafigiri, David; Groves, Sara; Katende, Godfrey; Kiguli-Malwadde, Elsie; Kiguli, Juliet; Galukande, Moses; Roy, Mayega; Bollinger, Robert; Pariyo, George

    2011-03-09

    Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) in Uganda is undergoing a major reform to become a more influential force in society. It is important that its medicine and nursing graduates are equipped to best address the priority health needs of the Ugandan population, as outlined in the government's Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSP). The assessment identifies critical gaps in the core competencies of the MakCHS medicine and nursing and ways to overcome them in order to achieve HSSP goals. Documents from the Uganda Ministry of Health were reviewed, and medicine and nursing curricula were analyzed. Nineteen key informant interviews (KII) and seven focus group discussions (FGD) with stakeholders were conducted. The data were manually analyzed for emerging themes and sub-themes. The study team subsequently used the checklists to create matrices summarizing the findings from the KIIs, FGDs, and curricula analysis. Validation of findings was done by triangulating information from the different data collection methods. The core competencies that medicine and nursing students are expected to achieve by the end of their education were outlined for both programs. The curricula are in the process of reform towards competency-based education, and on the surface, are well aligned with the strategic needs of the country. But implementation is inadequate, and can be changed:• Learning objectives need to be more applicable to achieving competencies.• Learning experiences need to be more relevant for competencies and setting in which students will work after graduation (i.e. not just clinical care in a tertiary care facility).• Student evaluation needs to be better designed for assessing these competencies. MakCHS has made a significant attempt to produce relevant, competent nursing and medicine graduates to meet the community needs. Ways to make them more effective though deliberate efforts to apply a competency-based education are possible.

  18. Gambling-Related Problems as a Mediator Between Treatment and Mental Health with At-Risk College Student Gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisner, Irene Markman; Bowen, Sarah; Lostutter, Ty W; Cronce, Jessica M; Granato, Hollie; Larimer, Mary E

    2015-09-01

    Disordered gambling has been linked to increased negative affect, and some promising treatments have been shown to be effective at reducing gambling behaviors and related problems (Larimer et al. in Addiction 107:1148-1158, 2012). The current study seeks to expand upon the findings of Larimer et al. (Addiction 107:1148-1158, 2012) by examining the relationship between gambling-related problems and mental health symptoms in college students. Specifically, the three-group design tested the effects of two brief interventions for gambling—an individual, in-person personalized feedback intervention (PFI) delivered using motivational interviewing and group-based cognitive behavioral therapy, versus assessment only on mood outcomes. The mediating effect of gambling-related problems on mood was also explored. Participants (N = 141; 65% men; 60% Caucasian, 28% Asian) were at-risk college student gamblers [South Oaks Gambling Screen (Lesieur and Blume in Am J Psychiatry 144:1184-1188, 1987) ≥3], assessed at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Gambling problems were assessed using the Gambling Problems Index (Neighbors et al. in J Gamb Stud 18:339-360, 2002). Mental health symptoms were assessed using the depression, anxiety, and hostility subscales of the Brief Symptom Inventory (Derogatis in Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI): administration, scoring, and procedures manual, National Computer Systems, Inc., Minneapolis, 1993). Results revealed that the PFI condition differentially reduced negative mood, and that reductions in gambling-related problems partially mediated this effect. Implications for intervention for comorbid mood and gambling disorders are discussed.

  19. Suicidal Behavior and Help Seeking among Diverse College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownson, Chris; Becker, Martin Swanbrow; Shadick, Richard; Jaggars, Shanna S.; Nitkin-Kaner, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal and help-seeking behaviors of students of color remain a significant problem on college campuses. Self-reported suicidal experiences and help-seeking behavior of diverse students are examined on the basis of results from a national survey of college student mental health. The results suggest significant differences in the expression of…

  20. Factors that influence health quotient in Chinese college undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Whittemore, Robin; He, Guo-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the health quotient of Chinese undergraduates, to discern whether socio-demographic characteristics, academic achievements and perceived health status significantly affect the health quotient of Chinese college students and to identify the predictable factors of health quotient in undergraduates. Rapidly increasing enrollment in higher education in China in recent years has brought growing concern about undergraduate health and lifestyle. The Health Quotient profile questionnaire, which assesses self-reported holistic health, provides opportunity to study the health of Chinese undergraduates. A descriptive cross-sectional study. The study was conducted with 1874 Chinese undergraduates aged 15-28 from eight colleges in Changsha. Students were recruited by a multistage cluster stratified random sampling method. The mean score of the Health Quotient questionnaire indicated a positive health quotient; however, 32.1% of the sample scored below the criterion score for a positive health quotient. Undergraduates scored low on knowledge of health. Gender, residence before university, father's educational background, self-rated health, college category, achievement in study and status as student chief significantly predicted health quotient scores. Holistic health of college students is important and implies positive health behaviours and a focus on health promotion. The overall holistic health of the subjects was good, and students appear capable of managing their own health. Poor health knowledge may be an important factor in college students' future health status. Risk factors associated with health quotient of undergraduates should be considered in college health care. The health quotient is one instrument that can be used to assess college students' holistic health and target health promotion interventions. Health knowledge dissemination could be a core task for Chinese college nurses. Further, international research that

  1. Perceived Prejudice and the Mental Health of Chinese Ethnic Minority College Students: The Chain Mediating Effect of Ethnic Identity and Hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jin; Yang, Liping

    2017-01-01

    As a multinational country incorporating 56 officially recognized ethnic groups, China is concerned with the mental health of members of minority ethnic groups, with an increasing focus on supporting Chinese ethnic minority college students. Nevertheless, in daily life, members of minority ethnic groups in China often perceive prejudice, which may in turn negatively influence their mental health, with respect to relative levels of ethnic identity and hope. To examine the mediating effects of ethnic identity and hope on the relationship between perceived prejudice and the mental health of Chinese ethnic minority college students, 665 students (18-26 years old; 207 males, 458 females; the proportion of participants is 95.38%) from nine colleges in the Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region and Yunnan and Guizhou provinces of China took part in our study, each completing adapted versions of a perceived prejudice scale, a multiethnic identity measure, an adult dispositional hope scale, and a general health questionnaire. Analysis of the results reveals that perceived prejudice negatively influences mental health through both ethnic identity and hope in Chinese ethnic minority college students. The total mediation effect was 54.9%. Perceived prejudice was found to negatively predict ethnic identity and hope, suggesting that perceived prejudice brings about a negative reconstruction of ethnic identity and hope mechanisms within the study's Chinese cultural context. The relationship between perceived prejudice and mental health was fully mediated by hope and the chain of ethnic identity and hope. Ethnic identity partially mediated the relationship between perceived prejudice and hope. The relationship between perceived prejudice and mental health mediated by ethnic identity was not significant, which suggests that the rejection-identification model cannot be applied to Chinese ethnic minority college students. This paper concludes by considering the limitations of our study and

  2. Perceived Prejudice and the Mental Health of Chinese Ethnic Minority College Students: The Chain Mediating Effect of Ethnic Identity and Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jin; Yang, Liping

    2017-01-01

    As a multinational country incorporating 56 officially recognized ethnic groups, China is concerned with the mental health of members of minority ethnic groups, with an increasing focus on supporting Chinese ethnic minority college students. Nevertheless, in daily life, members of minority ethnic groups in China often perceive prejudice, which may in turn negatively influence their mental health, with respect to relative levels of ethnic identity and hope. To examine the mediating effects of ethnic identity and hope on the relationship between perceived prejudice and the mental health of Chinese ethnic minority college students, 665 students (18–26 years old; 207 males, 458 females; the proportion of participants is 95.38%) from nine colleges in the Guangxi Zhuang autonomous region and Yunnan and Guizhou provinces of China took part in our study, each completing adapted versions of a perceived prejudice scale, a multiethnic identity measure, an adult dispositional hope scale, and a general health questionnaire. Analysis of the results reveals that perceived prejudice negatively influences mental health through both ethnic identity and hope in Chinese ethnic minority college students. The total mediation effect was 54.9%. Perceived prejudice was found to negatively predict ethnic identity and hope, suggesting that perceived prejudice brings about a negative reconstruction of ethnic identity and hope mechanisms within the study's Chinese cultural context. The relationship between perceived prejudice and mental health was fully mediated by hope and the chain of ethnic identity and hope. Ethnic identity partially mediated the relationship between perceived prejudice and hope. The relationship between perceived prejudice and mental health mediated by ethnic identity was not significant, which suggests that the rejection–identification model cannot be applied to Chinese ethnic minority college students. This paper concludes by considering the limitations of our study

  3. The Prevalence and Correlates of Depression among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Billie J.; Fabiano, Patricia; Stark, Chris

    2009-01-01

    This study examined depression among a random sample of students (N = 618) enrolled in a medium size university in the Pacific Northwest who responded to the American College Health Association's National College Health Assessment. The results indicated that one in four students experienced depression in the past year and men were as likely as…

  4. THE USE OF PROTECTIVE BEHAVIORAL STRATEGIES IS RELATED TO REDUCED RISK IN HEAVY DRINKING COLLEGE STUDENTS WITH POORER MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH*

    OpenAIRE

    LaBrie, Joseph W.; Kenney, Shannon R.; Lac, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the moderating role of health status (physical, mental, and social health) and the relationships between protective behavioral strategies utilized to reduce high-risk drinking (e.g., avoiding drinking games, setting consumption limits, or having a designated driver) and alcohol use and negative consequences in a sample of heavy drinking college students (N = 1,820). In this high risk sample, multiple regression analyses showed that stronger social health was related...

  5. College Student Alcohol Use and Abuse: Social Norms, Health Beliefs, and Selected Socio-Demographic Variables as Explanatory Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Denisha A.; Lewis, Todd F.; Myers, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Surgeon General described college alcohol abuse as the most significant public health concern on university campuses (DHHS, 2007). Social norms have been identified as a strong predictor of college drinking and yet programs based on norms have had limited effectiveness in changing drinking behavior. Other theoretical explanations, such as…

  6. Mental Health Help-Seeking Behaviors among Asian American Community College Students: The Effect of Stigma, Cultural Barriers, and Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Meekyung; Pong, Helen

    2015-01-01

    According to the 2008 U.S. Census, there are 15.5 million Asian Americans in the United States, and 17% are students enrolled in a university (Shea & Yeh, 2008). Asian American college students in higher education are oftentimes perceived as the "model minority" with high academic achievements and few mental and/or behavioral…

  7. Investigation and Analysis of "Zhai" Lifestyle's Effects on College Students' Physical and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    With the development of science and technology, especially the popularity of the Internet, mobile phone, and computer, college students' lifestyle is changing, which leads to the "Zhai" phenomenon. More and more students house in the dorm or home. They reduce the communication with the outside world. This phenomenon not only reduces the…

  8. Socio-demographic predictors of health behaviors in Mexican college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulla Díez, Sara M; Pérez-Fortis, Adriana

    2010-03-01

    Our objectives in this cross-sectional descriptive study were to analyze to what extent freshmen exhibit healthy behaviors, which socio-demographic variables predict healthy or unhealthy lifestyle, and what is the strength of the relationship. Three hundred seven Mexican University students were assessed. t-Test and adjusted multiple regression analysis were computed. Life style was measured by use of the HPLP-II questionnaire and socio-demographics data. The results showed that most students presented a non-healthy lifestyle profile. Overall, the health behavior score was predicted by sex, mother's education and socio-economic level (R(2) = 0.104; p = 0.00001). When controlling for the other variables, nutrition was partially predicted by mother's education (R(2) = 0.048; p = 0.001); physical activity and stress management were modulated by sex, marital status and mother's education (R(2) = 0.111, p socio-demographic profiles that might be at higher risk for certain behaviors.

  9. Experiences of Community College Student Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Student governance is one way for students to become involved on college campuses. Student government allows participants to represent the needs of the student body and to voice their concerns to college administrators. In a qualitative study, five presidents of community college student government associations were interviewed. The student…

  10. College Student Credit Card Usage and Debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Kathryn M.

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of the concerns related to credit card usage by college students. Offers information student affairs professionals can use to help college students make responsible choices. (Contains 26 references.) (GCP)

  11. Cyber Victimization, Psychological Intimate Partner Violence, and Problematic Mental Health Outcomes Among First-Year College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Kelli S; Krauss, Alison; Jouriles, Ernest N; McDonald, Renee

    2016-09-01

    Both cyber victimization and psychological intimate partner violence (IPV) have been associated with negative mental health outcomes among adolescents and young adults. The present study examined relations among cyber victimization, psychological IPV, and mental health outcomes (depressive symptoms, antisocial behavior) among first-year college students. Consistent with polyvictimization theory, we hypothesized that cyber victimization and psychological IPV would be related to each other. We also hypothesized that each would uniquely contribute to depressive symptoms and antisocial behavior, after accounting for the other. Participants (N = 342, M age = 18.33 years; 50% male) completed questionnaires during a single lab visit. Results indicated that cyber victimization and psychological IPV were related to each other, and both contributed uniquely to depressive symptoms, but only cyber victimization contributed uniquely to antisocial behavior. Exploratory analyses indicated that experiencing both cyber victimization and psychological IPV was necessary for increased depressive symptoms and antisocial behavior. This study is the first to establish a unique relation between cyber victimization and mental health problems, after accounting for psychological IPV. The findings also suggest a need to consider multiple forms of victimization when considering relations between specific types of victimization and mental health problems.

  12. Subjective Life Expectancy Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodemann, Alyssa E; Arigo, Danielle

    2017-09-14

    Establishing healthy habits in college is important for long-term health. Despite existing health promotion efforts, many college students fail to meet recommendations for behaviors such as healthy eating and exercise, which may be due to low perceived risk for health problems. The goals of this study were to examine: (1) the accuracy of life expectancy predictions, (2) potential individual differences in accuracy (i.e., gender and conscientiousness), and (3) potential change in accuracy after inducing awareness of current health behaviors. College students from a small northeastern university completed an electronic survey, including demographics, initial predictions of their life expectancy, and their recent health behaviors. At the end of the survey, participants were asked to predict their life expectancy a second time. Their health data were then submitted to a validated online algorithm to generate calculated life expectancy. Participants significantly overestimated their initial life expectancy, and neither gender nor conscientiousness was related to the accuracy of these predictions. Further, subjective life expectancy decreased from initial to final predictions. These findings suggest that life expectancy perceptions present a unique-and potentially modifiable-psychological process that could influence college students' self-care.

  13. College Student Use of Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Lola; Skidmore, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    It has been reported (Aagaard & Skidmore, 2004; Sikorski et al., 2002) that only a minority of college students actually read the course textbook in preparation for examinations. Although professors widely lament students' propensity to ignore the carefully chosen textbooks, research specifically investigating why this phenomenon occurs is…

  14. Mental Health Stigma and Self-Concealment as Predictors of Help-Seeking Attitudes among Latina/o College Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Hadrian; Masuda, Akihiko; Swartout, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    The study examined whether mental health stigma and self-concealment are uniquely related to various dimensions of attitudes toward seeking professional psychological services (i.e., help-seeking attitudes) in Latina/o college students. Data from 129 Latina/o undergraduates (76% female) were used in the analysis. Results revealed that mental…

  15. An Examination of the Impact of Minority Status Stress and Impostor Feelings on the Mental Health of Diverse Ethnic Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokley, Kevin; McClain, Shannon; Enciso, Alicia; Martinez, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    This study examined differences in minority status stress, impostor feelings, and mental health in a sample of 240 ethnic minority college students. African Americans reported higher minority status stress than Asian Americans and Latino/a Americans, whereas Asian Americans reported higher impostor feelings. Minority status stress and impostor…

  16. Mental Health Stigma, Self-Concealment, and Help-Seeking Attitudes among Asian American and European American College Students with No Help-Seeking Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Akihiko; Boone, Matthew S.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined whether mental health stigma (i.e., negative attitudes toward people with a psychological disorder) and self-concealment are unique predictors of help-seeking attitudes in Asian American and European American college students with no history of seeking professional psychological services. The Asian American group had…

  17. Help-Seeking Intentions and Behaviors among Mainland Chinese College Students: Integrating the Theory of Planned Behavior and Behavioral Model of Health Services Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Denson, Linley A.; Dorstyn, Diana S.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated help-seeking intentions and use of mental health services within a sample of 1128 Mainland Chinese college students (630 males and 498 females; mean age = 20.01 years, SD = 1.48). Results of structural equation modeling and logistic regression analysis suggested that social-cognitive variables had significant effects both…

  18. Ability of admissions criteria to predict early academic performance among students of health science colleges at King Saud University, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadlaq, Adel M; Alshammari, Osama F; Alsager, Saleh M; Neel, Khalid A Fouda; Mohamed, Ashry G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of admissions criteria at King Saud University (KSU), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, to predict students' early academic performance at three health science colleges (medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy). A retrospective cohort study was conducted with data from the records of students enrolled in the three colleges from the 2008-09 to 2010-11 academic years. The admissions criteria-high school grade average (HSGA), aptitude test (APT) score, and achievement test (ACT) score-were the independent variables. The dependent variable was the average of students' first- and second-year grade point average (GPA). The results showed that the ACT was a better predictor of the students' early academic performance than the HSGA (β=0.368, β=0.254, respectively). No significant relationship was found between the APT and students' early academic performance (β=-0.019, p>0.01). The ACT was most predictive for pharmacy students (β=0.405), followed by dental students (β =0.392) and medical students (β=0.195). Overall, the current admissions criteria explained only 25.5% of the variance in the students' early academic performance. While the ACT and HSGA were found to be predictive of students' early academic performance in health colleges at KSU, the APT was not a strong predictor. Since the combined current admissions criteria for the health science colleges at KSU were weak predictors of the variance in early academic performance, it may be necessary to consider noncognitive evaluation methods during the admission process.

  19. Emotional intelligence and psychological health in a sample of Kuwaiti college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhadher, Othman

    2007-06-01

    This summary investigated correlations between emotional intelligence and psychological health amongst 191 Kuwaiti undergraduate students in psychology, 98 men and 93 women (M age=20.6 yr., SD=2.8). There were two measures of emotional intelligence, one based on the ability model, the Arabic Test for Emotional Intelligence, and the other on the mixed model, the Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire. Participants' psychological health was assessed using scales from the Personality Assessment Inventory. A weak relationship between the two types of emotional intelligence was found. A correlation for scores on the Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire with the Personality Assessment Inventory was found but not with those of the Arabic Test for Emotional Intelligence. Regression analysis indicated scores on Managing Emotions and Self-awareness accounted for most of the variance in the association with the Personality Assessment Inventory. Significant sex differences were found only on the Arabic Test for Emotional Intelligence; women scored higher than men. On Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire measures, men had significantly higher means on Managing Emotions and Self-motivation. However, no significant differences were found between the sexes on the Total Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire scores.

  20. The Behavioral Risks of Today's College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivakhnenko, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    In the past 10 to 15 years, the wide prevalence of various forms of negative behavior among young people in college has become one of the main causes of their deteriorating health. Traditionally classified among such forms are the excessive consumption of alcohol, smoking, and narcotics abuse. Issues relating to the protection of students' health…

  1. Physical Activity among Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sarah J.; Sturts, Jill R.; Ross, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study provides insight into the perceived physical activity levels of students attending a Midwestern 2-year community college. Over 60% of respondents were classified as overweight or obese based on a BMI measurement. The majority of respondents were not participating regularly in physical activity to gain any health benefits,…

  2. Review of College Student Study Time

    OpenAIRE

    中島, ゆり

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to review college student study time. Study time is one of the significant variables to understand how well each college manages its curriculum. Colleges conduct student survey and measure how much time students spend on homework or assignments each week, often employing categorized measurement scales. Scholars point out that Japanese students do not study as much as the US students do. Japanese governments demand each college to make students study at least two hours o...

  3. A Longitudinal Analysis of Contextual Exposure to Peers with College Educated Parents and Students' College Enrollment

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kate H.; Raley, R. Kelly; Muller, Chandra; RIEGLE-CRUMB, CATHERINE

    2008-01-01

    Students with college educated parents are more likely to attain higher levels of education than students of parents with lower levels of education. Past research has explained this favorable outcome as the result of advantageous placement and greater availability of educational resources. Using data from Add Health and AHAA, we find evidence that exposure to students of college educated parents at the school level and within courses increase the likelihood of four year college enrollment eve...

  4. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontoangelos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ; (b The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90; (c The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; (d State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Results: State anxiety and trait anxiety were correlated, to a statistically significant degree, with the family status of the students (p = 0.024 and the past visits to the psychiatrist (p = 0.039 respectively. The subscale of psychoticism is significantly related with the students’ origin, school, family status and semester. The subscale of neuroticism is significantly related with the students’ school. The subscale of extraversion is significantly related with the students’ family psychiatric history. Students, whose place of origin is Attica, have on average higher scores in somatization, phobic anxiety and paranoid ideation than the other students. Students from abroad have, on average, higher scores in interpersonal sensitivity and psychoticism than students who hail from other parts of Greece. The majority of the students (79.7% do not suffer from depression, according to the Beck’s depression inventory scale. Conclusions: Anxiety, somatization, personality traits and depression are related with the students’ college life.

  5. Greek College Students and Psychopathology: New Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Koundi, Kalliopi; Pappa, Xenia; Sakkas, Pavlos; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: College students’ mental health problems include depression, anxiety, panic disorders, phobias and obsessive compulsive thoughts. Aims: To investigate Greek college students’ psychopathology. Methods: During the initial evaluation, 638 college students were assessed through the following psychometric questionnaires: (a) Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ); (b) The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90); (c) The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); (d) State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Results: State anxiety and trait anxiety were correlated, to a statistically significant degree, with the family status of the students (p = 0.024) and the past visits to the psychiatrist (p = 0.039) respectively. The subscale of psychoticism is significantly related with the students’ origin, school, family status and semester. The subscale of neuroticism is significantly related with the students’ school. The subscale of extraversion is significantly related with the students’ family psychiatric history. Students, whose place of origin is Attica, have on average higher scores in somatization, phobic anxiety and paranoid ideation than the other students. Students from abroad have, on average, higher scores in interpersonal sensitivity and psychoticism than students who hail from other parts of Greece. The majority of the students (79.7%) do not suffer from depression, according to the Beck’s depression inventory scale. Conclusions: Anxiety, somatization, personality traits and depression are related with the students’ college life. PMID:25938913

  6. Depression in College Students: Student Experience Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Angela G.; Redfield, Doris L.

    To assess depression in college students, two inventories were compared: the Student Experience Inventory (SEI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). SEI, a self-report questionnaire, contains 56 items that are designed to measure hopelessness and decreased energy levels, as well as five factors covered in BDI: (1) negative affect toward self,…

  7. Use of abnormal and health psychology as topics in a classroom format to reduce alcohol and other drug abuse among college students at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, W M

    2001-12-01

    This study was done to assess whether classes containing topics derived from two college courses, Abnormal Psychology and Health Psychology, could be used in a class room format to reduce alcohol and other drug abuse among at-risk college students. Topics covered included stress and stress management, alcohol and other drug use and abuse, chronic illnesses and psychological disorders that develop from an unhealthy lifestyle, and factors that play a role in good health and well-being. Students were enrolled in a semester-long course for college credit as an alternative to punitive sanctions for on-campus alcohol violations and other drug violations. The Midwest Institute on Drug Use Survey and the CORE Alcohol and Drug Survey were administered on the first and last days of class. Analysis indicated a significant self-reported reduction in drug use and associated negative symptoms and behavioral effects. Women were more likely to report reductions in drug use than men.

  8. Associations Between Smoking and Media Literacy in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Primack, Brian A; Sidani, Jaime; Carroll, Mary V.; Fine, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Organizations recommend media literacy to reduce tobacco use, and higher media literacy has been associated with lower smoking among high school students. The relationship between smoking media literacy and tobacco use, however, has not been systematically studied among college students. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between smoking and smoking media literacy among college students. We conducted the National College Health Assessment (NCHA) at a large, urban unive...

  9. Gender Differences in the Relationships among Parenting Styles and College Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Alison L.; Kirtley, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Levels of student depression may increase as stress increases; parenting styles may be one indirect source of stress. The authors examined the role of parenting style in relationship to student stress, anxiety, and depression, with focused attention on gender differences. Participants: Participants were 290 undergraduate students (58%…

  10. Perceived Social Norms of Health Behaviours and College Engagement in British Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlaney, John; Jenkins, William

    2017-01-01

    The social norms approach is an increasingly widely used strategy of behaviour and attitude change that is based on challenging misperceptions individuals hold about their peers. Research to date has been carried out predominately in the US college system, with a focus on substance use behaviours. The aim of the current study was to explore peer…

  11. Mobile Health Technology Using a Wearable Sensorband for Female College Students With Problem Drinking: An Acceptability and Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Noelle Regina; Silverman, Michelle; Sherpa, Dawa Phuti; Naegle, Madeline A; Kim, Hyorim; Coffman, Donna L; Ferdschneider, Marcy

    2017-07-07

    An increasing number of mobile app interventions have been developed for problem drinking among college students; however, few studies have examined the integration of a mobile app with continuous physiological monitoring and alerting of affective states related to drinking behaviors. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of Mind the Moment (MtM), a theoretically based intervention for female college students with problem drinking that combines brief, in-person counseling with ecological momentary intervention (EMI) on a mobile app integrated with a wearable sensorband. We recruited 10 non-treatment seeking, female undergraduates from a university health clinic who scored a 3 or higher on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C) to participate in this pilot study. Study activities involved an in-person baseline intake and 1 follow-up assessment, 2 in-person alcohol brief intervention counseling sessions, and use of MtM technology components (sensorband and EMI on a mobile app) for approximately 3-4 weeks. The intervention used motivational interviewing (MI) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) strategies for reducing risks associated with drinking. We used both qualitative and quantitative assessments to measure acceptability of the intervention and feasibility of delivery. Use patterns of the sensorband and mobile app were also collected. Quantitative and qualitative data indicated high levels of acceptability for the MtM intervention. Altogether, participants made reports on the app on 26.7% (78/292) the days the technology was available to them and completed a total of 325 reports with wide variation between participants. Qualitative findings indicated that sensorband-elicited alerts promoted an increase in awareness of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors related to current environmental stressors and drinking behaviors in theoretically meaningful ways. Specific challenges related to functionality and

  12. Correlation of the health-promoting lifestyle, enrollment level, and academic performance of College of Nursing students in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kandari, Fatimah; Vidal, Victoria L

    2007-06-01

    This descriptive study of 224 nursing students assessed their health-promoting lifestyle profile and correlated it with the levels of enrollment in nursing courses and academic performance. The health-promoting lifestyle profile was measured by Walker's Health-promoting Lifestyle Profile II instrument. Academic performance was measured by assessing the nursing grade point average and general grade point average of the students. The students had positive health-promoting lifestyles with significant differences noted between males and females in the overall profile, physical activity, interpersonal relations, and stress management. Sociodemographic variables, such as age, nationality, and marital status, but not income, showed an association with students' health-promoting lifestyles. A significant correlation was noted between students' nursing enrollment and level of health responsibility. No significant correlation was established between a health-promoting lifestyle and academic performance. This study poses a challenge for nurse educators to provide an effective environment to maximize students' potential to be future vanguards of health.

  13. Qualitative description of college students' dinner groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Brita; Brown, Lora Beth

    2012-01-01

    To discover how college students conduct dinner groups and perceptions of the benefits and difficulties of participation. Qualitative study conducted with 7 focus groups. A university campus, with 36 students participating in dinner groups, defined as a group of 3 people or more cooking for one another (or together) and eating together at least 4 times a week. Dinner groups. The focus group recordings were transcribed, coded, and reconciled. NUDIST NVivo software (version 8, QSR International, Victoria, Australia, 2008) assisted in coding data to identify themes and subthemes. Dinner groups were composed of roommates or students living nearby. They rotated who made each dinner. Benefits identified included social interaction, increasing confidence in cooking, saving money and time, and eating more varied and healthful foods. Difficulties, which were uncommon, included increased time spent on days the student cooked and stresses related to cooking on a schedule. Students found that the benefits far outweighed the difficulties and universally wanted to continue in a dinner group. College students enjoyed dinner groups, and promoting them may be an option for improving college students' eating habits. Nearly all students believed that they ate better in a dinner group, but research is needed to assess actual intake. Copyright © 2012 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Survey of health literacy level and related influencing factors in military college students in Chongqing, China: A cross-sectional analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghui Rong

    Full Text Available Health literacy (HL has become an important public health issue and is receiving growing attention. However, the HL levels of military college students in China have never been analyzed. This study aimed to investigate the HL and related associate factors in military college students in Chongqing, China. Data was obtained with the "Chinese Citizen Health Literacy Questionnaire (2012 edition" from 3183 military college students aged 16-28 years at Chongqing in December 2015. A total score of ≥80 points determined adequate HL, and HL level was defined as the proportion of students who had adequate HL out of the total number of participants. Multiple logistic regression analysis with a stepwise forward likelihood ratio (LR method was used to determine the effects of sociodemographic characteristics, health-related behaviors, and family-related factors on HL level. The mean score of HL was 68.56, and the HL level of military college students was 21.05%; the overall knowledge rate was 71.33%. The independent factors that were associated with HL level were years in college, educational system, time playing online games, annual household income and father's education level. Senior (odds ratio [OR] = 1.229, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.018∼1.484, undergraduate (OR = 1.509, 95% CI 1.151∼1.978, time played games more than 5 hours each week (OR = 0.638, 95% CI 0.486∼0.837, annual household incomes more than 50,000 yuan (OR = 1.231, 95% CI 1.027∼1.476 and father's education level (high school: OR = 2.327, 95% CI 1.186∼4.565; university: OR = 2.450, 95% CI 1.244∼4.825, were independently associated with higher HL level. HL levels of military college students in Chongqing need to be improved across the board. Our data suggests that special emphasis should be placed on students in junior and those in the specialist educational system. School departments may also benefit from incorporating health literacy into their curricula and helping

  15. Survey of health literacy level and related influencing factors in military college students in Chongqing, China: A cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Honghui; Cheng, Xin; Garcia, Jose M; Zhang, Ling; Lu, Lu; Fang, Jian; Le, Mingshan; Hu, Peng; Dong, Xinlu; Yang, Junli; Wang, Ya; Luo, Ting; Liu, Jun; Chen, Ji-An

    2017-01-01

    Health literacy (HL) has become an important public health issue and is receiving growing attention. However, the HL levels of military college students in China have never been analyzed. This study aimed to investigate the HL and related associate factors in military college students in Chongqing, China. Data was obtained with the "Chinese Citizen Health Literacy Questionnaire (2012 edition)" from 3183 military college students aged 16-28 years at Chongqing in December 2015. A total score of ≥80 points determined adequate HL, and HL level was defined as the proportion of students who had adequate HL out of the total number of participants. Multiple logistic regression analysis with a stepwise forward likelihood ratio (LR) method was used to determine the effects of sociodemographic characteristics, health-related behaviors, and family-related factors on HL level. The mean score of HL was 68.56, and the HL level of military college students was 21.05%; the overall knowledge rate was 71.33%. The independent factors that were associated with HL level were years in college, educational system, time playing online games, annual household income and father's education level. Senior (odds ratio [OR] = 1.229, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.018∼1.484), undergraduate (OR = 1.509, 95% CI 1.151∼1.978), time played games more than 5 hours each week (OR = 0.638, 95% CI 0.486∼0.837), annual household incomes more than 50,000 yuan (OR = 1.231, 95% CI 1.027∼1.476) and father's education level (high school: OR = 2.327, 95% CI 1.186∼4.565; university: OR = 2.450, 95% CI 1.244∼4.825), were independently associated with higher HL level. HL levels of military college students in Chongqing need to be improved across the board. Our data suggests that special emphasis should be placed on students in junior and those in the specialist educational system. School departments may also benefit from incorporating health literacy into their curricula and helping students manage the

  16. Survey of health literacy level and related influencing factors in military college students in Chongqing, China: A cross-sectional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Honghui; Cheng, Xin; Garcia, Jose M.; Zhang, Ling; Lu, Lu; Fang, Jian; Le, Mingshan; Hu, Peng; Dong, Xinlu; Yang, Junli; Wang, Ya; Luo, Ting; Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Health literacy (HL) has become an important public health issue and is receiving growing attention. However, the HL levels of military college students in China have never been analyzed. This study aimed to investigate the HL and related associate factors in military college students in Chongqing, China. Data was obtained with the “Chinese Citizen Health Literacy Questionnaire (2012 edition)” from 3183 military college students aged 16–28 years at Chongqing in December 2015. A total score of ≥80 points determined adequate HL, and HL level was defined as the proportion of students who had adequate HL out of the total number of participants. Multiple logistic regression analysis with a stepwise forward likelihood ratio (LR) method was used to determine the effects of sociodemographic characteristics, health-related behaviors, and family-related factors on HL level. The mean score of HL was 68.56, and the HL level of military college students was 21.05%; the overall knowledge rate was 71.33%. The independent factors that were associated with HL level were years in college, educational system, time playing online games, annual household income and father's education level. Senior (odds ratio [OR] = 1.229, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.018∼1.484), undergraduate (OR = 1.509, 95% CI 1.151∼1.978), time played games more than 5 hours each week (OR = 0.638, 95% CI 0.486∼0.837), annual household incomes more than 50,000 yuan (OR = 1.231, 95% CI 1.027∼1.476) and father's education level (high school: OR = 2.327, 95% CI 1.186∼4.565; university: OR = 2.450, 95% CI 1.244∼4.825), were independently associated with higher HL level. HL levels of military college students in Chongqing need to be improved across the board. Our data suggests that special emphasis should be placed on students in junior and those in the specialist educational system. School departments may also benefit from incorporating health literacy into their curricula and helping students

  17. Knowledge of Normal and Pathological Memory Aging in College Students, Social Workers, and Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E.; Allen, Priscilla D.; Jackson, Erin M.; Hawley, Karri S.; Brigman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Knowledge of Memory Aging Questionnaire (KMAQ) measures laypersons' knowledge of normal memory changes and pathological memory deficits in adulthood. In Experiment 1, undergraduate and graduate social work students and social work practitioners completed the KMAQ. Social workers and graduate students were more accurate on the pathological than…

  18. "Borrowing Happiness from the Future": Exploring College Students' Own Experiences on Health-Related Lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Yarnal, Careen; Bram, Barry

    2017-01-01

    Combining the theory of emerging adulthood with self-authorship, the authors utilized students' reflection papers (n = 111) to explore their current lifestyles and reasons behind behavioral changes. Decreased physical activity, increased substance use, irregular sleep patterns, and unhealthy dietary habits emerged after students transitioned to…

  19. Cheating on examinations and its predictors among undergraduate students at Hawassa University College of Medicine and Health Science, Hawassa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalegn, Anteneh Assefa; Berhan, Asres

    2014-04-30

    Cheating on examinations in academic institutions is a worldwide issue. When cheating occurs in medical schools, it has serious consequences for human life, social values, and the economy. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of cheating and identify factors that influence cheating among students of Hawassa University College of medicine and health science. A cross sectional study was conducted from May through June 2013. A pre-tested self-administered, structured questionnaire was used to collect self-reported data regarding cheating. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Degree of association was measured by Chi Square test, with significance level set at p = 0.05. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess associations. The prevalence of self-reported cheating was found to be 19.8% (95% CI = 17.4-21.9). About 12.1% (95% CI = 10.2-13.9) of students disclosed cheating on the entrance examination. The majority of students (80.1% (95% CI = 77.9-82.3) disclosed that they would not report cheating to invigilators even if they had witnessed cheating. Analysis by multiple regression models showed that students who cheated in high school were more likely to cheat (adjusted OR = 1. 80, 95% CI = 1. 01-3.19) and that cheating was less likely among students who didn't cheat on entrance examinations (adjusted OR = 0. 25, 95% CI = 0. 14-0.45). Dining outside the university cafeteria and receiving pocket money of Birr 300 or more were strongly associated with cheating (adjusted OR = 3.08, 95% CI = 1.54-6.16 and adjusted OR = 1.69 (95% CI = 1.05-2.72), respectively. The odds of cheating among students were significantly higher for those who went to private high school, were substance users, and didn't attend lectures than for those who attended government schools, were not substance abusers, and

  20. Cheating on examinations and its predictors among undergraduate students at Hawassa University College of Medicine and Health Science, Hawassa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cheating on examinations in academic institutions is a worldwide issue. When cheating occurs in medical schools, it has serious consequences for human life, social values, and the economy. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of cheating and identify factors that influence cheating among students of Hawassa University College of medicine and health science. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from May through June 2013. A pre-tested self-administered, structured questionnaire was used to collect self-reported data regarding cheating. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Degree of association was measured by Chi Square test, with significance level set at p = 0.05. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess associations. Results The prevalence of self-reported cheating was found to be 19.8% (95% CI = 17.4-21.9). About 12.1% (95% CI = 10.2-13.9) of students disclosed cheating on the entrance examination. The majority of students (80.1% (95% CI = 77.9-82.3) disclosed that they would not report cheating to invigilators even if they had witnessed cheating. Analysis by multiple regression models showed that students who cheated in high school were more likely to cheat (adjusted OR = 1. 80, 95% CI = 1. 01–3.19) and that cheating was less likely among students who didn’t cheat on entrance examinations (adjusted OR = 0. 25, 95% CI = 0. 14–0.45). Dining outside the university cafeteria and receiving pocket money of Birr 300 or more were strongly associated with cheating (adjusted OR = 3.08, 95% CI = 1.54-6.16 and adjusted OR = 1.69 (95% CI = 1.05-2.72), respectively. The odds of cheating among students were significantly higher for those who went to private high school, were substance users, and didn’t attend lectures than for those who attended government

  1. Health-Related Variables and Academic Performance among First-Year College Students: Implications for Sleep and Other Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trockel, Mickey T.; Barnes, Michael D.; Egget, Dennis L.

    2000-01-01

    Analyzed the effect of several health behaviors and health-related variables on college freshmen's grade point averages (GPAs). Survey data indicated that sleep habits, particularly wake-up time, accounted for the most variance in GPAs. Higher GPAs related to strength training and study of spiritually oriented material. Lower GPAs related to…

  2. Correlates of Family Health History Discussions between College Students and Physicians: Does Family Cancer History Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Sosa, Erica T.; Hochhalter, Angela K.; Covin, Julie; Ory, Marcia G.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.

    2011-01-01

    Effective communication between young adults and their healthcare providers can contribute to early detection of risk for developing cancer and establishment of lifelong habits for engagement in healthcare and health promotion behaviors. Our objectives were to examine factors influencing family health history discussions between college students…

  3. A Health Probe in College Students Living in Los Angeles and in Taiwan: Dietary Pattern, Physical Activity and Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Hui; Yang, Hsin Ling; Chen, Yin Chang; Davis, Rebecca; Schwartz, Miriam E.; Tam, Chick F.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to examine differences of dietary pattern, physical activity and energy balance in 240 college students with 137 of them enrolled in California State University, Los Angeles (LA) and the other 93 enrolled in China Medical University in Taichung, Taiwan (TW). A three-day dietary record and a 24-hour physical activity journal were…

  4. Reducing the Impact of Temptation Cues on Health-Related Goal Cognitions among College Student Cigarette Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisserson, Rebecca N.

    2011-01-01

    Smoking is an increasing problem among college-age individuals. Despite having the desire to quit smoking, many students are unable to achieve this goal. One factor that contributes to difficulties in the self-control of smoking is the effect of temptation contexts on the valuation of goals related to smoking cessation. Contextual cues may…

  5. The Feasibility of Assessing Alcohol Use among College Students Using Wireless Mobile Devices: Implications for Health Education and Behavioural Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Darren; Cremeens, Jennifer; Usdan, Stuart; Martin, Ryan J.; Arriola, Kimberly J.; Bernhardt, Jay M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the feasibility of using wireless mobile devices (MDs) to collect daily alcohol information among college students, in particular examining feasibility in the context of costs associated with the use of wireless MDs. This study reports on practical aspects of using MDs to collect alcohol data, including compliance,…

  6. Comparison of Two Approaches to Prevention of Mental Health Problems in College Students: Enhancing Coping and Executive Function Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettis, Alexandra H.; Coiro, Mary Jo; England, Jessica; Murphy, Lexa K.; Zelkowitz, Rachel L.; Dejardins, Leandra; Eskridge, Rachel; Adery, Laura Hieber; Yarboi, Janet; Pardo, Daniel; Compas, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: College students face a significant number of stressors, increasing risk for internalizing and externalizing psychopathology. The current study examines two promising avenues of intervention aimed to reduce stress and prevent psychopathology in this population: a coping skills group and a cognitive training program. Participants: 62…

  7. Loneliness among Japanese and American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, T; Klopf, D W

    1990-08-01

    Both Japanese and American college students (ns = 100), away from home at their first year in college, showed high scores in the Differential Loneliness Scale, with Japanese students scoring higher on all subscales.

  8. Electronic cigarette use by college students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sutfin, Erin L; McCoy, Thomas P; Morrell, Holly E R; Hoeppner, Bettina B; Wolfson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    .... college students have been reported. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of e-cigarette use and identify correlates of use among a large, multi-institution, random sample of college students...

  9. Problem Drinking Among At-Risk College Students: The Examination of Greek Involvement, Freshman Status, and History of Mental Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Haley S; Klanecky, Alicia K; McChargue, Dennis E

    2018-02-06

    Scarce research has examined the combined effect of mental health difficulties and demographic risk factors such as freshman status and Greek affiliation in understanding college problem drinking. The current study is interested in looking at the interaction among freshman status, Greek affiliation, and mental health difficulties. Undergraduate students (N = 413) from a private and public Midwestern university completed a large online survey battery between January 2009 and April 2013. Data from both schools were aggregated for the analyses. After accounting for gender, age, and school type, the three-way interaction indicated that the highest drinking levels were reported in freshman students who reported a history of mental health problems although were not involved in Greek life. Findings are discussed in the context of perceived social norms, as well as alcohol-related screenings and intervention opportunities on college campuses.

  10. Standardised orientation program for first year undergraduate students in the College of Health and Science at the University of Western Sydney. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Gill

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFirst year students often feel ill-equipped academically and emotionally, hindering their integration and adjustment into university life. This paper describes a standardised orientation program for first year undergraduate students focusing on peer and academic support based on ‘just-in-time’ and ‘just-for-me’ principles, assisting commencing students to achieve a smooth transition into university. This initiative has been employed since 2009, in one of the three large colleges at the University of Western Sydney, to foster a sense of community and reduce stress among commencing students. Building on existing orientation activities, we introduced three new activities which focused on ‘just-in-time’ information for the first year, first semester experience, incorporation of student presentations and the inclusion of ice-breaker activities. Evaluative feedback revealed strong academic support for the initiatives, with College of Health & Science students reporting their orientation experience significantly more positively (P=0.003 than students from the other two colleges.

  11. AOD Screening Tools for College Students. Prevention Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), the goal of screening in student health or other college settings is to reduce alcohol-related harm. NIAAA points out that identifying those students at greatest risk for alcohol problems is the first step in prevention. Colleges and universities have used a number of…

  12. African American College Students: Literacy of Depression and Help Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Kim L.; Wimsatt, Maureen; Simpson, Gaynell Marie; Martin, Fayetta; Nelson, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Depression is a serious public health concern in the United States affecting almost 18.8 million adults. It is a common mental disorder in college students, with estimates of 1 in 4 "experiencing an episode by age 24." African American college students are at an elevated risk for depression due to racism, stress, sleep deprivation, and lack of…

  13. The Effectiveness of Light Therapy for College Student Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Lisa A.; Walton, Barry

    2018-01-01

    There is a growing number of students on college campuses with mental health problems and college counseling services are reporting significant increases in student demand for counseling. Depression, a mental illness consisting of profound sadness, fatigue, and irritability, as well as low motivation, poor academic performance, and suicidal…

  14. College Student Utilization of a Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharon L.; Kader, Mahrin; Haggerty, Melinda Z.; Bakhai, Yogesh D.; Warren, Calvert G.

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to identify college students at risk for experiencing a mental health crisis that warranted a psychiatric evaluation at a hospital and/or a psychiatric hospitalization. A retrospective chart review of college students evaluated at a comprehensive psychiatric emergency program during a 1-year period was conducted. Demographic…

  15. Meningitis in a College Student in Connecticut, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Lynn E.; Gupta, Shaili; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Hadler, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aseptic meningitis in a college student that was ultimately attributed to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The authors also provide a review of LCMV infection, epidemiology, and public health implications. Providers should be aware of LCMV as a cause of meningitis in college students,…

  16. A Collaborative Approach to Nutrition Education for College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Tara M.; Goldstein, Marion; Franko, Debra L.

    2004-01-01

    It is well established in the literature that college students have poor eating habits and that many barriers exist to achieving optimal nutrition for this busy population. Little is known about students' perceptions of this problem or suggestions for improving their dietary habits. Similarly, college health professionals need innovative…

  17. College Students and Their Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Lawrence; Alexander, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two Siamese and 32 mixed breed cats' personalities were rated by their respective college student owners and compared. Further, the owners' self rated personality traits were correlated with the pets'; significant Siamese and Mixed differences and correlations were obtained. These are the first data to examine breed of cat on a personality…

  18. Mushroom Use by College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John P.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed 1,507 college students to investigate the extent of hallucinogenic mushroom use and compared mushroom users to nonusers. Results showed that among the respondents who reported use of hallucinogenic drugs (17 percent), over 85 percent had used hallucinogenic (psilocybin) mushrooms and over half had used mushrooms but no other…

  19. Gateway Health Behaviors in College Students: Investigating Transfer and Compensation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Claudio Renato; Lee, Hye-ryeon; Hubbard, Amy E.; Min-Sun, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Objective: There is a dearth of studies on the mechanisms of multiple risk behaviors, even though these behaviors are significant public health issues. The authors investigated whether health behavior interventions have transfer or compensatory effects on other health behaviors. Participants and Methods: The authors looked at transfer and…

  20. Campus Climate Matters: Changing the Mental Health Climate on College Campuses Improves Student Outcomes and Benefits Society. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAND Corporation, 2016

    2016-01-01

    California, which has some 2.8 million students on its public higher education campuses, is taking steps to reduce the gap between students' need for mental health treatment and their use of mental health services. Beginning in 2011, as part of a statewide initiative to improve mental health outcomes for all Californians, the California Mental…