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Sample records for collectrin differentially interact

  1. Collectrin, a homologue of ACE2, its transcriptional control and functional perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yanling; Wada, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Collectrin is a type I membrane protein and shares significant homology with C-terminal domain of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2). However, collectrin lacks catalytic domain and it suggests the presence of uncharacterized physiological functions of collectrin. Collectrin is transcriptionally regulated by hepatocyte nuclear factor-α and -β and is highly expressed on renal proximal tubules and collecting ducts as well as pancreatic β-cells. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated interesting physiological roles of collectrin related to insulin secretion, formation of primary cilia, renal cyst formation and amino acid transport. The common underlying molecular mechanism may be suggested by the evidence that collectrin binds to SNARE complex by interacting with snapin. Collectrin is involved in the process of vesicle transport and membrane fusion and thus it delivers insulin for exocytosis or various membrane proteins to apical plasmalemma and primary cilia. Collectrin may be the new therapeutic target for various pathological processes such as diabetes, polycystic kidney disease, hypertension and aminoaciduria

  2. Tissue-specific amino acid transporter partners ACE2 and collectrin differentially interact with hartnup mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camargo, Simone M R; Singer, Dustin; Makrides, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hartnup amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19) is the major luminal sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter of small intestine and kidney proximal tubule. The expression of B(0)AT1 in kidney was recently shown to depend on its association with collectrin (Tmem27...

  3. Differentiation of energy concepts through speech and gesture in interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Hunter G.; Scherr, Rachel E.

    2012-02-01

    Through microanalysis of speech and gesture in one interaction between learners (in a course on energy for in-service teachers), we observe coherent states of conceptual differentiation of different learners. We observe that the interaction among learners across different states of differentiation is not in itself sufficient to accomplish differentiation; however, the real-time receptivity of the learners to conceptually relevant details in each other's actions suggests that future instruction that focuses explicitly on such actions and their meaning in context may assist differentiation.

  4. Interactive differential equations modeling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, B.W.; Mankin, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    Due to the recent emphasis on mathematical modeling, many ecologists are using mathematics and computers more than ever, and engineers, mathematicians and physical scientists are now included in ecological projects. However, the individual ecologist, with intuitive knowledge of the system, still requires the means to critically examine and adjust system models. An interactive program was developed with the primary goal of allowing an ecologist with minimal experience in either mathematics or computers to develop a system model. It has also been used successfully by systems ecologists, engineers, and mathematicians. This program was written in FORTRAN for the DEC PDP-10, a remote terminal system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, with relatively minor modifications, it can be implemented on any remote terminal system with a FORTRAN IV compiler, or equivalent. This program may be used to simulate any phenomenon which can be described as a system of ordinary differential equations. The program allows the user to interactively change system parameters and/or initial conditions, to interactively select a set of variables to be plotted, and to model discontinuities in the state variables and/or their derivatives. One of the most useful features to the non-computer specialist is the ability to interactively address the system parameters by name and to interactively adjust their values between simulations. These and other features are described in greater detail

  5. FIND: difFerential chromatin INteractions Detection using a spatial Poisson process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djekidel, Mohamed Nadhir; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Michael Q

    2018-02-12

    Polymer-based simulations and experimental studies indicate the existence of a spatial dependency between the adjacent DNA fibers involved in the formation of chromatin loops. However, the existing strategies for detecting differential chromatin interactions assume that the interacting segments are spatially independent from the other segments nearby. To resolve this issue, we developed a new computational method, FIND, which considers the local spatial dependency between interacting loci. FIND uses a spatial Poisson process to detect differential chromatin interactions that show a significant difference in their interaction frequency and the interaction frequency of their neighbors. Simulation and biological data analysis show that FIND outperforms the widely used count-based methods and has a better signal-to-noise ratio. © 2018 Djekidel et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Nanomaterials modulate stem cell differentiation: biological interaction and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2017-10-25

    Stem cells are unspecialized cells that have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation into more specialized cell types. The chemical and physical properties of surrounding microenvironment contribute to the growth and differentiation of stem cells and consequently play crucial roles in the regulation of stem cells' fate. Nanomaterials hold great promise in biological and biomedical fields owing to their unique properties, such as controllable particle size, facile synthesis, large surface-to-volume ratio, tunable surface chemistry, and biocompatibility. Over the recent years, accumulating evidence has shown that nanomaterials can facilitate stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and great effort is undertaken to explore their possible modulating manners and mechanisms on stem cell differentiation. In present review, we summarize recent progress in the regulating potential of various nanomaterials on stem cell differentiation and discuss the possible cell uptake, biological interaction and underlying mechanisms.

  7. Differential reconstructed gene interaction networks for deriving toxicity threshold in chemical risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Maxwell, Andrew; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Nan; Perkins, Edward J; Zhang, Chaoyang; Gong, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Pathway alterations reflected as changes in gene expression regulation and gene interaction can result from cellular exposure to toxicants. Such information is often used to elucidate toxicological modes of action. From a risk assessment perspective, alterations in biological pathways are a rich resource for setting toxicant thresholds, which may be more sensitive and mechanism-informed than traditional toxicity endpoints. Here we developed a novel differential networks (DNs) approach to connect pathway perturbation with toxicity threshold setting. Our DNs approach consists of 6 steps: time-series gene expression data collection, identification of altered genes, gene interaction network reconstruction, differential edge inference, mapping of genes with differential edges to pathways, and establishment of causal relationships between chemical concentration and perturbed pathways. A one-sample Gaussian process model and a linear regression model were used to identify genes that exhibited significant profile changes across an entire time course and between treatments, respectively. Interaction networks of differentially expressed (DE) genes were reconstructed for different treatments using a state space model and then compared to infer differential edges/interactions. DE genes possessing differential edges were mapped to biological pathways in databases such as KEGG pathways. Using the DNs approach, we analyzed a time-series Escherichia coli live cell gene expression dataset consisting of 4 treatments (control, 10, 100, 1000 mg/L naphthenic acids, NAs) and 18 time points. Through comparison of reconstructed networks and construction of differential networks, 80 genes were identified as DE genes with a significant number of differential edges, and 22 KEGG pathways were altered in a concentration-dependent manner. Some of these pathways were perturbed to a degree as high as 70% even at the lowest exposure concentration, implying a high sensitivity of our DNs approach

  8. diffHic: a Bioconductor package to detect differential genomic interactions in Hi-C data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Aaron T L; Smyth, Gordon K

    2015-08-19

    Chromatin conformation capture with high-throughput sequencing (Hi-C) is a technique that measures the in vivo intensity of interactions between all pairs of loci in the genome. Most conventional analyses of Hi-C data focus on the detection of statistically significant interactions. However, an alternative strategy involves identifying significant changes in the interaction intensity (i.e., differential interactions) between two or more biological conditions. This is more statistically rigorous and may provide more biologically relevant results. Here, we present the diffHic software package for the detection of differential interactions from Hi-C data. diffHic provides methods for read pair alignment and processing, counting into bin pairs, filtering out low-abundance events and normalization of trended or CNV-driven biases. It uses the statistical framework of the edgeR package to model biological variability and to test for significant differences between conditions. Several options for the visualization of results are also included. The use of diffHic is demonstrated with real Hi-C data sets. Performance against existing methods is also evaluated with simulated data. On real data, diffHic is able to successfully detect interactions with significant differences in intensity between biological conditions. It also compares favourably to existing software tools on simulated data sets. These results suggest that diffHic is a viable approach for differential analyses of Hi-C data.

  9. In or Out of the Pumpkin Shell? Sex Role Differentiation in Classroom Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Pamela J.

    A review of research on sex role differentiation in classroom interaction reveals that women are marginalized from education by its content and by the classroom interactional processes. Sex-role stereotyping exists in curriculum materials at all educational levels, with textbooks more likely to portray boys in active roles and girls in passive…

  10. Differential phytosociological interactions involving male and female atriplex bonnevillensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J.; Emlen, J.M.; Rinella, M.; Snelgrove, J.; Freeman, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Wind-pollinated dioecious plants often exhibit spatial segregation of the sexes. This partial niche separation has most often been explored using abiotic niche axes. However, if the sexes are truly separated in space, then they are apt to encounter different plant species that may heavily affect growth and reproduction. Also, to the extent that their niches differ, the sexes may respond differently to the same co-occurring species. Here we examine interspecific interactions that influence male and female reproductive potential in Atriplex bonnevillensis. Using Emlen's interaction assessment, a technique which assesses species interactions based on cover classes, we show that Salsola species compete significantly with females but not males, while Halogeton glomeratus competes with males but not females. The effect of competition only became apparent when we corrected for site-specific fertility. These results imply that differential competition must be considered when studying dioecious plants that display spatial segregation of the sexes.

  11. WKB: an interactive code for solving differential equations using phase integral methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    A small code for the analysis of ordinary differential equations interactively through the use of Phase Integral Methods (WKB) has been written for use on the DEC 10. This note is a descriptive manual for those interested in using the code

  12. Differential CLE peptide perception by plant receptors implicated from structural and functional analyses of TDIF-TDR interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhijie; Chakraborty, Sayan; Xu, Guozhou; Kobe, Bostjan

    2017-04-06

    Tracheary Element Differentiation Inhibitory Factor (TDIF) belongs to the family of post-translationally modified CLE (CLAVATA3/embryo surrounding region (ESR)-related) peptide hormones that control root growth and define the delicate balance between stem cell proliferation and differentiation in SAM (shoot apical meristem) or RAM (root apical meristem). In Arabidopsis, Tracheary Element Differentiation Inhibitory Factor Receptor (TDR) and its ligand TDIF signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of procambial cell proliferation and inhibiting its differentiation into xylem cells. Here we present the crystal structures of the extracellular domains (ECD) of TDR alone and in complex with its ligand TDIF resolved at 2.65 Åand 2.75 Å respectively. These structures provide insights about the ligand perception and specific interactions between the CLE peptides and their cognate receptors. Our in vitro biochemical studies indicate that the interactions between the ligands and the receptors at the C-terminal anchoring site provide conserved binding. While the binding interactions occurring at the N-terminal anchoring site dictate differential binding specificities between different ligands and receptors. Our studies will open different unknown avenues of TDR-TDIF signaling pathways that will enhance our knowledge in this field highlighting the receptor ligand interaction, receptor activation, signaling network, modes of action and will serve as a structure function relationship model between the ligand and the receptor for various similar leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs).

  13. Active-constructive-interactive: a conceptual framework for differentiating learning activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Michelene T H

    2009-01-01

    Active, constructive, and interactive are terms that are commonly used in the cognitive and learning sciences. They describe activities that can be undertaken by learners. However, the literature is actually not explicit about how these terms can be defined; whether they are distinct; and whether they refer to overt manifestations, learning processes, or learning outcomes. Thus, a framework is provided here that offers a way to differentiate active, constructive, and interactive in terms of observable overt activities and underlying learning processes. The framework generates a testable hypothesis for learning: that interactive activities are most likely to be better than constructive activities, which in turn might be better than active activities, which are better than being passive. Studies from the literature are cited to provide evidence in support of this hypothesis. Moreover, postulating underlying learning processes allows us to interpret evidence in the literature more accurately. Specifying distinct overt activities for active, constructive, and interactive also offers suggestions for how learning activities can be coded and how each kind of activity might be elicited. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  14. Differentiated Staffing and Non-Teamed Organizational Structures as They Affect Elementary School Teacher-Pupil Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Thomas A.; And Others

    A study was conducted of the differences in the frequency of selected student-teacher interaction in differentiated staffs and in non-teamed schools. The interaction processes studied were synthesized from Erikson's four stages of childhood: student behaviors--information processing, choice-making, reflection, problem solving, and procedures or…

  15. Distinguishing differential susceptibility from diathesis-stress: recommendations for evaluating interaction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roisman, Glenn I; Newman, Daniel A; Fraley, R Chris; Haltigan, John D; Groh, Ashley M; Haydon, Katherine C

    2012-05-01

    This report describes the state of the art in distinguishing data generated by differential susceptibility from diathesis-stress models. We discuss several limitations of existing practices for probing interaction effects and offer solutions that are designed to better differentiate differential susceptibility from diathesis-stress models and quantify their corresponding implications. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of these methods by revisiting published evidence suggesting that temperamental difficulty serves as a marker of enhanced susceptibility to early maternal caregiving across a range of outcome domains in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. We find that, with the exception of mother reports of psychopathology, there is consistent evidence in the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development that the predictive significance of early sensitivity is moderated by difficult temperament over time. However, differential susceptibility effects emerged primarily for teacher reports of academic skills, social competence, and symptomatology. In contrast, effects more consistent with the diathesis-stress model were obtained for mother reports of social skills and objective tests of academic skills. We conclude by discussing the value of the application of this work to the next wave of Gene × Environment studies focused on early caregiving experiences.

  16. Age-related changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaorong Gu

    Full Text Available Age-related changes in the retina are often accompanied by visual impairment but their mechanistic details remain poorly understood.Proteomic studies were pursued toward a better molecular understanding of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE aging mechanisms. RPE cells were isolated from young adults (3-4 month-old and old (24-25 month-old F344BN rats, and separated into subcellular fractions containing apical microvilli (MV and RPE cell bodies (CB lacking their apical microvilli. Proteins were extracted in detergent, separated by SDS-PAGE, digested in situ with trypsin and analyzed by LC MS/MS. Select proteins detected in young and old rat RPE were further studied using immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis.A total of 356 proteins were identified in RPE MV from young and 378 in RPE MV from old rats, 48% of which were common to each age group. A total of 897 proteins were identified in RPE CB from young rats and 675 in old CB, 56% of which were common to each age group. Several of the identified proteins, including proteins involved in response to oxidative stress, displayed both quantitative and qualitative changes in overall abundance during RPE aging. Numerous proteins were identified for the first time in the RPE. One such protein, collectrin, was localized to the apical membrane of apical brush border of proximal tubules where it likely regulates several amino acid transporters. Elsewhere, collectrin is involved in pancreatic β cell proliferation and insulin secretion. In the RPE, collectrin expression was significantly modulated during RPE aging. Another age-regulated, newly described protein was DJ-1, a protein extensively studied in brain where oxidative stress-related functions have been described.The data presented here reveals specific changes in the RPE during aging, providing the first protein database of RPE aging, which will facilitate future studies of age-related retinal diseases.

  17. Accounting for components interactions in the differential importance measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zio, Enrico; Podofillini, Luca

    2006-01-01

    A limitation of the importance measures (IMs) currently used in reliability and risk analyses is that they rank only individual components or basic events whereas they are not directly applicable to combinations or groups of components or basic events. To partially overcome this limitation, recently, the differential importance measure (DIM), has been introduced for use in risk-informed decision making. The DIM is a first-order sensitivity measure that ranks the parameters of the risk model according to the fraction of total change in the risk that is due to a small change in the parameters' values, taken one at a time. However, it does not account for the effects of interactions among components. In this paper, a second-order extension of the DIM, named DIM II , is proposed for accounting of the interactions of pairs of components when evaluating the change in system performance due to changes of the reliability parameters of the components. A numerical application is presented in which the informative contents of DIM and DIM II are compared. The results confirm that in certain cases when second-order interactions among components are accounted for, the importance ranking of the components may differ from that produced by a first-order sensitivity measure

  18. Wnt/beta-catenin signaling interacts differentially with Ihh signaling in controlling endochondral bone and synovial joint formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Kingston Kinglun; Chen, Miao-Hsueh; Day, Timothy F; Chuang, Pao-Tien; Yang, Yingzi

    2006-09-01

    Both the Wnt/beta-catenin and Ihh signaling pathways play essential roles in crucial aspects of endochondral ossification: osteoblast differentiation, chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. To understand the genetic interaction between these two signaling pathways, we have inactivated the beta-catenin gene and upregulated Ihh signaling simultaneously in the same cells during endochondral skeletal development using beta-catenin and patched 1 floxed alleles. We uncovered previously unexpected roles of Ihh signaling in synovial joint formation and the essential function of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in regulating chondrocyte survival. More importantly, we found that Wnt and Ihh signaling interact with each other in distinct ways to control osteoblast differentiation, chondrocyte proliferation, hypertrophy, survival and synovial joint formation in the developing endochondral bone. Beta-catenin is required downstream of Ihh signaling and osterix expression for osteoblast differentiation. But in chondrocyte survival, beta-catenin is required upstream of Ihh signaling to inhibit chondrocyte apoptosis. In addition, Ihh signaling can inhibit chondrocyte hypertrophy and synovial joint formation independently of beta-catenin. However, there is a strong synergistic interaction between Wnt/beta-catenin and Ihh signaling in regulating synovial joint formation.

  19. Differential proteomics reveals novel insights into Nosema-honey bee interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurze, Christoph; Dosselli, Ryan; Grassl, Julia; Le Conte, Yves; Kryger, Per; Baer, Boris; Moritz, Robin F A

    2016-12-01

    Host manipulation is a common strategy by parasites to reduce host defense responses, enhance development, host exploitation, reproduction and, ultimately, transmission success. As these parasitic modifications can reduce host fitness, increased selection pressure may result in reciprocal adaptations of the host. Whereas the majority of studies on host manipulation have explored resistance against parasites (i.e. ability to prevent or limit an infection), data describing tolerance mechanisms (i.e. ability to limit harm of an infection) are scarce. By comparing differential protein abundance, we provide evidence of host-parasite interactions in the midgut proteomes of N. ceranae-infected and uninfected honey bees from both Nosema-tolerant and Nosema-sensitive lineages. We identified 16 proteins out of 661 protein spots that were differentially abundant between experimental groups. In general, infections of Nosema resulted in an up-regulation of the bee's energy metabolism. Additionally, we identified 8 proteins that were differentially abundant between tolerant and sensitive honey bees regardless of the Nosema infection. Those proteins were linked to metabolism, response to oxidative stress and apoptosis. In addition to bee proteins, we also identified 3 Nosema ceranae proteins. Interestingly, abundance of two of these Nosema proteins were significantly higher in infected Nosema-sensitive honeybees relative to the infected Nosema-tolerant lineage. This may provide a novel candidate for studying the molecular interplay between N. ceranae and its honey bee host in more detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MeCP2 interacts with HP1 and modulates its heterochromatin association during myogenic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Noopur; Hardt, Tanja; Brero, Alessandro; Nowak, Danny; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Becker, Annette; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of crosstalk between epigenetic modifications such as histone and DNA methylation, recognized by HP1 and methyl CpG-binding proteins, respectively. We have previously shown that the level of methyl CpG-binding proteins increased dramatically during myogenesis leading to large-scale heterochromatin reorganization. In this work, we show that the level of HP1 isoforms did not change significantly throughout myogenic differentiation but their localization did. In particular, HP1γ relocalization to heterochromatin correlated with MeCP2 presence. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays, we found that these heterochromatic factors interact in vivo via the chromo shadow domain of HP1 and the first 55 amino acids of MeCP2. We propose that this dynamic interaction of HP1 and MeCP2 increases their concentration at heterochromatin linking two major gene silencing pathways to stabilize transcriptional repression during differentiation. PMID:17698499

  1. Ethnic differentials in the timing of family formation: A case study of the complex interaction between ethnicity, socioeconomic level, and marriage market pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Booth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ethnic differentials in the timing of family formation in Fiji cannot be adequately explained by hypotheses commonly used to explain differentials in fertility behaviour, namely the norms, characteristics, minority group and interaction hypotheses. The norms hypothesis explains a large part of the differentials, but socio-economic factors and changing norms are increasingly involved. The interaction hypothesis is partially operational but cannot explain decreasing age at marriage among lower socio-economic groups. A more comprehensive approach incorporates the counterbalancing effects of modernisation and marriage market imbalances arising from fertility transition. This approach also allows for true interactions between norms, socio-economic characteristics and demographic behaviour.

  2. Intracellular calcium levels determine differential modulation of allosteric interactions within G protein-coupled receptor heteromers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Gemma; Aguinaga, David; Moreno, Estefania; Hradsky, Johannes; Reddy, Pasham P; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Mikhaylova, Marina; Kreutz, Michael R; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; McCormick, Peter J; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-11-20

    The pharmacological significance of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromer is well established and it is being considered as an important target for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and other neuropsychiatric disorders. However, the physiological factors that control its distinctive biochemical properties are still unknown. We demonstrate that different intracellular Ca2+ levels exert a differential modulation of A2AR-D2R heteromer-mediated adenylyl-cyclase and MAPK signaling in striatal cells. This depends on the ability of low and high Ca2+ levels to promote a selective interaction of the heteromer with the neuronal Ca2+-binding proteins NCS-1 and calneuron-1, respectively. These Ca2+-binding proteins differentially modulate allosteric interactions within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, which constitutes a unique cellular device that integrates extracellular (adenosine and dopamine) and intracellular (Ca+2) signals to produce a specific functional response.

  3. Differential Habitat Use or Intraguild Interactions: What Structures a Carnivore Community?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew E Gompper

    Full Text Available Differential habitat use and intraguild competition are both thought to be important drivers of animal population sizes and distributions. Habitat associations for individual species are well-established, and interactions between particular pairs of species have been highlighted in many focal studies. However, community-wide assessments of the relative strengths of these two factors have not been conducted. We built multi-scale habitat occupancy models for five carnivore taxa of New York's Adirondack landscape and assessed the relative performance of these models against ones in which co-occurrences of potentially competing carnivore species were also incorporated. Distribution models based on habitat performed well for all species. Black bear (Ursus americanus and fisher (Martes pennanti distribution was similar in that occupancy of both species was negatively associated with paved roads. However, black bears were also associated with larger forest fragments and fishers with smaller forest fragments. No models with habitat features were more supported than the null habitat model for raccoons (Procyon lotor. Martens (Martes americana were most associated with increased terrain ruggedness and elevation. Weasel (Mustela spp. occupancy increased with the cover of deciduous forest. For most species dyads habitat-only models were more supported than those models with potential competitors incorporated. The exception to this finding was for the smallest carnivore taxa (marten and weasel where habitat plus coyote abundance models typically performed better than habitat-only models. Assessing this carnivore community as whole, we conclude that differential habitat use is more important than species interactions in maintaining the distribution and structure of this carnivore guild.

  4. Child Maltreatment and Gender Interactions as Predictors of Differential Neuroendocrine Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doom, Jenalee R.; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.; Dackis, Melissa N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Child maltreatment is a potent stressor associated with neuroendocrine dysregulation and increased risk for mental and physical disorders throughout the lifespan. Gender differences in stress reactivity and adult psychopathology prevalence may be related to sex-specific responsivity to stress. The purpose of this study is to examine whether gender interacts with the stress of maltreatment to produce differential neuroendocrine profiles in children. Participants included 137 maltreated and 110 nonmaltreated low-income, racially and ethnically diverse children (range: 7.9–10.9 years; M= 9.42 years; 52% male) who attended a summer research day camp. Saliva was collected 3 times across the day for 5 days for cortisol and dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA) analysis. Department of Human Services records were examined to determine the type, severity, chronicity, onset, and recency of maltreatment for children in the maltreated group. Significant interactions between gender and maltreatment pervasiveness predicted diurnal cortisol, DHEA, and cortisol/DHEA ratio levels. Elevated daily cortisol levels were reported for boys compared to girls in the group with more pervasive maltreatment. Boys with less pervasive maltreatment had lower DHEA and higher cortisol/DHEA ratio levels than girls with similar experiences, nonmaltreated boys, and boys with more pervasive maltreatment. Further results are consistent with down-regulation of cortisol production in girls with more pervasive maltreatment and girls who experienced maltreatment that was early onset and not recent. The effectiveness of interventions for maltreated children may be improved with greater knowledge of how maltreatment differentially affects neuroendocrine regulation by gender. PMID:23333253

  5. Differential reconstructed gene interaction networks for deriving toxicity threshold in chemical risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yi; Maxwell, Andrew; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Nan; Perkins, Edward J; Zhang, Chaoyang; Gong, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathway alterations reflected as changes in gene expression regulation and gene interaction can result from cellular exposure to toxicants. Such information is often used to elucidate toxicological modes of action. From a risk assessment perspective, alterations in biological pathways are a rich resource for setting toxicant thresholds, which may be more sensitive and mechanism-informed than traditional toxicity endpoints. Here we developed a novel differential networks (DNs) appro...

  6. Global map of physical interactions among differentially expressed genes in multiple sclerosis relapses and remissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuller, Tamir; Atar, Shimshi; Ruppin, Eytan; Gurevich, Michael; Achiron, Anat

    2011-09-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a central nervous system autoimmune inflammatory T-cell-mediated disease with a relapsing-remitting course in the majority of patients. In this study, we performed a high-resolution systems biology analysis of gene expression and physical interactions in MS relapse and remission. To this end, we integrated 164 large-scale measurements of gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MS patients in relapse or remission and healthy subjects, with large-scale information about the physical interactions between these genes obtained from public databases. These data were analyzed with a variety of computational methods. We find that there is a clear and significant global network-level signal that is related to the changes in gene expression of MS patients in comparison to healthy subjects. However, despite the clear differences in the clinical symptoms of MS patients in relapse versus remission, the network level signal is weaker when comparing patients in these two stages of the disease. This result suggests that most of the genes have relatively similar expression levels in the two stages of the disease. In accordance with previous studies, we found that the pathways related to regulation of cell death, chemotaxis and inflammatory response are differentially expressed in the disease in comparison to healthy subjects, while pathways related to cell adhesion, cell migration and cell-cell signaling are activated in relapse in comparison to remission. However, the current study includes a detailed report of the exact set of genes involved in these pathways and the interactions between them. For example, we found that the genes TP53 and IL1 are 'network-hub' that interacts with many of the differentially expressed genes in MS patients versus healthy subjects, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a 'network-hub' in the case of MS patients with relapse versus remission. The statistical approaches employed in this study enabled us

  7. Interaction between FKBP5 variability and recent life events in the anxiety spectrum: Evidence for the differential susceptibility model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Pérez-Pérez

    Full Text Available Gene-environment interaction (GxE research has highlighted the importance of investigating the FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5 gene as a sensitivity gene. However, previous GxE studies with FKBP5 have not measured the full environmental spectrum or applied statistical tests to discern whether the GxE interaction fits better with the differential-susceptibility or diathesis-stress hypotheses. This study examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on FKBP5 gene moderate the association of positive and negative recent life events (LEs with depressive symptoms, state-anxiety, neuroticism, and social anxiety traits.A total of 86 nonclinical young adults were administered psychological measures and were genotyped for five FKBP5 SNPs (rs3800373, rs9296158, rs1360780, rs9470080 and rs4713916.Regression analyses indicated significant GxE interactions for social anxiety and neuroticism. The interactions predicting neuroticism fit different models for different SNPs, although the overall effect indicated by the haplotype was consistent with the differential-susceptibility hypothesis: the risk-haplotype group presented higher neuroticism in the presence of more negative LEs and lower neuroticism in the presence of more positive LEs. The GxE interactions for social anxiety were consistent with the diathesis-stress model. The lack of significance in the for-better side for social anxiety might be related to the fact that it mapped onto low extraversion, which is associated with a lower permeability to positive experiences.Findings underscore the importance of testing the differential-susceptibility model in relation to FKBP5 to adequately characterize its role in healthy and pathological developmental processes.

  8. Experimental determination of differential cross-sections of muonic neutrinos and muonic antineutrinos interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, Anne-Marie.

    1975-05-01

    The experimental determination of muonic neutrinos and muonic antineutrinos differential cross-sections by the analysis of pictures taken in the CERN Gargamelle heavy liquid bubble chamber is presented. The methods used to solve experimental difficulties (muon identification, hadronic energy determination) and the errors on the experimental distributions are explained in detail. Then, the structure functions in charge changing interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos are analyzed and interpreted in terms of parton distribution inside the nucleon [fr

  9. The BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism Interacts with Maternal Parenting Influencing Adolescent Depressive Symptoms: Evidence of Differential Susceptibility Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leilei; Li, Zhi; Chen, Jie; Li, Xinying; Zhang, Jianxin; Belsky, Jay

    2016-03-01

    Although depressive symptoms are common during adolescence, little research has examined gene-environment interaction on youth depression. This study chose the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, tested the interaction between a functional polymorphism resulting amino acid substitution of valine (Val) to methionine (Met) in the proBDNF protein at codon 66 (Val66Met), and maternal parenting on youth depressive symptoms in a sample of 780 community adolescents of Chinese Han ethnicity (aged 11-17, M = 13.6, 51.3 % females). Participants reported their depressive symptoms and perceived maternal parenting. Results indicated the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism significantly moderated the influence of maternal warmth-reasoning, but not harshness-hostility, on youth depressive symptoms. Confirmatory model evaluation indicated that the interaction effect involving warmth-reasoning conformed to the differential-susceptibility rather than diathesis-stress model of person-X-environment interaction. Thus, Val carriers experienced less depressive symptoms than Met homozygotes when mothering was more positive but more symptoms when mothering was less positive. The findings provided evidence in support of the differential susceptibility hypothesis of youth depressive symptoms and shed light on the importance of examining the gene-environment interaction from a developmental perspective.

  10. YB1/p32, a nuclear Y-box binding protein 1, is a novel regulator of myoblast differentiation that interacts with Msx1 homeoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Young Joon [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Science, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-Gu, Incheon, Korea, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol, E-mail: hlee@inha.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Science, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-Gu, Incheon, Korea, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Precisely controlled cellular differentiation is essential for the proper development of vertebrate embryo and deregulated differentiation is a major cause of many human congenital diseases as well as cancer. Msx1 is a member of the homeoprotein family implicated in these processes, which inhibits the differentiation of skeletal muscle and other cell types, presumably by regulating transcription of target genes through interaction with other cellular factors. We presently show that YB1/p32, a nuclear Y-box binding protein 1, interacts with Msx1 homeoprotein and functions as a regulator of C2C12 myoblast differentiation. We demonstrate that YB1/p32 functionally interacts with Msx1 through its N-terminal region and colocalizes with Msx1 at the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we find that YB1/p32 is competent for inhibition of C2C12 myoblast differentiation, which is correlated with its activity as a negative regulator of MyoD gene expression and binding to the MyoD core enhancer region (CER). Furthermore, YB1/p32 cooperates with Msx1 in transcriptional repression and knocking down the expression of endogenous YB1 attenuates the effects of Msx1. Taken together, our study has uncovered a new function of YB1/p32, a regulator of skeletal muscle differentiation.

  11. YB1/p32, a nuclear Y-box binding protein 1, is a novel regulator of myoblast differentiation that interacts with Msx1 homeoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Young Joon; Lee, Hansol

    2010-01-01

    Precisely controlled cellular differentiation is essential for the proper development of vertebrate embryo and deregulated differentiation is a major cause of many human congenital diseases as well as cancer. Msx1 is a member of the homeoprotein family implicated in these processes, which inhibits the differentiation of skeletal muscle and other cell types, presumably by regulating transcription of target genes through interaction with other cellular factors. We presently show that YB1/p32, a nuclear Y-box binding protein 1, interacts with Msx1 homeoprotein and functions as a regulator of C2C12 myoblast differentiation. We demonstrate that YB1/p32 functionally interacts with Msx1 through its N-terminal region and colocalizes with Msx1 at the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we find that YB1/p32 is competent for inhibition of C2C12 myoblast differentiation, which is correlated with its activity as a negative regulator of MyoD gene expression and binding to the MyoD core enhancer region (CER). Furthermore, YB1/p32 cooperates with Msx1 in transcriptional repression and knocking down the expression of endogenous YB1 attenuates the effects of Msx1. Taken together, our study has uncovered a new function of YB1/p32, a regulator of skeletal muscle differentiation.

  12. Interaction between FKBP5 variability and recent life events in the anxiety spectrum: Evidence for the differential susceptibility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinbaum, Tamara; Kwapil, Thomas R.; Ballespí, Sergi; Peña, Elionora; de Castro-Catala, Marta; Riba, Maria Dolors; Rosa, Araceli

    2018-01-01

    Background Gene-environment interaction (GxE) research has highlighted the importance of investigating the FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP5) gene as a sensitivity gene. However, previous GxE studies with FKBP5 have not measured the full environmental spectrum or applied statistical tests to discern whether the GxE interaction fits better with the differential-susceptibility or diathesis-stress hypotheses. This study examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on FKBP5 gene moderate the association of positive and negative recent life events (LEs) with depressive symptoms, state-anxiety, neuroticism, and social anxiety traits. Methods A total of 86 nonclinical young adults were administered psychological measures and were genotyped for five FKBP5 SNPs (rs3800373, rs9296158, rs1360780, rs9470080 and rs4713916). Results Regression analyses indicated significant GxE interactions for social anxiety and neuroticism. The interactions predicting neuroticism fit different models for different SNPs, although the overall effect indicated by the haplotype was consistent with the differential-susceptibility hypothesis: the risk-haplotype group presented higher neuroticism in the presence of more negative LEs and lower neuroticism in the presence of more positive LEs. The GxE interactions for social anxiety were consistent with the diathesis-stress model. The lack of significance in the for-better side for social anxiety might be related to the fact that it mapped onto low extraversion, which is associated with a lower permeability to positive experiences. Discussion Findings underscore the importance of testing the differential-susceptibility model in relation to FKBP5 to adequately characterize its role in healthy and pathological developmental processes. PMID:29466454

  13. LncRNA Dum interacts with Dnmts to regulate Dppa2 expression during myogenic differentiation and muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yu; Bao, Xichen; Zhu, Xihua; Kwok, Yvonne Ka-yin; Sun, Kun; Chen, Xiaona; Huang, Yongheng; Jauch, Ralf; Esteban, Miguel A; Sun, Hao; Wang, Huating

    2015-01-01

    Emerging studies document the roles of long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) in regulating gene expression at chromatin level but relatively less is known how they regulate DNA methylation. Here we identify an lncRNA, Dum (developmental pluripotency-associated 2 (Dppa2) Upstream binding Muscle lncRNA) in skeletal myoblast cells. The expression of Dum is dynamically regulated during myogenesis in vitro and in vivo. It is also transcriptionally induced by MyoD binding upon myoblast differentiation. Functional analyses show that it promotes myoblast differentiation and damage-induced muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, Dum was found to silence its neighboring gene, Dppa2, in cis through recruiting Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Furthermore, intrachromosomal looping between Dum locus and Dppa2 promoter is necessary for Dum/Dppa2 interaction. Collectively, we have identified a novel lncRNA that interacts with Dnmts to regulate myogenesis. PMID:25686699

  14. Research on odor interaction between aldehyde compounds via a partial differential equation (PDE) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Luchun; Liu, Jiemin; Qu, Chen; Gu, Xingye; Zhao, Xia

    2015-01-28

    In order to explore the odor interaction of binary odor mixtures, a series of odor intensity evaluation tests were performed using both individual components and binary mixtures of aldehydes. Based on the linear relation between the logarithm of odor activity value and odor intensity of individual substances, the relationship between concentrations of individual constituents and their joint odor intensity was investigated by employing a partial differential equation (PDE) model. The obtained results showed that the binary odor interaction was mainly influenced by the mixing ratio of two constituents, but not the concentration level of an odor sample. Besides, an extended PDE model was also proposed on the basis of the above experiments. Through a series of odor intensity matching tests for several different binary odor mixtures, the extended PDE model was proved effective at odor intensity prediction. Furthermore, odorants of the same chemical group and similar odor type exhibited similar characteristics in the binary odor interaction. The overall results suggested that the PDE model is a more interpretable way of demonstrating the odor interactions of binary odor mixtures.

  15. Clustering gene expression data based on predicted differential effects of GV interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hai-Yan; Zhu, Jun; Han, Dan-Fu

    2005-02-01

    Microarray has become a popular biotechnology in biological and medical research. However, systematic and stochastic variabilities in microarray data are expected and unavoidable, resulting in the problem that the raw measurements have inherent "noise" within microarray experiments. Currently, logarithmic ratios are usually analyzed by various clustering methods directly, which may introduce bias interpretation in identifying groups of genes or samples. In this paper, a statistical method based on mixed model approaches was proposed for microarray data cluster analysis. The underlying rationale of this method is to partition the observed total gene expression level into various variations caused by different factors using an ANOVA model, and to predict the differential effects of GV (gene by variety) interaction using the adjusted unbiased prediction (AUP) method. The predicted GV interaction effects can then be used as the inputs of cluster analysis. We illustrated the application of our method with a gene expression dataset and elucidated the utility of our approach using an external validation.

  16. Are Max-Specified Infant Facial Expressions during Face-to-Face Interaction Consistent with Differential Emotions Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Reinaldo; Cohn, Jeffrey F.

    1993-01-01

    Examined infant facial expressions at two, four, and six months of age during face-to-face play and a still-face interaction with their mothers. Contrary to differential emotions theory, at no age did proportions or durations of discrete and blended negative expressions differ; they also showed different patterns of developmental change. (MM)

  17. Interaction of differentiated human adipocytes with macrophages leads to trogocytosis and selective IL-6 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárvári, A K; Doan-Xuan, Q-M; Bacsó, Z; Csomós, I; Balajthy, Z; Fésüs, L

    2015-01-22

    Obesity leads to adipose tissue inflammation that is characterized by increased release of proinflammatory molecules and the recruitment of activated immune cells. Although macrophages are present in the highest number among the immune cells in obese adipose tissue, not much is known about their direct interaction with adipocytes. We have introduced an ex vivo experimental system to characterize the cellular interactions and the profile of secreted cytokines in cocultures of macrophages and human adipocytes differentiated from either mesenchymal stem cells or a preadipocyte cell line. As observed by time-lapse microscopy, flow, and laser-scanning cytometry, macrophages phagocytosed bites of adipocytes (trogocytosis), which led to their de novo, phagocytosis and NF-κB-dependent synthesis, then release of interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. IL-6 secretion was not accompanied by secretion of other proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-8, except MCP-1. LPS-induced release of TNF-α, IL-8 and MCP-1 was decreased in the presence of the differentiated adipocytes but the IL-6 level did not subside suggesting that phagocytosis-dependent IL-6 secretion may have significant regulatory function in the inflamed adipose tissue.

  18. Positron interactions with water–total elastic, total inelastic, and elastic differential cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tattersall, Wade; Chiari, Luca; Machacek, J. R.; Anderson, Emma; Sullivan, James P.; White, Ron D.; Brunger, M. J.; Buckman, Stephen J.; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Utilising a high-resolution, trap-based positron beam, we have measured both elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons from water vapour. The measurements comprise differential elastic, total elastic, and total inelastic (not including positronium formation) absolute cross sections. The energy range investigated is from 1 eV to 60 eV. Comparison with theory is made with both R-Matrix and distorted wave calculations, and with our own application of the Independent Atom Model for positron interactions

  19. Differentiating Emotions Across Contexts: Comparing Adults with and without Social Anxiety Disorder Using Random, Social Interaction, and Daily Experience Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashdan, Todd B.; Farmer, Antonina S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize and label emotional experiences has been associated with well-being and adaptive functioning. This skill is particularly important in social situations, as emotions provide information about the state of relationships and help guide interpersonal decisions, such as whether to disclose personal information. Given the interpersonal difficulties linked to social anxiety disorder (SAD), deficient negative emotion differentiation may contribute to impairment in this population. We hypothesized that people with SAD would exhibit less negative emotion differentiation in daily life, and these differences would translate to impairment in social functioning. We recruited 43 people diagnosed with generalized SAD and 43 healthy adults to describe the emotions they experienced over 14 days. Participants received palmtop computers for responding to random prompts and describing naturalistic social interactions; to complete end-of-day diary entries, they used a secure online website. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients to capture the degree of differentiation of negative and positive emotions for each context (random moments, face-to-face social interactions, and end-of-day reflections). Compared to healthy controls, the SAD group exhibited less negative (but not positive) emotion differentiation during random prompts, social interactions, and (at trend level) end-of-day assessments. These differences could not be explained by emotion intensity or variability over the 14 days, or to comorbid depression or anxiety disorders. Our findings suggest that people with generalized SAD have deficits in clarifying specific negative emotions felt at a given point of time. These deficits may contribute to difficulties with effective emotion regulation and healthy social relationship functioning. PMID:24512246

  20. Differentiating emotions across contexts: comparing adults with and without social anxiety disorder using random, social interaction, and daily experience sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashdan, Todd B; Farmer, Antonina S

    2014-06-01

    The ability to recognize and label emotional experiences has been associated with well-being and adaptive functioning. This skill is particularly important in social situations, as emotions provide information about the state of relationships and help guide interpersonal decisions, such as whether to disclose personal information. Given the interpersonal difficulties linked to social anxiety disorder (SAD), deficient negative emotion differentiation may contribute to impairment in this population. We hypothesized that people with SAD would exhibit less negative emotion differentiation in daily life, and these differences would translate to impairment in social functioning. We recruited 43 people diagnosed with generalized SAD and 43 healthy adults to describe the emotions they experienced over 14 days. Participants received palmtop computers for responding to random prompts and describing naturalistic social interactions; to complete end-of-day diary entries, they used a secure online website. We calculated intraclass correlation coefficients to capture the degree of differentiation of negative and positive emotions for each context (random moments, face-to-face social interactions, and end-of-day reflections). Compared to healthy controls, the SAD group exhibited less negative (but not positive) emotion differentiation during random prompts, social interactions, and (at trend level) end-of-day assessments. These differences could not be explained by emotion intensity or variability over the 14 days, or to comorbid depression or anxiety disorders. Our findings suggest that people with generalized SAD have deficits in clarifying specific negative emotions felt at a given point of time. These deficits may contribute to difficulties with effective emotion regulation and healthy social relationship functioning.

  1. Differential gene expression and Hog1 interaction with osmoresponsive genes in the extremely halotolerant black yeast Hortaea werneckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plemenitaš Ana

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in external salinity force eukaryotic cells to respond by changes in the gene expression of proteins acting in protective biochemical processes, thus counteracting the changing osmotic pressure. The high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG signaling pathway is essential for the efficient up-regulation of the osmoresponsive genes. In this study, the differential gene expression of the extremely halotolerant black yeast Hortaea werneckii was explored. Furthermore, the interaction of mitogen-activated protein kinase HwHog1 and RNA polymerase II with the chromatin in cells adapted to an extremely hypersaline environment was analyzed. Results A cDNA subtraction library was constructed for H. werneckii, adapted to moderate salinity or an extremely hypersaline environment of 4.5 M NaCl. An uncommon osmoresponsive set of 95 differentially expressed genes was identified. The majority of these had not previously been connected with the adaptation of salt-sensitive S. cerevisiae to hypersaline conditions. The transcriptional response in hypersaline-adapted and hypersaline-stressed cells showed that only a subset of the identified genes responded to acute salt-stress, whereas all were differentially expressed in adapted cells. Interaction with HwHog1 was shown for 36 of the 95 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the identified osmoresponsive and HwHog1-dependent genes in H. werneckii have not been previously reported as Hog1-dependent genes in the salt-sensitive S. cerevisiae. The study further demonstrated the co-occupancy of HwHog1 and RNA polymerase II on the chromatin of 17 up-regulated and 2 down-regulated genes in 4.5 M NaCl-adapted H. werneckii cells. Conclusion Extremely halotolerant H. werneckii represents a suitable and highly relevant organism to study cellular responses to environmental salinity. In comparison with the salt-sensitive S. cerevisiae, this yeast shows a different set of genes being expressed at

  2. Conversational assessment in memory clinic encounters: interactional profiling for differentiating dementia from functional memory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Danielle; Drew, Paul; Elsey, Christopher; Blackburn, Daniel; Wakefield, Sarah; Harkness, Kirsty; Reuber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In the UK dementia is under-diagnosed, there is limited access to specialist memory clinics, and many of the patients referred to such clinics are ultimately found to have functional (non-progressive) memory disorders (FMD), rather than a neurodegenerative disorder. Government initiatives on 'timely diagnosis' aim to improve the rate and quality of diagnosis for those with dementia. This study seeks to improve the screening and diagnostic process by analysing communication between clinicians and patients during initial specialist clinic visits. Establishing differential conversational profiles could help the timely differential diagnosis of memory complaints. This study is based on video- and audio recordings of 25 initial consultations between neurologists and patients referred to a UK memory clinic. Conversation analysis was used to explore recurrent communicative practices associated with each diagnostic group. Two discrete conversational profiles began to emerge, to help differentiate between patients with dementia and functional memory complaints, based on (1) whether the patient is able to answer questions about personal information; (2) whether they can display working memory in interaction; (3) whether they are able to respond to compound questions; (4) the time taken to respond to questions; and (5) the level of detail they offer when providing an account of their memory failure experiences. The distinctive conversational profiles observed in patients with functional memory complaints on the one hand and neurodegenerative memory conditions on the other suggest that conversational profiling can support the differential diagnosis of functional and neurodegenerative memory disorders.

  3. Heterocellular interaction enhances recruitment of α and β-catenins and ZO-2 into functional gap-junction complexes and induces gap junction-dependant differentiation of mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talhouk, Rabih S.; Mroue, Rana; Mokalled, Mayssa; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Nehme, Ralda; Ismail, Ayman; Khalil, Antoine; Zaatari, Mira; El-Sabban, Marwan E.

    2008-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJ) are required for mammary epithelial differentiation. Using epithelial (SCp2) and myoepithelial-like (SCg6) mouse-derived mammary cells, the role of heterocellular interaction in assembly of GJ complexes and functional differentiation (β-casein expression) was evaluated. Heterocellular interaction is critical for β-casein expression, independent of exogenous basement membrane or cell anchoring substrata. Functional differentiation of SCp2, co-cultured with SCg6, is more sensitive to GJ inhibition relative to homocellular SCp2 cultures differentiated by exogenous basement membrane. Connexin (Cx)32 and Cx43 levels were not regulated across culture conditions; however, GJ functionality was enhanced under differentiation-permissive conditions. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated association of junctional complex components (α-catenin, β-catenin and ZO-2) with Cx32 and Cx43, in differentiation conditions, and additionally with Cx30 in heterocellular cultures. Although β-catenin did not shuttle between cadherin and GJ complexes, increased association between connexins and β-catenin in heterocellular cultures was observed. This was concomitant with reduced nuclear β-catenin, suggesting that differentiation in heterocellular cultures involves sequestration of β-catenin in GJ complexes

  4. Interactions of coal gangue and pine sawdust during combustion of their blends studied using differential thermogravimetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhu, Mingming; Cheng, Fangqin; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-08-01

    The interactions between coal gangue and pine sawdust during the combustion process were studied using thermogravimetric analysis. The effect of the blending ratio, oxygen concentration and heating rate on the weight loss (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (TGA) profiles was examined. The TG and DTG curves of the blends were not additives of those of the individual materials, suggesting that interactions between coal gangue and pine sawdust had occurred during the combustion, especially in the temperature range of 400-600°C. Kinetic analysis confirmed that the combustion of coal gangue, pine sawdust and their blends was chemical reaction controlled. Further analysis revealed that the interactions between coal gangue and pine sawdust were primarily due to thermal effects rather than structural changes, with the thermal inertia of coal gangue dominating over the behaviour of the blends. The interactions decreased with decreasing the coal gangue ratio in the blend, oxygen concentration and heating rate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential models in ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barco Gomez, Carlos; Barco Gomez, German

    2002-01-01

    The models mathematical writings with differential equations are used to describe the populational behavior through the time of the animal species. These models can be lineal or no lineal. The differential models for unique specie include the exponential pattern of Malthus and the logistical pattern of Verlhust. The lineal differential models to describe the interaction between two species include the competition relationships, predation and symbiosis

  6. The mental representation of living and nonliving things: differential weighting and interactivity of sensorial and non-sensorial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Paulo; Morais, José; Brito-Mendes, Carlos; Kolinsky, Régine

    2005-02-01

    Warrington and colleagues (Warrington & McCarthy, 1983, 1987; Warrington & Shallice, 1984) claimed that sensorial and functional-associative (FA) features are differentially important in determining the meaning of living things (LT) and nonliving things (NLT). The first aim of the present study was to evaluate this hypothesis through two different access tasks: feature generation (Experiment 1) and cued recall (Experiment 2). The results of both experiments provided consistent empirical support for Warrington and colleagues' assumption. The second aim of the present study was to test a new differential interactivity hypothesis that combines Warrington and colleagueS' assumption with the notion of a higher number of intercorrelations and hence of a stronger connectivity between sensorial and non-sensorial features for LTs than for NLTs. This hypothesis was motivated by previoUs reports of an uncrossed interaction between domain (LTs vs NLTs) and attribute type (sensorial vs FA) in, for example, a feature verification task (Laws, Humber, Ramsey, & McCarthy, 1995): while FA attributes are verified faster than sensorial attributes for NLTs, no difference is observed for LTs. We replicated and generalised this finding using several feature verification tasks on both written words and pictures (Experiment 3), including in conditions aimed at minimising the intervention of priming biases and strategic or mnemonic processes (Experiment 4). The whole set of results suggests that both privileged relations between features and categories, and the differential importance of intercorrelations between features as a function of category, modulate access to semantic features.

  7. Equations of motion of interacting massless fields of all spins as a free differential algebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, M A

    1988-08-11

    It is argued that the equations of motion of interacting massless fields of all spins s=0, 1, ..., infinity can naturally be formulated in terms of a free differential algebra (FDA) constructed from one-forms and zero-forms that belong both to the adjoint representation of the infinite-dimensional superalgebra of higher spins and auxiliary fields proposed previously. This FDA is found explicitly in the first non-trivial order in the zero-forms. Various properties of the proposed FDA are discussed including the ways for incorporating internal (Yang-Mills) gauge symmetries via associative algebras.

  8. Receptor-interacting Protein 140 Overexpression Promotes Neuro-2a Neuronal Differentiation by ERK1/2 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal neuronal differentiation plays an important role in central nervous system (CNS development abnormalities such as Down syndrome (DS, a disorder that results directly from overexpression of genes in trisomic cells. Receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140 is significantly upregulated in DS brains, suggesting its involvement in DS CNS development abnormalities. However, the role of RIP140 in neuronal differentiation is still not clear. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of RIP140 overexpression on the differentiation of neuro-2a (N2a neuroblastoma cells, in vitro. Methods: Stably RIP140-overexpressing N2a (N2a-RIP140 cells were used as a neurodevelopmental model, and were constructed by lipofection and overexpression validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Retinoic acid (RA was used to stimulate N2a differentiation. Combining the expression of Tuj1 at the mRNA and protein levels, the percentage of cells baring neurites, and the number of neurites per cell body was semi-quantified to determine the effect of RIP140 on differentiation of N2a cells. Furthermore, western blot and the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 were used to identify the specific signaling pathway by which RIP140 induces differentiation of N2a cells. Statistical significance of the differences between groups was determined by one-way analysis of variance followed by the Dunnett test. Results: Compared to untransfected N2a cells RIPl40 expression in N2a-RIP140 cells was remarkably upregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels. N2a-RIP140 cells had a significantly increased percentage of cells baring neurites, and numbers of neurites per cell, as compared to N2a cells, in the absence and presence of RA (P < 0.05. In addition, Tuj1, a neuronal biomarker, was strongly upregulated in N2a-RIP140 cells (P < 0.05 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2 levels in N2a-RIP140 cells were dramatically increased, while differentiation was

  9. DNMT1 mutations found in HSANIE patients affect interaction with UHRF1 and neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Martha; Link, Stephanie; Wolf, Patricia; Schneider, Katrin; Solis, Veronica; Ryan, Joel; Meilinger, Daniela; Qin, Weihua; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2017-04-15

    DNMT1 is recruited to substrate sites by PCNA and UHRF1 to maintain DNA methylation after replication. The cell cycle dependent recruitment of DNMT1 is mediated by the PCNA-binding domain (PBD) and the targeting sequence (TS) within the N-terminal regulatory domain. The TS domain was found to be mutated in patients suffering from hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies with dementia and hearing loss (HSANIE) and autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) and is associated with global hypomethylation and site specific hypermethylation. With functional complementation assays in mouse embryonic stem cells, we showed that DNMT1 mutations P496Y and Y500C identified in HSANIE patients not only impair DNMT1 heterochromatin association, but also UHRF1 interaction resulting in hypomethylation. Similar DNA methylation defects were observed when DNMT1 interacting domains in UHRF1, the UBL and the SRA domain, were deleted. With cell-based assays, we could show that HSANIE associated mutations perturb DNMT1 heterochromatin association and catalytic complex formation at methylation sites and decrease protein stability in late S and G2 phase. To investigate the neuronal phenotype of HSANIE mutations, we performed DNMT1 rescue assays and could show that cells expressing mutated DNMT1 were prone to apoptosis and failed to differentiate into neuronal lineage. Our results provide insights into the molecular basis of DNMT1 dysfunction in HSANIE patients and emphasize the importance of the TS domain in the regulation of DNA methylation in pluripotent and differentiating cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Molecular Identification of tw5: Vps52 Promotes Pluripotential Cell Differentiation through Cell–Cell Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiko Sugimoto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available After implantation, pluripotent epiblasts are converted to embryonic ectoderm through cell–cell interactions that significantly change the transcriptional and epigenetic networks. An entrée to understanding this vital developmental transition is the tw5 mutation of the mouse t complex. This mutation produces highly specific defects in the embryonic ectoderm before gastrulation, leading to death of the embryonic ectoderm. Using a positional cloning approach, we have now identified the mutated gene, completing a decades-long search. The gene, vacuolar protein sorting 52 (Vps52, is a mouse homolog of yeast VPS52 that is involved in the retrograde trafficking of endosomes. Our data suggest that Vps52 acts in extraembryonic tissues to support the growth and differentiation of embryonic ectoderm via cell–cell interactions. It is also required in the formation of embryonic structures at a later stage of development, revealing hitherto unknown functions of Vps52 in the development of a multicellular organism.

  11. Rare sugar D-allose strongly induces thioredoxin-interacting protein and inhibits osteoclast differentiation in Raw264 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kana; Noguchi, Chisato; Kamitori, Kazuyo; Dong, Youyi; Hirata, Yuko; Hossain, Mohammad A; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Tokuda, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Fuminori

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress modulates the osteoclast differentiation via redox systems, and thioredoxin 1 (Trx) promotes the osteoclast formation by regulating the activity of transcription factors. The function of Trx is known to be regulated by its binding partner, thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). We previously reported that the expression of TXNIP gene is strongly induced by a rare sugar D-allose. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that D-allose could inhibit the osteoclast differentiation by regulating the Trx function. We used a murine Raw264 cell line that differentiates to the osteoclast by the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) treatment. The effect of sugars was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. The expression and localization of TXNIP and Trx protein were examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemisty. The activity of the nuclear factor-κB, nuclear factor of activated T cells, and activator protein 1 transcription factors was measured by the luciferase reporter assay. The addition of D-allose (25 mmol/L) inhibited the osteoclast differentiation down to 9.53% ± 1.27% of a receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-only treatment. During the osteoclast differentiation, a significant increase of TNXIP was observed by D-allose treatment. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that both Trx and TXNIP existed in the nucleus in preosteoclasts and osteoclasts. Overexpression of TXNIP by plasmid transfection also inhibited the osteoclast formation, indicating the functional importance of TXNIP for the osteoclast differentiation. Transcriptional activity of the activator protein 1, nuclear factor-κB, and nuclear factor of activated T cells, known to be modulated by Trx, were inhibited by D-allose. In conclusion, our data indicate that D-allose is a strong inhibitor of the osteoclast differentiation, and this effect could be caused by TXNIP induction and a resulting inhibition of the Trx function

  12. Industry wage differentials, rent sharing and gender: three empirical essays

    OpenAIRE

    Tojerow, Ilan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the industry wage differentials, rent-sharing and the gender wage gap. I empirically investigate: i) the interaction between inter-industry wage differentials and the gender wage gap in six European countries, ii) how rent sharing interacts with the gender wage gap in the Belgian private sector and iii) the existence of inter-industry wage differentials in Belgium, through the unobserved ability hypothesis.The first chapter is devoted to the analysis of the interaction ...

  13. Nuclear Mechanics and Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xinjian; Gavara, Nuria; Song, Guanbin

    2015-12-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential. Stem cell differentiation is a prerequisite for the application of stem cells in regenerative medicine and clinical therapy. In addition to chemical stimulation, mechanical cues play a significant role in regulating stem cell differentiation. The integrity of mechanical sensors is necessary for the ability of cells to respond to mechanical signals. The nucleus, the largest and stiffest cellular organelle, interacts with the cytoskeleton as a key mediator of cell mechanics. Nuclear mechanics are involved in the complicated interactions of lamins, chromatin and nucleoskeleton-related proteins. Thus, stem cell differentiation is intimately associated with nuclear mechanics due to its indispensable role in mechanotransduction and mechanical response. This paper reviews several main contributions of nuclear mechanics, highlights the hallmarks of the nuclear mechanics of stem cells, and provides insight into the relationship between nuclear mechanics and stem cell differentiation, which may guide clinical applications in the future.

  14. The temporal dynamics of differential gene expression in Aspergillus fumigatus interacting with human immature dendritic cells in vitro.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morton, Charles O

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most important antigen presenting cells and play a pivotal role in host immunity to infectious agents by acting as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDC) were infected with viable resting conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af293) for 12 hours at an MOI of 5; cells were sampled every three hours. RNA was extracted from both organisms at each time point and hybridised to microarrays. iDC cell death increased at 6 h in the presence of A. fumigatus which coincided with fungal germ tube emergence; >80% of conidia were associated with iDC. Over the time course A. fumigatus differentially regulated 210 genes, FunCat analysis indicated significant up-regulation of genes involved in fermentation, drug transport, pathogenesis and response to oxidative stress. Genes related to cytotoxicity were differentially regulated but the gliotoxin biosynthesis genes were down regulated over the time course, while Aspf1 was up-regulated at 9 h and 12 h. There was an up-regulation of genes in the subtelomeric regions of the genome as the interaction progressed. The genes up-regulated by iDC in the presence of A. fumigatus indicated that they were producing a pro-inflammatory response which was consistent with previous transcriptome studies of iDC interacting with A. fumigatus germ tubes. This study shows that A. fumigatus adapts to phagocytosis by iDCs by utilising genes that allow it to survive the interaction rather than just up-regulation of specific virulence genes.

  15. The temporal dynamics of differential gene expression in Aspergillus fumigatus interacting with human immature dendritic cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles O Morton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are the most important antigen presenting cells and play a pivotal role in host immunity to infectious agents by acting as a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems. Monocyte-derived immature DCs (iDC were infected with viable resting conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus (Af293 for 12 hours at an MOI of 5; cells were sampled every three hours. RNA was extracted from both organisms at each time point and hybridised to microarrays. iDC cell death increased at 6 h in the presence of A. fumigatus which coincided with fungal germ tube emergence; >80% of conidia were associated with iDC. Over the time course A. fumigatus differentially regulated 210 genes, FunCat analysis indicated significant up-regulation of genes involved in fermentation, drug transport, pathogenesis and response to oxidative stress. Genes related to cytotoxicity were differentially regulated but the gliotoxin biosynthesis genes were down regulated over the time course, while Aspf1 was up-regulated at 9 h and 12 h. There was an up-regulation of genes in the subtelomeric regions of the genome as the interaction progressed. The genes up-regulated by iDC in the presence of A. fumigatus indicated that they were producing a pro-inflammatory response which was consistent with previous transcriptome studies of iDC interacting with A. fumigatus germ tubes. This study shows that A. fumigatus adapts to phagocytosis by iDCs by utilising genes that allow it to survive the interaction rather than just up-regulation of specific virulence genes.

  16. Role of Interaction between Magnetic Rossby Waves and Tachocline Differential Rotation in Producing Solar Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; McIntosh, Scott W.; Bothun, Gregory; Cally, Paul S.; Ghosh, Siddhartha S.; Gilman, Peter A.; Umurhan, Orkan M.

    2018-02-01

    We present a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic shallow-water model for the solar tachocline (MHD-SWT) that generates quasi-periodic tachocline nonlinear oscillations (TNOs) that can be identified with the recently discovered solar “seasons.” We discuss the properties of the hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic Rossby waves that interact with the differential rotation and toroidal fields to sustain these oscillations, which occur due to back-and-forth energy exchanges among potential, kinetic, and magnetic energies. We perform model simulations for a few years, for selected example cases, in both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic regimes and show that the TNOs are robust features of the MHD-SWT model, occurring with periods of 2–20 months. We find that in certain cases multiple unstable shallow-water modes govern the dynamics, and TNO periods vary with time. In hydrodynamically governed TNOs, the energy exchange mechanism is simple, occurring between the Rossby waves and differential rotation. But in MHD cases, energy exchange becomes much more complex, involving energy flow among six energy reservoirs by means of eight different energy conversion processes. For toroidal magnetic bands of 5 and 35 kG peak amplitudes, both placed at 45° latitude and oppositely directed in north and south hemispheres, we show that the energy transfers responsible for TNO, as well as westward phase propagation, are evident in synoptic maps of the flow, magnetic field, and tachocline top-surface deformations. Nonlinear mode–mode interaction is particularly dramatic in the strong-field case. We also find that the TNO period increases with a decrease in rotation rate, implying that the younger Sun had more frequent seasons.

  17. Baryon exchange in 12 GeV/c. pi. /sup -/p interactions. [Differential cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenton, M W; Bacino, W J; Hauptman, J M; Rudnick, F D; Shepard, P F; Slater, W E; Stork, D H; Ticho, H K [California Univ., Los Angeles (USA)

    1978-08-14

    Final states produced by charged baryon exchange in ..pi../sup -/p interactions at 12 GeV/c laboratory momentum have been studied. Forward neutrons with momenta determined by a calorimeter to be greater than 8.5 +- 1.4 GeV/c triggered the SLAC 40-inch hydrogen bubble chamber which operated at a 10 Hz expansion rate. Data on the reactions ..pi../sup -/p..-->..n..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/, ..pi../sup -/p..-->..n..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup 0/, and ..pi../sup -/p..-->..n..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/are reported. In ..pi../sup -/p..-->..n..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/ production of rho and f mesons is observed. Differential cross sections are derived and compared with data at lower incident momentum and with theoretical models. In ..pi../sup -/p..-->..n..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup 0/, ..omega.. production is observed with a differential cross section having a deep dip near u' = 0.2 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. In ..pi../sup -/p..-->..n..pi../sup -/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/, ..delta../sup -/, rho and f production is observed. The observed mass distributions appear to indicate the production of wide resonances decaying into rho..pi pi... Some evidence for rho-..omega.. interference is also observed.

  18. Symbiotic Cell Differentiation and Cooperative Growth in Multicellular Aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumpei F Yamagishi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As cells grow and divide under a given environment, they become crowded and resources are limited, as seen in bacterial biofilms and multicellular aggregates. These cells often show strong interactions through exchanging chemicals, as evident in quorum sensing, to achieve mutualism and division of labor. Here, to achieve stable division of labor, three characteristics are required. First, isogenous cells differentiate into several types. Second, this aggregate of distinct cell types shows better growth than that of isolated cells without interaction and differentiation, by achieving division of labor. Third, this cell aggregate is robust with respect to the number distribution of differentiated cell types. Indeed, theoretical studies have thus far considered how such cooperation is achieved when the ability of cell differentiation is presumed. Here, we address how cells acquire the ability of cell differentiation and division of labor simultaneously, which is also connected with the robustness of a cell society. For this purpose, we developed a dynamical-systems model of cells consisting of chemical components with intracellular catalytic reaction dynamics. The reactions convert external nutrients into internal components for cellular growth, and the divided cells interact through chemical diffusion. We found that cells sharing an identical catalytic network spontaneously differentiate via induction from cell-cell interactions, and then achieve division of labor, enabling a higher growth rate than that in the unicellular case. This symbiotic differentiation emerged for a class of reaction networks under the condition of nutrient limitation and strong cell-cell interactions. Then, robustness in the cell type distribution was achieved, while instability of collective growth could emerge even among the cooperative cells when the internal reserves of products were dominant. The present mechanism is simple and general as a natural consequence of

  19. An autosampling differential scanning calorimeter instrument for studying molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Valerian; Rochalski, Andrew; Brandts, Michael; Brandts, John F; Williston, Samuel; Frasca, Verna; Lin, Lung-Nan

    2002-11-01

    A new ultrasensitive differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) instrument is described, which utilizes autosampling for continuous operation. High scanning rates to 250 deg/h with rapid cooling and equilibration between scans facilitates higher sample throughput up to 50 samples during each 24 h of unattended operation. The instrument is suited for those pharmaceutical applications where higher throughput is important, such as screening drug candidates for binding constant or screening solution conditions for stability of liquid protein formulations. Results are presented on the binding of five different anionic inhibitors to ribonuclease A, which included cytidine 2'-monophosphate (2'CMP), 3'CMP, uridine 3'-monophosphate, pyrophosphate, and phosphate. Binding constants K(B) (or dissociation constants K(d)) are obtained from the shift in the transition temperature T(M) for ribonuclease thermal unfolding in the presence of ligand relative to the transition temperature in the absence of ligand. Measured binding constants ranged from 155 M(-1) (K(d) = 6.45 mM) for the weak-binding phosphate anion to 13100 M(-1) (K(d) = 76.3 microM) for the strongest binding ligand, 2'CMP. The DSC method for measuring binding constants can also be extended to ultratight interactions involving either ligand-protein or protein-protein binding.

  20. Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.

    2011-08-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of change in

  1. Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.; Hacker, Sally D.; Freidenburg, Tess; Lubchenco, Jane; Craig, Ryan; Rilov, Gil; Noble, Mae Marjore; Richmond, Erin

    2011-01-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of change in

  2. Differential interaction and aggregation of 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau isoforms with 14-3-3ζ protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadik, Golam; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Kato, Kiyoko; Yanagi, Kentaro; Kudo, Takashi; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2009-01-01

    Tau isoforms, 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat tau (4R), are differentially involved in neuronal development and in several tauopathies. 14-3-3 protein binds to tau and 14-3-3/tau association has been found both in the development and in tauopathies. To understand the role of 14-3-3 in the differential regulation of tau isoforms, we have performed studies on the interaction and aggregation of 3R-tau and 4R-tau, either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated, with 14-3-3ζ. We show by surface plasmon resonance studies that the interaction between unphosphorylated 3R-tau and 14-3-3ζ is ∼3-folds higher than that between unphosphorylated 4R-tau and 14-3-3ζ. Phosphorylation of tau by protein kinase A (PKA) increases the affinity of both 3R- and 4R-tau for 14-3-3ζ to a similar level. An in vitro aggregation assay employing both transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the aggregation of unphosphorylated 4R-tau to be significantly higher than that of unphosphorylated 3R-tau following the induction of 14-3-3ζ. The filaments formed from 3R- and 4R-tau were almost similar in morphology. In contrast, the aggregation of both 3R- and 4R-tau was reduced to a similar low level after phosphorylation with PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that 14-3-3ζ exhibits a similar role for tau isoforms after PKA-phosphorylation, but a differential role for unphosphorylated tau. The significant aggregation of 4R-tau by 14-3-3ζ suggests that 14-3-3 may act as an inducer in the generation of 4R-tau-predominant neurofibrillary tangles in tauopathies.

  3. Collectrin gene screening in Turner syndrome patients with kidney ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    function predisposing to diabetes mellitus in TS (Bakalov et al. 2004). The loss of ... family histories were positive for four cases, while type 1 diabetes was absent in .... cases and a literature review. Pediatr. Nephrol. ... in children. Urology 67 ...

  4. Nucleon-deuteron breakup quantities calculated with separable interactions including tensor forces and P-wave interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruinsma, J.; Wageningen, R. van

    1977-01-01

    Nucleon-deuteron breakup calculations at a nucleon bombarding energy of 22.7 MeV have been performed with separable interactions including a tensor force and P-wave interactions. Differential cross sections and a selection of polarization quantities have been computed for special regions of the phase space. The influence of a tensor force and P-wave interactions on the differential cross section is of the order of 20%. Large discrepancies between theory and experiment occur for the vector analyzing powers, both for the kinematically complete and for the incomplete situation. The calculations show that there are kinematical situations in which the differential cross sections and the tensor analyzing powers are sufficiently large to make measurements feasible. (Auth.)

  5. Non-interacting surface solvation and dynamics in protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Koen M.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315886668; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions control a plethora of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and signal transduction. Understanding how and why proteins interact will inevitably lead to novel structure-based drug design methods, as well as design of de novo

  6. Enhancing the gene-environment interaction framework through a quasi-experimental research design: evidence from differential responses to September 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    This article uses a gene-environment interaction framework to examine the differential responses to an objective external stressor based on genetic variation in the production of depressive symptoms. This article advances the literature by utilizing a quasi-experimental environmental exposure design, as well as a regression discontinuity design, to control for seasonal trends, which limit the potential for gene-environment correlation and allow stronger causal claims. Replications are attempted for two prominent genes (5-HTT and MAOA), and three additional genes are explored (DRD2, DRD4, and DAT1). This article provides evidence of a main effect of 9/11 on reports of feelings of sadness and fails to replicate a common finding of interaction using 5-HTT but does show support for interaction with MAOA in men. It also provides new evidence that variation in the DRD4 gene modifies an individual's response to the exposure, with individuals with no 7-repeats found to have a muted response.

  7. Application of Differential Colorimetry To Evaluate Anthocyanin-Flavonol-Flavanol Ternary Copigmentation Interactions in Model Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Belén; Rodríguez-Pulido, Francisco J; González-Miret, M Lourdes; Quijada-Morín, Natalia; Rivas-Gonzalo, Julián C; García-Estévez, Ignacio; Heredia, Francisco J; Escribano-Bailón, M Teresa

    2015-09-09

    The combined effect of anthocyanin-flavanol-flavonol ternary interactions on the colorimetric and chemical stability of malvidin-3-glucoside has been studied. Model solutions with fixed malvidin-3-glucoside/(+)-catechin ratio (MC) and variable quercetin-3-β-d-glucoside concentration (MC+Q) and solutions with fixed malvidin-3-glucoside/quercetin-3-β-d-glucoside ratio (MQ) and variable (+)-catechin concentration (MQ+C) were tested at levels closer to those existing in wines. Color variations during storage were evaluated by differential colorimetry. Changes in the anthocyanin concentration were monitored by HPLC-DAD. CIELAB color-difference formulas were demonstrated to be of practical interest to assess the stronger and more stable interaction of quercetin-3-β-d-glucoside with MC binary mixture than (+)-catechin with MQ mixture. The results imply that MC+Q ternary solutions kept their intensity and bluish tonalities for a longer time in comparison to MQ+C solutions. The stability of malvidin-3-glucoside improves when the concentration of quercetin-3-β-d-glucoside increases in MC+Q mixtures, whereas the addition of (+)-catechin in MQ+C mixtures resulted in an opposite effect.

  8. Differential TAM receptor-ligand-phospholipid interactions delimit differential TAM bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Erin D; Oh, Jennifer; Burrola, Patrick G; Lax, Irit; Zagórska, Anna; Través, Paqui G; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lemke, Greg

    2014-09-29

    The TAM receptor tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl, and Mer regulate key features of cellular physiology, yet the differential activities of the TAM ligands Gas6 and Protein S are poorly understood. We have used biochemical and genetic analyses to delineate the rules for TAM receptor-ligand engagement and find that the TAMs segregate into two groups based on ligand specificity, regulation by phosphatidylserine, and function. Tyro3 and Mer are activated by both ligands but only Gas6 activates Axl. Optimal TAM signaling requires coincident TAM ligand engagement of both its receptor and the phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PtdSer): Gas6 lacking its PtdSer-binding 'Gla domain' is significantly weakened as a Tyro3/Mer agonist and is inert as an Axl agonist, even though it binds to Axl with wild-type affinity. In two settings of TAM-dependent homeostatic phagocytosis, Mer plays a predominant role while Axl is dispensable, and activation of Mer by Protein S is sufficient to drive phagocytosis.

  9. Effect of auxin on xylem tracheids differentiation in decapitated stems of Pinus silvestris L. and its interaction with some vitamins and growth regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Wodzicki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of several vitamins and substances known as important agents in regulation of cell metabolism upon secondary xylem differentiation were studied in interaction with auxin (IAA as applied in lanoline to decapitated stems of 5-year-old Pinus silvestris trees in early and late-summer. Tested substances were: gibberellic acid, kinetin, nicotinic acid, thiamine, pyridoxine, calcium panthotenate, choline chloride, riboflavin, inositol, ascorbic acid, vitamin, A (alcohol, vitamin A (ester, saponin. None of the effects of these substances appeared significant enough to indicate the involvement in the seasonal variation of the response of cambium or differentiating tracheids to auxin. However, several effects, especially those of inositol, vitamin A and pyridoxine upon cambial xylem production and further stages of tracheid differentiation were observed. Auxin (IAA affected cambial activity and subsequent differentiation of tracheids during the earliest stages of cell ontogenesis. At these stages auxin treatment induced quantitative expression of the developmental processes involving radial growth and secondary wall formation by tracheids. In this respect, auxin did not affect cells advanced in differentiation, however, it proved to be an essential factor in the completion of the full cycle of tracheid ontogenesis.

  10. VEGF-A isoforms differentially regulate ATF-2-dependent VCAM-1 gene expression and endothelial-leukocyte interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Odell, Adam F; Latham, Antony M; Mughal, Nadeem A; Bruns, Alexander F; Burgoyne, Nicholas J; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Zachary, Ian C; Hollstein, Monica C; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2014-08-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) regulates many aspects of vascular physiology. VEGF-A stimulates signal transduction pathways that modulate endothelial outputs such as cell migration, proliferation, tubulogenesis, and cell-cell interactions. Multiple VEGF-A isoforms exist, but the biological significance of this is unclear. Here we analyzed VEGF-A isoform-specific stimulation of VCAM-1 gene expression, which controls endothelial-leukocyte interactions, and show that this is dependent on both ERK1/2 and activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2). VEGF-A isoforms showed differential ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation kinetics. A key feature of VEGF-A isoform-specific ERK1/2 activation and nuclear translocation was increased phosphorylation of ATF-2 on threonine residue 71 (T71). Using reverse genetics, we showed ATF-2 to be functionally required for VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial VCAM-1 gene expression. ATF-2 knockdown blocked VEGF-A-stimulated VCAM-1 expression and endothelial-leukocyte interactions. ATF-2 was also required for other endothelial cell outputs, such as cell migration and tubulogenesis. In contrast, VCAM-1 was essential only for promoting endothelial-leukocyte interactions. This work presents a new paradigm for understanding how soluble growth factor isoforms program complex cellular outputs and responses by modulating signal transduction pathways. © 2014 Fearnley et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Differential impact of student behaviours on group interaction and collaborative learning: medical students' and tutors' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Maha; Velan, Gary M; O'Sullivan, Anthony J; Balasooriya, Chinthaka

    2016-08-22

    Collaboration is of increasing importance in medical education and medical practice. Students' and tutors' perceptions about small group learning are valuable to inform the development of strategies to promote group dynamics and collaborative learning. This study investigated medical students' and tutors' views on competencies and behaviours which promote effective learning and interaction in small group settings. This study was conducted at UNSW Australia. Five focus group discussions were conducted with first and second year medical students and eight small group tutors were interviewed. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was conducted. Students and tutors identified a range of behaviours that influenced collaborative learning. The main themes that emerged included: respectfulness; dominance, strong opinions and openness; constructiveness of feedback; active listening and contribution; goal orientation; acceptance of roles and responsibilities; engagement and enthusiasm; preparedness; self- awareness and positive personal attributes. An important finding was that some of these student behaviours were found to have a differential impact on group interaction compared with collaborative learning. This information could be used to promote higher quality learning in small groups. This study has identified medical students' and tutors' perceptions regarding interactional behaviours in small groups, as well as behaviours which lead to more effective learning in those settings. This information could be used to promote learning in small groups.

  12. Division of Labor in Biofilms: the Ecology of Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jordi; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The dense aggregation of cells on a surface, as seen in biofilms, inevitably results in both environmental and cellular heterogeneity. For example, nutrient gradients can trigger cells to differentiate into various phenotypic states. Not only do cells adapt physiologically to the local environmental conditions, but they also differentiate into cell types that interact with each other. This allows for task differentiation and, hence, the division of labor. In this article, we focus on cell differentiation and the division of labor in three bacterial species: Myxococcus xanthus, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. During biofilm formation each of these species differentiates into distinct cell types, in some cases leading to cooperative interactions. The division of labor and the cooperative interactions between cell types are assumed to yield an emergent ecological benefit. Yet in most cases the ecological benefits have yet to be elucidated. A notable exception is M. xanthus, in which cell differentiation within fruiting bodies facilitates the dispersal of spores. We argue that the ecological benefits of the division of labor might best be understood when we consider the dynamic nature of both biofilm formation and degradation.

  13. Differential effects of accumbens core vs. shell lesions in a rat concurrent conditioned place preference paradigm for cocaine vs. social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Michael; El Rawas, Rana; Klement, Sabine; Kummer, Kai; Mayr, Michael J; Eggart, Vincent; Salti, Ahmad; Bardo, Michael T; Saria, Alois; Zernig, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A main challenge in the therapy of drug dependent individuals is to help them reactivate interest in non-drug-associated activities. Among these activities, social interaction is doubly important because treatment adherence itself depends on it. We previously developed a rat experimental model based on the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in which only four 15-min episodes of social interaction with a gender- and weight-matched male conspecific (i) reversed CPP from cocaine to social interaction despite continuing cocaine training and (ii) prevented the reinstatement of cocaine CPP. In the present study, we investigated if the two subregions of the nucleus accumbens (Acb), i.e., the core (AcbC) and the shell (AcbSh), would differentially affect CPP for cocaine vs social interaction. Animals were concurrently trained for CPP pairing cocaine with one compartment and social interaction with the other (i.e., mutually exclusive stimulus presentation during training). Excitotoxic lesioning of the AcbC or the BLA shifted CPP toward social interaction, whereas AcbSh inactivation shifted CPP toward cocaine. Overall, our findings suggest that inactivation of the AcbC or the BLA is sufficient to shift CPP away from a drug of abuse toward social interaction. Lesioning the AcbSh produced the opposite effect.

  14. On some methods of achieving a continuous and differentiated assessment in Linear Algebra and Analytic and Differential Geometry courses and seminars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A.P. PURCARU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at highlighting some aspects related to assessment as regards its use as a differentiated training strategy for Linear Algebra and Analytic and Differential Geometry courses and seminars. Thus, the following methods of continuous differentiated assessment are analyzed and exemplified: the portfolio, the role play, some interactive methods and practical examinations.

  15. The role of projectile interactions in triply differential cross sections for excitation-ionization of helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, R., E-mail: ritud@ipp.mpg.d [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Roy, A.C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711 202, West Bengal (India)

    2011-02-01

    We report triply differential cross section (TDCS) for the simultaneous excitation-ionization of helium by electron impact for both coplanar and non-coplanar geometry. In the coplanar case, calculations have been performed for an incident energy of 500 eV and low ejection energies (3 and 10 eV), whereas in the noncoplanar case we have considered impact energies in the range 1240-4260 eV for a symmetric geometry. The present calculation is based on the eikonal approximation due to Glauber. We have incorporated the effect of post-collision interaction in the Glauber approximation. A comparison is made of the present calculations with the results of other theoretical methods and recent experiments. The Glauber results are in reasonably good agreement with the experiment for small scattering angles.

  16. Interaction of Wnt Signaling with BMP/Smad Signaling during the Transition from Cell Proliferation to Myogenic Differentiation in Mouse Myoblast-Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Terada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wnt signaling is involved in muscle formation through β-catenin-dependent or -independent pathways, but interactions with other signaling pathways including transforming growth factor β/Smad have not been precisely elucidated. Results. As Wnt4 stimulates myogenic differentiation by antagonizing myostatin (GDF8 activity, we examined the role of Wnt4 signaling during muscle differentiation in the C2C12 myoblast cell line. Among several extrinsic signaling molecules examined in a microarray analysis of C2C12 cells during the transition from cell proliferation to differentiation after mitogen deprivation, bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4 expression was prominently increased. Wnt4 overexpression had similar effects on BMP4 expression. BMP4 was able to inhibit muscle differentiation when added to the culture medium. BMP4 and noggin had no effects on the cellular localization of β-catenin induced by Wnt3a; however, the BMP4-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8 was enhanced by Wnt4, but not by Wnt3a. The BMP antagonist noggin effectively stimulated muscle differentiation through binding to endogenous BMPs, and the effect of noggin was enhanced by the presence of Wnt3a and Wnt4. Conclusion. These results suggest that BMP/Smad pathways are modified through Wnt signaling during the transition from progenitor cell proliferation to myogenic differentiation, although Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not modified with BMP/Smad signaling.

  17. Weak interactions in clobazam–lactose mixtures examined by differential scanning calorimetry: Comparison with the captopril–lactose system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toscani, S.; Cornevin, L.; Burgot, G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of weak interactions in binary systems by DSC. ► Energy-barrier decrease for lactose dehydration induced by clobazam. ► Recrystallisation of metastable liquid clobazam induced by anhydrous alpha lactose. ► Decrease of lactose dehydration temperature in binary mixtures with captopril. ► Increase of lactose dehydration enthalpy in binary mixtures with captopril. - Abstract: The thermal behaviour of binary mixtures of two drugs (clobazam and captopril, respectively) and a pharmaceutical excipient (lactose monohydrate) was measured with differential scanning calorimetry to determine thermodynamic and kinetic parameters (dehydration and melting enthalpies and dehydration and glass-transition activation energies) which might be affected by intermolecular interactions. A kinetic study showed that lactose dehydration is not a single-step conversion and that clobazam contributed to reduce the energy barrier for the bulk dehydration of the excipient. On the other hand, the physical interactions between metastable liquid clobazam and crystalline anhydrous α-lactose obtained from monohydrate dehydration gave rise to the recrystallisation of clobazam. In the captopril–lactose system, the liquid captopril influenced the lactose dehydration: a sharp increase of the dehydration enthalpy and a concurrent reduction of the dehydration temperature were observed. Finally, it turned out that solid-phase transitions were enhanced by the contact with a liquid phase.

  18. Differential effects of the extracellular microenvironment on human embryonic stem cell differentiation into keratinocytes and their subsequent replicative life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahednia, Mohammad Mehdi; Kidwai, Fahad Karim; Zou, Yu; Tong, Huei Jinn; Liu, Xiaochen; Islam, Intekhab; Toh, Wei Seong; Raghunath, Michael; Cao, Tong

    2015-04-01

    Culture microenvironment plays a critical role in the propagation and differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and their differentiated progenies. Although high efficiency of hESC differentiation to keratinocytes (hESC-Kert) has been achieved, little is known regarding the effects of early culture microenvironment and pertinent extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions during epidermal commitment on subsequent proliferative capacity of hESC-Kert. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of the different ECM microenvironments during hESC differentiation on subsequent replicative life span of hESC-Kert. In doing so, H1-hESCs were differentiated to keratinocytes (H1-Kert) in two differentiation systems. The first system employed autologous fibroblast feeder support, in which keratinocytes (H1-Kert(ACC)) were derived by coculture of hESCs with hESC-derived fibroblasts (H1-ebFs). The second system employed a novel decellularized matrix from H1-ebFs to create a dermoepidermal junction-like (DEJ) matrix. H1-Kert(AFF) were derived by differentiation of hESCs on the feeder-free system employing the DEJ matrix. Our study indicated that the feeder-free system with the use of DEJ matrix was more efficient in differentiation of hESCs toward epidermal progenitors. However, the feeder-free system was not sufficient to support the subsequent replicative capacity of differentiated keratinocytes. Of note, H1-Kert(AFF) showed limited replicative capacity with reduced telomere length and early cellular senescence. We further showed that the lack of cell-cell interactions during epidermal commitment led to heightened production of TGF-β1 by hESC-Kert during extended culture, which in turn was responsible for resulting in the limited replicative life span with cellular senescence of hESC-Kert derived under the feeder-free culture system. This study highlights for the first time the importance of the culture microenvironment and cell-ECM interactions during

  19. Differential TAM receptor–ligand–phospholipid interactions delimit differential TAM bioactivities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Erin D; Oh, Jennifer; Burrola, Patrick G; Lax, Irit; Zagórska, Anna; Través, Paqui G; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lemke, Greg

    2014-01-01

    The TAM receptor tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl, and Mer regulate key features of cellular physiology, yet the differential activities of the TAM ligands Gas6 and Protein S are poorly understood. We have used biochemical and genetic analyses to delineate the rules for TAM receptor–ligand engagement and find that the TAMs segregate into two groups based on ligand specificity, regulation by phosphatidylserine, and function. Tyro3 and Mer are activated by both ligands but only Gas6 activates Axl. Optimal TAM signaling requires coincident TAM ligand engagement of both its receptor and the phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PtdSer): Gas6 lacking its PtdSer-binding ‘Gla domain’ is significantly weakened as a Tyro3/Mer agonist and is inert as an Axl agonist, even though it binds to Axl with wild-type affinity. In two settings of TAM-dependent homeostatic phagocytosis, Mer plays a predominant role while Axl is dispensable, and activation of Mer by Protein S is sufficient to drive phagocytosis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03385.001 PMID:25265470

  20. Differentially-Expressed Pseudogenes in HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Gupta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Not all pseudogenes are transcriptionally silent as previously thought. Pseudogene transcripts, although not translated, contribute to the non-coding RNA pool of the cell that regulates the expression of other genes. Pseudogene transcripts can also directly compete with the parent gene transcripts for mRNA stability and other cell factors, modulating their expression levels. Tissue-specific and cancer-specific differential expression of these “functional” pseudogenes has been reported. To ascertain potential pseudogene:gene interactions in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed transcriptomes from infected and uninfected T-cells and found that 21 pseudogenes are differentially expressed in HIV-1 infection. This is interesting because parent genes of one-third of these differentially-expressed pseudogenes are implicated in HIV-1 life cycle, and parent genes of half of these pseudogenes are involved in different viral infections. Our bioinformatics analysis identifies candidate pseudogene:gene interactions that may be of significance in HIV-1 infection. Experimental validation of these interactions would establish that retroviruses exploit this newly-discovered layer of host gene expression regulation for their own benefit.

  1. Differentially-Expressed Pseudogenes in HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Brown, C Titus; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Adami, Christoph

    2015-09-29

    Not all pseudogenes are transcriptionally silent as previously thought. Pseudogene transcripts, although not translated, contribute to the non-coding RNA pool of the cell that regulates the expression of other genes. Pseudogene transcripts can also directly compete with the parent gene transcripts for mRNA stability and other cell factors, modulating their expression levels. Tissue-specific and cancer-specific differential expression of these "functional" pseudogenes has been reported. To ascertain potential pseudogene:gene interactions in HIV-1 infection, we analyzed transcriptomes from infected and uninfected T-cells and found that 21 pseudogenes are differentially expressed in HIV-1 infection. This is interesting because parent genes of one-third of these differentially-expressed pseudogenes are implicated in HIV-1 life cycle, and parent genes of half of these pseudogenes are involved in different viral infections. Our bioinformatics analysis identifies candidate pseudogene:gene interactions that may be of significance in HIV-1 infection. Experimental validation of these interactions would establish that retroviruses exploit this newly-discovered layer of host gene expression regulation for their own benefit.

  2. Platinum(II Complexes with Tetradentate Schiff Bases as Ligands: Synthesis, Characterization and Detection of DNA Interaction by Differential Pulse Voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Five sterically hindered platinum(II complexes with tetradentate schiff bases as ligands, [Pt(L] (L= N,N′-bisalicylidene-1,2-ethylenediamine (L1, N,N′-bisalicylidene-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (L2, N,N′-bis(5-hydroxyl-salicylidene-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (L3, N,N′-bisalicylidene-1,2-diphenyl-ethylenediamine (L4 and N,N′-bis(3-tert-butyl-5-methyl-salicylidene-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine (L5 have been synthesized and characterized by IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The sterical hindrance of antitumor drug candidates potentially makes them less susceptible to deactivation by sulphur containing proteins and helping to overcome resistance mechanisms. The interaction of these metal complexes with fish sperm single-stranded DNA (ssDNA was studied electrochemically based on the oxidation signals of guanine and adenine. Differential pulse voltammetry was employed to monitor the DNA interaction in solution by using renewable pencil graphite electrode. The results indicate that ligands with different groups can strongly affect the interaction between [Pt(L] complexes and ssDNA due to sterical hindrances and complex [Pt(L1] has the best interaction with DNA among the five complexes.

  3. The Signaling Pathways Involved in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Hypertrophic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrocytes communicate with each other mainly via diffusible signals rather than direct cell-to-cell contact. The chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is well regulated by the interactions of varieties of growth factors, cytokines, and signaling molecules. A number of critical signaling molecules have been identified to regulate the differentiation of chondrocyte from mesenchymal progenitor cells to their terminal maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs, SRY-related high-mobility group-box gene 9 (Sox9, parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP, Indian hedgehog (Ihh, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3, and β-catenin. Except for these molecules, other factors such as adenosine, O2 tension, and reactive oxygen species (ROS also have a vital role in cartilage formation and chondrocyte maturation. Here, we outlined the complex transcriptional network and the function of key factors in this network that determine and regulate the genetic program of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte differentiation.

  4. Weak interactions in clobazam-lactose mixtures examined by differential scanning calorimetry: Comparison with the captopril-lactose system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toscani, S. [Departement de Chimie - UMR 6226, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Rennes 1, Batiment 10B, 263 avenue du General Leclerc, F-35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Cornevin, L. [Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte de Pharmacie, 2 Avenue Leon Bernard, F-35043 Rennes Cedex (France); Burgot, G., E-mail: Gwenola.burgot@univ-rennes1.fr [Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte de Pharmacie, Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique, EA 1274 ' Mouvement, sports, sante' , 2 Avenue Leon Bernard, F-35043 Rennes Cedex (France); CHGR Rennes, Pole Medico-Technique Pharmacie, F-35703 Rennes Cedex (France)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of weak interactions in binary systems by DSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy-barrier decrease for lactose dehydration induced by clobazam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recrystallisation of metastable liquid clobazam induced by anhydrous alpha lactose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease of lactose dehydration temperature in binary mixtures with captopril. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase of lactose dehydration enthalpy in binary mixtures with captopril. - Abstract: The thermal behaviour of binary mixtures of two drugs (clobazam and captopril, respectively) and a pharmaceutical excipient (lactose monohydrate) was measured with differential scanning calorimetry to determine thermodynamic and kinetic parameters (dehydration and melting enthalpies and dehydration and glass-transition activation energies) which might be affected by intermolecular interactions. A kinetic study showed that lactose dehydration is not a single-step conversion and that clobazam contributed to reduce the energy barrier for the bulk dehydration of the excipient. On the other hand, the physical interactions between metastable liquid clobazam and crystalline anhydrous {alpha}-lactose obtained from monohydrate dehydration gave rise to the recrystallisation of clobazam. In the captopril-lactose system, the liquid captopril influenced the lactose dehydration: a sharp increase of the dehydration enthalpy and a concurrent reduction of the dehydration temperature were observed. Finally, it turned out that solid-phase transitions were enhanced by the contact with a liquid phase.

  5. Isolation and Osteogenic Differentiation of Rat Periosteum-derived Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Declercq, Heidi Andrea; De Ridder, Leo Isabelle; Cornelissen, Maria Jozefa

    2005-01-01

    Selection of appropriate cultures having an osteogenic potential is a necessity if cell/biomaterial interactions are studied in long-term cultures. Osteoblastic cells derived from rat long bones or calvaria have the disadvantage of being in an advanced differentiation stage which results in terminal differentiation within 21 days. In this regard, less differentiated periosteum-derived osteoprogenitors could be more suitable.

  6. Coorientational Accuracy and Differentiation in the Management of Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Michael J.; Pood, Elliott A.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between coorientational accuracy and differentiation time and two dimensions of conflict (interaction satisfaction and assertiveness of influence strategies). Suggests that entering a conflict with high coorientational accuracy leads to less differentiation and fewer assertive strategies during the confrontation and…

  7. Differential gene expression in foxtail millet during incompatible interaction with Uromyces setariae-italicae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yong Li

    Full Text Available Foxtail millet (Setaria italica is an important food and fodder grain crop that is grown for human consumption. Production of this species is affected by several plant diseases, such as rust. The cultivar Shilixiang has been identified as resistant to the foxtail millet rust pathogen, Uromyces setariae-italicae. In order to identify signaling pathways and genes related to the plant's defense mechanisms against rust, the Shilixiang cultivar was used to construct a digital gene expression (DGE library during the interaction of foxtail millet with U. setariae-italicae. In this study, we determined the most abundant differentially expressed signaling pathways of up-regulated genes in foxtail millet and identified significantly up-regulated genes. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis was used to analyze the expression of nine selected genes, and the patterns observed agreed well with DGE analysis. Expression levels of the genes were also compared between a resistant cultivar Shilixiang and a susceptible cultivar Yugu-1, and the result indicated that expression level of Shilixiang is higher than that of Yugu-1. This study reveals the relatively comprehensive mechanisms of rust-responsive transcription in foxtail millet.

  8. BMP and Ihh/PTHrP signaling interact to coordinate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minina, E; Wenzel, H M; Kreschel, C; Karp, S; Gaffield, W; McMahon, A P; Vortkamp, A

    2001-11-01

    During endochondral ossification, two secreted signals, Indian hedgehog (Ihh) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), have been shown to form a negative feedback loop regulating the onset of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), another family of secreted factors regulating bone formation, have been implicated as potential interactors of the Ihh/PTHrP feedback loop. To analyze the relationship between the two signaling pathways, we used an organ culture system for limb explants of mouse and chick embryos. We manipulated chondrocyte differentiation by supplementing these cultures either with BMP2, PTHrP and Sonic hedgehog as activators or with Noggin and cyclopamine as inhibitors of the BMP and Ihh/PTHrP signaling systems. Overexpression of Ihh in the cartilage elements of transgenic mice results in an upregulation of PTHrP expression and a delayed onset of hypertrophic differentiation. Noggin treatment of limbs from these mice did not antagonize the effects of Ihh overexpression. Conversely, the promotion of chondrocyte maturation induced by cyclopamine, which blocks Ihh signaling, could not be rescued with BMP2. Thus BMP signaling does not act as a secondary signal of Ihh to induce PTHrP expression or to delay the onset of hypertrophic differentiation. Similar results were obtained using cultures of chick limbs. We further investigated the role of BMP signaling in regulating proliferation and hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and identified three functions of BMP signaling in this process. First we found that maintaining a normal proliferation rate requires BMP and Ihh signaling acting in parallel. We further identified a role for BMP signaling in modulating the expression of IHH: Finally, the application of Noggin to mouse limb explants resulted in advanced differentiation of terminally hypertrophic cells, implicating BMP signaling in delaying the process of hypertrophic differentiation itself. This

  9. Scaffold composition affects cytoskeleton organization, cell-matrix interaction and the cellular fate of human mesenchymal stem cells upon chondrogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuk Yin; Choy, Tze Hang; Ho, Fu Chak; Chan, Pui Barbara

    2015-06-01

    The stem cell niche, or microenvironment, consists of soluble, matrix, cell and mechanical factors that together determine the cellular fates and/or differentiation patterns of stem cells. Collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are important scaffolding materials that can mimic the natural matrix niche. Here, we hypothesize that imposing changes in the scaffold composition or, more specifically, incorporating GAGs into the collagen meshwork, will affect the morphology, cytoskeletal organization and integrin expression profiles, and hence the fate of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) upon the induction of differentiation. Using chondrogenesis as an example, we microencapsulated MSCs in three scaffold systems that had varying matrix compositions: collagen alone (C), aminated collagen (AC) and aminated collagen with GAGs (ACG). We then induced the MSCs to differentiate toward a chondrogenic lineage, after which, we characterized the cell viability and morphology, as well as the level of cytoskeletal organization and the integrin expression profile. We also studied the fate of the MSCs by evaluating the major chondrogenic markers at both the gene and protein level. In C, MSC chondrogenesis was successfully induced and MSCs that spread in the scaffolds had a clear actin cytoskeleton; they expressed integrin α2β1, α5 and αv; promoted sox9 nuclear localization transcription activation; and upregulated the expression of chondrogenic matrix markers. In AC, MSC chondrogenesis was completely inhibited but the scaffold still supported cell survival. The MSCs did not spread and they had no actin cytoskeleton; did not express integrin α2 or αv; they failed to differentiate into chondrogenic lineage cells even on chemical induction; and there was little colocalization or functional interaction between integrin α5 and fibronectin. In ACG, although the MSCs did not express integrin α2, they did express integrin αv and there was strong co-localization and hence functional

  10. 5C analysis of the Epidermal Differentiation Complex locus reveals distinct chromatin interaction networks between gene-rich and gene-poor TADs in skin epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Poterlowicz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian genomes contain several dozens of large (>0.5 Mbp lineage-specific gene loci harbouring functionally related genes. However, spatial chromatin folding, organization of the enhancer-promoter networks and their relevance to Topologically Associating Domains (TADs in these loci remain poorly understood. TADs are principle units of the genome folding and represents the DNA regions within which DNA interacts more frequently and less frequently across the TAD boundary. Here, we used Chromatin Conformation Capture Carbon Copy (5C technology to characterize spatial chromatin interaction network in the 3.1 Mb Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC locus harbouring 61 functionally related genes that show lineage-specific activation during terminal keratinocyte differentiation in the epidermis. 5C data validated by 3D-FISH demonstrate that the EDC locus is organized into several TADs showing distinct lineage-specific chromatin interaction networks based on their transcription activity and the gene-rich or gene-poor status. Correlation of the 5C results with genome-wide studies for enhancer-specific histone modifications (H3K4me1 and H3K27ac revealed that the majority of spatial chromatin interactions that involves the gene-rich TADs at the EDC locus in keratinocytes include both intra- and inter-TAD interaction networks, connecting gene promoters and enhancers. Compared to thymocytes in which the EDC locus is mostly transcriptionally inactive, these interactions were found to be keratinocyte-specific. In keratinocytes, the promoter-enhancer anchoring regions in the gene-rich transcriptionally active TADs are enriched for the binding of chromatin architectural proteins CTCF, Rad21 and chromatin remodeler Brg1. In contrast to gene-rich TADs, gene-poor TADs show preferential spatial contacts with each other, do not contain active enhancers and show decreased binding of CTCF, Rad21 and Brg1 in keratinocytes. Thus, spatial interactions between gene

  11. Differential Fecundity, Markets and Gender Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Aloysius Siow

    1996-01-01

    Women are fecund for a shorter period of their lives than men. This paper investigates how differential fecundity interacts with marriage, labor and financial markets to affect gender roles. The main findings of the paper are: (i) Differential fecundity does not have any market invariant gender effect. (ii) Gender roles depend on competition for mates in the marriage market and the way in which ex-post differences in earnings affect that competition. (iii) Gender differences in the labor mark...

  12. Differential expression and interaction of host factors augment HIV-1 gene expression in neonatal mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaravaradan, Vasudha; Mehta, Roshni; Harris, David T.; Zack, Jerome A.; Ahmad, Nafees

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown a higher level of HIV-1 replication and gene expression in neonatal (cord) blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) compared with adult blood cells (PBMC), which could be due to differential expression of host factors. We performed the gene expression profile of CBMC and PBMC and found that 8013 genes were expressed at higher levels in CBMC than PBMC and 8028 genes in PBMC than CBMC, including 1181 and 1414 genes upregulated after HIV-1 infection in CBMC and PBMC, respectively. Several transcription factors (NF-κB, E2F, HAT-1, TFIIE, Cdk9, Cyclin T1), signal transducers (STAT3, STAT5A) and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10) were upregulated in CBMC than PBMC, which are known to influence HIV-1 replication. In addition, a repressor of HIV-1 transcription, YY1, was down regulated in CBMC than PBMC and several matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-7, -12, -14) were significantly upregulated in HIV-1 infected CBMC than PBMC. Furthermore, we show that CBMC nuclear extracts interacted with a higher extent to HIV-1 LTR cis-acting sequences, including NF-κB, NFAT, AP1 and NF-IL6 compared with PBMC nuclear extracts and retroviral based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for STAT3 and IL-6 down regulated their own and HIV-1 gene expression, signifying that these factors influenced differential HIV-1 gene expression in CBMC than PBMC.

  13. Calculated differential secondary-particle production cross sections after nonelastic neutron interactions with carbon and oxygen between 15 and 60 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.J.; Prael, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Calculated values are given for double-differential (energy/angle) cross sections for the nonelastic production of hydrogen and helium isotopes and heavier-mass recoils, after the interaction of 15- to 60-MeV neutrons with carbon and oxygen. The data are calculated with an intranuclear cascade code, including alpha clustering and particle pickup, followed by a Fermi-breakup mechanism, incorporating decay via intermediate particle-unstable states. The predictions have been extensively tested against available experimental data in this energy/mass range. copyright 1989 Academic Press, Inc

  14. Vasa promotes Drosophila germline stem cell differentiation by activating mei-P26 translation by directly interacting with a (U)-rich motif in its 3' UTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Niankun; Han, Hong; Lasko, Paul

    2009-12-01

    Vasa (Vas) is a DEAD-box RNA-binding protein required in Drosophila at several steps of oogenesis and for primordial germ cell (PGC) specification. Vas associates with eukaryotic initiation factor 5B (eIF5B), and this interaction has been implicated in translational activation of gurken mRNA in the oocyte. Vas is expressed in all ovarian germline cells, and aspects of the vas-null phenotype suggest a function in regulating the balance between germline stem cells (GSCs) and their fate-restricted descendants. We used a biochemical approach to recover Vas-associated mRNAs and obtained mei-P26, whose product represses microRNA activity and promotes GSC differentiation. We found that vas and mei-P26 mutants interact, and that mei-P26 translation is substantially reduced in vas mutant cells. In vitro, Vas protein bound specifically to a (U)-rich motif in the mei-P26 3' untranslated region (UTR), and Vas-dependent regulation of GFP-mei-P26 transgenes in vivo was dependent on the same (U)-rich 3' UTR domain. The ability of Vas to activate mei-P26 expression in vivo was abrogated by a mutation that greatly reduces its interaction with eIF5B. Taken together, our data support the conclusion that Vas promotes germ cell differentiation by directly activating mei-P26 translation in early-stage committed cells.

  15. [Differential gene expression in incompatible interaction between Lilium regale Wilson and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lilii revealed by combined SSH and microarray analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, J; Liu, D; Zhang, N; He, H; Ge, F; Chen, C

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium wilt, caused by a soilborne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lilii, is the major disease of lily (Lilium L.). In order to isolate the genes differentially expressed in a resistant reaction to F. oxysporum in L. regale Wilson, a cDNA library was constructed with L. regale root during F. oxysporum infection using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), and a total of 585 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained. Furthermore, the gene expression profiles in the incompatible interaction between L. regale and F. oxysporum were revealed by oligonucleotide microarray analysis of 585 unique ESTs comparison to the compatible interaction between a susceptible Lilium Oriental Hybrid 'Siberia' and F. oxysporum. The result of expression profile analysis indicated that the genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs), antioxidative stress enzymes, secondary metabolism enzymes, transcription factors, signal transduction proteins as well as a large number of unknown genes were involved in early defense response of L. regale to F. oxysporum infection. Moreover, the following quantitative reverse transcription PCR (QRT-PCR) analysis confirmed reliability of the oligonucleotide microarray data. In the present study, isolation of differentially expressed genes in L. regale during response to F. oxysporum helped to uncover the molecular mechanism associated with the resistance of L. regale against F. oxysporum.

  16. Surgical management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakih, A.R.; Mistry, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The differentiated management of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with lymph node and/or systemic metastases is very much a treatable cancer. Interaction between the surgeon and the nuclear medicine specialist is essential to ensure quality survival in these patient. This review is confined to surgical aspects and is based on experience with 417 patients who were operated for DTC at the Tata Memorial Hospital between 1971 and 1985

  17. Differential susceptibility effects: the interaction of negative emotionality and sibling relationship quality on childhood internalizing problems and social skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Judith K; Shaw, Daniel S; Olino, Thomas M

    2012-08-01

    Whereas socialization influences in early childhood have been linked to children's emerging internalizing problems and prosocial behavior, relatively few studies have examined how NE might moderate such associations in both advantageous and maladaptive ways. Furthermore, more research is needed to evaluate the impact of sibling relationships as an influential socialization influence on these child outcomes. In the current study we examined how NE might differentially moderate the associations between quality of relationships with siblings and both internalizing problems and social skills at school entry. NE moderated the effects of positive and destructive sibling relationship quality on child internalizing problems. Specifically, for boys high on NE, more positive sibling relationship quality predicted fewer internalizing problems, but more destructive sibling conflict predicted more internalizing problems. NE also moderated the effects of destructive sibling conflict on child social skills. For boys high on NE, destructive sibling conflict predicted fewer social skills. Boys high on NE appear to show greater susceptibility to the effects of sibling socialization on child outcomes, relative to boys low on NE. The implications of these interactions are discussed with respect to differential susceptibility theory.

  18. FAIR 1.0 (Framework to Assess International Regimes for differentiation of commitments). An interactive model to explore options for differentiation of future commitments in international climate policy making. User documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Elzen, M.G.J.; Berk, M.M.; Both, S.; Faber, A.; Oostenrijk, R.

    2001-02-01

    This report contains the model documentation and user instructions of the FAIR model (Framework to Assess International Regimes for differentiation of commitments). FAIR is an interactive - scanner-type - computer model to quantitatively explore a range of alternative climate policy options for international differentiation of future commitments and link these to targets for global climate protection. The model includes three different approaches for evaluating international commitment regimes: (1) Increasing participation: in this mode the number of parties involved and their level of commitment gradually increase according to participation and differentiation rules, such as per capita income, per capita emissions, or contribution to global warming; (2) Convergence: in this mode all parties participate in the burden-sharing regime, with emission rights converging to equal per capita levels over time; (3) Triptych: different burden sharing rules are applied for different sectors (e.g. convergence of per capita emissions in the domestic sector, efficiency and de-carbonisation targets for the industry sector and the power generation sector). The first two modes are representatives of top-down methodologies, so from global emission ceilings to regional emission budgets, whereas the triptych approach is more bottom-up in character, although it can be combined with specific emission targets (as illustrated in the case of the EU). In order to construct and evaluate global emission profiles, the FAIR model also has the mode: Scenario construction. In this mode the impacts in terms of the main climate indicators can be scanned of a constructed or well-defined global emissions profile

  19. Analytic, Algebraic and Geometric Aspects of Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Haraoka, Yoshishige; Michalik, Sławomir

    2017-01-01

    This volume consists of invited lecture notes, survey papers and original research papers from the AAGADE school and conference held in Będlewo, Poland in September 2015. The contributions provide an overview of the current level of interaction between algebra, geometry and analysis and demonstrate the manifold aspects of the theory of ordinary and partial differential equations, while also pointing out the highly fruitful interrelations between those aspects. These interactions continue to yield new developments, not only in the theory of differential equations but also in several related areas of mathematics and physics such as differential geometry, representation theory, number theory and mathematical physics. The main goal of the volume is to introduce basic concepts, techniques, detailed and illustrative examples and theorems (in a manner suitable for non-specialists), and to present recent developments in the field, together with open problems for more advanced and experienced readers. It will be of i...

  20. An odor interaction model of binary odorant mixtures by a partial differential equation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Luchun; Liu, Jiemin; Wang, Guihua; Wu, Chuandong

    2014-07-09

    A novel odor interaction model was proposed for binary mixtures of benzene and substituted benzenes by a partial differential equation (PDE) method. Based on the measurement method (tangent-intercept method) of partial molar volume, original parameters of corresponding formulas were reasonably displaced by perceptual measures. By these substitutions, it was possible to relate a mixture's odor intensity to the individual odorant's relative odor activity value (OAV). Several binary mixtures of benzene and substituted benzenes were respectively tested to establish the PDE models. The obtained results showed that the PDE model provided an easily interpretable method relating individual components to their joint odor intensity. Besides, both predictive performance and feasibility of the PDE model were proved well through a series of odor intensity matching tests. If combining the PDE model with portable gas detectors or on-line monitoring systems, olfactory evaluation of odor intensity will be achieved by instruments instead of odor assessors. Many disadvantages (e.g., expense on a fixed number of odor assessors) also will be successfully avoided. Thus, the PDE model is predicted to be helpful to the monitoring and management of odor pollutions.

  1. An Odor Interaction Model of Binary Odorant Mixtures by a Partial Differential Equation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchun Yan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel odor interaction model was proposed for binary mixtures of benzene and substituted benzenes by a partial differential equation (PDE method. Based on the measurement method (tangent-intercept method of partial molar volume, original parameters of corresponding formulas were reasonably displaced by perceptual measures. By these substitutions, it was possible to relate a mixture’s odor intensity to the individual odorant’s relative odor activity value (OAV. Several binary mixtures of benzene and substituted benzenes were respectively tested to establish the PDE models. The obtained results showed that the PDE model provided an easily interpretable method relating individual components to their joint odor intensity. Besides, both predictive performance and feasibility of the PDE model were proved well through a series of odor intensity matching tests. If combining the PDE model with portable gas detectors or on-line monitoring systems, olfactory evaluation of odor intensity will be achieved by instruments instead of odor assessors. Many disadvantages (e.g., expense on a fixed number of odor assessors also will be successfully avoided. Thus, the PDE model is predicted to be helpful to the monitoring and management of odor pollutions.

  2. Possible interaction between B1 retrotransposon-containing sequences and β(major) globin gene transcriptional activation during MEL cell erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizirianakis, Ioannis S; Tezias, Sotirios S; Amanatiadou, Elsa P; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive sequences consist of >50% of mammalian genomic DNAs and among these SINEs (short interspersed nuclear elements), e.g. B1 elements, account for 8% of the mouse genome. In an effort to delineate the molecular mechanism(s) involved in the blockade of the in vitro differentiation program of MEL (murine erythroleukaemia) cells by treatment with methylation inhibitors, we detected a DNA region of 559 bp in chromosome 7 located downstream of the 3'-end of the β(major) globin gene (designated B1-559) with unique characteristics. We have fully characterized this B1-559 region that includes a B1 element, several repeats of ATG initiation codons and consensus DNA-binding sites for erythroid-specific transcription factors NF-E2 (nuclear factor-erythroid-derived 2), GATA-1 and EKLF (erythroid Krüppel-like factor). Fragments derived from B1-559 incubated with nuclear extracts form protein complexes in both undifferentiated and differentiated MEL cells. Transient reporter-gene experiments in MEL and human erythroleukaemia K-562 cells with recombinant constructs containing B1-559 fragments linked to HS-2 (hypersensitive site-2) sequences of human β-globin gene LCR (locus control region) indicated potential cooperation upon erythropoiesis and globin gene expression. The possible interaction between the B1-559 region and β(major) globin gene transcriptional activation upon execution of erythroid MEL cell differentiation programme is discussed. © The Author(s) Journal compilation © 2012 Portland Press Limited

  3. Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) suppresses in vitro angiogenesis through a novel interaction with connective tissue growth factor (CCN2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Ramon J; Lucia, Marshall Scott; Lambert, James R

    2013-06-01

    Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) and the CCN family member, connective tissue growth factor (CCN2), are associated with cardiac disease, inflammation, and cancer. The precise role and signaling mechanism for these factors in normal and diseased tissues remains elusive. Here we demonstrate an interaction between GDF-15 and CCN2 using yeast two-hybrid assays and have mapped the domain of interaction to the von Willebrand factor type C domain of CCN2. Biochemical pull down assays using secreted GDF-15 and His-tagged CCN2 produced in PC-3 prostate cancer cells confirmed a direct interaction between these proteins. To investigate the functional consequences of this interaction, in vitro angiogenesis assays were performed. We demonstrate that GDF-15 blocks CCN2-mediated tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVEC) cells. To examine the molecular mechanism whereby GDF-15 inhibits CCN2-mediated angiogenesis, activation of αV β3 integrins and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was examined. CCN2-mediated FAK activation was inhibited by GDF-15 and was accompanied by a decrease in αV β3 integrin clustering in HUVEC cells. These results demonstrate, for the first time, a novel signaling pathway for GDF-15 through interaction with the matricellular signaling molecule CCN2. Furthermore, antagonism of CCN2 mediated angiogenesis by GDF-15 may provide insight into the functional role of GDF-15 in disease states. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Supplementary Material for: Potential impact of climate-related changes is buffered by differential responses to recruitment and interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Menge, Bruce A.; Hacker, Sally D.; Freidenburg, Tess; Lubchenco, Jane; Craig, Ryan; Rilov, Gil; Noble, Mae Marjore; Richmond, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Detection of ecosystem responsiveness to climatic perturbations can provide insight into climate change consequences. Recent analyses linking phytoplankton abundance and mussel recruitment to the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO) revealed a paradox. Despite large increases in mussel recruitment beginning in 2000, adult mussel responses were idiosyncratic by site and intertidal zone, with no response at one long-term site, and increases in the low zone (1.5% per year) and decreases in the mid zone (1.3% per year) at the other. What are the mechanisms underlying these differential changes? Species interactions such as facilitation by barnacles and predation are potential determinants of successful mussel colonization. To evaluate these effects, we analyzed patterns of barnacle recruitment, determined if predation rate covaried with the increase in mussel recruitment, and tested facilitation interactions in a field experiment. Neither magnitude nor season of barnacle recruitment changed meaningfully with site or zone from the 1990s to the 2000s. In contrast to the relationship between NPGO and local-scale mussel recruitment, relationships between local-scale patterns of barnacle recruitment and climate indices were weak. Despite differences in rates of prey recruitment and abundance of sea stars in 1990–1991, 1999–2000, and 2007–2008, predation rates were nearly identical in experiments before, during, and after 1999–2000. The facilitation experiment showed that mussels M. trossulus only became abundant when barnacle recruitment was allowed, when abundance of barnacles reached high abundance of ∼50% cover, and when mussel recruitment was sufficiently high. Thus, in the low zone minimal changes in mussel abundance despite sharply increased recruitment rates are consistent with the hypothesis that change in adult mussel cover was buffered by the relative insensitivity of barnacle recruitment to climatic fluctuations, and a resultant lack of

  5. Tensors, differential forms, and variational principles

    CERN Document Server

    Lovelock, David

    1989-01-01

    Incisive, self-contained account of tensor analysis and the calculus of exterior differential forms, interaction between the concept of invariance and the calculus of variations. Emphasis is on analytical techniques, with large number of problems, from routine manipulative exercises to technically difficult assignments.

  6. Direct differentiation of the quasi-incompressible fluid formulation of fluid-structure interaction using the PFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Minjie; Scott, Michael H.

    2017-07-01

    Accurate and efficient response sensitivities for fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations are important for assessing the uncertain response of coastal and off-shore structures to hydrodynamic loading. To compute gradients efficiently via the direct differentiation method (DDM) for the fully incompressible fluid formulation, approximations of the sensitivity equations are necessary, leading to inaccuracies of the computed gradients when the geometry of the fluid mesh changes rapidly between successive time steps or the fluid viscosity is nonzero. To maintain accuracy of the sensitivity computations, a quasi-incompressible fluid is assumed for the response analysis of FSI using the particle finite element method and DDM is applied to this formulation, resulting in linearized equations for the response sensitivity that are consistent with those used to compute the response. Both the response and the response sensitivity can be solved using the same unified fractional step method. FSI simulations show that although the response using the quasi-incompressible and incompressible fluid formulations is similar, only the quasi-incompressible approach gives accurate response sensitivity for viscous, turbulent flows regardless of time step size.

  7. Representing Sudden Shifts in Intensive Dyadic Interaction Data Using Differential Equation Models with Regime Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Ou, Lu; Ciptadi, Arridhana; Prince, Emily B; You, Dongjun; Hunter, Michael D; Rehg, James M; Rozga, Agata; Messinger, Daniel S

    2018-06-01

    A growing number of social scientists have turned to differential equations as a tool for capturing the dynamic interdependence among a system of variables. Current tools for fitting differential equation models do not provide a straightforward mechanism for diagnosing evidence for qualitative shifts in dynamics, nor do they provide ways of identifying the timing and possible determinants of such shifts. In this paper, we discuss regime-switching differential equation models, a novel modeling framework for representing abrupt changes in a system of differential equation models. Estimation was performed by combining the Kim filter (Kim and Nelson State-space models with regime switching: classical and Gibbs-sampling approaches with applications, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1999) and a numerical differential equation solver that can handle both ordinary and stochastic differential equations. The proposed approach was motivated by the need to represent discrete shifts in the movement dynamics of [Formula: see text] mother-infant dyads during the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP), a behavioral assessment where the infant is separated from and reunited with the mother twice. We illustrate the utility of a novel regime-switching differential equation model in representing children's tendency to exhibit shifts between the goal of staying close to their mothers and intermittent interest in moving away from their mothers to explore the room during the SSP. Results from empirical model fitting were supplemented with a Monte Carlo simulation study to evaluate the use of information criterion measures to diagnose sudden shifts in dynamics.

  8. Hippo Signaling Influences HNF4A and FOXA2 Enhancer Switching during Hepatocyte Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Alder

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cell fate acquisition is heavily influenced by direct interactions between master regulators and tissue-specific enhancers. However, it remains unclear how lineage-specifying transcription factors, which are often expressed in both progenitor and mature cell populations, influence cell differentiation. Using in vivo mouse liver development as a model, we identified thousands of enhancers that are bound by the master regulators HNF4A and FOXA2 in a differentiation-dependent manner, subject to chromatin remodeling, and associated with differentially expressed target genes. Enhancers exclusively occupied in the embryo were found to be responsive to developmentally regulated TEAD2 and coactivator YAP1. Our data suggest that Hippo signaling may affect hepatocyte differentiation by influencing HNF4A and FOXA2 interactions with temporal enhancers. In summary, transcription factor-enhancer interactions are not only tissue specific but also differentiation dependent, which is an important consideration for researchers studying cancer biology or mammalian development and/or using transformed cell lines. : It is unclear how key transcription factors are critical for both lineage specification during embryonic development and maintenance of a differentiated, adult phenotype. By profiling the enhancer occupancy of the key transcription factors HNF4A and FOXA2 during mouse liver development, Alder et al. have found that YAP1 can influence enhancer interactions and target gene expression levels. Enhancer switching enables HNF4A and FOXA2 to fulfill distinct roles during organ development.

  9. Category-bound rights and obligations of young EFL learners in Denmark: The case of (extreme) differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    aus der Wieschen, Maria Vanessa

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates if and how primary school teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) to young learners in Denmark interact in everyday classroom interaction with students who - according to a receptive vocabulary test - differ vastly in their English skills. Using Conversation Analysis......, the study looks at how students present themselves in terms of claimed and demonstrated proficiency, epistemic displays, and willingness to participate, and at teachers’ methods to engage in interactions with these children, for example when they select them as next speakers. The analysis focuses on how...... for successful differentiation. The analysis of EFL teachers’ practices of doing differentiation in teaching-in-interaction of Young Learners of EFL in Denmark contributes to our understanding of differentiation in language classrooms....

  10. Lie algebroids in derived differential topology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuiten, J.J.

    2018-01-01

    A classical principle in deformation theory asserts that any formal deformation problem is controlled by a differential graded Lie algebra. This thesis studies a generalization of this principle to Lie algebroids, and uses this to examine the interactions between the theory of Lie algebroids and the

  11. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  12. Rho GTPases in ameloblast differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Otsu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During tooth development, ameloblasts differentiate from inner enamel epithelial cells to enamel-forming cells by modulating the signal pathways mediating epithelial–mesenchymal interaction and a cell-autonomous gene network. The differentiation process of epithelial cells is characterized by marked changes in their morphology and polarity, accompanied by dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization and changes in cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesion over time. Functional ameloblasts are tall, columnar, polarized cells that synthesize and secrete enamel-specific proteins. After deposition of the full thickness of enamel matrix, ameloblasts become smaller and regulate enamel maturation. Recent significant advances in the fields of molecular biology and genetics have improved our understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the ameloblast cell life cycle, mediated by the Rho family of small GTPases. They act as intracellular molecular switch that transduce signals from extracellular stimuli to the actin cytoskeleton and the nucleus. In our review, we summarize studies that provide current evidence for Rho GTPases and their involvement in ameloblast differentiation. In addition to the Rho GTPases themselves, their downstream effectors and upstream regulators have also been implicated in ameloblast differentiation.

  13. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher; Waldron, Levi

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression...... changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein...... interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two...

  14. Interactive effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and retinoids on proliferation and differentiation in cultured human keratinocytes: quantification of cross-linked envelope formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkers, J.A.M.; Hassing, I.; Spenkelink, B.; Brouwer, A.; Blaauboer, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    Dioxins are potent inducers of chloracne in humans. This skin aberration can be interpreted as an altered differentiation pattern of acinar sebaceous base cells and a change in the rate of terminal differentiation of the keratinocytes. We measured this rate induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in primary cultures of human keratinocytes. As parameters for differentiation, we quantified the 35 S-methionine incorporation into cross-linked envelopes (revealing the total CLE biomass), as well as the number of microscopically visible CLEs. It was shown that TCDD is a very potent inducer of both CLE biomass and number with a half-maximal effect concentration (EC 50 ) of 1.4 nM. CLE biomass was maximally increased 10-fold and the number of cells in culture producing a CLE was increased from 15% in control cultures to maximally 75% of the cells in TCDD-treated cultures. Both effects were Ca 2+ -dependent and increased with elevated cell density, being optimal in post-confluent cultures. Retinoic acid dose-dependently decreased the effect of 10 -8 M TCDD, 10 -6 M having a nearly complete antagonistic action. This interaction of retinoic acid with TCDD-induced differentiation was non-competitive. Retinol was equally potent as an antagonist of the TCDD-induced elevation of CLE formation as compared with retinoic acid. Retinyl palmitate and etretinate were not very effective as TCDD antagonists. Supplementation of hydrocortisone suppressed the TCDD-induced keratinocyte differentiation. It was concluded that CLE biomass quantification provides a reliable and sensitive parameter for keratinocyte differentiation. In this in vitro system it is shown that TCDD strongly induces a switch from proliferation to terminal differentiation and that this effect can be antagonized effectively by retinoic acid and retinol. (orig.)

  15. Cocaine self-administration differentially affects allosteric A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interactions in the striatum. Relevance for cocaine use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintsuk, Julia; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Pomierny, Bartosz; Wydra, Karolina; Zaniewska, Magdalena; Filip, Malgorzata; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-05-01

    In the current study behavioral and biochemical experiments were performed to study changes in the allosteric A2AR-D2R interactions in the ventral and dorsal striatum after cocaine self-administration versus corresponding yoked saline control. By using ex vivo [(3)H]-raclopride/quinpirole competition experiments, the effects of the A2AR agonist CGS 21680 (100 nM) on the KiH and KiL values of the D2-like receptor (D2-likeR) were determined. One major result was a significant reduction in the D2-likeR agonist high affinity state observed with CGS 21680 after cocaine self-administration in the ventral striatum compared with the yoked saline group. The results therefore support the hypothesis that A2AR agonists can at least in part counteract the motivational actions of cocaine. This action is mediated via the D2-likeR by targeting the A2AR protomer of A2AR-D2-like R heteroreceptor complexes in the ventral striatum, which leads to the reduction of D2-likeR protomer recognition through the allosteric receptor-receptor interaction. In contrast, in the dorsal striatum the CGS 21680-induced antagonistic modulation in the D2-likeR agonist high affinity state was abolished after cocaine self-administration versus the yoked saline group probably due to a local dysfunction/disruption of the A2AR-D2-like R heteroreceptor complexes. Such a change in the dorsal striatum in cocaine self-administration can contribute to the development of either locomotor sensitization, habit-forming learning and/or the compulsive drug seeking by enhanced D2-likeR protomer signaling. Potential differences in the composition and stoichiometry of the A2AR-D2R heteroreceptor complexes, including differential recruitment of sigma 1 receptor, in the ventral and dorsal striatum may explain the differential regional changes observed in the A2A-D2-likeR interactions after cocaine self-administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Incorporation of Biomaterials in Multicellular Aggregates Modulates Pluripotent Stem Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt-Leal, Andrés M.; Carpenedo, Richard L.; Ungrin, Mark; Zandstra, Peter W.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials are increasingly being used to engineer the biochemical and biophysical properties of the extracellular stem cell microenvironment in order to tailor niche characteristics and direct cell phenotype. To date, stem cell-biomaterial interactions have largely been studied by introducing stem cells into artificial environments, such as 2D cell culture on biomaterial surfaces, encapsulation of cell suspensions within hydrogel materials, or cell seeding on 3D polymeric scaffolds. In this study, microparticles fabricated from different materials, such as agarose, PLGA and gelatin, were stably integrated, in a dose-dependent manner, within aggregates of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) prior to differentiation as a means to directly examine stem cell-biomaterial interactions in 3D. Interestingly, the presence of the materials within the stem cell aggregates differentially modulated the gene and protein expression patterns of several differentiation markers without adversely affecting cell viability. Microparticle incorporation within 3D stem cell aggregates can control the spatial presentation of extracellular environmental cues (i.e. soluble factors, extracellular matrix and intercellular adhesion molecules) as a means to direct the differentiation of stem cells for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In addition, these results suggest that the physical presence of microparticles within stem cell aggregates does not compromise PSC differentiation, but in fact the choice of biomaterials can impact the propensity of stem cells to adopt particular differentiated cell phenotypes. PMID:20864164

  17. pPKCδ activates SC35 splicing factor during H9c2 myoblastic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Susi; Falconi, Mirella; Rapino, Monica; Zago, Michela; Orsini, Giovanna; Mazzotti, Giovanni; Cataldi, Amelia; Teti, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Although Protein Kinase C (PKC) isoforms' role in the neonatal and adult cardiac tissue development and ageing has been widely described "in vivo", the interaction of such enzymes with specific nuclear substrates needs to be investigated. The aim of our research has been the study of the expression, localization and interaction with the splicing factor SC35 of PKC isoforms (α, δ, ε, ζ) and their potential role in modulating the transcription machinery. H9c2 cells induced to myoblast differentiation in the presence of 1% Horse Serum (HS) have represented our experimental model. The expression of PKC isoforms, their distribution and interaction with SC35 have been evaluated by western blotting, co-immunoprecipitation and double gold immunolabeling for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Our results show PKCδ as the most expressed isoform in differentiated cells. Surprisingly, the distribution of PKCδ and SC35 does not show any significant modification between 10%FBS and 1%HS treated samples and no co-localization is observed. Moreover the interaction between the phosphorylated form of PKCδ (pPKCδ) and SC35 increases, is distributed and co-localizes within the nucleus of differentiated H9c2. These data represent reasonable evidence of pPKCδ mediated SC35 splicing factor activation, suggesting its direct effect on transcription via interaction with the transcription machinery. Furthermore, this co-localization represents a crucial event resulting in downstream changes in transcription of components which determine the morphological modifications related to cardiomyoblast differentiated phenotype.

  18. Differential cross sections of Λ- and bar Λ-hyperon production in bar pp and pp interactions at momenta 12, 32, and 100 GeV/c in the quark-gluon string model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidalov, A.B.; Klochkov, M.A.; Sarychev, L.I.; Smirnova, L.N.

    1989-01-01

    The inclusive differential cross sections of Λ- and bar Λ-hyperon production in bar pp and pp interactions at momenta 12, 32, and 100 GeV/c are calculated in the quark-gluon string model and compared with experiment. The model satisfactorily reproduces the experimental data

  19. Analysis of the differential cross sections for the reaction pp→ppK+K- in view of the K+K- interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silarski, M.

    2008-07-01

    Measurements of the pp→ppK + K - reaction, performed with the experiment COSY-11 at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY, show a significant difference between the obtained excitation function and theoretical expectations including pp-FSI. The discrepancy may be assigned to the influence of K + K - or K - p interaction. This interaction should manifest itself in the distributions of the differential cross section. This thesis presents an analysis of event distributions as a function of the invariant masses of two particle subsystems. In particular in the analysis two generalizations of the Dalitz plot proposed by Goldhaber and Nyborg are used. The present Investigations are based on the experimental data determined by the COSY-11 collaboration from two measurements at excess energies of Q=10 MeV and 28 MeV. The experimental distributions are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations generated with various parameters of the K + K - and K - p interaction. The values of the K + K - scattering length, extracted from two data sets for Q=10 MeV and 28 MeV amount to: a K + K - =(11±8)+i(0±6) fm for Q=10 MeV, and a K + K - =(0.2±0.2)+i(0.0±0.5) fm for Q=28 MeV. Due to the low statistics, the extracted values have large uncertainties and are consistent with very low values of the real and imaginary part of the scattering length. (orig.)

  20. A differential vapor-pressure equipment for investigations of biopolymer interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim B; Koga, Y.; Westh, Peter

    2002-01-01

    the use of high-accuracy capacitance manometers and a leak-tight system of stainless steel pipes, below-scaled valves and metal-gasket fittings, DeltaP can be measured with a resolution of about 0.5 mubar (0.05 Pa) in some applications. This sensitivity level, along with other features of the equipment......, particularly a "gas-phase titration" routine for changing the cell composition, makes it effective for the investigations of several types of biopolymer interactions. These include isothermal studies of net affinities such as the adsorption of water to proteins or membranes, the preferential interaction...

  1. Differential interactions of virulent and non-virulent H. parasuis strains with naïve or swine influenza virus pre-infected dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussá, Tufária; Rodríguez-Cariño, Carolina; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Baratelli, Massimiliano; Costa-Hurtado, Mar; Fraile, Lorenzo; Domínguez, Javier; Aragon, Virginia; Montoya, María

    2012-11-16

    Pigs possess a microbiota in the upper respiratory tract that includes Haemophilus parasuis. Pigs are also considered the reservoir of influenza viruses and infection with this virus commonly results in increased impact of bacterial infections, including those by H. parasuis. However, the mechanisms involved in host innate responses towards H. parasuis and their implications in a co-infection with influenza virus are unknown. Therefore, the ability of a non-virulent H. parasuis serovar 3 (SW114) and a virulent serovar 5 (Nagasaki) strains to interact with porcine bone marrow dendritic cells (poBMDC) and their modulation in a co-infection with swine influenza virus (SwIV) H3N2 was examined. At 1 hour post infection (hpi), SW114 interaction with poBMDC was higher than that of Nagasaki, while at 8 hpi both strains showed similar levels of interaction. The co-infection with H3N2 SwIV and either SW114 or Nagasaki induced higher levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12 and IL-10 compared to mock or H3N2 SwIV infection alone. Moreover, IL-12 and IFN-α secretion differentially increased in cells co-infected with H3N2 SwIV and Nagasaki. These results pave the way for understanding the differences in the interaction of non-virulent and virulent strains of H. parasuis with the swine immune system and their modulation in a viral co-infection.

  2. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Fortuna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation.

  3. A novel method to identify hub pathways of rheumatoid arthritis based on differential pathway networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shi-Tong; Sun, Yong-Hua; Zong, Shi-Hua

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to identify hub pathways of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using a novel method based on differential pathway network (DPN) analysis. The present study proposed a DPN where protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network was integrated with pathway‑pathway interactions. Pathway data was obtained from background PPI network and the Reactome pathway database. Subsequently, pathway interactions were extracted from the pathway data by building randomized gene‑gene interactions and a weight value was assigned to each pathway interaction using Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) to identify differential pathway interactions. Differential pathway interactions were visualized using Cytoscape to construct a DPN. Topological analysis was conducted to identify hub pathways that possessed the top 5% degree distribution of DPN. Modules of DPN were mined according to ClusterONE. A total of 855 pathways were selected to build pathway interactions. By filtrating pathway interactions of weight values >0.7, a DPN with 312 nodes and 791 edges was obtained. Topological degree analysis revealed 15 hub pathways, such as heparan sulfate/heparin‑glycosaminoglycan (HS‑GAG) degradation, HS‑GAG metabolism and keratan sulfate degradation for RA based on DPN. Furthermore, hub pathways were also important in modules, which validated the significance of hub pathways. In conclusion, the proposed method is a computationally efficient way to identify hub pathways of RA, which identified 15 hub pathways that may be potential biomarkers and provide insight to future investigation and treatment of RA.

  4. Differential growth of wrinkled biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeso, D. R.; Carpio, A.; Einarsson, B.

    2015-02-01

    Biofilms are antibiotic-resistant bacterial aggregates that grow on moist surfaces and can trigger hospital-acquired infections. They provide a classical example in biology where the dynamics of cellular communities may be observed and studied. Gene expression regulates cell division and differentiation, which affect the biofilm architecture. Mechanical and chemical processes shape the resulting structure. We gain insight into the interplay between cellular and mechanical processes during biofilm development on air-agar interfaces by means of a hybrid model. Cellular behavior is governed by stochastic rules informed by a cascade of concentration fields for nutrients, waste, and autoinducers. Cellular differentiation and death alter the structure and the mechanical properties of the biofilm, which is deformed according to Föppl-Von Kármán equations informed by cellular processes and the interaction with the substratum. Stiffness gradients due to growth and swelling produce wrinkle branching. We are able to reproduce wrinkled structures often formed by biofilms on air-agar interfaces, as well as spatial distributions of differentiated cells commonly observed with B. subtilis.

  5. Correlative micro-diffraction and differential phase contrast study of mean inner potential and subtle beam-specimen interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Mingjian, E-mail: mingjian.wu@fau.de; Spiecker, Erdmann, E-mail: erdmann.spiecker@fau.de

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Correlative micro-diffraction and DPC-STEM as effective and intuitive method for probing nano-scale electric fields/electrostatic potentials. • Mean inner potential accurately measured by electron refraction from cleaved crystal wedge. • Suggested a pseudo-contactless mode for probing electrostatic potential differences by considering subtle displacements of Fresnel fringes. - Abstract: We present a correlative micro-diffraction and differential phase contrast (DPC) study within scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) on the determination of mean inner potential (MIP) and explain the origin of subtle beam-specimen interactions at the edge of wedge-shaped crystals using both experiment and simulation. Our measurement of MIP of Si and GaAs resulted in 12.48 ± 0.22 V and 14.15 ± 0.22 V, respectively, from directly evaluating beam refraction in micro-diffraction mode. DPC-STEM measurements gave very similar values. Fresnel fringes within the diffraction disk resulting from interaction of the highly coherent electron beam with the aperture are observed and a numerical simulation scheme is implemented to reproduce the effect of the specimen on the fringe pattern. Perfect agreement between experiment and simulation has been achieved in terms of subtle displacements of the fringes upon approaching the sample edge with the electron probe. The existence of the fringes has minor effect on the DPC-STEM signal, which is well below the noise level of our setup at practically reasonable acquisition times. We suggest the possibility to perform pseudo-contactless probing of weak potential differences in beam sensitive samples by evaluating the subtle displacements of Fresnel fringes quantitatively.

  6. Triply differential cross sections for ionization of helium by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauner, M.; Briggs, J.S.; Broad, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    A correlated three-body continuum wavefunction, already successfully employed to describe hydrogen atom impact ionization, is used to calculate the triply-differential cross section for electron impact ionization of helium. A good description is obtained of all the major structure in the differential cross sections in both symmetric and asymmetric geometries. It is demonstrated how interference between the various projectile-target interactions is necessary to reproduce the experimentally observed structure. (author)

  7. Differential Susceptibility to the Effects of Child Temperament on Maternal Warmth and Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunju J.

    2013-01-01

    A child's difficult temperament can elicit negative parenting and inhibit positive parenting behavior. However, mothers appear to be differentially susceptible to child temperament. The author examined the differential susceptibility to the effects of a child's temperament on the mother-child interaction style (i.e., maternal warmth and…

  8. Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Korn, Granino A

    2010-01-01

    Showing you how to use personal computers for modeling and simulation, Interactive Dynamic-System Simulation, Second Edition provides a practical tutorial on interactive dynamic-system modeling and simulation. It discusses how to effectively simulate dynamical systems, such as aerospace vehicles, power plants, chemical processes, control systems, and physiological systems. Written by a pioneer in simulation, the book introduces dynamic-system models and explains how software for solving differential equations works. After demonstrating real simulation programs with simple examples, the author

  9. Intergroup differentiation in computer-mediated communication : Effects of depersonalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmes, T; Spears, R; Lea, M

    Two studies examined intergroup discussions via computer-mediated communication systems. It was hypothesized that depersonalization, in comparison with individuated interaction, would increase the tendency for intergroup differentiation in attitudes and stereotypes, In Study 1, 24 groups

  10. Is neutrino produced in standard weak interactions a Dirac or Majorana particle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beshtoev, Kh.M.

    2010-01-01

    This work considers the following problem: what type (Dirac or Majorana) of neutrinos is produced in standard weak interactions? It is concluded that only Dirac neutrinos but not Majorana neutrinos can be produced in these interactions. Then neutrino interacts with W ± and Z bosons but neutrinoless double beta decay is absent. It means that this neutrino will be produced in another type of interaction. Namely, Majorana neutrino will be produced in the interaction which differentiates spin projections but cannot differentiate neutrino (particle) from antineutrino (antiparticle). Then neutrino will interact with W ± bosons and neutrinoless double beta decay will arise. But interaction with Z boson will be absent. Such an interaction has not been discovered yet. Therefore, experiments with very high precision are important to detect the neutrinoless double decays if they are realized in the Nature

  11. Vascular Mural Cells Promote Noradrenergic Differentiation of Embryonic Sympathetic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Vitor; Pardanaud, Luc; Brunet, Isabelle; Ola, Roxana; Ristori, Emma; Santoro, Massimo M; Nicoli, Stefania; Eichmann, Anne

    2015-06-23

    The sympathetic nervous system controls smooth muscle tone and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. Postganglionic sympathetic neurons (SNs) develop in close proximity to the dorsal aorta (DA) and innervate visceral smooth muscle targets. Here, we use the zebrafish embryo to ask whether the DA is required for SN development. We show that noradrenergic (NA) differentiation of SN precursors temporally coincides with vascular mural cell (VMC) recruitment to the DA and vascular maturation. Blocking vascular maturation inhibits VMC recruitment and blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) signaling prevents VMC differentiation and also blocks NA differentiation of SN precursors. NA differentiation is normal in cloche mutants that are devoid of endothelial cells but have VMCs. Thus, PDGFR-mediated mural cell recruitment mediates neurovascular interactions between the aorta and sympathetic precursors and promotes their noradrenergic differentiation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Differential Effects of Rape Prevention Programming on Attitudes, Behavior, and Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, Mary J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Evaluates whether type of programming differentially affects the processing of rape prevention messages, attitudes, knowledge, behaviors, and stability of change. Participants (n=258) were assigned to a didactic-video program, an interactive drama, or control. Results indicated that the interactive video was most effective in central route…

  13. Review of Two-Photon Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urner, David

    2004-01-01

    Presented are recent results of two-photon interactions. Topics include photon structure functions, inclusive hadron production, differential cross sections derived from tagged γγ fusion events and results in exclusive hadron production, particularly the observations of the η'c

  14. Interaction between vitamin D 2 and magnesium in liposomes: Differential scanning calorimetry and FTIR spectroscopy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyran, Neslihan; Severcan, Feride

    2007-08-01

    Magnesium (Mg 2+) ion is of great importance in physiology by its intervention in 300 enzymatic systems, its role in membrane structure, its function in neuromuscular excitability and vitamin D metabolism and/or action. In the present study, the interaction of Mg 2+, at low (1 mole %) and high (7 mole %) concentrations with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes has been studied in the presence and absence of vitamin D 2 (1 mole %) by using two noninvasive techniques, namely differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. DSC studies reveal that the presence of vitamin D 2 in the pure or Mg 2+ (at both low and high concentrations) containing liposomes diminishes the pretransition. The calorimetric results also reveal that, inclusion of Mg 2+ (more significantly at high concentration) into pure or vitamin D 2 containing DPPC liposomes increases the main phase transition temperature. The investigation of the CH 2 symmetric, the CH 3 asymmetric, the C dbnd O stretching, and the PO2- antisymmetric double bond stretching bands in FTIR spectra with respect to changes occurring in the wavenumber and/or the bandwidth values as a function of temperature reveal that, inclusion of vitamin D 2 or Mg 2+ into pure DPPC liposomes orders and decreases the dynamics of the acyl chains in both gel and liquid-crystalline phases and does not induce hydrogen bond formation in the interfacial region. Furthermore, the dynamics of the head groups of the liposomes decreases in both phases. Our findings reveal that, simultaneous presence of vitamin D 2 and Mg 2+ alters the effect of each other, which is reflected as a decrease in the interactions between these two additives within the model membrane.

  15. Mesenchymal precursor cells maintain the differentiation and proliferation potentials of breast epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stromal-epithelial interactions play a fundamental role in tissue homeostasis, controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. Not surprisingly, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to malignancies. Studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions require ex vivo experimental model systems that recapitulate the complexity of human tissue without compromising the differentiation and proliferation potentials of human primary cells. Methods We isolated and characterized human breast epithelial and mesenchymal precursors from reduction mammoplasty tissue and tagged them with lentiviral vectors. We assembled heterotypic co-cultures and compared mesenchymal and epithelial cells to cells in corresponding monocultures by analyzing growth, differentiation potentials, and gene expression profiles. Results We show that heterotypic culture of non-immortalized human primary breast epithelial and mesenchymal precursors maintains their proliferation and differentiation potentials and constrains their growth. We further describe the gene expression profiles of stromal and epithelial cells in co-cultures and monocultures and show increased expression of the tumor growth factor beta (TGFβ) family member inhibin beta A (INHBA) in mesenchymal cells grown as co-cultures compared with monocultures. Notably, overexpression of INHBA in mesenchymal cells increases colony formation potential of epithelial cells, suggesting that it contributes to the dynamic reciprocity between breast mesenchymal and epithelial cells. Conclusions The described heterotypic co-culture system will prove useful for further characterization of the molecular mechanisms mediating interactions between human normal or neoplastic breast epithelial cells and the stroma, and will provide a framework to test the relevance of the ever-increasing number of oncogenomic alterations identified in human breast cancer. PMID:24916766

  16. Identification of genes differentially expressed in ectomycorrhizal roots during the Pinus pinaster-Laccaria bicolor interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Monterroso, Aranzazu; Canales, Javier; de la Torre, Fernando; Ávila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2013-06-01

    Ectomycorrhizal associations are of major ecological importance in temperate and boreal forests. The development of a functional ectomycorrhiza requires many genetic and biochemical changes. In this study, suppressive subtraction hybridization was used to identify differentially expressed genes in the roots of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton) inoculated with Laccaria bicolor, a mycorrhizal fungus. A total number of 200 unigenes were identified as being differentially regulated in maritime pine roots during the development of mycorrhiza. These unigenes were classified into 10 categories according to the function of their homologues in the GenBank database. Approximately, 40 % of the differentially expressed transcripts were genes that coded for unknown proteins in the databases or that had no homology to known genes. A group of these differentially expressed genes was selected to validate the results using quantitative real-time PCR. The transcript levels of the representative genes were compared between the non-inoculated and inoculated plants at 1, 5, 15 and 30 days after inoculation. The observed expression patterns indicate (1) changes in the composition of the wall cell, (2) tight regulation of defence genes during the development of mycorrhiza and (3) changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Ammonium excess or deficiency dramatically affected the stability of ectomycorrhiza and altered gene expression in maritime pine roots.

  17. Listeria arpJ gene modifies T helper type 2 subset differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoh, Makoto; Maruyama, Saho; Shen, Hua; Matsumoto, Akira; Shinomiya, Hiroto; Przybilla, Karin; Gouin, Edith; Cossart, Pascale; Goebel, Werner; Asano, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-15

    Although the T-cell subset differentiation pathway has been characterized extensively from the view of host gene regulation, the effects of genes of the pathogen on T-cell subset differentiation during infection have yet to be elucidated. Especially, the bacterial genes that are responsible for this shift have not yet been determined. Utilizing a single-gene-mutation Listeria panel, we investigated genes involved in the host-pathogen interaction that are required for the initiation of T-cell subset differentiation in the early phase of pathogen infection. We demonstrate that the induction of T helper types 1 and 2 (Th1 and Th2) subsets are separate phenomena and are mediated by distinct Listeria genes. We identified several candidate Listeria genes that appear to be involved in the host-Listeria interaction. Among them, arpJ is the strongest candidate gene for inhibiting Th2 subset induction. Furthermore, the analysis utilizing arpJ-deficient Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) revealed that the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily (Tnfsf) 9-TNF receptor superfamily (Tnfrsf) 9 interaction inhibits the Th2 response during Lm infection. arpJ is the candidate gene for inhibiting Th2 T-cell subset induction. The arpJ gene product influences the expression of Tnfsf/Tnfrsf on antigen-presenting cells and inhibits the Th2 T-cell subset differentiation during Listeria infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. To the calculation of differential and total cross sections of γπ interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplij, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    The differential and total cross sections of different charge channels of the γπ→ππ process are calculated. At the threshold energies the vector dominance model predicts twice as large values of the total cross sections than the current algebra. In resonance the total cross section of photoproduction on a neutral pion is 10-50 μb, on a charged pion - 5-10μb, at near-threshold energies (Esub(γ)=300-600 MeV) both cross sections are of the 20-40 nb order. For the γπ→ππ process the differential cross sections according to the invariant mass of two pions are obtained for different charge channels. At the threshold energies the total cross sections of the γπ→ππ process is of the 0.1-1 nb order

  19. A Bayesian approach to estimating hidden variables as well as missing and wrong molecular interactions in ordinary differential equation-based mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Benjamin; Kschischo, Maik; Fröhlich, Holger

    2017-06-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are a popular approach to quantitatively model molecular networks based on biological knowledge. However, such knowledge is typically restricted. Wrongly modelled biological mechanisms as well as relevant external influence factors that are not included into the model are likely to manifest in major discrepancies between model predictions and experimental data. Finding the exact reasons for such observed discrepancies can be quite challenging in practice. In order to address this issue, we suggest a Bayesian approach to estimate hidden influences in ODE-based models. The method can distinguish between exogenous and endogenous hidden influences. Thus, we can detect wrongly specified as well as missed molecular interactions in the model. We demonstrate the performance of our Bayesian dynamic elastic-net with several ordinary differential equation models from the literature, such as human JAK-STAT signalling, information processing at the erythropoietin receptor, isomerization of liquid α -Pinene, G protein cycling in yeast and UV-B triggered signalling in plants. Moreover, we investigate a set of commonly known network motifs and a gene-regulatory network. Altogether our method supports the modeller in an algorithmic manner to identify possible sources of errors in ODE-based models on the basis of experimental data. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. Aquaporin Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Virginia Roche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are tetrameric membrane-bound channels that facilitate transport of water and other small solutes across cell membranes. In eukaryotes, they are frequently regulated by gating or trafficking, allowing for the cell to control membrane permeability in a specific manner. Protein–protein interactions play crucial roles in both regulatory processes and also mediate alternative functions such as cell adhesion. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about aquaporin protein–protein interactions; dividing the interactions into three types: (1 interactions between aquaporin tetramers; (2 interactions between aquaporin monomers within a tetramer (hetero-tetramerization; and (3 transient interactions with regulatory proteins. We particularly focus on the structural aspects of the interactions, discussing the small differences within a conserved overall fold that allow for aquaporins to be differentially regulated in an organism-, tissue- and trigger-specific manner. A deep knowledge about these differences is needed to fully understand aquaporin function and regulation in many physiological processes, and may enable design of compounds targeting specific aquaporins for treatment of human disease.

  1. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-α with BCAR1 and Traf6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, Lisa J.; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L.; Blair, Harry C.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at ∼ 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-β-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-α (ERα) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ERα. However, ERα was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ERα in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid (∼ 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ERα-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-κB activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-κB nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ERα.

  2. Estrogen inhibits RANKL-stimulated osteoclastic differentiation of human monocytes through estrogen and RANKL-regulated interaction of estrogen receptor-{alpha} with BCAR1 and Traf6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Lisa J., E-mail: robinsonlj@msx.upmc.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B.; Griswold, Reed D.; Zadorozny, Eva V.; Guo, Lida; Tourkova, Irina L. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Blair, Harry C. [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Veteran' s Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15243 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The effects of estrogen on osteoclast survival and differentiation were studied using CD14-selected mononuclear osteoclast precursors from peripheral blood. Estradiol at {approx} 1 nM reduced RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation by 40-50%. Osteoclast differentiation was suppressed 14 days after addition of RANKL even when estradiol was withdrawn after 18 h. In CD14+ cells apoptosis was rare and was not augmented by RANKL or by 17-{beta}-estradiol. Estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) expression was strongly down-regulated by RANKL, whether or not estradiol was present. Mature human osteoclasts thus cannot respond to estrogen via ER{alpha}. However, ER{alpha} was present in CD14+ osteoclast progenitors, and a scaffolding protein, BCAR1, which binds ER{alpha} in the presence of estrogen, was abundant. Immunoprecipitation showed rapid ({approx} 5 min) estrogen-dependent formation of ER{alpha}-BCAR1 complexes, which were increased by RANKL co-treatment. The RANKL-signaling intermediate Traf6, which regulates NF-{kappa}B activity, precipitated with this complex. Reduction of NF-{kappa}B nuclear localization occurred within 30 min of RANKL stimulation, and estradiol inhibited the phosphorylation of I{kappa}B in response to RANKL. Inhibition by estradiol was abolished by siRNA knockdown of BCAR1. We conclude that estrogen directly, but only partially, curtails human osteoclast formation. This effect requires BCAR1 and involves a non-genomic interaction with ER{alpha}.

  3. Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis Bl-04 interactions with prebiotic carbohydrates using differential proteomics and protein characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Ejby

    of probiotics, primarily non-digestible carbohydrates, are termed prebiotics. The knowledge of prebiotic utilization and in particular the specificities of carbohydrate transport and metabolism are limited, hampering robust understanding for the basis of selective utilization of known prebiotics...... and the discovery and documentation of novel ones. In this project we set out to investigate the metabolism of carbohydrates that are prebiotic or potential prebiotic compounds utilized by the probiotic organisms Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BL-04 (Bl-04). The aim...... of this Ph.D. thesis was the study of probiotic NCFM and Bl-04 interaction with prebiotic carbohydrates using differential proteomics and protein characterization. Proteomics is a potential omics tool to investigate probiotic bacteria and its response to prebiotic carbohydrates at the protein level...

  4. Differentiability and continuity of quantum fields on a lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    deLyra, J.L.; Foong, S.K.; Gallivan, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    The differentiability and continuity properties of quantized bosonic fields on a lattice are examined. It is shown for free fields that, in the continuum limit, the dominant configurations in the functional integral become discontinuous when the spacetime dimension is greater than 1. It is argued that the same is true for interacting fields. This is unlike the one-dimensional case of quantum mechanics, in which the dominant configurations are continuous but not differentiable. As a consequence of this discontinuity, classically equivalent actions may produce inequivalent quantum field theories upon functional-integral quantization

  5. Particle Systems and Partial Differential Equations I

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the international conference Particle Systems and Partial Differential Equations I, which took place at the Centre of Mathematics of the University of Minho, Braga, Portugal, from the 5th to the 7th of December, 2012.  The purpose of the conference was to bring together world leaders to discuss their topics of expertise and to present some of their latest research developments in those fields. Among the participants were researchers in probability, partial differential equations and kinetics theory. The aim of the meeting was to present to a varied public the subject of interacting particle systems, its motivation from the viewpoint of physics and its relation with partial differential equations or kinetics theory, and to stimulate discussions and possibly new collaborations among researchers with different backgrounds.  The book contains lecture notes written by François Golse on the derivation of hydrodynamic equations (compressible and incompressible Euler and Navie...

  6. ERα inhibited myocardin-induced differentiation in uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Xing-Hua, E-mail: xinghualiao@hotmail.com [Institute of Biology and Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Fermentation Microbiology, Ministry of Education and Tianjin, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Li, Jun-Yan [Henan Vocational College of Applied Technology, Zhengzhou 450042 (China); Dong, Xiu-Mei [Institute of Biology and Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065 (China); Yuncheng County People' s Hospital, Shandong 274700 (China); Wang, Xiuhong [Xianning Central Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Xianning, Hubei 437100 (China); Xiang, Yuan; Li, Hui; Yu, Cheng-Xi; Li, Jia-Peng; Yuan, Bai-Yin [Institute of Biology and Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065 (China); Zhou, Jun, E-mail: zhoujun@wust.edu.cn [Institute of Biology and Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065 (China); School of Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430065 (China); Zhang, Tong-Cun, E-mail: zhangtongcun@wust.edu.cn [Institute of Biology and Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430065 (China); Key Laboratory of Industrial Fermentation Microbiology, Ministry of Education and Tianjin, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Uterine fibroids, also known as uterine leiomyomas, are a benign tumor of the human uterus and the commonest estrogen-dependent benign tumor found in women. Myocardin is an important transcriptional regulator in smooth and cardiac muscle development. The role of myocardin and its relationship with ERα in uterine fibroids have barely been addressed. We noticed that the expression of myocardin was markedly reduced in human uterine fibroid tissue compared with corresponding normal or adjacent myometrium tissue. Here we reported that myocardin induced the transcription and expression of differentiation markers SM22α and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in rat primary uterine smooth muscle cells (USMCs) and this effect was inhibited by ERα. Notably, we showed that, ERα induced expression of proliferation markers PCNA and ki-67 in rat primary USMCs. We also found ERα interacted with myocardin and formed complex to bind to CArG box and inhibit the SM22α promoter activity. Furthermore, ERα inhibited the transcription and expression of myocardin, and reduced the levels of transcription and expression of downstream target SM22α, a SMC differentiation marker. Our data thus provided important and novel insights into how ERα and myocardin interact to control the cell differentiation and proliferation of USMCs. Thus, it may provide potential therapeutic target for uterine fibroids.

  7. Differential cross-sections of a double spin-flip In d + d reactions and supermultiplet potential model of the interaction of clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, V M; Struzhko, B G

    2002-01-01

    The experimental two-dimensional proton-proton coincidence spectra of the four-particle reaction d + d -> p + p + n + n are simulated with regard to dominant quasi-binary processes, viz. a quasi-free scattering of protons and final-state interaction of nucleons. Differential cross-sections d sigma (nu,E)/d OMEGA of a deuteron charge exchange sup 2 H(d, sup 2 n) sup 2 p reaction (0,57 +- 0.03 mb/sr at THETA sub c sub m 62,5 degree, 1,01 +- 0,05 mb /sr at THETA sub c sub m = 79,6 degree, E sub c sub m = 11,6 MeV) and spin-isospin flip sup 2 H(d,d sup *)d sup * one (1,1 +- 0,3 mb /sr at THETA sub c sub m = 90 degree E sub c sub m 23,4 MeV) are defined. They are compared to the cross-sections calculated in the approach of generalized (supermultiplet) potential model where the problem of the interaction of clusters A and B can be reduced to a set of one-channel scattering problems with potentials V sup [ f], where [f] are the allowed Young schemes for the system A + B. This is important for channels with minimum t...

  8. The analysis of fractional differential equations an application-oriented exposition using differential operators of Caputo type

    CERN Document Server

    Diethelm, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Fractional calculus was first developed by pure mathematicians in the middle of the 19th century. Some 100 years later, engineers and physicists have found applications for these concepts in their areas. However there has traditionally been little interaction between these two communities. In particular, typical mathematical works provide extensive findings on aspects with comparatively little significance in applications, and the engineering literature often lacks mathematical detail and precision. This book bridges the gap between the two communities. It concentrates on the class of fractional derivatives most important in applications, the Caputo operators, and provides a self-contained, thorough and mathematically rigorous study of their properties and of the corresponding differential equations. The text is a useful tool for mathematicians and researchers from the applied sciences alike. It can also be used as a basis for teaching graduate courses on fractional differential equations.

  9. Differential isospin-fractionation in dilute asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Ma Hongru; Xu Jun; Yong Gaochan

    2007-01-01

    The differential isospin-fractionation (IsoF) during the liquid-gas phase transition in dilute asymmetric nuclear matter is studied as a function of nucleon momentum. Within a self-consistent thermal model it is shown that the neutron/proton ratio of the gas phase becomes smaller than that of the liquid phase for energetic nucleons, although the gas phase is overall more neutron-rich. Clear indications of the differential IsoF consistent with the thermal model predictions are demonstrated within a transport model for heavy-ion reactions. Future comparisons with experimental data will allow us to extract critical information about the momentum dependence of the isovector strong interaction

  10. and O-based composite materials derived from differential ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, we have made an effort to determine whether the effective atomic numbers of H-, C-, N- and O-based composite materials would indeed remain a constant over the energy grid of 280–1200 keV wherein incoherent scattering dominates their interaction with photons. For this purpose, the differential ...

  11. Investigation of interactions between poly-L-lysine-coated boron nitride nanotubes and C2C12 cells: up-take, cytocompatibility, and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Ciofani

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available G Ciofani1, L Ricotti1, S Danti2,3, S Moscato4, C Nesti2, D D’Alessandro2,4, D Dinucci5, F Chiellini5, A Pietrabissa3, M Petrini2,3, A Menciassi1,61Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy; 2CUCCS-RRMR, Center for the Clinical Use of Stem Cells – Regional Network of Regenerative Medicine, 3Department of Oncology, Transplants and Advanced Technologies, 4Department of Human Morphology and Applied Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 5Laboratory of Bioactive Polymeric Materials for Biomedical and Environmental Applications (BIOlab, UdR INSTM, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, San Piero a Grado, Italy; 6Italian Institute of Technology, Genova, ItalyAbstract: Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs have generated considerable interest within the scientific community by virtue of their unique physical properties, which can be exploited in the biomedical field. In the present in vitro study, we investigated the interactions of poly-L-lysine-coated BNNTs with C2C12 cells, as a model of muscle cells, in terms of cytocompatibility and BNNT internalization. The latter was performed using both confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Finally, we investigated myoblast differentiation in the presence of BNNTs, evaluating the protein synthesis of differentiating cells, myotube formation, and expression of some constitutive myoblastic markers, such as MyoD and Cx43, by reverse transcription – polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We demonstrated that BNNTs are highly internalized by C2C12 cells, with neither adversely affecting C2C12 myoblast viability nor significantly interfering with myotube formation.Keywords: boron nitride nanotubes, C2C12 cells, cytocompatibility, up-take, differentiation, MyoD, connexin 43

  12. Fluorescent polymer-based post-translational differentiation and subtyping of breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Michael D; Dutta, Rinku; Haldar, Manas K; Wagh, Anil; Gustad, Thomas R; Law, Benedict; Friesner, Daniel L; Mallik, Sanku

    2012-12-07

    Herein, we report the application of synthesized fluorescent, water soluble polymers for post-translational subtyping and differentiation of breast cancer cells in vitro. The fluorescence emission spectra from these polymers were modulated differently in the presence of conditioned cell culture media from various breast cancer cells. These polymers differentiate at a post-translation level possibly due to their ability to interact with extracellular enzymes that are over-expressed in cancerous conditions.

  13. Interactive publications: creation and usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, George R.; Ford, Glenn; Chung, Michael; Vasudevan, Kirankumar; Antani, Sameer

    2006-02-01

    As envisioned here, an "interactive publication" has similarities to multimedia documents that have been in existence for a decade or more, but possesses specific differentiating characteristics. In common usage, the latter refers to online entities that, in addition to text, consist of files of images and video clips residing separately in databases, rarely providing immediate context to the document text. While an interactive publication has many media objects as does the "traditional" multimedia document, it is a self-contained document, either as a single file with media files embedded within it, or as a "folder" containing tightly linked media files. The main characteristic that differentiates an interactive publication from a traditional multimedia document is that the reader would be able to reuse the media content for analysis and presentation, and to check the underlying data and possibly derive alternative conclusions leading, for example, to more in-depth peer reviews. We have created prototype publications containing paginated text and several media types encountered in the biomedical literature: 3D animations of anatomic structures; graphs, charts and tabular data; cell development images (video sequences); and clinical images such as CT, MRI and ultrasound in the DICOM format. This paper presents developments to date including: a tool to convert static tables or graphs into interactive entities, authoring procedures followed to create prototypes, and advantages and drawbacks of each of these platforms. It also outlines future work including meeting the challenge of network distribution for these large files.

  14. Diffany: an ontology-driven framework to infer, visualise and analyse differential molecular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Sofie; Van Parys, Thomas; Dubois, Marieke; Inzé, Dirk; Van de Peer, Yves

    2016-01-05

    Differential networks have recently been introduced as a powerful way to study the dynamic rewiring capabilities of an interactome in response to changing environmental conditions or stimuli. Currently, such differential networks are generated and visualised using ad hoc methods, and are often limited to the analysis of only one condition-specific response or one interaction type at a time. In this work, we present a generic, ontology-driven framework to infer, visualise and analyse an arbitrary set of condition-specific responses against one reference network. To this end, we have implemented novel ontology-based algorithms that can process highly heterogeneous networks, accounting for both physical interactions and regulatory associations, symmetric and directed edges, edge weights and negation. We propose this integrative framework as a standardised methodology that allows a unified view on differential networks and promotes comparability between differential network studies. As an illustrative application, we demonstrate its usefulness on a plant abiotic stress study and we experimentally confirmed a predicted regulator. Diffany is freely available as open-source java library and Cytoscape plugin from http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/supplementary_data/solan/diffany/.

  15. Kaonic nuclei and kaon-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ikuta, K; Masutani, K

    2002-01-01

    Although kaonic atoms provide valuable information concerning the K sup - -nucleus interaction at low energies, they cannot fully determine the K sup - - nucleus optical potential. We demonstrate that K sup - nuclear bound states, if they exist, can be useful in investigating the K sup - -nucleus interaction, especially in the interior of the nucleus. In order to show this possibility, we calculate the double differential cross sections for (K sup - , P) using the Green function method. (author)

  16. Small functional groups for controlled differentiation of hydrogel-encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Durney, Andrew R.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2008-10-01

    Cell-matrix interactions have critical roles in regeneration, development and disease. The work presented here demonstrates that encapsulated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can be induced to differentiate down osteogenic and adipogenic pathways by controlling their three-dimensional environment using tethered small-molecule chemical functional groups. Hydrogels were formed using sufficiently low concentrations of tether molecules to maintain constant physical characteristics, encapsulation of hMSCs in three dimensions prevented changes in cell morphology, and hMSCs were shown to differentiate in normal growth media, indicating that the small-molecule functional groups induced differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first example where synthetic matrices are shown to control induction of multiple hMSC lineages purely through interactions with small-molecule chemical functional groups tethered to the hydrogel material. Strategies using simple chemistry to control complex biological processes would be particularly powerful as they could make production of therapeutic materials simpler, cheaper and more easily controlled.

  17. Hierarchical structure of ecological and non-ecological processes of differentiation shaped ongoing gastropod radiation in the Malawi Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bocxlaer, Bert

    2017-09-13

    Ecological processes, non-ecological processes or a combination of both may cause reproductive isolation and speciation, but their specific roles and potentially complex interactions in evolutionary radiations remain poorly understood, which defines a central knowledge gap at the interface of microevolution and macroevolution. Here I examine genome scans in combination with phenotypic and environmental data to disentangle how ecological and non-ecological processes contributed to population differentiation and speciation in an ongoing radiation of Lanistes gastropods from the Malawi Basin. I found a remarkable hierarchical structure of differentiation mechanisms in space and time: neutral and mutation-order processes are older and occur mainly between regions, whereas more recent adaptive processes are the main driver of genetic differentiation and reproductive isolation within regions. The strongest differentiation occurs between habitats and between regions, i.e. when ecological and non-ecological processes act synergistically. The structured occurrence of these processes based on the specific geographical setting and ecological opportunities strongly influenced the potential for evolutionary radiation. The results highlight the importance of interactions between various mechanisms of differentiation in evolutionary radiations, and suggest that non-ecological processes are important in adaptive radiations, including those of cichlids. Insight into such interactions is critical to understanding large-scale patterns of organismal diversity. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Differential Effects of Social Networks on Mammography Use by Poverty Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Younsook

    2016-01-01

    This study examines whether social networks have differential effects on mammography use depending on poverty status. Data were analyzed on US women (40+), employing logistic regression and simple slope analyses for a post hoc probing of moderating effects. Among women not in poverty, living with a spouse/partner and attending church, regardless of frequency, were positively associated with mammography use; family size was negatively associated. Among women living in poverty, mammography showed a positive association only with weekly church attendance. Mammography was negatively associated with health-related social interactions occurring through the Internet. Post hoc probing showed significant moderating effects of poverty on the relationship between online health-related interactions and mammography use. To make the Internet a meaningful health empowerment tool for women in poverty, future research should identify how health-related interactions that occur online affect women in poverty's psychological and behavioral reactions that will contribute to our understanding of why they are discouraged from having mammograms. The mechanisms behind the differential effects of church attendance and poverty status on mammography also need further clarification.

  19. Effects of Substrate and Co-Culture on Neural Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Erin Boote [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the study of stem and progenitor cells has moved to the forefront of research. Since the isolation of human hematopoietic stem cells in 1988 and the subsequent discovery of a self renewing population of multipotent cells in many tissues, many researchers have envisioned a better understanding of development and potential clinical usage in intractable diseases. Both these goals, however, depend on a solid understanding of the intracellular and extracellular forces that cause stem cells to differentiate to a specific cell fate. Many diseases of large scale cell loss have been suggested as candidates for stem cell based treatments. It is proposed that replacing the function of the damaged or defective cells by specific differentiation of stem or progenitor cells could treat the disease. Before cells can be directed to specific lineages, the mechanisms of differentiation must be better understood. Differentiation in vivo is an intensively complex system that is difficult to study. The goal of this research is to develop further understanding of the effects of soluble and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues on the differentiation of neural progenitor cells with the use of a simplified in vitro culture system. Specific research objectives are to study the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in response to astrocyte conditioned medium and protein substrate composition and concentration. In an effort to reveal the mechanism of the conditioned medium interaction, a test for the presence of a feedback loop between progenitor cells and astrocytes is presented along with an examination of conditioned medium storage temperature, which can reveal enzymatic dependencies. An examination of protein substrate composition and concentration will help to reveal the role of any ECM interactions on differentiation. This thesis is organized into a literature review covering recent advances in use of external modulators of differentiation such as surface coatings, co

  20. Programmed mitophagy is essential for the glycolytic switch during cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Martínez, Lorena; Sierra-Filardi, Elena; McGreal, Rebecca S; Salazar-Roa, María; Mariño, Guillermo; Seco, Esther; Durand, Sylvère; Enot, David; Graña, Osvaldo; Malumbres, Marcos; Cvekl, Ales; Cuervo, Ana María; Kroemer, Guido; Boya, Patricia

    2017-06-14

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the sole projecting neurons of the retina and their axons form the optic nerve. Here, we show that embryogenesis-associated mouse RGC differentiation depends on mitophagy, the programmed autophagic clearance of mitochondria. The elimination of mitochondria during RGC differentiation was coupled to a metabolic shift with increased lactate production and elevated expression of glycolytic enzymes at the mRNA level. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of either mitophagy or glycolysis consistently inhibited RGC differentiation. Local hypoxia triggered expression of the mitophagy regulator BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa-interacting protein 3-like (BNIP3L, best known as NIX) at peak RGC differentiation. Retinas from NIX-deficient mice displayed increased mitochondrial mass, reduced expression of glycolytic enzymes and decreased neuronal differentiation. Similarly, we provide evidence that NIX-dependent mitophagy contributes to mitochondrial elimination during macrophage polarization towards the proinflammatory and more glycolytic M1 phenotype, but not to M2 macrophage differentiation, which primarily relies on oxidative phosphorylation. In summary, developmentally controlled mitophagy promotes a metabolic switch towards glycolysis, which in turn contributes to cellular differentiation in several distinct developmental contexts. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suppresses the Myostatin signaling pathway during myogenic differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retamales, A.; Zuloaga, R.; Valenzuela, C.A.; Gallardo-Escarate, C.; Molina, A.; Valdés, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Myogenic differentiation is a complex and well-coordinated process for generating mature skeletal muscle fibers. This event is autocrine/paracrine regulated by growth factors, principally Myostatin (MSTN) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth in vertebrates that exerts its inhibitory function by activating Smad transcription factors. In contrast, IGF-1 promotes the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study reports on a novel functional crosstalk between the IGF-1 and MSTN signaling pathways, as mediated through interaction between PI3K/Akt and Smad3. Stimulation of skeletal myoblasts with MSTN resulted in a transient increase in the pSmad3:Smad3 ratio and Smad-dependent transcription. Moreover, MSTN inhibited myod gene expression and myoblast fusion in an Activin receptor-like kinase/Smad3-dependent manner. Preincubation of skeletal myoblasts with IGF-1 blocked MSTN-induced Smad3 activation, promoting myod expression and myoblast differentiation. This inhibitory effect of IGF-1 on the MSTN signaling pathway was dependent on IGF-1 receptor, PI3K, and Akt activities. Finally, immunoprecipitation assay analysis determined that IGF-1 pretreatment increased Akt and Smad3 interaction. These results demonstrate that the IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway may inhibit MSTN signaling during myoblast differentiation, providing new insight to existing knowledge on the complex crosstalk between both growth factors. - Highlights: • IGF-1 inhibits Myostatin canonical signaling pathway through IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt pathway. • IGF-1 promotes myoblast differentiation through a direct blocking of Myostatin signaling pathway. • IGF-1 induces the interaction of Akt with Smad3 in skeletal myoblast

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suppresses the Myostatin signaling pathway during myogenic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retamales, A.; Zuloaga, R.; Valenzuela, C.A. [Laboratorio de Biotecnología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile); Gallardo-Escarate, C. [Laboratory of Biotechnology and Aquatic Genomics, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), P.O. Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Molina, A. [Laboratorio de Biotecnología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), P.O. Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Valdés, J.A., E-mail: jvaldes@unab.cl [Laboratorio de Biotecnología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andrés Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), P.O. Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2015-08-21

    Myogenic differentiation is a complex and well-coordinated process for generating mature skeletal muscle fibers. This event is autocrine/paracrine regulated by growth factors, principally Myostatin (MSTN) and Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth in vertebrates that exerts its inhibitory function by activating Smad transcription factors. In contrast, IGF-1 promotes the differentiation of skeletal myoblasts by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This study reports on a novel functional crosstalk between the IGF-1 and MSTN signaling pathways, as mediated through interaction between PI3K/Akt and Smad3. Stimulation of skeletal myoblasts with MSTN resulted in a transient increase in the pSmad3:Smad3 ratio and Smad-dependent transcription. Moreover, MSTN inhibited myod gene expression and myoblast fusion in an Activin receptor-like kinase/Smad3-dependent manner. Preincubation of skeletal myoblasts with IGF-1 blocked MSTN-induced Smad3 activation, promoting myod expression and myoblast differentiation. This inhibitory effect of IGF-1 on the MSTN signaling pathway was dependent on IGF-1 receptor, PI3K, and Akt activities. Finally, immunoprecipitation assay analysis determined that IGF-1 pretreatment increased Akt and Smad3 interaction. These results demonstrate that the IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway may inhibit MSTN signaling during myoblast differentiation, providing new insight to existing knowledge on the complex crosstalk between both growth factors. - Highlights: • IGF-1 inhibits Myostatin canonical signaling pathway through IGF-1R/PI3K/Akt pathway. • IGF-1 promotes myoblast differentiation through a direct blocking of Myostatin signaling pathway. • IGF-1 induces the interaction of Akt with Smad3 in skeletal myoblast.

  3. The influence of host genotype X environment Interactions on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mean squares for environments, genotypes and G x E interactions were highly significant (P<0.0001) for anthracnose infection. Significant G x E interactions, accounting for 19% of the treatment sums of squares, indicated that genotypes responded differentially to anthracnose infection across environments. The additive ...

  4. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma bypasses the function of the retinoblastoma protein in adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jacob B.; Petersen, R K; Larsen, B M

    1999-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is an important regulator of development, proliferation, and cellular differentiation. pRB was recently shown to play a pivotal role in adipocyte differentiation, to interact physically with adipogenic CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs), and to positively...

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulate Differentiation of Myeloid Progenitor Cells During Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouzegar, Afsaneh; Mittal, Sharad K; Sahu, Anuradha; Sahu, Srikant K; Chauhan, Sunil K

    2017-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess distinct immunomodulatory properties and have tremendous potential for use in therapeutic applications in various inflammatory diseases. MSCs have been shown to regulate pathogenic functions of mature myeloid inflammatory cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils. Intriguingly, the capacity of MSCs to modulate differentiation of myeloid progenitors (MPs) to mature inflammatory cells remains unknown to date. Here, we report the novel finding that MSCs inhibit the expression of differentiation markers on MPs under inflammatory conditions. We demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of MSCs is dependent on direct cell-cell contact and that this intercellular contact is mediated through interaction of CD200 expressed by MSCs and CD200R1 expressed by MPs. Furthermore, using an injury model of sterile inflammation, we show that MSCs promote MP frequencies and suppress infiltration of inflammatory cells in the inflamed tissue. We also find that downregulation of CD200 in MSCs correlates with abrogation of their immunoregulatory function. Collectively, our study provides unequivocal evidence that MSCs inhibit differentiation of MPs in the inflammatory environment via CD200-CD200R1 interaction. Stem Cells 2017;35:1532-1541. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  6. Cell differentiation and matrix organization in engineered teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Lechguer, A; Couble, M L; Labert, N; Kuchler-Bopp, S; Keller, L; Magloire, H; Bleicher, F; Lesot, H

    2011-05-01

    Embryonic dental cells were used to check a series of criteria to be achieved for tooth engineering. Implantation of cultured cell-cell re-associations led to crown morphogenesis, epithelial histogenesis, organ vascularization, and root and periodontium development. The present work aimed to investigate the organization of predentin/dentin, enamel, and cementum which formed and mineralized after implantation. These implants were processed for histology, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, and electron diffraction. After two weeks of implantation, the re-associations showed gradients of differentiating odontoblasts. There were ciliated, polarized, and extended cell processes in predentin/dentin. Ameloblasts became functional. Enamel crystals showed a typical oriented arrangement in the inner and outer enamel. In the developing root, odontoblasts differentiated, cementogenesis occurred, and periodontal ligament fibroblasts interacted with the root surface and newly formed bone. The implantation of cultured dental cell re-associations allows for reproduction of complete functional differentiation at the cell, matrix, and mineral levels.

  7. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  8. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  9. Zymosan-induced immune challenge modifies the stress response of hypoxic air-breathing fish (Anabas testudineus Bloch): Evidence for reversed patterns of cortisol and thyroid hormone interaction, differential ion transporter functions and non-specific immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simi, S; Peter, Valsa S; Peter, M C Subhash

    2017-09-15

    Fishes have evolved physiological mechanisms to exhibit stress response, where hormonal signals interact with an array of ion transporters and regulate homeostasis. As major ion transport regulators in fish, cortisol and thyroid hormones have been shown to interact and fine-tune the stress response. Likewise, in fishes many interactions have been identified between stress and immune components, but the physiological basis of such interaction has not yet delineated particularly in air-breathing fish. We, therefore, investigated the responses of thyroid hormones and cortisol, ion transporter functions and non-specific immune response of an obligate air-breathing fish Anabas testudineus Bloch to zymosan treatment or hypoxia stress or both, to understand how immune challenge modifies the pattern of stress response in this fish. Induction of experimental peritonitis in these fish by zymosan treatment (200ngg -1 ) for 24h produced rise in respiratory burst and lysozomal activities in head kidney phagocytes. In contrast, hypoxia stress for 30min in immune-challenged fish reversed these non-specific responses of head kidney phagocytes. The decline in plasma cortisol in zymosan-treated fish and its further suppression by hypoxia stress indicate that immune challenge suppresses the cortisol-driven stress response of this fish. Likewise, the decline in plasma T 3 and T 4 after zymosan-treatment and the rise in plasma T 4 after hypoxia stress in immune-challenged fish indicate a critical role for thyroid hormone in immune-stress response due to its differential sensitivity to both immune and stress challenges. Further, analysis of the activity pattern of ion-dependent ATPases viz. Na + /K + -ATPase, H + /K + -ATPase and Na + /NH 4 + -ATPase indicates a functional interaction of ion transport system with the immune response as evident in its differential and spatial modifications after hypoxia stress in immune-challenged fish. The immune-challenge that produced differential

  10. Interaction times for damped heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, W.U.; Birkelund, J.R.; Huizenga, J.R.; Wolf, K.L.; Viola, V.E. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Sticking and nonsticking models are used to calculate the angular-momentum-dependent interaction times for the reactions 165 Ho + 84 Kr, 209 Bi + 84 Kr, and 209 Bi + 136 Xe. The angular momenta and differential cross sections are plotted. Five references

  11. Generalized differential transform method to differential-difference equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Li; Wang Zhen; Zong Zhi

    2009-01-01

    In this Letter, we generalize the differential transform method to solve differential-difference equation for the first time. Two simple but typical examples are applied to illustrate the validity and the great potential of the generalized differential transform method in solving differential-difference equation. A Pade technique is also introduced and combined with GDTM in aim of extending the convergence area of presented series solutions. Comparisons are made between the results of the proposed method and exact solutions. Then we apply the differential transform method to the discrete KdV equation and the discrete mKdV equation, and successfully obtain solitary wave solutions. The results reveal that the proposed method is very effective and simple. We should point out that generalized differential transform method is also easy to be applied to other nonlinear differential-difference equation.

  12. Enteric neural crest cells regulate vertebrate stomach patterning and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Sandrine; McKey, Jennifer; Sagnol, Sébastien; de Santa Barbara, Pascal

    2015-01-15

    In vertebrates, the digestive tract develops from a uniform structure where reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions pattern this complex organ into regions with specific morphologies and functions. Concomitant with these early patterning events, the primitive GI tract is colonized by the vagal enteric neural crest cells (vENCCs), a population of cells that will give rise to the enteric nervous system (ENS), the intrinsic innervation of the GI tract. The influence of vENCCs on early patterning and differentiation of the GI tract has never been evaluated. In this study, we report that a crucial number of vENCCs is required for proper chick stomach development, patterning and differentiation. We show that reducing the number of vENCCs by performing vENCC ablations induces sustained activation of the BMP and Notch pathways in the stomach mesenchyme and impairs smooth muscle development. A reduction in vENCCs also leads to the transdifferentiation of the stomach into a stomach-intestinal mixed phenotype. In addition, sustained Notch signaling activity in the stomach mesenchyme phenocopies the defects observed in vENCC-ablated stomachs, indicating that inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway is essential for stomach patterning and differentiation. Finally, we report that a crucial number of vENCCs is also required for maintenance of stomach identity and differentiation through inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway. Altogether, our data reveal that, through the regulation of mesenchyme identity, vENCCs act as a new mediator in the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions that control stomach development. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froissart, Marcel

    1976-01-01

    Strong interactions are introduced by their more obvious aspect: nuclear forces. In hadron family, the nucleon octet, OMEGA - decuplet, and quark triply are successively considered. Pion wave having been put at the origin of nuclear forces, low energy phenomena are described, the force being explained as an exchange of structure corresponding to a Regge trajectory in a variable rotating state instead of the exchange of a well defined particle. At high energies the concepts of pomeron, parton and stratons are introduced, pionization and fragmentation are briefly differentiated [fr

  14. Differentially activated macrophages orchestrate myogenic precursor cell fate during human skeletal muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saclier, Marielle; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Mackey, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    , we explored both in vitro and in vivo, in human, the interactions of differentially activated MPs with myogenic precursor cells (MPCs) during adult myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration. We showed in vitro that through the differential secretion of cytokines and growth factors, proinflammatory...... anti-inflammatory markers. These data demonstrate for the first time in human that MPs sequentially orchestrate adult myogenesis during regeneration of damaged skeletal muscle. These results support the emerging concept that inflammation, through MP activation, controls stem cell fate and coordinates......Macrophages (MPs) exert either beneficial or deleterious effects on tissue repair, depending on their activation/polarization state. They are crucial for adult skeletal muscle repair, notably by acting on myogenic precursor cells. However, these interactions have not been fully characterized. Here...

  15. Theoretical and experimental study on electron interactions with chlorobenzene: Shape resonances and differential cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Alessandra Souza [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Varella, Márcio T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão 1731, 05508-090 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sanchez, Sergio d’A.; Bettega, Márcio H. F., E-mail: bettega@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Ameixa, João; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Ferreira da Silva, Filipe [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Blanco, Francisco [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2016-08-28

    In this work, we report theoretical and experimental cross sections for elastic scattering of electrons by chlorobenzene (ClB). The theoretical integral and differential cross sections (DCSs) were obtained with the Schwinger multichannel method implemented with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR). The calculations with the SMCPP method were done in the static-exchange (SE) approximation, for energies above 12 eV, and in the static-exchange plus polarization approximation, for energies up to 12 eV. The calculations with the IAM-SCAR method covered energies up to 500 eV. The experimental differential cross sections were obtained in the high resolution electron energy loss spectrometer VG-SEELS 400, in Lisbon, for electron energies from 8.0 eV to 50 eV and angular range from 7{sup ∘} to 110{sup ∘}. From the present theoretical integral cross section (ICS) we discuss the low-energy shape-resonances present in chlorobenzene and compare our computed resonance spectra with available electron transmission spectroscopy data present in the literature. Since there is no other work in the literature reporting differential cross sections for this molecule, we compare our theoretical and experimental DCSs with experimental data available for the parent molecule benzene.

  16. Triple differential cross-sections for near threshold ( 2 ) process for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gon, krypton and xenon [4,5] have shown that the triple differential cross-sections. (TDCs) are highly dependent on target-dependent short range correlations and lead to different angular distributions even though at asymptotic separations the long-range interactions in the final state are essentially identical and target inde-.

  17. Poorly-differentiated colorectal neuroendocrine tumour: CT differentiation from well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour and poorly-differentiated adenocarcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji Hee [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The differentiation of poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (PD-NETs), well-differentiated NETs (WD-NETs), and adenocarcinomas (ADCs) is important due to different management options and prognoses. This study is to find the differential CT features of colorectal PD-NETs from WD-NETs and ADCs. CT features of 25 colorectal WD-NETs, 36 PD-NETs, and 36 ADCs were retrospectively reviewed. Significant variables were assessed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Receiver operating characteristics analysis determined the optimal cut-off value of tumour and lymph node (LN) size. Large size, rectum location, ulceroinfiltrative morphology without intact overlying mucosa, heterogeneous attenuation with necrosis, presence of ≥3 enlarged LNs, and metastasis were significant variables to differentiate PD-NETs from WD-NETs (P < 0.05). High attenuation on arterial phase, persistently high enhancement pattern, presence of ≥6 enlarged LNs, large LN size, and wash-in/wash-out enhancement pattern of liver metastasis were significant variables to differentiate PD-NETs from ADCs (P < 0.05). Compared to WD-NETs, colorectal PD-NETs are usually large, heterogeneous, and ulceroinfiltrative mass without intact overlying mucosa involving enlarged LNs and metastasis. High attenuation on arterial phase, presence of enlarged LNs with larger size and greater number, and wash-in/wash-out enhancement pattern of liver metastasis can be useful CT discriminators of PD-NETs from ADCs. (orig.)

  18. A survey of the alpha-nucleon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.; Ahmad, A.A.Z.; Ferdous, N.

    1984-10-01

    A survey of the alpha-nucleon interaction is made. The experimental work on angular distributions of differential scattering cross-sections and polarizations in proton-alpha and neutron-alpha scattering is described. The phenomenological approach which includes the study of both local and non-local potentials reproducing the experimental alpha-nucleon scattering data, is discussed. Basic studies of the alpha-nucleon interaction attempting to build an interaction between an alpha particle and a nucleon from first principles are then described. A critical discussion of the results with some concluding remarks suggesting the direction for further investigation is made. (author)

  19. 3rd International Conference on Particle Systems and Partial Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Soares, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this book is on different topics in probability theory, partial differential equations and kinetic theory, presenting some of the latest developments in these fields. It addresses mathematical problems concerning applications in physics, engineering, chemistry and biology that were presented at the Third International Conference on Particle Systems and Partial Differential Equations, held at the University of Minho, Braga, Portugal in December 2014. The purpose of the conference was to bring together prominent researchers working in the fields of particle systems and partial differential equations, providing a venue for them to present their latest findings and discuss their areas of expertise. Further, it was intended to introduce a vast and varied public, including young researchers, to the subject of interacting particle systems, its underlying motivation, and its relation to partial differential equations. This book will appeal to probabilists, analysts and those mathematicians whose wor...

  20. Differential expression of CCN-family members in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrich Christian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human cysteine rich protein 61 (CYR61, CCN1 as well as the other members of the CCN family of genes play important roles in cellular processes such as proliferation, adhesion, migration and survival. These cellular events are of special importance within the complex cellular interactions ongoing in bone remodeling. Previously, we analyzed the role of CYR61/CCN1 as an extracellular signaling molecule in human osteoblasts. Since mesenchymal stem cells of bone marrow are important progenitors for various differentiation pathways in bone and possess increasing potential for regenerative medicine, here we aimed to analyze the expression of CCN family members in bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells and along the osteogenic, the adipogenic and the chondrogenic differentiation. Results Primary cultures of human mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from the femoral head of patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Differentiation into adipocytes and osteoblasts was done in monolayer culture, differentiation into chondrocytes was induced in high density cell pellet cultures. For either pathway, established differentiation markers and CCN-members were analyzed at the mRNA level by RT-PCR and the CYR61/CCN1 protein was analyzed by immunocytochemistry. RT-PCR and histochemical analysis revealed the appropriate phenotype of differentiated cells (Alizarin-red S, Oil Red O, Alcian blue, alkaline phosphatase; osteocalcin, collagen types I, II, IX, X, cbfa1, PPARγ, aggrecan. Mesenchymal stem cells expressed CYR61/CCN1, CTGF/CCN2, CTGF-L/WISP2/CCN5 and WISP3/CCN6. The CYR61/CCN1 expression decreased markedly during osteogenic differentiation, adipogenic differentiation and chondrogenic differentiation. These results were confirmed by immuncytochemical analyses. WISP2/CCN5 RNA expression declined during adipogenic differentiation and WISP3/CCN6 RNA expression was markedly reduced in chondrogenic differentiation. Conclusion The

  1. Introduction of N-cadherin-binding motif to alginate hydrogels for controlled stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Won; An, Hyoseok; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2017-07-01

    Control of stem cell fate and phenotype using biomimetic synthetic extracellular matrices (ECMs) is an important tissue engineering approach. Many studies have focused on improving cell-matrix interactions. However, proper control of cell-cell interactions using synthetic ECMs could be critical for tissue engineering, especially with undifferentiated stem cells. In this study, alginate hydrogels were modified with a peptide derived from the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5), which is known to bind to N-cadherin, as a cell-cell interaction motif. In vitro changes in the morphology and differentiation of mouse bone marrow stromal cells (D1 stem cells) cultured in LRP5-alginate hydrogels were investigated. LRP5-alginate gels successfully induced stem cell aggregation and enhanced chondrogenic differentiation of D1 stem cells, compared to RGD-alginate gels, at low cell density. This approach to tailoring synthetic biomimetic ECMs using cell-cell interaction motifs may be critical in tissue engineering approaches using stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Long noncoding RNA TUG1 facilitates osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells via interacting with Lin28A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qin; Yang, Shuangyan; Gu, Xiuge; Li, Mengying; Wang, Chunling; Wei, Fulan

    2018-04-19

    Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental tissues with multidirectional differentiation potential and excellent self-renewing ability. Recently, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play important roles in MSC osteogenic differentiation. In this study, we found that taurine upregulated gene 1 (TUG1), an evolutionarily conserved and widely present lncRNA was significantly upregulated in osteogenically induced PDLSCs compared to their undifferentiated counterparts. Further investigation demonstrated that the expression of TUG1 was positively correlated with the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs following the induction, as evidenced by the increase in cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level, formation of calcium nodules, and the upregulation of several osteogenic-related gene markers such as ALP, osteocalcin (OCN), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). Conversely, TUG1 knockdown was demonstrated to inhibit the potential of PDLSCs for osteogenic differentiation. Using bioinformatics analysis, we identified lin-28 homolog A (Lin28A) as a potential target of TUG1 during osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. Lin28A was found to be significantly downregulated in TUG1-repressed PDLSCs and contained multiple binding sites for lncRNA TUG1. Moreover, suppression of Lin28A was shown to be able to inhibit osteogenic differentiation and decreased the expression of several osteogenic genes. Taken together, these results could help researchers better understand the mechanism that governs the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs, and also serve as a stepping stone for the development of novel therapeutic strategies that can be used to regenerate dental tissues.

  3. Differentiation of strains of yellow fever virus in γ-irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgeorge, R.; Bradish, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The mouse sensitized by optimal, sub-lethal γ-irradiation has been used for the differentiation of strains of yellow fever virus and for the resolution of their immunogenicity and pathogenicity as distinct characteristics. For different strains of yellow fever virus, the patterns of antibody-synthesis, regulatory immunity (pre-challenge) and protective immunity (post-challenge) are differentially sensitive to γ-irradiation. These critical differentiations of strains of yellow fever virus in γ-irradiated mice have been compared with those shown in normal athymic and immature mice in order to elucidate the range of quantifiable in vivo characteristics and the course of the virus-host interaction. This is discussed as a basis for the comparisons of the responses of model and principal hosts to vaccines and pathogens. (author)

  4. Solid-state interactions between trimethoprim and parabens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S.; Kristensen, H. G.; Cornett, Claus

    1994-01-01

    by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and solid-state C-13-NMR. Interactions between trimethoprim and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and its ethyl,propyl and butyl esters were not observed. The nature of the trimethoprim and methyl parahydroxybenzoate...

  5. Identification of differentially expressed genes in childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nian-Zhen; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Mu, Yu-Hua; Wang, Hewen

    2018-05-01

    Asthma has been the most common chronic disease in children that places a major burden for affected people and their families.An integrated analysis of microarrays studies was performed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in childhood asthma compared with normal control. We also obtained the differentially methylated genes (DMGs) in childhood asthma according to GEO. The genes that were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated were identified. Functional annotation and protein-protein interaction network construction were performed to interpret biological functions of DEGs. We performed q-RT-PCR to verify the expression of selected DEGs.One DNA methylation and 3 gene expression datasets were obtained. Four hundred forty-one DEGs and 1209 DMGs in childhood asthma were identified. Among which, 16 genes were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated in childhood asthma. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity pathway, Jak-STAT signaling pathway, and Wnt signaling pathway were 3 significantly enriched pathways in childhood asthma according to our KEGG enrichment analysis. The PPI network of top 20 up- and downregulated DEGs consisted of 822 nodes and 904 edges and 2 hub proteins (UBQLN4 and MID2) were identified. The expression of 8 DEGs (GZMB, FGFBP2, CLC, TBX21, ALOX15, IL12RB2, UBQLN4) was verified by qRT-PCR and only the expression of GZMB and FGFBP2 was inconsistent with our integrated analysis.Our finding was helpful to elucidate the underlying mechanism of childhood asthma and develop new potential diagnostic biomarker and provide clues for drug design.

  6. Physicochemical Control of Adult Stem Cell Differentiation: Shedding Light on Potential Molecular Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    stem - cell -based biomedical and therapeutic applications, including tissue engineering, requires an understanding of the cell-cell and cell-environment interactions. To this end, recent efforts have been focused on the manipulation of adult stem cell differentiation using inductive soluble factors, designing suitable mechanical environments, and applying noninvasive physical forces. Although each of these different approaches has been successfully applied to regulate stem cell differentiation, it would be of great interest and

  7. Hyperbolic partial differential equations populations, reactors, tides and waves theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Matthew

    1983-01-01

    Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations, Volume 1: Population, Reactors, Tides and Waves: Theory and Applications covers three general areas of hyperbolic partial differential equation applications. These areas include problems related to the McKendrick/Von Foerster population equations, other hyperbolic form equations, and the numerical solution.This text is composed of 15 chapters and begins with surveys of age specific population interactions, populations models of diffusion, nonlinear age dependent population growth with harvesting, local and global stability for the nonlinear renewal eq

  8. Effect of molecular weight and concentration of hyaluronan on cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ningbo, E-mail: curl-zhao@163.com; Wang, Xin, E-mail: 394041230@qq.com; Qin, Lei, E-mail: qinlei30@126.com; Guo, Zhengze, E-mail: zhzeguo@163.com; Li, Dehua, E-mail: lidehuafmmu@163.com

    2015-09-25

    Hyaluronan (HA), the simplest glycosaminoglycan and a major component of the extracellular matrix, exists in various tissues. It is involved in some critical biological procedures, including cellular signaling, cell adhesion and proliferation, and cell differentiation. The effect of molecular weight (MW) and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation was controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect of MW and concentration of HA on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived stem cells in vitro. Results showed that high MW HA decreased the cell adhesion rate in a concentration-dependant manner. The cell adhesion rate was decreased by increasing MW of HA. Cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by low MW HA (P < 0.05). The factorial analysis indicated that MW and concentration had an interactive effect on the cell adhesion rate and cell proliferation (P < 0.05). High MW HA increased the mRNA expressions of ALP, RUNX-2 and OCN. The higher the MW was, the higher the mRNA expressions were. The factorial analysis indicated that MW and concentration had an interactive effect on ALP mRNA expression (P < 0.05). HA of higher MW and higher concentration promoted bone formation. These findings provide some useful information in understanding the mechanism underlying the effect of MW and concentration of HA on cell proliferation and differentiation. - Highlights: • Effect of hyaluronan on cell proliferation and differentiation is evaluated in vitro. • Hyaluronan of low molecular weight increases cell proliferation. • Hyaluronan of high molecular weight promotes cell osteogenic differentiation. • Molecular weight and concentration of hyaluronan show interactive effect.

  9. Differential proteomics reveals novel insights into Nosema-honey bee interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurze, Christoph; Dosselli, Ryan; Grassl, Julia

    2016-01-01

    . In general, infections of Nosema resulted in an up-regulation of the bee's energy metabolism. Additionally, we identified 8 proteins that were differentially abundant between tolerant and sensitive honey bees regardless of the Nosema infection. Those proteins were linked to metabolism, response to oxidative...... stress and apoptosis. In addition to bee proteins, we also identified 3 Nosema ceranae proteins. Interestingly, abundance of two of these Nosema proteins were significantly higher in infected Nosema-sensitive honeybees relative to the infected Nosema-tolerant lineage. This may provide a novel candidate...

  10. Invariant manifolds and applications for functional differential equations of mixed type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hupkes, Hermen Jan

    2008-01-01

    Differential equations posed on discrete lattices have by now become a popular modelling tool used in a wide variety of scientific disciplines. Such equations allow the inclusion of non-local interactions into models and lead to interesting dynamical and pattern-forming behaviour. Although many

  11. Basic principles of drug--excipients interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranić, Edina

    2004-05-01

    Excipients are generally considered inert additives included in drug formulation to help in the manufacturing, administration or absorption. Other reasons for inclusion concern product differentiation, appearance enhancement or retention of quality. Excipients can initiate, propagate or participate in chemical or physical interactions with an active substance, possibly leading to compromised quality or performance of the medication. Understanding the chemical and physical nature of excipients, the impurities or residues associated with them and how they may interact with other materials, or with each other, forewarns the pharmaceutical technologist of possibilities for undesirable developments.

  12. Dynamic interaction between markets for leasing and selling automobiles

    OpenAIRE

    Andrikopoulos, Athanasios; Markellos, Raphael N.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a model of dynamic interactions between price variations in leasing and selling markets for automobiles. Our framework assumes a differential game between multiple Bertrand-type competing firms which offer differentiated products to forward-looking agents. Empirical analysis of our model using monthly US data from 2002 to 2011 shows that variations in selling (cash) market prices lead rapidly dissipating changes of leasing market prices in the opposite direction. We discuss the pra...

  13. The lake foodweb: modelling predation and abiotic/biotic interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hakanson, L; Boulion, V.V

    2002-01-01

    .... The model is based on many new approaches of structuring lake foodweb interactions. It uses ordinary differential equations and gives weekly variations in production and biomass for its nine groups of organisms...

  14. BTG interacts with retinoblastoma to control cell fate in Dictyostelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Conte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the genesis of many tissues, a phase of cell proliferation is followed by cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation. The latter two processes overlap: genes involved in the cessation of growth may also be important in triggering differentiation. Though conceptually distinct, they are often causally related and functional interactions between the cell cycle machinery and cell fate control networks are fundamental to coordinate growth and differentiation. A switch from proliferation to differentiation may also be important in the life cycle of single-celled organisms, and genes which arose as regulators of microbial differentiation may be conserved in higher organisms. Studies in microorganisms may thus contribute to understanding the molecular links between cell cycle machinery and the determination of cell fate choice networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that in the amoebozoan D. discoideum, an ortholog of the metazoan antiproliferative gene btg controls cell fate, and that this function is dependent on the presence of a second tumor suppressor ortholog, the retinoblastoma-like gene product. Specifically, we find that btg-overexpressing cells preferentially adopt a stalk cell (and, more particularly, an Anterior-Like Cell fate. No btg-dependent preference for ALC fate is observed in cells in which the retinoblastoma-like gene has been genetically inactivated. Dictyostelium btg is the only example of non-metazoan member of the BTG family characterized so far, suggesting that a genetic interaction between btg and Rb predated the divergence between dictyostelids and metazoa. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While the requirement for retinoblastoma function for BTG antiproliferative activity in metazoans is known, an interaction of these genes in the control of cell fate has not been previously documented. Involvement of a single pathway in the control of mutually exclusive processes may have relevant implication in the

  15. N-cadherin-mediated interaction with multiple myeloma cells inhibits osteoblast differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Richard W. J.; de Rooij, Martin F. M.; Kocemba, Kinga A.; Reijmers, Rogier M.; de Haan-Kramer, Anneke; Overdijk, Marije B.; Aalders, Linda; Rozemuller, Henk; Martens, Anton C. M.; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Kersten, Marie José; Pals, Steven T.; Spaargaren, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematologic malignancy characterized by a clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow, which is accompanied by the development of osteolytic lesions and/or diffuse osteopenia. The intricate bi-directional interaction with the bone marrow microenvironment plays

  16. N-cadherin-mediated interaction with multiple myeloma cells inhibits osteoblast differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R.W.J.; de Rooij, M.F.M.; Kocemba, K.A.; Reijmers, R.M.; de Haan-Kramer, A.; Overdijk, M.B.; Aalders, L.; Rozemuller, H.; Martens, A.C.M.; Bergsagel, P.L.; Kersten, M.J.; Pals, S.T.; Spaargaren, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is a hematologic malignancy characterized by a clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow, which is accompanied by the development of osteolytic lesions and/or diffuse osteopenia. The intricate bi-directional interaction with the bone marrow

  17. A bridge between hyperspherical and integro-differential approaches to the many-body bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre de la Ripelle, M.

    1986-01-01

    The solution of the Schroedinger equation can be obtained from the one of a system of coupled differential equations generated from the potential harmonic expansion of the bound-state wave function of a system of identical particles governed by two-body central interactions. It is shown that the system of coupled equations can be transformed into an equivalent integro-differential equation. For three bosons in S states this equation is identical to the Faddeev equation as written by Noyes. The integro-differential equations describing the triton for non-central realistic N-N forces are explicitly given. (Auth.)

  18. Abundant Interaction Solutions of Sine-Gordon Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DaZhao Lü

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the help of computer symbolic computation software (e.g., Maple, abundant interaction solutions of sine-Gordon equation are obtained by means of a constructed Wronskian form expansion method. The method is based upon the forms and structures of Wronskian solutions of sine-Gordon equation, and the functions used in the Wronskian determinants do not satisfy linear partial differential equations. Such interaction solutions are difficultly obtained via other methods. And the method can be automatically carried out in computer.

  19. The expression of VE-cadherin in breast cancer cells modulates cell dynamics as a function of tumor differentiation and promotes tumor-endothelial cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Maryam; Cao, Jiahui; Friedrich, Katrin; Kemper, Björn; Brendel, Oliver; Grosser, Marianne; Adrian, Manuela; Baretton, Gustavo; Breier, Georg; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    The cadherin switch has profound consequences on cancer invasion and metastasis. The endothelial-specific vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) has been demonstrated in diverse cancer types including breast cancer and is supposed to modulate tumor progression and metastasis, but underlying mechanisms need to be better understood. First, we evaluated VE-cadherin expression by tissue microarray in 392 cases of breast cancer tumors and found a diverse expression and distribution of VE-cadherin. Experimental expression of fluorescence-tagged VE-cadherin (VE-EGFP) in undifferentiated, fibroblastoid and E-cadherin-negative MDA-231 (MDA-VE-EGFP) as well as in differentiated E-cadherin-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-VE-EGFP), respectively, displayed differentiation-dependent functional differences. VE-EGFP expression reversed the fibroblastoid MDA-231 cells to an epithelial-like phenotype accompanied by increased β-catenin expression, actin and vimentin remodeling, increased cell spreading and barrier function and a reduced migration ability due to formation of VE-cadherin-mediated cell junctions. The effects were largely absent in both MDA-VE-EGFP and in control MCF-EGFP cell lines. However, MCF-7 cells displayed a VE-cadherin-independent planar cell polarity and directed cell migration that both developed in MDA-231 only after VE-EGFP expression. Furthermore, VE-cadherin expression had no effect on tumor cell proliferation in monocultures while co-culturing with endothelial cells enhanced tumor cell proliferation due to integration of the tumor cells into monolayer where they form VE-cadherin-mediated cell contacts with the endothelium. We propose an interactive VE-cadherin-based crosstalk that might activate proliferation-promoting signals. Together, our study shows a VE-cadherin-mediated cell dynamics and an endothelial-dependent proliferation in a differentiation-dependent manner.

  20. Differential Regulation of Elastic Fiber Formation by Fibulin-4 and -5*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rawshan; McGovern, Amanda; Ridley, Caroline; Cain, Stuart A.; Baldwin, Andrew; Wang, Ming-Chuan; Guo, Chun; Mironov, Aleksandr; Drymoussi, Zoe; Trump, Dorothy; Shuttleworth, Adrian; Baldock, Clair; Kielty, Cay M.

    2009-01-01

    Fibulin-4 and -5 are extracellular glycoproteins with essential non-compensatory roles in elastic fiber assembly. We have determined how they interact with tropoelastin, lysyl oxidase, and fibrillin-1, thereby revealing how they differentially regulate assembly. Strong binding between fibulin-4 and lysyl oxidase enhanced the interaction of fibulin-4 with tropoelastin, forming ternary complexes that may direct elastin cross-linking. In contrast, fibulin-5 did not bind lysyl oxidase strongly but bound tropoelastin in terminal and central regions and could concurrently bind fibulin-4. Both fibulins differentially bound N-terminal fibrillin-1, which strongly inhibited their binding to lysyl oxidase and tropoelastin. Knockdown experiments revealed that fibulin-5 controlled elastin deposition on microfibrils, although fibulin-4 can also bind fibrillin-1. These experiments provide a molecular account of the distinct roles of fibulin-4 and -5 in elastic fiber assembly and how they act in concert to chaperone cross-linked elastin onto microfibrils. PMID:19570982

  1. Arithmetic differential equations on $GL_n$, I: differential cocycles

    OpenAIRE

    Buium, Alexandru; Dupuy, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The theory of differential equations has an arithmetic analogue in which derivatives are replaced by Fermat quotients. One can then ask what is the arithmetic analogue of a linear differential equation. The study of usual linear differential equations is the same as the study of the differential cocycle from $GL_n$ into its Lie algebra given by the logarithmic derivative. However we prove here that there are no such cocycles in the context of arithmetic differential equations. In sequels of t...

  2. Multi-class oscillating systems of interacting neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Löcherbach, Eva

    2017-01-01

    We consider multi-class systems of interacting nonlinear Hawkes processes modeling several large families of neurons and study their mean field limits. As the total number of neurons goes to infinity we prove that the evolution within each class can be described by a nonlinear limit differential...

  3. Microarray-based screening of differentially expressed genes in glucocorticoid-induced avascular necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangyong; Wei, Yibing; Zhao, Guanglei; Xia, Jun; Wang, Siqun; Wu, Jianguo; Chen, Feiyan; Chen, Jie; Shi, Jingshen

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) have yet to be fully understood, in particular the mechanisms associated with the change of gene expression pattern. The present study aimed to identify key genes with a differential expression pattern in GC-induced ANFH. E-MEXP-2751 microarray data were downloaded from the ArrayExpress database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in 5 femoral head samples of steroid-induced ANFH rats compared with 5 placebo-treated rat samples. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses were performed upon these DEGs. A total 93 DEGs (46 upregulated and 47 downregulated genes) were identified in GC-induced ANFH samples. These DEGs were enriched in different GO terms and pathways, including chondrocyte differentiation and detection of chemical stimuli. The enrichment map revealed that skeletal system development was interconnected with several other GO terms by gene overlap. The literature mined network analysis revealed that 5 upregulated genes were associated with femoral necrosis, including parathyroid hormone receptor 1 (PTHR1), vitamin D (1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3) receptor (VDR), collagen, type II, α1, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 6 and zinc finger protein 354C (ZFP354C). In addition, ZFP354C and VDR were identified to transcription factors. Furthermore, PTHR1 was revealed to interact with VDR, and α-2-macroglobulin (A2M) interacted with fibronectin 1 (FN1) in the PPI network. PTHR1 may be involved in GC-induced ANFH via interacting with VDR. A2M may also be involved in the development of GC-induced ANFH through interacting with FN1. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced ANFH may provide novel targets for diagnostics and therapeutic treatment. PMID:28393228

  4. Microarray‑based screening of differentially expressed genes in glucocorticoid‑induced avascular necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangyong; Wei, Yibing; Zhao, Guanglei; Xia, Jun; Wang, Siqun; Wu, Jianguo; Chen, Feiyan; Chen, Jie; Shi, Jingshen

    2017-06-01

    The underlying mechanisms of glucocorticoid (GC)‑induced avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) have yet to be fully understood, in particular the mechanisms associated with the change of gene expression pattern. The present study aimed to identify key genes with a differential expression pattern in GC‑induced ANFH. E‑MEXP‑2751 microarray data were downloaded from the ArrayExpress database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in 5 femoral head samples of steroid‑induced ANFH rats compared with 5 placebo‑treated rat samples. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses were performed upon these DEGs. A total 93 DEGs (46 upregulated and 47 downregulated genes) were identified in GC‑induced ANFH samples. These DEGs were enriched in different GO terms and pathways, including chondrocyte differentiation and detection of chemical stimuli. The enrichment map revealed that skeletal system development was interconnected with several other GO terms by gene overlap. The literature mined network analysis revealed that 5 upregulated genes were associated with femoral necrosis, including parathyroid hormone receptor 1 (PTHR1), vitamin D (1,25‑Dihydroxyvitamin D3) receptor (VDR), collagen, type II, α1, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 6 and zinc finger protein 354C (ZFP354C). In addition, ZFP354C and VDR were identified to transcription factors. Furthermore, PTHR1 was revealed to interact with VDR, and α‑2‑macroglobulin (A2M) interacted with fibronectin 1 (FN1) in the PPI network. PTHR1 may be involved in GC‑induced ANFH via interacting with VDR. A2M may also be involved in the development of GC‑induced ANFH through interacting with FN1. An improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying GC‑induced ANFH may provide novel targets for diagnostics and therapeutic treatment.

  5. EFFECT OF CSR ON PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION IN THE PRESENCE OF COST ADVANTAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar K. Mukhopadhyay

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Corporate social responsibility (CSR, once thought of only a philanthropic activity of a firm, is now treated as a serious business strategy that can contribute to a firm’s profitability. The seemingly altruistic activity helps build the firm’s image with all the stakeholders including its customers so that it has the potential to increase the firm’s profit. This fact is now well established in research literature. Product differentiation is another corporate strategy that is pursued by some companies in order to offer a distinctive product in the market to avoid competition, charge premium price, and increase profit. What is not known is that when two firms compete in a Hotelling type product differentiation line, how much this product differentiation is affected by the extent of the CSR activity of a firm. Our study is conducted in a game-theoretic setting where the CSR firm is competing with a non-CSR firm. The CSR firm maximizes a convex combination of its own profit and a form of social utility function, while the non-CSR firm maximizes its own profit only. The CSR firm is also assumed to have a technological advantage that reduces its production cost. The interaction of the effects of both the extent of CSR and the extent of this production cost advantage is also considered. We also study a scenario of asymmetric information. Our main results include that the degree of product differentiation is reduced when CSR is practiced. On the other hand, product differentiation increases with the production cost advantage. The interaction between the two factors – CSR activity and cost advantage – is also studied.

  6. Student talk and opportunities for mathematical learning in small group interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, M.; Kalinec, C.

    2012-01-01

    Small group interactions are an important tool for mathematical learning and yet researchers have neither examined small group talk across entire lessons nor have they focused on moments of mathematical learning in small groups. We examined such talk and identified kinds of interactions and connections between interactions and mathematical learning. We differentiated talk based upon its focus: mathematical objects (mathematizing), people (subjectifying), or more specifically, people’s attribu...

  7. Ferritin nanoparticles for improved self-renewal and differentiation of human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Seung; Yang, Kisuk; Cho, Ann-Na; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2018-01-01

    Biomaterials that promote the self-renewal ability and differentiation capacity of neural stem cells (NSCs) are desirable for improving stem cell therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Incorporation of micro- and nanoparticles into stem cell culture has gained great attention for the control of stem cell behaviors, including proliferation and differentiation. In this study, ferritin, an iron-containing natural protein nanoparticle, was applied as a biomaterial to improve the self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Ferritin nanoparticles were added to NSC or NPC culture during cell growth, allowing for incorporation of ferritin nanoparticles during neurosphere formation. Compared to neurospheres without ferritin treatment, neurospheres with ferritin nanoparticles showed significantly promoted self-renewal and cell-cell interactions. When spontaneous differentiation of neurospheres was induced during culture without mitogenic factors, neuronal differentiation was enhanced in the ferritin-treated neurospheres. In conclusion, we found that natural nanoparticles can be used to improve the self-renewal ability and differentiation potential of NSCs and NPCs, which can be applied in neural tissue engineering and cell therapy for neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Aubergine Controls Germline Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Progeny Differentiation via Distinct Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xing; Zhu, Xiujuan; Han, Yingying; Story, Benjamin; Do, Trieu; Song, Xiaoqing; Wang, Su; Zhang, Ying; Blanchette, Marco; Gogol, Madelaine; Hall, Kate; Peak, Allison; Anoja, Perera; Xie, Ting

    2017-04-24

    Piwi family protein Aubergine (Aub) maintains genome integrity in late germ cells of the Drosophila ovary through Piwi-associated RNA-mediated repression of transposon activities. Although it is highly expressed in germline stem cells (GSCs) and early progeny, it remains unclear whether it plays any roles in early GSC lineage development. Here we report that Aub promotes GSC self-renewal and GSC progeny differentiation. RNA-iCLIP results show that Aub binds the mRNAs encoding self-renewal and differentiation factors in cultured GSCs. Aub controls GSC self-renewal by preventing DNA-damage-induced Chk2 activation and by translationally controlling the expression of self-renewal factors. It promotes GSC progeny differentiation by translationally controlling the expression of differentiation factors, including Bam. Therefore, this study reveals a function of Aub in GSCs and their progeny, which promotes translation of self-renewal and differentiation factors by directly binding to its target mRNAs and interacting with translational initiation factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Penalized differential pathway analysis of integrative oncogenomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wieringen, Wessel N; van de Wiel, Mark A

    2014-04-01

    Through integration of genomic data from multiple sources, we may obtain a more accurate and complete picture of the molecular mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. We discuss the integration of DNA copy number and mRNA gene expression data from an observational integrative genomics study involving cancer patients. The two molecular levels involved are linked through the central dogma of molecular biology. DNA copy number aberrations abound in the cancer cell. Here we investigate how these aberrations affect gene expression levels within a pathway using observational integrative genomics data of cancer patients. In particular, we aim to identify differential edges between regulatory networks of two groups involving these molecular levels. Motivated by the rate equations, the regulatory mechanism between DNA copy number aberrations and gene expression levels within a pathway is modeled by a simultaneous-equations model, for the one- and two-group case. The latter facilitates the identification of differential interactions between the two groups. Model parameters are estimated by penalized least squares using the lasso (L1) penalty to obtain a sparse pathway topology. Simulations show that the inclusion of DNA copy number data benefits the discovery of gene-gene interactions. In addition, the simulations reveal that cis-effects tend to be over-estimated in a univariate (single gene) analysis. In the application to real data from integrative oncogenomic studies we show that inclusion of prior information on the regulatory network architecture benefits the reproducibility of all edges. Furthermore, analyses of the TP53 and TGFb signaling pathways between ER+ and ER- samples from an integrative genomics breast cancer study identify reproducible differential regulatory patterns that corroborate with existing literature.

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Tanja; Hart, Melanie; Patarroyo, Manuel; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Klein, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM) which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521) showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells. PMID:26406476

  11. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Seeger

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521 showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells.

  12. A statistical framework for differential network analysis from microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datta Somnath

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been long well known that genes do not act alone; rather groups of genes act in consort during a biological process. Consequently, the expression levels of genes are dependent on each other. Experimental techniques to detect such interacting pairs of genes have been in place for quite some time. With the advent of microarray technology, newer computational techniques to detect such interaction or association between gene expressions are being proposed which lead to an association network. While most microarray analyses look for genes that are differentially expressed, it is of potentially greater significance to identify how entire association network structures change between two or more biological settings, say normal versus diseased cell types. Results We provide a recipe for conducting a differential analysis of networks constructed from microarray data under two experimental settings. At the core of our approach lies a connectivity score that represents the strength of genetic association or interaction between two genes. We use this score to propose formal statistical tests for each of following queries: (i whether the overall modular structures of the two networks are different, (ii whether the connectivity of a particular set of "interesting genes" has changed between the two networks, and (iii whether the connectivity of a given single gene has changed between the two networks. A number of examples of this score is provided. We carried out our method on two types of simulated data: Gaussian networks and networks based on differential equations. We show that, for appropriate choices of the connectivity scores and tuning parameters, our method works well on simulated data. We also analyze a real data set involving normal versus heavy mice and identify an interesting set of genes that may play key roles in obesity. Conclusions Examining changes in network structure can provide valuable information about the

  13. Role of OCT-1 and partner proteins in T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Soo Seok; Kim, Lark Kyun; Lee, Gap Ryol; Flavell, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    The understanding of CD4 T cell differentiation gives important insights into the control of immune responses against various pathogens and in autoimmune diseases. Naïve CD4 T cells become effector T cells in response to antigen stimulation in combination with various environmental cytokine stimuli. Several transcription factors and cis-regulatory regions have been identified to regulate epigenetic processes on chromatin, to allow the production of proper effector cytokines during CD4 T cell differentiation. OCT-1 (Pou2f1) is well known as a widely expressed transcription factor in most tissues and cells. Although the importance of OCT-1 has been emphasized during development and differentiation, its detailed molecular underpinning and precise role are poorly understood. Recently, a series of studies have reported that OCT-1 plays a critical role in CD4 T cells through regulating gene expression during differentiation and mediating long-range chromosomal interactions. In this review, we will describe the role of OCT-1 in CD4 T cell differentiation and discuss how this factor orchestrates the fate and function of CD4 effector T cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Equations of motion of higher-spin gauge fields as a free differential algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the introduction of auxiliary dynamical variables that generalize the gravitational Weyl tensor permits one to reduce the equations of motion of free massless fields of all spins in the anti-de Sitter O(3,2) space to a form characteristic of free differential algebras. The equations of motion of auxiliary gauge fields introduced previously are modified analogously. Arguments are presented to the effect that the equations of motion of interacting massless fields of all spins should be described in terms of a free differential algebra which is a deformation of a known free differential algebra generated by 1- and 0-forms in the adjoint representation of a nonabelian superalgebra of higher spins and auxiliary fields

  15. CT differentiation of poorly-differentiated gastric neuroendocrine tumours from well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours and gastric adenocarcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Ho; Kim, Se Hyung; Shin, Cheong-il; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min-A [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the differential CT features of gastric poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (PD-NETs) from well-differentiated NETs (WD-NETs) and gastric adenocarcinomas (ADCs) and to suggest differential features of hepatic metastases from gastric NETs and ADCs. Our study population was comprised of 36 patients with gastric NETs (18 WD-NETs, 18 PD-NETs) and 38 patients with gastric ADCs who served as our control group. Multiple CT features were assessed to identify significant differential CT findings of PD-NETs from WD-NETs and ADCs. In addition, CT features of hepatic metastases including the metastasis-to-liver ratio were analyzed to differentiate metastatic NETs from ADCs. The presence of metastatic lymph nodes was the sole differentiator of PD-NETs from WD-NETs (P =.001, odds ratio = 56.67), while the presence of intact overlying mucosa with mucosal tenting was the sole significant CT feature differentiating PD-NETs from ADCs (P =.047, odds ratio = 15.3) For hepatic metastases, metastases from NETs were more hyper-attenuated than those from ADCs. The presence of metastatic LNs and intact overlying mucosa with mucosal tenting are useful CT discriminators of PD-NETs from WD-NETs and ADCs, respectively. In addition, a higher metastasis-to-liver ratio may help differentiate hepatic metastases of gastric NETs from those of gastric ADCs with high accuracy. (orig.)

  16. Merger and Innovation Incentives in a Differentiated Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Kesavayuth, Dusanee; Lee, Sang-Ho; Zikos, Vasileios

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a duopoly with product differentiation and examine the interaction between merger and innovation incentives. The analysis reveals that a merger tends to discourage innovation, unless the investment cost is sufficiently low. This result holds whether or not side payments between firms are allowed. When side payments are permitted, a bilateral merger-to-monopoly is always profitable, a standard result in the literature. When side payments are not permitted, however, w...

  17. Control of germline stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the Drosophila ovary: concerted actions of niche signals and intrinsic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ting

    2013-01-01

    In the Drosophila ovary, germline stem cells (GSCs) physically interact with their niche composed of terminal filament cells, cap cells, and possibly GSC-contacting escort cells (ECs). A GSC divides to generate a self-renewing stem cell that remains in the niche and a differentiating daughter that moves away from the niche. The GSC niche provides a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signal that maintains GSC self-renewal by preventing stem cell differentiation via repression of the differentiation-promoting gene bag of marbles (bam). In addition, it expresses E-cadherin, which mediates cell adhesion for anchoring GSCs in the niche, enabling continuous self-renewal. GSCs themselves also express different classes of intrinsic factors, including signal transducers, transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors, translation regulators, and miRNAs, which control self-renewal by strengthening interactions with the niche and repressing various differentiation pathways. Differentiated GSC daughters, known as cystoblasts (CBs), also express distinct classes of intrinsic factors to inhibit self-renewal and promote germ cell differentiation. Surprisingly, GSC progeny are also dependent on their surrounding ECs for proper differentiation at least partly by preventing BMP from diffusing to the differentiated germ cell zone and by repressing ectopic BMP expression. Therefore, both GSC self-renewal and CB differentiation are controlled by collaborative actions of extrinsic signals and intrinsic factors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Physiology and Genetics of Tree-Phytophage Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances Lieutier; William J. Mattson; Michael R. Wagner

    1999-01-01

    Interactions between trees and phytophagous organisms represent an important fundamental process in the evolution of forest ecosystems. Through evolutionary time, the special traits of trees have lead the herbivore populations to differentiate and evolve in order to cope with the variability in natural resistance mechanisms of their hosts. Conversely, damage by...

  19. Differential transimpedance amplifier circuit for correlated differential amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresham, Christopher A [Albuquerque, NM; Denton, M Bonner [Tucson, AZ; Sperline, Roger P [Tucson, AZ

    2008-07-22

    A differential transimpedance amplifier circuit for correlated differential amplification. The amplifier circuit increase electronic signal-to-noise ratios in charge detection circuits designed for the detection of very small quantities of electrical charge and/or very weak electromagnetic waves. A differential, integrating capacitive transimpedance amplifier integrated circuit comprising capacitor feedback loops performs time-correlated subtraction of noise.

  20. Glimpse into Hox and tale regulation of cell differentiation and reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdá-Esteban, Nuria; Spagnoli, Francesca M

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development, cells become gradually restricted in their developmental potential and start elaborating lineage-specific transcriptional networks to ultimately acquire a unique differentiated state. Hox genes play a central role in specifying regional identities, thereby providing the cell with critical information on positional value along its differentiation path. The exquisite DNA-binding specificity of the Hox proteins is frequently dependent upon their interaction with members of the TALE family of homeodomain proteins. In addition to their function as Hox-cofactors, TALE homeoproteins control multiple crucial developmental processes through Hox-independent mechanisms. Here, we will review recent findings on the function of both Hox and TALE proteins in cell differentiation, referring mostly to vertebrate species. In addition, we will discuss the direct implications of this knowledge on cell plasticity and cell reprogramming. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Barbu, Viorel

    2016-01-01

    This textbook is a comprehensive treatment of ordinary differential equations, concisely presenting basic and essential results in a rigorous manner. Including various examples from physics, mechanics, natural sciences, engineering and automatic theory, Differential Equations is a bridge between the abstract theory of differential equations and applied systems theory. Particular attention is given to the existence and uniqueness of the Cauchy problem, linear differential systems, stability theory and applications to first-order partial differential equations. Upper undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics and systems theory with a background in advanced calculus will find this book particularly useful. Supplementary topics are covered in an appendix enabling the book to be completely self-contained.

  2. ERβ induces the differentiation of cultured osteoblasts by both Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Xinhua [Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha (China); Wang, Xiaoyuan [Department of Nephrology, Xi An Honghui Hospital, Xi an (China); Hu, Xiongke; Chen, Yong; Zeng, Kefeng [Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha (China); Zhang, Hongqi, E-mail: zhq9699@126.com [Department of Spine Surgery, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha (China)

    2015-07-01

    Although 17β-estradial (E2) is known to stimulate bone formation, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent studies have implicated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as a major signaling cascade in bone biology. The interactions between Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways have been reported in many tissues. In this study, E2 significantly increased the expression of β-catenin by inducing phosphorylations of GSK3β at serine 9. ERβ siRNAs were transfected into MC3T3-E1 cells and revealed that ERβ involved E2-induced osteoblasts proliferation and differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The osteoblast differentiation genes (BGP, ALP and OPN) and proliferation related gene (cyclin D1) expression were significantly induced by E2-mediated ERβ. Furthermore immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that E2 induced the accumulation of β-catenin protein in the nucleus which leads to interaction with T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors. Taken together, these findings suggest that E2 promotes osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation by inducing proliferation-related and differentiation-related gene expression via ERβ/GSK-3β-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of E2 in osteoblastogenesis. - Highlights: • 17β-estradial (E2) promotes GSK3-β phosphorylation. • E2 activates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway interacts with estrogen signaling pathways. • E2-mediated ER induced osteoblast differentiation and proliferation related genes expression.

  3. ERβ induces the differentiation of cultured osteoblasts by both Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Xinhua; Wang, Xiaoyuan; Hu, Xiongke; Chen, Yong; Zeng, Kefeng; Zhang, Hongqi

    2015-01-01

    Although 17β-estradial (E2) is known to stimulate bone formation, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent studies have implicated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway as a major signaling cascade in bone biology. The interactions between Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and estrogen signaling pathways have been reported in many tissues. In this study, E2 significantly increased the expression of β-catenin by inducing phosphorylations of GSK3β at serine 9. ERβ siRNAs were transfected into MC3T3-E1 cells and revealed that ERβ involved E2-induced osteoblasts proliferation and differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The osteoblast differentiation genes (BGP, ALP and OPN) and proliferation related gene (cyclin D1) expression were significantly induced by E2-mediated ERβ. Furthermore immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that E2 induced the accumulation of β-catenin protein in the nucleus which leads to interaction with T-cell-specific transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors. Taken together, these findings suggest that E2 promotes osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation by inducing proliferation-related and differentiation-related gene expression via ERβ/GSK-3β-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of E2 in osteoblastogenesis. - Highlights: • 17β-estradial (E2) promotes GSK3-β phosphorylation. • E2 activates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway interacts with estrogen signaling pathways. • E2-mediated ER induced osteoblast differentiation and proliferation related genes expression

  4. Interaction Pattern of Arg 62 in the A-Pocket of Differentially Disease-Associated HLA-B27 Subtypes Suggests Distinct TCR Binding Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Valentina; Caristi, Silvana; Sorrentino, Rosa; Böckmann, Rainer A.; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The single amino acid replacement Asp116His distinguishes the two subtypes HLA-B*2705 and HLA-B*2709 which are, respectively, associated and non-associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis, an autoimmune chronic inflammatory disease. The reason for this differential association is so far poorly understood and might be related to subtype-specific HLA:peptide conformations as well as to subtype/peptide-dependent dynamical properties on the nanoscale. Here, we combine functional experiments with extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the molecular dynamics and function of the conserved Arg62 of the α1-helix for both B27 subtypes in complex with the self-peptides pVIPR (RRKWRRWHL) and TIS (RRLPIFSRL), and the viral peptides pLMP2 (RRRWRRLTV) and NPflu (SRYWAIRTR). Simulations of HLA:peptide systems suggest that peptide-stabilizing interactions of the Arg62 residue observed in crystal structures are metastable for both B27 subtypes under physiological conditions, rendering this arginine solvent-exposed and, probably, a key residue for TCR interaction more than peptide-binding. This view is supported by functional experiments with conservative (R62K) and non-conservative (R62A) B*2705 and B*2709 mutants that showed an overall reduction in their capability to present peptides to CD8+ T cells. Moreover, major subtype-dependent differences in the peptide recognition suggest distinct TCR binding modes for the B*2705 versus the B*2709 subtype. PMID:22403718

  5. Effects of H-H interactions on the heat of H absorption by β and delta Zr hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Yutaka; Mabuchi, Mahito; Naito, Shizuo; Hashino, Tomoyasu

    1987-01-01

    The heat of H absorption by β and delta Zr hydrides has been measured by isoperibol calorimetry over the range of H concentration 0.1 - 1.6 H/Zr at temperatures 873-1273 K. In the β hydride the heat per H atom (differential heat) increases and then decreases as the H concentration increases. In the delta hydride only a decrease at large H concentrations is clearly observed. The increase in the β hydride is related by self-consistent calculations to a pair indirect interaction between H atoms; the decreases in the β and delta hydrides are due to a pair direct interaction which is of the form of a screened Coulomb potential. The differential heat is estimated from the pair indirect and direct interactions by the use of Monte Carlo simulations and compared with the measured differential heat. (author)

  6. Identification of Noncanonical Wnt Receptors Required for Wnt-3a-Induced Early Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoa-Vergniory, Nora; Gorroño-Etxebarria, Irantzu; López-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Marra, Michele; Di Chiaro, Pierluigi; Kypta, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Wnt proteins preferentially activate either β-catenin-dependent or β-catenin-independent signals, but the activity of a particular Wnt also depends on cellular context and receptor availability. We previously reported that Wnt-3a induces neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) in a β-catenin-independent manner by activating a signal involving JNK and the AP-1 family member ATF-2. Here, we report the results of a gene silencing approach to identify the Wnt receptors that mediate this response to Wnt-3a. Silencing of ROR2 increased neuronal differentiation, as measured by expression of the genes DCX, NEUROD1, and NGN1, suggesting ROR2 signals normally prevent differentiation. Silencing of the other Wnt receptors singly did not affect Wnt-3a-induced neuronal differentiation. However, pairwise silencing of ROR1 and FZD4 or FZD5 and of LRP6 and FZD4 or FZD5 inhibited neuronal differentiation, as detected by reductions in the expression of neuronal genes and immunocytochemical detection of DCX, NEUROD1 and DCX. Ectopic expression of these receptors in HEK 293 cells increased ATF2-dependent transcription. In addition, ROR1 coimmunoprecipitated with FZD4 and LRP6 in transfected HEK 293 cells and colocalized with FZD4 and with LRP6 at the cell surface of transfected L cells. Wnt-3a did not appear to affect these interactions but did alter the interactions between LRP6 and FZD4/5. Together, these observations highlight roles for ROR1, LRP6, FZD4, and FZD5 in neural stem cell differentiation and provide support for a model in which dynamic interactions among these receptors mediate Wnt-3a activation of ATF2 signaling.

  7. Fluid-structure interactions in one-dimensional linear cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, U.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of pressure waves in a pipe with an elastic endwall (piston) is analyzed using a linear ('acoustic') model. Two transient and two periodic cases are investigated. In the transient cases the motions are initiated by either a sudden pressure drop at the opeen end (breaking membrane) or by a sudden release of the piston from a non-equilibrium position ('snapback'); in the latter case the other end of the pipe is closed. In the periodic cases harmonic oscillations of the piston and the fluid are investigated with the other end of the pipe being either closed or open (kept at constant pressure). The problem is characterized by three non-dimensional numbers (e.g.: Mach-, Strouhal-, and an interaction-number). The solution of the wave equation for the pressure accounting for the coupling to the structure can be reduced analytically to the problem of integrating one ordinary differential equation of second order in time. This differential equation in turn can be integrated analytically at least for a certain time period. At later times this ordinary differential equation is integrated numerically. For the periodic cases eigenvalue-problems arise with an infinite number of solutions. The first few eigensolutions are given. (orig./RW) [de

  8. Automatic differentiation bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, G.F. [comp.

    1992-07-01

    This is a bibliography of work related to automatic differentiation. Automatic differentiation is a technique for the fast, accurate propagation of derivative values using the chain rule. It is neither symbolic nor numeric. Automatic differentiation is a fundamental tool for scientific computation, with applications in optimization, nonlinear equations, nonlinear least squares approximation, stiff ordinary differential equation, partial differential equations, continuation methods, and sensitivity analysis. This report is an updated version of the bibliography which originally appeared in Automatic Differentiation of Algorithms: Theory, Implementation, and Application.

  9. Visualization of the Differential Transition State Stabilization within the Active Site Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Leszczynski

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Increasing interest in the enzymatic reaction mechanisms and in the nature of catalytic effects in enzymes causes the need of appropriate visualization methods. A new interactive method to investigate catalytic effects using differential transition state stabilization approach (DTSS [1, 2] is presented. The catalytic properties of the active site of cytidine deaminase (E.C. 3.5.4.5 is visualized in the form of differential electrostatic properties. The visualization was implemented using scripting interface of VMD [3]. Cumulative Atomic Multipole Moments (CAMM [4,5,6] were utilized for efficient yet accurate evaluation of the electrostatic properties. The implementation is efficient enough for interactive presentation of catalytic effects in the active site of the enzyme due to transition state or substrate movement. This system of visualization of DTTS approach can be potentially used to validate hypotheses regarding the catalytic mechanism or to study binding properties of transition state analogues.

  10. Thrombopoietin has a differentiative effect on late-stage human erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Wang, M; Tang, D C; Ding, I; Rodgers, G P

    1999-05-01

    To further explore the mechanism of the effect of thrombopoietin (TPO) on erythropoiesis, we used a two-phase culture system to investigate the effect of TPO on late-stage human erythroid lineage differentiation. In serum-free suspension and semisolid cultures of human peripheral blood derived erythroid progenitors, TPO alone did not produce benzidine-positive cells. However, in serum-containing culture, TPO alone stimulated erythroid cell proliferation and differentiation, demonstrated by erythroid colony formation, production of benzidine-positive cells and haemoglobin (Hb) synthesis. Monoclonal anti-human erythropoietin antibody and anti-human erythropoietin receptor antibody completely abrogated the erythroid differentiative ability of TPO in the serum-containing systems. This implied that binding of EPO and EPO-R was essential for erythropoiesis and the resultant signal transduction may be augmented by the signals emanating from TPO-c-Mpl interaction. Experiment of withdrawal of TPO further demonstrated the involvement of TPO in late-stage erythropoiesis. RT-PCR results showed that there was EPO-R but not c-Mpl expression on developing erythroblasts induced by TPO in serum-containing system. Our results establish that TPO affects not only the proliferation of erythroid progenitors but also the differentiation of erythroid progenitors to mature erythroid cells.

  11. Differential manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Kosinski, Antoni A

    2007-01-01

    The concepts of differential topology form the center of many mathematical disciplines such as differential geometry and Lie group theory. Differential Manifolds presents to advanced undergraduates and graduate students the systematic study of the topological structure of smooth manifolds. Author Antoni A. Kosinski, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics at Rutgers University, offers an accessible approach to both the h-cobordism theorem and the classification of differential structures on spheres.""How useful it is,"" noted the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society, ""to have a single, sho

  12. Surface potential-governed cellular osteogenic differentiation on ferroelectric polyvinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bolin; Zhang, Bo; Zhuang, Junjun; Wang, Qi; Dong, Lingqing; Cheng, Kui; Weng, Wenjian

    2018-05-02

    Surface potential of biomaterials can dramatically influence cellular osteogenic differentiation. In this work, a wide range of surface potential on ferroelectric polyvinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) films was designed to get insight into the interfacial interaction of cell-charged surface. The P(VDF-TrFE) films poled by contact electric poling at various electric fields obtained well stabilized surface potential, with wide range from -3 to 915 mV. The osteogenic differentiation level of cells cultured on the films was strongly dependent on surface potential and reached the optimum at 391 mV in this system. Binding specificity assay indicated that surface potential could effectively govern the binding state of the adsorbed fibronectin (FN) with integrin. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation further revealed that surface potential brought a significant difference in the relative distance between RGD and synergy PHSRN sites of adsorbed FN, resulting in a distinct integrin-FN binding state. These results suggest that the full binding of integrin α5β1 with both RGD and PHSRN sites of FN possesses a strong ability to activate osteogenic signaling pathway. This work sheds light on the underlying mechanism of osteogenic differentiation behavior on charged material surfaces, and also provides a guidance for designing a reasonable charged surface to enhance osteogenic differentiation. The ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) films with steady and a wide range of surface potential were designed to understand underlying mechanism of cell-charged surface interaction. The results showed that the charged surface well favored upregulation of osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells, and more importantly, a highest level occurred on the film with a moderate surface potential. Experiments and molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that the surface potential could govern fibronectin conformation and then the integrin-fibronectin binding. We propose that a full binding

  13. BAG3 is involved in neuronal differentiation and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nicolin, Vanessa; Florenzano, Fulvio; Rosati, Alessandra; Capunzo, Mario; Nori, Stefania L

    2017-05-01

    Bcl2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) protein belongs to the family of co-chaperones interacting with several heat shock proteins. It plays a key role in protein quality control and mediates the clearance of misfolded proteins. Little is known about the expression and cellular localization of BAG3 during nervous system development and differentiation. Therefore, we analyze the subcellular distribution and expression of BAG3 in nerve-growth-factor-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and in developing and adult cortex of mouse brain. In differentiated PC12 cells, BAG3 was localized mainly in the neuritic domain rather than the cell body, whereas in control cells, it appeared to be confined to the cytoplasm near the nuclear membrane. Interestingly, the change of BAG3 localization during neuronal differentiation was associated only with a slight increase in total BAG3 expression. These data were coroborated by transmission electron microscopy showing that BAG3 was confined mainly within large dense-core vesicles of the axon in differentiated PC12 cells. In mouse developing cortex, BAG3 appeared to be intensely expressed in cellular processes of migrating cells, whereas in adult brain, a diffuse expression of low to medium intensity was detected in neuronal cell bodies. These findings suggest that BAG3 expression is required for neuronal differentiation and migration and that its role is linked to a change in its distribution pattern rather than to an increase in its protein expression levels.

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein signaling and olig1/2 interact to regulate the differentiation and maturation of adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoxin; Wang, Yaping; He, Qian; Qiu, Mengsheng; Whittemore, Scott R; Cao, Qilin

    2007-12-01

    Promotion of remyelination is an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of the demyelinating neurological disorders. Adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), which normally reside quiescently in the adult central nervous system (CNS), become activated and proliferative after demyelinating lesions. However, the extent of endogenous remyelination is limited because of the failure of adult OPCs to mature into myelinating oligodendrocytes (OLs) in the demyelinated CNS. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the differentiation of adult OPCs could lead to new therapeutic strategies to treat these disorders. In this study, we established a stable culture of adult spinal cord OPCs and developed a reliable in vitro protocol to induce their sequential differentiation. Adult OPCs expressed bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type Ia, Ib, and II receptor subunits, which are required for BMP signal transduction. BMP2 and 4 promoted dose-dependent astrocyte differentiation of adult OPCs with concurrent suppression of OL differentiation. Treatment of OPCs with BMP2 and 4 increased ID4 expression and decreased the expression of olig1 and olig2. Overexpression of olig1 or olig2 blocked the astrocyte differentiation of adult OPCs induced by BMP2 and 4. Furthermore, overexpression of both olig1 and olig2, but not olig1 or olig2 alone, rescued OL differentiation from inhibition by BMP2 and 4. Our results demonstrated that downregulation of olig1 and olig2 is an important mechanism by which BMP2 and 4 inhibit OL differentiation of adult OPCs. These data suggest that blocking BMP signaling combined with olig1/2 overexpression could be a useful therapeutic strategy to enhance endogenous remyelination and facilitate functional recovery in CNS demyelinated disorders. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  15. The Cellular Differential Evolution Based on Chaotic Local Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingfeng Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To avoid immature convergence and tune the selection pressure in the differential evolution (DE algorithm, a new differential evolution algorithm based on cellular automata and chaotic local search (CLS or ccDE is proposed. To balance the exploration and exploitation tradeoff of differential evolution, the interaction among individuals is limited in cellular neighbors instead of controlling parameters in the canonical DE. To improve the optimizing performance of DE, the CLS helps by exploring a large region to avoid immature convergence in the early evolutionary stage and exploiting a small region to refine the final solutions in the later evolutionary stage. What is more, to improve the convergence characteristics and maintain the population diversity, the binomial crossover operator in the canonical DE may be instead by the orthogonal crossover operator without crossover rate. The performance of ccDE is widely evaluated on a set of 14 bound constrained numerical optimization problems compared with the canonical DE and several DE variants. The simulation results show that ccDE has better performances in terms of convergence rate and solution accuracy than other optimizers.

  16. Plant GSK3 proteins regulate xylem cell differentiation downstream of TDIF-TDR signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yuki; Ito, Tasuku; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Hirakawa, Yuki; Saito, Masato; Tamaki, Takayuki; Shirasu, Ken; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-03-01

    During plant radial growth typically seen in trees, procambial and cambial cells act as meristematic cells in the vascular system to self-proliferate and differentiate into xylem cells. These two processes are regulated by a signalling pathway composed of a peptide ligand and its receptor; tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor (TDIF) and TDIF RECEPTOR (TDR). Here we show that glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins (GSK3s) are crucial downstream components of the TDIF signalling pathway suppressing xylem differentiation from procambial cells. TDR interacts with GSK3s at the plasma membrane and activates GSK3s in a TDIF-dependent fashion. Consistently, a specific inhibitor of plant GSK3s strongly induces xylem cell differentiation through BRI1-EMS SUPPRESSOR 1 (BES1), a well-known target transcription factor of GSK3s. Our findings provide insight into the regulation of cell fate determination in meristem maintenance.

  17. Interpreting treatment x environment interaction in agronomy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vargas, M.; Crossa, J.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.; Sayre, K.; Reynolds, M.P.

    2001-01-01

    Multienvironment trials are important in agronomy because the effects of agronomic treatments can change differentially in relation to environmental changes, producing a treatment × environment interaction (T × E). The aim of this study was to find a parsimonious description of the T × E existing in

  18. Differential reflectometry of thin film metal oxides on copper, tungsten, molybdenum and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, F.K. III; Hummel, R.E.; Verink, E.D. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A differential reflectometry study was undertaken to investigate the characteristics of thin oxide films on metal substrates. The oxides were produced by heating pure metals of copper, tungsten, molybdenum and chromium in dry oxygen. A new 'halfpolishing' technique was applied to obtain specimens with a step in oxide thickness in order to make them suitable for differential reflectometry. It was found that oxides formed this way yielded the same differential reflectograms as by electrochemical oxidation. A mathematical model involving the interaction of light with a thin corrosion product on metal substrates was applied to generate computer calculated differential reflectograms utilizing various optical constants and thicknesses of the assumed film. Three different thickness ranges have been identified. (a) For large film thicknesses, the differential reflectograms are distinguished by a sequence of interference peaks. (b) If the product of thickness and refraction index of the films is smaller than about 40 nm, no interference peaks are present. Any experimentally observed peaks in differential reflectograms of these films are caused entirely by electron interband transitions. (c) In an intermediate thickness range, superposition of interference and interband peaks are observed. (author)

  19. Natural Product Vibsanin A Induces Differentiation of Myeloid Leukemia Cells through PKC Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zu-Yin; Xiao, He; Wang, Li-Mei; Shen, Xing; Jing, Yu; Wang, Lin; Sun, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Cui, Yu; Shan, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Xing, Shuang; Xiong, Guo-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Dong, Bo; Feng, Jian-Nan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Luo, Qing-Liang; Zhao, Qin-Shi; Cong, Yu-Wen

    2016-05-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-based cell differentiation therapy has been successful in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia, a unique subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, other subtypes of AML display resistance to ATRA-based treatment. In this study, we screened natural, plant-derived vibsane-type diterpenoids for their ability to induce differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells, discovering that vibsanin A potently induced differentiation of AML cell lines and primary blasts. The differentiation-inducing activity of vibsanin A was mediated through direct interaction with and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Consistent with these findings, pharmacological blockade of PKC activity suppressed vibsanin A-induced differentiation. Mechanistically, vibsanin A-mediated activation of PKC led to induction of the ERK pathway and decreased c-Myc expression. In mouse xenograft models of AML, vibsanin A administration prolonged host survival and inhibited PKC-mediated inflammatory responses correlated with promotion of skin tumors in mice. Collectively, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for vibsanin A as a myeloid differentiation-inducing compound, with potential application as an antileukemic agent. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2698-709. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Possibility of Undifferentiated Human Thigh Adipose Stem Cells Differentiating into Functional Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hoon Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis study aimed to investigate the possibility of isolating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human thigh adipose tissue and the ability of human thigh adipose stem cells (HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocytes.MethodsThe adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs were isolated from thigh adipose tissue. Growth factors, cytokines, and hormones were added to the collagen coated dishes to induce the undifferentiated HTASCs to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells. To confirm the experimental results, the expression of hepatocyte-specific markers on undifferentiated and differentiated HTASCs was analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical staining. Differentiation efficiency was evaluated using functional tests such as periodic acid schiff (PAS staining and detection of the albumin secretion level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.ResultsThe majority of the undifferentiated HTASCs were changed into a more polygonal shape showing tight interactions between the cells. The differentiated HTASCs up-regulated mRNA of hepatocyte markers. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that they were intensely stained with anti-albumin antibody compared with undifferentiated HTASCs. PAS staining showed that HTASCs submitted to the hepatocyte differentiation protocol were able to more specifically store glycogen than undifferentiated HTASCs, displaying a purple color in the cytoplasm of the differentiated HTASCs. ELISA analyses showed that differentiated HTASCs could secrete albumin, which is one of the hepatocyte markers.ConclusionsMSCs were islolated from human thigh adipose tissue differentiate to heapatocytes. The source of ADSCs is not only abundant abdominal adipose tissue, but also thigh adipose tissue for cell therapy in liver regeneration and tissue regeneration.

  1. Differentiation of human B lymphocyte subpopulations induced by an alloreactive helper T-cell clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.J.; Hummell, D.S.; Lawton, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    We have used cloned alloreactive helper T cells to determine if direct T cell-B cell interaction can induce differentiation of human peripheral blood B cells which do not respond to pokeweed mitogen (PWM). T-cell clone 2F8 was derived from a one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction. 2F8 cells are T3+T4+T8-IL-2R+ and proliferate in response to irradiated stimulator cells, but not autologous cells, in the absence of exogenous interleukin-2. 2F8 cells provide allospecific help for polyclonal proliferation and differentiation of B cells in the absence of any other stimulus. The magnitude of this response is comparable to that of the response of the same B cells to PWM and fresh autologous T cells. 2F8 cells could also provide nonspecific help for unrelated donor B cells in the presence of PWM, with no requirement for costimulation by irradiated stimulator cells. Allospecific stimulation of B cells was completely inhibited by antibodies to class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) framework determinants and was abrogated by 1000-rad irradiation. Cloned 2F8 T cells stimulated differentiation of both small, high-density B cells and larger B cells, generating up to 30% plasma cells with either fraction. B cells forming rosettes with mouse erythrocytes were also induced to differentiate by the helper T cell clone. As found previously, neither small, high-density B cells nor mouse rosette+ B cells responded well to PWM. Direct interaction with allospecific T cells induces differentiation of a broader spectrum of B cells than soluble growth and differentiation factors in conjunction with polyclonal activators such as PWM and protein A containing staphylococci

  2. Differential emotional processing in concrete and abstract words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bo; Keitel, Anne; Bruce, Gillian; Scott, Graham G; O'Donnell, Patrick J; Sereno, Sara C

    2018-02-12

    Emotion (positive and negative) words are typically recognized faster than neutral words. Recent research suggests that emotional valence, while often treated as a unitary semantic property, may be differentially represented in concrete and abstract words. Studies that have explicitly examined the interaction of emotion and concreteness, however, have demonstrated inconsistent patterns of results. Moreover, these findings may be limited as certain key lexical variables (e.g., familiarity, age of acquisition) were not taken into account. We investigated the emotion-concreteness interaction in a large-scale, highly controlled lexical decision experiment. A 3 (Emotion: negative, neutral, positive) × 2 (Concreteness: abstract, concrete) design was used, with 45 items per condition and 127 participants. We found a significant interaction between emotion and concreteness. Although positive and negative valenced words were recognized faster than neutral words, this emotion advantage was significantly larger in concrete than in abstract words. We explored potential contributions of participant alexithymia level and item imageability to this interactive pattern. We found that only word imageability significantly modulated the emotion-concreteness interaction. While both concrete and abstract emotion words are advantageously processed relative to comparable neutral words, the mechanisms of this facilitation are paradoxically more dependent on imageability in abstract words. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Search for contact interactions and leptoquarks at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheins, J.

    1999-01-01

    The measured single differential cross section dσ/dQ 2 is compared to the Standard Model expectation and analyzed to search for (e-bar e)(q-bar q) contact interactions. No significant deviation is observed and limits on leptoquark compositeness scales and virtual leptoquark exchange are presented

  4. Analysis of the differential cross sections for the reaction pp{yields}ppK{sup +}K{sup -} in view of the K{sup +}K{sup -} interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silarski, M.

    2008-07-15

    Measurements of the pp{yields}ppK{sup +}K{sup -} reaction, performed with the experiment COSY-11 at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY, show a significant difference between the obtained excitation function and theoretical expectations including pp-FSI. The discrepancy may be assigned to the influence of K{sup +}K{sup -} or K{sup -}p interaction. This interaction should manifest itself in the distributions of the differential cross section. This thesis presents an analysis of event distributions as a function of the invariant masses of two particle subsystems. In particular in the analysis two generalizations of the Dalitz plot proposed by Goldhaber and Nyborg are used. The present Investigations are based on the experimental data determined by the COSY-11 collaboration from two measurements at excess energies of Q=10 MeV and 28 MeV. The experimental distributions are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations generated with various parameters of the K{sup +}K{sup -} and K{sup -}p interaction. The values of the K{sup +}K{sup -} scattering length, extracted from two data sets for Q=10 MeV and 28 MeV amount to: a{sub K{sup +}}{sub K{sup -}}=(11{+-}8)+i(0{+-}6) fm for Q=10 MeV, and a{sub K{sup +}}{sub K{sup -}}=(0.2{+-}0.2)+i(0.0{+-}0.5) fm for Q=28 MeV. Due to the low statistics, the extracted values have large uncertainties and are consistent with very low values of the real and imaginary part of the scattering length. (orig.)

  5. Studies on sildenafil citrate (Viagra) interaction with DNA using electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Sakandar; Nawaz, Haq; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Ghauri, Muhammad A; Khalid, Ahmad M

    2007-05-15

    The interaction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) with DNA was studied by using an electrochemical DNA biosensor. The binding mechanism of sildenafil citrate was elucidated by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry at DNA-modified glassy carbon electrode. The decrease in the guanine oxidation peak area or peak current was used as an indicator for the interaction in 0.2M acetate buffer (pH 5). The binding constant (K) values obtained were 2.01+/-0.05 x 10(5) and 1.97+/-0.01 x 10(5)M(-1) with constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. A linear dependence of the guanine peak area or peak current was observed within the range of 1-40 microM sildenafil citrate with slope=-2.74 x 10(-4)s/microM, r=0.989 and slope=-2.78 x 10(-3)microA/microM, r=0.995 by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. Additionally, binding constant values for sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction were determined for the pH range of 4-8 and in biological fluids (serum and urine) at pH 5. The influence of sodium and calcium ions was also studied to elucidate the mechanism of sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction under different solution conditions. The present study may prove to be helpful in extending our understanding of the anticancer activity of sildenafil citrate from cellular to DNA level.

  6. DEEP--a tool for differential expression effector prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, Jost; Haubrock, Martin; Dönitz, Jürgen; Wingender, Edgar; Crass, Torsten

    2007-07-01

    High-throughput methods for measuring transcript abundance, like SAGE or microarrays, are widely used for determining differences in gene expression between different tissue types, dignities (normal/malignant) or time points. Further analysis of such data frequently aims at the identification of gene interaction networks that form the causal basis for the observed properties of the systems under examination. To this end, it is usually not sufficient to rely on the measured gene expression levels alone; rather, additional biological knowledge has to be taken into account in order to generate useful hypotheses about the molecular mechanism leading to the realization of a certain phenotype. We present a method that combines gene expression data with biological expert knowledge on molecular interaction networks, as described by the TRANSPATH database on signal transduction, to predict additional--and not necessarily differentially expressed--genes or gene products which might participate in processes specific for either of the examined tissues or conditions. In a first step, significance values for over-expression in tissue/condition A or B are assigned to all genes in the expression data set. Genes with a significance value exceeding a certain threshold are used as starting points for the reconstruction of a graph with signaling components as nodes and signaling events as edges. In a subsequent graph traversal process, again starting from the previously identified differentially expressed genes, all encountered nodes 'inherit' all their starting nodes' significance values. In a final step, the graph is visualized, the nodes being colored according to a weighted average of their inherited significance values. Each node's, or sub-network's, predominant color, ranging from green (significant for tissue/condition A) over yellow (not significant for either tissue/condition) to red (significant for tissue/condition B), thus gives an immediate visual clue on which molecules--differentially

  7. New approximations of the differential electron-atom elastic scattering cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niculescu, V.I.R.; Catana, D.

    1994-01-01

    In the present note concerning the electron-atom interaction a cubic Spline method was used to obtain approximations of the differential cross-sections. These approximations gave a 20 times reduction of the computing time preserving also the accuracy (2%). The example is for Al in the 1-256 keV electron energy range. (Author) 2 Tabs., 3 Refs

  8. Application of proteomics to investigate barley-Fusarium graminearum interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Fen; Finnie, Christine; Jacobsen, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Due to the great loss of barley grain yield and quality in addition to mycotoxins contamination caused by Fusarium head blight (FHB), it is essential to understand the molecular interaction between barley and Fusarium graminearum, one of the primary Fusarium species causing FHB, in order to control the disease. Due to the advantages of gel-based proteomics that differentially expressed proteins involved in the interaction can be directly detected by comparing protein profiles displayed on 2-D...

  9. Mouse-induced pluripotent stem cells differentiate into odontoblast-like cells with induction of altered adhesive and migratory phenotype of integrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Ozeki

    Full Text Available Methods for differentiating induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells into odontoblasts generally require epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Here, we sought to characterize the cells produced by a 'hanging drop' technique for differentiating mouse iPS cells into odontoblast-like cells that requires no such interaction. Cells were cultured by the hanging drop method on a collagen type-I (Col-I scaffold (CS combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-4 (CS/BMP-4 without an epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. We evaluated the expression of odontoblast-related mRNA and protein, and the proliferation rate of these cells using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, immunofluorescence staining, and BrdU cell proliferation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The differentiated cells strongly expressed the mRNA for dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP and dentin matrix protein-1 (Dmp-1, which are markers of mature odontoblasts. Osteopontin and osteocalcin were not expressed in the differentiated cells, demonstrating that the differentiated iPS cells bore little resemblance to osteoblasts. Instead, they acquired odontoblast-specific properties, including the adoption of an odontoblastic phenotype, typified by high alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and calcification capacity. The cell-surface expression of proteins such as integrins α2, α6, αV and αVβ3 was rapidly up-regulated. Interestingly, antibodies and siRNAs against integrin α2 suppressed the expression of DSPP and Dmp-1, reduced the activity of ALP and blocked calcification, suggesting that integrin α2 in iPS cells mediates their differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. The adhesion of these cells to fibronectin and Col-I, and their migration on these substrata, was significantly increased following differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Thus, we have demonstrated that integrin α2 is involved in the differentiation of mouse iPS cells into odontoblast-like cells

  10. The Mathlet Toolkit: Creating Dynamic Applets for Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic/interactive graphing applets can be used to supplement standard computer algebra systems such as Maple, Mathematica, Derive, or TI calculators, in courses such as Calculus, Differential Equations, and Dynamical Systems. The addition of this type of software can lead to discovery learning, with students developing their own conjectures, and…

  11. Tiam1 Regulates the Wnt/Dvl/Rac1 Signaling Pathway and the Differentiation of Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čajánek, Lukáš; Ganji, Ranjani Sri; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Koník, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive the differentiation of dopaminergic (DA) neurons is crucial for successful development of novel therapies for Parkinson's disease, in which DA neurons progressively degenerate. However, the mechanisms underlying the differentiation-promoting effects of Wnt5a on DA precursors are poorly understood. Here, we present the molecular and functional characterization of a signaling pathway downstream of Wnt5a, the Wnt/Dvl/Rac1 pathway. First, we characterize the interaction between Rac1 and Dvl and identify the N-terminal part of Dvl3 as necessary for Rac1 binding. Next, we show that Tiam1, a Rac1 guanosine exchange factor (GEF), is expressed in the ventral midbrain, interacts with Dvl, facilitates Dvl-Rac1 interaction, and is required for Dvl- or Wnt5a-induced activation of Rac1. Moreover, we show that Wnt5a promotes whereas casein kinase 1 (CK1), a negative regulator of the Wnt/Dvl/Rac1 pathway, abolishes the interactions between Dvl and Tiam1. Finally, using ventral midbrain neurosphere cultures, we demonstrate that the generation of DA neurons in culture is impaired after Tiam1 knockdown, indicating that Tiam1 is required for midbrain DA differentiation. In summary, our data identify Tiam1 as a novel regulator of DA neuron development and as a Dvl-associated and Rac1-specific GEF acting in the Wnt/Dvl/Rac1 pathway. PMID:23109420

  12. Dissecting the calcium-induced differentiation of human primary keratinocytes stem cells by integrative and structural network analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiana Toufighi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The molecular details underlying the time-dependent assembly of protein complexes in cellular networks, such as those that occur during differentiation, are largely unexplored. Focusing on the calcium-induced differentiation of primary human keratinocytes as a model system for a major cellular reorganization process, we look at the expression of genes whose products are involved in manually-annotated protein complexes. Clustering analyses revealed only moderate co-expression of functionally related proteins during differentiation. However, when we looked at protein complexes, we found that the majority (55% are composed of non-dynamic and dynamic gene products ('di-chromatic', 19% are non-dynamic, and 26% only dynamic. Considering three-dimensional protein structures to predict steric interactions, we found that proteins encoded by dynamic genes frequently interact with a common non-dynamic protein in a mutually exclusive fashion. This suggests that during differentiation, complex assemblies may also change through variation in the abundance of proteins that compete for binding to common proteins as found in some cases for paralogous proteins. Considering the example of the TNF-α/NFκB signaling complex, we suggest that the same core complex can guide signals into diverse context-specific outputs by addition of time specific expressed subunits, while keeping other cellular functions constant. Thus, our analysis provides evidence that complex assembly with stable core components and competition could contribute to cell differentiation.

  13. Constraint Differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mödersheim, Sebastian Alexander; Basin, David; Viganò, Luca

    2010-01-01

    We introduce constraint differentiation, a powerful technique for reducing search when model-checking security protocols using constraint-based methods. Constraint differentiation works by eliminating certain kinds of redundancies that arise in the search space when using constraints to represent...... results show that constraint differentiation substantially reduces search and considerably improves the performance of OFMC, enabling its application to a wider class of problems....

  14. Network Analysis for the Identification of Differentially Expressed Hub Genes Using Myogenin Knock-down Muscle Satellite Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Malik

    Full Text Available Muscle, a multinucleate syncytium formed by the fusion of mononuclear myoblasts, arises from quiescent progenitors (satellite cells via activation of muscle-specific transcription factors (MyoD, Myf5, myogenin: MYOG, and MRF4. Subsequent to a decline in Pax7, induction in the expression of MYOG is a hallmark of myoblasts that have entered the differentiation phase following cell cycle withdrawal. It is evident that MYOG function cannot be compensated by any other myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs. Despite a plethora of information available regarding MYOG, the mechanism by which MYOG regulates muscle cell differentiation has not yet been identified. Using an RNA-Seq approach, analysis of MYOG knock-down muscle satellite cells (MSCs have shown that genes associated with cell cycle and division, DNA replication, and phosphate metabolism are differentially expressed. By constructing an interaction network of differentially expressed genes (DEGs using GeneMANIA, cadherin-associated protein (CTNNA2 was identified as the main hub gene in the network with highest node degree. Four functional clusters (modules or communities were identified in the network and the functional enrichment analysis revealed that genes included in these clusters significantly contribute to skeletal muscle development. To confirm this finding, in vitro studies revealed increased expression of CTNNA2 in MSCs on day 12 compared to day 10. Expression of CTNNA2 was decreased in MYOG knock-down cells. However, knocking down CTNNA2, which leads to increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM genes (type I collagen α1 and type I collagen α2 along with myostatin (MSTN, was not found significantly affecting the expression of MYOG in C2C12 cells. We therefore propose that MYOG exerts its regulatory effects by acting upstream of CTNNA2, which in turn regulates the differentiation of C2C12 cells via interaction with ECM genes. Taken together, these findings highlight a new

  15. Palmitoylation regulates epidermal homeostasis and hair follicle differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pleasantine Mill

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Palmitoylation is a key post-translational modification mediated by a family of DHHC-containing palmitoyl acyl-transferases (PATs. Unlike other lipid modifications, palmitoylation is reversible and thus often regulates dynamic protein interactions. We find that the mouse hair loss mutant, depilated, (dep is due to a single amino acid deletion in the PAT, Zdhhc21, resulting in protein mislocalization and loss of palmitoylation activity. We examined expression of Zdhhc21 protein in skin and find it restricted to specific hair lineages. Loss of Zdhhc21 function results in delayed hair shaft differentiation, at the site of expression of the gene, but also leads to hyperplasia of the interfollicular epidermis (IFE and sebaceous glands, distant from the expression site. The specific delay in follicle differentiation is associated with attenuated anagen propagation and is reflected by decreased levels of Lef1, nuclear beta-catenin, and Foxn1 in hair shaft progenitors. In the thickened basal compartment of mutant IFE, phospho-ERK and cell proliferation are increased, suggesting increased signaling through EGFR or integrin-related receptors, with a parallel reduction in expression of the key differentiation factor Gata3. We show that the Src-family kinase, Fyn, involved in keratinocyte differentiation, is a direct palmitoylation target of Zdhhc21 and is mislocalized in mutant follicles. This study is the first to demonstrate a key role for palmitoylation in regulating developmental signals in mammalian tissue homeostasis.

  16. Constraints on non-Standard Model Higgs boson interactions in an effective Lagrangian using differential cross sections measured in the H→γγ decay channel at s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aad

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The strength and tensor structure of the Higgs boson's interactions are investigated using an effective Lagrangian, which introduces additional CP-even and CP-odd interactions that lead to changes in the kinematic properties of the Higgs boson and associated jet spectra with respect to the Standard Model. The parameters of the effective Lagrangian are probed using a fit to five differential cross sections previously measured by the ATLAS experiment in the H→γγ decay channel with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb−1 at s=8 TeV. In order to perform a simultaneous fit to the five distributions, the statistical correlations between them are determined by re-analysing the H→γγ candidate events in the proton–proton collision data. No significant deviations from the Standard Model predictions are observed and limits on the effective Lagrangian parameters are derived. The statistical correlations are made publicly available to allow for future analysis of theories with non-Standard Model interactions.

  17. Neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S.; Prakash, M.; Lattimer, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    We study the charged and neutral current weak interaction rates relevant for the determination of neutrino opacities in dense matter found in supernovae and neutron stars. We establish an efficient formalism for calculating differential cross sections and mean free paths for interacting, asymmetric nuclear matter at arbitrary degeneracy. The formalism is valid for both charged and neutral current reactions. Strong interaction corrections are incorporated through the in-medium single particle energies at the relevant density and temperature. The effects of strong interactions on the weak interaction rates are investigated using both potential and effective field-theoretical models of matter. We investigate the relative importance of charged and neutral currents for different astrophysical situations, and also examine the influence of strangeness-bearing hyperons. Our findings show that the mean free paths are significantly altered by the effects of strong interactions and the multi-component nature of dense matter. The opacities are then discussed in the context of the evolution of the core of a protoneutron star. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  18. Fuel cladding mechanical interaction during power ramps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical interaction between fuel and cladding may occur as a consequence of two types of phenomenon: i) fuel swelling especially at levels of caesium accumulation, and ii) thermal differential expansion during power changes. Slow overpower ramps which may occur during incidental events are of course one of the circumstances responsible for this second type of fuel cladding mechanical interaction (FCMI). Experiments and analysis of this problem that have been done at C.E.A. allow to determine the main parameters which will fix the level of stress and the risk of damage induced by the fuel in the cladding during overpower transients

  19. The Green-Kubo formula for locally interacting fermionic open systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jaksic, V; Pillet, C A

    2006-01-01

    We consider a model describing finitely many free Fermi gas reservoirs coupled by local interactions and prove the Green-Kubo formulas and the Onsager reciprocity relations for heat and charge fluxes generated by temperature and chemical potential differentials.

  20. CNF1 improves astrocytic ability to support neuronal growth and differentiation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella Malchiodi-Albedi

    Full Text Available Modulation of cerebral Rho GTPases activity in mice brain by intracerebral administration of Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1 leads to enhanced neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity and improves learning and memory. To gain more insight into the interactions between CNF1 and neuronal cells, we used primary neuronal and astrocytic cultures from rat embryonic brain to study CNF1 effects on neuronal differentiation, focusing on dendritic tree growth and synapse formation, which are strictly modulated by Rho GTPases. CNF1 profoundly remodeled the cytoskeleton of hippocampal and cortical neurons, which showed philopodia-like, actin-positive projections, thickened and poorly branched dendrites, and a decrease in synapse number. CNF1 removal, however, restored dendritic tree development and synapse formation, suggesting that the toxin can reversibly block neuronal differentiation. On differentiated neurons, CNF1 had a similar effacing effect on synapses. Therefore, a direct interaction with CNF1 is apparently deleterious for neurons. Since astrocytes play a pivotal role in neuronal differentiation and synaptic regulation, we wondered if the beneficial in vivo effect could be mediated by astrocytes. Primary astrocytes from embryonic cortex were treated with CNF1 for 48 hours and used as a substrate for growing hippocampal neurons. Such neurons showed an increased development of neurites, in respect to age-matched controls, with a wider dendritic tree and a richer content in synapses. In CNF1-exposed astrocytes, the production of interleukin 1β, known to reduce dendrite development and complexity in neuronal cultures, was decreased. These results demonstrate that astrocytes, under the influence of CNF1, increase their supporting activity on neuronal growth and differentiation, possibly related to the diminished levels of interleukin 1β. These observations suggest that the enhanced synaptic plasticity and improved learning and memory described

  1. CNF1 Improves Astrocytic Ability to Support Neuronal Growth and Differentiation In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Paradisi, Silvia; Di Nottia, Michela; Simone, Daiana; Travaglione, Sara; Falzano, Loredana; Guidotti, Marco; Frank, Claudio; Cutarelli, Alessandro; Fabbri, Alessia; Fiorentini, Carla

    2012-01-01

    Modulation of cerebral Rho GTPases activity in mice brain by intracerebral administration of Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1) leads to enhanced neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity and improves learning and memory. To gain more insight into the interactions between CNF1 and neuronal cells, we used primary neuronal and astrocytic cultures from rat embryonic brain to study CNF1 effects on neuronal differentiation, focusing on dendritic tree growth and synapse formation, which are strictly modulated by Rho GTPases. CNF1 profoundly remodeled the cytoskeleton of hippocampal and cortical neurons, which showed philopodia-like, actin-positive projections, thickened and poorly branched dendrites, and a decrease in synapse number. CNF1 removal, however, restored dendritic tree development and synapse formation, suggesting that the toxin can reversibly block neuronal differentiation. On differentiated neurons, CNF1 had a similar effacing effect on synapses. Therefore, a direct interaction with CNF1 is apparently deleterious for neurons. Since astrocytes play a pivotal role in neuronal differentiation and synaptic regulation, we wondered if the beneficial in vivo effect could be mediated by astrocytes. Primary astrocytes from embryonic cortex were treated with CNF1 for 48 hours and used as a substrate for growing hippocampal neurons. Such neurons showed an increased development of neurites, in respect to age-matched controls, with a wider dendritic tree and a richer content in synapses. In CNF1-exposed astrocytes, the production of interleukin 1β, known to reduce dendrite development and complexity in neuronal cultures, was decreased. These results demonstrate that astrocytes, under the influence of CNF1, increase their supporting activity on neuronal growth and differentiation, possibly related to the diminished levels of interleukin 1β. These observations suggest that the enhanced synaptic plasticity and improved learning and memory described in CNF1-injected

  2. Taguchi method for partial differential equations with application in tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, M; Turnea, M; Rotariu, M; Arotăriţei, D; Popescu, Marilena

    2014-01-01

    The growth of tumors is a highly complex process. To describe this process, mathematical models are needed. A variety of partial differential mathematical models for tumor growth have been developed and studied. Most of those models are based on the reaction-diffusion equations and mass conservation law. A variety of modeling strategies have been developed, each focusing on tumor growth. Systems of time-dependent partial differential equations occur in many branches of applied mathematics. The vast majority of mathematical models in tumor growth are formulated in terms of partial differential equations. We propose a mathematical model for the interactions between these three cancer cell populations. The Taguchi methods are widely used by quality engineering scientists to compare the effects of multiple variables, together with their interactions, with a simple and manageable experimental design. In Taguchi's design of experiments, variation is more interesting to study than the average. First, Taguchi methods are utilized to search for the significant factors and the optimal level combination of parameters. Except the three parameters levels, other factors levels other factors levels would not be considered. Second, cutting parameters namely, cutting speed, depth of cut, and feed rate are designed using the Taguchi method. Finally, the adequacy of the developed mathematical model is proved by ANOVA. According to the results of ANOVA, since the percentage contribution of the combined error is as small. Many mathematical models can be quantitatively characterized by partial differential equations. The use of MATLAB and Taguchi method in this article illustrates the important role of informatics in research in mathematical modeling. The study of tumor growth cells is an exciting and important topic in cancer research and will profit considerably from theoretical input. Interpret these results to be a permanent collaboration between math's and medical oncologists.

  3. Root Differentiation of Agricultural Plant Cultivars and Proveniences Using FTIR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Legner

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of roots of agricultural species is desired for a deeper understanding of the belowground root interaction which helps to understand the complex interaction in intercropping and crop-weed systems. The roots can be reliably differentiated via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR. In two replicated greenhouse experiments, six pea cultivars, five oat cultivars as well as seven maize cultivars and five barnyard grass proveniences (n = 10 plants/cultivar or provenience were grown under controlled conditions. One root of each plant was harvested and five different root segments of each root were separated, dried and measured with FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. The results showed that, firstly, the root spectra of single pea and single oat cultivars as well as single maize and single barnyard grass cultivars/proveniences separated species-specific in cluster analyses. In the majority of cases the species separation was correct, but in a few cases, the spectra of the root tips had to be omitted to ensure the precise separation between the species. Therefore, species differentiation is possible regardless of the cultivar or provenience. Consequently, all tested cultivars of pea and oat spectra were analyzed together and separated within a cluster analysis according to their affiliated species. The same result was found in a cluster analysis with maize and barnyard grass spectra. Secondly, a cluster analysis with all species (pea, oat, maize and barnyard grass was performed. The species split up species-specific and formed a dicotyledonous pea cluster and a monocotyledonous cluster subdivided in oat, maize and barnyard grass subclusters. Thirdly, cultivar or provenience differentiations within one species were possible in one of the two replicated experiments. But these separations were less resilient.

  4. Saturation behavior: a general relationship described by a simple second-order differential equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepner, Gordon R

    2010-04-13

    The numerous natural phenomena that exhibit saturation behavior, e.g., ligand binding and enzyme kinetics, have been approached, to date, via empirical and particular analyses. This paper presents a mechanism-free, and assumption-free, second-order differential equation, designed only to describe a typical relationship between the variables governing these phenomena. It develops a mathematical model for this relation, based solely on the analysis of the typical experimental data plot and its saturation characteristics. Its utility complements the traditional empirical approaches. For the general saturation curve, described in terms of its independent (x) and dependent (y) variables, a second-order differential equation is obtained that applies to any saturation phenomena. It shows that the driving factor for the basic saturation behavior is the probability of the interactive site being free, which is described quantitatively. Solving the equation relates the variables in terms of the two empirical constants common to all these phenomena, the initial slope of the data plot and the limiting value at saturation. A first-order differential equation for the slope emerged that led to the concept of the effective binding rate at the active site and its dependence on the calculable probability the interactive site is free. These results are illustrated using specific cases, including ligand binding and enzyme kinetics. This leads to a revised understanding of how to interpret the empirical constants, in terms of the variables pertinent to the phenomenon under study. The second-order differential equation revealed the basic underlying relations that describe these saturation phenomena, and the basic mathematical properties of the standard experimental data plot. It was shown how to integrate this differential equation, and define the common basic properties of these phenomena. The results regarding the importance of the slope and the new perspectives on the empirical

  5. Differentiation of a bipotential glial progenitor cell in a single cell microculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, S; Raff, M C

    Although it is known that most cells of the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) are derived from the neuroepithelial cells of the neural tube, the factors determining whether an individual neuroepithelial cell develops into a particular type of neurone or glial cell remain unknown. A promising model for studying this problem is the bipotential glial progenitor cell in the developing rat optic nerve; this cell differentiates into a particular type of astrocyte (a type-2 astrocyte) if cultured in 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and into an oligodendrocyte if cultured in serum-free medium. As the oligodendrocyte-type-2 astrocyte (0-2A) progenitor cell can differentiate along either glial pathway in neurone-free cultures, living axons clearly are not required for its differentiation, at least in vitro. However, the studies on 0-2A progenitor cells were carried out in bulk cultures of optic nerve, and so it was possible that other cell-cell interactions were required for differentiation in culture. We show here that 0-2A progenitor cells can differentiate into type-2 astrocytes or oligodendrocytes when grown as isolated cells in microculture, indicating that differentiation along either glial pathway in vitro does not require signals from other CNS cells, apart from the signals provided by components of the culture medium. We also show that single 0-2A progenitor cells can differentiate along either pathway without dividing, supporting our previous studies using 3H-thymidine and suggesting that DNA replication is not required for these cells to choose between the two differentiation programmes.

  6. Altered binding of human histone gene transcription factors during the shutdown of proliferation and onset of differentiation in HL-60 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, G.; Lian, J.; Stein, J.; Shalhoub, V.; Wright, K.; Pauli, U.; Van Wijnen, A.; Briggs, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two sites of protein-DNA interaction have been identified in vivo and in vitro in the proximal promoter regions of an H4 and an H3 human histone gene. In proliferating cells, these genes are transcribed throughout the cell cycle, and both the more distal site I and the proximal site II are occupied by promoter-binding factors. In this report the authors demonstrate that during the shutdown of proliferation and onset of differentiation of the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 into cells that exhibit phenotypic properties of monocytes, histone gene expression is down-regulated at the level of transcription. In vivo occupancy of site I by promoter factors persists in the differentiated HL-60 cells, but protein-DNA interactions at site II are selectively lost. Furthermore, in vitro binding activity of the site II promoter factor HiNF-D is lost in differentiated cells, and nuclear extracts from differentiated cells do not support in vitro transcription of these histone genes. The results suggest that the interaction of HiNF-D with proximal promoter site II sequences plays a primary role in rendering cell growth-regulated histone genes transcribable in proliferating cells. It appears that while cell-cycle control of histone gene expression is mediated by both transcription and mRNA stability, with the shutdown of proliferation and onset of differentiation, histone gene expression is regulated at the transcriptional level

  7. Integrated approaches to miRNAs target definition: time-series analysis in an osteosarcoma differentiative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, A; Sciandra, M; Terracciano, M; Picci, P; Scotlandi, K

    2015-06-30

    microRNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs involved in the fine regulation of several cellular processes by inhibiting their target genes at post-transcriptional level. Osteosarcoma (OS) is a tumor thought to be related to a molecular blockade of the normal process of osteoblast differentiation. The current paper explores temporal transcriptional modifications comparing an osteosarcoma cell line, Saos-2, and clones stably transfected with CD99, a molecule which was found to drive OS cells to terminally differentiate. Parental cell line and CD99 transfectants were cultured up to 14 days in differentiating medium. In this setting, OS cells were profiled by gene and miRNA expression arrays. Integration of gene and miRNA profiling was performed by both sequence complementarity and expression correlation. Further enrichment and network analyses were carried out to focus on the modulated pathways and on the interactions between transcriptome and miRNome. To track the temporal transcriptional modification, a PCA analysis with differentiated human MSC was performed. We identified a strong (about 80 %) gene down-modulation where reversion towards the osteoblast-like phenotype matches significant enrichment in TGFbeta signaling players like AKT1 and SMADs. In parallel, we observed the modulation of several cancer-related microRNAs like miR-34a, miR-26b or miR-378. To decipher their impact on the modified transcriptional program in CD99 cells, we correlated gene and microRNA time-series data miR-34a, in particular, was found to regulate a distinct subnetwork of genes with respect to the rest of the other differentially expressed miRs and it appeared to be the main mediator of several TGFbeta signaling genes at initial and middle phases of differentiation. Integration studies further highlighted the involvement of TGFbeta pathway in the differentiation of OS cells towards osteoblasts and its regulation by microRNAs. These data underline that the expression of miR-34a and down

  8. CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β Regulates Expression of Indian Hedgehog during Chondrocytes Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Takahiro; Okazaki, Ken; Tsushima, Hidetoshi; Ishihara, Kohei; Doi, Toshio; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2014-01-01

    Background CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor that promotes hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. Indian hedgehog (Ihh) also stimulates the hypertrophic transition of chondrocytes. Furthermore, runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2) was reported to regulate chondrocyte maturation during skeletal development and to directly regulate transcriptional activity of Ihh. In this study, we investigated whether the interaction of C/EBPβ and RUNX2 regulates the expression of Ihh during chondrocyte differentiation. Methodology/Results Immunohistochemistry of embryonic growth plate revealed that both C/EBPβ and Ihh were strongly expressed in pre-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes. Overexpression of C/EBPβ by adenovirus vector in ATDC5 cells caused marked stimulation of Ihh and Runx2. Conversely, knockdown of C/EBPβ by lentivirus expressing shRNA significantly repressed Ihh and Runx2 in ATDC5 cells. A reporter assay revealed that C/EBPβ stimulated transcriptional activity of Ihh. Deletion and mutation analysis showed that the C/EBPβ responsive element was located between −214 and −210 bp in the Ihh promoter. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay also revealed the direct binding of C/EBPβ to this region. Moreover, reporter assays demonstrated that RUNX2 failed to stimulate the transcriptional activity of the Ihh promoter harboring a mutation at the C/EBPβ binding site. EMSA and ChIP assays showed that RUNX2 interacted to this element with C/EBPβ. Immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX2 and C/EBPβ formed heterodimer complex with each other in the nuclei of chondrocytes. These data suggested that the C/EBPβ binding element is also important for RUNX2 to regulate the expression of Ihh. Ex vivo organ culture of mouse limbs transfected with C/EBPβ showed that the expression of Ihh and RUNX2 was increased upon ectopic C/EBPβ expression. Conclusions C

  9. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β regulates expression of Indian hedgehog during chondrocytes differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ushijima

    Full Text Available CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ is a transcription factor that promotes hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes. Indian hedgehog (Ihh also stimulates the hypertrophic transition of chondrocytes. Furthermore, runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2 was reported to regulate chondrocyte maturation during skeletal development and to directly regulate transcriptional activity of Ihh. In this study, we investigated whether the interaction of C/EBPβ and RUNX2 regulates the expression of Ihh during chondrocyte differentiation.Immunohistochemistry of embryonic growth plate revealed that both C/EBPβ and Ihh were strongly expressed in pre-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes. Overexpression of C/EBPβ by adenovirus vector in ATDC5 cells caused marked stimulation of Ihh and Runx2. Conversely, knockdown of C/EBPβ by lentivirus expressing shRNA significantly repressed Ihh and Runx2 in ATDC5 cells. A reporter assay revealed that C/EBPβ stimulated transcriptional activity of Ihh. Deletion and mutation analysis showed that the C/EBPβ responsive element was located between -214 and -210 bp in the Ihh promoter. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay also revealed the direct binding of C/EBPβ to this region. Moreover, reporter assays demonstrated that RUNX2 failed to stimulate the transcriptional activity of the Ihh promoter harboring a mutation at the C/EBPβ binding site. EMSA and ChIP assays showed that RUNX2 interacted to this element with C/EBPβ. Immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX2 and C/EBPβ formed heterodimer complex with each other in the nuclei of chondrocytes. These data suggested that the C/EBPβ binding element is also important for RUNX2 to regulate the expression of Ihh. Ex vivo organ culture of mouse limbs transfected with C/EBPβ showed that the expression of Ihh and RUNX2 was increased upon ectopic C/EBPβ expression.C/EBPβ and RUNX2 cooperatively stimulate

  10. Interacting massless scalar and source-free electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyangar, B.R.N.; Mohanty, G.

    1985-01-01

    The relativistic field equations for interacting massless attractive scalar and source-free electromagnetic fields in a cylindrically symmetric spacetime of one degree of freedom with reflection symmetry have been reduced to a first order implicit differential equation depending on time which enables one to generate a class of solution to the field equations. The nature of the scalar and electromagnetic fields is discussed. It is shown that the geometry of the spacetime admits of an irrotational stiff fluid distribution without prejudice to the interacting electromagnetic fields. 10 refs. (author)

  11. Functional network analysis of genes differentially expressed during xylogenesis in soc1ful woody Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, Nicolas; Edger, Patrick P; Hefer, Charles A; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Schuetz, Mathias; Smets, Erik; Myburg, Alexander A; Douglas, Carl J; Schranz, Michael E; Lens, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    Many plant genes are known to be involved in the development of cambium and wood, but how the expression and functional interaction of these genes determine the unique biology of wood remains largely unknown. We used the soc1ful loss of function mutant - the woodiest genotype known in the otherwise herbaceous model plant Arabidopsis - to investigate the expression and interactions of genes involved in secondary growth (wood formation). Detailed anatomical observations of the stem in combination with mRNA sequencing were used to assess transcriptome remodeling during xylogenesis in wild-type and woody soc1ful plants. To interpret the transcriptome changes, we constructed functional gene association networks of differentially expressed genes using the STRING database. This analysis revealed functionally enriched gene association hubs that are differentially expressed in herbaceous and woody tissues. In particular, we observed the differential expression of genes related to mechanical stress and jasmonate biosynthesis/signaling during wood formation in soc1ful plants that may be an effect of greater tension within woody tissues. Our results suggest that habit shifts from herbaceous to woody life forms observed in many angiosperm lineages could have evolved convergently by genetic changes that modulate the gene expression and interaction network, and thereby redeploy the conserved wood developmental program. © 2016 The Authors. The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Differential equations a dynamical systems approach ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, John H

    1991-01-01

    This is a corrected third printing of the first part of the text Differential Equations: A Dynamical Systems Approach written by John Hubbard and Beverly West. The authors' main emphasis in this book is on ordinary differential equations. The book is most appropriate for upper level undergraduate and graduate students in the fields of mathematics, engineering, and applied mathematics, as well as the life sciences, physics and economics. Traditional courses on differential equations focus on techniques leading to solutions. Yet most differential equations do not admit solutions which can be written in elementary terms. The authors have taken the view that a differential equations defines functions; the object of the theory is to understand the behavior of these functions. The tools the authors use include qualitative and numerical methods besides the traditional analytic methods. The companion software, MacMath, is designed to bring these notions to life.

  13. Coincidence: Fortran code for calculation of (e, e'x) differential cross-sections, nuclear structure functions and polarization asymmetry in self-consistent random phase approximation with Skyrme interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavinato, M.; Marangoni, M.; Saruis, A.M.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes the COINCIDENCE code written for the IBM 3090/300E computer in Fortran 77 language. The output data of this code are the (e, e'x) threefold differential cross-sections, the nuclear structure functions, the polarization asymmetry and the angular correlation coefficients. In the real photon limit, the output data are the angular distributions for plane polarized incident photons. The code reads from tape the transition matrix elements previously calculated, by in continuum self-consistent RPA (random phase approximation) theory with Skyrme interactions. This code has been used to perform a numerical analysis of coincidence (e, e'x) reactions with polarized electrons on the /sup 16/O nucleous.

  14. Synthetic niches for differentiation of human embryonic stem cells bypassing embryoid body formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yarong; Fox, Victoria; Lei, Yuning; Hu, Biliang; Joo, Kye-Il; Wang, Pin

    2014-07-01

    The unique self-renewal and pluripotency features of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offer the potential for unlimited development of novel cell therapies. Currently, hESCs are cultured and differentiated using methods, such as monolayer culture and embryoid body (EB) formation. As such, achieving efficient differentiation into higher order structures remains a challenge, as well as maintaining cell viability during differentiation into homogeneous cell populations. Here, we describe the application of highly porous polymer scaffolds as synthetic stem cell niches. Bypassing the EB formation step, these scaffolds are capable of three-dimensional culture of undifferentiated hESCs and subsequent directed differentiation into three primary germ layers. H9 hESCs were successfully maintained and proliferated in biodegradable polymer scaffolds based on poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The results showed that cells within PLGA scaffolds retained characteristics of undifferentiated pluripotent stem cells. Moreover, the scaffolds allowed differentiation towards the lineage of interest by the addition of growth factors to the culture system. The in vivo transplantation study revealed that the scaffolds could provide a microenvironment that enabled hESCs to interact with their surroundings, thereby promoting cell differentiation. Therefore, this approach, which provides a unique culture/differentiation system for hESCs, will find its utility in various stem cell-based tissue-engineering applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Measurement of the muon antineutrino double-differential cross section for quasielastic-like scattering on hydrocarbon at Eν˜3.5 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, C. E.; Aliaga, L.; Bashyal, A.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Caceres v., G. F. R.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chavarria, E.; da Motta, H.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Gran, R.; Han, J. Y.; Harris, D. A.; Henry, S.; Hurtado, K.; Jena, D.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Lu, X.-G.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; McFarland, K. S.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nowak, G. M.; Nuruzzaman, Paolone, V.; Perdue, G. N.; Peters, E.; Ramírez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Sultana, M.; Sánchez Falero, S.; Teklu, A. M.; Valencia, E.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Yaeggy, B.; Zhang, D.; Miner ν A Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    We present double-differential measurements of antineutrino charged-current quasielastic scattering in the MINERvA detector. This study improves on a previous single-differential measurement by using updated reconstruction algorithms and interaction models and provides a complete description of observed muon kinematics in the form of a double-differential cross section with respect to muon transverse and longitudinal momentum. We include in our signal definition zero-meson final states arising from multinucleon interactions and from resonant pion production followed by pion absorption in the primary nucleus. We find that model agreement is considerably improved by a model tuned to MINERvA inclusive neutrino scattering data that incorporates nuclear effects such as weak nuclear screening and two-particle, two-hole enhancements.

  16. Short Stat5-interacting peptide derived from phospholipase C-β3 inhibits hematopoietic cell proliferation and myeloid differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Yasudo

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of the transcription factor Stat5 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells leads to various hematopoietic malignancies including myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN. Our recent study found that phospholipase C (PLC-β3 is a novel tumor suppressor involved in MPN, lymphoma and other tumors. Stat5 activity is negatively regulated by the SH2 domain-containing protein phosphatase SHP-1 in a PLC-β3-dependent manner. PLC-β3 can form the multimolecular SPS complex together with SHP-1 and Stat5. The close physical proximity of SHP-1 and Stat5 brought about by interacting with the C-terminal segment of PLC-β3 (PLC-β3-CT accelerates SHP-1-mediated dephosphorylation of Stat5. Here we identify the minimal sequences within PLC-β3-CT required for its tumor suppressor function. Two of the three Stat5-binding noncontiguous regions, one of which also binds SHP-1, substantially inhibited in vitro proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Surprisingly, an 11-residue Stat5-binding peptide (residues 988-998 suppressed Stat5 activity in Ba/F3 cells and in vivo proliferation and myeloid differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Therefore, this study further defines PLC-β3-CT as the Stat5- and SHP-1-binding domain by identifying minimal functional sequences of PLC-β3 for its tumor suppressor function and implies their potential utility in the control of hematopoietic malignancies.

  17. Functions of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins in Stem Cell Potency and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qishan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells possess huge importance in developmental biology, disease modelling, cell replacement therapy, and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine because they have the remarkable potential for self-renewal and to differentiate into almost all the cell types in the human body. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell potency and differentiation is essential and critical for extensive application. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs are modular proteins consisting of RNA-binding motifs and auxiliary domains characterized by extensive and divergent functions in nucleic acid metabolism. Multiple roles of hnRNPs in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation enable them to be effective gene expression regulators. More recent findings show that hnRNP proteins are crucial factors implicated in maintenance of stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency and cell differentiation. The hnRNPs interact with certain sequences in target gene promoter regions to initiate transcription. In addition, they recognize 3′UTR or 5′UTR of specific gene mRNA forming mRNP complex to regulate mRNA stability and translation. Both of these regulatory pathways lead to modulation of gene expression that is associated with stem cell proliferation, cell cycle control, pluripotency, and committed differentiation.

  18. Nutlin-3 down-regulates retinoblastoma protein expression and inhibits muscle cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Erica M. [Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, MengMeng; Bergholz, Johann [Center of Growth, Metabolism and Aging, College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610014 China (China); Jim Xiao, Zhi-Xiong, E-mail: jxiao@bu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Center of Growth, Metabolism and Aging, College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610014 China (China)

    2015-05-29

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation, cell death and differentiation. The MDM2 oncoprotein is a major negative regulator for p53 by binding to and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. The small molecule inhibitor, nutlin-3, disrupts MDM2-p53 interaction resulting in stabilization and activation of p53 protein. We have previously shown that nutlin-3 activates p53, leading to MDM2 accumulation as concomitant of reduced retinoblastoma (Rb) protein stability. It is well known that Rb is important in muscle development and myoblast differentiation and that rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), or cancer of the skeletal muscle, typically harbors MDM2 amplification. In this study, we show that nutlin-3 inhibited myoblast proliferation and effectively prevented myoblast differentiation, as evidenced by lack of expression of muscle differentiation markers including myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as a failure to form multinucleated myotubes, which were associated with dramatic increases in MDM2 expression and decrease in Rb protein levels. These results indicate that nutlin-3 can effectively inhibit muscle cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Nutlin-3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and prevents differentiation into myotubes. • Nutlin-3 increases MDM2 expression and down-regulates Rb protein levels. • This study has implication in nutlin-3 treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas.

  19. Symposium on Differential Geometry and Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Marcel; Bryant, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The DD6 Symposium was, like its predecessors DD1 to DD5 both a research symposium and a summer seminar and concentrated on differential geometry. This volume contains a selection of the invited papers and some additional contributions. They cover recent advances and principal trends in current research in differential geometry.

  20. Schwarzian conditions for linear differential operators with selected differential Galois groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelaziz, Y; Maillard, J-M

    2017-01-01

    We show that non-linear Schwarzian differential equations emerging from covariance symmetry conditions imposed on linear differential operators with hypergeometric function solutions can be generalized to arbitrary order linear differential operators with polynomial coefficients having selected differential Galois groups. For order three and order four linear differential operators we show that this pullback invariance up to conjugation eventually reduces to symmetric powers of an underlying order-two operator. We give, precisely, the conditions to have modular correspondences solutions for such Schwarzian differential equations, which was an open question in a previous paper. We analyze in detail a pullbacked hypergeometric example generalizing modular forms, that ushers a pullback invariance up to operator homomorphisms. We finally consider the more general problem of the equivalence of two different order-four linear differential Calabi–Yau operators up to pullbacks and conjugation, and clarify the cases where they have the same Yukawa couplings. (paper)

  1. Schwarzian conditions for linear differential operators with selected differential Galois groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Y.; Maillard, J.-M.

    2017-11-01

    We show that non-linear Schwarzian differential equations emerging from covariance symmetry conditions imposed on linear differential operators with hypergeometric function solutions can be generalized to arbitrary order linear differential operators with polynomial coefficients having selected differential Galois groups. For order three and order four linear differential operators we show that this pullback invariance up to conjugation eventually reduces to symmetric powers of an underlying order-two operator. We give, precisely, the conditions to have modular correspondences solutions for such Schwarzian differential equations, which was an open question in a previous paper. We analyze in detail a pullbacked hypergeometric example generalizing modular forms, that ushers a pullback invariance up to operator homomorphisms. We finally consider the more general problem of the equivalence of two different order-four linear differential Calabi-Yau operators up to pullbacks and conjugation, and clarify the cases where they have the same Yukawa couplings.

  2. Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy to Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersky, Joshua P.; Topitzes, James; Grant-Savela, Stacey D.; Brondino, Michael J.; McNeil, Cheryl B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study presents outcomes from a randomized trial of a novel Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) model for foster families. Differential effects of two intervention doses on child externalizing and internalizing symptoms are examined. Method: A sample of 102 foster children was assigned to one of three conditions--brief PCIT,…

  3. Computational Psychosomatics and Computational Psychiatry: Toward a Joint Framework for Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzschner, Frederike H; Weber, Lilian A E; Gard, Tim; Stephan, Klaas E

    2017-09-15

    This article outlines how a core concept from theories of homeostasis and cybernetics, the inference-control loop, may be used to guide differential diagnosis in computational psychiatry and computational psychosomatics. In particular, we discuss 1) how conceptualizing perception and action as inference-control loops yields a joint computational perspective on brain-world and brain-body interactions and 2) how the concrete formulation of this loop as a hierarchical Bayesian model points to key computational quantities that inform a taxonomy of potential disease mechanisms. We consider the utility of this perspective for differential diagnosis in concrete clinical applications. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Concentrated Differential Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Dwork, Cynthia; Rothblum, Guy N.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Concentrated Differential Privacy, a relaxation of Differential Privacy enjoying better accuracy than both pure differential privacy and its popular "(epsilon,delta)" relaxation without compromising on cumulative privacy loss over multiple computations.

  5. Coexistence of GMO production, labeling policies, and strategic firm interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venus, Thomas Johann

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation analyzes the market effects of the coexistence of genetically modified organism (GMO) and conventional production, labeling policies, and strategic firm interactions through vertical product differentiation. Although we focus on GMOs, the applied frameworks can be adopted and

  6. Differentiation and injury-repair signals modulate the interaction of E2F and pRB proteins with novel target genes in keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wing Y; Andrews, Joseph; Carter, David E; Dagnino, Lina

    2006-08-01

    E2F transcription factors are central to epidermal morphogenesis and regeneration after injury. The precise nature of E2F target genes involved in epidermal formation and repair has yet to be determined. Identification of these genes is essential to understand how E2F proteins regulate fundamental aspects of epidermal homeostasis and transformation. We have conducted a genome-wide screen using CpG island microarray analysis to identify novel promoters bound by E2F3 and E2F5 in human keratinocytes. We further characterized several of these genes, and determined that multiple E2F and retinoblastoma (pRb) family proteins associate with them in exponentially proliferating cells. We also assessed the effect on E2F and pRb binding to those genes in response to differentiation induced by bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6), or to activation of repair mechanisms induced by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). These studies demonstrate promoter- and cytokine-specific changes in binding profiles of E2F and/or pRb family proteins. For example, E2F1, 3, 4 and p107 were recruited to the N-myc promoter in cells treated with BMP-6, whereas E2F1, 3, 4, 5, p107 and p130 were bound to this promoter in the presence of TGF-beta. Functionally, these different interactions resulted in transcriptional repression by BMP-6 and TGF-beta of the N-myc gene, via mechanisms that involved E2F binding to the promoter and association with pRb-family proteins. Thus, multiple combinations of E2F and pRb family proteins may associate with and transcriptionally regulate a given target promoter in response to differentiation and injury-repair stimuli in epidermal keratinocytes.

  7. Genotype by environment interactions and yield stability of stem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a maize breeding program, potential genotypes are usually evaluated in different environments before desirable ones are selected. Genotype x environment (G x E) interaction is associated with the differential performance of genotypes tested at different locations and in different years, and influences selection and ...

  8. Gender Wage Differentials in a Competitive Labor Market : The Household Interaction Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francois, P.; van Ours, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    We present a theoretical explanation of the gender wage gap which turns on the interaction between men and women in households.In equilibria where men are over-represented in full-time work, we show that firms rationally choose to hire women only at strictly lower wages than men.The model developed

  9. EZH2: a pivotal regulator in controlling cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Huey; Hung, Mien-Chie; Li, Long-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in stem cell self-renewal, maintenance and lineage differentiation. The epigenetic profiles of stem cells are related to their transcriptional signature. Enhancer of Zeste homlog 2 (EZH2), a catalytic subunit of epigenetic regulator Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), has been shown to be a key regulator in controlling cellular differentiation. EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase that not only methylates histone H3 on Lys 27 (H3K27me3) but also interacts with and recruits DNA methyltransferases to methylate CpG at certain EZH2 target genes to establish firm repressive chromatin structures, contributing to tumor progression and the regulation of development and lineage commitment both in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells. In addition to its well-recognized epigenetic gene silencing function, EZH2 also directly methylates nonhistone targets such as the cardiac transcription factor, GATA4, resulting in attenuated GATA4 transcriptional activity and gene repression. This review addresses recent progress toward the understanding of the biological functions and regulatory mechanisms of EZH2 and its targets as well as their roles in stem cell maintenance and cell differentiation.

  10. Calculating differential Galois groups of parametrized differential equations, with applications to hypertranscendence

    OpenAIRE

    Hardouin, Charlotte; Minchenko, Andrei; Ovchinnikov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    The main motivation of our work is to create an efficient algorithm that decides hypertranscendence of solutions of linear differential equations, via the parameterized differential and Galois theories. To achieve this, we expand the representation theory of linear differential algebraic groups and develop new algorithms that calculate unipotent radicals of parameterized differential Galois groups for differential equations whose coefficients are rational functions. P. Berman and M.F. Singer ...

  11. Modulation of neuronal differentiation by CD40 isoforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Huayu; Obregon, Demian; Lou, Deyan; Ehrhart, Jared; Fernandez, Frank; Silver, Archie; Tan Jun

    2008-01-01

    Neuron differentiation is a complex process involving various cell-cell interactions, and multiple signaling pathways. We showed previously that CD40 is expressed and functional on mouse and human neurons. In neurons, ligation of CD40 protects against serum withdrawal-induced injury and plays a role in survival and differentiation. CD40 deficient mice display neuron dysfunction, aberrant neuron morphologic changes, and associated gross brain abnormalities. Previous studies by Tone and colleagues suggested that five isoforms of CD40 exist with two predominant isoforms expressed in humans: signal-transducible CD40 type I and a C-terminal truncated, non-signal-transducible CD40 type II. We hypothesized that differential expression of CD40 isoform type I and type II in neurons may modulate neuron differentiation. Results show that adult wild-type, and CD40 -/- deficient mice predominantly express CD40 type I and II isoforms. Whereas adult wild-type mice express mostly CD40 type I in cerebral tissues at relatively high levels, in age and gender-matched CD40 -/- mice CD40 type I expression was almost completely absent; suggesting a predominance of the non-signal-transducible CD40 type II isoform. Younger, 1 day old wild-type mice displayed less CD40 type I, and more CD40 type II, as well as, greater expression of soluble CD40 (CD40L/CD40 signal inhibitor), compared with 1 month old mice. Neuron-like N2a cells express CD40 type I and type II isoforms while in an undifferentiated state, however once induced to differentiate, CD40 type I predominates. Further, differentiated N2a cells treated with CD40 ligand express high levels of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN); an effect reduced by anti-CD40 type I siRNA, but not by control (non-targeting) siRNA. Altogether these data suggest that CD40 isoforms may act in a temporal fashion to modulate neuron differentiation during brain development. Thus, modulation of neuronal CD40 isoforms and CD40 signaling may represent

  12. Evaluation of self-interaction parameters from binary phase diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellison, T.L.

    1977-10-01

    The feasibility of calculating Wagner self-interaction parameters from binary phase diagrams was examined. The self-interaction parameters of 22 non-ferrous liquid solutions were calculated utilizing an equation based on the equality of the chemical potentials of a component in two equilibrium phases. Utilization of the equation requires the evaluation of the first and second derivatives of various liquidus and solidus data at infinite dilution of the solute component. Several numerical methods for evaluating the derivatives of tabular data were examined. A method involving power series curve fitting and subsequent differentiation of the power series was found to be the most suitable for the interaction parameter calculations. Comparison of the calculated self-interaction parameters with values obtained from thermodynamic measurements indicates that the Wagner self-interaction parameter can be successfully calculated from binary phase diagrams

  13. Differentiation between work and nonwork self-aspects as a predictor of presenteeism and engagement: cross-cultural differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garczynski, Amy M; Waldrop, Jessica S; Rupprecht, Elizabeth A; Grawitch, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Research on the work-life interface does not specifically account for how individuals cognitively conceptualize their work and nonwork lives in terms of the differentiation between work and nonwork self-aspects. In addition, no cross-cultural research examines self-concept differentiation in conjunction with employee outcomes of presenteeism and engagement, pointing to a need to study these relationships cross-culturally. Results of the current study revealed cultural differences in self-concept differentiation, engagement, mental presenteeism, and physical presenteeism. Indian participants reported lower levels of differentiation and higher levels of engagement, mental presenteeism, and physical presenteeism than American participants. Nationality interacted with self-concept differentiation to predict mental presenteeism, physical presenteeism, and engagement. Among Indian participants, self-concept differentiation did not impact scores on the other variables. However, among American participants, those lower in differentiation reported greater engagement, lower mental presenteeism, and lower physical presenteeism. These results have important implications for the study of the work-life interface, and they provide evidence that engagement and presenteeism may be culturally contingent.

  14. The accurate calculation about p(p-bar)→p(p-bar)' differential cross-section of the renormalized π0 chain propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Zaifu; Jingchu Univ. of Technology, Jingmen; Fang Zhenyun; Chen Wensuo; Xu Jin; Yi Junmei

    2008-01-01

    In the Lorentz coupling model of strong interaction between neutral meson π 0 and N-N-bar, we have strictly analytic calculated the scattering differential cross-section of p-(p-bar) about the π 0 renormalized chained propagator and obtained accurate theoretical outcome. Moreover, after comparing with the differential cross- section of π 0 tree propagator, we have obtained related radiation correction outcome. All these, we have done, can be reference for further researching p-(p-bar) elastic collision at high, middle or low ergo region and description Lorentz invariant coupling model theory with strong interaction. (authors)

  15. CCAR1 is required for Ngn3-mediated endocrine differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chung-Kuang; Lai, Yi-Chyi; Lin, Yung-Fu; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chiang, Ming-Ko

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We identify CCAR1 to directly interact with Ngn3. ► CCAR1 is co-localized with Ngn3 in the nucleus. ► CCAR1 cooperates with Ngn3 in activating NeuroD expression. ► CCAR1 is required for Ngn3-mediated PANC-1 transdifferentiation. -- Abstract: Neurogenin3 (Ngn3) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that specifies pancreatic endocrine cell fates during pancreas development. It can also initiate a transdifferentiation program when expressed in pancreatic exocrine and ductal cells. However, how Ngn3 initiates a transcriptional cascade to achieve endocrine differentiation is still poorly understood. Here, we show that cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 1 (CCAR1), which is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors, also interacts with Ngn3. The association between Ngn3 and CCAR1 was verified by pull-down assays and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Using gene reporter assays, we found that CCAR1 is essential for Ngn3 to activate the expression of the reporter genes containing the NeuroD promoter. Moreover, down-regulation of endogenous CCAR1 in the PANC-1 pancreatic ductal cell line inhibits the transdifferentiation program initiated by Ngn3. CCAR1 is, therefore, a novel partner of Ngn3 in mediating endocrine differentiation.

  16. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  17. Proteomic Dissection of Nanotopography-Sensitive Mechanotransductive Signaling Hubs that Foster Neuronal Differentiation in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Maffioli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cells are competent in precisely sensing nanotopographical features of their microenvironment. The perceived microenvironmental information will be “interpreted” by mechanotransductive processes and impacts on neuronal functioning and differentiation. Attempts to influence neuronal differentiation by engineering substrates that mimic appropriate extracellular matrix (ECM topographies are hampered by the fact that profound details of mechanosensing/-transduction complexity remain elusive. Introducing omics methods into these biomaterial approaches has the potential to provide a deeper insight into the molecular processes and signaling cascades underlying mechanosensing/-transduction but their exigence in cellular material is often opposed by technical limitations of major substrate top-down fabrication methods. Supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD allows instead the bottom-up fabrication of nanostructured substrates over large areas characterized by a quantitatively controllable ECM-like nanoroughness that has been recently shown to foster neuron differentiation and maturation. Exploiting this capacity of SCBD, we challenged mechanosensing/-transduction and differentiative behavior of neuron-like PC12 cells with diverse nanotopographies and/or changes of their biomechanical status, and analyzed their phosphoproteomic profiles in these settings. Versatile proteins that can be associated to significant processes along the mechanotransductive signal sequence, i.e., cell/cell interaction, glycocalyx and ECM, membrane/f-actin linkage and integrin activation, cell/substrate interaction, integrin adhesion complex, actomyosin organization/cellular mechanics, nuclear organization, and transcriptional regulation, were affected. The phosphoproteomic data suggested furthermore an involvement of ILK, mTOR, Wnt, and calcium signaling in these nanotopography- and/or cell mechanics-related processes. Altogether, potential nanotopography

  18. Analysis of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in vitro using classification association rule mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqi; Wang, Yanbo Justin; Bañares-Alcántara, René; Coenen, Frans; Cui, Zhanfeng

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, data mining is used to analyze the data on the differentiation of mammalian Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs), aiming at discovering known and hidden rules governing MSC differentiation, following the establishment of a web-based public database containing experimental data on the MSC proliferation and differentiation. To this effect, a web-based public interactive database comprising the key parameters which influence the fate and destiny of mammalian MSCs has been constructed and analyzed using Classification Association Rule Mining (CARM) as a data-mining technique. The results show that the proposed approach is technically feasible and performs well with respect to the accuracy of (classification) prediction. Key rules mined from the constructed MSC database are consistent with experimental observations, indicating the validity of the method developed and the first step in the application of data mining to the study of MSCs.

  19. A study of inclusive neutrino interactions in a marble target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panman, J.

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the results of an analysis of neutrino and antineutrino interactions on nuclei are presented. The data were taken with the calorimeter of the Amsterdam-CERN-Hamburg-Moscow-Rome (CHARM) collaboration at the narrow-band beam of the CERN SPS. The detector combines a large target mass with a high power of pattern recognition. The presently accepted theory of weak interactions of Glashow, Salam, and Weinberg is introduced. Applications of the quark-parton model in the context of deep-inelastic neutrino interactions on nuclei are summarized. The properties of the narrow-band neutrino beam at CERN, which are relevant for the experiment are given. The neutrino energy spectrum and the flux monitors are described. Measurements of total cross-sections are presented. From the ratios of neutral-current and charged-current cross-sections of neutrinos and antineutrinos the coupling constants of the weak neutral-current are deduced. Some details of the methods used in the analysis of differential distributions are discussed. The differential charged-current cross-sections dsigma/dy and dsigma/dx are measured. Finally, the analysis of the structure functions is presented in terms of x and Q 2 . (Auth.)

  20. Genetics and biochemistry of collagen binding-triggered glandular differentiation in a human colon carcinoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignatelli, M.; Bodmer, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have examined the interaction between collagen binding and epithelial differentiation by using a human colon carcinoma cell line (SW1222) that can differentiate structurally when grown in a three-dimensional collagen gel to form glandular structures. As much as 66% inhibition of glandular differentiation can be achieved by addition to the culture of a synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr (RGDT) sequence, which is a cell recognition site found in collagen. Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr also inhibited the cell attachment to collagen-coated plates. Chromosome 15 was found in all human-mouse hybrid clones that could differentiate in the collagen gel and bind collagen. Both binding to collagen and glandular differentiation of the hybrid cells were also inhibited by Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr as for the parent cell line SW1222. The ability of SW1222 cells to express the differentiated phenotype appears, therefore, to be determined by an Arg-Gly-Asp-directed collagen receptor on the cell surface that is controlled by a gene on chromosome 15

  1. Theory of gravitational interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Gasperini, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This is the second edition of a well-received book that is a modern, self-contained introduction to the theory of gravitational interactions. The new edition includes more details on gravitational waves of cosmological origin, the so-called brane world scenario, and gravitational time-delay effects. The first part of the book follows the traditional presentation of general relativity as a geometric theory of the macroscopic gravitational field, while the second, more advanced part discusses the deep analogies (and differences) between a geometric theory of gravity and the “gauge” theories of the other fundamental interactions. This fills a gap within the traditional approach to general relativity which usually leaves students puzzled about the role of gravity. The required notions of differential geometry are reduced to the minimum, allowing room for aspects of gravitational physics of current phenomenological and theoretical interest, such as the properties of gravitational waves, the gravitational inter...

  2. Role of differential physical properties in emergent behavior of 3D cell co-cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbman, Dan; Das, Moumita

    2015-03-01

    The biophysics of binary cell populations is of great interest in many biological processes, whether the formation of embryos or the initiation of tumors. During these processes, cells are surrounded by other cell types with different physical properties, often with important consequences. For example, recent experiments on a co-culture of breast cancer cells and healthy breast epithelial cells suggest that the mechanical mismatch between the two cell types may contribute to enhanced migration of the cancer cells. Here we explore how the differential physical properties of different cell types may influence cell-cell interaction, aggregation, and migration. To this end, we study a proof of concept model- a three-dimensional binary system of interacting, active, and deformable particles with different physical properties such as elastic stiffness, contractility, and particle-particle adhesion, using Langevin Dynamics simulations. Our results may provide insights into emergent behavior such as segregation and differential migration in cell co-cultures in three dimensions.

  3. Human Activity Differentially Redistributes Large Mammals in the Canadian Rockies National Parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Kimo. Rogala

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available National parks are important for conservation of species such as wolves (Canis lupus and elk (Cervus canadensis. However, topography, vegetation conditions, and anthropogenic infrastructure within parks may limit available habitat. Human activity on trails and roads may lead to indirect habitat loss, further limiting available habitat. Predators and prey may respond differentially to human activity, potentially disrupting ecological processes. However, research on such impacts to wildlife is incomplete, especially at fine spatial and temporal scales. Our research investigated the relationship between wolf and elk distribution and human activity using fine-scale Global Positioning System (GPS wildlife telemetry locations and hourly human activity measures on trails and roads in Banff, Kootenay, and Yoho National Parks, Canada. We observed a complex interaction between the distance animals were located from trails and human activity level resulting in species adopting both mutual avoidance and differential response behaviors. In areas < 50 m from trails human activity led to a mutual avoidance response by both wolves and elk. In areas 50 - 400 m from trails low levels of human activity led to differential responses; wolves avoided these areas, whereas elk appeared to use these areas as a predation refugia. These differential impacts on elk and wolves may have important implications for trophic dynamics. As human activity increased above two people/hour, areas 50 - 400 m from trails were mutually avoided by both species, resulting in the indirect loss of important montane habitat. If park managers are concerned with human impacts on wolves and elk, or on these species' trophic interactions with other species, they can monitor locations near trails and roads and consider hourly changes of human activity levels in areas important to wildlife.

  4. Differential games

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2006-01-01

    This volume lays the mathematical foundations for the theory of differential games, developing a rigorous mathematical framework with existence theorems. It begins with a precise definition of a differential game and advances to considerations of games of fixed duration, games of pursuit and evasion, the computation of saddle points, games of survival, and games with restricted phase coordinates. Final chapters cover selected topics (including capturability and games with delayed information) and N-person games.Geared toward graduate students, Differential Games will be of particular interest

  5. Social interactions predict genetic diversification: an experimental manipulation in shorebirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Charles; Parra, Jorge E; Coals, Lucy; Beltrán, Marcela; Zefania, Sama; Székely, Tamás

    2018-01-01

    Mating strategy and social behavior influence gene flow and hence affect levels of genetic differentiation and potentially speciation. Previous genetic analyses of closely related plovers Charadrius spp. found strikingly different population genetic structure in Madagascar: Kittlitz's plovers are spatially homogenous whereas white-fronted plovers have well segregated and geographically distinct populations. Here, we test the hypotheses that Kittlitz's plovers are spatially interconnected and have extensive social interactions that facilitate gene flow, whereas white-fronted plovers are spatially discrete and have limited social interactions. By experimentally removing mates from breeding pairs and observing the movements of mate-searching plovers in both species, we compare the spatial behavior of Kittlitz's and white-fronted plovers within a breeding season. The behavior of experimental birds was largely consistent with expectations: Kittlitz's plovers travelled further, sought new mates in larger areas, and interacted with more individuals than white-fronted plovers, however there was no difference in breeding dispersal. These results suggest that mating strategies, through spatial behavior and social interactions, are predictors of gene flow and thus genetic differentiation and speciation. Our study highlights the importance of using social behavior to understand gene flow. However, further work is needed to investigate the relative importance of social structure, as well as intra- and inter-season dispersal, in influencing the genetic structures of populations.

  6. R&D, patents and innovation: a differential game approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H.-M.

    2016-01-01

    A patent race is a technological competition among firms and the firm making a first-hand innovation takes advantages of patenting. Firms strategically invest in R&D and produce knowledge in order to innovate. Instead of growing model of R&D, I use a differential game approach to investigate firms interaction of R&D behavior in a patent race. In general, knowledge is an intangible good that gives a special feature of a patent race. Whether knowledge is substitutable to the existing knowledge ...

  7. A Differentiation Framework for Maritime Clusters: Comparisons across Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Neto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to point out some of the main characteristics and critical factors for success that can substantiate the proposal of a differentiation framework for maritime clusters. We conduct a benchmarking analysis intended to distinguish the most relevant aspects which can or should be observed in these types of clusters, applied to the following countries: Spain (Basque Country, Germany (Lander of Schleswig-Holstein, the Netherlands and Norway. The differentiation factors involve agglomeration economies and endogenous conditions derived from geographic proximity, essential for lowering transaction costs, strengthening the leverage of public/private cooperation through centres of maritime excellence, at the same time providing an adequate local environment that favours positive interactions between the different maritime industries and actors. The main results arising from this article are presented through a reconceptualisation of Porter’s Diamond framework for diagnosing the competitiveness of maritime clusters.

  8. Symbolic computation of nonlinear wave interactions on MACSYMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bers, A.; Kulp, J.L.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper the use of a large symbolic computation system - MACSYMA - in determining approximate analytic expressions for the nonlinear coupling of waves in an anisotropic plasma is described. MACSYMA was used to implement the solutions of a fluid plasma model nonlinear partial differential equations by perturbation expansions and subsequent iterative analytic computations. By interacting with the details of the symbolic computation, the physical processes responsible for particular nonlinear wave interactions could be uncovered and appropriate approximations introduced so as to simplify the final analytic result. Details of the MACSYMA system and its use are discussed and illustrated. (Auth.)

  9. The immediate early gene product EGR1 and polycomb group proteins interact in epigenetic programming during chondrogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Spaapen

    Full Text Available Initiation of and progression through chondrogenesis is driven by changes in the cellular microenvironment. At the onset of chondrogenesis, resting mesenchymal stem cells are mobilized in vivo and a complex, step-wise chondrogenic differentiation program is initiated. Differentiation requires coordinated transcriptomic reprogramming and increased progenitor proliferation; both processes require chromatin remodeling. The nature of early molecular responses that relay differentiation signals to chromatin is poorly understood. We here show that immediate early genes are rapidly and transiently induced in response to differentiation stimuli in vitro. Functional ablation of the immediate early factor EGR1 severely deregulates expression of key chondrogenic control genes at the onset of differentiation. In addition, differentiating cells accumulate DNA damage, activate a DNA damage response and undergo a cell cycle arrest and prevent differentiation associated hyper-proliferation. Failed differentiation in the absence of EGR1 affects global acetylation and terminates in overall histone hypermethylation. We report novel molecular connections between EGR1 and Polycomb Group function: Polycomb associated histone H3 lysine27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 blocks chromatin access of EGR1. In addition, EGR1 ablation results in abnormal Ezh2 and Bmi1 expression. Consistent with this functional interaction, we identify a number of co-regulated targets genes in a chondrogenic gene network. We here describe an important role for EGR1 in early chondrogenic epigenetic programming to accommodate early gene-environment interactions in chondrogenesis.

  10. Neuroendocrine immune interaction in fish: differential regulation of phagocyte activity by neuroendocrine factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.; Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Chadzinska, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Coping with physical, chemical and biological disturbances depends on an extensive repertoire of physiological, endocrinological and immunological responses. Fish provide intriguing models to study bi-directional interaction between the neuroendocrine and the immune systems. Macrophages and

  11. Differential geometry of curves and surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Banchoff, Thomas F

    2010-01-01

    Students and professors of an undergraduate course in differential geometry will appreciate the clear exposition and comprehensive exercises in this book that focuses on the geometric properties of curves and surfaces, one- and two-dimensional objects in Euclidean space. The problems generally relate to questions of local properties (the properties observed at a point on the curve or surface) or global properties (the properties of the object as a whole). Some of the more interesting theorems explore relationships between local and global properties. A special feature is the availability of accompanying online interactive java applets coordinated with each section. The applets allow students to investigate and manipulate curves and surfaces to develop intuition and to help analyze geometric phenomena.

  12. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaiya, Shiro; Shiraito, Yuki; Kato, Junko; Ide, Hiroko; Okada, Kensuke; Takano, Kouji; Kansaku, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human) and strategy (random, tit-for-tat) in repeated prisoner's dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate) and theory of mind (ToM) regions [i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and precuneus]. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (de)activation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during social interactions.

  13. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro eSakaiya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human and strategy (random, tit-for-tat in repeated prisoner’s dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate and theory of mind (ToM regions (i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex [VMPFC] and precuneus. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (deactivation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during

  14. Differential proteomic analysis reveals novel links between primary metabolism and antibiotic production in Amycolatopsis balhimycina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, G.; Renzone, G.; Alduina, R.

    2010-01-01

    A differential proteomic analysis, based on 2-DE and MS procedures, was performed on Amycolatopsis balhimycina DSM5908, the actinomycete producing the vancomycin-like antibiotic balhimycin. A comparison of proteomic profiles before and during balhimycin production characterized differentially...... available over the World Wide Web as interactive web pages (http://www.unipa.it/ampuglia/Abal-proteome-maps). Functional clustering analysis revealed that differentially expressed proteins belong to functional groups involved in central carbon metabolism, amino acid metabolism and protein biosynthesis...... intermediates, were upregulated during antibiotic production. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that 8 out of 14 upregulated genes showed a positive correlation between changes at translational and transcriptional expression level. Furthermore, proteomic analysis of two nonproducing mutants, restricted to a sub...

  15. α-Syntrophin stabilizes catalase to reduce endogenous reactive oxygen species levels during myoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jae Yun; Choi, Su Jin; Heo, Cheol Ho; Kim, Hwan Myung; Kim, Hye Sun

    2017-07-01

    α-Syntrophin is a component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that interacts with various intracellular signaling proteins in muscle cells. The α-syntrophin knock-down C2 cell line (SNKD), established by infecting lentivirus particles with α-syntrophin shRNA, is characterized by a defect in terminal differentiation and increase in cell death. Since myoblast differentiation is accompanied by intensive mitochondrial biogenesis, the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is also increased during myogenesis. Two-photon microscopy imaging showed that excessive intracellular ROS accumulated during the differentiation of SNKD cells as compared with control cells. The formation of 4-hydroxynonenal adduct, a byproduct of lipid peroxidation during oxidative stress, significantly increased in differentiated SNKD myotubes and was dramatically reduced by epigallocatechin-3-gallate, a well-known ROS scavenger. Among antioxidant enzymes, catalase was significantly decreased during differentiation of SNKD cells without changes at the mRNA level. Of interest was the finding that the degradation of catalase was rescued by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor, in the SNKD cells. This study demonstrates a novel function of α-syntrophin. This protein plays an important role in the regulation of oxidative stress from endogenously generated ROS during myoblast differentiation by modulating the protein stability of catalase. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. GSK-3 Inhibition Sensitizes Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to 1,25D-Mediated Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kalpana; Stefan, Tammy; Ignatz-Hoover, James; Moreton, Stephen; Parizher, Gary; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Wald, David N.

    2017-01-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), the biologically active form of vitamin D, is widely considered a promising therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) based on its ability to drive differentiation of leukemic cells. However, clinical trials have been disappointing in part to dose-limiting hypercalcemia. Here we show how inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) can improve the differentiation response of AML cells to 1,25D-mediated differentiation. GSK3 inhibition in AML cells enhanced the differentiating effects of low concentrations of 1,25D. In addition, GSK3 inhibition augmented the ability of 1,25D to induce irreversible growth inhibition and slow the progression of AML in mouse models. Mechanistic studies revealed that GSK3 inhibition led to the hyperphosphorylation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), enabling an interaction between VDR and the coactivator, SRC-3 (NCOA3), thereby increasing transcriptional activity. We also found that activation of JNK-mediated pathways in response to GSK3 inhibition contributed to the potentiation of 1,25D-induced differentiation. Taken together, our findings offer a preclinical rationale to explore the repositioning of GSK3 inhibitors to enhance differentiation-based therapy for AML treatment. PMID:26964622

  17. The influence of scaffold microstructure on chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Ge, Zigang; Wu, Yingnan; Lee, Eng Hin; Thote, Tanushree; Yang, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Different forms of biomaterials, including microspheres, sponges, hydrogels and nanofibres have been broadly used in cartilage regeneration; however, effects of internal structures of biomaterials on chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) remain largely unexplored. Here we investigated the effect of physical microenvironments of sponges and hydrogels on chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. MSCs, cultured in these two scaffold systems, were induced with TGF-β 3  in chondrogeneic differentiation medium and the chondrogenic differentiation was evaluated and compared after three weeks. MSCs in the sponges clustered with spindle morphologies, while they distributed homogenously with round morphologies in the hydrogel. The MSCs proliferated faster in the sponge compared to that in the hydrogel. Significantly higher glycosaminoglycan and collagen II were found in the sponges but not in the hydrogels. The different tissue formation ability of MSCs in these two systems could be attributed to the different metabolic requirements and the cellular events prerequisite in the chondrogenic process of MSCs. It is reasonable to conclude that sponges with relatively active microenvironments that facilitate cell–cell contacts and cell–matrix interaction are optimal for early stage of chondrogeneic differentiation. (paper)

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor α Stimulates Osteoclast Differentiation by a Mechanism Independent of the Odf/Rankl–Rank Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kanichiro; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Jimi, Eijiro; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takami, Masamichi; Kotake, Shigeru; Nakagawa, Nobuaki; Kinosaki, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Kyoji; Shima, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hisataka; Morinaga, Tomonori; Higashio, Kanji; Martin, T. John; Suda, Tatsuo

    2000-01-01

    Osteoclast differentiation factor (ODF, also called RANKL/TRANCE/OPGL) stimulates the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage into osteoclasts in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, also called CSF-1). When mouse bone marrow cells were cultured with M-CSF, M-CSF–dependent bone marrow macrophages (M-BMMφ) appeared within 3 d. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase–positive osteoclasts were also formed when M-BMMφ were further cultured for 3 d with mouse tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in the presence of M-CSF. Osteoclast formation induced by TNF-α was inhibited by the addition of respective antibodies against TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) or TNFR2, but not by osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor (OCIF, also called OPG, a decoy receptor of ODF/RANKL), nor the Fab fragment of anti–RANK (ODF/RANKL receptor) antibody. Experiments using M-BMMφ prepared from TNFR1- or TNFR2-deficient mice showed that both TNFR1- and TNFR2-induced signals were important for osteoclast formation induced by TNF-α. Osteoclasts induced by TNF-α formed resorption pits on dentine slices only in the presence of IL-1α. These results demonstrate that TNF-α stimulates osteoclast differentiation in the presence of M-CSF through a mechanism independent of the ODF/RANKL–RANK system. TNF-α together with IL-1α may play an important role in bone resorption of inflammatory bone diseases. PMID:10637272

  19. Complexes of γ-tubulin with nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases Src and Fyn in differentiating P19 embryonal carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukharskyy, Vitaliy; Sulimenko, Vadym; Macurek, Libor; Sulimenko, Tetyana; Draberova, Eduarda; Draber, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinases of the Src family have been shown to play an important role in signal transduction as well as in regulation of microtubule protein interactions. Here we show that γ-tubulin (γ-Tb) in P19 embryonal carcinoma cells undergoing neuronal differentiation is phosphorylated and forms complexes with protein tyrosine kinases of the Src family, Src and Fyn. Elevated expression of both kinases during differentiation corresponded with increased level of proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine. Immunoprecipitation experiments with antibodies against Src, Fyn, γ-tubulin, and with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody revealed that γ-tubulin appeared in complexes with these kinases. In vitro kinase assays showed tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins in γ-tubulin complexes isolated from differentiated cells. Pretreatment of cells with Src family selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2 reduced the amount of phosphorylated γ-tubulin in the complexes. Binding experiments with recombinant SH2 and SH3 domains of Src and Fyn kinases revealed that protein complexes containing γ-tubulin bound to SH2 domains and that these interactions were of SH2-phosphotyrosine type. The combined data suggest that Src family kinases might have an important role in the regulation of γ-tubulin interaction with tubulin dimers or other proteins during neurogenesis

  20. Deciphering the transcriptional circuitry of microRNA genes expressed during human monocytic differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian; MacPherson, Cameron R; Essack, Magbubah; Kaur, Mandeep; Schaefer, Ulf; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Macrophages are immune cells involved in various biological processes including host defence, homeostasis, differentiation, and organogenesis. Disruption of macrophage biology has been linked to increased pathogen infection, inflammation and malignant diseases. Differential gene expression observed in monocytic differentiation is primarily regulated by interacting transcription factors (TFs). Current research suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) degrade and repress translation of mRNA, but also may target genes involved in differentiation. We focus on getting insights into the transcriptional circuitry regulating miRNA genes expressed during monocytic differentiation. Results: We computationally analysed the transcriptional circuitry of miRNA genes during monocytic differentiation using in vitro time-course expression data for TFs and miRNAs. A set of TF?miRNA associations was derived from predicted TF binding sites in promoter regions of miRNA genes. Time-lagged expression correlation analysis was utilised to evaluate the TF?miRNA associations. Our analysis identified 12 TFs that potentially play a central role in regulating miRNAs throughout the differentiation process. Six of these 12 TFs (ATF2, E2F3, HOXA4, NFE2L1, SP3, and YY1) have not previously been described to be important for monocytic differentiation. The remaining six TFs are CEBPB, CREB1, ELK1, NFE2L2, RUNX1, and USF2. For several miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-424, and miR-17-92), we show how their inferred transcriptional regulation impacts monocytic differentiation. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that miRNAs and their transcriptional regulatory control are integral molecular mechanisms during differentiation. Furthermore, it is the first study to decipher on a large-scale, how miRNAs are controlled by TFs during human monocytic differentiation. Subsequently, we have identified 12 candidate key controllers of miRNAs during this differentiation process. 2009 Schmeier et al; licensee Bio

  1. Deciphering the transcriptional circuitry of microRNA genes expressed during human monocytic differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2009-12-10

    Background: Macrophages are immune cells involved in various biological processes including host defence, homeostasis, differentiation, and organogenesis. Disruption of macrophage biology has been linked to increased pathogen infection, inflammation and malignant diseases. Differential gene expression observed in monocytic differentiation is primarily regulated by interacting transcription factors (TFs). Current research suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) degrade and repress translation of mRNA, but also may target genes involved in differentiation. We focus on getting insights into the transcriptional circuitry regulating miRNA genes expressed during monocytic differentiation. Results: We computationally analysed the transcriptional circuitry of miRNA genes during monocytic differentiation using in vitro time-course expression data for TFs and miRNAs. A set of TF?miRNA associations was derived from predicted TF binding sites in promoter regions of miRNA genes. Time-lagged expression correlation analysis was utilised to evaluate the TF?miRNA associations. Our analysis identified 12 TFs that potentially play a central role in regulating miRNAs throughout the differentiation process. Six of these 12 TFs (ATF2, E2F3, HOXA4, NFE2L1, SP3, and YY1) have not previously been described to be important for monocytic differentiation. The remaining six TFs are CEBPB, CREB1, ELK1, NFE2L2, RUNX1, and USF2. For several miRNAs (miR-21, miR-155, miR-424, and miR-17-92), we show how their inferred transcriptional regulation impacts monocytic differentiation. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that miRNAs and their transcriptional regulatory control are integral molecular mechanisms during differentiation. Furthermore, it is the first study to decipher on a large-scale, how miRNAs are controlled by TFs during human monocytic differentiation. Subsequently, we have identified 12 candidate key controllers of miRNAs during this differentiation process. 2009 Schmeier et al; licensee Bio

  2. Interaction of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells with a nanoporous titanium surface is sufficient to induce their osteogenic differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Schürmann

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenic differentiation of various adult stem cell populations such as neural crest-derived stem cells is of great interest in the context of bone regeneration. Ideally, exogenous differentiation should mimic an endogenous differentiation process, which is partly mediated by topological cues. To elucidate the osteoinductive potential of porous substrates with different pore diameters (30 nm, 100 nm, human neural crest-derived stem cells isolated from the inferior nasal turbinate were cultivated on the surface of nanoporous titanium covered membranes without additional chemical or biological osteoinductive cues. As controls, flat titanium without any topological features and osteogenic medium was used. Cultivation of human neural crest-derived stem cells on 30 nm pores resulted in osteogenic differentiation as demonstrated by alkaline phosphatase activity after seven days as well as by calcium deposition after 3 weeks of cultivation. In contrast, cultivation on flat titanium and on membranes equipped with 100 nm pores was not sufficient to induce osteogenic differentiation. Moreover, we demonstrate an increase of osteogenic transcripts including Osterix, Osteocalcin and up-regulation of Integrin β1 and α2 in the 30 nm pore approach only. Thus, transplantation of stem cells pre-cultivated on nanostructured implants might improve the clinical outcome by support of the graft adherence and acceleration of the regeneration process.

  3. Introduction to a special issue on genotype by environment interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expression of a phenotype is a function of the genotype, the environment, and the differential sensitivity of certain genotypes to different environments, also known as genotype by environment (G × E) interaction. This special issue of Crop Science includes a collection of manuscripts that reviews t...

  4. Selective quantitation of the neurotoxin BMAA by use of hydrophilic-interaction liquid chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-DMS-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Daniel G; Kerrin, Elliott S; Quilliam, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    The neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been reported in cyanobacteria and shellfish, raising concerns about widespread human exposure. However, inconsistent results for BMAA analysis have led to controversy. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is the most appropriate method for analysis of BMAA, but the risk of interference from isomers, other sample components, and the electrospray background is still present. We have investigated differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as an ion filter to improve selectivity in the hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatographic (HILIC)-MS/MS determination of BMAA. We obtained standards for two BMAA isomers not previously analyzed by HILIC-MS, β-amino-N-methylalanine and 3,4-diaminobutanoic acid, and the typically used 2,4-diaminobutanoic acid and N-(2-aminoethyl)glycine. DMS separation of BMAA from these isomers was achieved and optimized conditions were used to develop a sensitive and highly selective multidimensional HILIC-DMS-MS/MS method. This work revealed current technical limitations of DMS for trace quantitation, and practical solutions were implemented. Accurate control of low levels of DMS carrier gas modifier was essential, but required external metering. The linearity of our optimized method was excellent from 0.01 to 6 μmol L(-1). The instrumental LOD was 0.4 pg BMAA injected on-column and the estimated method LOD was 20 ng g(-1) dry weight for BMAA in sample matrix. The method was used to analyze cycad plant tissue, a cyanobacterial reference material, and mussel tissues, by use of isotope-dilution quantitation with deuterated BMAA. This confirmed the presence of BMAA and several of its isomers in cycad and mussel tissues, including commercially available mussel tissue reference materials certified for other biotoxins. Graphical Abstract Differential Mobility Spectrometry is used to increases the selectivity of BMAA analysis by HILIC-MS/MS.

  5. A-dependence of differential multiplicity at 7 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arefyev, A.V.; Bayukov, Yu.D.; Efremenko, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    Particle production in the inelastic proton-nucleus interactions have been investigated at the initial momentum psub(0)=7 GeV/c for Be, Al, C, Cu, Cd and Pb nuclei. A-dependences of both π - and p differential multiplicities are parametrized as approximately Asup(α(sub(i)))i. Similar parametrization seems to be also suitable for the normalized topological cross-section Wsup(n-)(A) of the processes with nsup(-) forward emitted negative pions. The dependence of αsub(i) on the secondary particle type and its kinematic region for (A) and on n - for Wsup(n-)(A) has been obtained. These experimental data indicate to secondary interactions of the produced particles inside nucleus. The total multiplicity distribution is observed to obey KNO scaling

  6. Nonlinear differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  7. Nonlinear differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics

  8. Radioresistance related genes screened by protein-protein interaction network analysis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiaodong; Guo Ya; Qu Song; Li Ling; Huang Shiting; Li Danrong; Zhang Wei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discover radioresistance associated molecular biomarkers and its mechanism in nasopharyngeal carcinoma by protein-protein interaction network analysis. Methods: Whole genome expression microarray was applied to screen out differentially expressed genes in two cell lines CNE-2R and CNE-2 with different radiosensitivity. Four differentially expressed genes were randomly selected for further verification by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis with self-designed primers. The common differentially expressed genes from two experiments were analyzed with the SNOW online database in order to find out the central node related to the biomarkers of nasopharyngeal carcinoma radioresistance. The expression of STAT1 in CNE-2R and CNE-2 cells was measured by Western blot. Results: Compared with CNE-2 cells, 374 genes in CNE-2R cells were differentially expressed while 197 genes showed significant differences. Four randomly selected differentially expressed genes were verified by RT-PCR and had same change trend in consistent with the results of chip assay. Analysis with the SNOW database demonstrated that those 197 genes could form a complicated interaction network where STAT1 and JUN might be two key nodes. Indeed, the STAT1-α expression in CNE-2R was higher than that in CNE-2 (t=4.96, P<0.05). Conclusions: The key nodes of STAT1 and JUN may be the molecular biomarkers leading to radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and STAT1-α might have close relationship with radioresistance. (authors)

  9. Ihh/Gli2 signaling promotes osteoblast differentiation by regulating Runx2 expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Atsuko; Wada, Masahiro; Ikeda, Fumiyo; Hata, Kenji; Matsubara, Takuma; Nifuji, Akira; Noda, Masaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Akira; Nishimura, Riko; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    Genetic and cell biological studies have indicated that Indian hedgehog (Ihh) plays an important role in bone development and osteoblast differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Ihh regulates osteoblast differentiation is complex and remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of Ihh signaling in osteoblast differentiation using mesenchymal cells and primary osteoblasts. We observed that Ihh stimulated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin expression, and calcification. Overexpression of Gli2- but not Gli3-induced ALP, osteocalcin expression, and calcification of these cells. In contrast, dominant-negative Gli2 markedly inhibited Ihh-dependent osteoblast differentiation. Ihh treatment or Gli2 overexpression also up-regulated the expression of Runx2, an essential transcription factor for osteoblastogenesis, and enhanced the transcriptional activity and osteogenic action of Runx2. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated a physical interaction between Gli2 and Runx2. Moreover, Ihh or Gli2 overexpression failed to increase ALP activity in Runx2-deficient mesenchymal cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Ihh regulates osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal cells through up-regulation of the expression and function of Runx2 by Gli2.

  10. Efficient detection of differentially methylated regions using DiMmeR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Diogo Marinho; Uhrenfeldt Skov, Ida; Silva, Artur

    2017-01-01

    in the programming language R, have no user interface, and do not offer all necessary steps to guide users from raw data all the way down to statistically significant differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and the associated genes. RESULTS: Here, we present DiMmeR (Discovery of Multiple Differentially Methylated...... Regions), the first free standalone software that interactively guides with a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) scientists the whole way through EWAS data analysis. It offers parallelized statistical methods for efficiently identifying DMRs in both Illumina 450K and 850K EPIC chip data. Di......MmeR computes empirical p-values through randomization tests, even for big data sets of hundreds of patients and thousands of permutations within a few minutes on a standard desktop PC. It is independent of any third-party libraries, computes regression coefficients, p-values and empirical p...

  11. The epithelial-mesenchymal interactions: insights into physiological and pathological aspects of oral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, Arvind Babu Rajendra; Jones, Thaon Jon

    2014-03-17

    In the human biological system, the individual cells divide and form tissues and organs. These tissues are hetero-cellular. Basically any tissue consists of an epithelium and the connective tissue. The latter contains mainly mesenchymally-derived tissues with a diversified cell population. The cell continues to grow and differentiate in a pre-programmed manner using a messenger system. The epithelium and the mesenchymal portion of each tissue have two different origins and perform specific functions, but there is a well-defined interaction mechanism, which mediates between them. Epithelial mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) are part of this mechanism, which can be regarded as a biological conversation between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations involved in the cellular differentiation of one or both cell populations. EMIs represent a process that is essential for cell growth, cell differentiation and cell multiplication. EMIs are associated with normal physiological processes in the oral cavity, such as odontogenesis, dentino-enamel junction formation, salivary gland development, palatogenesis, and also pathological processes, such as oral cancer. This paper focuses the role EMIs in odontogenesis, salivary gland development, palatogenesis and oral cancer.

  12. Effects of matrix elasticity and cell density on human mesenchymal stem cells differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ruyue; Li, Julie Yi-Shuan; Yeh, Yiting; Yang, Li; Chien, Shu

    2013-09-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can differentiate into various cell types, including osteogenic and chondrogenic cells. The matrix elasticity and cell seeding density are important factors in hMSCs differentiation. We cultured hMSCs at different seeding densities on polyacrylamide hydrogels with different stiffness corresponding to Young's moduli of 1.6 ± 0.3 and 40 ± 3.6 kPa. The promotion of osteogenic marker expression by hard gel is overridden by a high seeding density. Cell seeding density, however, did not influence the chondrogenic marker expressions induced by soft gel. These findings suggest that interplays between cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions contribute to hMSCs differentiation. The promotion of osteogenic differentiation on hard matrix was shown to be mediated through the Ras pathway. Inhibition of Ras (RasN17) significantly decreased ERK, Smad1/5/8 and AKT activation, and osteogenic markers expression. However, constitutively active Ras (RasV12) had little effect on osteogenic marker expression, suggesting that the Ras pathways are necessary but not sufficient for osteogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that matrix elasticity and cell density are important microenvironmental cues driving hMSCs proliferation and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  13. Fully differential cross sections for low to intermediate energy perpendicular plane ionization of xenon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, G., E-mail: ghanshyam.purohit@spsu.ac.in; Singh, P.; Patidar, V.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We present triply differential cross section (TDCS) results for the perpendicular plane ionization of xenon atoms. • The TDCS has been calculated in the modified distorted wave Born approximation formalism. • The effects of target polarization and post collision interaction have also been included. • The polarization potential, higher order effects and PCI has been found to be useful in the description of TDCS. - Abstract: Triple differential cross section (TDCS) results are reported for the perpendicular plane ionization of Xe (5p) at incident electron energies 5 eV, 10 eV, 20 eV, and 40 eV above ionization potential. The modified distorted wave Born approximation formalism with first as well as the second order Born terms has been used to calculate the TDCS. Effects of target polarization and post collision interaction have also been included. We compare the (e, 2e) TDCS results of our calculation with the recent available experimental data and theoretical results and discuss the process contributing to structure seen in the differential cross section. It has been observed from the present study that the second order effect and target polarization make significant contribution in description of collision dynamics of xenon at the low and intermediate energy for the perpendicular emission of electrons.

  14. Fully differential cross sections for low to intermediate energy perpendicular plane ionization of xenon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, G.; Singh, P.; Patidar, V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present triply differential cross section (TDCS) results for the perpendicular plane ionization of xenon atoms. • The TDCS has been calculated in the modified distorted wave Born approximation formalism. • The effects of target polarization and post collision interaction have also been included. • The polarization potential, higher order effects and PCI has been found to be useful in the description of TDCS. - Abstract: Triple differential cross section (TDCS) results are reported for the perpendicular plane ionization of Xe (5p) at incident electron energies 5 eV, 10 eV, 20 eV, and 40 eV above ionization potential. The modified distorted wave Born approximation formalism with first as well as the second order Born terms has been used to calculate the TDCS. Effects of target polarization and post collision interaction have also been included. We compare the (e, 2e) TDCS results of our calculation with the recent available experimental data and theoretical results and discuss the process contributing to structure seen in the differential cross section. It has been observed from the present study that the second order effect and target polarization make significant contribution in description of collision dynamics of xenon at the low and intermediate energy for the perpendicular emission of electrons

  15. Differential susceptibility to maternal expressed emotion in children with ADHD and their siblings? Investigating plasticity genes, prosocial and antisocial behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jennifer S; Hartman, Catharina A; Franke, Barbara; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Arias Vásquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan K

    2015-02-01

    The differential susceptibility theory states that children differ in their susceptibility towards environmental experiences, partially due to plasticity genes. Individuals carrying specific variants in such genes will be more disadvantaged in negative but, conversely, more advantaged in positive environments. Understanding gene-environment interactions may help unravel the causal mechanisms involved in multifactorial psychiatric disorders such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The differential susceptibility theory was examined by investigating the presence of interaction effects between maternal expressed emotion (EE; warmth and criticism) and the solitary and combined effects of plasticity genes (DAT1, DRD4, 5-HTT) on prosocial and antisocial behaviour (measured with parent- and self-reports) in children with ADHD and their siblings (N = 366, M = 17.11 years, 74.9% male). Maternal warmth was positively associated with prosocial behaviour and negatively with antisocial behaviour, while maternal criticism was positively associated with antisocial behaviour and negatively with prosocial behaviour. No evidence of differential susceptibility was found. The current study found no evidence for differential susceptibility based on the selected plasticity genes, in spite of strong EE-behaviour associations. It is likely that additional factors play a role in the complex relationship between genes, environment and behaviour.

  16. Lectures on differential Galois theory

    CERN Document Server

    Magid, Andy R

    1994-01-01

    Differential Galois theory studies solutions of differential equations over a differential base field. In much the same way that ordinary Galois theory is the theory of field extensions generated by solutions of (one variable) polynomial equations, differential Galois theory looks at the nature of the differential field extension generated by the solutions of differential equations. An additional feature is that the corresponding differential Galois groups (of automorphisms of the extension fixing the base and commuting with the derivation) are algebraic groups. This book deals with the differential Galois theory of linear homogeneous differential equations, whose differential Galois groups are algebraic matrix groups. In addition to providing a convenient path to Galois theory, this approach also leads to the constructive solution of the inverse problem of differential Galois theory for various classes of algebraic groups. Providing a self-contained development and many explicit examples, this book provides ...

  17. THE EFFECT OF CULTIVAR AND BEARING TREE ON BUD DIFFERENTIATION, FROST DAMAGE AND FRUIT SET IN APPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Pavičić

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available After severe winter frost, an examination was initiated of frost damage suffered by Idared and Golden Delicious clone B. The cultivars differed significantly in the differentiation intensity, the hare of damaged differentiated buds, but not in share of damaged undifferentiated buds. In both cultivars the bud damage was more intensive on long bearing wood than on spur, regardless differentiation grade. The interaction between the cultivar and the bearing wood was insignificant. The flower bud differentiation was better in Idared, but it also suffered more frost damage than the Golden Delicious clone B with differentiated buds, but not than that with undifferentiated buds. In both cultivars frost damage increases with increase of differentiated flower buds (R2=0.759; P≤0.001. The fruit set was within the limits of expectation only on the spurs of the Golden Delicious clone B, which showed strong tendency towards fruit set on long bearing shoots. In 2000, the yield of the cultivars was almost equal, as the result of thinning due to the frost damage on Idared.

  18. Differential effects of arousal in positive and negative autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jaclyn Hennessey; Addis, Donna Rose; Giovanello, Kelly S

    2012-01-01

    Autobiographical memories are characterised by a range of emotions and emotional reactions. Recent research has demonstrated that differences in emotional valence (positive vs. negative emotion) and arousal (the degree of emotional intensity) differentially influence the retrieved memory narrative. Although the mnemonic effects of valence and arousal have both been heavily studied, it is currently unclear whether the effects of emotional arousal are equivalent for positive and negative autobiographical events. In the current study, multilevel models were used to examine differential effects of emotional valence and arousal on the richness of autobiographical memory retrieval both between and within subjects. Thirty-four young adults were asked to retrieve personal autobiographical memories associated with popular musical cues and to rate the valence, arousal and richness of these events. The multilevel analyses identified independent influences of valence and intensity upon retrieval characteristics at the within- and between-subject levels. In addition, the within-subject interactions between valence and arousal highlighted differential effects of arousal for positive and negative memories. These findings have important implications for future studies of emotion and memory, highlighting the importance of considering both valence and arousal when examining the role emotion plays in the richness of memory representation.

  19. [CONDITIONS OF SYNOVIAL MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS DIFFERENTIATING INTO FIBROCARTILAGE CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peiliang; Cong, Ruijun; Chen, Song; Zhang, Lei; Ding, Zheru; Zhou, Qi; Li, Lintao; Xu, Zhenyu; Wu, Yuli; Wu, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    To explore the conditions of synovial derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) differentiating into the fibrocartilage cells by using the orthogonal experiment. The synovium was harvested from 5 adult New Zealand white rabbits, and SMSCs were separated by adherence method. The flow cytometry and multi-directional differentiation method were used to identify the SMSCs. The conditions were found from the preliminary experiment and literature review. The missing test was carried out to screen the conditions and then 12 conditions were used for the orthogonal experiment, including transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2), dexamethasone (DEX), proline, ascorbic acid (ASA), pyruvic acid, insulin + transferrin + selenious acid pre-mixed solution (ITS), bovin serum albumin (BSA), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), intermittent hydraulic pressure (IHP), bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF). The L60 (212) orthogonal experiment was designed using the SPSS 18.0 with 2 level conditions and the cells were induced to differentiate on the small intestinal submucosa (SIS)-3D scaffold. The CD151+/CD44+ cells were detected with the flow cytometry and then the differentiation rate was recorded. The immumohistochemical staining, cellular morphology, toluidine blue staining, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR examination for the gene expressions of sex determining region Y (SRY)-box 9 gene (Sox9), aggrecan gene (AGN), collagen type I gene (Col I), collagen type II gene (Col II), collagen type IX gene (Col IX) were used for result confirmation. The differentiation rate was calculated as the product of CD151/CD44+ cells and cells with Col I high expression. The grow curve was detected with the DNA abundance using the PicoGreen Assay. The visual observation and the variances analysis among the variable were used to evaluate the result of the orthogonal experiment, 1 level interaction was considered. The q-test and the

  20. Cholesterol affects the interaction between an ionic liquid and phospholipid vesicles. A study by differential scanning calorimetry and nanoplasmonic sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giacomo; Witos, Joanna; Rantamäki, Antti H; Wiedmer, Susanne K

    2017-12-01

    The present work aims at studying the interactions between cholesterol-rich phosphatidylcholine-based lipid vesicles and trioctylmethylphosphonium acetate ([P 8881 ][OAc]), a biomass dissolving ionic liquid (IL). The effect of cholesterol was assayed by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and nanoplasmonic sensing (NPS) measurement techniques. Cholesterol-enriched dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine vesicles were exposed to different concentrations of the IL, and the derived membrane perturbation was monitored by DSC. The calorimetric data could suggest that the binding and infiltration of the IL are delayed in the vesicles containing cholesterol. To clarify our findings, NPS was applied to quantitatively follow the resistance of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine incorporating 0, 10, and 50mol% of cholesterol toward the IL exposure over time. The membrane perturbation induced by different concentrations of IL was found to be a concentration dependent process on cholesterol-free lipid vesicles. Moreover, our results showed that lipid depletion in cholesterol-enriched lipid vesicles is inversely proportional to the increasing amount of cholesterol in the vesicles. These findings support that cholesterol-rich lipid bilayers are less susceptible toward membrane disrupting agents as compared to membranes that do not incorporate any sterols. This probably occurs because cholesterol tightens the phospholipid acyl chain packing of the plasma membranes, increasing their resistance and reducing their permeability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of decaying atomic states on integral and time differential Moessbauer spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kankeleit, E.

    1975-01-01

    Moessbauer spectra for time dependent monopole interaction have been calculated for the case that the nuclear transition feeding the Moessbauer state excites an electric state of the atom. This is assumed to decay in a time comparable with the lifetime of the Moessbauer state. Spectra have been calculated for both time differential and integral experiments. (orig.) [de

  2. Final-state interaction in processes of deuteron breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome Filho, Z.D.

    1974-12-01

    Interaction between particles in the final state of reactions can strongly affect the experimental angular distributions, as in the scattering processes with the breaking of the deuteron target, where the final state interaction is responsible for the disappearance of the differential cross section in the front direction. It is then necessary to include the contribution of the final state interaction to small angles of incoherent processes particle-deuteron. In this work line, an analysis is made of the process πd → πpn for different values of the incident energy. The data obtained are compared with existing experimental data. The hypothesis is also considered of the nucleon which collides with the incident particle being outside the mass layer. An analytical extension of the resonant amplitude πN outwards the mass layer is also used

  3. Interaction of differentiated human adipocytes with macrophages leads to trogocytosis and selective IL-6 secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Sárvári, Anitta Kinga; Doan-Xuan, Quang-Minh; Bacsó, Zsolt; Csomós, István; Balajthy, Zoltán; Fésüs, László

    2015-01-01

    Obesity leads to adipose tissue inflammation that is characterized by increased release of proinflammatory molecules and the recruitment of activated immune cells. Although macrophages are present in the highest number among the immune cells in obese adipose tissue, not much is known about their direct interaction with adipocytes. We have introduced an ex vivo experimental system to characterize the cellular interactions and the profile of secreted cytokines in cocultures of macrophages and h...

  4. Partial Differential Equations

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    The volume contains a selection of papers presented at the 7th Symposium on differential geometry and differential equations (DD7) held at the Nankai Institute of Mathematics, Tianjin, China, in 1986. Most of the contributions are original research papers on topics including elliptic equations, hyperbolic equations, evolution equations, non-linear equations from differential geometry and mechanics, micro-local analysis.

  5. Bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance in three-segment Frenkel–Kontorova lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Ya-li; Lu, Shi-cai; Hu, Cai-tian; Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    By coupling three nonlinear 1D lattice segments, we demonstrate a thermal insulator model, where the system acts like an insulator for large temperature bias and a conductor for very small temperature bias. We numerically investigate the parameter range of the thermal insulator and find that the nonlinear response (the role of on-site potential), the weakly coupling interaction between each segment, and the small system size collectively contribute to the appearance of bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance (BNDTR). The corresponding exhibition of BNDTR can be explained in terms of effective phonon-band shifts. Our results can provide a new perspective for understanding the microscopic mechanism of negative differential thermal resistance and also would be conducive to further developments in designing and fabricating thermal devices and functional materials. (paper)

  6. Causal structure of oscillations in gene regulatory networks: Boolean analysis of ordinary differential equation attractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengyang; Cheng, Xianrui; Socolar, Joshua E S

    2013-06-01

    A common approach to the modeling of gene regulatory networks is to represent activating or repressing interactions using ordinary differential equations for target gene concentrations that include Hill function dependences on regulator gene concentrations. An alternative formulation represents the same interactions using Boolean logic with time delays associated with each network link. We consider the attractors that emerge from the two types of models in the case of a simple but nontrivial network: a figure-8 network with one positive and one negative feedback loop. We show that the different modeling approaches give rise to the same qualitative set of attractors with the exception of a possible fixed point in the ordinary differential equation model in which concentrations sit at intermediate values. The properties of the attractors are most easily understood from the Boolean perspective, suggesting that time-delay Boolean modeling is a useful tool for understanding the logic of regulatory networks.

  7. System-wide temporal characterization of the proteome and phosphoproteome of human embryonic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T.G.; Prokhorova, Tatyana; Akimov, Vyacheslav

    2011-01-01

    by feeder cells. We profiled 6521 proteins and 23,522 phosphorylation sites, of which almost 50% displayed dynamic changes in phosphorylation status during 24 hours of differentiation. These data are a resource for studies of the events associated with the maintenance of hESC pluripotency and those...... of the matching sequence motif. In addition to identifying previously unknown phosphorylation sites on factors associated with differentiation, such as kinases and transcription factors, we observed dynamic phosphorylation of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). We found a specific interaction of DNMTs during early......To elucidate cellular events underlying the pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we performed parallel quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of hESCs during differentiation initiated by a diacylglycerol analog or transfer to media that had not been conditioned...

  8. Differential and Cooperative Cell Adhesion Regulates Cellular Pattern in Sensory Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Hideru

    2016-01-01

    Animal tissues are composed of multiple cell types arranged in complex and elaborate patterns. In sensory epithelia, including the auditory epithelium and olfactory epithelium, different types of cells are arranged in unique mosaic patterns. These mosaic patterns are evolutionarily conserved, and are thought to be important for hearing and olfaction. Recent progress has provided accumulating evidence that the cellular pattern formation in epithelia involves cell rearrangements, movements, and shape changes. These morphogenetic processes are largely mediated by intercellular adhesion systems. Differential adhesion and cortical tension have been proposed to promote cell rearrangements. Many different types of cells in tissues express various types of cell adhesion molecules. Although cooperative mechanisms between multiple adhesive systems are likely to contribute to the production of complex cell patterns, our current understanding of the cooperative roles between multiple adhesion systems is insufficient to entirely explain the complex mechanisms underlying cellular patterning. Recent studies have revealed that nectins, in cooperation with cadherins, are crucial for the mosaic cellular patterning in sensory organs. The nectin and cadherin systems are interacted with one another, and these interactions provide cells with differential adhesive affinities for complex cellular pattern formations in sensory epithelia, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism.

  9. Solving Differential Equations in R: Package deSolve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karline Soetaert

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the R package deSolve to solve initial value problems (IVP written as ordinary differential equations (ODE, differential algebraic equations (DAE of index 0 or 1 and partial differential equations (PDE, the latter solved using the method of lines approach. The differential equations can be represented in R code or as compiled code. In the latter case, R is used as a tool to trigger the integration and post-process the results, which facilitates model development and application, whilst the compiled code significantly increases simulation speed. The methods implemented are efficient, robust, and well documented public-domain Fortran routines. They include four integrators from the ODEPACK package (LSODE, LSODES, LSODA, LSODAR, DVODE and DASPK2.0. In addition, a suite of Runge-Kutta integrators and special-purpose solvers to efficiently integrate 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional partial differential equations are available. The routines solve both stiff and non-stiff systems, and include many options, e.g., to deal in an efficient way with the sparsity of the Jacobian matrix, or finding the root of equations. In this article, our objectives are threefold: (1 to demonstrate the potential of using R for dynamic modeling, (2 to highlight typical uses of the different methods implemented and (3 to compare the performance of models specified in R code and in compiled code for a number of test cases. These comparisons demonstrate that, if the use of loops is avoided, R code can efficiently integrate problems comprising several thousands of state variables. Nevertheless, the same problem may be solved from 2 to more than 50 times faster by using compiled code compared to an implementation using only R code. Still, amongst the benefits of R are a more flexible and interactive implementation, better readability of the code, and access to R’s high-level procedures. deSolve is the successor of package odesolve which will be deprecated in

  10. Influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on double-layer capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Recently a Poisson-Helmholtz-Boltzmann (PHB) model [Bohinc , Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.031130 85, 031130 (2012)] was developed by accounting for solvent-mediated nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions. Nonelectrostatic interactions are described by a Yukawa-like pair potential. In the present work, we modify the PHB model by adding steric effects (finite ion size) into the free energy to derive governing equations. The modified PHB model is capable of capturing both ion specificity and ion crowding. This modified model is then employed to study the capacitance of the double layer. More specifically, we focus on the influence of nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions on charging a double layer near a flat surface in the presence of steric effects. We numerically compute the differential capacitance as a function of the voltage under various conditions. At small voltages and low salt concentrations (dilute solution), we find out that the predictions from the modified PHB model are the same as those from the classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory, indicating that nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions and steric effects are negligible. At moderate voltages, nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions play an important role in determining the differential capacitance. Generally speaking, nonelectrostatic interactions decrease the capacitance because of additional nonelectrostatic repulsion among excess counterions inside the double layer. However, increasing the voltage gradually favors steric effects, which induce a condensed layer with crowding of counterions near the electrode. Accordingly, the predictions from the modified PHB model collapse onto those computed by the modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory considering steric effects alone. Finally, theoretical predictions are compared and favorably agree with experimental data, in particular, in concentrated solutions, leading one to conclude that the modified PHB model adequately predicts the diffuse

  11. Scaling of differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Langtangen, Hans Petter

    2016-01-01

    The book serves both as a reference for various scaled models with corresponding dimensionless numbers, and as a resource for learning the art of scaling. A special feature of the book is the emphasis on how to create software for scaled models, based on existing software for unscaled models. Scaling (or non-dimensionalization) is a mathematical technique that greatly simplifies the setting of input parameters in numerical simulations. Moreover, scaling enhances the understanding of how different physical processes interact in a differential equation model. Compared to the existing literature, where the topic of scaling is frequently encountered, but very often in only a brief and shallow setting, the present book gives much more thorough explanations of how to reason about finding the right scales. This process is highly problem dependent, and therefore the book features a lot of worked examples, from very simple ODEs to systems of PDEs, especially from fluid mechanics. The text is easily accessible and exam...

  12. Cubic–quintic long-range interactions with double well potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsilifis, Panagiotis A; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G; Rothos, Vassilis M

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we examine the combined effects of cubic and quintic terms of the long-range type in the dynamics of a double well potential. Employing a two-mode approximation, we systematically develop two cubic–quintic ordinary differential equations and assess the contributions of the long-range interactions in each of the relevant prefactors, gauging how to simplify the ensuing dynamical system. Finally, we obtain a reduced canonical description for the conjugate variables of relative population imbalance and relative phase between the two wells and proceed to a dynamical systems analysis of the resulting pair of ordinary differential equations. While in the case of cubic and quintic interactions of the same kind (e.g. both attractive or both repulsive), only a symmetry-breaking bifurcation can be identified, a remarkable effect that emerges e.g. in the setting of repulsive cubic but attractive quintic interactions is a ‘symmetry-restoring’ bifurcation. Namely, in addition to the supercritical pitchfork that leads to a spontaneous symmetry breaking of the antisymmetric state, there is a subcritical pitchfork that eventually reunites the asymmetric daughter branch with the antisymmetric parent one. The relevant bifurcations, the stability of the branches and their dynamical implications are examined both in the reduced (ODE) and in the full (PDE) setting. The model is argued to be of physical relevance, especially so in the context of optical thermal media. (paper)

  13. A Novel Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatographic Method for Differentiating the DNA Interaction Affinity of Environmental Contaminants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia D'Ulivo

    Full Text Available The interaction of chemicals with DNA may lead to genotoxicity, mutation or carcinogenicity. A simple open tubular capillary electrochromatographic method is proposed to rapidly assess the interaction affinity of three environmental contaminants (1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene to DNA by measuring their retention in the capillaries coated with DNA probes. DNA oligonucleotide probes were immobilized on the inner wall of a fused silica capillary that was first derivatized with 3-(aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES. The difference in retention times and factors was considered as the difference in interaction affinity of the contaminants to the DNA probes. The interaction of the contaminants with both double-stranded (dsDNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA coatings was compared. Retention factors of 1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene in the capillary coated with ssDNA probe were 0.29, 0.42, and 0.44, respectively. A similar trend was observed in the capillary coated with dsDNA, indicating that 2,4-diaminotoluene has the highest affinity among the three contaminants. The relative standard deviation (RSD for the retention factors was in the range of 0.05-0.69% (n = 3. The results demonstrated that the developed technique could be applied for preliminary screening purpose to provide DNA interaction affinity information of various environmental contaminants.

  14. The development of a differential game related to terrorism: Min-Max differential game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Monem A. Megahed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study a differential game related to terrorism: Min-Max differential game taking into account the governmental activities such as the education quality, increasing the chances of labor, social justice, religious awareness and security arrangements. A Min-Max differential game between government and terrorist organizations is considered in this study. To obtain the optimal strategy of solving this problem, we study the analytic form of a Min-Max differential game and the governmental activities. Furthermore, a saddle point of a Min-Max differential game is studied.

  15. Negative differential resistance in nanoscale transport in the Coulomb blockade regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parida, Prakash; Lakshmi, S; Pati, Swapan K

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we have studied the transport behavior of coupled quantum dot systems in the Coulomb blockade regime using the master (rate) equation approach. We explore how electron-electron interactions in a donor-acceptor system, resembling weakly coupled quantum dots with varying charging energy, can modify the system's response to an external bias, taking it from normal Coulomb blockade behavior to negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage characteristics.

  16. Weak interactions in deuterons: exchange currents and nucleon-nucleon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautry, F.; Rho, M.; Riska, D.O.

    1976-01-01

    While the meson-exchange electromagnetic current has been tested with an impressive success in the two-nucleon system, nothing much is known about the reliability of the exchange currents in weak interactions. This question is studied using muon absorption in the deuteron, μ - + d→n + n + γ. The meson-exchange current, previously derived in parallel to those of the electromagnetic interaction, is checked for consistency against the p-wave piece of the p + p→d + π + process near threshold and then tested with the total capture rate for which some (though not so accurate) data are available. The same Hamiltonian is then used to calculate the matrix elements for the solar neutrino processes p + p→d + e + + γ and p + p + e - → d + γ in the hope that they would be measured and help resolve the solar neutrino puzzle. Finally a detailed analysis is made of the differential capture rate dGAMMA/dEsub(n), Esub(n) being the kinematic energy in the c.m. of the two neutrons, in the expectation that it will be used to pin down the ever elusive n-n scattering length. (Auth.)

  17. Vector Differential Calculus

    OpenAIRE

    HITZER, Eckhard MS

    2002-01-01

    This paper treats the fundamentals of the vector differential calculus part of universal geometric calculus. Geometric calculus simplifies and unifies the structure and notation of mathematics for all of science and engineering, and for technological applications. In order to make the treatment self-contained, I first compile all important geometric algebra relationships,which are necesssary for vector differential calculus. Then differentiation by vectors is introduced and a host of major ve...

  18. Reduced differential transform method for partial differential equations within local fractional derivative operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jafari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The non-differentiable solution of the linear and non-linear partial differential equations on Cantor sets is implemented in this article. The reduced differential transform method is considered in the local fractional operator sense. The four illustrative examples are given to show the efficiency and accuracy features of the presented technique to solve local fractional partial differential equations.

  19. Single-cell entropy for accurate estimation of differentiation potency from a cell's transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Enver, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    The ability to quantify differentiation potential of single cells is a task of critical importance. Here we demonstrate, using over 7,000 single-cell RNA-Seq profiles, that differentiation potency of a single cell can be approximated by computing the signalling promiscuity, or entropy, of a cell's transcriptome in the context of an interaction network, without the need for feature selection. We show that signalling entropy provides a more accurate and robust potency estimate than other entropy-based measures, driven in part by a subtle positive correlation between the transcriptome and connectome. Signalling entropy identifies known cell subpopulations of varying potency and drug resistant cancer stem-cell phenotypes, including those derived from circulating tumour cells. It further reveals that expression heterogeneity within single-cell populations is regulated. In summary, signalling entropy allows in silico estimation of the differentiation potency and plasticity of single cells and bulk samples, providing a means to identify normal and cancer stem-cell phenotypes. PMID:28569836

  20. What can we learn from high-energy hadron-nucleus interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tow, D.M.

    1979-12-01

    High-energy hadron-nucleus (hA) collisions provide the exciting possibility of giving information about the spacetime development of hadron-hadron interactions and therefore differentiating various multiparticle production models. Some of the major developments in this field during the past decade, both experimentally and theoretically are reviewed. Several general features of the data are pointed out, and several classes of models are discussed. A recently proposed simple spacetime model for high-energy hA collisions is elaborated. Comments are made on the extension to nucleus-nucleus interactions and the future outlook

  1. RAGE, receptor of advanced glycation endoproducts, negatively regulates chondrocytes differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Kosaka

    Full Text Available RAGE, receptor for advanced glycation endoproducts (AGE, has been characterized as an activator of osteoclastgenesis. However, whether RAGE directly regulates chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation is unclear. Here, we show that RAGE has an inhibitory role in chondrocyte differentiation. RAGE expression was observed in chondrocytes from the prehypertrophic to hypertrophic regions. In cultured cells, overexpression of RAGE or dominant-negative-RAGE (DN-RAGE demonstrated that RAGE inhibited cartilaginous matrix production, while DN-RAGE promoted production. Additionally, RAGE regulated Ihh and Col10a1 negatively but upregulated PTHrP receptor. Ihh promoter analysis and real-time PCR analysis suggested that downregulation of Cdxs was the key for RAGE-induced inhibition of chondrocyte differentiation. Overexpression of the NF-κB inhibitor I-κB-SR inhibited RAGE-induced NF-κB activation, but did not influence inhibition of cartilaginous matrix production by RAGE. The inhibitory action of RAGE was restored by the Rho family GTPases inhibitor Toxin B. Furthermore, inhibitory action on Ihh, Col10a1 and Cdxs was reproduced by constitutively active forms, L63RhoA, L61Rac, and L61Cdc42, but not by I-κB-SR. Cdx1 induced Ihh and Col10a1 expressions and directly interacted with Ihh promoter. Retinoic acid (RA partially rescued the inhibitory action of RAGE. These data combined suggests that RAGE negatively regulates chondrocyte differentiation at the prehypertrophic stage by modulating NF-κB-independent and Rho family GTPases-dependent mechanisms.

  2. "Brain sex differentiation" in teleosts: Emerging concepts with potential biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian; Sudhakumari, Cheni-Chery; Mamta, Sajwan-Khatri; Raghuveer, Kavarthapu; Swapna, Immani; Murugananthkumar, Raju

    2015-09-01

    "Brain sex differentiation" in teleosts is a contentious topic of research as most of the earlier reports tend to suggest that gonadal sex differentiation drives brain sex differentiation. However, identification of sex-specific marker genes in the developing brain of teleosts signifies brain-gonadal interaction during early sexual development in lower vertebrates. In this context, the influence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-gonadotropin (GTH) axis on gonadal sex differentiation, if any requires in depth analysis. Presence of seabream (sb) GnRH immunoreactivity (ir-) in the brain of XY Nile tilapia was found as early as 5days post hatch (dph) followed by qualitative reduction in the preoptic area-hypothalamus region. In contrast, in the XX female brain a steady ir- of sbGnRH was evident from 15dph. Earlier studies using sea bass already implied the importance of hypothalamic gonadotropic axis completion during sex differentiation period. Such biphasic pattern of localization was also seen in pituitary GTHs using heterologous antisera in tilapia. However, more recent analysis in the same species could not detect any sexually dimorphic pattern using homologous antisera for pituitary GTHs. Detailed studies on the development of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-gonadal axis in teleosts focusing on hypothalamic monoamines (MA) and MA-related enzymes demonstrated sex-specific differential expression of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) in the early stages of developing male and female brains of tilapia and catfish. The changes in Tph expression was in agreement with the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxytryptophan in the preoptic area-hypothalamus. Considering the stimulatory influence of 5-HT on GnRH and GTH release, it is possible to propose a network association between these correlates during early development, which may bring about brain sex dimorphism in males. A recent study from our laboratory during female brain sex development demonstrated high expression of

  3. Study of KN interaction in zero isospin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, R.M.

    1977-04-01

    The low-energy parameters for kaon-nucleon interaction in the isospin T = 0 state are computed. The differential cross section for K + - deuteron scattering with charge exchange is calculated using the multiple scattering expansion. The various kinematical and dynamical possibilities are discussed. Wave parameters for s, p1/2 and p3/2 are determined by fitting the obtained cross section with the experimental data at low and intermediate energies. (Author) [pt

  4. Short-lived, transitory cell-cell interactions foster migration-dependent aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa D Pope

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, motile cells aggregate into cohesive groups, which give rise to tissues and organs. The role of cell migration in regulating aggregation is unclear. The current paradigm for aggregation is based on an equilibrium model of differential cell adhesivity to neighboring cells versus the underlying substratum. In many biological contexts, however, dynamics is critical. Here, we provide evidence that multicellular aggregation dynamics involves both local adhesive interactions and transport by cell migration. Using time-lapse video microscopy, we quantified the duration of cell-cell contacts among migrating cells that collided and adhered to another cell. This lifetime of cell-cell interactions exhibited a monotonic decreasing dependence on substratum adhesivity. Parallel quantitative measurements of cell migration speed revealed that across the tested range of adhesive substrata, the mean time needed for cells to migrate and encounter another cell was greater than the mean adhesion lifetime, suggesting that aggregation dynamics may depend on cell motility instead of the local differential adhesivity of cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, aggregate size exhibited a biphasic dependence on substratum adhesivity, matching the trend we observed for cell migration speed. Our findings suggest a new role for cell motility, alongside differential adhesion, in regulating developmental aggregation events and motivate new design principles for tuning aggregation dynamics in tissue engineering applications.

  5. The Aptitude-Treatment Interaction Effects on the Learning of Grammar Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwu, Fenfang; Sun, Shuyan

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the interaction between two types of explicit instructional approaches, deduction and explicit-induction, and the level of foreign language aptitude in the learning of grammar rules. Results indicate that on the whole the two equally explicit instructional approaches did not differentially affect learning…

  6. Conformity expectations: Differential effects on IVF twins and singletons' parent-child relationships and adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kayla N; Rueter, Martha A; Connor, Jennifer J; Chen, Muzi; Damario, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Increased utilization of in vitro fertilization (IVF) to treat infertility has resulted in a growing twin birthrate. Despite early childhood risks, twins have fewer psychosocial problems in middle childhood than singleton children. This study proposes that parents' conformity expectations for children have differential effects on parent-child relationships for twin and singleton children, which indirectly explains twins' more optimum psychosocial adjustment. Parental conformity expectations, parent-child relationship satisfaction, and children's emotional, behavioral, and attention problems were assessed in a sample of 288 6- to 12-year-old IVF-conceived twins and singletons. Overall, parents of twins had higher expectations for child conformity to parent rules than singleton parents. Path models demonstrate that twin status and parental expectations for child conformity interact to influence parent-child relationships, and this interaction indirectly accounted for differences in twins' and singletons' psychosocial adjustment. Findings suggest parenting constructs have differential influences on the association between twin status and parent-child relationships. Parenting research, predominantly conducted with singletons, should be reexamined before applying existing research to twin children and their families. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Yeast three-hybrid screen identifies TgBRADIN/GRA24 as a negative regulator of Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoite differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahi V Odell

    Full Text Available Differentiation of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii into its latent bradyzoite stage is a key event in the parasite's life cycle. Compound 2 is an imidazopyridine that was previously shown to inhibit the parasite lytic cycle, in part through inhibition of parasite cGMP-dependent protein kinase. We show here that Compound 2 can also enhance parasite differentiation, and we use yeast three-hybrid analysis to identify TgBRADIN/GRA24 as a parasite protein that interacts directly or indirectly with the compound. Disruption of the TgBRADIN/GRA24 gene leads to enhanced differentiation of the parasite, and the TgBRADIN/GRA24 knockout parasites show decreased susceptibility to the differentiation-enhancing effects of Compound 2. This study represents the first use of yeast three-hybrid analysis to study small-molecule mechanism of action in any pathogenic microorganism, and it identifies a previously unrecognized inhibitor of differentiation in T. gondii. A better understanding of the proteins and mechanisms regulating T. gondii differentiation will enable new approaches to preventing the establishment of chronic infection in this important human pathogen.

  8. Linking Diversity and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Rolf Gregorius

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, the term differentiation refers to differences between collections for the distribution of specified traits of their members, while diversity deals with (effective numbers of trait states (types. Counting numbers of types implies discrete traits such as alleles and genotypes in population genetics or species and taxa in ecology. Comparisons between the concepts of differentiation and diversity therefore primarily refer to discrete traits. Diversity is related to differentiation through the idea that the total diversity of a subdivided collection should be composed of the diversity within the subcollections and a complement called “diversity between subcollections”. The idea goes back to the perception that the mixing of differentiated collections increases diversity. Several existing concepts of “diversity between subcollections” are based on this idea. Among them, β-diversity and fixation (inadvertently called differentiation are the most prominent in ecology and in population genetics, respectively. The pertaining measures are shown to quantify the effect of differentiation in terms of diversity components, though from a dual perspective: the classical perspective of differentiation between collections for their type compositions, and the reverse perspective of differentiation between types for their collection affiliations. A series of measures of diversity-oriented differentiation is presented that consider this dual perspective at two levels of diversity partitioning: the overall type or subcollection diversity and the joint type-subcollection diversity. It turns out that, in contrast with common notions, the measures of fixation (such as FST or GST refer to the perspective of type rather than subcollection differentiation. This unexpected observation strongly suggests that the popular interpretations of fixation measures must be reconsidered.

  9. Study of particle production in hadron-nucleus interactions for neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Palczewski, Tomasz Jan

    The dissertation presents a study of hadron product ion in the NA61/SHINE large acceptance spectrometer at CERN SPS. The differential cross se ctions were obtained for the production of negatively charged pions, neutral Kaons, and Lam bdas from the proton-Carbon interactions at 31 GeV/c. Methods of particle yields extraction from proton Carbon interactions were developed. An analysis chain of global correction m ethod (h- method) was established for the thin carbon target and as well for T2K replica targ et and compared to the results obtained with full particle identification. The h- method permits to cover larger phase space region not otherwise accessible. In addition, a full chain of V 0 analysis was prepared to obtain neutral Kaon and Lambda results in polar angle and momentum variables (p, θ ). Results on the differential production cross sections and mean mul tiplicities in production processes for negatively charge...

  10. Interacting ghost dark energy in Brans-Dicke theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the QCD ghost model of dark energy in the framework of Brans-Dicke cosmology. First, we study the non-interacting ghost dark energy in a flat Brans-Dicke theory. In this case we obtain the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and a differential equation governing the evolution of ghost energy density. Interestingly enough, we find that the equation of state parameter of the non-interacting ghost dark energy can cross the phantom line (w D =-1) provided the parameters of the model are chosen suitably. Then, we generalize the study to the interacting ghost dark energy in both flat and non-flat Brans-Dicke framework and find out that the transition of w D to phantom regime can be more easily achieved for than when resort to the Einstein field equations is made.

  11. Identification of Redox and Glucose-Dependent Txnip Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Forred

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip acts as a negative regulator of thioredoxin function and is a critical modulator of several diseases including, but not limited to, diabetes, ischemia-reperfusion cardiac injury, and carcinogenesis. Therefore, Txnip has become an attractive therapeutic target to alleviate disease pathologies. Although Txnip has been implicated with numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, fatty acid and glucose metabolism, inflammation, and apoptosis, the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are largely unknown. The objective of these studies was to identify Txnip interacting proteins using the proximity-based labeling method, BioID, to understand differential regulation of pleiotropic Txnip cellular functions. The BioID transgene fused to Txnip expressed in HEK293 identified 31 interacting proteins. Many protein interactions were redox-dependent and were disrupted through mutation of a previously described reactive cysteine (C247S. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this model can be used to identify dynamic Txnip interactions due to known physiological regulators such as hyperglycemia. These data identify novel Txnip protein interactions and demonstrate dynamic interactions dependent on redox and glucose perturbations, providing clarification to the pleiotropic cellular functions of Txnip.

  12. Informatics in radiology: radiology gamuts ontology: differential diagnosis for the Semantic Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budovec, Joseph J; Lam, Cesar A; Kahn, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    The Semantic Web is an effort to add semantics, or "meaning," to empower automated searching and processing of Web-based information. The overarching goal of the Semantic Web is to enable users to more easily find, share, and combine information. Critical to this vision are knowledge models called ontologies, which define a set of concepts and formalize the relations between them. Ontologies have been developed to manage and exploit the large and rapidly growing volume of information in biomedical domains. In diagnostic radiology, lists of differential diagnoses of imaging observations, called gamuts, provide an important source of knowledge. The Radiology Gamuts Ontology (RGO) is a formal knowledge model of differential diagnoses in radiology that includes 1674 differential diagnoses, 19,017 terms, and 52,976 links between terms. Its knowledge is used to provide an interactive, freely available online reference of radiology gamuts ( www.gamuts.net ). A Web service allows its content to be discovered and consumed by other information systems. The RGO integrates radiologic knowledge with other biomedical ontologies as part of the Semantic Web. © RSNA, 2014.

  13. Interaction of rare gas metastable atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.Z.F.

    1977-11-01

    The physical and chemical properties of metastable rare gas atoms are discussed and summarized. This is followed by a detailed examination of the various possible pathways whereby the metastable's excess electronic energy can be dissipated. The phenomenon of chemi-ionization is given special emphasis, and a theoretical treatment based on the use of complex (optical) potential is presented. This is followed by a discussion on the unique advantages offered by elastic differential cross section measurements in the apprehension of the fundamental forces governing the ionization process. The methodology generally adopted to extract information about the interaction potential for scattering data is also systematically outlined. Two widely studied chemi-ionization systems are then closely examined in the light of accurate differential cross section measurements obtained in this work. The first system is He(2 3 S) + Ar for which one can obtain an interaction potential which is in good harmony with the experimental results of other investigators. The validity of using the first-order semiclassical approximation for the phase shifts calculation in the presence of significant opacities is also discussed. The second reaction studied is He*+D 2 for which measurements were made on both spin states of the metastable helium. A self-consistent interaction potential is obtained for the triplet system, and reasons are given for not being able to do likewise for the singlet system. The anomalous hump proposed by a number of laboratories is analyzed. Total elastic and ionization cross sections as well as rate constants are calculated for the triplet case. Good agreement with experimental data is found. Finally, the construction and operation of a high power repetitively pulsed nitrogen laser pumped dye laser system is described in great details. Details for the construction and operation of a flashlamp pumped dye laser are likewise given

  14. A two-component model of host–parasitoid interactions: determination of the size of inundative releases of parasitoids in biological pest contro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Herwaarden, van O.A.; Hemerik, L.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2001-01-01

    A two-component differential equation model is formulated for a host–parasitoid interaction. Transient dynamics and population crashes of this system are analysed using differential inequalities. Two different cases can be distinguished: either the intrinsic growth rate of the host population is

  15. Chromatin plasticity as a differentiation index during muscle differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Higuchi, Sayaka; Kawauchi, Keiko; Tsukasaki, Yoshikazu; Ichimura, Taro; Fujita, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Change in the epigenetic landscape during myogenesis was optically investigated. ► Mobility of nuclear proteins was used to state the epigenetic status of the cell. ► Mobility of nuclear proteins decreased as myogenesis progressed in C2C12. ► Differentiation state diagram was developed using parameters obtained. -- Abstract: Skeletal muscle undergoes complicated differentiation steps that include cell-cycle arrest, cell fusion, and maturation, which are controlled through sequential expression of transcription factors. During muscle differentiation, remodeling of the epigenetic landscape is also known to take place on a large scale, determining cell fate. In an attempt to determine the extent of epigenetic remodeling during muscle differentiation, we characterized the plasticity of the chromatin structure using C2C12 myoblasts. Differentiation of C2C12 cells was induced by lowering the serum concentration after they had reached full confluence, resulting in the formation of multi-nucleated myotubes. Upon induction of differentiation, the nucleus size decreased whereas the aspect ratio increased, indicating the presence of force on the nucleus during differentiation. Movement of the nucleus was also suppressed when differentiation was induced, indicating that the plasticity of chromatin changed upon differentiation. To evaluate the histone dynamics during differentiation, FRAP experiment was performed, which showed an increase in the immobile fraction of histone proteins when differentiation was induced. To further evaluate the change in the histone dynamics during differentiation, FCS was performed, which showed a decrease in histone mobility on differentiation. We here show that the plasticity of chromatin decreases upon differentiation, which takes place in a stepwise manner, and that it can be used as an index for the differentiation stage during myogenesis using the state diagram developed with the parameters obtained in this study.

  16. [Adult mortality differentials in Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofman, R

    1994-06-01

    Adult mortality differentials in Argentina are estimated and analyzed using data from the National Social Security Administration. The study of adult mortality has attracted little attention in developing countries because of the scarcity of reliable statistics and the greater importance assigned to demographic phenomena traditionally associated with development, such as infant mortality and fertility. A sample of 39,421 records of retired persons surviving as of June 30, 1988, was analyzed by age, sex, region of residence, relative amount of pension, and social security fund of membership prior to the consolidation of the system in 1967. The thirteen former funds were grouped into the five categories of government, commerce, industry, self-employed, and other, which were assumed to be proxies for the activity sector in which the individual spent his active life. The sample is not representative of the Argentine population, since it excludes the lowest and highest socioeconomic strata and overrepresents men and urban residents. It is, however, believed to be adequate for explaining mortality differentials for most of the population covered by the social security system. The study methodology was based on the technique of logistic analysis and on the use of regional model life tables developed by Coale and others. To evaluate the effect of the study variables on the probability of dying, a regression model of maximal verisimilitude was estimated. The model relates the logit of the probability of death between ages 65 and 95 to the available explanatory variables, including their possible interactions. Life tables were constructed by sex, region of residence, previous pension fund, and income. As a test of external consistency, a model including only age and sex as explanatory variables was constructed using the methodology. The results confirmed consistency between the estimated values and other published estimates. A significant conclusion of the study was that

  17. Finite element analysis of a fluid-structure interaction in flexible pipe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The obtained mathematical system is constituted of four non-linear hyperbolic partial differential equations describing the wave propagation in both pipe wall and liquid flow. The fluid-structure interaction is found to be governed by Poisson's ratio. In this steady finite element method based on Galerkin formulation is applied.

  18. Differential equations for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Holzner, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The fun and easy way to understand and solve complex equations Many of the fundamental laws of physics, chemistry, biology, and economics can be formulated as differential equations. This plain-English guide explores the many applications of this mathematical tool and shows how differential equations can help us understand the world around us. Differential Equations For Dummies is the perfect companion for a college differential equations course and is an ideal supplemental resource for other calculus classes as well as science and engineering courses. It offers step-by-step techniques, practical tips, numerous exercises, and clear, concise examples to help readers improve their differential equation-solving skills and boost their test scores.

  19. Is it possible to develop a cross-country test of social interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Brett; Atler, Karen; Fisher, Anne G

    2017-11-01

    The Evaluation of Social Interaction (ESI) is used in Asia, Australia, North America and Europe. What is considered to be appropriate social interaction, however, differs amongst countries. If social interaction varies, the relative difficulty of the ESI items and types of social exchange also could vary, resulting in differential item functioning (DIF) and test bias in the form of differential test functioning (DTF). Yet, because the ESI scoring criteria are designed to account for culture, the ESI should be free of DIF and DTF. The purpose, therefore, was to determine whether the ESI demonstrates DIF or DTF related to country. A retrospective, descriptive, cross-sectional study of 9811 participants 2-102 years, 55% female, from 12 countries was conducted using many-facet Rasch analyses. DIF analyses compared paired item and social exchange type values by country against a critical effect size (±0.55 logit). DTF analyses compared paired ESI measures by country to 95% confidence intervals. All paired social exchange types and 98.3% of paired items differed by less than ±0.55 logit. All persons fell within 95% confidence intervals. Minimal DIF resulted in no test bias, supporting the cross-country validity of the ESI.

  20. The epithelial-mesenchymal interactions: insights into physiological and pathological aspects of oral tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Babu Rajendra Santosh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the human biological system, the individual cells divide and form tissues and organs. These tissues are hetero-cellular. Basically any tissue consists of an epithelium and the connective tissue. The latter contains mainly mesenchymally-derived tissues with a diversified cell population. The cell continues to grow and differentiate in a pre-programmed manner using a messenger system. The epithelium and the mesenchymal portion of each tissue have two different origins and perform specific functions, but there is a well-defined interaction mechanism, which mediates between them. Epithelial mesenchymal interactions (EMIs are part of this mechanism, which can be regarded as a biological conversation between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations involved in the cellular differentiation of one or both cell populations. EMIs represent a process that is essential for cell growth, cell differentiation and cell multiplication. EMIs are associated with normal physiological processes in the oral cavity, such as odontogenesis, dentino-enamel junction formation, salivary gland development, palatogenesis, and also pathological processes, such as oral cancer. This paper focuses the role EMIs in odontogenesis, salivary gland development, palatogenesis and oral cancer.

  1. Morphological Investigation into Starch Bio-Nanocomposites via Synchrotron Radiation and Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a hydrophilic, plasticized bionanocomposite system involving sorbitol plasticizer, amylose biopolymer, and montmorillonite (MMT for the presence of competitive interactions among them at different moisture content. Synchrotron analysis via small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and thermal analysis using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were performed to understand crystalline growth and the distribution of crystalline domains within the samples. The SAXS diffraction patterns showed reduced interhelix spacing in the amylose network indicating strong amylose-sorbitol interactions. Depending on the sorbitol and MMT concentration, these interactions also affected the free moisture content and crystalline domains. Domains of around 95 Å and 312 Å were found in the low-moisture-content samples as compared to a single domain of 95 Å in the high-moisture-content samples. DSC measurements confirmed that the MMT increased the onset and the melting temperature of nanocomposites. Moreover, the results showed that the ternary interactions among sorbitol-amylose-MMT supported the crystalline heterogeneity through secondary nucleation.

  2. Central and peripheral interactions of hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dremin, I.M. [Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Nechitailo, V.A. [Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); White, S.N. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-12-15

    Surprisingly enough, the ratio of elastic to inelastic cross sections of proton interactions increases with energy in the interval corresponding to ISR→LHC (i.e. from 10 to 10{sup 4} GeV). That leads to special features of their spatial interaction region at these and higher energies. Within the framework of some phenomenological models, we show how the particular ranges of the transferred momenta measured in elastic scattering experiments expose the spatial features of the inelastic interaction region according to the unitarity condition. The difference between their predictions at higher energies is discussed. The notion of central and peripheral collisions of hadrons is treated in terms of the impact-parameter description. It is shown that the shape of the differential cross section in the diffraction cone is mostly determined by collisions with intermediate impact parameters. Elastic scattering at very small transferred momenta is sensitive to peripheral processes with large impact parameters. The role of central collisions in the formation of the diffraction cone is less significant. (orig.)

  3. Mathematical modeling of tumor-associated macrophage interactions with the cancer microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlbacher, Grace; Curtis, Louis T; Lowengrub, John; Frieboes, Hermann B

    2018-01-30

    Immuno-oncotherapy has emerged as a promising means to target cancer. In particular, therapeutic manipulation of tumor-associated macrophages holds promise due to their various and sometimes opposing roles in tumor progression. It is established that M1-type macrophages suppress tumor progression while M2-types support it. Recently, Tie2-expressing macrophages (TEM) have been identified as a distinct sub-population influencing tumor angiogenesis and vascular remodeling as well as monocyte differentiation. This study develops a modeling framework to evaluate macrophage interactions with the tumor microenvironment, enabling assessment of how these interactions may affect tumor progression. M1, M2, and Tie2 expressing variants are integrated into a model of tumor growth representing a metastatic lesion in a highly vascularized organ, such as the liver. Behaviors simulated include M1 release of nitric oxide (NO), M2 release of growth-promoting factors, and TEM facilitation of angiogenesis via Angiopoietin-2 and promotion of monocyte differentiation into M2 via IL-10. The results show that M2 presence leads to larger tumor growth regardless of TEM effects, implying that immunotherapeutic strategies that lead to TEM ablation may fail to restrain growth when the M2 represents a sizeable population. As TEM pro-tumor effects are less pronounced and on a longer time scale than M1-driven tumor inhibition, a more nuanced approach to influence monocyte differentiation taking into account the tumor state (e.g., under chemotherapy) may be desirable. The results highlight the dynamic interaction of macrophages within a growing tumor, and, further, establish the initial feasibility of a mathematical framework that could longer term help to optimize cancer immunotherapy.

  4. Interaction Design Beyond the Product : Creating Technology-Enhanced Activity Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptelinin, Victor; Bannon, Liam J.

    2012-01-01

    The field of interaction design to date has been predominantly concerned with designing products, that is, devices, systems, and more recently services. A growing body of theoretical and empirical analyses suggests that the scope of interaction design needs to be expanded: An explicit concern...... of the field should include not only helping designers create better products but also helping people themselves create better environments for their work, learning, and leisure activities. In this article we argue that expanding the scope of interaction design beyond products requires a revision of some...... of the most central concepts in interaction design, including the notion of “the object of design” and our understanding of the impact of technologies on human practices. The aim of the article is to explore some of these conceptual challenges and discuss possible ways of dealing with them. We differentiate...

  5. Apoptosis in differentiating C2C12 muscle cells selectively targets Bcl-2-deficient myotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoneich, Christian; Dremina, Elena; Galeva, Nadezhda; Sharov, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Muscle cell apoptosis accompanies normal muscle development and regeneration, as well as degenerative diseases and aging. C2C12 murine myoblast cells represent a common model to study muscle differentiation. Though it was already shown that myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells is accompanied by enhanced apoptosis in a fraction of cells, either the cell population sensitive to apoptosis or regulatory mechanisms for the apoptotic response are unclear so far. In the current study we characterize apoptotic phenotypes of different types of C2C12 cells at all stages of differentiation, and report here that myotubes of differentiated C2C12 cells with low levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression are particularly vulnerable to apoptosis even though they are displaying low levels of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax, Bak and Bad. In contrast, reserve cells exhibit higher levels of Bcl-2 and high resistance to apoptosis. The transfection of proliferating myoblasts with Bcl-2 prior to differentiation did not protect against spontaneous apoptosis accompanying differentiation of C2C12 cell but led to Bcl-2 overexpression in myotubes and to significant protection from apoptotic cell loss caused by exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Overall, our data advocate for a Bcl-2-dependent mechanism of apoptosis in differentiated muscle cells. However, downstream processes for spontaneous and hydrogen peroxide induced apoptosis are not completely similar. Apoptosis in differentiating myoblasts and myotubes is regulated not through interaction of Bcl-2 with pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins such as Bax, Bak, and Bad. PMID:24129924

  6. Thermal evolution of magma reservoirs in the shallow crust and incidence on magma differentiation: the St-Jean-du-Doigt layered intrusion (Brittany, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboni, M.; Bussy, F.; Ovtcharova, M.; Schoene, B.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the emplacement and growth of intrusive bodies in terms of mechanism, duration, thermal evolution and rates are fundamental aspects of crustal evolution. Recent studies show that many plutons grow in several Ma by in situ accretion of discrete magma pulses, which constitute small-scale magmatic reservoirs. The residence time of magmas, and hence their capacities to interact and differentiate, are controlled by the local thermal environment. The latter is highly dependant on 1) the emplacement depth, 2) the magmas and country rock composition, 3) the country rock thermal conductivity, 4) the rate of magma injection and 5) the geometry of the intrusion. In shallow level plutons, where magmas solidify quickly, evidence for magma mixing and/or differentiation processes is considered by many authors to be inherited from deeper levels. We show however that in-situ differentiation and magma interactions occurred within basaltic and felsic sills at shallow depth (0.3 GPa) in the St-Jean-du-Doigt bimodal intrusion, France. Field evidence coupled to high precision zircon U-Pb dating document progressive thermal maturation within the incrementally built laccolith. Early m-thick mafic sills are homogeneous and fine-grained with planar contacts with neighbouring felsic sills; within a minimal 0.5 Ma time span, the system gets warmer, adjacent sills interact and mingle, and mafic sills are differentiating in the top 40 cm of the layer. Rheological and thermal modelling show that observed in-situ differentiation-accumulation processes may be achieved in less than 10 years at shallow depth, provided that (1) the differentiating sills are injected beneath consolidated, yet still warm basalt sills, which act as low conductive insulating screens, (2) the early mafic sills accreted under the roof of the laccolith as a 100m thick top layer within 0.5 My, and (3) subsequent and sustained magmatic activity occurred on a short time scale (years) at an injection rate of ca. 0

  7. Modelling interaction cross sections for intermediate and low energy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toburen, L.H.; Shinpaugh, J.L.; Justiniano, E.L.B.

    2002-01-01

    When charged particles slow in tissue they undergo electron capture and loss processes than can have profound effects on subsequent interaction cross sections. Although a large amount of data exists for the interaction of bare charged particles with atoms and molecules, few experiments have been reported for these 'dressed' particles. Projectile electrons contribute to an impact-parameter-dependent screening of the projectile charge that precludes straightforward scaling of energy loss cross sections from those of bare charged particles. The objective of this work is to develop an analytical model for the energy-loss-dependent effects of screening on differential ionisation cross sections that can be used in track structure calculations for high LET ions. As a first step a model of differential ionisation cross sections for bare ions has been combined with a simple screening model to explore cross sections for intermediate and low energy dressed ions in collisions with atomic and molecular gas targets. The model is described briefly and preliminary results compared to measured electron energy spectra. (author)

  8. Thyroid Hormone in the CNS: Contribution of Neuron-Glia Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Mami

    2018-01-01

    The endocrine system and the central nervous system (CNS) are intimately linked. Among hormones closely related to the nervous system, thyroid hormones (THs) are critical for the regulation of development and differentiation of neurons and neuroglia and hence for development and function of the CNS. T3 (3,3',5-triiodothyronine), an active form of TH, is important not only for neuronal development but also for differentiation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, and for microglial development. In adult brain, T3 affects glial morphology with sex- and age-dependent manner and therefore may affect their function, leading to influence on neuron-glia interaction. T3 is an important signaling factor that affects microglial functions such as migration and phagocytosis via complex mechanisms. Therefore, dysfunction of THs may impair glial function as well as neuronal function and thus disturb the brain, which may cause mental disorders. Investigations on molecular and cellular basis of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism will help us to understand changes in neuron-glia interaction and therefore consequent psychiatric symptoms. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Polymeric membranes modulate human keratinocyte differentiation in specific epidermal layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Simona; Morelli, Sabrina; Giordano, Francesca; Gordano, Amalia; Bartolo, Loredana De

    2016-10-01

    In vitro models of human bioengineered skin substitutes are an alternative to animal experimentation for testing the effects and toxicity of drugs, cosmetics and pollutants. For the first time specific and distinct human epidermal strata were engineered by using membranes and keratinocytes. To this purpose, biodegradable membranes of chitosan (CHT), polycaprolactone (PCL) and a polymeric blend of CHT-PCL were prepared by phase-inversion technique and characterized in order to evaluate their morphological, physico-chemical and mechanical properties. The capability of membranes to modulate keratinocyte differentiation inducing specific interactions in epidermal membrane systems was investigated. The overall results demonstrated that the membrane properties strongly influence the cell morpho-functional behaviour of human keratinocytes, modulating their terminal differentiation, with the creation of specific epidermal strata or a fully proliferative epidermal multilayer system. In particular, human keratinocytes adhered on CHT and CHT-PCL membranes, forming the structure of the epidermal top layers, such as the corneum and granulosum strata, characterized by withdrawal or reduction from the cell cycle and cell proliferation. On the PCL membrane, keratinocytes developed an epidermal basal lamina, with high proliferating cells that stratified and migrated over time to form a complete differentiating epidermal multilayer system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Horizontally Differentiated Store Brands: Production Outsourcing to National Brand Manufacturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Shindo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study a retailer's strategic decision with regard to outsourcing the production of such types of store brands (SBs to national brand (NB manufacturers. The wholesale price of NB is assumed to be set by the manufacturer, while that of the SB is assumed to be set by the retailer. When a retailer outsources SB production to an NB manufacturer, the NB manufacturer might suffer from cannibalization due to offering both the SB and the NB, implying that a strategic interaction between the retailer and manufacturer is an important issue. Based on this motivation, we mainly focus on the strategy of a dominant retailer in such a situation and investigate it with a game-theoretic approach. We show that the optimal strategy for the SB retailer sensitively depends on the degree of differentiation between the SB and the NB. In particular, if both products are less differentiated, the retailer benefits from offering only the SB, and, in this case, the retailer should offer its wholesale price, after the manufacturer sets the NB wholesale price. Furthermore, it is shown that the optimal strategies of the retailer are socially efficient, if and only if the SB and the NB are sufficiently differentiated.

  11. Auditory-Motor Interactions in Pediatric Motor Speech Disorders: Neurocomputational Modeling of Disordered Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, H.R.; Maassen, B.A.M.; Guenther, F.H.; Brumberg, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose: Differentiating the symptom complex due to phonological-level disorders, speech delay and pediatric motor speech disorders is a controversial issue in the field of pediatric speech and language pathology. The present study investigated the developmental interaction between

  12. Auditory-motor interactions in pediatric motor speech disorders: Neurocomputational modeling of disordered development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, H.; Maassen, B.; Guenther, F. H.; Brumberg, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Differentiating the symptom complex due to phonological-level disorders, speech delay and pediatric motor speech disorders is a controversial issue in the field of pediatric speech and language pathology. The present study investigated the developmental interaction between

  13. Complex interactions between human myoblasts and the surrounding 3D fibrin-based matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Chiron

    Full Text Available Anchorage of muscle cells to the extracellular matrix is crucial for a range of fundamental biological processes including migration, survival and differentiation. Three-dimensional (3D culture has been proposed to provide a more physiological in vitro model of muscle growth and differentiation than routine 2D cultures. However, muscle cell adhesion and cell-matrix interplay of engineered muscle tissue remain to be determined. We have characterized cell-matrix interactions in 3D muscle culture and analyzed their consequences on cell differentiation. Human myoblasts were embedded in a fibrin matrix cast between two posts, cultured until confluence, and then induced to differentiate. Myoblasts in 3D aligned along the longitudinal axis of the gel. They displayed actin stress fibers evenly distributed around the nucleus and a cortical mesh of thin actin filaments. Adhesion sites in 3D were smaller in size than in rigid 2D culture but expression of adhesion site proteins, including α5 integrin and vinculin, was higher in 3D compared with 2D (p<0.05. Myoblasts and myotubes in 3D exhibited thicker and ellipsoid nuclei instead of the thin disk-like shape of the nuclei in 2D (p<0.001. Differentiation kinetics were faster in 3D as demonstrated by higher mRNA concentrations of α-actinin and myosin. More important, the elastic modulus of engineered muscle tissues increased significantly from 3.5 ± 0.8 to 7.4 ± 4.7 kPa during proliferation (p<0.05 and reached 12.2 ± 6.0 kPa during differentiation (p<0.05, thus attesting the increase of matrix stiffness during proliferation and differentiation of the myocytes. In conclusion, we reported modulations of the adhesion complexes, the actin cytoskeleton and nuclear shape in 3D compared with routine 2D muscle culture. These findings point to complex interactions between muscle cells and the surrounding matrix with dynamic regulation of the cell-matrix stiffness.

  14. Solving Linear Differential Equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, K.A.; Put, M. van der

    2010-01-01

    The theme of this paper is to 'solve' an absolutely irreducible differential module explicitly in terms of modules of lower dimension and finite extensions of the differential field K. Representations of semi-simple Lie algebras and differential Galo is theory are the main tools. The results extend

  15. Fundamentals of differential beamforming

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob; Pan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a systematic study of the fundamental theory and methods of beamforming with differential microphone arrays (DMAs), or differential beamforming in short. It begins with a brief overview of differential beamforming and some popularly used DMA beampatterns such as the dipole, cardioid, hypercardioid, and supercardioid, before providing essential background knowledge on orthogonal functions and orthogonal polynomials, which form the basis of differential beamforming. From a physical perspective, a DMA of a given order is defined as an array that measures the differential acoustic pressure field of that order; such an array has a beampattern in the form of a polynomial whose degree is equal to the DMA order. Therefore, the fundamental and core problem of differential beamforming boils down to the design of beampatterns with orthogonal polynomials. But certain constraints also have to be considered so that the resulting beamformer does not seriously amplify the sensors’ self noise and the mism...

  16. Differential Effects of Sodium Butyrate and Lithium Chloride on Rhesus Monkey Trophoblast Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarsini Kumar

    Full Text Available Trophoblast differentiation during early placental development is critical for successful pregnancy and aberrant differentiation causes preeclampsia and early pregnancy loss. During the first trimester, cytotrophoblasts are exposed to low oxygen tension (equivalent to~2%-3% O2 and differentiation proceeds along an extravillous pathway (giving rise to invasive extravillous cytotrophoblasts and a villous pathway (giving rise to multinucleated syncytiotrophoblast. Interstitial extravillous cytotrophoblasts invade the decidua, while endovascular extravillous cytotrophoblasts are involved in re-modelling uterine spiral arteries. We tested the idea that sodium butyrate (an epigenetic modulator induces trophoblast differentiation in early gestation rhesus monkey trophoblasts through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The results show that syncytiotrophoblast formation was increased by butyrate, accompanied by nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, and increased expression of EnvV2 and galectin-1 (two factors thought to be involved in trophoblast fusion. Surprisingly, the expression of GCM1 and syncytin-2 was not affected by sodium butyrate. When trophoblasts were incubated with lithium chloride, a GSK3 inhibitor that mimics Wnt activation, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin also occurred but differentiation into syncytiotrophoblast was not observed. Instead the cells differentiated to mononucleated spindle-shaped cells and showed molecular and behavioral characteristics of endovascular trophoblasts. Another highly specific inhibitor of GSK3, CHIR99021, failed to induce endovascular trophoblast characteristics. These observations suggest that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway correlates with both trophoblast differentiation pathways, but that additional factors determine specific cell fate decisions. Other experiments suggested that the differential effects of sodium butyrate and lithium chloride might be explained by their effects on TNF

  17. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  18. An effective Skyrme-type interaction for the calculation of nuclear structures of the whole mass table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waroquier, M.E.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov formalism is extended for 3 body interactions and applied to spherical nuclei. The structure of the proposed extension of the Skyrme-type interaction is given, together with the analytical expression of the corresponding Hartree-Fock differential equation. The Skyrme-force parameters are modified in order to be able to reproduce the ground state properties. The problem of the spin-stability of the proposed interaction is treated. The Skyrme-interaction is applied as particle-hole interaction and saturation properties are studied. Structure of the charge, neutron density distributions and changes introduced by adding protons or neutrons are treated. (MDC)

  19. Differential algebras without differentials: An easy C++ implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Automated differentiation can be motivated and explained rather plainly without any reference to infinitesimals or differentials whatsoever. We shall describe one possible approach in this paper. The method which we shall use will suggest its own implementation. However, FORTRAN is not the most natural language in which to carry it out. In the second section we shall describe an almost trivial implementation using C++. (Indeed, one of the motivations for writing this paper is to persuade militant FORTRAN extremists to invest the four or five days necessary to learn this powerful and easy language.) Take heed, however, that what we describe below is only a stripped-down implementation, written in three days, of differential algebra's most essential features; it is not as robust as and does not contain the battery of tools available in Berz's DA package, the product of a significant amount of work. 10 refs

  20. Differential algebras without differentials: An easy C++ implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelotti, L.

    1989-03-01

    Automated differentiation can be motivated and explained rather plainly without any reference to infinitesimals or differentials whatsoever. We shall describe one possible approach in this paper. The method which we shall use will suggest its own implementation. However, FORTRAN is not the most natural language in which to carry it out. In the second section we shall describe an almost trivial implementation using C++. (Indeed, one of the motivations for writing this paper is to persuade militant FORTRAN extremists to invest the four or five days necessary to learn this powerful and easy language.) Take heed, however, that what we describe below is only a stripped-down implementation, written in three days, of differential algebra's most essential features; it is not as robust as and does not contain the battery of tools available in Berz's DA package, the product of a significant amount of work. 10 refs.

  1. Introduction to differentiable manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Louis

    2009-01-01

    The first book to treat manifold theory at an introductory level, this text surveys basic concepts in the modern approach to differential geometry. The first six chapters define and illustrate differentiable manifolds, and the final four chapters investigate the roles of differential structures in a variety of situations.Starting with an introduction to differentiable manifolds and their tangent spaces, the text examines Euclidean spaces, their submanifolds, and abstract manifolds. Succeeding chapters explore the tangent bundle and vector fields and discuss their association with ordinary diff

  2. Competitive interactions between co-occurring invaders: identifying asymmetries between two invasive crayfish species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudina, S.; Galic, N.G.; Roessink, I.; Hock, K.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystems today increasingly suffer invasions by multiple invasive species. Complex interactions between invasive species can have different fitness implications for each invader, which can in turn determine the future progression of their invasions and result in differential impacts on native

  3. Cartan for beginners differential geometry via moving frames and exterior differential systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ivey, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    Two central aspects of Cartan's approach to differential geometry are the theory of exterior differential systems (EDS) and the method of moving frames. This book presents thorough and modern treatments of both subjects, including their applications to both classic and contemporary problems in geometry. It begins with the classical differential geometry of surfaces and basic Riemannian geometry in the language of moving frames, along with an elementary introduction to exterior differential systems. Key concepts are developed incrementally, with motivating examples leading to definitions, theorems, and proofs. Once the basics of the methods are established, the authors develop applications and advanced topics. One notable application is to complex algebraic geometry, where they expand and update important results from projective differential geometry. As well, the book features an introduction to G-structures and a treatment of the theory of connections. The techniques of EDS are also applied to obtain explici...

  4. Differential privacy-based evaporative cooling feature selection and classification with relief-F and random forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trang T; Simmons, W Kyle; Misaki, Masaya; Bodurka, Jerzy; White, Bill C; Savitz, Jonathan; McKinney, Brett A

    2017-09-15

    Classification of individuals into disease or clinical categories from high-dimensional biological data with low prediction error is an important challenge of statistical learning in bioinformatics. Feature selection can improve classification accuracy but must be incorporated carefully into cross-validation to avoid overfitting. Recently, feature selection methods based on differential privacy, such as differentially private random forests and reusable holdout sets, have been proposed. However, for domains such as bioinformatics, where the number of features is much larger than the number of observations p≫n , these differential privacy methods are susceptible to overfitting. We introduce private Evaporative Cooling, a stochastic privacy-preserving machine learning algorithm that uses Relief-F for feature selection and random forest for privacy preserving classification that also prevents overfitting. We relate the privacy-preserving threshold mechanism to a thermodynamic Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, where the temperature represents the privacy threshold. We use the thermal statistical physics concept of Evaporative Cooling of atomic gases to perform backward stepwise privacy-preserving feature selection. On simulated data with main effects and statistical interactions, we compare accuracies on holdout and validation sets for three privacy-preserving methods: the reusable holdout, reusable holdout with random forest, and private Evaporative Cooling, which uses Relief-F feature selection and random forest classification. In simulations where interactions exist between attributes, private Evaporative Cooling provides higher classification accuracy without overfitting based on an independent validation set. In simulations without interactions, thresholdout with random forest and private Evaporative Cooling give comparable accuracies. We also apply these privacy methods to human brain resting-state fMRI data from a study of major depressive disorder. Code

  5. Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Namrata; Barletta, Justine A

    2014-12-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma (PDTC) has been recognized for the past 30 years as an entity showing intermediate differentiation and clinical behavior between well-differentiated thyroid carcinomas (ie, papillary thyroid carcinoma and follicular thyroid carcinoma) and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma; however, there has been considerable controversy around the definition of PDTC. In this review, the evolution in the definition of PDTC, current diagnostic criteria, differential diagnoses, potentially helpful immunohistochemical studies, and molecular alterations are discussed with the aim of highlighting where the diagnosis of PDTC currently stands. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Ordinary differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Richard K

    1982-01-01

    Ordinary Differential Equations is an outgrowth of courses taught for a number of years at Iowa State University in the mathematics and the electrical engineering departments. It is intended as a text for a first graduate course in differential equations for students in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences. Although differential equations is an old, traditional, and well-established subject, the diverse backgrounds and interests of the students in a typical modern-day course cause problems in the selection and method of presentation of material. In order to compensate for this diversity,

  7. Uncertain differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the basic concepts of and latest findings in the area of differential equations with uncertain factors. It covers the analytic method and numerical method for solving uncertain differential equations, as well as their applications in the field of finance. Furthermore, the book provides a number of new potential research directions for uncertain differential equation. It will be of interest to researchers, engineers and students in the fields of mathematics, information science, operations research, industrial engineering, computer science, artificial intelligence, automation, economics, and management science.

  8. Differential Effects for Sexual Risk Behavior: An Application of Finite Mixture Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza, Stephanie T.; Kugler, Kari C.; Mathur, Charu

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the multiple factors that place individuals at risk for sexual risk behavior is critical for developing effective intervention programs. Regression-based methods are commonly used to estimate the average effects of risk factors, however such results can be difficult to translate to prevention implications at the individual level. Although differential effects can be examined to some extent by including interaction terms, as risk factors and moderators are added to the model inte...

  9. Analysis of hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic hepatic carcinoma via functional modules in a protein-protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to identify protein clusters with potential functional relevance in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and metastatic hepatic carcinoma using network analysis. Materials and Methods: We used human protein interaction data to build a protein-protein interaction network with Cytoscape and then derived functional clusters using MCODE. Combining the gene expression profiles, we calculated the functional scores for the clusters and selected statistically significant clusters. Meanwhile, Gene Ontology was used to assess the functionality of these clusters. Finally, a support vector machine was trained on the gold standard data sets. Results: The differentially expressed genes of HCC were mainly involved in metabolic and signaling processes. We acquired 13 significant modules from the gene expression profiles. The area under the curve value based on the differentially expressed modules were 98.31%, which outweighed the classification with DEGs. Conclusions: Differentially expressed modules are valuable to screen biomarkers combined with functional modules.

  10. Evolution of plant reproduction: from fusion and dispersal to interaction and communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, M.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the existing data concerning the evolution of the sexual reproduction, it is argued that the processes of sex differentiation and interactions play a key role in evolution. From the beginning environment and organism are unified. In a changing dynamic environment life originates and the

  11. Calsyntenin-3 molecular architecture and interaction with neurexin 1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhuoyang; Wang, Yun; Chen, Fang; Tong, Huimin; Reddy, M V V V Sekhar; Luo, Lin; Seshadrinathan, Suchithra; Zhang, Lei; Holthauzen, Luis Marcelo F; Craig, Ann Marie; Ren, Gang; Rudenko, Gabby

    2014-12-12

    Calsyntenin 3 (Cstn3 or Clstn3), a recently identified synaptic organizer, promotes the development of synapses. Cstn3 localizes to the postsynaptic membrane and triggers presynaptic differentiation. Calsyntenin members play an evolutionarily conserved role in memory and learning. Cstn3 was recently shown in cell-based assays to interact with neurexin 1α (n1α), a synaptic organizer that is implicated in neuropsychiatric disease. Interaction would permit Cstn3 and n1α to form a trans-synaptic complex and promote synaptic differentiation. However, it is contentious whether Cstn3 binds n1α directly. To understand the structure and function of Cstn3, we determined its architecture by electron microscopy and delineated the interaction between Cstn3 and n1α biochemically and biophysically. We show that Cstn3 ectodomains form monomers as well as tetramers that are stabilized by disulfide bonds and Ca(2+), and both are probably flexible in solution. We show further that the extracellular domains of Cstn3 and n1α interact directly and that both Cstn3 monomers and tetramers bind n1α with nanomolar affinity. The interaction is promoted by Ca(2+) and requires minimally the LNS domain of Cstn3. Furthermore, Cstn3 uses a fundamentally different mechanism to bind n1α compared with other neurexin partners, such as the synaptic organizer neuroligin 2, because Cstn3 does not strictly require the sixth LNS domain of n1α. Our structural data suggest how Cstn3 as a synaptic organizer on the postsynaptic membrane, particularly in tetrameric form, may assemble radially symmetric trans-synaptic bridges with the presynaptic synaptic organizer n1α to recruit and spatially organize proteins into networks essential for synaptic function. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Pattern formation of a nonlocal, anisotropic interaction model

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2017-11-24

    We consider a class of interacting particle models with anisotropic, repulsive–attractive interaction forces whose orientations depend on an underlying tensor field. An example of this class of models is the so-called Kücken–Champod model describing the formation of fingerprint patterns. This class of models can be regarded as a generalization of a gradient flow of a nonlocal interaction potential which has a local repulsion and a long-range attraction structure. In contrast to isotropic interaction models the anisotropic forces in our class of models cannot be derived from a potential. The underlying tensor field introduces an anisotropy leading to complex patterns which do not occur in isotropic models. This anisotropy is characterized by one parameter in the model. We study the variation of this parameter, describing the transition between the isotropic and the anisotropic model, analytically and numerically. We analyze the equilibria of the corresponding mean-field partial differential equation and investigate pattern formation numerically in two dimensions by studying the dependence of the parameters in the model on the resulting patterns.

  13. Pattern formation of a nonlocal, anisotropic interaction model

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin; Dü ring, Bertram; Kreusser, Lisa Maria; Markowich, Peter A.; Schö nlieb, Carola-Bibiane

    2017-01-01

    We consider a class of interacting particle models with anisotropic, repulsive–attractive interaction forces whose orientations depend on an underlying tensor field. An example of this class of models is the so-called Kücken–Champod model describing the formation of fingerprint patterns. This class of models can be regarded as a generalization of a gradient flow of a nonlocal interaction potential which has a local repulsion and a long-range attraction structure. In contrast to isotropic interaction models the anisotropic forces in our class of models cannot be derived from a potential. The underlying tensor field introduces an anisotropy leading to complex patterns which do not occur in isotropic models. This anisotropy is characterized by one parameter in the model. We study the variation of this parameter, describing the transition between the isotropic and the anisotropic model, analytically and numerically. We analyze the equilibria of the corresponding mean-field partial differential equation and investigate pattern formation numerically in two dimensions by studying the dependence of the parameters in the model on the resulting patterns.

  14. Auto-Zero Differential Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilligan, Gerard T. (Inventor); Aslam, Shahid (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An autozero amplifier may include a window comparator network to monitor an output offset of a differential amplifier. The autozero amplifier may also include an integrator to receive a signal from a latched window comparator network, and send an adjustment signal back to the differential amplifier to reduce an offset of the differential amplifier.

  15. Nup358 interacts with Dishevelled and aPKC to regulate neuronal polarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankhuri Vyas

    2013-10-01

    Par polarity complex, consisting of Par3, Par6, and aPKC, plays a conserved role in the establishment and maintenance of polarization in diverse cellular contexts. Recent reports suggest that Dishevelled (Dvl, a cytoplasmic mediator of Wnt signalling, interacts with atypical protein kinase C and regulates its activity during neuronal differentiation and directed cell migration. Here we show that Nup358 (also called RanBP2, a nucleoporin previously implicated in polarity during directed cell migration, interacts with Dishevelled and aPKC through its N-terminal region (BPN and regulates axon–dendrite differentiation of cultured hippocampal neurons. Depletion of endogenous Nup358 leads to generation of multiple axons, whereas overexpression of BPN abrogates the process of axon formation. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Dvl or inhibition of aPKC by a pseudosubstrate inhibitor significantly reverses the multiple axon phenotype produced by Nup358 depletion. Collectively, these data suggest that Nup358 plays an important role in regulating neuronal polarization upstream to Dvl and aPKC.

  16. Low energy positron interactions with uracil—Total scattering, positronium formation, and differential elastic scattering cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, E. K.; Boadle, R. A.; Machacek, J. R.; Makochekanwa, C.; Sullivan, J. P. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Chiari, L. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, 5001 SA (Australia); Buckman, S. J., E-mail: Stephen.buckman@anu.edu.au [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Brunger, M. J. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, 5001 SA (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fısica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigationes Cientıficas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fısica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ingolfsson, O. [Department of Chemistry, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavík 107 (Iceland)

    2014-07-21

    Measurements of the grand total and total positronium formation cross sections for positron scattering from uracil have been performed for energies between 1 and 180 eV, using a trap-based beam apparatus. Angular, quasi-elastic differential cross section measurements at 1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 eV are also presented and discussed. These measurements are compared to existing experimental results and theoretical calculations, including our own calculations using a variant of the independent atom approach.

  17. physico-chemical studies on DNA-drugs interaction and their analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, S.A

    2003-01-01

    The present thesis is devoted to study the interaction of some antibacterial agents i.e. fluoroquinolones . these agents include ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin , ofloxacin , pefloxacin and levofloxacin with DNA. voltammetric and spectrophotometric methods were used to carry out this study. Also the interaction of the suggested drugs with DNA at the surface of carbon electrode by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse techniques is examined. The work comprises three chapters: (1) includes an introduction of voltammetry , differential pulse, drug-DNA interaction and fluoroquinoline- DNA interaction and literature survey on fluoroquinolones.Chapter (II) includes preparation of the solutions and instruments which were used for the measurements using the different techniques.Chapter(III) comprises three parts; (1) deals with the interaction of fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin and levofloxacin) with DNA in solution have been investigated by means of voltammetry and spectroscopy . the results show that the values of binding constant of fluoroquinolne drugs with DNA obtained through the changes of the anodic peak current, and their values are, 30900,31000,32300,32000 and 32500 M -1 respectively. or changes of absorption and values are, 36000,30200.38300,36500 and 34400 M -1 receptively.(II) includes voltammetric behavior of fluoroquinolones on DNA-modified carbon paste electrode. (III)includes analytical application for proposed method for the determination of levofloxacin as a typical example for fluoroquinolones. Concentration in the range 5.0x10 -7 ∼ 5.0x10 -6 mol/L , with a detection limit of 1.0x10 -7 mol/L. direct and simple determination of levofloxacin in urine was established with no manipulation of urine sample other than dilution 1:10

  18. Analysis of root proteome unravels differential molecular responses during compatible and incompatible interaction between chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri Race1 (Foc1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Moniya; Gupta, Sumanti; Bhar, Anirban; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Basu, Debabrata; Das, Sampa

    2014-11-03

    Vascular wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri Race 1 (Foc1) is a serious disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) accounting for approximately 10-15% annual crop loss. The fungus invades the plant via roots, colonizes the xylem vessels and prevents the upward translocation of water and nutrients, finally resulting in wilting of the entire plant. Although comparative transcriptomic profiling have highlighted some important signaling molecules, but proteomic studies involving chickpea-Foc1 are limited. The present study focuses on comparative root proteomics of susceptible (JG62) and resistant (WR315) chickpea genotypes infected with Foc1, to understand the mechanistic basis of susceptibility and/or resistance. The differential and unique proteins of both genotypes were identified at 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h post Foc1 inoculation. 2D PAGE analyses followed by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS identified 100 differentially (>1.5 foldproteins. These proteins were further categorized into 10 functional classes and grouped into GO (gene ontology) categories. Network analyses of identified proteins revealed intra and inter relationship of these proteins with their neighbors as well as their association with different defense signaling pathways. qRT-PCR analyses were performed to correlate the mRNA and protein levels of some proteins of representative classes. The differential and unique proteins identified indicate their involvement in early defense signaling of the host. Comparative analyses of expression profiles of obtained proteins suggest that albeit some common components participate in early defense signaling in both susceptible and resistant genotypes, but their roles and regulation differ in case of compatible and/or incompatible interactions. Thus, functional characterization of identified PR proteins (PR1, BGL2, TLP), Trypsin protease inhibitor, ABA responsive protein, cysteine protease, protein disulphide isomerase, ripening related protein and albumins are

  19. Nonlinear degenerate cross-diffusion systems with nonlocal interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Di Francesco, M.; Esposito, A.; Fagioli, S.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a class of systems of partial differential equations with nonlinear cross-diffusion and nonlocal interactions, which are of interest in several contexts in social sciences, finance, biology, and real world applications. Assuming a uniform "coerciveness" assumption on the diffusion part, which allows to consider a large class of systems with degenerate cross-diffusion (i.e. of porous medium type) and relaxes sets of assumptions previously considered in the literature, we prove g...

  20. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells stimulate proliferation and neuronal differentiation of retinal progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xia

    Full Text Available During retina development, retinal progenitor cell (RPC proliferation and differentiation are regulated by complex inter- and intracellular interactions. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs are reported to express a variety of cytokines and neurotrophic factors, which have powerful trophic and protective functions for neural tissue-derived cells. Here, we show that the expanded RPC cultures treated with BMSC-derived conditioned medium (CM which was substantially enriched for bFGF and CNTF, expressed clearly increased levels of nuclear receptor TLX, an essential regulator of neural stem cell (NSC self-renewal, as well as betacellulin (BTC, an EGF-like protein described as supporting NSC expansion. The BMSC CM- or bFGF-treated RPCs also displayed an obviously enhanced proliferation capability, while BMSC CM-derived bFGF knocked down by anti-bFGF, the effect of BMSC CM on enhancing RPC proliferation was partly reversed. Under differentiation conditions, treatment with BMSC CM or CNTF markedly favoured RPC differentiation towards retinal neurons, including Brn3a-positive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs and rhodopsin-positive photoreceptors, and clearly diminished retinal glial cell differentiation. These findings demonstrate that BMSCs supported RPC proliferation and neuronal differentiation which may be partly mediated by BMSC CM-derived bFGF and CNTF, reveal potential limitations of RPC culture systems, and suggest a means for optimizing RPC cell fate determination in vitro.

  1. Singular stochastic differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cherny, Alexander S

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce, in this research monograph on stochastic differential equations, a class of points termed isolated singular points. Stochastic differential equations possessing such points (called singular stochastic differential equations here) arise often in theory and in applications. However, known conditions for the existence and uniqueness of a solution typically fail for such equations. The book concentrates on the study of the existence, the uniqueness, and, what is most important, on the qualitative behaviour of solutions of singular stochastic differential equations. This is done by providing a qualitative classification of isolated singular points, into 48 possible types.

  2. Conditions Promoting Mycorrhizal Parasitism Are of Minor Importance for Competitive Interactions in Two Differentially Mycotrophic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, Martina; Unger, Stephan; Hellmann, Christine; Beyschlag, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) may range along a broad continuum from strong mutualism to parasitism, with mycorrhizal benefits received by the plant being determined by climatic and edaphic conditions affecting the balance between carbon costs vs. nutritional benefits. Thus, environmental conditions promoting either parasitism or mutualism can influence the mycorrhizal growth dependency (MGD) of a plant and in consequence may play an important role in plant-plant interactions. In a multifactorial field experiment we aimed at disentangling the effects of environmental and edaphic conditions, namely the availability of light, phosphorus and nitrogen, and the implications for competitive interactions between Hieracium pilosella and Corynephorus canescens for the outcome of the AMF symbiosis. Both species were planted in single, intraspecific and interspecific combinations using a target-neighbor approach with six treatments distributed along a gradient simulating conditions for the interaction between plants and AMF ranking from mutualistic to parasitic. Across all treatments we found mycorrhizal association of H. pilosella being consistently mutualistic, while pronounced parasitism was observed in C. canescens, indicating that environmental and edaphic conditions did not markedly affect the cost:benefit ratio of the mycorrhizal symbiosis in both species. Competitive interactions between both species were strongly affected by AMF, with the impact of AMF on competition being modulated by colonization. Biomass in both species was lowest when grown in interspecific competition, with colonization being increased in the less mycotrophic C. canescens, while decreased in the obligate mycotrophic H. pilosella. Although parasitism-promoting conditions negatively affected MGD in C. canescens, these effects were small as compared to growth decreases related to increased colonization levels in this species. Thus, the lack of plant control over

  3. Conditions Promoting Mycorrhizal Parasitism are of Minor Importance for Competitive Interactions in Two Differentially Mycotrophic Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Friede

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Interactions of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF may range along a broad continuum from strong mutualism to parasitism, with mycorrhizal benefits received by the plant being determined by climatic and edaphic conditions affecting the balance between carbon costs vs. nutritional benefits. Thus, environmental conditions promoting either parasitism or mutualism can influence the mycorrhizal growth dependency (MGD of a plant and in consequence may play an important role in plant-plant interactions.In a multifactorial field experiment we aimed at disentangling the effects of environmental and edaphic conditions, namely the availability of light, phosphorus and nitrogen, and the implications for competitive interactions between Hieracium pilosella and Corynephorus canescens for the outcome of the AMF symbiosis. Both species were planted in single, intraspecific and interspecific combinations using a target-neighbor approach with six treatments distributed along a gradient simulating conditions for the interaction between plants and AMF ranking from mutualistic to parasitic.Across all treatments we found mycorrhizal association of H. pilosella being consistently mutualistic, while pronounced parasitism was observed in C. canescens, indicating that environmental and edaphic conditions did not markedly affect the cost:benefit ratio of the mycorrhizal symbiosis in both species. Competitive interactions between both species were strongly affected by AMF, with the impact of AMF on competition being modulated by colonization. Biomass in both species was lowest when grown in interspecific competition, with colonization being increased in the less mycotrophic C. canescens, while decreased in the obligate mycotrophic H. pilosella. Although parasitism-promoting conditions negatively affected MGD in C. canescens, these effects were small as compared to growth decreases related to increased colonization levels in this species. Thus, the lack of plant

  4. Differential Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Stoker, J J

    2011-01-01

    This classic work is now available in an unabridged paperback edition. Stoker makes this fertile branch of mathematics accessible to the nonspecialist by the use of three different notations: vector algebra and calculus, tensor calculus, and the notation devised by Cartan, which employs invariant differential forms as elements in an algebra due to Grassman, combined with an operation called exterior differentiation. Assumed are a passing acquaintance with linear algebra and the basic elements of analysis.

  5. Characterization of pitches by differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrburger, P.; Martin, C.; Lahaye, J.; Saint-Romain, J.L.; Couderc, P.

    1988-12-01

    Pitch materials have generally a very complex composition with molecular mass ranging from a few hundred to several thousands units. In order to characterize these materials their properties related to the glassy transformation, in particular to enthalpy relaxation, have been investigated. Solvent soluble fractions have been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). As with polymeric materials, enthalpy relaxation can provide information about pitches and the interactions occurring between the different types of molecules present in the pitch: mean molecular size, structural factor, molecular-size distribution. The determination of glass transition properties provides a useful means for the characterization of pitch and of their solvent extracts. It also permits insight into the complex reactions which occur when pitch materials are heat-treated. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Accurate calculation of the differential cross section of compton scattering with electron mixed chain propagator in SM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuewen; Fang Zhenyun; Shi Chengye

    2012-01-01

    By using the electroweak standard model (SM), we analyzed the framework of electron mixed chain propagator which composed of serious of different physical loops participating in electroweak interaction and completed the relevant analytical calculation. Then, we obtained the analytical result of electron mixed chain propagator. By applying our result to Compton scattering, the differential cross section of Compton scattering dσ SM (chain) /dcosθ is counted accurately. This result is compared with the lowest order differential cross section dσ (tree) /dcosθ and the electronic chain propagator Compton scattering differential cross section dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ in quantum electrodynamics (QED). It can be seen that dσ SM (chain ) /dcosθ can show the radiation correction more subtly than dσ QED (chain) /dcosθ. (authors)

  7. Consideration of Transient Stream/Aquifer Interaction with the Nonlinear Boussinesq Equation using HPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganji, S. S.; Barari, Amin; Sfahani, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    of time. The differential equations were solved using the method of Homotopy Perturbation. The simplicity and accuracy of the approximation are compared with “exact” solution and illustrated numerically and graphically. The results reveal that the HPM is very effective and simple and provides highly...... accurate solutions for nonlinear differential equations.......The phenomenon of stream–aquifer interaction was investigated via mathematical modeling using the Boussinesq equation. A new approximate solution of the one-dimensional Boussinesq equation is presented for a semi-infinite aquifer when the hydraulic head at the source is an arbitrary function...

  8. Mirna biogenesis pathway is differentially regulated during adipose derived stromal/stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E C; Qureshi, A T; Llamas, C B; Burow, M E; King, A G; Lee, O C; Dasa, V; Freitas, M A; Forsberg, J A; Elster, E A; Davis, T A; Gimble, J M

    2018-02-07

    Stromal/stem cell differentiation is controlled by a vast array of regulatory mechanisms. Included within these are methods of mRNA gene regulation that occur at the level of epigenetic, transcriptional, and/or posttranscriptional modifications. Current studies that evaluate the posttranscriptional regulation of mRNA demonstrate microRNAs (miRNAs) as key mediators of stem cell differentiation through the inhibition of mRNA translation. miRNA expression is enhanced during both adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation; however, the mechanism by which miRNA expression is altered during stem cell differentiation is less understood. Here we demonstrate for the first time that adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) induced to an adipogenic or osteogenic lineage have differences in strand preference (-3p and -5p) for miRNAs originating from the same primary transcript. Furthermore, evaluation of miRNA expression in ASCs demonstrates alterations in both miRNA strand preference and 5'seed site heterogeneity. Additionally, we show that during stem cell differentiation there are alterations in expression of genes associated with the miRNA biogenesis pathway. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated changes in the Argonautes (AGO1-4), Drosha, and Dicer at intervals of ASC adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation compared to untreated ASCs. Specifically, we demonstrated altered expression of the AGOs occurring during both adipogenesis and osteogenesis, with osteogenesis increasing AGO1-4 expression and adipogenesis decreasing AGO1 gene and protein expression. These data demonstrate changes to components of the miRNA biogenesis pathway during stromal/stem cell differentiation. Identifying regulatory mechanisms for miRNA processing during ASC differentiation may lead to novel mechanisms for the manipulation of lineage differentiation of the ASC through the global regulation of miRNA as opposed to singular regulatory mechanisms.

  9. LIE GROUPS AND NUMERICAL SOLUTIONS OF DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS: INVARIANT DISCRETIZATION VERSUS DIFFERENTIAL APPROXIMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decio Levi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review two different methods of applying Lie group theory in the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. On specific examples we show how the symmetry preserving discretization provides difference schemes for which the “first differential approximation” is invariant under the same Lie group as the original ordinary differential equation.

  10. Diversity of sharp-wave–ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Besserve, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Sharp-wave–ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R–triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions. PMID:26540729

  11. Diversity of sharp-wave-ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F; Logothetis, Nikos K; Besserve, Michel

    2015-11-17

    Sharp-wave-ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R-triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions.

  12. Constraints on non-Standard Model Higgs boson interactions in an effective Lagrangian using differential cross sections measured in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

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Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-02-10

    The strength and tensor structure of the Higgs boson's interactions are investigated within an effective field theory framework, which allows new CP-even and CP-odd interactions that can lead to changes in the kinematic properties of the Higgs boson and associated jet spectra. The parameters of the effective field theory are probed using a fit to five differential cross sections previously measured by the ATLAS experiment in the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ decay channel with an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. In order to perform a simultaneous fit to the five distributions, the statistical correlations between them are determined by re-analysing the $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ candidate events in the proton-proton collision data. No significant deviations from the Standard Model are observed and limits on the effective field theory parameters are derived. The statistical correlations are made publicly available to allow for future analysis of theories with non-Standard Model int...

  13. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  14. Homing and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D In Vitro Models

    OpenAIRE

    Popielarczyk, Tracee

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have great potential to improve clinical outcomes for many inflammatory and degenerative diseases through delivery of exogenous MSCs via injection or cell-laden scaffolds and through mobilization and migration of endogenous MSCs to injury sites. MSC fate and function is determined by microenvironmental cues, specifically dimensionality, topography, and cell-cell interactions. MSC responses of migration and differentiation are the focus of this dissertation. Cell ...

  15. Solving Partial Differential Equations Using a New Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natee Panagant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an alternative meshless approach to solve partial differential equations (PDEs. With a global approximate function being defined, a partial differential equation problem is converted into an optimisation problem with equality constraints from PDE boundary conditions. An evolutionary algorithm (EA is employed to search for the optimum solution. For this approach, the most difficult task is the low convergence rate of EA which consequently results in poor PDE solution approximation. However, its attractiveness remains due to the nature of a soft computing technique in EA. The algorithm can be used to tackle almost any kind of optimisation problem with simple evolutionary operation, which means it is mathematically simpler to use. A new efficient differential evolution (DE is presented and used to solve a number of the partial differential equations. The results obtained are illustrated and compared with exact solutions. It is shown that the proposed method has a potential to be a future meshless tool provided that the search performance of EA is greatly enhanced.

  16. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Binds to Both Osteoactivin and Integrin αVβ3 and Inhibits Osteoclast Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Miyauchi, Satoshi; Anada, Takahisa; Tawada, Akira; Suzuki, Osamu

    2015-10-01

    Integrins and their ligands have been suggested to be associated with osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. The present study was designed to investigate whether chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), which is one of the sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), is involved in osteoactivin (OA) activity, and osteoclast differentiation. The binding affinity of sulfated GAGs to integrin and its ligand was measured using biotin-labeled CS-E, and the osteoclast differentiation was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and a pit formation assay. CS-E as well as CS-B, synthetic chondroitin polysulfate, and heparin inhibited osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow-derived macrophages. Pre-coating of OA to synthetic calcium phosphate-coated plates enhanced the osteoclastic differentiation of RAW264 cells, and addition of a neutralizing antibody to OA inhibited its differentiation. CS-E bound not only to OA, fibronectin, and vitronectin, but also to its receptor integrin αVβ3, and inhibited the direct binding of OA to integrin αVβ3. Furthermore, CS-E blocked the binding of OA to cells and inhibited OA-induced osteoclastic differentiation. On the other hand, heparinase treatment of RAW264 cells inhibited osteoclastic differentiation. Since binding of OA to the cells was inhibited by the presence of heparan sulfate or heparinase treatment of cells, heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) was also considered to be an OA receptor. Taken together, the present results suggest that CS-E is capable of inhibiting OA-induced osteoclast differentiation by blocking the interaction of OA to integrin αVβ3 and HSPG. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Territorial differentiation of incomes adjusted for inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Valeryevna, Moroshkina

    2017-06-01

    strong tendency of divergence between the regions. This dynamics can be explained by the differences in the level of prices in different Russian regions. The analysis of this indicator in comparable prices showed the opposite dynamics ndash the dynamics of convergence of the regions since 1999. During this period ndash the period of rising prices ndash we see the process of budgetary funds redistribution which increases the income of the population employed in publicsector organizations. The income growth leads to convergence between the regions and to the reduced disparity. Scientific novelty the article analyzes the dynamics of regional differences of the Russian regions in terms of quotper capita incomesquot in current and comparable prices which allowed to assess the impact of inflation on this indicator in the period since 1991. Practical significance the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in scientific and practical activities in addressing the issues of interregional differentiation. The results of the Gini index calculations by comparable prices of 1991 are presented in a table and can be used in the analysis of interaction of macroeconomic indicators in the Russian regions and Russia as a whole.

  18. Genome-Nuclear Lamina Interactions Regulate Cardiac Stem Cell Lineage Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleshko, Andrey; Shah, Parisha P; Gupta, Mudit; Babu, Apoorva; Morley, Michael P; Manderfield, Lauren J; Ifkovits, Jamie L; Calderon, Damelys; Aghajanian, Haig; Sierra-Pagán, Javier E; Sun, Zheng; Wang, Qiaohong; Li, Li; Dubois, Nicole C; Morrisey, Edward E; Lazar, Mitchell A; Smith, Cheryl L; Epstein, Jonathan A; Jain, Rajan

    2017-10-19

    Progenitor cells differentiate into specialized cell types through coordinated expression of lineage-specific genes and modification of complex chromatin configurations. We demonstrate that a histone deacetylase (Hdac3) organizes heterochromatin at the nuclear lamina during cardiac progenitor lineage restriction. Specification of cardiomyocytes is associated with reorganization of peripheral heterochromatin, and independent of deacetylase activity, Hdac3 tethers peripheral heterochromatin containing lineage-relevant genes to the nuclear lamina. Deletion of Hdac3 in cardiac progenitor cells releases genomic regions from the nuclear periphery, leading to precocious cardiac gene expression and differentiation into cardiomyocytes; in contrast, restricting Hdac3 to the nuclear periphery rescues myogenesis in progenitors otherwise lacking Hdac3. Our results suggest that availability of genomic regions for activation by lineage-specific factors is regulated in part through dynamic chromatin-nuclear lamina interactions and that competence of a progenitor cell to respond to differentiation signals may depend upon coordinated movement of responding gene loci away from the nuclear periphery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Discussion Concerning the Inclusion of Variety Effect when Analysis of Variance is Used to Detect Differentially Expressed Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guri Feten

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In microarray studies several statistical methods have been proposed with the purpose of identifying differentially expressed genes in two varieties. A commonly used method is an analysis of variance model where only the effect of interaction between variety and gene is tested. In this paper we argue that in addition to the interaction effects, the main effect of variety should simultaneously also be taken into account when posting the hypothesis.

  20. Performance in intercultural interactions at work: cross-cultural differences in response to behavioral mirroring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Burks, Jeffrey; Bartel, Caroline A; Blount, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how performance in intercultural workplace interactions can be compromised even in the absence of overt prejudice. The authors show that individuals respond differently to nonverbal behavioral mirroring cues exhibited in workplace interactions, depending on their cultural group membership. In a field study with experienced managers, U.S. Anglos and U.S. Latinos interacted with a confederate who, unbeknownst to the participant, engaged (or not) in behavioral mirroring. Results show that the level of the confederate's mirroring differentially affected Latinos' state anxiety, but not Anglos' state anxiety, as well as actual performance in the interaction. Two additional laboratory experiments provide further evidence of the interactive relationship of behavioral mirroring and cultural group membership on evaluations of workplace interactions. Implications for intercultural interactions and research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. A Numerical Method for Partial Differential Algebraic Equations Based on Differential Transform Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Osmanoglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have considered linear partial differential algebraic equations (LPDAEs of the form , which has at least one singular matrix of . We have first introduced a uniform differential time index and a differential space index. The initial conditions and boundary conditions of the given system cannot be prescribed for all components of the solution vector here. To overcome this, we introduced these indexes. Furthermore, differential transform method has been given to solve LPDAEs. We have applied this method to a test problem, and numerical solution of the problem has been compared with analytical solution.

  2. Differential Heating in the Indian Ocean Differentially Modulates Precipitation in the Ganges and Brahmaputra Basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shahriar Pervez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Indo-Pacific sea surface temperature dynamics play a prominent role in Asian summer monsoon variability. Two interactive climate modes of the Indo-Pacific—the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO and the Indian Ocean dipole mode—modulate the amount of precipitation over India, in addition to precipitation over Africa, Indonesia, and Australia. However, this modulation is not spatially uniform. The precipitation in southern India is strongly forced by the Indian Ocean dipole mode and ENSO. In contrast, across northern India, encompassing the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins, the climate mode influence on precipitation is much less. Understanding the forcing of precipitation in these river basins is vital for food security and ecosystem services for over half a billion people. Using 28 years of remote sensing observations, we demonstrate that (i the tropical west-east differential heating in the Indian Ocean influences the Ganges precipitation and (ii the north-south differential heating in the Indian Ocean influences the Brahmaputra precipitation. The El Niño phase induces warming in the warm pool of the Indian Ocean and exerts more influence on Ganges precipitation than Brahmaputra precipitation. The analyses indicate that both the magnitude and position of the sea surface temperature anomalies in the Indian Ocean are important drivers for precipitation dynamics that can be effectively summarized using two new indices, one tuned for each basin. These new indices have the potential to aid forecasting of drought and flooding, to contextualize land cover and land use change, and to assess the regional impacts of climate change.

  3. Differential heating in the Indian Ocean differentially modulates precipitation in the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Md Shahriar; Henebry, Geoffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Indo-Pacific sea surface temperature dynamics play a prominent role in Asian summer monsoon variability. Two interactive climate modes of the Indo-Pacific—the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean dipole mode—modulate the amount of precipitation over India, in addition to precipitation over Africa, Indonesia, and Australia. However, this modulation is not spatially uniform. The precipitation in southern India is strongly forced by the Indian Ocean dipole mode and ENSO. In contrast, across northern India, encompassing the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins, the climate mode influence on precipitation is much less. Understanding the forcing of precipitation in these river basins is vital for food security and ecosystem services for over half a billion people. Using 28 years of remote sensing observations, we demonstrate that (i) the tropical west-east differential heating in the Indian Ocean influences the Ganges precipitation and (ii) the north-south differential heating in the Indian Ocean influences the Brahmaputra precipitation. The El Niño phase induces warming in the warm pool of the Indian Ocean and exerts more influence on Ganges precipitation than Brahmaputra precipitation. The analyses indicate that both the magnitude and position of the sea surface temperature anomalies in the Indian Ocean are important drivers for precipitation dynamics that can be effectively summarized using two new indices, one tuned for each basin. These new indices have the potential to aid forecasting of drought and flooding, to contextualize land cover and land use change, and to assess the regional impacts of climate change.

  4. Induction of osteoblast differentiation by selective activation of kinase-mediated actions of the estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousteni, Stavroula; Almeida, Maria; Han, Li; Bellido, Teresita; Jilka, Robert L; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2007-02-01

    Estrogens control gene transcription by cis or trans interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with target DNA or via the activation of cytoplasmic kinases. We report that selective activation of kinase-mediated actions of the ER with 4-estren-3alpha,17beta-diol (estren) or an estradiol-dendrimer conjugate, each a synthetic compound that stimulates kinase-mediated ER actions 1,000 to 10,000 times more potently than direct DNA interactions, induced osteoblastic differentiation in established cell lines of uncommitted osteoblast precursors and primary cultures of osteoblast progenitors by stimulating Wnt and BMP-2 signaling in a kinase-dependent manner. In sharp contrast, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) suppressed BMP-2-induced osteoblast progenitor commitment and differentiation. Consistent with the in vitro findings, estren, but not E(2), stimulated Wnt/beta-catenin-mediated transcription in T-cell factor-lacZ transgenic mice. Moreover, E(2) stimulated BMP signaling in mice in which ERalpha lacks DNA binding activity and classical estrogen response element-mediated transcription (ERalpha(NERKI/-)) but not in wild-type controls. This evidence reveals for the first time the existence of a large signalosome in which inputs from the ER, kinases, bone morphogenetic proteins, and Wnt signaling converge to induce differentiation of osteoblast precursors. ER can either induce it or repress it, depending on whether the activating ligand (and presumably the resulting conformation of the receptor protein) precludes or accommodates ERE-mediated transcription.

  5. Integrated analysis of miRNAs and transcriptomes in Aedes albopictus midgut reveals the differential expression profiles of immune-related genes during dengue virus serotype-2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Xia; Li, Fen-Xiang; Liu, Zhuan-Zhuan; Jia, Zhi-Rong; Zhou, Yan-He; Zhang, Hao; Yan, Hui; Zhou, Xian-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Mosquito microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in host-virus interaction, and have been reported to be altered by dengue virus (DENV) infection in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of Aedes albopictus midgut-the first organ to interact with DENV-involved in its resistance to DENV. Here we used high-throughput sequencing to characterize miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns in Aedes albopictus midgut in response to dengue virus serotype 2. A total of three miRNAs and 777 mRNAs were identified to be differentially expressed upon DENV infection. For the mRNAs, we identified 198 immune-related genes and 31 of them were differentially expressed. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes enrichment analyses also showed that the differentially expressed immune-related genes were involved in immune response. Then the differential expression patterns of six immune-related genes and three miRNAs were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, seven known miRNA-mRNA interaction pairs were identified by aligning our two datasets. These analyses of miRNA and mRNA transcriptomes provide valuable information for uncovering the DENV response genes and provide a basis for future study of the resistance mechanisms in Aedes albopictus midgut. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Protein interaction networks at the host-microbe interface in Diaphorina citri, the insect vector of the citrus greening pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, J S; Chavez, J D; Johnson, R; Hosseinzadeh, S; Mahoney, J E; Mohr, J P; Robison, F; Zhong, X; Hall, D G; MacCoss, M; Bruce, J; Cilia, M

    2017-02-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid ( Diaphorina citri) is the insect vector responsible for the worldwide spread of ' Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas), the bacterial pathogen associated with citrus greening disease. Developmental changes in the insect vector impact pathogen transmission, such that D. citri transmission of CLas is more efficient when bacteria are acquired by nymphs when compared with adults. We hypothesize that expression changes in the D. citri immune system and commensal microbiota occur during development and regulate vector competency. In support of this hypothesis, more proteins, with greater fold changes, were differentially expressed in response to CLas in adults when compared with nymphs, including insect proteins involved in bacterial adhesion and immunity. Compared with nymphs, adult insects had a higher titre of CLas and the bacterial endosymbionts Wolbachia, Profftella and Carsonella. All Wolbachia and Profftella proteins differentially expressed between nymphs and adults are upregulated in adults, while most differentially expressed Carsonella proteins are upregulated in nymphs. Discovery of protein interaction networks has broad applicability to the study of host-microbe relationships. Using protein interaction reporter technology, a D. citri haemocyanin protein highly upregulated in response to CLas was found to physically interact with the CLas coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis enzyme phosphopantothenoylcysteine synthetase/decarboxylase. CLas pantothenate kinase, which catalyses the rate-limiting step of CoA biosynthesis, was found to interact with a D. citri myosin protein. Two Carsonella enzymes involved in histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis were found to physically interact with D. citri proteins. These co-evolved protein interaction networks at the host-microbe interface are highly specific targets for controlling the insect vector responsible for the spread of citrus greening.

  7. CASK inhibits ECV304 cell growth and interacts with Id1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Jie; Su Yongyue; Sun Rongju; Zhang Fang; Luo Xiaofeng; Yang Zongcheng; Luo Xiangdong

    2005-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) is generally known as a scaffold protein. Here we show that overexpression of CASK resulted in a reduced rate of cell growth, while inhibition of expression of endogenous CASK via RNA-mediated interference resulted in an increased rate of cell growth in ECV304 cells. To explore the molecular mechanism, we identified a novel CASK-interacting protein, inhibitor of differentiation 1 (Id1) with a yeast two-hybrid screening. Furthermore, endogenous CASK and Id1 proteins were co-precipitated from the lysates of ECV304 cells by immunoprecipitation. Mammalian two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assays indicated that CASK possessed a different binding activity for Id1 and its alternative splicing variant. It is known that Id proteins play important roles in regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Thus, we speculate that the regulation of cell growth mediated by CASK may be involved in Id1. Our findings indicate a novel function of CASK, the mechanism that remains to be further investigated

  8. Interaction of natural borates with potassium hydroxide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarova, L.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.; Kudinov, I.B.; Panasyuk, G.P.; Danilov, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    Interaction of natural borates - inyoite, ulexite and hydroboracite MgCa[B 3 O 4 (OH) 3 ] 2 ·3H 2 O with KOH solution is studied at 50 Deg C by the methods of chemical, x- ray phase, differential thermal analyses and IR spectroscopy. IR spectra points out on island character of forming borates and confirms the data of x-ray phase and chemical analyses about presence of asharite and calcium hydrous borate in resulting products. Hydroboracite (chain structure) under the action of potassium hydroxide passes into borates of magnesium and calcium with island structure and in this case boron transforms partially into liquid phase. When potassium hydroxide interacts with inyoite and ulexite calcium hydroxide and roentgenoamorphous boron-containing product precipitate [ru

  9. Transposon mutagenesis reveals differential pathogenesis of Ralstonia solanacearum on tomato and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Mei; Chou, I-Chun; Wang, Jaw-Fen; Ho, Fang-I; Chu, Yu-Ju; Huang, Pei-Cheng; Lu, Der-Kang; Shen, Hwei-Ling; Elbaz, Mounira; Huang, Shu-Mei; Cheng, Chiu-Ping

    2008-09-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum causes a deadly wilting disease on a wide range of crops. To elucidate pathogenesis of this bacterium in different host plants, we set out to identify R. solanacearum genes involved in pathogenesis by screening random transposon insertion mutants of a highly virulent strain, Pss190, on tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutants exhibiting various decreased virulence levels on these two hosts were identified. Sequence analysis showed that most, but not all, of the identified pathogenesis genes are conserved among distinct R. solanacearum strains. A few of the disrupted loci were not reported previously as being involved in R. solanacearum pathogenesis. Notably, a group of mutants exhibited differential pathogenesis on tomato and Arabidopsis. These results were confirmed by characterizing allelic mutants in one other R. solanacearum strain of the same phylotype. The significantly decreased mutants' colonization in Arabidopsis was found to be correlated with differential pathogenesis on these two plants. Differential requirement of virulence genes suggests adaptation of this bacterium in different host environments. Together, this study reveals commonalities and differences of R. solanacearum pathogenesis on single solanaceous and nonsolanaceous hosts, and provides important new insights into interactions between R. solanacearum and different host plants.

  10. A Tutorial on RxODE: Simulating Differential Equation Pharmacometric Models in R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W; Hallow, K M; James, D A

    2016-01-01

    This tutorial presents the application of an R package, RxODE, that facilitates quick, efficient simulations of ordinary differential equation models completely within R. Its application is illustrated through simulation of design decision effects on an adaptive dosing regimen. The package provides an efficient, versatile way to specify dosing scenarios and to perform simulation with variability with minimal custom coding. Models can be directly translated to Rshiny applications to facilitate interactive, real-time evaluation/iteration on simulation scenarios.

  11. Mouse ES cells have a potential to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells using hanging drop method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, R; Ozeki, N; Yamaguchi, H; Tanaka, T; Nakata, K; Mogi, M; Nakamura, H

    2014-05-01

    We examined whether mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate into odontoblast-like cells without epithelial-mesenchymal interaction. Cells were cultured by the 'hanging drop' method using a collagen type-I scaffold (CS) combined with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 (CS/BMP-4). Expression of odontoblast-related mRNA and protein, and cell proliferation were performed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence staining and WST-1 assay, respectively. Cells potently expressed odontoblast-related cell marker mRNAs following induction of odontoblastic differentiation. Dentin sialophosphoprotein, a marker of mature odontoblasts, was strongly expressed in differentiated ES cells. The cells also acquired an odontoblast-like functional phenotype, as evidenced by the appearance of alkaline phosphatase activity and calcification. The cell-surface expression of α2, α6, αV and αVβ3 integrin proteins was rapidly upregulated in differentiated cells. Finally, anti-α2 integrin antibody suppressed the expression of odontoblastic markers in cells grown using this culture system, suggesting that α2 integrin expression in ES cells triggers their differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Mouse ES cells cultured by the 'hanging drop' method are able to differentiate into cells with odontoblast-specific physiological functions and cell-surface integrin protein expression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Tlx3 promotes glutamatergic neuronal subtype specification through direct interactions with the chromatin modifier CBP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Shimomura

    Full Text Available Nervous system development relies on the generation of precise numbers of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. The homeodomain transcription factor, T-cell leukemia 3 (Tlx3, functions as the master neuronal fate regulator by instructively promoting the specification of glutamatergic excitatory neurons and suppressing the specification of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons. However, how Tlx3 promotes glutamatergic neuronal subtype specification is poorly understood. In this study, we found that Tlx3 directly interacts with the epigenetic co-activator cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB-binding protein (CBP and that the Tlx3 homeodomain is essential for this interaction. The interaction between Tlx3 and CBP was enhanced by the three amino acid loop extension (TALE-class homeodomain transcription factor, pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 3 (Pbx3. Using mouse embryonic stem (ES cells stably expressing Tlx3, we found that the interaction between Tlx3 and CBP became detectable only after these Tlx3-expressing ES cells were committed to a neural lineage, which coincided with increased Pbx3 expression during neural differentiation from ES cells. Forced expression of mutated Tlx3 lacking the homeodomain in ES cells undergoing neural differentiation resulted in significantly reduced expression of glutamatergic neuronal subtype markers, but had little effect on the expression on pan neural markers. Collectively, our results strongly suggest that functional interplay between Tlx3 and CBP plays a critical role in neuronal subtype specification, providing novel insights into the epigenetic regulatory mechanism that modulates the transcriptional efficacy of a selective set of neuronal subtype-specific genes during differentiation.

  13. β‐Taxilin participates in differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakane, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Tomohiko; Nogami, Satoru; Horii, Yukimi [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Graduate school of Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kitakobayashi, Mibu-town, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Akasaki, Kenji [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, Fukuyama, Hiroshima 729-0292 (Japan); Shirataki, Hiromichi, E-mail: hiro-sh@dokkyomed.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Graduate school of Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kitakobayashi, Mibu-town, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    Myogenesis is required for the development of skeletal muscle. Accumulating evidence indicates that the expression of several genes are upregulated during myogenesis and these genes play pivotal roles in myogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying myogenesis is not fully understood. In this study, we found that β-taxilin, which is specifically expressed in the skeletal muscle and heart tissues, was progressively expressed during differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes, prompting us to investigate the role of β-taxilin in myogenesis. In C2C12 cells, knockdown of β-taxilin impaired the fusion of myoblasts into myotubes, and decreased the diameter of myotubes. We also found that β-taxilin interacted with dysbindin, a coiled-coil-containing protein. Knockdown of dysbindin conversely promoted the fusion of myoblasts into myotubes and increased the diameter of myotubes in C2C12 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of dysbindin attenuated the inhibitory effect of β-taxilin depletion on myotube formation of C2C12 cells. These results demonstrate that β-taxilin participates in myogenesis through suppressing the function of dysbindin to inhibit the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotubes. - Highlights: • β‐Taxilin is progressively expressed during differentiation of C2C12 cell. • Knockdown of β-taxilin impaired C2C12 myotube formation. • β‐Taxilin interacted with dysbindin. • Knockdown of dysbindin promoted C2C12 myotube formation. • The function of β-taxilin in C2C12 myotube formation depends on dysbindin.

  14. Clonal expansion under the microscope: studying lymphocyte activation and differentiation using live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonsky, Michal; Chain, Benjamin; Friedman, Nir

    2016-03-01

    Clonal expansion of lymphocytes is a hallmark of vertebrate adaptive immunity. A small number of precursor cells that recognize a specific antigen proliferate into expanded clones, differentiate and acquire various effector and memory phenotypes, which promote effective immune responses. Recent studies establish a large degree of heterogeneity in the level of expansion and in cell state between and within expanding clones. Studying these processes in vivo, while providing insightful information on the level of heterogeneity, is challenging due to the complex microenvironment and the inability to continuously track individual cells over extended periods of time. Live cell imaging of ex vivo cultures within micro fabricated arrays provides an attractive methodology for studying clonal expansion. These experiments facilitate continuous acquisition of a large number of parameters on cell number, proliferation, death and differentiation state, with single-cell resolution on thousands of expanding clones that grow within controlled environments. Such data can reveal stochastic and instructive mechanisms that contribute to observed heterogeneity and elucidate the sequential order of differentiation events. Intercellular interactions can also be studied within these arrays by following responses of a controlled number of interacting cells, all trapped within the same microwell. Here we describe implementations of live-cell imaging within microwell arrays for studies of lymphocyte clonal expansion, portray insights already gained from these experiments and outline directions for future research. These tools, together with in vivo experiments tracking single-cell responses, will expand our understanding of adaptive immunity and the ways by which it can be manipulated.

  15. T cell-B cell interactions in primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangye, Stuart G; Deenick, Elissa K; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Ma, Cindy S

    2012-02-01

    Regulated interactions between cells of the immune system facilitate the generation of successful immune responses, thereby enabling efficient neutralization and clearance of pathogens and the establishment of both cell- and humoral-mediated immunological memory. The corollary of this is that impediments to efficient cell-cell interactions, normally necessary for differentiation and effector functions of immune cells, underly the clinical features and disease pathogenesis of primary immunodeficiencies. In affected individuals, these defects manifest as impaired long-term humoral immunity and susceptibility to infection by specific pathogens. In this review, we discuss the importance of, and requirements for, effective interactions between B cells and T cells during the formation of CD4(+) T follicular helper cells and the elicitation of cytotoxic function of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as how these processes are abrogated in primary immunodeficiencies due to loss-of-function mutations in defined genes. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  16. Attachment, attractiveness, and social interaction: a diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, M C; Reis, H T; Shaver, P R

    1996-10-01

    To what extent are attachment styles manifested in natural social activity? A total of 125 participants categorized as possessing secure, avoidant, or anxious-ambivalent attachment styles kept structured social interaction diaries for 1 week. Several theoretically important findings emerged. First, compared with secure and anxious-ambivalent persons, avoidant persons reported lower levels of intimacy, enjoyment, promotive interaction, and positive emotions, and higher levels of negative emotions, primarily in opposite-sex interactions. Analyses indicated that avoidant persons may structure social activities in ways that minimize closeness. Second, secure people differentiated more clearly than either insecure group between romantic and other opposite-sex partners. Third, the subjective experiences of anxious-ambivalent persons were more variable than those of the other groups. Finally, the authors examined and rejected the possibility that attachment effects might be confounded with physical attractiveness. These findings suggest that feeling and behaviors that arise during spontaneous, everyday social activity may contribute to the maintenance of attachment styles in adulthood.

  17. Minocycline Loaded Hybrid Composites Nanoparticles for Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation into Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allister Yingwei Tham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone transplants are used to treat fractures and increase new tissue development in bone tissue engineering. Grafting of massive implantations showing slow curing rate and results in cell death for poor vascularization. The potentials of biocomposite scaffolds to mimic extracellular matrix (ECM and including new biomaterials could produce a better substitute for new bone tissue formation. A purpose of this study is to analyze polycaprolactone/silk fibroin/hyaluronic acid/minocycline hydrochloride (PCL/SF/HA/MH nanoparticles initiate human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs proliferation and differentiation into osteogenesis. Electrospraying technique was used to develop PCL, PCL/SF, PCL/SF/HA and PCL/SF/HA/MH hybrid biocomposite nanoparticles and characterization was analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, contact angle and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. The obtained results proved that the particle diameter and water contact angle obtained around 0.54 ± 0.12 to 3.2 ± 0.18 µm and 43.93 ± 10.8° to 133.1 ± 12.4° respectively. The cell proliferation and cell-nanoparticle interactions analyzed using (3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium inner salt MTS assay (Promega, Madison, WI, USA, FESEM for cell morphology and 5-Chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA dye for imaging live cells. Osteogenic differentiation was proved by expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP and mineralization was confirmed by using alizarin red (ARS. The quantity of cells was considerably increased in PCL/SF/HA/MH nanoparticles when compare to all other biocomposite nanoparticles and the cell interaction was observed more on PCL/SF/HA/MH nanoparticles. The electrosprayed PCL/SF/HA/MH biocomposite nanoparticle significantly initiated increased cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and mineralization, which provide huge potential for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Mediator complex cooperatively regulates transcription of retinoic acid target genes with Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 during neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukasawa, Rikiya; Iida, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Taiki; Hirose, Yutaka; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2015-11-01

    The Mediator complex (Mediator) plays key roles in transcription and functions as the nexus for integration of various transcriptional signals. Previously, we screened for Mediator cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-interacting factors and identified three proteins related to chromatin regulation. One of them, SUZ12 is required for both stability and activity of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). PRC2 primarily suppresses gene expression through histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation, resulting in stem cell maintenance and differentiation; perturbation of this process leads to oncogenesis. Recent work showed that Mediator contributes to the embryonic stem cell state through DNA loop formation, which is strongly associated with chromatin architecture; however, it remains unclear how Mediator regulates gene expression in cooperation with chromatin regulators (i.e. writers, readers and remodelers). We found that Mediator CDKs interact directly with the PRC2 subunit EZH2, as well as SUZ12. Known PRC2 target genes were deregulated by Mediator CDK knockdown during neuronal differentiation, and both Mediator and PRC2 complexes co-occupied the promoters of developmental genes regulated by retinoic acid. Our results provide a mechanistic link between Mediator and PRC2 during neuronal differentiation. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Platelet-Rich Plasma Derived Growth Factors Contribute to Stem Cell Differentiation in Musculoskeletal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Qian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell treatment and platelet-rich plasma (PRP therapy are two significant issues in regenerative medicine. Stem cells such as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells can be successfully applied in the field of tissue regeneration. PRP, a natural product isolated from whole blood, can secrete multiple growth factors (GFs for regulating physiological activities. These GFs can stimulate proliferation and differentiation of different stem cells in injury models. Therefore, combination of both agents receives wide expectations in regenerative medicine, especially in bone, cartilage and tendon repair. In this review, we thoroughly discussed the interaction and underlying mechanisms of PRP derived GFs with stem cells, and assessed their functions in cell differentiation for musculoskeletal regeneration.

  20. Platelet-rich plasma derived growth factors contribute to stem cell differentiation in musculoskeletal regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yun; Han, Qixin; Chen, Wei; Song, Jialin; Zhao, Xiaotian; Ouyang, Yuanming; Yuan, Weien; Fan, Cunyi

    2017-10-01

    Stem cell treatment and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy are two significant issues in regenerative medicine. Stem cells such as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal ligament stem cells can be successfully applied in the field of tissue regeneration. PRP, a natural product isolated from whole blood, can secrete multiple growth factors (GFs) for regulating physiological activities. These GFs can stimulate proliferation and differentiation of different stem cells in injury models. Therefore, combination of both agents receives wide expectations in regenerative medicine, especially in bone, cartilage and tendon repair. In this review, we thoroughly discussed the interaction and underlying mechanisms of platelet-rich plasma derived growth factors with stem cells, and assessed their functions in cell differentiation for musculoskeletal regeneration.

  1. Differential emotion attribution to neutral faces of own and other races.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chao S; Wang, Qiandong; Han, Tong; Weare, Ethan; Fu, Genyue

    2017-02-01

    Past research has demonstrated differential recognition of emotion on faces of different races. This paper reports the first study to explore differential emotion attribution to neutral faces of different races. Chinese and Caucasian adults viewed a series of Chinese and Caucasian neutral faces and judged their outward facial expression: neutral, positive, or negative. The results showed that both Chinese and Caucasian viewers perceived more Chinese faces than Caucasian faces as neutral. Nevertheless, Chinese viewers attributed positive emotion to Caucasian faces more than to Chinese faces, whereas Caucasian viewers attributed negative emotion to Caucasian faces more than to Chinese faces. Moreover, Chinese viewers attributed negative and neutral emotion to the faces of both races without significant difference in frequency, whereas Caucasian viewers mostly attributed neutral emotion to the faces. These differences between Chinese and Caucasian viewers may be due to differential visual experience, culture, racial stereotype, or expectation of the experiment. We also used eye tracking among the Chinese participants to explore the relationship between face-processing strategy and emotion attribution to neutral faces. The results showed that the interaction between emotion attribution and face race was significant on face-processing strategy, such as fixation proportion on eyes and saccade amplitude. Additionally, pupil size during processing Caucasian faces was larger than during processing Chinese faces.

  2. Transiently truncated and differentially regulated expression of midkine during mouse embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Qin; Yuan Yuanyang; Lin Shuibin; Chang Youde; Zhuo Xinming; Wei Wei; Tao Ping; Ruan Lingjuan; Li Qifu; Li Zhixing

    2005-01-01

    Midkine (MK) is a retinoic acid response cytokine, mostly expressed in embryonic tissues. Aberrant expression of MK was found in numerous cancers. In human, a truncated MK was expressed specifically in tumor/cancer tissues. Here we report the discovery of a novel truncated form of MK transiently expressed during normal mouse embryonic development. In addition, MK is concentrated at the interface between developing epithelium and mesenchyme as well as highly proliferating cells. Its expression, which is closely coordinated with angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, is spatiotemporally regulated with peaks in extensive organogenesis period and undifferentiated cells tailing off in maturing cells, implying its role in nascent blood vessel (endothelial) signaling of tissue differentiation and stem cell renewal/differentiation.. Cloning and sequencing analysis revealed that the embryonic truncated MK, in which the conserved domain is in-frame deleted, presumably producing a novel secreted small peptide, is different from the truncated form in human cancer tissues, whose deletion results in a frame-shift mutation. Our data suggest that MK may play a role in epithelium-mesenchyme interactions, blood vessel signaling, and the decision of proliferation vs differentiation. Detection of the transiently expressed truncated MK reveals its novel function in development and sheds light on its role in carcinogenesis

  3. Differential Protein Expressions in Virus-Infected and Uninfected Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ding; Pengtao, Gong; Ju, Yang; Jianhua, Li; He, Li; Guocai, Zhang; Xichen, Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Protozoan viruses may influence the function and pathogenicity of the protozoa. Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protozoan that could contain a double stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus, T. vaginalis virus (TVV). However, there are few reports on the properties of the virus. To further determine variations in protein expression of T. vaginalis , we detected 2 strains of T. vaginalis ; the virus-infected (V + ) and uninfected (V - ) isolates to examine differentially expressed proteins upon TVV infection. Using a stable isotope N-terminal labeling strategy (iTRAQ) on soluble fractions to analyze proteomes, we identified 293 proteins, of which 50 were altered in V + compared with V - isolates. The results showed that the expression of 29 proteins was increased, and 21 proteins decreased in V + isolates. These differentially expressed proteins can be classified into 4 categories: ribosomal proteins, metabolic enzymes, heat shock proteins, and putative uncharacterized proteins. Quantitative PCR was used to detect 4 metabolic processes proteins: glycogen phosphorylase, malate dehydrogenase, triosephosphate isomerase, and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, which were differentially expressed in V + and V - isolates. Our findings suggest that mRNA levels of these genes were consistent with protein expression levels. This study was the first which analyzed protein expression variations upon TVV infection. These observations will provide a basis for future studies concerning the possible roles of these proteins in host-parasite interactions.

  4. Is Melanoma a stem cell tumor? Identification of neurogenic proteins in trans-differentiated cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Linda S

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although several genes and proteins have been implicated in the development of melanomas, the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of these tumors are not well understood. To gain a better understanding of the relationship between the cell growth, tumorigenesis and differentiation, we have studied a highly malignant cat melanoma cell line that trans-differentiates into neuronal cells after exposure to a feline endogenous retrovirus RD114. Methods To define the repertoire of proteins responsible for the phenotypic differences between melanoma and its counterpart trans-differentiated neuronal cells we have applied proteomics technology and compared protein profiles of the two cell types and identified differentially expressed proteins by 2D-gel electrophoresis, image analyses and mass spectrometry. Results The melanoma and trans-differentiated neuronal cells could be distinguished by the presence of distinct sets of proteins in each. Although approximately 60–70% of the expressed proteins were shared between the two cell types, twelve proteins were induced de novo after infection of melanoma cells with RD114 virus in vitro. Expression of these proteins in trans-differentiated cells was significantly associated with concomitant down regulation of growth promoting proteins and up-regulation of neurogenic proteins (p = 95% proteins expressed in trans-differentiated cells could be associated with the development, differentiation and regulation of nervous system cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that the cat melanoma cells have the ability to differentiate into distinct neuronal cell types and they express proteins that are essential for self-renewal. Since melanocytes arise from the neural crest of the embryo, we conclude that this melanoma arose from embryonic precursor stem cells. This model system provides a unique opportunity to identify domains of interactions between the expressed proteins that halt the

  5. Particle interaction with the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.P.

    1974-09-01

    A study of the particle deuteron interactions at low, intermediate and high energies is presented. The differential cross section for pion deuteron scattering, near the 33 resonance, is calculated considering the Fermi motion and the off energy shell effects. We present formulae for the calculation of correction to the incoherent production cross section on deuteron arising from the multiple scattering and interference; we apply them to the case K + → K 0 π + between 1. and 5 Gev/c. is introduced. A relativistic correction to the double scattering Glauber formula and is done an application to the rho photoproduction on deuteron at high energies

  6. Ecological interactions are evolutionarily conserved across the entire tree of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, José M; Verdú, Miguel; Perfectti, Francisco

    2010-06-17

    Ecological interactions are crucial to understanding both the ecology and the evolution of organisms. Because the phenotypic traits regulating species interactions are largely a legacy of their ancestors, it is widely assumed that ecological interactions are phylogenetically conserved, with closely related species interacting with similar partners. However, the existing empirical evidence is inadequate to appropriately evaluate the hypothesis of phylogenetic conservatism in ecological interactions, because it is both ecologically and taxonomically biased. In fact, most studies on the evolution of ecological interactions have focused on specialized organisms, such as some parasites or insect herbivores, belonging to a limited subset of the overall tree of life. Here we study the evolution of host use in a large and diverse group of interactions comprising both specialist and generalist acellular, unicellular and multicellular organisms. We show that, as previously found for specialized interactions, generalized interactions can be evolutionarily conserved. Significant phylogenetic conservatism of interaction patterns was equally likely to occur in symbiotic and non-symbiotic interactions, as well as in mutualistic and antagonistic interactions. Host-use differentiation among species was higher in phylogenetically conserved clades, irrespective of their generalization degree and taxonomic position within the tree of life. Our findings strongly suggest a shared pattern in the organization of biological systems through evolutionary time, mediated by marked conservatism of ecological interactions among taxa.

  7. Elastic diffraction interactions of hadrons at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismatov, E.I.; Ubaev, J.K.; Tshay, K.V.; Zholdasova, S.M.; Juraev, Sh.Kh.; Essaniazov, Sh.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: 1. The diffraction theory of elastic and inelastic scattering of hadron-hadron and hadron-nucleus processes is developed. The description of experimental data on differential cross section of elastic scattering p p, p-bar p in wide range of transferred momentum is made in the frames of the developed inelastic overlap function model. The investigation of nuclei elastic scattering at the low, middle and high energies is carried out, that allowed to execute quantitative control of efficiency or quantum-field and phenomenological theories and make critical analysis of their utility. The principle of construction of realistic amplitudes of the elastic scattering is confirmed on the basic of the s- and t-channel approaches both conditions stationary of amplitudes. For a wide range of models the comparative analysis of amplitude of inelastic scattering in representation of impact parameter is executed. The expression for effective radius of interaction, effective trajectory Regge and slope of inelastic function of overlapping are analysed. In diffraction approximation the satisfactory description of the data on hadrons interaction at the energy of tens GeV with proton and deuterons is received. The features of spectra of fast particles are analysed. The theory of collective variables S, T, P which characterize a d