WorldWideScience

Sample records for collaborative human-machine nuclear

  1. Collaborative human-machine nuclear non-proliferation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, F.L.; Badalamente, R.V.; Stewart, T.S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a project investigating support concepts for the information treatment needs of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, also referred to as the Agency) and its attempts to strengthen international safeguards. The aim of the research was to define user/computer interface concepts and intelligent support features that will enhance the analyst`s access to voluminous and diverse information, the ability to recognize and evaluate uncertain data, and the capability to make decisions and recommendations. The objective was to explore techniques for enhancing safeguards analysis through application of (1) more effective user-computer interface designs and (2) advanced concepts involving human/system collaboration. The approach was to identify opportunities for human/system collaboration that would capitalize on human strengths and still accommodate human limitations. This paper documents the findings and describes a concept prototype, Proliferation Analysis Support System (PASS), developed for demonstration purposes. The research complements current and future efforts to enhance the information systems used by the IAEA, but has application elsewhere, as well.

  2. CHISSL: A Human-Machine Collaboration Space for Unsupervised Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt, Dustin L.; Komurlu, Caner; Blaha, Leslie M.

    2017-07-14

    We developed CHISSL, a human-machine interface that utilizes supervised machine learning in an unsupervised context to help the user group unlabeled instances by her own mental model. The user primarily interacts via correction (moving a misplaced instance into its correct group) or confirmation (accepting that an instance is placed in its correct group). Concurrent with the user's interactions, CHISSL trains a classification model guided by the user's grouping of the data. It then predicts the group of unlabeled instances and arranges some of these alongside the instances manually organized by the user. We hypothesize that this mode of human and machine collaboration is more effective than Active Learning, wherein the machine decides for itself which instances should be labeled by the user. We found supporting evidence for this hypothesis in a pilot study where we applied CHISSL to organize a collection of handwritten digits.

  3. Human-machine interaction in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    2005-01-01

    Advanced nuclear power plants are generally large complex systems automated by computers. Whenever a rate plant emergency occurs the plant operators must cope with the emergency under severe mental stress without committing any fatal errors. Furthermore, the operators must train to improve and maintain their ability to cope with every conceivable situation, though it is almost impossible to be fully prepared for an infinite variety of situations. In view of the limited capability of operators in emergency situations, there has been a new approach to preventing the human error caused by improper human-machine interaction. The new approach has been triggered by the introduction of advanced information systems that help operators recognize and counteract plant emergencies. In this paper, the adverse effect of automation in human-machine systems is explained. The discussion then focuses on how to configure a joint human-machine system for ideal human-machine interaction. Finally, there is a new proposal on how to organize technologies that recognize the different states of such a joint human-machine system

  4. Collaborative machining solution extends the operating life of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, Geoff; Becker, Andrew; Vandenberg, James

    2007-01-01

    Examination of a CANDU 6 nuclear power plant's steam generators during a scheduled maintenance outage revealed that the manway ports, part of the ASME Section III, Class 1 pressure boundary, needed repair. The port's inner cover gasket was not seating properly. Integrity was at risk. It was determined that this operation would required a specialized machine to successfully repair the manway port. The solution included the modification of a standard portable boring machine with a custom mounting option to enlarge the counterbore in the primary head shell from a round shape to an obround shape (76 mm of shell thickness, 16 mm radially). The shape change was needed to accommodate the new obround cover and gasket seal design. Once the new major shape was machined, the repair was finished with a Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machine developed by the service team to achieve the necessary gasket face location and sizing. The final result met all of the plant's expectations and was completed well within the time allotted during the maintenance shut down. This success was due to the positive partnership and collaboration of the service team and the machine tool manufacture working together to successfully extend the operating life of the nuclear power plant. (author)

  5. Collaborative human-machine analysis using a controlled natural language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, David H.; Shemanski, Donald R.; Giammanco, Cheryl; Braines, Dave

    2015-05-01

    A key aspect of an analyst's task in providing relevant information from data is the reasoning about the implications of that data, in order to build a picture of the real world situation. This requires human cognition, based upon domain knowledge about individuals, events and environmental conditions. For a computer system to collaborate with an analyst, it must be capable of following a similar reasoning process to that of the analyst. We describe ITA Controlled English (CE), a subset of English to represent analyst's domain knowledge and reasoning, in a form that it is understandable by both analyst and machine. CE can be used to express domain rules, background data, assumptions and inferred conclusions, thus supporting human-machine interaction. A CE reasoning and modeling system can perform inferences from the data and provide the user with conclusions together with their rationale. We present a logical problem called the "Analysis Game", used for training analysts, which presents "analytic pitfalls" inherent in many problems. We explore an iterative approach to its representation in CE, where a person can develop an understanding of the problem solution by incremental construction of relevant concepts and rules. We discuss how such interactions might occur, and propose that such techniques could lead to better collaborative tools to assist the analyst and avoid the "pitfalls".

  6. Effects of digital human-machine interface characteristics on human error in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Pengcheng; Zhang Li; Dai Licao; Huang Weigang

    2011-01-01

    In order to identify the effects of digital human-machine interface characteristics on human error in nuclear power plants, the new characteristics of digital human-machine interface are identified by comparing with the traditional analog control systems in the aspects of the information display, user interface interaction and management, control systems, alarm systems and procedures system, and the negative effects of digital human-machine interface characteristics on human error are identified by field research and interviewing with operators such as increased cognitive load and workload, mode confusion, loss of situation awareness. As to the adverse effects related above, the corresponding prevention and control measures of human errors are provided to support the prevention and minimization of human errors and the optimization of human-machine interface design. (authors)

  7. Social Intelligence in a Human-Machine Collaboration System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Morishima, Yasunori; Yamada, Ryota; Brave, Scott; Maldonado, Heidy; Nass, Clifford; Kawaji, Shigeyasu

    In this information society of today, it is often argued that it is necessary to create a new way of human-machine interaction. In this paper, an agent with social response capabilities has been developed to achieve this goal. There are two kinds of information that is exchanged by two entities: objective and functional information (e.g., facts, requests, states of matters, etc.) and subjective information (e.g., feelings, sense of relationship, etc.). Traditional interactive systems have been designed to handle the former kind of information. In contrast, in this study social agents handling the latter type of information are presented. The current study focuses on sociality of the agent from the view point of Media Equation theory. This article discusses the definition, importance, and benefits of social intelligence as agent technology and argues that social intelligence has a potential to enhance the user's perception of the system, which in turn can lead to improvements of the system's performance. In order to implement social intelligence in the agent, a mind model has been developed to render affective expressions and personality of the agent. The mind model has been implemented in a human-machine collaborative learning system. One differentiating feature of the collaborative learning system is that it has an agent that performs as a co-learner with which the user interacts during the learning session. The mind model controls the social behaviors of the agent, thus making it possible for the user to have more social interactions with the agent. The experiment with the system suggested that a greater degree of learning was achieved when the students worked with the co-learner agent and that the co-learner agent with the mind model that expressed emotions resulted in a more positive attitude toward the system.

  8. Methodological evolutions in human-machine cooperative problem solving with applications to nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Masaharu; Takahashi, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    A new framework for attaining higher safety of nuclear plants through introducing machine intelligence and robots has been proposed in this paper. The main emphasis of the framework is placed on user-centered human-machine cooperation in solving problems experienced during conducting operation, monitoring and maintenance activities in nuclear plants. In this framework, human operator is supposed to take initiative of actions at any moment of operation. No attempt has been made to replace human experts by machine intelligence and robots. Efforts have been paid to clarify the expertise and behavioral model of human experts so that the developed techniques are consistent with human mental activities in solving highly complicated operational and maintenance problems. Several techniques essential to the functioning of the framework have also been introduced. Modification of environment to provide support information has also been pursued to realize the concept of ubiquitous computing. (author)

  9. Human-Machine interface for off normal and emergency situations in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants (NPPs) have reported that a high percentage of all major failures in the plants are caused by human errors. Therefore, there has been much focus on elimination of human errors, enhancement of human performance, and general improvement of human machine interface (HMI). Both the utility management and the regulators are demanding improvement in this area. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Specialists' Meeting on 'Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in Nuclear Power Plants' was co-organized by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and the Korea Power Engineering Company, INC (KOPEC), and took place in Taejeon, Republic of Korea, 1999 October 26-28. Fifty eight participants, representing nine member countries reviewed recent developments and discussed directions for future efforts in the Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in NPPs. Twenty papers were presented, covering a wide spectrum of technical and scientific subjects including recent experience and benefits from Operational Experience with HMI, Development of HMI System, Licensing Issues for HMI and Future Development and Trends. (Author)

  10. Human-Machine interface for off normal and emergency situations in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-01-01

    Many nuclear power plants (NPPs) have reported that a high percentage of all major failures in the plants are caused by human errors. Therefore, there has been much focus on elimination of human errors, enhancement of human performance, and general improvement of human machine interface (HMI). Both the utility management and the regulators are demanding improvement in this area. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Specialists' Meeting on 'Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in Nuclear Power Plants' was co-organized by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and the Korea Power Engineering Company, INC (KOPEC), and took place in Taejeon, Republic of Korea, 1999 October 26-28. Fifty eight participants, representing nine member countries reviewed recent developments and discussed directions for future efforts in the Human-Machine Interface for Off Normal and Emergency Situations in NPPs. Twenty papers were presented, covering a wide spectrum of technical and scientific subjects including recent experience and benefits from Operational Experience with HMI, Development of HMI System, Licensing Issues for HMI and Future Development and Trends. (Author)

  11. Collaborative Systems – Finite State Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the finite state machines are defined and formalized. There are presented the collaborative banking systems and their correspondence is done with finite state machines. It highlights the role of finite state machines in the complexity analysis and performs operations on very large virtual databases as finite state machines. It builds the state diagram and presents the commands and documents transition between the collaborative systems states. The paper analyzes the data sets from Collaborative Multicash Servicedesk application and performs a combined analysis in order to determine certain statistics. Indicators are obtained, such as the number of requests by category and the load degree of an agent in the collaborative system.

  12. Preliminary Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxstrand, Johanna Helene; Le Blanc, Katya Lee; Spielman, Zachary Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Reactor Technologies Program sponsors research, development and deployment activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Reactor Concepts, and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) Programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Human Automation Collaboration (HAC) Research Project is located under the aSMR Program, which identifies developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces as one of four key research areas. It is expected that the new nuclear power plant designs will employ technology significantly more advanced than the analog systems in the existing reactor fleet as well as utilizing automation to a greater extent. Moving towards more advanced technology and more automation does not necessary imply more efficient and safer operation of the plant. Instead, a number of concerns about how these technologies will affect human performance and the overall safety of the plant need to be addressed. More specifically, it is important to investigate how the operator and the automation work as a team to ensure effective and safe plant operation, also known as the human-automation collaboration (HAC). The focus of the HAC research is to understand how various characteristics of automation (such as its reliability, processes, and modes) effect an operator's use and awareness of plant conditions. In other words, the research team investigates how to best design the collaboration between the operators and the automated systems in a manner that has the greatest positive impact on overall plant performance and reliability. This report addresses the Department of Energy milestone M4AT-15IN2302054, Complete Preliminary Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration, by discussing the two phased development of a preliminary HAC framework. The framework developed in the first phase was used as

  13. Preliminary Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna Helene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Le Blanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary Alexander [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s Advanced Reactor Technologies Program sponsors research, development and deployment activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Reactor Concepts, and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) Programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Human Automation Collaboration (HAC) Research Project is located under the aSMR Program, which identifies developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces as one of four key research areas. It is expected that the new nuclear power plant designs will employ technology significantly more advanced than the analog systems in the existing reactor fleet as well as utilizing automation to a greater extent. Moving towards more advanced technology and more automation does not necessary imply more efficient and safer operation of the plant. Instead, a number of concerns about how these technologies will affect human performance and the overall safety of the plant need to be addressed. More specifically, it is important to investigate how the operator and the automation work as a team to ensure effective and safe plant operation, also known as the human-automation collaboration (HAC). The focus of the HAC research is to understand how various characteristics of automation (such as its reliability, processes, and modes) effect an operator’s use and awareness of plant conditions. In other words, the research team investigates how to best design the collaboration between the operators and the automated systems in a manner that has the greatest positive impact on overall plant performance and reliability. This report addresses the Department of Energy milestone M4AT-15IN2302054, Complete Preliminary Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration, by discussing the two phased development of a preliminary HAC framework. The framework developed in the first phase was used as the

  14. Designing Computer Agents With Facial Personality To Improve Human-Machine Collaboration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tidball, Brian E

    2006-01-01

    ...-machine collaborative task. The first experiment measured user-perception of personality based on the emotional expression in two sets of five static digital faces, one face from each set represented the five primary emotions...

  15. Feasibility study on use of virtual collaborator for remote NPP control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Lee, Seung Jun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we study the feasibility of Virtual Collaborator for Remote NPP Control as long-term research theme. And we present similar and related researches that are fulfilled at I and C laboratory in nuclear department of KAIST. Yoshikawa's laboratory, Kyoto University in Japan, is developing 'virtual collaborator', agent robot, which realized in virtual reality. Virtual Collaborator is a new type of human-machine interface which works as 'intelligent interface agent' to help machine operators manipulating large scale machine system such as power plant. The Virtual Collaborator is a sort of 'virtual robot' which behaves as if an intelligent agent robot in virtual space, who can communicate naturally with human like humans do with each other

  16. Human-Machine Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farbrot, J.E.; Nihlwing, Ch.; Svengren, H.

    2005-01-01

    New requirements for enhanced safety and design changes in process systems often leads to a step-wise installation of new information and control equipment in the control room of older nuclear power plants, where nowadays modern digital I and C solutions with screen-based human-machine interfaces (HMI) most often are introduced. Human factors (HF) expertise is then required to assist in specifying a unified, integrated HMI, where the entire integration of information is addressed to ensure an optimal and effective interplay between human (operators) and machine (process). Following a controlled design process is the best insurance for ending up with good solutions. This paper addresses the approach taken when introducing modern human-machine communication in the Oskarshamn 1 NPP, the results, and the lessons learned from this work with high operator involvement seen from an HF point of view. Examples of possibilities modern technology might offer for the operators are also addressed. (orig.)

  17. Human-robot collaborative navigation for autonomous maintenance management of nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugroho, Djoko Hari

    2002-01-01

    Development of human and robot collaborative navigation for autonomous maintenance management of nuclear installation has been conducted. The human-robot collaborative system is performed using a switching command between autonomous navigation and manual navigation that incorporate a human intervention. The autonomous navigation path is conducted using a novel algorithm of MLG method based on Lozano-Perez s visibility graph. The MLG optimizes the shortest distance and safe constraints. While the manual navigation is performed using manual robot tele operation tools. Experiment in the MLG autonomous navigation system is conducted for six times with 3-D starting point and destination point coordinate variation. The experiment shows a good performance of autonomous robot maneuver to avoid collision with obstacle. The switching navigation is well interpreted using open or close command to RS-232C constructed using LabVIEW

  18. Human factor engineering applied to nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, A.; Valdivia, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Advantages of implementing adequate Human Factor Engineering techniques in the design of nuclear reactors have become not only a fact recognized by the majority of engineers and operators but also an explicit requirement regulated and mandatory for the new designs of the so called advanced reactors. The first step for this is preparing a plan to incorporate all the Human Factor Engineering principles and developing an integral design of the Instrumentation and Control and Man-machine interface systems. Such a plan should state: -) Activities to be performed, and -) Creation of a Human Factor Engineering team adequately qualified. The Human Factor Engineering team is an integral part of the design team and is strongly linked to the engineering organizations but simultaneously has independence to act and is free to evaluate designs and propose changes in order to enhance human behavior. TECNATOM S.A. (a Spanish company) has been a part of the Design and Human Factor Engineering Team and has collaborated in the design of an advanced Nuclear Power Plant, developing methodologies and further implementing those methodologies in the design of the plant systems through the development of the plant systems operational analysis and of the man-machine interface design. The methodologies developed are made up of the following plans: -) Human Factor Engineering implementation in the Man-Machine Interface design; -) Plant System Functional Requirement Analysis; -) Allocation of Functions to man/machine; -) Task Analysis; -) Human-System Interface design; -) Control Room Verification and -) Validation

  19. Towards a Future Reallocation of Work between Humans and Machines – Taxonomy of Tasks and Interaction Types in the Context of Machine Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Traumer, Fabian; Oeste-Reiß, Sarah; Leimeister, Jan Marco

    2017-01-01

    In today’s race for competitive advantages, more and more companies implement innovations in artificial intelligence and machine learning (ML). Although these machines take over tasks that have been executed by humans, they will not make human workforce obsolete. To leverage the potentials of ML, collaboration between humans and machines is necessary. Before collaboration processes can be developed, a classification of tasks in the field of ML is needed. Therefore, we present a taxonomy for t...

  20. Human-machine interface upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.; Chab, V.

    2002-01-01

    The article describes a new human-machine interface that was installed at the VR-1 training reactor. The human-machine interface upgrade was completed in the summer 2001. The interface was designed with respect to functional, ergonomic and aesthetic requirements. The interface is based on a personal computer equipped with two displays. One display enables alphanumeric communication between the reactor operator and the nuclear reactor I and C. The second display is a graphical one. It presents the status of the reactor, principal parameters (as power, period), control rods positions, course of the reactor power. Furthermore, it is possible to set parameters, to show the active core configuration, to perform reactivity calculations, etc. The software for the new human-machine interface was produced with the InTouch developing tool of the Wonder-Ware Company. It is possible to switch the language of the interface between Czech and English because of many foreign students and visitors to the reactor. Microcomputer based communication units with proper software were developed to connect the new human-machine interface with the present reactor I and C. The new human-machine interface at the VR-1 training reactor improves the comfort and safety of the reactor utilisation, facilitates experiments and training, and provides better support for foreign visitors. (orig.)

  1. Graphic man-machine interface applied to nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Claudio M.N.A; Mol, Antonio Carlos A.

    1999-01-01

    The Man-Machine Interfaces have been of interest of many researchers in the area of nuclear human factors engineering, principally applied to monitoring systems. The clarity of information provides best adaptation of the men to the machine. This work proposes the development of a Graphic Man-Machine Interface applied to nuclear reactor designs as a tool to optimize them. Here is present a prototype of a graphic man-machine interface for the Hammer code developed for PC under the Windows environment. The results of its application are commented. (author)

  2. Development of effective tool for iterative design of human machine interfaces in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Matsuo, Satoko; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Wu, Wei; Kameda, Akiyuki; Fumizawa, Motoo

    2000-01-01

    The authors have developed SEAMAID, which is a Simulation-based Evaluation and Analysis support system for MAn-machine Interface Design (SEAMAID) in the domain of nuclear power plants. The SEAMAID simulated the interaction between an operator and human machine interfaces (HMI), and supports to evaluate the HMI by using the simulation results. In this paper, a case study of evaluation for conventional center control room design was conducted. The authors were confirmed that SEAMAID is a useful tool for improvements of HMI design (J.P.N.)

  3. A Function-Behavior-State Approach to Designing Human Machine Interface for Nuclear Power Plant Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Zhang, W. J.

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents an approach to human-machine interface design for control room operators of nuclear power plants. The first step in designing an interface for a particular application is to determine information content that needs to be displayed. The design methodology for this step is called the interface design framework (called framework ). Several frameworks have been proposed for applications at varying levels, including process plants. However, none is based on the design and manufacture of a plant system for which the interface is designed. This paper presents an interface design framework which originates from design theory and methodology for general technical systems. Specifically, the framework is based on a set of core concepts of a function-behavior-state model originally proposed by the artificial intelligence research community and widely applied in the design research community. Benefits of this new framework include the provision of a model-based fault diagnosis facility, and the seamless integration of the design (manufacture, maintenance) of plants and the design of human-machine interfaces. The missing linkage between design and operation of a plant was one of the causes of the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor incident. A simulated plant system is presented to explain how to apply this framework in designing an interface. The resulting human-machine interface is discussed; specifically, several fault diagnosis examples are elaborated to demonstrate how this interface could support operators' fault diagnosis in an unanticipated situation.

  4. Human factors engineering measures taken by nuclear power plant owners/operators for optimisation of the man-machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisgruber, H.

    1996-01-01

    Both operating results and human factors studies show that man is able to meet the requirements in this working environment. Hence the degree of human reliability required by the design basis of nuclear power plants is ensured. This means: - Nuclear technology for electricity generation is justifiable from the human factors point of view. - The chief opponent is not right in saying that man is not able to cope with the risks and challenges brought about by nuclear technology applications. The human factors concept for optimisation or configuration of the man-machine systems represents an additional endeavor on the part of nuclear power plant operators within the framework of their responsibilities. Human factors analyses meet with good response by the personnel, as analysis results and clarification of causes of accident scenarios contribute to relieve the personnel (exoneration) and find ways for remedial action. (orig./DG) [de

  5. Behavioral simulation of a nuclear power plant operator crew for human-machine system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, K.; Shimada, T.; Kondo, S.

    1999-01-01

    This article proposes an architecture of behavioral simulation of an operator crew in a nuclear power plant including group processes and interactions between the operators and their working environment. An operator model was constructed based on the conceptual human information processor and then substantiated as a knowledge-based system with multiple sets of knowledge base and blackboard, each of which represents an individual operator. From a trade-off between reality and practicality, we adopted an architecture of simulation that consists of the operator, plant and environment models in order to consider operator-environment interactions. The simulation system developed on this framework and called OCCS was tested using a scenario of BWR plant operation. The case study showed that operator-environment interactions have significant effects on operator crew performance and that they should be considered properly for simulating behavior of human-machine systems. The proposed architecture contributed to more realistic simulation in comparison with an experimental result, and a good prospect has been obtained that computer simulation of an operator crew is feasible and useful for human-machine system design. (orig.)

  6. A foundation for allocating control functions to humans and machines in future CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupton, L.R.; Lipsett, J.J.; Davey, E.C.; Olmstead, R.A.

    1990-06-01

    Since the control room for the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited CANDU 6 plant was designed in the 1970s, requirements for control rooms have changed dramatically as a result of new licensing requirements, evolution of major new standards for control centre design and technological advances. The role of the human operator has become prominent in the design and operation of industrial and, in particular, nuclear plants. Major industrial accidents in the last decade have highlighted the need for paying significantly more attention to the requirements of the human as an integral part of the plant control system. A Functional Design Methodology has been defined that addresses the issues related to maximizing the strengths of the human and the machine in the next generation of CANDU plants. This method is based, in part, on the recently issued international standard IEC 964. The application of this method will lead to the definition of the requirements for detailed design of the control room, including man-machine interfaces, preliminary operating procedures, staffing and training. Further, it provides a basis for the verification and validation of the allocation of functions to the operator and the machine

  7. Design for the human-machine interface of a digitalized reactor control-room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Ronghong; Zhang Liangju; Li Duo; Yu Hui

    2005-01-01

    Digitalized technology is implemented in the instrumentation and control system of an in-construction research reactor, which advances information display in both contents and styles in a nuclear reactor control-room, and greatly improves human-machine interface. In the design for a digitalized nuclear reactor control-room there are a series of new problems and technologies should be considered seriously. This paper mainly introduces the design for the digitalized control-room of the research nuclear reactor and covered topics include design principle of human-machine interface, organization and classification of interface graphics, technologies and principles based on human factors engineering and implemented in the graphics design. (authors)

  8. Human Factors Consideration for the Design of Collaborative Machine Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung; Fisk, Arthur D.; Rogers, Wendy A.

    Recent improvements in technology have facilitated the use of robots and virtual humans not only in entertainment and engineering but also in the military (Hill et al., 2003), healthcare (Pollack et al., 2002), and education domains (Johnson, Rickel, & Lester, 2000). As active partners of humans, such machine assistants can take the form of a robot or a graphical representation and serve the role of a financial assistant, a health manager, or even a social partner. As a result, interactive technologies are becoming an integral component of people's everyday lives.

  9. Human factor problem in nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Kenji; Fujimoto, Junzo

    1999-01-01

    Since a nuclear power plant accident at Threemile Island in U.S.A. occurred in March, 1979, twenty years have passed. After the accident, the human factor problem became focussed in nuclear power, to succeed its research at present. For direct reason of human error, most of factors at individual level or work operation level are often listed at their center. Then, it is natural that studies on design of a machine or apparatus suitable for various human functions and abilities and on improvement of relationship between 'human being and machine' and 'human being and working environment' are important in future. Here was, as first, described on outlines of the human factor problem in a nuclear power plant developed at a chance of past important accident, and then was described on educational training for its countermeasure. At last, some concrete researching results obtained by human factor research were introduced. (G.K.)

  10. A Collaboration-Oriented M2M Messaging Mechanism for the Collaborative Automation between Machines in Future Industrial Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaozong Meng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Machine-to-machine (M2M communication is a key enabling technology for industrial internet of things (IIoT-empowered industrial networks, where machines communicate with one another for collaborative automation and intelligent optimisation. This new industrial computing paradigm features high-quality connectivity, ubiquitous messaging, and interoperable interactions between machines. However, manufacturing IIoT applications have specificities that distinguish them from many other internet of things (IoT scenarios in machine communications. By highlighting the key requirements and the major technical gaps of M2M in industrial applications, this article describes a collaboration-oriented M2M (CoM2M messaging mechanism focusing on flexible connectivity and discovery, ubiquitous messaging, and semantic interoperability that are well suited for the production line-scale interoperability of manufacturing applications. The designs toward machine collaboration and data interoperability at both the communication and semantic level are presented. Then, the application scenarios of the presented methods are illustrated with a proof-of-concept implementation in the PicknPack food packaging line. Eventually, the advantages and some potential issues are discussed based on the PicknPack practice.

  11. International collaboration for nuclear competence building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapalehto, T.; Storey, P.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of the nuclear industry is no different to that of any other industry, indeed to most forms of human activity: birth, growth, maturity, decline, rebirth and renewal or death. As a result of the twin facets of long time scales and essential technical competence the industry now faces two problems: how to retain existing skills and competences for the 50 plus years that a plant is operating and how to develop and retain new skills and competences in the areas of decommissioning and radioactive waste management. Different countries are at different stages of the nuclear technology life cycle, a competence that may have declined or be lost in one country may be strong in another. And therein lies one solution to the problems the sector faces - international collaboration. The initiatives such as the NEA Halden project and the Generation IV International Forum lay a ground for quiet optimism that collaboration, information exchange and exchange of personnel continue to be an integral part of the development of nuclear power. Also there is evidence that myriad initiatives are underway in the area of nuclear education and training. Though, national surveys show that still more engineers and scientists having nuclear knowledge are required than are graduating. (author)

  12. Control rooms and man-machine interface in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    The importance of man-machine interface for ensuring safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants has always been recognized. Since the early 1970's, the concepts of operator support and human factors have been increasingly used to better define the role of control rooms. In the late 1970's, the lessons learned from experience considerably accelerated the development of recommendations and regulatory requirements governing the resources and data available to operators in nuclear power plant control rooms, and specified the expertise required to assist them in case of need. This document summarizes the steps which have been taken and are being planned around the world to improve the man-machine interface for safe and economic power generation. It intends to present to the reader useful examples on some selected control room design and man-machine interface practices for operation and surveillance of nuclear power plants. 53 refs, 94 figs, 27 tabs

  13. Attributing Agency to Automated Systems: Reflections on Human-Robot Collaborations and Responsibility-Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Sven

    2017-07-18

    Many ethicists writing about automated systems (e.g. self-driving cars and autonomous weapons systems) attribute agency to these systems. Not only that; they seemingly attribute an autonomous or independent form of agency to these machines. This leads some ethicists to worry about responsibility-gaps and retribution-gaps in cases where automated systems harm or kill human beings. In this paper, I consider what sorts of agency it makes sense to attribute to most current forms of automated systems, in particular automated cars and military robots. I argue that whereas it indeed makes sense to attribute different forms of fairly sophisticated agency to these machines, we ought not to regard them as acting on their own, independently of any human beings. Rather, the right way to understand the agency exercised by these machines is in terms of human-robot collaborations, where the humans involved initiate, supervise, and manage the agency of their robotic collaborators. This means, I argue, that there is much less room for justified worries about responsibility-gaps and retribution-gaps than many ethicists think.

  14. The significance of human factors in nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weil, L.; Berg, H.P.

    1999-01-01

    Human factors is an aspect increasingly investigated in the last few years in efforts and programmes for enhancing the operational safety of nuclear systems. Methodology has been elaborated for analysis and evaluation of human reliability, or development of instruments supporting the decisions to be taken by the operators at the man-control room interface of nuclear installations, as well as initial approaches to introduce organisational factors which may influence the man-machine function allocation, and thus are an element of the safety culture concept. The significance of human factors in nuclear activities, as well as activities at the national and international level for optimisation of the man-machine interface and the man-organisation interface are discussed. (orig./CB) [de

  15. The nuclear structure and low-energy reactions (NSLER) collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, D J

    2006-01-01

    The long-term vision of the Nuclear Structure and Low-Energy Reactions (NSLER) collaboration is to arrive at a comprehensive and unified description of nuclei and their reactions that is grounded in the interactions between the constituent nucleons. For this purpose, we will develop a universal energy density functional for nuclei and replace current phenomenological models of nuclear structure and reactions with a well-founded microscopic theory that will deliver maximum predictive power with minimal uncertainties that are well quantified. Nuclear structure and reactions play an essential role in the science to be investigated at rare isotope facilities, and in nuclear physics applications to the Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship Program, next-generation reactors, and threat reduction. We anticipate an expansion of the computational techniques and methods we currently employ, and developments of new treatments, to take advantage of petascale architectures and demonstrate the capability of the leadership class machines to deliver new science heretofore impossible

  16. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  17. Ergonomics in nuclear and human factors engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muench, E.; Schultheiss, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The work situation including man-machine-relationships in nuclear power plants is described. The overview gives only a compact summary of some important ergonomic parameters, i.e. human body dimension, human load, human characteristics and human knowledge. (DG)

  18. Human Reliability and the Current Dilemma in Human-Machine Interface Design Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passalacqua, Roberto; Yamada, Fumiaki

    2002-01-01

    Since human error dominates the probability of failures of still-existing human-requiring systems (as the Monju reactor), the human-machine interface needs to be improved. Several rationales may lead to the conclusion that 'humans' should limit themselves to monitor the 'machine'. For example, this is the trend in the aviation industry: newest aircrafts are designed to be able to return to a safe state by the use of control systems, which do not need human intervention. Thus, the dilemma whether we really need operators (for example in the nuclear industry) might arise. However, social-technical approaches in recent human error analyses are pointing out the so-called 'organizational errors' and the importance of a human-machine interface harmonization. Typically plant's operators are a 'redundant' safety system with a much lower reliability (than the machine): organizational factors and harmonization requirements suggest designing the human-machine interface in a way that allows improvement of operator's reliability. In addition, taxonomy studies of accident databases have also proved that operators' training should promote processes of decision-making. This is accomplished in the latest trends of PSA technology by introducing the concept of a 'Safety Monitor' that is a computer-based tool that uses a level 1 PSA model of the plant. Operators and maintenance schedulers of the Monju FBR will be able to perform real-time estimations of the plant risk level. The main benefits are risk awareness and improvements in decision-making by operators. Also scheduled maintenance can be approached in a more rational (safe and economic) way. (authors)

  19. Human-machine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, J Chris [Sandia Park, NM; Xavier, Patrick G [Albuquerque, NM; Abbott, Robert G [Albuquerque, NM; Brannon, Nathan G [Albuquerque, NM; Bernard, Michael L [Tijeras, NM; Speed, Ann E [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  20. Development of Simulation-Based Evaluation System for Iterative Design of Human-Machine Interface in a Nuclear Power Plant - Application for Reducing Workload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo; Kameda, Akiyuki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Wu Wei; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    2003-01-01

    Development of simulation-based evaluation and analysis support system for man-machine interface design (SEAMAID) has been conducted in the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation to simulate the behavior of a few operators and the human-machine interface (HMI) in a commercialized pressurized water reactor plant. The workload is one of the key factors with respect to reducing the human error in the operation of nuclear power plants. In order to produce a high-quality design of HMI, the evaluation method was developed to simulate and analyze the operator's workload. Our method was adopted from the cognition model proposed by Reason. The workload such as the length of the visual point movement and the moving length of the operators was visualized in a monitor image during the simulation, and then recorded as a movie-file. As a consequence, the validation of SEAMAID was clarified

  1. Essential technologies for developing human and robot collaborative system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo

    1997-10-01

    In this study, we aim to develop a concept of new robot system, i.e., 'human and robot collaborative system', for the patrol of nuclear power plants. This paper deals with the two essential technologies developed for the system. One is the autonomous navigation program with human intervention function which is indispensable for human and robot collaboration. The other is the position estimation method by using gyroscope and TV image to make the estimation accuracy much higher for safe navigation. Feasibility of the position estimation method is evaluated by experiment and numerical simulation. (author)

  2. A Critique on the Effectiveness of Current Human Reliability Analysis Approach for the Human-Machine Interface Design in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee

    2010-01-01

    Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) in cooperation of PSA has been conducted to evaluate the safety of a system and the validity of a system design. HRA has been believed to provide a quantitative value of human error potential and the safety level of a design alternative in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). However, it becomes doubtful that current HRA is worth to conduct to evaluate the human factors of NPP design, since there have been many critiques upon the virtue of HRA. Inevitably, the newer the technology becomes, the larger endeavors bound for the new facilitated methods. This paper describes the limitations and the obsolescence of the current HRA, especially for the design evaluation of Human-Machine Interface (HMI) utilizing the recent digital technologies. An alternative approach to the assessment of the human error potential of HMI design is proposed

  3. Technology Roadmap on Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-01-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order. Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies

  4. Importance of human factors on nuclear installations safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    Actually, installations safety and, in particular the nuclear installations infer a strong incidence in human factors related to the design and operation of such installations. In general, the experience aims to that the most important accidents have happened as result of the components' failures combination and human failures in the operation of safety systems. Human factors in the nuclear installations may be divided into two areas: economy and human reliability. Human factors treatments for the safety evaluation of the nuclear installations allow to diagnose the weak points of man-machine interaction. (Author) [es

  5. Toward human-centered man-machine system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Fumiya

    1993-01-01

    The Japanese LWR power plants are classified into 4 categories, from the viewpoints of the control panel in central control room and the extent of automation. Their characteristics are outlined. The potential weaknesses indwelt in the conventional approaches are discussed; that are the loss of applicability to the unanticipated facts and the loss of morale of the operators. The need for the construction of human-centered man-machine system is emphasized in order to overcome these potential weaknesses. The most important features required for the system are, in short term, to support operators in dificulties, and at the same time, in long term, to assure the acquisition and conservation of the personnels' morale and potential to cope with the problems. The concepts of the 'ecological interface' and 'adaptive aiding' system are introduced as the design concepts for the human-centered man-machine system. (J.P.N.)

  6. Human modeling in nuclear engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Furuta, Kazuo.

    1994-01-01

    Review on progress of research and development on human modeling methods is made from the viewpoint of its importance on total man-machine system reliability surrounding nuclear power plant operation. Basic notions on three different approaches of human modeling (behavioristics, cognitives and sociologistics) are firstly introduced, followed by the explanation of fundamental scheme to understand human cognitives at man-machine interface and the mechanisms of human error and its classification. Then, general methodologies on human cognitive model by AI are explained with the brief summary of various R and D activities now prevailing in the human modeling communities around the world. A new method of dealing with group human reliability is also introduced which is based on sociologistic mathematical model. Lastly, problems on human model validation are discussed, followed by the introduction of new experimental method to estimate human cognitive state by psycho-physiological measurement, which is a new methodology plausible for human model validation. (author)

  7. Digital twins of human robot collaboration in a production setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Ali Ahmad; Bilberg, Arne

    2018-01-01

    This paper aims to present a digital twin framework to support the design, build and control of human-machine cooperation. In this study, computer simulations are used to develop a digital counterpart of a human-robot collaborative work environment for assembly work. The digital counterpart remains...... updated during the life cycle of the production system by continuously mirroring the physical system for quick and safe embed for continuous improvements. The case of a manufacturing company with human-robot work teams is presented for developing and validating the digital twin framework....

  8. Human factors evaluation of man-machine interface for periodic safety review of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Hwang, In Koo; Lee, Hyun Cheol; Jang, Tong Il; Ku, Jin Young; Kim, Soo Jin

    2004-12-01

    This report describes the research results of human factors assessment on the MMI(Man Machine Interface) equipment as part of Periodic Safety Review(PSR) of Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs). As MMI is a key factor among human factors to be reviewed in PSR, we reviewed the MMI components of nuclear power plants in aspect of human factors engineering. The availability, suitability, and effectiveness of the MMI devices were chosen to be reviewed. The MMI devices were investigated through the review of design documents related to the MMI, survey of control panels, evaluation of experts, and experimental assessment. Checklists were used to perform this assessment and record the review results. The items mentioned by the expert comments to review in detail in relation with task procedures were tested by experiments with operators' participation. For some questionable issues arisen during this MMI review, operator workload and possibility of errors in operator actions were analysed. The reviewed MMI devices contain MCR(Main Control Room), SPDS(Safety Parameter Display System), RSP(Remote Shutdown Panel), and the selected LCBs(Local Control Boards) importantly related to safety. As results of the assessments, any significant problem challenging the safety was not found on human factors in the MMI devices. However, several small items to be changed and improved in suitability of MMI devices were discovered. An action plan is recommended to accommodate the suggestions and review comments. It will enhance the plant safety on MMI area

  9. Refueling machine for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, E.F.; Hornak, L.P.; Swidwa, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    An improved refuelling machine for inserting and removing fuel assemblies from a nuclear reactor is described which has been designed to increase the reliability of such machines. The system incorporates features which enable the refuelling operation to be performed more efficiently and economically. (U.K.)

  10. New human machine interface for VR-1 training reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kropik, M.; Matejka, K.; Sklenka, L.; Chab, V.

    2002-01-01

    The contribution describes a new human machine interface that was installed at the VR-1 training reactor. The human machine interface update was completed in the summer 2001. The human machine interface enables to operate the training reactor. The interface was designed with respect to functional, ergonomic and aesthetic requirements. The interface is based on a personal computer equipped with two displays. One display enables alphanumeric communication between a reactor operator and the control and safety system of the nuclear reactor. Messages appear from the control system, the operator can write commands and send them there. The second display is a graphical one. It is possible to represent there the status of the reactor, principle parameters (as power, period), control rods' positions, the course of the reactor power. Furthermore, it is possible to set parameters, to show the active core configuration, to perform reactivity calculations, etc. The software for the new human machine interface was produced in the InTouch developing environment of the WonderWare Company. It is possible to switch the language of the interface between Czech and English because of many foreign students and visitors at the reactor. The former operator's desk was completely removed and superseded with a new one. Besides of the computer and the two displays, there are control buttons, indicators and individual numerical displays of instrumentation there. Utilised components guarantee high quality of the new equipment. Microcomputer based communication units with proper software were developed to connect the contemporary control and safety system with the personal computer of the human machine interface and the individual displays. New human machine interface at the VR-1 training reactor improves the safety and comfort of the reactor utilisation, facilitates experiments and training, and provides better support of foreign visitors.(author)

  11. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  12. Quantification of human error and common-mode failures in man-machine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisboa, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Quantification of human performance, particularly the determination of human error, is essential for realistic assessment of overall system performance of man-machine systems. This paper presents an analysis of human errors in nuclear power plant systems when measured against common-mode failures (CMF). Human errors evaluated are improper testing, inadequate maintenance strategy, and miscalibration. The methodology presented in the paper represents a positive contribution to power plant systems availability by identifying sources of common-mode failure when operational functions are involved. It is also applicable to other complex systems such as chemical plants, aircraft and motor industries; in fact, any large man-created, man-machine system could be included

  13. Activities of IAEA related to human interface in man-machine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiwaki, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    The present paper outlines some activities of IAEA related to human interface in man-machine systems. It has been recognized for quite some time that in large and complex man-machine interactive systems human errors can contribute substantially to failures of these systems, and that the improvement in the human interface in man-machine systems is essential for the safety of the plant. Many important surveys have been made in some member countries. These studies and operational experience have shown that it is possible to substantially reduce this adverse impact of human errors in nuclear power plant operations by the application of human factors technology. This technology. This technology includes: (1) selection of people with the requisite skills and knowledge and providing them with job-relevant training, (2) maintenance of the necessary job qualifications for each person in the plant, (3) design of man-machine interfaces which are fully compatible with the capabilities and limitations of the people in the system, and (4) design of job operations, including written materials, to facilitate required quality of human performance. A review is made of education/training, operator support systems, human error data collection, analysis of safety significant events and future activities. (Nogami, K.)

  14. Asian collaboration on nuclear reaction data compilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Furutachi, Naoya; Kato, Kiyoshi; Makinaga, Ayano; Devi, Vidya; Ichinkhorloo, Dagvadorj; Odsuren, Myagmarjav; Tsubakihara, Kohsuke; Katayama, Toshiyuki; Otuka, Naohiko

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear reaction data are essential for research and development in nuclear engineering, radiation therapy, nuclear physics and astrophysics. Experimental data must be compiled in a database and be accessible to nuclear data users. One of the nuclear reaction databases is the EXFOR database maintained by the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Recently, collaboration among the Asian NRDC members is being further developed under the support of the Asia-Africa Science Platform Program of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. We report the activity for three years to develop the Asian collaboration on nuclear reaction data compilation. (author)

  15. Human machine interaction research experience and perspectives as seen from the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oewre, F.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper a short review is given on important safety issues in the field of human machine interaction as expressed by important nuclear organisations such as USNRC, IAEA and the OECD NEA. Further on, a presentation is offered of research activities at the OECD Halden Reactor Project in the field of human machine interaction aiming to clarify some of the issues outlined by the above mentioned organisations. The OECD Halden Reactor Project is a joint undertaking of national nuclear organisations in 19 countries sponsoring a jointly financed research programme under the auspices of the OECD - Nuclear Energy Agency. One of the research areas is the man-machine systems research addressing the operator tasks in a control room environment. The overall objective is to provide a basis for improving today's control rooms through introduction of computer-based solutions for effective and safe execution of surveillance and control functions in normal as well as off-normal plant situations. (author)

  16. Human factor engineering applied to nuclear power plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, A.; Valdivia, J.C.; Jimenez, A.

    2001-01-01

    For the design and construction of new nuclear power plants as well as for maintenance and operation of the existing ones new man-machine interface designs and modifications are been produced. For these new designs Human Factor Engineering must be applied the same as for any other traditional engineering discipline. Advantages of implementing adequate Human Factor Engineering techniques in the design of nuclear reactors have become not only a fact recognized by the majority of engineers and operators but also an explicit requirement regulated and mandatory for the new designs of the so called advanced reactors. Additionally, the big saving achieved by a nuclear power plant having an operating methodology which significantly decreases the risk of operating errors makes it necessary and almost vital its implementation. The first step for this is preparing a plan to incorporate all the Human Factor Engineering principles and developing an integral design of the Instrumentation and Control and Man-machine interface systems. (author)

  17. The Human/Machine Humanities: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollivier Dyens

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to be human in the 21st century? The pull of engineering on every aspect of our lives, the impact of machines on how we represent ourselves, the influence of computers on our understanding of free-will, individuality and species, and the effect of microorganisms on our behaviour are so great that one cannot discourse on humanity and humanities without considering their entanglement with technology and with the multiple new dimensions of reality that it opens up. The future of humanities should take into account AI, bacteria, software, viruses (both organic and inorganic, hardware, machine language, parasites, big data, monitors, pixels, swarms systems and the Internet. One cannot think of humanity and humanities as distinct from technology anymore.

  18. University Research Collaborations on Nuclear Technology: A Legal Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakoshi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: International nuclear research collaborations are becoming increasingly important as the need for environmentally sound and safe energy technology grows. Despite having its risk, the benefits of using nuclear energy cannot be overlooked considering the energy crisis the world is facing. In order to maximize the safety of existing technology and promoting safe ways of taking advantage of nuclear energy, collaborative efforts of all who are involved in nuclear technology is necessary, regardless of national borders or affiliation. Non-conventional use of nuclear energy shall also be sought after in order to reduce greenhouse gas emission and to overcome the energy crisis the world is facing. It is therefore important that international collaborations among research institutes are promoted. Collaboration amongst universities poses a series of legal questions on how to form the framework, how to protect individual and communal inventions and how to share the fruits of the invention. This paper proposes a possible framework of collaboration and elaborates on possible legal issues and solutions. (author

  19. Proceedings of the 5. International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation Controls, and Human Machine Interface Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of nuclear power systems. The ICHMI system, together with plant personnel, is the 'central nervous system' for operating plants. It senses basic parameters, monitors performance, integrates information, and makes adjustments to plant operations as necessary. It also responds to failures and off-normal events, thus ensuring goals of efficient power production and safety. The ICHMI system embodies the sensing, communications, monitoring, control, and presentation and command systems between the process (i.e., the reactor, heat transport, and energy conversion systems) and the plant personnel. It enables plant personnel to more effectively monitor the health of the plant and to identify opportunities to improve the performance of equipment and systems as well as to anticipate, understand, and respond to potential problems. Improved controls provide the basis to operate more closely to performance margins, and the improved integration of automatic and human response enables them to work cooperatively to accomplish production and safety goals. The ICHMI system thus directly impacts the performance of the entire plant and thereby the economics, safety, and security of current and future reactor designs. The 5. International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation Control and Human-Machine Interface Technology (NPIC and HMIT 2006) is specifically devoted to advances in these important technologies. In these proceedings, more than 200 papers and panel sessions from all over the world have been assembled to share the most recent information and innovations in ICHMI technology and to discuss the important issues that face the future of the industry. The papers fall into two major groupings: instrumentation and control (I and C) and human-machine interface technology (HMIT). The I and C papers are organized into five tracks. 'Systems

  20. Proceedings of the 5. International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation Controls, and Human Machine Interface Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of nuclear power systems. The ICHMI system, together with plant personnel, is the 'central nervous system' for operating plants. It senses basic parameters, monitors performance, integrates information, and makes adjustments to plant operations as necessary. It also responds to failures and off-normal events, thus ensuring goals of efficient power production and safety. The ICHMI system embodies the sensing, communications, monitoring, control, and presentation and command systems between the process (i.e., the reactor, heat transport, and energy conversion systems) and the plant personnel. It enables plant personnel to more effectively monitor the health of the plant and to identify opportunities to improve the performance of equipment and systems as well as to anticipate, understand, and respond to potential problems. Improved controls provide the basis to operate more closely to performance margins, and the improved integration of automatic and human response enables them to work cooperatively to accomplish production and safety goals. The ICHMI system thus directly impacts the performance of the entire plant and thereby the economics, safety, and security of current and future reactor designs. The 5. International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation Control and Human-Machine Interface Technology (NPIC and HMIT 2006) is specifically devoted to advances in these important technologies. In these proceedings, more than 200 papers and panel sessions from all over the world have been assembled to share the most recent information and innovations in ICHMI technology and to discuss the important issues that face the future of the industry. The papers fall into two major groupings: instrumentation and control (I and C) and human-machine interface technology (HMIT). The I and C papers are organized into five tracks

  1. Man-machine considerations in nuclear power plant control room design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennant, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    Although human factors is a subject that has been around for a number of years, this area of design has only recently become known to the power industry. As power plants have grown in size and complexity, the instrumentation required to control and monitor plant processes has increased tremendously. This has been especially true in nuclear power facilities. Although operators are better trained and qualified, very little consideration has been devoted to man-machine interface and the limitations of human operators. This paper explores the historic aspects and design philosophy associated with nuclear plant control rooms. Current problems and solutions are explored along with the components of a control room review. Finally, a survey of future advances in control room design are offered. This paper is concerned with instrumentation, controls, and displays

  2. International collaboration on inherently safe nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkenbus, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    Science and technology transcend economic and political ideologies, providing a means of communications and approach common to both the United States and the Soviet Union. This paper suggests that the field of nuclear fission is a logical and productive area for superpower and broader collaboration, but that the kind of collaboration characteristic of past and present activity is less than it optimally could be. The case for cost sharing is compelling with budget constraints and mounting concerns over global warming. The case for collaboration is based on economic, psychological, and political grounds. A collaborative effort in nuclear fission is presented as a near term effort by building and testing of a prototype reactor in the 1990s

  3. Human factors and man-machine-interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr-Bruckmayr, E.

    1985-01-01

    Definitions of the man-machine-interface concept are given. The importance of ergonomics in planning, construction, start-up and operation of a nuclear power plant is highlighted. A comprehensive task analysis is the basis of man-machine-interaction. Personnel performance, work shaping and security are discussed

  4. Sensitivity analysis of synergistic collaborative scenarios towards sustainable nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesenko, G.; Kuznetsov, V.; Poplavskaya, E.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of the study on the role of collaboration among countries towards sustainable global nuclear energy systems. The study explores various market shares for nuclear fuel cycle services, possible scale of collaboration among countries and assesses benefits and issues relevant for collaboration between suppliers and users of nuclear fuel cycle services. The approach used in the study is based on a heterogeneous world model with grouping of the non-personified nuclear energy countries according to different nuclear fuel cycle policies. The methodology applied in the analysis allocates a fraction of future global nuclear energy generation to each of such country-groups as a function of time. The sensitivity studies performed show the impacts of the group shares on the scope of collaboration among countries and on the resulting possible reactor mix and nuclear fuel cycle infrastructure versus time. The study quantitatively demonstrates that the synergistic approach to nuclear fuel cycle has a significant potential for offering a win-win collaborative strategy to both, technology holders and technology users on their joint way to future sustainable nuclear energy systems. The study also highlights possible issues on such a collaborative way. (authors)

  5. Man--machine interface issues for space nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.; Haugset, K.

    1991-01-01

    The deployment of nuclear reactors in space necessitates an entirely new set of guidelines for the design of the man--machine interface (MMI) when compared to earth-based applications such as commerical nuclear power plants. Although the design objectives of earth- and space-based nuclear power systems are the same, that is, to produce electrical power, the differences in the application environments mean that the operator's role will be significantly different for space-based systems. This paper explores the issues associated with establishing the necessary MMI guidelines for space nuclear power systems. The generic human performance requirements for space-based systems are described, and the operator roles that are utilized for the operation of current and advanced earth-based reactors are briefly summarized. The development of a prototype advanced control room, the Integrated Surveillance and Control System (ISACS) at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Halden Reactor Project is introduced. Finally, preliminary ideas for the use of the ISACS system as a test bed for establishing MMI guidelines for space nuclear systems are presented

  6. Predictive Mechanisms Are Not Involved the Same Way during Human-Human vs. Human-Machine Interactions: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïsha Sahaï

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, interactions with others do not only involve human peers but also automated systems. Many studies suggest that the motor predictive systems that are engaged during action execution are also involved during joint actions with peers and during other human generated action observation. Indeed, the comparator model hypothesis suggests that the comparison between a predicted state and an estimated real state enables motor control, and by a similar functioning, understanding and anticipating observed actions. Such a mechanism allows making predictions about an ongoing action, and is essential to action regulation, especially during joint actions with peers. Interestingly, the same comparison process has been shown to be involved in the construction of an individual's sense of agency, both for self-generated and observed other human generated actions. However, the implication of such predictive mechanisms during interactions with machines is not consensual, probably due to the high heterogeneousness of the automata used in the experimentations, from very simplistic devices to full humanoid robots. The discrepancies that are observed during human/machine interactions could arise from the absence of action/observation matching abilities when interacting with traditional low-level automata. Consistently, the difficulties to build a joint agency with this kind of machines could stem from the same problem. In this context, we aim to review the studies investigating predictive mechanisms during social interactions with humans and with automated artificial systems. We will start by presenting human data that show the involvement of predictions in action control and in the sense of agency during social interactions. Thereafter, we will confront this literature with data from the robotic field. Finally, we will address the upcoming issues in the field of robotics related to automated systems aimed at acting as collaborative agents.

  7. Roadmap for Research, Development, and Demonstration of Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Don W.; Arndt, Steven A.; Bond, Leonard J.; Dudenhoeffer, Donald D.; Hallbert, Bruce P.; Holcomb, David E.; Wood, Richard T.; Naser, Joseph A.; O'Hara, John M.; Quinn, Edward L.

    2008-01-01

    Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The nuclear power industry is currently engaged in a transition from traditional analog-based instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) systems to implementations employing digital technologies. This transition has primarily occurred in an ad hoc fashion through individual system upgrades at existing plants and has been constrained by a number of concerns. Although international implementation of evolutionary nuclear power plants and the progression toward new plants in the United States have spurred design of more fully digital plant-wide ICHMI systems, the experience base in the nuclear power application domain is limited. Additionally, design and development programs by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for advanced reactor concepts, such as the Generation IV Program and Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), introduce different plant conditions and unique plant configurations that increase the need for enhanced ICHMI capabilities to fully achieve programmatic goals related to economic competitiveness, safety and reliability, sustainability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. As a result, there are challenges that need to be addressed to enable the nuclear power industry to effectively and efficiently complete the transition to safe and comprehensive use of digital technology

  8. An intelligent human-machine system based on an ecological interface design concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, N.

    1995-01-01

    It seems both necessary and promising to develop an intelligent human-machine system, considering the objective of the human-machine system and the recent advance in cognitive engineering and artificial intelligence together with the ever-increasing importance of human factor issues in nuclear power plant operation and maintenance. It should support human operators in their knowledge-based behaviour and allow them to cope with unanticipated abnormal events, including recovery from erroneous human actions. A top-down design approach has been adopted based on cognitive work analysis, and (1) an ecological interface, (2) a cognitive model-based advisor and (3) a robust automatic sequence controller have been established. These functions have been integrated into an experimental control room. A validation test was carried out by the participation of experienced operators and engineers. The results showed the usefulness of this system in supporting the operator's supervisory plant control tasks. ((orig.))

  9. Detecting anomalous nuclear materials accounting transactions: Applying machine learning to plutonium processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccaro, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear materials accountancy is the only safeguards measure that provides direct evidence of the status of nuclear materials. Of the six categories that gives rise to inventory differences, the technical capability is now in place to implement the technical innovations necessary to reduce the human error categories. There are really three main approaches to detecting anomalies in materials control and accountability (MC ampersand A) data: (1) Statistical: numeric methods such as the Page's Test, CUSUM, CUMUF, SITMUF, etc., can detect anomalies in metric (numeric) data. (2) Expert systems: Human expert's rules can be encoded into software systems such as ART, KEE, or Prolog. (3) Machine learning: Training data, such as historical MC ampersand A records, can be fed to a classifier program or neutral net or other machine learning algorithm. The Wisdom ampersand Sense (W ampersand S) software is a combination of approaches 2 and 3. The W ampersand S program includes full features for adding administrative rules and expert judgment rules to the rule base. if desired, the software can enforce consistency among all rules in the rule base

  10. Issues for resolving adverse effects on the safety culture of human work underload and workload transitions in complex human-machine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, T.G.

    1996-01-01

    A workshop was conducted whose specific purpose was to build on earlier work of the US National Research Council, US federal government agencies, and the larger human factors community to: (1) clarify human factors issues pertaining to degraded safety performance in advanced human-machine systems(e.g., nuclear production, transportation, aerospace) due to human work underload and workload transition, and (2) develop strategies for resolving these issues. The workshop affirmed that: (1) work underload and workload transition are issues that will have to be addressed by designers of advanced human-machine systems, especially those relying on automation, if cost, performance, safety, and operator acceptability are to be optimized, (2) human machine allocation models, standards and guidelines which go beyond simple capability approaches will be needed to preclude or seriously diminish the work underload and workload transition problems, and (3) the 16 workload definition, measurement, situational awareness, and trust issues identified during the workshop, need resolution if these models, standards, and guidelines are to be achieved

  11. Human factor engineering analysis for computerized human machine interface design issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhifang; Gu Pengfei; Zhang Jianbo

    2010-01-01

    The application of digital I and C technology in nuclear power plants is a significant improvement in terms of functional performances and flexibility, and it also poses a challenge to operation safety. Most of the new NPPs under construction are adopting advanced control room design which utilizes the computerized human machine interface (HMI) as the main operating means. Thus, it greatly changes the way the operators interact with the plant. This paper introduces the main challenges brought out by computerized technology on the human factor engineering aspect and addresses the main issues to be dealt with in the computerized HMI design process. Based on a operator task-resources-cognitive model, it states that the root cause of human errors is the mismatch between resources demand and their supply. And a task-oriented HMI design principle is discussed. (authors)

  12. Testing a CANDU-fueling machine at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cojocaru, Virgil

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, as a national and European premiere, the Fueling Machine Head no. 4 (F/M) for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda Unit 2 (NPP) was successfully tested at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR). In 2005, the second Fueling Machine (no. 5) has tested for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda Unit 2. The Institute's main objective is to develop scientific and technological support for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. Testing the Fueling Machines at INR Pitesti is part of the overall program to assimilate the CANDU technology in Romania. To perform the tests of these machines at INR Pitesti, a special testing rig has built being available for this goal. Both the testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. There was a delivery contract between GEC Canada and Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 to provide the Fueling Machines no. 4 and no. 5 in Romania before testing activity. As a first conclusion, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti has the facilities, the staff and the experience to perform possible co-operations with any CANDU Reactor owner

  13. Can machine learning explain human learning?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vahdat, M.; Oneto, L.; Anguita, D.; Funk, M.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    Learning Analytics (LA) has a major interest in exploring and understanding the learning process of humans and, for this purpose, benefits from both Cognitive Science, which studies how humans learn, and Machine Learning, which studies how algorithms learn from data. Usually, Machine Learning is

  14. Hybrid-augmented intelligence:collaboration and cognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-ning ZHENG; Zi-yi LIU; Peng-ju REN; Yong-qiang MA; Shi-tao CHEN; Si-yu YU; Jian-ru XUE

    2017-01-01

    The long-term goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to make machines learn and think like human beings. Due to the high levels of uncertainty and vulnerability in human life and the open-ended nature of problems that humans are facing, no matter how intelligent machines are, they are unable to completely replace humans. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce human cognitive capabilities or human-like cognitive models into AI systems to develop a new form of AI, that is, hybrid-augmented intelligence. This form of AI or machine intelligence is a feasible and important developing model. Hybrid-augmented intelligence can be divided into two basic models:one is human-in-the-loop augmented intelligence with human-computer collaboration, and the other is cognitive computing based augmented intelligence, in which a cognitive model is embedded in the machine learning system. This survey describes a basic framework for human-computer collaborative hybrid-augmented intelligence, and the basic elements of hybrid-augmented intelligence based on cognitive computing. These elements include intuitive reasoning, causal models, evolution of memory and knowledge, especially the role and basic principles of intuitive reasoning for complex problem solving, and the cognitive learning framework for visual scene understanding based on memory and reasoning. Several typical applications of hybrid-augmented intelligence in related fields are given.

  15. Challenges for coexistence of machine to machine and human to human applications in mobile network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanyal, R.; Cianca, E.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2012-01-01

    A key factor for the evolution of the mobile networks towards 4G is to bring to fruition high bandwidth per mobile node. Eventually, due to the advent of a new class of applications, namely, Machine-to-Machine, we foresee new challenges where bandwidth per user is no more the primal driver...... be evolved to address various nuances of the mobile devices used by man and machines. The bigger question is as follows. Is the state-of-the-art mobile network designed optimally to cater both the Human-to-Human and Machine-to-Machine applications? This paper presents the primary challenges....... As an immediate impact of the high penetration of M2M devices, we envisage a surge in the signaling messages for mobility and location management. The cell size will shrivel due to high tele-density resulting in even more signaling messages related to handoff and location updates. The mobile network should...

  16. Development of an advanced human-machine interface for next generation nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Soon Heung; Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Jin Kyun; Heo, Gyunyoung; Kim, Han Gon

    1999-01-01

    An advanced human-machine interface (HMI) has been developed to enhance the safety and availability of a nuclear power plant (NPP) by improving operational reliability. The key elements of the proposed HMI are the large display panels which present synopsis of plant status and the compact, computer-based work stations for monitoring, control and protection functions. The work station consists of four consoles such as a dynamic alarm console (DAC), a system information console (SIC), a computerized operating-procedure console (COC), and a safety system information console (SSIC). The DAC provides clean alarm pictures, in which information overlapping is excluded and alarm impacts are discriminated, for quick situation awareness. The SIC supports a normal operation by offering all necessary system information and control functions over non-safety systems. In addition, it is closely linked to the other consoles in order to automatically display related system information according to situations of the DAC and the COC. The COC aids operators with proper operating procedures during normal plant startup and shutdown or after a plant trip, and it also reduces their physical/mental burden through soft automation. The SSIC continuously displays safety system status and enables operators to control safety systems. The proposed HMI has been evaluated using the checklists that are extracted from various human factors guidelines. From the evaluation results, it can be concluded that the HMI is so designed as to address the human factors issues reasonably. After sufficient validation, the concept and the design features of the proposed HMI will be reflected in the design of the main control room of the Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR)

  17. Considerations upon the Machine Learning Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Alin Munteanu; Cristina Ofelia Sofran

    2006-01-01

    Artificial intelligence offers superior techniques and methods by which problems from diverse domains may find an optimal solution. The Machine Learning technologies refer to the domain of artificial intelligence aiming to develop the techniques allowing the computers to “learn”. Some systems based on Machine Learning technologies tend to eliminate the necessity of the human intelligence while the others adopt a man-machine collaborative approach.

  18. Human-machine interactions: The human element of expert systems for the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper will begin with a brief history of the development of expert systems in the nuclear industry. This discussion will serve to provide the reader with an understanding of how the field of artificial intelligence (AI) applications in the nuclear industry has developed. Next, this paper will discuss the general human factors issues relative to the development and implementation of expert systems for the nuclear industry. It will summarize the relevant research that addresses these issues and identify those areas that need the most effort for success. Since much of the prominent work for the application of expert systems has focused on computerized aids for decisionmaking in emergencies, this paper will draw from this area for its examples. This area tends to highlight the issues because of the safety-critical nature of the application. The same issues, however, are relevant to other applications of expert systems in the nuclear industry as well, even though the consequences of failure may not be as dramatic. (orig./GL)

  19. Human reliability and the man/machine interface: what do we do after the control room review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folley, J.D. Jr.; Schurman, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear industry has focused on only one aspect of the man/machine interface--human factors engineering of control rooms - to enhance nuclear power plant (NPP) safety. There are other factors that profoundly affect the reliability of the operators and maintenance personnel of NPP which, thus, affect NPP safety and availability. This paper discusses the factors of training, selection, job engineering, and work satisfaction, describing the potential effects on reactor safety of these factors at the man/machine interface. The impact of these factors on safety and plant availability is illustrated with examples of results obtained in other fields

  20. Carolinas' Nuclear Cluster: building competency through collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J. [Carolinas' Nuclear Cluster (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This presentation discusses the Carolinas Nuclear Cluster that was built with collaboration amongst interested parties. The challenge facing the participants were availability of qualified & experienced workforce; retiring expertise; competition for resources within nuclear and other technology sectors; competition for skills and leadership; competing priorities in a changing environment such as slow growth in new nuclear in the U.S.; speedup in existing plant upgrades & retrofits and international project development. The established principles were collaboration amongst players, no competition, no borders, business driven focus on job creation, think as a global business, be willing to invest actively with money, talent, time and focus on results and not activities.

  1. Carolinas' Nuclear Cluster: building competency through collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation discusses the Carolinas Nuclear Cluster that was built with collaboration amongst interested parties. The challenge facing the participants were availability of qualified & experienced workforce; retiring expertise; competition for resources within nuclear and other technology sectors; competition for skills and leadership; competing priorities in a changing environment such as slow growth in new nuclear in the U.S.; speedup in existing plant upgrades & retrofits and international project development. The established principles were collaboration amongst players, no competition, no borders, business driven focus on job creation, think as a global business, be willing to invest actively with money, talent, time and focus on results and not activities.

  2. EUROPEAN NUCLEAR PHYSICS: Electron machine quest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    In 1989, initial thinking on the construction of an electron accelerator for nuclear physics in France resulted in an initial plan for a 4 GeV machine with continuous output at 100 microamps. Subsequently a further study recommended a more ambitious European scheme going beyond 10 GeV

  3. Considerations upon the Machine Learning Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin Munteanu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence offers superior techniques and methods by which problems from diverse domains may find an optimal solution. The Machine Learning technologies refer to the domain of artificial intelligence aiming to develop the techniques allowing the computers to “learn”. Some systems based on Machine Learning technologies tend to eliminate the necessity of the human intelligence while the others adopt a man-machine collaborative approach.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Roadmap on Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies in Current and Future Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, David Eugene

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) recently sponsored the creation of a roadmap for instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) technology development. The roadmap represents the collective efforts of a group of subject matter experts from the DOE national laboratories, academia, vendors, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and utilities. It is intended to provide the underpinnings to the government sponsored ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) performed in the United States for the next several years. A distinguishing feature of this roadmapping effort is that it is not limited to a technology progression plan but includes a detailed rationale, aimed at the nonspecialist, for the existence of a focused ICHMI RD and D program. Eight specific technology areas were identified for focused RD and D as follows: (1) sensors and electronics for harsh environments,(2) uncertainty characterization for diagnostics/prognostics applications, (3) quantification of software quality for high-integrity digital applications, (4) intelligent controls for nearly autonomous operation of advanced nuclear plants, (5) plant network architecture, (6) intelligent aiding technology for operational support, (7) human system interaction models and analysis tools, and (8) licensing and regulatory challenges and solutions.

  5. Development of an evaluation technique for human-machine interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Dae Hwan; Koo, Sang Hui; Ahn, Won Yeong; Ryu, Yeong Shin [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-15

    The purpose of this study is two-fold : firstly to establish an evaluation technique for HMI(Human Machine Interface) in NPPs(Nuclear Power Plants) and secondly to develop an architecture of a support system which can be used for the evaluation of HMI. In order to establish an evaluation technique, this study conducted literature review on basic theories of cognitive science studies and summarized the cognitive characteristics of humans. This study also surveyed evaluation techniques of HMI in general, and reviewed studies on the evaluation of HMI in NPPs. On the basis of this survey, the study established a procedure for the evaluation of HMI in NPPs in Korea and laid a foundation for empirical verification.

  6. Development of an evaluation technique for human-machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Dae Hwan; Koo, Sang Hui; Ahn, Won Yeong; Ryu, Yeong Shin

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold : firstly to establish an evaluation technique for HMI(Human Machine Interface) in NPPs(Nuclear Power Plants) and secondly to develop an architecture of a support system which can be used for the evaluation of HMI. In order to establish an evaluation technique, this study conducted literature review on basic theories of cognitive science studies and summarized the cognitive characteristics of humans. This study also surveyed evaluation techniques of HMI in general, and reviewed studies on the evaluation of HMI in NPPs. On the basis of this survey, the study established a procedure for the evaluation of HMI in NPPs in Korea and laid a foundation for empirical verification

  7. Neural networks for perception human and machine perception

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsler, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Neural Networks for Perception, Volume 1: Human and Machine Perception focuses on models for understanding human perception in terms of distributed computation and examples of PDP models for machine perception. This book addresses both theoretical and practical issues related to the feasibility of both explaining human perception and implementing machine perception in terms of neural network models. The book is organized into two parts. The first part focuses on human perception. Topics on network model ofobject recognition in human vision, the self-organization of functional architecture in t

  8. Conveyor belt nuclear weighing machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    In many industries the flow of materials on conveyor belts must be measured and controlled. Electromechanical weighing devices have high accuracy but are complicated and expensive to install and maintain. For many applications the nuclear weighing machine has sufficient accuracy but is considerably simpler, cheaper and more robust and is easier to maintain. The rating and performance of a gamma ray balance on the mar ket are detailed. (P.G.R.)

  9. East-west collaboration in nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfram von, Oertzen

    2002-01-01

    The Sandarski-2 meeting on east-west collaborations in nuclear sciences was held in May 2001 in Bulgaria with 115 participants from 17 European countries, Usa, Japan and Russia (Dubna). The scientific included 66 oral contributions. During the last decade Eastern Europe has undergone substantial political and economic changes. These changes have had a decisive impact on the scientific community in these countries, because the support for basic and applied science has decreased dramatically due to the collapse of economic systems. It should noted that there are still good resources: experimental installations, technical and scientific manpower and a well trained human intellectual reserve but conditions differ strongly from one institute to another. Many national and European institutions have set up support programs for the funding of local activities for scientists in their eastern institutions or by funding collaborations between eastern and western scientists. Many highly specialized eastern scientists work now in Europe, the Usa and Japan but the brain drain from the poorest eastern countries is a real problem. One recommendation put forward at this meeting is the creation of European structures for the support of scientists in their eastern home institutions in such a way that they can return and continue to work at home. (A.C.)

  10. Knowledge machines digital transformations of the sciences and humanities

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    In Knowledge Machines, Eric Meyer and Ralph Schroeder argue that digital technologies have fundamentally changed research practices in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Meyer and Schroeder show that digital tools and data, used collectively and in distributed mode -- which they term e-research -- have transformed not just the consumption of knowledge but also the production of knowledge. Digital technologies for research are reshaping how knowledge advances in disciplines that range from physics to literary analysis. Meyer and Schroeder map the rise of digital research and offer case studies from many fields, including biomedicine, social science uses of the Web, astronomy, and large-scale textual analysis in the humanities. They consider such topics as the challenges of sharing research data and of big data approaches, disciplinary differences and new forms of interdisciplinary collaboration, the shifting boundaries between researchers and their publics, and the ways that digital tools promote o...

  11. Collaborative Research in the Digital Humanities

    CERN Document Server

    Deegan, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration within digital humanities is both a pertinent and a pressing topic as the traditional mode of the humanist, working alone in his or her study, is supplemented by explicitly co-operative, interdependent and collaborative research. This is particularly true where computational methods are employed in large-scale digital humanities projects. This book, which celebrates the contributions of Harold Short to this field, presents fourteen essays by leading authors in the digital humanities. It addresses several issues of collaboration, from the multiple perspectives of institutions, pro

  12. HUMAN MACHINE COOPERATIVE TELEROBOTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    William R. Hamel; Spivey Douglass; Sewoong Kim; Pamela Murray; Yang Shou; Sriram Sridharan; Ge Zhang; Scott Thayer; Rajiv V. Dubey

    2003-01-01

    The remediation and deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear waste storage tanks using telerobotics is one of the most challenging tasks faced in environmental cleanup. Since a number of tanks have reached the end of their design life and some of them have leaks, the unstructured, uncertain and radioactive environment makes the work inefficient and expensive. However, the execution time of teleoperation consumes ten to hundred times that of direct contact with an associated loss in quality. Thus, a considerable effort has been expended to improve the quality and efficiency of telerobotics by incorporating into teleoperation and robotic control functions such as planning, trajectory generation, vision, and 3-D modeling. One example is the Robot Task Space Analyzer (RTSA), which has been developed at the Robotics and Electromechanical Systems Laboratory (REMSL) at the University of Tennessee in support of the D and D robotic work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This system builds 3-D models of the area of interest in task space through automatic image processing and/or human interactive manual modeling. The RTSA generates a task plan file, which describes the execution of a task including manipulator and tooling motions. The high level controller of the manipulator interprets the task plan file and executes the task automatically. Thus, if the environment is not highly unstructured, a tooling task, which interacts with environment, will be executed in the autonomous mode. Therefore, the RTSA not only increases the system efficiency, but also improves the system reliability because the operator will act as backstop for safe operation after the 3-D models and task plan files are generated. However, unstructured conditions of environment and tasks necessitate that the telerobot operates in the teleoperation mode for successful execution of task. The inefficiency in the teleoperation mode led to the

  13. HUMAN MACHINE COOPERATIVE TELEROBOTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Hamel; Spivey Douglass; Sewoong Kim; Pamela Murray; Yang Shou; Sriram Sridharan; Ge Zhang; Scott Thayer; Rajiv V. Dubey

    2003-06-30

    The remediation and deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear waste storage tanks using telerobotics is one of the most challenging tasks faced in environmental cleanup. Since a number of tanks have reached the end of their design life and some of them have leaks, the unstructured, uncertain and radioactive environment makes the work inefficient and expensive. However, the execution time of teleoperation consumes ten to hundred times that of direct contact with an associated loss in quality. Thus, a considerable effort has been expended to improve the quality and efficiency of telerobotics by incorporating into teleoperation and robotic control functions such as planning, trajectory generation, vision, and 3-D modeling. One example is the Robot Task Space Analyzer (RTSA), which has been developed at the Robotics and Electromechanical Systems Laboratory (REMSL) at the University of Tennessee in support of the D&D robotic work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This system builds 3-D models of the area of interest in task space through automatic image processing and/or human interactive manual modeling. The RTSA generates a task plan file, which describes the execution of a task including manipulator and tooling motions. The high level controller of the manipulator interprets the task plan file and executes the task automatically. Thus, if the environment is not highly unstructured, a tooling task, which interacts with environment, will be executed in the autonomous mode. Therefore, the RTSA not only increases the system efficiency, but also improves the system reliability because the operator will act as backstop for safe operation after the 3-D models and task plan files are generated. However, unstructured conditions of environment and tasks necessitate that the telerobot operates in the teleoperation mode for successful execution of task. The inefficiency in the teleoperation mode led to the research

  14. Human Centered Hardware Modeling and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolian Damon; Lawrence, Brad; Stelges, Katrine; Henderson, Gena

    2013-01-01

    In order to collaborate engineering designs among NASA Centers and customers, to in clude hardware and human activities from multiple remote locations, live human-centered modeling and collaboration across several sites has been successfully facilitated by Kennedy Space Center. The focus of this paper includes innovative a pproaches to engineering design analyses and training, along with research being conducted to apply new technologies for tracking, immersing, and evaluating humans as well as rocket, vehic le, component, or faci lity hardware utilizing high resolution cameras, motion tracking, ergonomic analysis, biomedical monitoring, wor k instruction integration, head-mounted displays, and other innovative human-system integration modeling, simulation, and collaboration applications.

  15. The crucial role of nomothetic and idiographic conceptions of time: interdisciplinary collaboration in nuclear waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Corinne; Stauffacher, Michael; Krütli, Pius; Scholz, Roland W

    2012-01-01

    The disposal of nuclear waste involves extensive time scales. Technical experts consider up to 1 million years for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in their safety assessment. Yet nuclear waste is not only a technical but also a so-called sociotechnical problem and, therefore, requires interdisciplinary collaboration between technical, natural, social sciences, and the humanities in its management. Given that these disciplines differ in their language, epistemics, and interests, such collaboration might be problematic. Based on evidence from cognitive psychology, we suggest that, in particular, a concept like time is presumably critical and can be understood differently. This study explores how different scientific disciplines understand extensive time scales in general and then focuses on nuclear waste. Eighteen qualitative exploratory interviews were conducted with experts for time-related phenomena of different disciplines, among them experts working in nuclear waste management. Analyses revealed two distinct conceptions of time corresponding to idiographic and nomothetic research approaches: scientists from the humanities and social sciences tend to have a more open, undetermined conception of time, whereas natural scientists tend to focus on a more determined conception that includes some undetermined aspects. Our analyses lead to reflections on potential difficulties for interdisciplinary teams in nuclear waste management. We focus on the understanding of the safety assessment, on potential implications for communication between experts from different disciplines (e.g., between experts from the humanities and engineering for risk assessment and risk communication), and we reflect on the roles of different disciplines in nuclear waste management. © 2011 Society for Risk Analysis.

  16. A Taxonomy of Human-Agent Team Collaborations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neef, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Future command teams will be heavily supported by artificial actors. This paper introduces a taxonomy of collaboration types in human – agent teams. Using two classifying dimensions, coordination type and collaboration type, eight different classes of human – agent collaborations transpire. These

  17. Using human brain activity to guide machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Ruth C; Scheirer, Walter J; Cox, David D

    2018-03-29

    Machine learning is a field of computer science that builds algorithms that learn. In many cases, machine learning algorithms are used to recreate a human ability like adding a caption to a photo, driving a car, or playing a game. While the human brain has long served as a source of inspiration for machine learning, little effort has been made to directly use data collected from working brains as a guide for machine learning algorithms. Here we demonstrate a new paradigm of "neurally-weighted" machine learning, which takes fMRI measurements of human brain activity from subjects viewing images, and infuses these data into the training process of an object recognition learning algorithm to make it more consistent with the human brain. After training, these neurally-weighted classifiers are able to classify images without requiring any additional neural data. We show that our neural-weighting approach can lead to large performance gains when used with traditional machine vision features, as well as to significant improvements with already high-performing convolutional neural network features. The effectiveness of this approach points to a path forward for a new class of hybrid machine learning algorithms which take both inspiration and direct constraints from neuronal data.

  18. Remote machine engineering applications for nuclear facilities decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toto, G.; Wyle, H.R.

    1983-01-01

    Decontamination and decommissioning of a nuclear facility require the application of techniques that protect the worker and the enviroment from radiological contamination and radiation. Remotely operated portable robotic arms, machines, and devices can be applied. The use of advanced systems should enhance the productivity, safety, and cost facets of the efforts; remote automatic tooling and systems may be used on any job where job hazard and other factors justify application. Many problems based on costs, enviromental impact, health, waste generation, and political issues may be mitigated by use of remotely operated machines. The work that man can not do or should not do will have to be done by machines

  19. Companies' human capital required for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albats, Ekaterina; Bogers, Marcel; Podmetina, Daria

    building, relationship building, IPR management and negotiation for the context of collaboration with universities. Our research has revealed an importance of expectation management skills for university-industry collaboration (UIC) context. We found that human capital for UIC is to be continuously......Universities are widely acknowledged as an important source of knowledge for corporate innovation, and collaboration with universities plays an important role in companies’ open innovation strategy. However, little is known about the human capital components required for collaboration...... with universities. Analysing the results of the survey among over 500 company managers we define the universal employees’ skills required for company’ successful collaborations with external stakeholders. Then through analysing qualitative interviews data we distinguish between these skills and capabilities...

  20. Concept Representation Analysis in the Context of Human-Machine Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    an inductive machine learning paradigm). The results will support figuring out the most significant key points for constructing a conceptual linkage between a human learning theory and a machine learning paradigm. Accordingly, I will construct a conceptual ground for expressing and analysing concepts......This article attempts to make a conceptual and epistemological junction between human learning and machine learning. I will be concerned with specifying and analysing the structure of concepts in the common ground between a concept-based human learning theory and a concept-based machine learning...... in the common ground of human and informatics sciences and in the context of human-machine interplays....

  1. Human as a component of a nuclear material safeguard system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, D.E.; Schechter, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Many human vigilance experiments are summarized and principles are extracted which should be useful in designing and evaluating a nuclear material safeguard system. A human is a poor observer and is not a dependable part of any man-machine system when required to function as an observer. There are a few techniques which improve his performance by providing feedback. A conceptual model is presented which is helpful in design and evaluation of systems. There is some slight experimental support for the model. Finally, some techniques of time study and statistical control charting will be useful as a means of detecting nuclear diversion attempts

  2. Development of human resource capacity building assistance for nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yo; Noro, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    The Integrated Support Center for Nuclear Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security (ISCN) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been providing nuclear security human resource development projects targeting at nuclear emerging countries in Asia in cooperation with the authorities concerned including the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). In the aftermath of the attacks of Sept. 11, the threat of terrorism was internationally recognized and thus the human resource capacity building is underway as an urgent task. In order to responding to emerging threats, the human resource capacity building that ISCN has implemented thus far needs to be multilaterally analyzed in order to develop more effective training programs. This paper studies ISCN's future direction by analyzing its achievements, as well as introduces the collaborative relationships with SNL that contributes to the reflection and maintenance of international trends for the contents of nuclear security training, the nuclear security enhancement support with which Japan is to provide nuclear emerging countries in Asia, and the achievements of the nuclear security training program that ISCN implemented. (author)

  3. Nuclear safety in all-European collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toepfer, K.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of international cooperation in the field of nuclear safety is shown by the fact that there are more than 400 nuclear powerstations of different designs, different ages and in different legal, economic and social systems worldwide. The German Federal Government therefore supports the regulations of the IAEA Safety Standard, the so called NUSS codes. In the bilateral field, agreements have already been made with many countries, which provide for collaboration to protect against the dangers of nuclear energy. The effects of the Chernobyl accident reinforce the necessity of making this more intensive and extending it to the countries of the former Eastern block. (DG) [de

  4. Choosing between different AI approaches? The scientific benefits of the confrontation, and the new collaborative era between humans and machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Vallverdú

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available AI is a multidisciplinary activity that involves specialists from several fields, and we can say that the aim of science, and AI science, is solving problems. AI and computer sciences are been creating a new kind of making science, that we can call in silico science. Both models top-eown and bottomup are useful for e-scientific research. There is no a real controversy between them. Besides, the extended mind model of human cognition, involves human-machine interactions. Huge amount of data requires new ways to make and organize scientific practices: supercomputers, grids, distributed computing, specific software and middleware and, basically, more efficient and visual ways to interact with information. This is one of the key points to understand contemporary relationships between humans and machines: usability of scientific data.

  5. Applicability of Machine-Learning Enabled LIBS in Post Irradiation Nuclear Forensic Analysis of High Level Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onkongi, J.; Maina, D.; Angeyo, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Forensics seeks Information to determine; Chemical Composition, Routes of transit, Origin (Provenance) and Intended use. Post Irradiation/Post detonation NF In a post-detonation event could you get clues/signatures from glass debris, minute sample sizes? Nuclear Forensic Technique Should be State-of -the art that is Rapid, Non-invasive, Remote ability and Non-destructive. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) unlike other Analytic Techniques that require tedious sample preparations such as Dissolution, digestion & matrix removal, which generate additional nuclear wastes that require proper Procedures for handling, storage & ultimate disposal, LIBS overcomes these limitations. Utility of Machine Learning Techniques employed include; Artificial Neural Networks, ANN (Regression/Modelling), Principal component Analysis, PCA (Classification) and Support Vector Machine SVM (Comparative study/Classification Machine Learning coupled with LIBS gives a state of the art analytic method. Utility of the technic in safeguards security and non-proliferation

  6. Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration - FY99 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. J. Leahy

    1999-07-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has created the Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration. The SNRC brings together some of America's finest laboratory and university nuclear researchers in a carefully focused research program intended to produce ''breakthrough'' solutions to the difficult issues of nuclear economics, safety, non-proliferation, and nuclear waste. This integrated program aims to address obstacles that stand in the way of nuclear power development in the US These include fuel cycle concerns related to waste and proliferation, the need for more efficient regulatory practices, and the high cost of constructing and operating nuclear power plants. Funded at an FY99 level of $2.58M, the SNRC is focusing the efforts of scientists and engineers from the INEEL and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to solve complex nuclear energy challenges in a carefully chosen, integrated portfolio of research topics. The result of this collaboration will be research that serves as a catalyst for future direct-funded nuclear research and technology development and which preserves and enhances the INEEL's role as America's leading national laboratory for nuclear power research. In its first year, the SNRC has focused on four research projects each of which address one or more of the four issues facing further nuclear power development (economics, safety, waste disposition and proliferation-resistance). This Annual Report describes technical work and accomplishments during the first year of the SNRC's existence.

  7. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Human Factors Program Plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This document is the Second Annual Revision to the NRC Human Factors Program Plan. The first edition was published in August 1983. Revision 1 was published in July of 1984. Purpose of the NRC Human Factors Program is to ensure that proper consideration is given to human factors in the design and operation of nuclear power plants. This document describes the plans of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation to address high priority human factors concerns of importance to reactor safety in FY 1986 and FY 1987. Revision 2 of the plan incorporates recent Commission decisions and policies bearing on the human factors aspects of reactor safety regulation. With a few exceptions, the principal changes from prior editions reflect a shift from developing new requirements to staff evaluation of industry progress in resolving human factors issues. The plan addresses seven major program elements: (1) Training, (2) Licensing Examinations, (3) Procedures, (4) Man-Machine Interface, (5) Staffing and Qualifications, (6) Management and Organization, and (7) Human Performance

  8. Human friendly man-machine system with advanced media technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Takamichi; Sasaki, Kazunori

    1993-01-01

    This paper deals with the methodology to implement the man-machine system (MMS) with enhanced human friendliness for nuclear power plants. The relevant technologies are investigated from the two view points: One is integrated multi-media usage for user-computer interface and the other cognitive engineering for user-task interaction. Promising MMS design methodologies, concepts, and their limitations are discussed. To overcome uncertain factors found in human behaviors or individual differences in performance and preference of operators, a design appproach to natural and flexible man-computer interactive environment is proposed by intergrated use of not only cognitive and psychological knowledge but also advanced media technology. Multi-media operator support system under development is shown as an example to evaluate the effectiveness of the new approach and future advancement is prospected. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear safety research collaborations between the US and Russian Federation international nuclear safety centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J; Braun, J.C; Klickman, A.E.; Bugaenko, S.E; Kabanov, L.P; Kraev, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) have formed International Nuclear Safety Centers to collaborate on nuclear safety research. USDOE established the U. S. Center at Argonne National Laboratory in October 1995. MINATOM established the Russian Center at the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering in Moscow in July 1996. In April 1998 the Russian center became an independent, autonomous organization under MINATOM. The goals of the centers are to: cooperate in the development of technologies associated with nuclear safety in nuclear power engineering. be international centers for the collection of information important for safety and technical improvements in nuclear power engineering. maintain a base for fundamental knowledge needed to design nuclear reactors.The strategic approach that is being used to accomplish these goals is for the two centers to work together to use the resources and the talents of the scientists associated with the US Center and the Russian Center to do collaborative research to improve the safety of Russian-designed nuclear reactors

  10. Combining human and machine processes (CHAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudit, Moises; Sudit, David; Hirsch, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Machine Reasoning and Intelligence is usually done in a vacuum, without consultation of the ultimate decision-maker. The late consideration of the human cognitive process causes some major problems in the use of automated systems to provide reliable and actionable information that users can trust and depend to make the best Course-of-Action (COA). On the other hand, if automated systems are created exclusively based on human cognition, then there is a danger of developing systems that don't push the barrier of technology and are mainly done for the comfort level of selected subject matter experts (SMEs). Our approach to combining human and machine processes (CHAMP) is based on the notion of developing optimal strategies for where, when, how, and which human intelligence should be injected within a machine reasoning and intelligence process. This combination is based on the criteria of improving the quality of the output of the automated process while maintaining the required computational efficiency for a COA to be actuated in timely fashion. This research addresses the following problem areas: • Providing consistency within a mission: Injection of human reasoning and intelligence within the reliability and temporal needs of a mission to attain situational awareness, impact assessment, and COA development. • Supporting the incorporation of data that is uncertain, incomplete, imprecise and contradictory (UIIC): Development of mathematical models to suggest the insertion of a cognitive process within a machine reasoning and intelligent system so as to minimize UIIC concerns. • Developing systems that include humans in the loop whose performance can be analyzed and understood to provide feedback to the sensors.

  11. Human factor in the process of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enenkl, V.

    The building up of nuclear power requires the training not only of personnel but of the whole population as well. Professional workers in nuclear power facilities production and personnel operating the equipment of nuclear power plants must be on a high technical and managerial level. The important quality of such personnel is their reliability and responsibility. The human factor influences the level, quality and thereby also the service-life of the machines and equipment and their operation. The improvement of the quality of work in nuclear power production depends on upgrading the scientific and technical level of workers and personnel, their training, in-service education and the raising of the social standing. (B.H.)

  12. Two CANDU fueling machines tested at the Institute For Nuclear Research - Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, Cezar; Cojocaru, Virgil

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, as a national and European premiere, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), the Fueling Machine Head no.4 (F/M) for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 was successfully tested. In 2005, a second Fueling Machine (no.5) was tested for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2. The Institute's main objective is to develop scientific and technological support for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. Testing the Fueling Machines at INR Pitesti is part of the overall program to assimilate in Romania the CANDU technology. To perform the tests of these machines at INR Pitesti, a special testing rig was built and is available for this goal. Both the testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. There was a delivery contract between GEC Canada and Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 to provide the Fueling Machines no. 4 and no. 5 in Romania before testing operation. As a first conclusion, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti has the facilities, the staff and the experience to perform possible co-operations with any other CANDU Reactor owner. This experience will support the next steps concerning F/M commissioning in the NPP Cernavoda - Unit 2 and also give the confidence to the end-users that the Institute's team can provide technical assistance during the operation. Also, the obtained results demonstrate that the overall refurbishment of the F/M control system in Unit 1 and Unit 2 will be possible. The paper presents: - a short description of the F/M head;- a short description of the F/M test rig; - the computer control system; - the F/M testing activities; -results and expectations. (authors)

  13. Two CANDU fueling machines tested at the Institute For Nuclear Research - Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, C.; Cojocaru, V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In 2003, as a national and European premiere, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), the Fueling Machine Head no.4 (F/M) for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 was successfully tested. In 2005, a second Fueling Machine (no.5) was tested for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2. The Institute's main objective is to develop scientific and technological support for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. Testing the Fueling Machines at INR Pitesti is part of the overall program to assimilate in Romania the CANDU technology. To perform the tests of these machines at INR Pitesti, a special testing rig was built and is available for this goal. Both the testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. There was a delivery contract between GEC Canada and Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 to provide the Fueling Machines no. 4 and no. 5 in Romania before testing operation. As a first conclusion, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti has the facilities, the staff and the experience to perform possible co-operations with any other CANDU Reactor owner. This experience will support the next steps concerning F/M commissioning in the NPP Cernavoda - Unit 2 and also give the confidence to the end-users that the Institute's team can provide technical assistance during the operation. Also, the obtained results demonstrate that the overall refurbishment of the F/M control system in Unit 1 and Unit 2 will be possible. The paper presents: - a short description of the F/M head;- a short description of the F/M test rig; - the computer control system; - the F/M testing activities; -results and expectations. (authors)

  14. Critical survey of research on human factors and the man-machine interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    A case is developed for placing a high priority on research into human factors in the nuclear power industry. This is based essentially on the fact that human error is a significant factor in plant reliability and the assurance of safety. Control of human error can therefore produce benefits in the reduction of both operational costs and public risk. Descriptions are given of activities initiated by the Commission of the European Communities in conjunction with institutes within the Member States. These include: a comprehensive survey and analysis of current relevant work; considerations of classification schemes for human factors activities; the use of simulators for human factors research; and a proposed European collaborative research programme. (author)

  15. The Nuclear Power Institute Programs for Human Resource Development for the Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicord, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    Principal conclusions: 1. NPI is a full-scope, end-to-end, integrated approach to human resource development. Participation of government and government agencies, and elected officials and decision makers is vital. These key individuals and organizations encourage the effort, and provide support, a voice and advocacy for NPI and its programs. 2. Critical role of vocational training. The majority of the workforce does not involve only B.S. level engineers, but are graduates from two-year programs that are developed in collaboration with industry that prepare them for careers as technologists and technicians at a nuclear power plant. 3. In education and training, education is only part of the story. Collaboration with industry results in: – curricula, material, inputs and programs, – opportunities for students to benefit from industry mentors and get onsite experience, and – work on real-world, industry defined problems. 4. Outreach is instrumental in: –engaging with the next generation both for support of nuclear power and in building the workforce, and –generating vital contacts with the community to foster public understanding and acceptance of nuclear energy

  16. Modelling human resource requirements for the nuclear industry in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, Ferry [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG) (Netherlands); Flore, Massimo; Estorff, Ulrik von [Joint Research Center (JRC) (Netherlands)

    2017-11-15

    The European Human Resource Observatory for Nuclear (EHRO-N) provides the European Commission with essential data related to supply and demand for nuclear experts in the EU-28 and the enlargement and integration countries based on bottom-up information from the nuclear industry. The objective is to assess how the supply of experts for the nuclear industry responds to the needs for the same experts for present and future nuclear projects in the region. Complementary to the bottom-up approach taken by the EHRO-N team at JRC, a top-down modelling approach has been taken in a collaboration with NRG in the Netherlands. This top-down modelling approach focuses on the human resource requirements for operation, construction, decommissioning, and efforts for long term operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes the top-down methodology, the model input, the main assumptions, and the results of the analyses.

  17. Modelling human resource requirements for the nuclear industry in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofs, Ferry; Flore, Massimo; Estorff, Ulrik von

    2017-01-01

    The European Human Resource Observatory for Nuclear (EHRO-N) provides the European Commission with essential data related to supply and demand for nuclear experts in the EU-28 and the enlargement and integration countries based on bottom-up information from the nuclear industry. The objective is to assess how the supply of experts for the nuclear industry responds to the needs for the same experts for present and future nuclear projects in the region. Complementary to the bottom-up approach taken by the EHRO-N team at JRC, a top-down modelling approach has been taken in a collaboration with NRG in the Netherlands. This top-down modelling approach focuses on the human resource requirements for operation, construction, decommissioning, and efforts for long term operation of nuclear power plants. This paper describes the top-down methodology, the model input, the main assumptions, and the results of the analyses.

  18. Second expert discussion on the BMU/BfS concept of man-machine interaction in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gersinska, R.; Hennig, R.; Kociok, B.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to assess the need for further research on the impact of human factors. As a result, the following topics were defined as future research projects: Technical requirements on the interface man-machine during the operation of nuclear power plants; technical, organizational and personal requirements during service, maintenance and repair in nuclear power plants; technical, organizational and personel requirements for accident management. For the examination of these key subjects detailled performance criteria were set up by the BfS. (orig./DG) [de

  19. The Machine within the Machine

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Although Virtual Machines are widespread across CERN, you probably won't have heard of them unless you work for an experiment. Virtual machines - known as VMs - allow you to create a separate machine within your own, allowing you to run Linux on your Mac, or Windows on your Linux - whatever combination you need.   Using a CERN Virtual Machine, a Linux analysis software runs on a Macbook. When it comes to LHC data, one of the primary issues collaborations face is the diversity of computing environments among collaborators spread across the world. What if an institute cannot run the analysis software because they use different operating systems? "That's where the CernVM project comes in," says Gerardo Ganis, PH-SFT staff member and leader of the CernVM project. "We were able to respond to experimentalists' concerns by providing a virtual machine package that could be used to run experiment software. This way, no matter what hardware they have ...

  20. Human reliability analysis in the man-machine interface design review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced, computer-based man-machine interface (MMI) is emerging as part of the new design of nuclear power plants. The impact of advanced MMI on the operator performance, and as a result, on plant safety should be thoroughly evaluated before such technology is actually adopted in the plants. This paper discusses the applicability of human reliability analysis (HRA) to support the design review process. Both the first-generation and the second-generation HRA methods are considered focusing on a couple of promising HRA methods, i.e. ATHEANA and CREAM, with the potential to assist the design review process

  1. Support vector machines for nuclear reactor state estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavaljevski, N.; Gross, K. C.

    2000-02-14

    Validation of nuclear power reactor signals is often performed by comparing signal prototypes with the actual reactor signals. The signal prototypes are often computed based on empirical data. The implementation of an estimation algorithm which can make predictions on limited data is an important issue. A new machine learning algorithm called support vector machines (SVMS) recently developed by Vladimir Vapnik and his coworkers enables a high level of generalization with finite high-dimensional data. The improved generalization in comparison with standard methods like neural networks is due mainly to the following characteristics of the method. The input data space is transformed into a high-dimensional feature space using a kernel function, and the learning problem is formulated as a convex quadratic programming problem with a unique solution. In this paper the authors have applied the SVM method for data-based state estimation in nuclear power reactors. In particular, they implemented and tested kernels developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET), a nonlinear, nonparametric estimation technique with a wide range of applications in nuclear reactors. The methodology has been applied to three data sets from experimental and commercial nuclear power reactor applications. The results are promising. The combination of MSET kernels with the SVM method has better noise reduction and generalization properties than the standard MSET algorithm.

  2. Support vector machines for nuclear reactor state estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaljevski, N.; Gross, K. C.

    2000-01-01

    Validation of nuclear power reactor signals is often performed by comparing signal prototypes with the actual reactor signals. The signal prototypes are often computed based on empirical data. The implementation of an estimation algorithm which can make predictions on limited data is an important issue. A new machine learning algorithm called support vector machines (SVMS) recently developed by Vladimir Vapnik and his coworkers enables a high level of generalization with finite high-dimensional data. The improved generalization in comparison with standard methods like neural networks is due mainly to the following characteristics of the method. The input data space is transformed into a high-dimensional feature space using a kernel function, and the learning problem is formulated as a convex quadratic programming problem with a unique solution. In this paper the authors have applied the SVM method for data-based state estimation in nuclear power reactors. In particular, they implemented and tested kernels developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET), a nonlinear, nonparametric estimation technique with a wide range of applications in nuclear reactors. The methodology has been applied to three data sets from experimental and commercial nuclear power reactor applications. The results are promising. The combination of MSET kernels with the SVM method has better noise reduction and generalization properties than the standard MSET algorithm

  3. Structural health monitoring for bolt loosening via a non-invasive vibro-haptics human-machine cooperative interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekedis, Mahmut; Mascerañas, David; Turan, Gursoy; Ercan, Emre; Farrar, Charles R.; Yildiz, Hasan

    2015-08-01

    For the last two decades, developments in damage detection algorithms have greatly increased the potential for autonomous decisions about structural health. However, we are still struggling to build autonomous tools that can match the ability of a human to detect and localize the quantity of damage in structures. Therefore, there is a growing interest in merging the computational and cognitive concepts to improve the solution of structural health monitoring (SHM). The main object of this research is to apply the human-machine cooperative approach on a tower structure to detect damage. The cooperation approach includes haptic tools to create an appropriate collaboration between SHM sensor networks, statistical compression techniques and humans. Damage simulation in the structure is conducted by releasing some of the bolt loads. Accelerometers are bonded to various locations of the tower members to acquire the dynamic response of the structure. The obtained accelerometer results are encoded in three different ways to represent them as a haptic stimulus for the human subjects. Then, the participants are subjected to each of these stimuli to detect the bolt loosened damage in the tower. Results obtained from the human-machine cooperation demonstrate that the human subjects were able to recognize the damage with an accuracy of 88 ± 20.21% and response time of 5.87 ± 2.33 s. As a result, it is concluded that the currently developed human-machine cooperation SHM may provide a useful framework to interact with abstract entities such as data from a sensor network.

  4. Integrating human factors and artificial intelligence in the development of human-machine cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maanen, P.P. van; Lindenberg, J.; Neericx, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing machine intelligence leads to a shift from a mere interactive to a much more complex cooperative human-machine relation requiring a multidisciplinary development approach. This paper presents a generic multidisciplinary cognitive engineering method CE+ for the integration of human factors

  5. Shape understanding system machine understanding and human understanding

    CERN Document Server

    Les, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    This is the third book presenting selected results of research on the further development of the shape understanding system (SUS) carried out by authors in the newly founded Queen Jadwiga Research Institute of Understanding. In this book the new term Machine Understanding is introduced referring to a new area of research aiming to investigate the possibility of building machines with the ability to understand. It is presented that SUS needs to some extent mimic human understanding and for this reason machines are evaluated according to the rules applied for the evaluation of human understanding. The book shows how to formulate problems and how it can be tested if the machine is able to solve these problems.    

  6. Human-factor operating concept for Borssele Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    The safety level in the operation of a reactor is determined basically by human beings. The Borssele Nuclear Power Station has carried out measures for improving the man-machine interface through training and operating instructions for the shift personnel. The retrofitting of control technology relevant to safety engineering should avoid operating instructions which can cause potential failures. A safety study has shown that the remaining risk following all retrofitting measures remains dependent to the extent of 80% on human factors and that human factors as a whole have a positive effect on reactor safety. (orig.) [de

  7. The laser micro-machining system for diamond anvil cell experiments and general precision machining applications at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Rod, Eric; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-07-01

    We have designed and constructed a new system for micro-machining parts and sample assemblies used for diamond anvil cells and general user operations at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source. The new micro-machining system uses a pulsed laser of 400 ps pulse duration, ablating various materials without thermal melting, thus leaving a clean edge. With optics designed for a tight focus, the system can machine holes any size larger than 3 μm in diameter. Unlike a standard electrical discharge machining drill, the new laser system allows micro-machining of non-conductive materials such as: amorphous boron and silicon carbide gaskets, diamond, oxides, and other materials including organic materials such as polyimide films (i.e., Kapton). An important feature of the new system is the use of gas-tight or gas-flow environmental chambers which allow the laser micro-machining to be done in a controlled (e.g., inert gas) atmosphere to prevent oxidation and other chemical reactions in air sensitive materials. The gas-tight workpiece enclosure is also useful for machining materials with known health risks (e.g., beryllium). Specialized control software with a graphical interface enables micro-machining of custom 2D and 3D shapes. The laser-machining system was designed in a Class 1 laser enclosure, i.e., it includes laser safety interlocks and computer controls and allows for routine operation. Though initially designed mainly for machining of the diamond anvil cell gaskets, the laser-machining system has since found many other micro-machining applications, several of which are presented here.

  8. The laser micro-machining system for diamond anvil cell experiments and general precision machining applications at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrubiak, Rostislav; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Rod, Eric; Shen, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a new system for micro-machining parts and sample assemblies used for diamond anvil cells and general user operations at the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team, sector 16 of the Advanced Photon Source. The new micro-machining system uses a pulsed laser of 400 ps pulse duration, ablating various materials without thermal melting, thus leaving a clean edge. With optics designed for a tight focus, the system can machine holes any size larger than 3 μm in diameter. Unlike a standard electrical discharge machining drill, the new laser system allows micro-machining of non-conductive materials such as: amorphous boron and silicon carbide gaskets, diamond, oxides, and other materials including organic materials such as polyimide films (i.e., Kapton). An important feature of the new system is the use of gas-tight or gas-flow environmental chambers which allow the laser micro-machining to be done in a controlled (e.g., inert gas) atmosphere to prevent oxidation and other chemical reactions in air sensitive materials. The gas-tight workpiece enclosure is also useful for machining materials with known health risks (e.g., beryllium). Specialized control software with a graphical interface enables micro-machining of custom 2D and 3D shapes. The laser-machining system was designed in a Class 1 laser enclosure, i.e., it includes laser safety interlocks and computer controls and allows for routine operation. Though initially designed mainly for machining of the diamond anvil cell gaskets, the laser-machining system has since found many other micro-machining applications, several of which are presented here

  9. Outline of human machine interface at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niioka, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Fujita, D.; Esashika, A.; Yoshida, Y.; Nakamura, W.; Tochigi, T.; Yoshimoto, A.; Yokoi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) has been performing the active tests since the end of March, 2006, for its Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant using the spent fuels retrieved from the Light Water Reactors. At the early stage of the tests relatively low burn-up fuels have been used, and the burn-up will be increased at later stages until the start of commercial operation planned next year. The plant is operated from the main control room in the Control Building, where two types of operator consoles are located for plant monitoring and operation. The Operator Interface Station (OIS) driven by computer systems is chiefly used for instrumentation and control for production activities during normal operation. In addition to this, safety panels composed of hardware circuits are installed for nuclear safety functions such as criticality safety management, explosion protection, and confinement of radioactive materials. This paper outlines the Human Machine Interface features applied to the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. (authors)

  10. Human-machine interface in mobile teleoperators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    In this document the following point has been made: human-machine interface is not ideal, and may be improved upon: telepresence is ideal but not required; current interfaces degrade normal human inputs/outputs; available and developing technology can improve interfaces

  11. Strategies for Human Capacity Development in Nuclear Safety and Security in the NNRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akpanowo, M.; Iwuala, E.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Nigerian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NNRA) is charged with the responsibility for nuclear safety and radiological protection regulation. With Nigeria as one of the nuclear power states, NNRA has since 2010 intensified efforts in developing capacity to license the first set of nuclear power plants in Nigeria. The NNRA has employed several strategies in developing building and strengthening the human capacity to fulfill its statutory functions. This paper describes available human capacity development programmes and the strategies for implementing them including, knowledge retention and management strategy. The strategy commences with the recruitment process, initial training and education and continuous training. As a technical support arm of the NNRA, the National Institute for Radiation Protection and Research offers postgraduate diploma and masters programmes in radiation protection, where many NNRA officers have been trained. The NNRA also leverages on its collaboration with different international organizations for the training of its manpower in the area of nuclear safety and security. NNRA Officers participate in various IAEA organized programmes including fellowship for postgraduate diploma and master programmes, training course, workshops, seminars, conferences, scientific visits and on-the-job-training (OJT). Collaborations with other international organizations are also presented. (author

  12. Human Factors in Nuclear Reactor Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustafa, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    While many people would blame nature for the disaster of the “Fukushima Daiichi” accident, experts considered this accident to be also a human-induced disaster. This confirmed the importance of human errors which have been getting a growing interest in the nuclear field after the Three Mile Island accident. Personnel play an important role in design, operation, maintenance, planning, and management. The interface between machine and man is known as a human factor. In the present work, the human factors that have to be considered were discussed. The effect of the control room configuration and equipment design effect on the human behavior was also discussed. Precise reviewing of person’s qualifications and experience was focused. Insufficient training has been a major cause of human error in the nuclear field. The effective training issues were introduced. Avoiding complicated operational processes and non responsive management systems was stressed. Distinguishing between the procedures for normal and emergency operations was emphasised. It was stated that human error during maintenance and testing activities could cause a serious accident. This is because safety systems do not cover much more risk probabilities in the maintenance and testing activities like they do in the normal operation. In nuclear industry, the need for a classification and identification of human errors has been well recognised. As a result of this, human reliability must be assessed. These errors are analyzed by a probabilistic safety assessment which deals with errors in reading, listening and implementing procedures but not with cognitive errors. Much efforts must be accomplished to consider cognitive errors in the probabilistic safety assessment. The ways of collecting human factor data were surveyed. The methods for identifying safe designs, helping decision makers to predict how proposed or current policies will affect safety, and comprehensive understanding of the relationship

  13. Tunnel Boring Machine for nuclear waste repository research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzon, H.A.

    1994-01-01

    A description is presented of a Tunnel Boring Machine and its intended use on a research project underway in Sweden for demonstrating and testing methods for rock investigation at a suitable depth for a deep repository for nuclear waste

  14. Refurbishing of a Freeze Drying Machine, used in Nuclear Medicine for Radiopharmaceuticals Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaytan-Gallardo, E.; Desales-Galeana, G.

    2006-01-01

    The refurbishing of a freeze drying machine used in the radiopharmaceuticals production, applied in nuclear medicine in the Radioactive Materials Department of the Nuclear Research National Institute in Mexico (ININ in Spanish), is presented. The freeze drying machine was acquired in the 80's decade and some components started having problems. Then it was necessary to refurbish this equipment by changing old cam-type temperature controllers and outdated recording devices, developing a sophisticated software system that substitutes those devices. The system is composed by a freeze drying machine by Hull, AC output modules for improved temperature control, a commercial data acquisition card, and the software system

  15. A Collaboration Model for Community-Based Software Development with Social Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Murray-Rust

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Crowdsourcing is generally used for tasks with minimal coordination, providing limited support for dynamic reconfiguration. Modern systems, exemplified by social ma chines, are subject to continual flux in both the client and development communities and their needs. To support crowdsourcing of open-ended development, systems must dynamically integrate human creativity with machine support. While workflows can be u sed to handle structured, predictable processes, they are less suitable for social machine development and its attendant uncertainty. We present models and techniques for coordination of human workers in crowdsourced software development environments. We combine the Social Compute Unit—a model of ad-hoc human worker teams—with versatile coordination protocols expressed in the Lightweight Social Calculus. This allows us to combine coordination and quality constraints with dynamic assessments of end-user desires, dynamically discovering and applying development protocols.

  16. Recognition and Prediction of Human Actions for Safe Human-Robot Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rasmus Skovgaard; Bøgh, Simon; Ceballos, Iker

    Collaborative industrial robots are creating new opportunities for collaboration between humans and robots in shared workspaces. In order for such collaboration to be efficient, robots - as well as humans - need to have an understanding of the other's intentions and current ongoing action....... In this work, we propose a method for learning, classifying, and predicting actions taken by a human. Our proposed method is based on the human skeleton model from a Kinect. For demonstration of our approach we chose a typical pick-and-place scenario. Therefore, only arms and upper body are considered......; in total 15 joints. Based on trajectories on these joints, different classes of motion are separated using partitioning around medoids (PAM). Subsequently, SVM is used to train the classes to form a library of human motions. The approach allows run-time detection of when a new motion has been initiated...

  17. Visualization tool for human-machine interface designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Michael P.; Banda, Carolyn P.

    1991-06-01

    As modern human-machine systems continue to grow in capabilities and complexity, system operators are faced with integrating and managing increased quantities of information. Since many information components are highly related to each other, optimizing the spatial and temporal aspects of presenting information to the operator has become a formidable task for the human-machine interface (HMI) designer. The authors describe a tool in an early stage of development, the Information Source Layout Editor (ISLE). This tool is to be used for information presentation design and analysis; it uses human factors guidelines to assist the HMI designer in the spatial layout of the information required by machine operators to perform their tasks effectively. These human factors guidelines address such areas as the functional and physical relatedness of information sources. By representing these relationships with metaphors such as spring tension, attractors, and repellers, the tool can help designers visualize the complex constraint space and interacting effects of moving displays to various alternate locations. The tool contains techniques for visualizing the relative 'goodness' of a configuration, as well as mechanisms such as optimization vectors to provide guidance toward a more optimal design. Also available is a rule-based design checker to determine compliance with selected human factors guidelines.

  18. Fuzzy Decision-Making Fuser (FDMF for Integrating Human-Machine Autonomous (HMA Systems with Adaptive Evidence Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A brain-computer interface (BCI creates a direct communication pathway between the human brain and an external device or system. In contrast to patient-oriented BCIs, which are intended to restore inoperative or malfunctioning aspects of the nervous system, a growing number of BCI studies focus on designing auxiliary systems that are intended for everyday use. The goal of building these BCIs is to provide capabilities that augment existing intact physical and mental capabilities. However, a key challenge to BCI research is human variability; factors such as fatigue, inattention, and stress vary both across different individuals and for the same individual over time. If these issues are addressed, autonomous systems may provide additional benefits that enhance system performance and prevent problems introduced by individual human variability. This study proposes a human-machine autonomous (HMA system that simultaneously aggregates human and machine knowledge to recognize targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP task. The HMA focuses on integrating an RSVP BCI with computer vision techniques in an image-labeling domain. A fuzzy decision-making fuser (FDMF is then applied in the HMA system to provide a natural adaptive framework for evidence-based inference by incorporating an integrated summary of the available evidence (i.e., human and machine decisions and associated uncertainty. Consequently, the HMA system dynamically aggregates decisions involving uncertainties from both human and autonomous agents. The collaborative decisions made by an HMA system can achieve and maintain superior performance more efficiently than either the human or autonomous agents can achieve independently. The experimental results shown in this study suggest that the proposed HMA system with the FDMF can effectively fuse decisions from human brain activities and the computer vision techniques to improve overall performance on the RSVP recognition task. This

  19. Fuzzy Decision-Making Fuser (FDMF) for Integrating Human-Machine Autonomous (HMA) Systems with Adaptive Evidence Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Pal, Nikhil R; Marathe, Amar R; Wang, Yu-Kai; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2017-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) creates a direct communication pathway between the human brain and an external device or system. In contrast to patient-oriented BCIs, which are intended to restore inoperative or malfunctioning aspects of the nervous system, a growing number of BCI studies focus on designing auxiliary systems that are intended for everyday use. The goal of building these BCIs is to provide capabilities that augment existing intact physical and mental capabilities. However, a key challenge to BCI research is human variability; factors such as fatigue, inattention, and stress vary both across different individuals and for the same individual over time. If these issues are addressed, autonomous systems may provide additional benefits that enhance system performance and prevent problems introduced by individual human variability. This study proposes a human-machine autonomous (HMA) system that simultaneously aggregates human and machine knowledge to recognize targets in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) task. The HMA focuses on integrating an RSVP BCI with computer vision techniques in an image-labeling domain. A fuzzy decision-making fuser (FDMF) is then applied in the HMA system to provide a natural adaptive framework for evidence-based inference by incorporating an integrated summary of the available evidence (i.e., human and machine decisions) and associated uncertainty. Consequently, the HMA system dynamically aggregates decisions involving uncertainties from both human and autonomous agents. The collaborative decisions made by an HMA system can achieve and maintain superior performance more efficiently than either the human or autonomous agents can achieve independently. The experimental results shown in this study suggest that the proposed HMA system with the FDMF can effectively fuse decisions from human brain activities and the computer vision techniques to improve overall performance on the RSVP recognition task. This conclusion

  20. A study for collaborative management for nuclear spent fuel control. Seeking for nuclear non-proliferation in East Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    Because of the rapid increase of power generation with nuclear fuel in East Asia area, the management and control of nuclear spent fuel from nuclear reactors has become an essential and urgent issue in this area. This study focused on the possibility of forming an intergovernmental collaborative management system for nuclear spent fuel with an emphasize on nuclear non-proliferation among East Asian countries, i.e. China, Korea, Taiwan and Japan who own and operate nuclear power plants. First, we studied the present situation for nuclear spent fuel, including the storage measures, the future fore- cast on the accumulation and the government measures to deal with these spent fuel. Then, based upon first step studies, we examined the pros and cons when the collaborative management is realized particularly from the viewpoint of prevention of nuclear proliferation. Further, we estimated possible means for management and control of nuclear spent fuel, including its system size and cost. Finally, we extracted some technological tasks to be solved and political issues to be discussed. Our findings are as follows. 1. The total amount of the power generation in three East Asian counties (China, Korea and Taiwan) is about 17 million KW presently. This will be tripled to 51 million KW by the year 2010. When Japan's ability is added it is 62 million KW currently and 121 million by 2010. 2. The nuclear spent fuel in Taiwan and Korea will be saturated for their storage capacity. On the other hand, Japan will start to operate her reprocessing plant in Aomori prefecture in 2003 and her new storage capability is completed in 1999. Also in China, a reprocessing pilot plant is under construction and its operation is scheduled in 2001. 3. As their national policy, China and Japan does reprocess from spent fuel but Korea and Taiwan don't. Instead, they take non-reprocessing and direct geological disposal. 4. If the collaborative management of nuclear wastes is realized Multi

  1. Human factors engineering applied to Control Centre Design of a research nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Larissa P. de; Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti dos; Carvalho, Paulo V.R., E-mail: larissapfarias@ymail.com [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (DENN/SEESC/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab, de Usabilidade e Confiabilidade Humana; Monteiro, Beany G. [Universidade Federal do Rio Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Departamento de Desenho Industrial

    2017-07-01

    The Human Factors Engineering (HFE) program is an essential aspect for the design of nuclear installations. The overall aim of the HFE program is the improvement of the operational reliability and safety of plant operation. The HFE program main purpose is to ensure that human factor practices are incorporated into the plant design, emphasizing man-machine interface issues and design improvement of the nuclear reactor Control Centre. The Control Centre of nuclear reactor is a combination of control rooms, control suites and local control stations, which are functionally connected and located on the reactor site. The objective of this paper is to present a design approach for the Control Centre of a nuclear reactor used to produce radioisotopes and for nuclear research, including human factor issues. The design approach is based on participatory design principles, using human factor standards, ergonomic guidelines, and the participation of a multidisciplinary team during all design phases. Using the information gathered, an initial sketch 3D of the Control Centre was developed. (author)

  2. Human factors engineering applied to Control Centre Design of a research nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Larissa P. de; Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti dos; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Monteiro, Beany G.

    2017-01-01

    The Human Factors Engineering (HFE) program is an essential aspect for the design of nuclear installations. The overall aim of the HFE program is the improvement of the operational reliability and safety of plant operation. The HFE program main purpose is to ensure that human factor practices are incorporated into the plant design, emphasizing man-machine interface issues and design improvement of the nuclear reactor Control Centre. The Control Centre of nuclear reactor is a combination of control rooms, control suites and local control stations, which are functionally connected and located on the reactor site. The objective of this paper is to present a design approach for the Control Centre of a nuclear reactor used to produce radioisotopes and for nuclear research, including human factor issues. The design approach is based on participatory design principles, using human factor standards, ergonomic guidelines, and the participation of a multidisciplinary team during all design phases. Using the information gathered, an initial sketch 3D of the Control Centre was developed. (author)

  3. 10th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technologies, San Francisco, CA, USA, June 11–15, 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashdan, Ahmad Al; Oxstrand, Johanna; Agarwal, Vivek

    2017-02-01

    As part of the ongoing efforts at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, Idaho National Laboratory is conducting several pilot projects in collaboration with the nuclear industry to improve the reliability, safety, and economics of the nuclear power industry, especially as the nuclear power plants extend their operating licenses to 80 years. One of these pilot projects is the automated work package (AWP) pilot project. An AWP is an electronic intelligent and interactive work package. It uses plant condition, resources status, and user progress to adaptively drive the work process in a manner that increases efficiency while reducing human error. To achieve this mission, the AWP acquires information from various systems of a nuclear power plant’s and incorporates several advanced instrumentation and control technologies along with modern human factors techniques. With the current rapid technological advancement, it is possible to envision several available or soon-to-be-available capabilities that can play a significant role in improving the work package process. As a pilot project, the AWP project develops a prototype of an expanding set of capabilities and evaluates them in an industrial environment. While some of the proposed capabilities are based on using technological advances in other applications, others are conceptual; thus, require significant research and development to be applicable in an AWP. The scope of this paper is to introduce a set of envisioned capabilities, their need for the industry, and the industry difficulties they resolve.

  4. An intelligent man-machine system for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Yoji; Hattori, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Juichiro; Fukumoto, Akira

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the development of an intelligent man-machine system for future nuclear power plants is enhancement of operational reliability by applying recent advances in cognitive science, artificial intelligence, and computer technologies. To realize this objective, the intelligent man-machine system, aiming to support a knowledge-based decision making process in an operator's supervisory plant control tasks, consists of three main functions, i.e., a cognitive model-based advisor, a robust automatic sequence controller, and an ecological interface. These three functions have been integrated into a console-type nuclear power plant monitoring and control system as a validation test bed. The validation tests in which experienced operator crews participated were carried out in 1991 and 1992. The test results show the usefulness of the support functions and the validity of the system design approach

  5. Lessons Learned from Human Factor Technical Support for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yeon Sub; Song, Tae Young

    2011-01-01

    NETEC is on the frontier to support Korean nuclear power plants. Requests of service are distributed through web based system. Human factor requests are occasionally posted. This paper analyzes interesting human factors requests/responses serviced, and summarizes the lesson learned. Subjects of the service include man machine interface, equipment label, procedure writing, procedure adherence, BISI, hand switch and alarm tile. Specifically the man machine interface is related to control command generated by acknowledge button, arrangement of switches. Procedure writing is about how to write contingency actions with proper numbering scheme. BISI is analyzed in view of automation level. Alarm tile is about how to handle the common alarm tile originated from local alarm boards. These topics seem to be legacies of past technology. Even though there are still human engineering discrepancies, these have been less evaluated because the topics need knowledge of other field domains

  6. Face Recognition in Humans and Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Alice; Tistarelli, Massimo

    The study of human face recognition by psychologists and neuroscientists has run parallel to the development of automatic face recognition technologies by computer scientists and engineers. In both cases, there are analogous steps of data acquisition, image processing, and the formation of representations that can support the complex and diverse tasks we accomplish with faces. These processes can be understood and compared in the context of their neural and computational implementations. In this chapter, we present the essential elements of face recognition by humans and machines, taking a perspective that spans psychological, neural, and computational approaches. From the human side, we overview the methods and techniques used in the neurobiology of face recognition, the underlying neural architecture of the system, the role of visual attention, and the nature of the representations that emerges. From the computational side, we discuss face recognition technologies and the strategies they use to overcome challenges to robust operation over viewing parameters. Finally, we conclude the chapter with a look at some recent studies that compare human and machine performances at face recognition.

  7. Integrated human-machine intelligence in space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Guy A.

    1992-01-01

    The integration of human and machine intelligence in space systems is outlined with respect to the contributions of artificial intelligence. The current state-of-the-art in intelligent assistant systems (IASs) is reviewed, and the requirements of some real-world applications of the technologies are discussed. A concept of integrated human-machine intelligence is examined in the contexts of: (1) interactive systems that tolerate human errors; (2) systems for the relief of workloads; and (3) interactive systems for solving problems in abnormal situations. Key issues in the development of IASs include the compatibility of the systems with astronauts in terms of inputs/outputs, processing, real-time AI, and knowledge-based system validation. Real-world applications are suggested such as the diagnosis, planning, and control of enginnered systems.

  8. Human performance and its influence on the safety of nuclear installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Karl-Heinz; Fechner, Jochen B. [Bundesministerium des Innern, Bonn (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Nuclear facilities need to be handled in all safety considerations as ''man-machine-system'' as humans considered as liveware are of equally importance ensuring safety as hardware and software. The Federal Minister of the Interior is attempting to give greater focus to this knowledge for the practice of nuclear safety measures. Therefore hardware and software need to be improved according to ergonomic findings and greater importance needs to be issued to the qualification of the operational staff as well as to the qualification of experts consulted by local authorities.

  9. Research and development on the human factors technologies for nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, B.S.; Lee, J.W.; Cheon, S.W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper introduces our research project on the development of human factors technologies for nuclear power plants in Korea. The project is divided into two sub-projects. The first sub-project is the development of human factors experimental evaluation techniques, which aims to develop the techniques for experimental design, experimental measurement and data collection/analysis, and to construct an integrated test facility (ITF) suitable for the experimental evaluation of man-machine interfaces (MMIs) at an advanced control room. The second is the development of human behavior analysis techniques, which has two research areas: one is the development of a task simulation analyzer and the other is human error case studies for nuclear power plants. (author)

  10. Anglo-French Collaboration in the Nuclear Sector: The Human, Social and Ethical Dimensions. Graduate seminar, Maison Francaise d'Oxford, Monday 15 May 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denoun, Martin; Tsuchiya, Miyuki; Degremont-Dorville, Marie; Bouillet, Jeremy; Deront, Eva; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kobylka, Krzysztof; Nithesh, Antony; Defard, Camille; Giachetti, Charles; Nivole, Audrey; Takahashi, Makoto; Pini, Paul-Etienne; Lloyd, Clara

    2017-05-01

    A graduate workshop was held on Monday 15 May, at the Maison francaise d'Oxford, involving a little group of graduate students, from the UK and France. They were invited to present their research and to engage in discussions over the place of nuclear energy in the context of the social sciences and humanities. Wider issues of relevance and interest regarding nuclear energy - such as its human, cultural and philosophical dimensions - have not received sufficient attention in either France or Britain. A number of specific areas were identified to be significant in this respect: - The need for clearer, 'unbiased' information, explanations and better understanding of the wider human dimensions associated with nuclear energy. - A better understanding of the influences upon, and differences in social attitudes towards nuclear in France and Britain. - The factors influencing varying attitudes within Britain and France amongst different sections of society. Particular references were made to the younger age groups and gender differences. - And understanding of 'changes' of attitude and support found in Britain and France, in more recent times. - The importance of the community, social, cultural, ethical and human dimensions given the unique nature of the nuclear sector, and in particular the long term nature and scale of economic and social investments associated with nuclear energy. - The impact of perceptions about the nuclear risk factors that may, or may not, be very different to reality over time. - The global nature of the impact of the sector on Anglo-French interests and the opportunities for positive collaboration, and learning in the wider human, social, ethical, cultural and philosophical aspects. - The multitude of social media channels available for disseminating information and opinions that influence social attitudes about nuclear energy. - A lack of trust in policy or operational statements emanating from the government, company or

  11. Electric field prediction for a human body-electric machine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, Maria G; Papadopoulos, Peter J; Dimitropoulou, Eugenia

    2004-01-01

    A system consisting of an electric machine and a human body is studied and the resulting electric field is predicted. A 3-phase induction machine operating at full load is modeled considering its geometry, windings, and materials. A human model is also constructed approximating its geometry and the electric properties of tissues. Using the finite element technique the electric field distribution in the human body is determined for a distance of 1 and 5 m from the machine and its effects are studied. Particularly, electric field potential variations are determined at specific points inside the human body and for these points the electric field intensity is computed and compared to the limit values for exposure according to international standards.

  12. Relating dynamic brain states to dynamic machine states: Human and machine solutions to the speech recognition problem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Wingfield

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is widespread interest in the relationship between the neurobiological systems supporting human cognition and emerging computational systems capable of emulating these capacities. Human speech comprehension, poorly understood as a neurobiological process, is an important case in point. Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR systems with near-human levels of performance are now available, which provide a computationally explicit solution for the recognition of words in continuous speech. This research aims to bridge the gap between speech recognition processes in humans and machines, using novel multivariate techniques to compare incremental 'machine states', generated as the ASR analysis progresses over time, to the incremental 'brain states', measured using combined electro- and magneto-encephalography (EMEG, generated as the same inputs are heard by human listeners. This direct comparison of dynamic human and machine internal states, as they respond to the same incrementally delivered sensory input, revealed a significant correspondence between neural response patterns in human superior temporal cortex and the structural properties of ASR-derived phonetic models. Spatially coherent patches in human temporal cortex responded selectively to individual phonetic features defined on the basis of machine-extracted regularities in the speech to lexicon mapping process. These results demonstrate the feasibility of relating human and ASR solutions to the problem of speech recognition, and suggest the potential for further studies relating complex neural computations in human speech comprehension to the rapidly evolving ASR systems that address the same problem domain.

  13. Machine learning for radioxenon event classification for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocki, Trevor J., E-mail: trevor_stocki@hc-sc.gc.c [Radiation Protection Bureau, 775 Brookfield Road, A.L. 6302D1, Ottawa, ON, K1A 1C1 (Canada); Li, Guichong; Japkowicz, Nathalie [School of Information Technology and Engineering, University of Ottawa, 800 King Edward Avenue, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Ungar, R. Kurt [Radiation Protection Bureau, 775 Brookfield Road, A.L. 6302D1, Ottawa, ON, K1A 1C1 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    A method of weapon detection for the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) consists of monitoring the amount of radioxenon in the atmosphere by measuring and sampling the activity concentration of {sup 131m}Xe, {sup 133}Xe, {sup 133m}Xe, and {sup 135}Xe by radionuclide monitoring. Several explosion samples were simulated based on real data since the measured data of this type is quite rare. These data sets consisted of different circumstances of a nuclear explosion, and are used as training data sets to establish an effective classification model employing state-of-the-art technologies in machine learning. A study was conducted involving classic induction algorithms in machine learning including Naive Bayes, Neural Networks, Decision Trees, k-Nearest Neighbors, and Support Vector Machines, that revealed that they can successfully be used in this practical application. In particular, our studies show that many induction algorithms in machine learning outperform a simple linear discriminator when a signal is found in a high radioxenon background environment.

  14. Machine learning for radioxenon event classification for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocki, Trevor J.; Li, Guichong; Japkowicz, Nathalie; Ungar, R. Kurt

    2010-01-01

    A method of weapon detection for the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) consists of monitoring the amount of radioxenon in the atmosphere by measuring and sampling the activity concentration of 131m Xe, 133 Xe, 133m Xe, and 135 Xe by radionuclide monitoring. Several explosion samples were simulated based on real data since the measured data of this type is quite rare. These data sets consisted of different circumstances of a nuclear explosion, and are used as training data sets to establish an effective classification model employing state-of-the-art technologies in machine learning. A study was conducted involving classic induction algorithms in machine learning including Naive Bayes, Neural Networks, Decision Trees, k-Nearest Neighbors, and Support Vector Machines, that revealed that they can successfully be used in this practical application. In particular, our studies show that many induction algorithms in machine learning outperform a simple linear discriminator when a signal is found in a high radioxenon background environment.

  15. Analysis on nuclear power plant control room system design and improvement based on human factor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Feng; Liu Yanzi; Sun Yongbin

    2014-01-01

    The design of nuclear power plant control room system is a process of improvement with the implementation of human factor engineering theory and guidance. The method of implementation human factor engineering principles into the nuclear power plant control room system design and improvement was discussed in this paper. It is recommended that comprehensive address should be done from control room system function, human machine interface, digital procedure, control room layout and environment design based on the human factor engineering theory and experience. The main issues which should be paid more attention during the control room system design and improvement also were addressed in this paper, and then advices and notices for the design and improvement of the nuclear power plant control room system were afforded. (authors)

  16. Concept Representation Analysis in the Context of Human-Machine Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    This article attempts to make a conceptual and epistemological junction between human learning and machine learning. I will be concerned with specifying and analysing the structure of concepts in the common ground between a concept-based human learning theory and a concept-based machine learning...... paradigm. I will focus on (i) humans’ conceptual representations in the framework of constructivism (as an educational theory of learning and model of knowing) and constructionism (as a theory for conceptualising learning) and (ii) concept representations in the framework of inductive concept learning (as...... an inductive machine learning paradigm). The results will support figuring out the most significant key points for constructing a conceptual linkage between a human learning theory and a machine learning paradigm. Accordingly, I will construct a conceptual ground for expressing and analysing concepts...

  17. The human elements in phenomena giving rise to nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.; Raggenbass, A.

    1977-01-01

    In its search for a high degree of safety, the nuclear industry should take into account the human parameters, which play an important role. This role is reflected in the individual records kept on incidents and analysis of these records, as has been carried out in conventional industry, represents a first attempt to allow for this factor. The first inquiries covering the background of incidents led to a series of studies and action in respect of individual staff members: on the part of operators, education of personnel in relation to their duties (for example, simulation of reactor control) and attempts to find objective selection criteria for certain specific posts; on the part of those responsible for safety, ergonomic studies and studies on human reliability. For effective prevention of accidents it is necessary to move backwards along the causality chains and therefore to study a nuclear facility as a man-machine system in order to discover the greatest number of potential accident factors. The nuclear facility is introduced into an environment which imposes its rules, constraints and checks and a full study of the human element in safety implies that they should be taken into account. The programme of the Nuclear Safety Department of the Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety includes not only systematic updating of incident records but also special ergonomic studies (maintenance in a radioactive environment), studies of human reliability and overall studies known as safety management studies. (author)

  18. Human factors in the operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaton, E.; Neboyan, V.; Lederman, L.

    1987-01-01

    In large and complex interactive systems, human error can contribute substantially to system failures. At nuclear power plants, operational experience demonstrates that human error accounts for a considerable proportion of safety-related incidents. However, experience also shows that human intervention can be very effective if there is a thorough understanding of the situation in the plant. Thus, an efficient interface of man and machine is important not only to prevent human errors but also to assist the operator in coping with unforeseen events. Human reliability can be understood as a qualitative as well as a quantitative term. Qualitatively it can be described as the aim for successful human performance of activities necessary for system reliability and availability. Quantitatively, it refers to data on failure rates or error probabilities that can be used, for example, for probabilistic safety assessments

  19. Development of nuclear power plant operator simulator for man-machine interface evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Nakatani, Yoshio; Sasaki, Kazunori; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Furuta, Tomihiko; Hasegawa, Akira.

    1997-01-01

    The operational safety in nuclear power plants depends strongly on man machine interfaces (MMI), such as assignment of equipment on control boards and operation procedures in emergency situations. Therefore, the evaluation and analysis methods for the MMI are important. In order for the methods to be practical, the methods should be executed in each step of design and be easy for designers to use. We aim to develop SEAMAID system: a computer supported system for evaluating and analyzing the MMI by simulating the interaction between the operator and the machine. In this paper, we discuss problems of the conventional methods and the required functions of the operator simulator for the SEAMAID. The operator simulator executes not human errors but correct behavior which follows the operational procedure. The SEAMAID evaluates the MMI by finding potential human errors which could occur in the simulated interactions and points out the problematic interaction parts which could induce human errors. We construct the operator simulator by combining the human model which was proposed by Prof. Reason, and the knowledge base model based on the Petri net model. This simulator can treat frequency parameter which represents the degree of frequency of using a certain knowledge. We conduct two sample simulations in different frequency parameters in the same scenario. These simulation results show that even if the operator behaves correctly following the procedure, there are alternative task sequences. We verify that the simulated interactions are in good agreement with the actual one. Also, we propose the method to point out the problematic parts in the interactions based on the working memory consumption. (author)

  20. Development of nuclear power plant operator simulator for man-machine interface evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Nakatani, Yoshio; Sasaki, Kazunori [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan). Industrial Electronics and Systems Development Lab.; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Furuta, Tomihiko; Hasegawa, Akira

    1997-08-01

    The operational safety in nuclear power plants depends strongly on man machine interfaces (MMI), such as assignment of equipment on control boards and operation procedures in emergency situations. Therefore, the evaluation and analysis methods for the MMI are important. In order for the methods to be practical, the methods should be executed in each step of design and be easy for designers to use. We aim to develop SEAMAID system: a computer supported system for evaluating and analyzing the MMI by simulating the interaction between the operator and the machine. In this paper, we discuss problems of the conventional methods and the required functions of the operator simulator for the SEAMAID. The operator simulator executes not human errors but correct behavior which follows the operational procedure. The SEAMAID evaluates the MMI by finding potential human errors which could occur in the simulated interactions and points out the problematic interaction parts which could induce human errors. We construct the operator simulator by combining the human model which was proposed by Prof. Reason, and the knowledge base model based on the Petri net model. This simulator can treat frequency parameter which represents the degree of frequency of using a certain knowledge. We conduct two sample simulations in different frequency parameters in the same scenario. These simulation results show that even if the operator behaves correctly following the procedure, there are alternative task sequences. We verify that the simulated interactions are in good agreement with the actual one. Also, we propose the method to point out the problematic parts in the interactions based on the working memory consumption. (author)

  1. MITI project on advanced man-machine system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kanji; Watanabe, Takao; Hayakawa, Hiroyasu; Naito, Norio; Masui, Takao; Ogino, Takamichi.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) against abnormal plant conditions was developed as a five-year project from 1980 to 1984, under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. The main purpose of the COSS development was to implement the lessons learned from the Three Mile Island accident. The main nuclear industries in Japan participated in the project. The design concept of the operator support functions and the method to implement it were established, and the prototype systems of the COSS for BWR and PWR plants were developed. After the completion of the COSS development, the above participant group once again joined for the work on an advanced man-machine system for nuclear power plants (MMS-NPP). This eight-year project aims at realizing an advanced operator support system by applying artificial intelligence, especially knowledge engineering, and sophisticated man-machine interface devices. Its main objectives are shown. This system configuration, operating method decision system, man-machine communication system, operation and maintenance support functions and so on are described. (Kako, I.)

  2. Human error: An essential problem of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smidt, D.

    1981-01-01

    The author first defines the part played by man in the nuclear power plant and then deals in more detail with the structure of his valse behavior in tactical and strategic repect. The dicussion of tactical errors and their avoidance is follwed by a report on the actual state of plant technology and possible improvements. Subsequently a study of the strategic errors including the conclusion to be drawn until now (joint between plant and man, personal selection and education) is made. If the joints between man and machine are designed according and physiological strenghts and weaknesses of man are fully realized and taken into account human errors not be essential problem in nuclear power plant. (GL) [de

  3. Design Control Systems of Human Machine Interface in the NTVS-2894 Seat Grinder Machine to Increase the Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardi, S.; Ardyansyah, D.

    2018-02-01

    In the Manufacturing of automotive spare parts, increased sales of vehicles is resulted in increased demand for production of engine valve of the customer. To meet customer demand, we carry out improvement and overhaul of the NTVS-2894 seat grinder machine on a machining line. NTVS-2894 seat grinder machine has been decreased machine productivity, the amount of trouble, and the amount of downtime. To overcome these problems on overhaul the NTVS-2984 seat grinder machine include mechanical and programs, is to do the design and manufacture of HMI (Human Machine Interface) GP-4501T program. Because of the time prior to the overhaul, NTVS-2894 seat grinder machine does not have a backup HMI (Human Machine Interface) program. The goal of the design and manufacture in this program is to improve the achievement of production, and allows an operator to operate beside it easier to troubleshoot the NTVS-2894 seat grinder machine thereby reducing downtime on the NTVS-2894 seat grinder machine. The results after the design are HMI program successfully made it back, machine productivity increased by 34.8%, the amount of trouble, and downtime decreased 40% decrease from 3,160 minutes to 1,700 minutes. The implication of our design, it could facilitate the operator in operating machine and the technician easer to maintain and do the troubleshooting the machine problems.

  4. Human-automation collaboration in manufacturing: identifying key implementation factors

    OpenAIRE

    Charalambous, George; Fletcher, Sarah; Webb, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Human-automation collaboration refers to the concept of human operators and intelligent automation working together interactively within the same workspace without conventional physical separation. This concept has commanded significant attention in manufacturing because of the potential applications, such as the installation of large sub-assemblies. However, the key human factors relevant to human-automation collaboration have not yet been fully investigated. To maximise effective implement...

  5. Techniques and applications of the human reliability analysis in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Fausto C.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis and prediction of the man-machine interaction are the objectives of human reliability analysis. In this work is presented in a manner that could be used by experts in the field of Probabilistic Safety Assessment, considering primarily the aspects of human errors. The Technique of Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP) is used in large scale to obtain data on human error. Applications of this technique are presented, as well as aspects of the state-of-art and of research and development of this particular field of work, where the construction of a reliable data bank is considered essential. In this work is also developed an application of the THERP for the TRIGA Mark 1 IPR R-1 Reactor of the Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear, Brazilian research institute of nuclear technology. The results indicate that some changes must be made in the emergency procedures of the reactor, in order to achieve a higher level of safety

  6. Overview of human performance improvement initiatives in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Ashok Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) are very complex systems. Diverse, multiple and redundant technological systems are used for effective control and safety of the NPPs. The increased numbers of such systems require increased operator attention. Additionally, the control stations (man-machine interfaces) are to be kept manageable in size. This sometimes reduces the scope for truly ergonomic design. These limitations, coupled with the shortcomings of human nature, led to unintended human performance problems and errors resulting into poor plant performance worldwide. Some organisational weaknesses, managerial decisions and latent errors also aided and abetted human errors. In view of this, a need was felt for development of performance culture at all levels in NPP organisations. Towards this end, ready-to-use performance improvement tools were developed and used for individual performers, supervisors and managers in the NPPs. This paper describes the experiences of the global nuclear electricity generating industry towards human performance improvement and error reduction. (author)

  7. Distributed collaborative probabilistic design for turbine blade-tip radial running clearance using support vector machine of regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Cheng-Wei; Bai, Guang-Chen

    2014-12-01

    To improve the computational precision and efficiency of probabilistic design for mechanical dynamic assembly like the blade-tip radial running clearance (BTRRC) of gas turbine, a distribution collaborative probabilistic design method-based support vector machine of regression (SR)(called as DCSRM) is proposed by integrating distribution collaborative response surface method and support vector machine regression model. The mathematical model of DCSRM is established and the probabilistic design idea of DCSRM is introduced. The dynamic assembly probabilistic design of aeroengine high-pressure turbine (HPT) BTRRC is accomplished to verify the proposed DCSRM. The analysis results reveal that the optimal static blade-tip clearance of HPT is gained for designing BTRRC, and improving the performance and reliability of aeroengine. The comparison of methods shows that the DCSRM has high computational accuracy and high computational efficiency in BTRRC probabilistic analysis. The present research offers an effective way for the reliability design of mechanical dynamic assembly and enriches mechanical reliability theory and method.

  8. Logical Characterisation of Concept Transformations from Human into Machine relying on Predicate Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Providing more human-like concept learning in machines has always been one of the most significant goals of machine learning paradigms and of human-machine interaction techniques. This article attempts to provide a logical specification of conceptual mappings from humans’ minds into machines......’ knowledge bases. I will focus on the representation of the mappings (transformations) relying on First-Order Predicate Logic. Additionally, the structure of concepts in the common ground between humans and machines will be analysed. It seems quite necessary to pay attention to the philosophy...

  9. The contribution of nuclear training staff to human factors work in the CEGB and Nuclear Electric PLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, V.J.

    1990-01-01

    The staff and simulators of utility's nuclear training function are being utilized in support of a wide range of human factor related activities. In addition to work on man machines interface review, operating procedures, operator support system and VDU format design and validation for the Magnox and AGR series of nuclear power plants, support is also being provided to the PWR Project Team through staff who have undergone extensive and comprehensive overseas PWR training programs. This paper discusses how recent initiatives in connection with a survey on operator stress and the possible use of psychometric testing in support of the selection of reactor desk engineers are also being supported

  10. Human factors methods for nuclear control room design. Volume 2. Human factors survey of control room design practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Parsons, S.O.

    1979-11-01

    An earlier review of the control rooms of operating nuclear power plants identified many design problems having potential for degrading operator performance. As a result, the formal application of human factors principles was found to be needed. This report demonstrates the use of human factors in the design of power plant control rooms. The approaches shown in the report can be applied to operating power plants, as well as to those in the design stage. This study documents human factors techniques required to provide a sustained concern for the man-machine interface from control room concept definition to system implementation

  11. Towards Semantic Analysis of Training-Learning Relationships within Human-Machine Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    In this article First-Order Predicate Logic (FOL) is employed for analysing some relationships between human beings and machines. Based on FOL, I will be conceptually and logically concerned with semantic analysis of training-learning relationships in human-machine interaction. The central focus...

  12. Attempt on construction of human friendly man-machine interface. Study and apply about human communication; Human friendly na man machine interface kochiku no kokoromi. Ningen no communication no kento to sono oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuno, J. [Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Kokubo, Y.; Matsumura, I.; Kobayashi, H. [Hosei University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes an attempt on a construction way of human friendly man-machine interface. At first, we do a simple experiment to find out the characteristic of human verbal communication. From the experimental results, we get some rules in case in human verbal communication. We construct the man-machine interface which is based on these rules. Through teaching process, we examine our verbal communication interface comparing with conventional interfaces. From this comparison, we recognize that the verbal communication interface is valid to construct the user-friendly man-machine interface. 12 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Massively collaborative machine learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, van J.N.

    2016-01-01

    Many scientists are focussed on building models. We nearly process all information we perceive to a model. There are many techniques that enable computers to build models as well. The field of research that develops such techniques is called Machine Learning. Many research is devoted to develop

  14. On the allocation of functions between human and machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirstad, J.

    1979-09-01

    The idea of allocating functions between human and machine was proceduralized early through aids like Fitts' List which describes the relative advantages of men and machines. Although the principle is clear, function allocation has never worked in practice. Some conditions for function allocations are discussed; adequate logic, a common man-machine system language, usable human engineering guides and data and professional habits and attitudes. Trends which will influence ergonomics procedures are described; influence from technology, increasing work environment requirements and user participation requirements. A procedural structure for human engineering or ergonomics in control system design is suggested. This does not include a separate function allocation activity but a number of activities, the result of which will be a systematic function allocation. A case study on ergonomics techniques for systematic function allocation in a control system is described in an appendix to the report. (author)

  15. The proposed human factors engineering program plan for man-machine interface system design of the next generation NPP in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, I.S.; Lee, H.C.; Seo, S.M.; Cheon, S.W.; Park, K.O.; Lee, J.W.; Sim, B.S.

    1994-01-01

    Human factors application to nuclear power plant (NPP) design, especially, to man-machine interface system (MMIS) design becomes an important issue among the licensing requirements. Recently, the nuclear regulatory bodies require the evidence of systematic human factors application to the MMIS design. Human Factors Engineering Program Plan (HFEPP), as a basis and central one among the human factors application by the MMIS designers. This paper describes the framework of HFEPP for the MMIS design of next generation NPP (NG-NPP) in Korea. This framework provides an integral plan and some bases of the systematic application of human factors to the MMIS design, and consists of purpose and scope, codes and standards, human factors organization, human factors tasks, engineering control methodology, human factors documentations, and milestones. The proposed HFEPP is a top level document to define and describe human factors tasks, based on each step of MMIS design process, in view point of how, what, when and by whom to be performed. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig

  16. Man-machine interface systems for the Sizewell B Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettcher, D.B.

    2004-01-01

    Sizewell B is the first nuclear power station to be built in the United Kingdom using the Pressurised Water Reactor or PWR system. The design is based on stations operating in the United States, but many changes and new features have been introduced to bring it up to date, and to meet United Kingdom practice and regulatory requirements. The Man-Machine Interfaces (MMIs) in the control rooms have been newly designed from first principles, with special attention paid to human factors and the role of the operators. The instrumentation and control (1 and C) systems which interface the MMIs to the process plant, and automate the operation of the station, use advanced technology to achieve high performance and availability. This paper describes the development of the control rooms and 1 and C systems, explaining the thinking that lay behind the principal decisions. (author)

  17. Nuclear safety research collaborations between the U.S. and Russian Federation International Nuclear Safety Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D. J.; Braun, J. C.; Klickman, A. E.; Bougaenko, S. E.; Kabonov, L. P.; Kraev, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    The Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) have formed International Nuclear Safety Centers to collaborate on nuclear safety research. USDOE established the US Center (ISINSC) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in October 1995. MINATOM established the Russian Center (RINSC) at the Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (RDIPE) in Moscow in July 1996. In April 1998 the Russian center became a semi-independent, autonomous organization under MINATOM. The goals of the center are to: Cooperate in the development of technologies associated with nuclear safety in nuclear power engineering; Be international centers for the collection of information important for safety and technical improvements in nuclear power engineering; and Maintain a base for fundamental knowledge needed to design nuclear reactors. The strategic approach is being used to accomplish these goals is for the two centers to work together to use the resources and the talents of the scientists associated with the US Center and the Russian Center to do collaborative research to improve the safety of Russian-designed nuclear reactors. The two centers started conducting joint research and development projects in January 1997. Since that time the following ten joint projects have been initiated: INSC databases--web server and computing center; Coupled codes--Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic; Severe accident management for Soviet-designed reactors; Transient management and advanced control; Survey of relevant nuclear safety research facilities in the Russian Federation; Computer code validation for transient analysis of VVER and RBMK reactors; Advanced structural analysis; Development of a nuclear safety research and development plan for MINATOM; Properties and applications of heavy liquid metal coolants; and Material properties measurement and assessment. Currently, there is activity in eight of these projects. Details on each of these

  18. Amplifying human ability through autonomics and machine learning in IMPACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieciuch, Iryna; Reeder, John; Gutzwiller, Robert; Gustafson, Eric; Coronado, Braulio; Martinez, Luis; Croft, Bryan; Lange, Douglas S.

    2017-05-01

    Amplifying human ability for controlling complex environments featuring autonomous units can be aided by learned models of human and system performance. In developing a command and control system that allows a small number of people to control a large number of autonomous teams, we employ an autonomics framework to manage the networks that represent mission plans and the networks that are composed of human controllers and their autonomous assistants. Machine learning allows us to build models of human and system performance useful for monitoring plans and managing human attention and task loads. Machine learning also aids in the development of tactics that human supervisors can successfully monitor through the command and control system.

  19. Development of a compact nuclear power station engineering simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian Jianfeng; Yang Yanhua; Lin Meng; Hu Rui

    2003-01-01

    The compact nuclear power plant project simulator is developed based on the Chashma nuclear power plant. This simulator consists of simulation computation code, data communication module and human-machine interface. This paper discusses the design and implementation of the simulator from such aspect as computer system, hydrothermal model, programming language, human-machine interface and data communication in details

  20. Applicability of Machine-Learning Enabled LIBS in Post Irradiation Nuclear Forensic Analysis of High Level Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onkongi, J.; Maina, D.; Angeyo, H.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Forensics seeks Information to determine; Chemical Composition, Routes of transit, Origin (Provenance) and Intended use. Post Irradiation/Post detonation NF In a post-detonation event could you get clues/signatures from glass debris, minute sample sizes? Nuclear Forensic Technique Should be State-of -the art that is Rapid, Non-invasive, Remote ability and Non-destructive. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) unlike other Analytic Techniques that require tedious sample preparations such as Dissolution, digestion & matrix removal, which generate additional nuclear wastes that require proper Procedures for handling, storage & ultimate disposal, LIBS overcomes these limitations. Utility of Machine Learning Techniques employed include; Artificial Neural Networks, ANN (Regression/Modelling), Principal component Analysis, PCA (Classification) and Support Vector Machine SVM (Comparative study/Classification Machine Learning coupled with LIBS gives a state of the art analytic method. Utility of the technic in safeguards security and non-proliferation

  1. Nuclear island buildings layout collaborative design platform development and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Li; Huang Wenqiang

    2014-01-01

    Based on characteristics of nuclear island layout design, the large number files and complicated interface, for realizing collaborative design and fine management goal, Establish collaborative design platform, which includes the design task module, 3D design module, project management module. These three modules can package design input files, realize synchronous design and real-time track design drawings state, timely feedback between design, procurement, construction site. There is no design task delay due to tracking and has realized fine management of design. (authors)

  2. On action- and affectpsychology of human reliability. An access by training simulators for complex man-machine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuette, M.

    2002-02-01

    Theoretical part and its topics: errors at the interface between man and machine; reliability analysis for man; the psychological explanation of action reliability of man (intention and control); a paradigma for human reliability (frustration and regression). Empirical part: Control room in a nuclear power plant: Influences on repeated blockages on component care in case of start-up operation; ship bridge: Frustration and regression while steering in a bight. Appendix: analysis of a social interaction.(GL)

  3. Fourth Collaborative Materials Exercise of the Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, J.M.; Reilly, D.; Marsden, O.

    2018-01-01

    The Nuclear Forensics International Technical Working Group is a community of nuclear forensic practitioners who respond to incidents involving nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. The Group is dedicated to advancing nuclear forensic science in part through periodic participation in materials exercises. The Group completed its fourth Collaborative Materials Exercise in 2015 in which laboratories from 15 countries and one multinational organization analyzed three samples of special nuclear material in support of a mock nuclear forensic investigation. This special section of the Journal for Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry is devoted to summarizing highlights from this exercise. (author)

  4. Living systematic reviews: 2. Combining human and machine effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, James; Noel-Storr, Anna; Marshall, Iain; Wallace, Byron; McDonald, Steven; Mavergames, Chris; Glasziou, Paul; Shemilt, Ian; Synnot, Anneliese; Turner, Tari; Elliott, Julian

    2017-11-01

    New approaches to evidence synthesis, which use human effort and machine automation in mutually reinforcing ways, can enhance the feasibility and sustainability of living systematic reviews. Human effort is a scarce and valuable resource, required when automation is impossible or undesirable, and includes contributions from online communities ("crowds") as well as more conventional contributions from review authors and information specialists. Automation can assist with some systematic review tasks, including searching, eligibility assessment, identification and retrieval of full-text reports, extraction of data, and risk of bias assessment. Workflows can be developed in which human effort and machine automation can each enable the other to operate in more effective and efficient ways, offering substantial enhancement to the productivity of systematic reviews. This paper describes and discusses the potential-and limitations-of new ways of undertaking specific tasks in living systematic reviews, identifying areas where these human/machine "technologies" are already in use, and where further research and development is needed. While the context is living systematic reviews, many of these enabling technologies apply equally to standard approaches to systematic reviewing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A study on intelligent nuclear systems (HASP: Human Acts Simulation Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Kiyoshi; Fujii, Minoru; Higuchi, Kenji; Kume, Etsuo; Ohtani, Takayuki; Far, B.H.; Kambayashi, Shaw; Akimoto, Masayuki

    1991-06-01

    The fourth year progress of the Human Acts Simulation Program HASP in short, has been presented in this report. The HASP started in 1987 at JAERI as a ten-year research and development program of underlying technologies for intelligent robots, intelligent nuclear plants and so on. It consists of the research and development of technologies of a knowledge-base system, robot vision, robot kinematics/kinetics, plant geometry database, dose evaluation and high speed Monte Carlo machine. (author)

  6. Successful Collaborations with Dr. S. Raman in Research on Nuclear Data in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu

    2005-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, Dr. Raman visited Japan many times and established a good and fruitful relationship with many scientists from universities and institutions in Japan. Many Japanese scientists, in particular young researchers, also worked together with him at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Through this successful collaboration, we made various achievements in the nuclear data and nuclear physics fields. Japanese researchers all remember Dr. Raman as a very active and warmhearted person. In this paper, some of the results that Dr. Raman established by collaborating with Japanese scientists will be presented

  7. Trends in control and decision-making for human-robot collaboration systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Fumin

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an overview of recent research developments in the automation and control of robotic systems that collaborate with humans. A measure of human collaboration being necessary for the optimal operation of any robotic system, the contributors exploit a broad selection of such systems to demonstrate the importance of the subject, particularly where the environment is prone to uncertainty or complexity. They show how such human strengths as high-level decision-making, flexibility, and dexterity can be combined with robotic precision, and ability to perform task repetitively or in a dangerous environment. The book focuses on quantitative methods and control design for guaranteed robot performance and balanced human experience. Its contributions develop and expand upon material presented at various international conferences. They are organized into three parts covering: one-human–one-robot collaboration; one-human–multiple-robot collaboration; and human–swarm collaboration. Individual topic ar...

  8. System-ergonomic optimisation of the man-machine system nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear power plant is described as a man-machine system, the approach of system ergonomics is explained as well as its integration in the process of manufacture and operation, and BMI projects to introduce this approach in a wider scale are reviewed. (orig./GL) [de

  9. Human-Robot Collaboration: A Literature Review and Augmented Reality Approach in Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Green

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available NASA's vision for space exploration stresses the cultivation of human-robotic systems. Similar systems are also envisaged for a variety of hazardous earthbound applications such as urban search and rescue. Recent research has pointed out that to reduce human workload, costs, fatigue driven error and risk, intelligent robotic systems will need to be a significant part of mission design. However, little attention has been paid to joint human-robot teams. Making human-robot collaboration natural and efficient is crucial. In particular, grounding, situational awareness, a common frame of reference and spatial referencing are vital in effective communication and collaboration. Augmented Reality (AR, the overlaying of computer graphics onto the real worldview, can provide the necessary means for a human-robotic system to fulfill these requirements for effective collaboration. This article reviews the field of human-robot interaction and augmented reality, investigates the potential avenues for creating natural human-robot collaboration through spatial dialogue utilizing AR and proposes a holistic architectural design for human-robot collaboration.

  10. Human-Robot Collaboration: A Literature Review and Augmented Reality Approach in Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Green

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available NASA?s vision for space exploration stresses the cultivation of human-robotic systems. Similar systems are also envisaged for a variety of hazardous earthbound applications such as urban search and rescue. Recent research has pointed out that to reduce human workload, costs, fatigue driven error and risk, intelligent robotic systems will need to be a significant part of mission design. However, little attention has been paid to joint human-robot teams. Making human-robot collaboration natural and efficient is crucial. In particular, grounding, situational awareness, a common frame of reference and spatial referencing are vital in effective communication and collaboration. Augmented Reality (AR, the overlaying of computer graphics onto the real worldview, can provide the necessary means for a human-robotic system to fulfill these requirements for effective collaboration. This article reviews the field of human-robot interaction and augmented reality, investigates the potential avenues for creating natural human-robot collaboration through spatial dialogue utilizing AR and proposes a holistic architectural design for human-robot collaboration.

  11. Modelling of human-machine interaction in equipment design of manufacturing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David S.; Arinez, Jorge F.; Collins, Micah T.; Bi, Zhuming

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes a systematic approach to model human-machine interactions (HMIs) in supervisory control of machining operations; it characterises the coexistence of machines and humans for an enterprise to balance the goals of automation/productivity and flexibility/agility. In the proposed HMI model, an operator is associated with a set of behavioural roles as a supervisor for multiple, semi-automated manufacturing processes. The model is innovative in the sense that (1) it represents an HMI based on its functions for process control but provides the flexibility for ongoing improvements in the execution of manufacturing processes; (2) it provides a computational tool to define functional requirements for an operator in HMIs. The proposed model can be used to design production systems at different levels of an enterprise architecture, particularly at the machine level in a production system where operators interact with semi-automation to accomplish the goal of 'autonomation' - automation that augments the capabilities of human beings.

  12. Securing a better future for all: Nuclear techniques for global development and environmental protection. NA factsheet on nuclear sciences and applications collaborating centres: Establishing a culture of cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    As a large international organization with a variety of programmes, initiatives and laboratories, one of the mandates of the IAEA is to promote the peaceful use of nuclear techniques worldwide while also collaborating with other institutions in its Member States in order to implement part of its approved activities. In this regard, the IAEA designates selected institutions as official IAEA collaborating centres (IAEA-CCs). Recognizing the need to preserve and transfer nuclear knowledge, the IAEA-CCs are dedicated to furthering the research, development and training in peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology. By working alongside various nuclear related institutions from around the world, the IAEA contributes to reaching important targets laid out by the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. The IAEA-CCs are, in general, scientific institutions such as laboratories, universities, research facilities, etc., that receive public recognition by the IAEA and have been designated to collaborate with the IAEA in a variety of fields, such as food safety, environmental protection, water resources and human health. In line with the objectives of the IAEA, IAEA-CCs are expected to further the research, development and training in the peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology. Through these research and academic institutions, Member States can assist the IAEA with their own original research, development and training in nuclear technologies. As a cooperative mechanism, the IAEA-CC is also efficient, as it encourages centres to share resources, knowledge and expertise. One of the goals of the IAEA-CC is also to help developing Member States expand their capabilities in these areas and thus improve the quality of life of their citizens. So far, the IAEA-CC has led to socioeconomic benefits in many parts of the world, from Asia to Latin America.

  13. A Conceptual Framework over Contextual Analysis of Concept Learning within Human-Machine Interplays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badie, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    This research provides a contextual description concerning existential and structural analysis of ‘Relations’ between human beings and machines. Subsequently, it will focus on conceptual and epistemological analysis of (i) my own semantics-based framework [for human meaning construction] and of (ii......) a well-structured machine concept learning framework. Accordingly, I will, semantically and epistemologically, focus on linking those two frameworks for logical analysis of concept learning in the context of human-machine interrelationships. It will be demonstrated that the proposed framework provides...

  14. Learning Human Aspects of Collaborative Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Irit; Sherman, Sofia; Hazzan, Orit

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration has become increasingly widespread in the software industry as systems have become larger and more complex, adding human complexity to the technological complexity already involved in developing software systems. To deal with this complexity, human-centric software development methods, such as Extreme Programming and other agile…

  15. Higgs Machine Learning Challenge 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Olivier, A-P; Bourdarios, C ; LAL / Orsay; Goldfarb, S ; University of Michigan

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics (HEP) has been using Machine Learning (ML) techniques such as boosted decision trees (paper) and neural nets since the 90s. These techniques are now routinely used for difficult tasks such as the Higgs boson search. Nevertheless, formal connections between the two research fields are rather scarce, with some exceptions such as the AppStat group at LAL, founded in 2006. In collaboration with INRIA, AppStat promotes interdisciplinary research on machine learning, computational statistics, and high-energy particle and astroparticle physics. We are now exploring new ways to improve the cross-fertilization of the two fields by setting up a data challenge, following the footsteps of, among others, the astrophysics community (dark matter and galaxy zoo challenges) and neurobiology (connectomics and decoding the human brain). The organization committee consists of ATLAS physicists and machine learning researchers. The Challenge will run from Monday 12th to September 2014.

  16. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2014 - March 31, 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-06-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year (FY) 2014. In FY 2014, we flexibly designed special training courses corresponding with the outside training needs, while organizing the annually scheduled regular training programs. We also actively addressed the challenging issues on human resource development, such as to enhance the collaboration with academia and to organize international training for Asian countries. Besides these regular courses, we also organized the special training courses based on the outside needs, e.g. Nuclear Regulatory Authority or the people in Naraha town in Fukushima Prefecture. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities. In respect of the cooperation with graduate school of The University of Tokyo, we accepted nuclear major students and cooperatively conducted lectures and practical exercises for one year. In terms of the collaboration network with universities, the joint course was successfully held with six universities through utilizing the remote education system. Besides, the intensive summer course and practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories were also conducted. Furthermore, JAEA had re-signed the agreement “Japan Nuclear Education Network” with 7 Universities in Feb. 2015 for the new participation of Nagoya University from FY 2015. Concerning International training, we continuously implemented the Instructor Training Program (ITP) by receiving the annual sponsorship from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. In FY 2014, eight countries (i.e. Bangladesh, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam) joined this Instructor training courses such as “Reactor Engineering Course”. Furthermore, we organized nuclear technology seminar courses, e.g. “Basic Radiation Knowledge for School Education”. In respect of

  17. Optimal design method to minimize users' thinking mapping load in human-machine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanqun; Li, Xu; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The discrepancy between human cognition and machine requirements/behaviors usually results in serious mental thinking mapping loads or even disasters in product operating. It is important to help people avoid human-machine interaction confusions and difficulties in today's mental work mastered society. Improving the usability of a product and minimizing user's thinking mapping and interpreting load in human-machine interactions. An optimal human-machine interface design method is introduced, which is based on the purpose of minimizing the mental load in thinking mapping process between users' intentions and affordance of product interface states. By analyzing the users' thinking mapping problem, an operating action model is constructed. According to human natural instincts and acquired knowledge, an expected ideal design with minimized thinking loads is uniquely determined at first. Then, creative alternatives, in terms of the way human obtains operational information, are provided as digital interface states datasets. In the last, using the cluster analysis method, an optimum solution is picked out from alternatives, by calculating the distances between two datasets. Considering multiple factors to minimize users' thinking mapping loads, a solution nearest to the ideal value is found in the human-car interaction design case. The clustering results show its effectiveness in finding an optimum solution to the mental load minimizing problems in human-machine interaction design.

  18. Human and machine perception communication, interaction, and integration

    CERN Document Server

    Cantoni, Virginio; Setti, Alessandra

    2005-01-01

    The theme of this book on human and machine perception is communication, interaction, and integration. For each basic topic there are invited lectures, corresponding to approaches in nature and machines, and a panel discussion. The lectures present the state of the art, outlining open questions and stressing synergies among the disciplines related to perception. The panel discussions are forums for open debate. The wide spectrum of topics allows comparison and synergy and can stimulate new approaches.

  19. Improving human reliability through better nuclear power plant system design. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golay, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    The project on open-quotes Development of a Theory of the Dependence of Human Reliability upon System Designs as a Means of Improving Nuclear Power Plant Performanceclose quotes has been undertaken in order to address the important problem of human error in advanced nuclear power plant designs. Most of the creativity in formulating such concepts has focused upon improving the mechanical reliability of safety related plant systems. However, the lack of a mature theory has retarded similar progress in reducing the likely frequencies of human errors. The main design mechanism used to address this class of concerns has been to reduce or eliminate the human role in plant operations and accident response. The plan of work being pursued in this project is to perform a set of experiments involving human subject who are required to operate, diagnose and respond to changes in computer-simulated systems, relevant to those encountered in nuclear power plants. In the tests the systems are made to differ in complexity in a systematic manner. The computer program used to present the problems to be solved also records the response of the operator as it unfolds. Ultimately this computer is also to be used in compiling the results of the project. The work of this project is focused upon nuclear power plant applications. However, the persuasiveness of human errors in using all sorts of electromechanical machines gives it a much greater potential importance. Because of this we are attempting to pursue our work in a fashion permitting broad generalizations

  20. Optimization of classification and regression analysis of four monoclonal antibodies from Raman spectra using collaborative machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Laetitia Minh Maï; Kégl, Balázs; Gramfort, Alexandre; Marini, Camille; Nguyen, David; Cherti, Mehdi; Tfaili, Sana; Tfayli, Ali; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette; Prognon, Patrice; Chaminade, Pierre; Caudron, Eric

    2018-07-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) constitutes one of the most important strategies to treat patients suffering from cancers such as hematological malignancies and solid tumors. These antibodies are prescribed by the physician and prepared by hospital pharmacists. An analytical control enables the quality of the preparations to be ensured. The aim of this study was to explore the development of a rapid analytical method for quality control. The method used four mAbs (Infliximab, Bevacizumab, Rituximab and Ramucirumab) at various concentrations and was based on recording Raman data and coupling them to a traditional chemometric and machine learning approach for data analysis. Compared to conventional linear approach, prediction errors are reduced with a data-driven approach using statistical machine learning methods. In the latter, preprocessing and predictive models are jointly optimized. An additional original aspect of the work involved on submitting the problem to a collaborative data challenge platform called Rapid Analytics and Model Prototyping (RAMP). This allowed using solutions from about 300 data scientists in collaborative work. Using machine learning, the prediction of the four mAbs samples was considerably improved. The best predictive model showed a combined error of 2.4% versus 14.6% using linear approach. The concentration and classification errors were 5.8% and 0.7%, only three spectra were misclassified over the 429 spectra of the test set. This large improvement obtained with machine learning techniques was uniform for all molecules but maximal for Bevacizumab with an 88.3% reduction on combined errors (2.1% versus 17.9%). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Zooniverse: Combining Human and Machine Classifiers for the Big Survey Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortson, Lucy; Wright, Darryl; Beck, Melanie; Lintott, Chris; Scarlata, Claudia; Dickinson, Hugh; Trouille, Laura; Willi, Marco; Laraia, Michael; Boyer, Amy; Veldhuis, Marten; Zooniverse

    2018-01-01

    Many analyses of astronomical data sets, ranging from morphological classification of galaxies to identification of supernova candidates, have relied on humans to classify data into distinct categories. Crowdsourced galaxy classifications via the Galaxy Zoo project provided a solution that scaled visual classification for extant surveys by harnessing the combined power of thousands of volunteers. However, the much larger data sets anticipated from upcoming surveys will require a different approach. Automated classifiers using supervised machine learning have improved considerably over the past decade but their increasing sophistication comes at the expense of needing ever more training data. Crowdsourced classification by human volunteers is a critical technique for obtaining these training data. But several improvements can be made on this zeroth order solution. Efficiency gains can be achieved by implementing a “cascade filtering” approach whereby the task structure is reduced to a set of binary questions that are more suited to simpler machines while demanding lower cognitive loads for humans.Intelligent subject retirement based on quantitative metrics of volunteer skill and subject label reliability also leads to dramatic improvements in efficiency. We note that human and machine classifiers may retire subjects differently leading to trade-offs in performance space. Drawing on work with several Zooniverse projects including Galaxy Zoo and Supernova Hunter, we will present recent findings from experiments that combine cohorts of human and machine classifiers. We show that the most efficient system results when appropriate subsets of the data are intelligently assigned to each group according to their particular capabilities.With sufficient online training, simple machines can quickly classify “easy” subjects, leaving more difficult (and discovery-oriented) tasks for volunteers. We also find humans achieve higher classification purity while samples

  2. Nuclear reactor machine refuelling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashen, W.S.; Erwin, D.

    1977-01-01

    Part of an on-line fuelling machine for a CANDU pressure-tube reactor is described. The present invention provides a refuelling machine wherein the fuelling components, including the fuel carrier and the closure adapter, are positively positioned and retained within the machine magazine or positively secured to the machine charge tube head, and cannot be accidentally disengaged as in former practice. The positive positioning devices include an arcuate keeper plate. Simplified hooked fingers are used. (NDH)

  3. Use of collaboration software to improve nuclear power plant outage management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germain, Shawn

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) refueling outages create some of the most challenging activities the utilities face in both tracking and coordinating thousands of activities in a short period of time. Other challenges, including nuclear safety concerns arising from atypical system configurations and resource allocation issues, can create delays and schedule overruns, driving up outage costs. Today the majority of the outage communication is done using processes that do not take advantage of advances in modern technologies that enable enhanced communication, collaboration and information sharing. Some of the common practices include: runners that deliver paper-based requests for approval, radios, telephones, desktop computers, daily schedule printouts, and static whiteboards that are used to display information. Many gains have been made to reduce the challenges facing outage coordinators; however; new opportunities can be realized by utilizing modern technological advancements in communication and information tools that can enhance the collective situational awareness of plant personnel leading to improved decision-making. Ongoing research as part of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS) has been targeting NPP outage improvement. As part of this research, various applications of collaborative software have been demonstrated through pilot project utility partnerships. Collaboration software can be utilized as part of the larger concept of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Collaborative software can be used for emergent issue resolution, Outage Control Center (OCC) displays, and schedule monitoring. Use of collaboration software enables outage staff and subject matter experts (SMEs) to view and update critical outage information from any location on site or off.

  4. Man-machine interaction in Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmstead, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The design of man-machine interaction in the CANDU plants has evolved considerably over several generations of plants, from the first Douglas Point plant through to the next generation of plants represented by new designs like CANDU 3. In the early plants, the control room configuration was based on designers' projections of control interface requirements. With succeeding generations of designs, there has been an evolution towards a more systematic consideration of human strengths and weaknesses, increasing attention to formal requirements definition, and incorporation of a larger base of operational experience. This paper describes the design of the man-machine interaction for third generation CANDU-3 control rooms for improved operator reliability and reduced costs. (author). 13 refs., 3 figs

  5. Human machine interface for research reactor instrumentation and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Mohd Idris Taib; Izhar Abu Hussin; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2010-01-01

    Most present design of Human Machine Interface for Research Reactor Instrumentation and Control System is modular-based, comprise of several cabinets such as Reactor Protection System, Control Console, Information Console as well as Communication Console. The safety, engineering and human factor will be concerned for the design. Redundancy and separation of signal and power supply are the main factor for safety consideration. The design of Operator Interface absolutely takes consideration of human and environmental factors. Physical parameters, experiences, trainability and long-established habit patterns are very important for user interface, instead of the Aesthetic and Operator-Interface Geometry. Physical design for New Instrumentation and Control System of RTP are proposed base on the state-of- the-art Human Machine Interface design. (author)

  6. Human-robot collaboration for a shared mission

    OpenAIRE

    Karami , Abir-Beatrice; Jeanpierre , Laurent; Mouaddib , Abdel-Illah

    2010-01-01

    International audience; We are interested in collaboration domains between a robot and a human partner, the partners share a common mission without an explicit communication about their plans. The decision process of the robot agent should consider the presence of its human partner. Also, the robot planning should be flexible to human comfortability and all possible changes in the shared environment. To solve the problem of human-robot collaborationwith no communication, we present a model th...

  7. Review on present state of human model researches in nuclear engineering and the prospect for their industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Furuta, Kazuo; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Yoshimura, Seiichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Naito, Norio

    1999-01-01

    Reviews have been made on the researches and developments for human models in the field of nuclear engineering. Until now, the related works have been made mainly for the modeling of plant operator and operator crew in the control room, but also there arise new tendencies of extending the modeling works for maintenance field as well as for personnel training purposes. The whole range of human model research is divided into the five areas of (a) modeling for machine system, (b) measurement and analysis of human information behavior, (c) modeling of human internal information process, (d) modeling of human interaction with machine system, and (e) that of between human themselves. The real examples of the human model developments as well as their methods, applications, and the model validations are described, and then, the further subjects and efforts are pointed out which would be needed for the broader industrial application of the human modeling. (author)

  8. Activities of nuclear human resource development in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujikura, Yonezo

    2010-01-01

    Since 2007, the JAIF (Japan Atomic Industrial Forum) had established the nuclear energy human resource development council to make analysis of the issue on nuclear human resource development. The author mainly contributed to develop its road map as a chairman of working group. Questionnaire survey to relevant parties on issues of nuclear human resource development had been conducted and the council identified the six relevant issues and ten recommendations. Both aspects for career design and skill-up program are necessary to develop nuclear human resource at each developing step and four respective central coordinating hubs should be linked to each sector participating in human resource development. (T. Tanaka)

  9. An Integrated Framework for Human-Robot Collaborative Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Weihua; Thobbi, Anand; Gu, Ye

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an integrated learning framework that enables humanoid robots to perform human-robot collaborative manipulation tasks. Specifically, a table-lifting task performed jointly by a human and a humanoid robot is chosen for validation purpose. The proposed framework is split into two phases: 1) phase I-learning to grasp the table and 2) phase II-learning to perform the manipulation task. An imitation learning approach is proposed for phase I. In phase II, the behavior of the robot is controlled by a combination of two types of controllers: 1) reactive and 2) proactive. The reactive controller lets the robot take a reactive control action to make the table horizontal. The proactive controller lets the robot take proactive actions based on human motion prediction. A measure of confidence of the prediction is also generated by the motion predictor. This confidence measure determines the leader/follower behavior of the robot. Hence, the robot can autonomously switch between the behaviors during the task. Finally, the performance of the human-robot team carrying out the collaborative manipulation task is experimentally evaluated on a platform consisting of a Nao humanoid robot and a Vicon motion capture system. Results show that the proposed framework can enable the robot to carry out the collaborative manipulation task successfully.

  10. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-03-15

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems.

  11. A Study on planning of promotion for international collaborative development of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hee, Chang Moon; Yang, M. S.; Ha, J. J.

    2006-06-01

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U. S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study is mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; - Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies - Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U. S. and conducting the international cooperation - International cooperation activities for the INPRO This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Furthermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems

  12. A Study on planning of the international collaboration foundation for the Advanced Nuclear Technology Development Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J. and others

    2005-03-01

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U.S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study aimed mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies, Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities, Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. and conducting the international cooperation, International cooperation activities for the INPRO. This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Futhermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems

  13. Ecological Design of Cooperative Human-Machine Interfaces for Safety of Intelligent Transport Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orekhov Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes research results in the domain of cooperative intelligent transport systems. The requirements for human-machine interface considering safety issue of for intelligent transport systems (ITSare analyzed. Profiling of the requirements to cooperative human-machine interface (CHMI for such systems including requirements to usability and safety is based on a set of standards for ITSs. An approach and design technique of cooperative human-machine interface for ITSs are suggested. The architecture of cloud-based CHMI for intelligent transport systems has been developed. The prototype of software system CHMI4ITSis described.

  14. Comparability of Conflict Opportunities in Human-to-Human and Human-to-Agent Online Collaborative Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Yigal

    2014-01-01

    Students' performance in human-to-human and human-to-agent collaborative problem solving assessment task is investigated in this paper. A secondary data analysis of the research reported by Rosen and Tager (2013) was conducted in order to investigate the comparability of the opportunities for conflict situations in human-to-human and…

  15. A study on advanced man-machine interface system for autonomous nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Takeshi; Numano, Masayoshi; Fukuto, Junji; Sugasawa, Shinobu; Miyazaki, Keiko; Someya, Minoru; Haraki, Nobuo

    1994-01-01

    A man-machine interface(MMI) system of an autonomous nuclear power plant has an advanced function compared with that of the present nuclear power plants. The MMI has a function model of a plant state, and updates and revises this function model by itself. This paper describes the concept of autonomous nuclear power plants, a plant simulator of an autonomous power plant, a contracted function model of a plant state, three-dimensional color graphic display of a plant state, and an event-tree like expression for plant states. (author)

  16. Improved fabrication of HgI2 nuclear radiation detectors by machine-cleaving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, A.; Burger, A.; Schieber, M.; Vandenberg, L.; Yellon, W.B.; Alkire, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The perfection of machine-cleaved sections from HgI 2 bulk crystals was examined. The perfection of the machine-cleaved sections as established by gamma diffraction rocking curves was found to be much better than the perfection of hand-cleaved sections or as grown thin platelets, reaching a perfection similar to that of the wire-sawn sections of HgI 2 . A correlation between the perfection and the thickness of the machine-cleaved section was also found, i.e., the thicker the cleaved-section the more perfect it is. The reproducibility of the fabrication was significantly improved by using machine cleaving in the process of fabrication. Large single crystals of HgI 2 weighing 20 to 200 g, can be grown from the vapor phase using the TOM Technique. In order to fabricate nuclear radiation detectors from these single crystals, thin sections of about 0.4 to 0.8 mm thickness have to be prepared. Up till now, the state-of-the-art of fabricating HgI 2 nuclear radiation detectors involved two methods to get thin sections from the large single crystals: (1) hand-cleaving using a razor-blade and (2) solution wire sawing. The chemical wire sawing method involves a loss of about 50% of the crystal volume and is usually followed by a chemical polishing process which involves a significant loss of volume of the original volume. This procedure is complicated and wasteful. The traditional fabrication method, i.e., hand-cleaving followed by rapid nonselective chemical etching, is simpler and less wasteful

  17. Knowledge-based support for design and operational use of human-machine interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, G.

    1994-01-01

    The possibilities for knowledge support of different human user classes, namely operators, operational engineers and designers of human-machine interfaces, are discussed. Several human-machine interface functionalities are briefly explained. The paper deals with such questions as which type of knowledge is needed for design and operation, how to represent it, where to get it from, how to process it, and how to consider and use it. The relationships between design and operational use are thereby emphasised. (author)

  18. Collaboration between Supported Employment and Human Resource Services: Strategies for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Michal; Campbell, Camille; Heinz, Tom; Kotsonas, Lori; Montgomery, Joyce; Storey, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the benefits of successful collaboration between supported employment agencies and human resource managers when working together to secure employment for individuals with disabilities. Two case studies are presented: one involving a successful collaboration with county human resource managers in negotiating a change in the…

  19. Improvement of human operator vibroprotection system in the utility machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchagin, P. A.; Teterina, I. A.; Rahuba, L. F.

    2018-01-01

    The article is devoted to an urgent problem of improving efficiency of road-building utility machines in terms of improving human operator vibroprotection system by determining acceptable values of the rigidity coefficients and resistance coefficients of operator’s cab suspension system elements and those of operator’s seat. Negative effects of vibration result in labour productivity decrease and occupational diseases. Besides, structure vibrations have a damaging impact on the machine units and mechanisms, which leads to reducing an overall service life of the machine. Results of experimental and theoretical research of operator vibroprotection system in the road-building utility machine are presented. An algorithm for the program to calculate dynamic impacts on the operator in terms of different structural and performance parameters of the machine and considering combination of external pertrubation influences was proposed.

  20. Communication of Robot Status to Improve Human-Robot Collaboration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future space exploration will require humans and robots to collaborate to perform all the necessary tasks. Current robots mostly operate separately from humans due...

  1. The Trust Project - Symbiotic Human Machine Teams: Social Cueing for Trust and Reliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2016-0096 THE TRUST PROJECT - SYMBIOTIC HUMAN-MACHINE TEAMS: SOCIAL CUEING FOR TRUST & RELIANCE Susan Rivers, Monika Lohani, Marissa...30 JUN 2012 – 30 JUN 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE TRUST PROJECT - SYMBIOTIC HUMAN-MACHINE TEAMS: SOCIAL CUEING FOR TRUST & RELIANCE 5a. CONTRACT

  2. The human error rate assessment and optimizing system HEROS - a new procedure for evaluating and optimizing the man-machine interface in PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richei, A.; Hauptmanns, U.; Unger, H.

    2001-01-01

    A new procedure allowing the probabilistic evaluation and optimization of the man-machine system is presented. This procedure and the resulting expert system HEROS, which is an acronym for Human Error Rate Assessment and Optimizing System, is based on the fuzzy set theory. Most of the well-known procedures employed for the probabilistic evaluation of human factors involve the use of vague linguistic statements on performance shaping factors to select and to modify basic human error probabilities from the associated databases. This implies a large portion of subjectivity. Vague statements are expressed here in terms of fuzzy numbers or intervals which allow mathematical operations to be performed on them. A model of the man-machine system is the basis of the procedure. A fuzzy rule-based expert system was derived from ergonomic and psychological studies. Hence, it does not rely on a database, whose transferability to situations different from its origin is questionable. In this way, subjective elements are eliminated to a large extent. HEROS facilitates the importance analysis for the evaluation of human factors, which is necessary for optimizing the man-machine system. HEROS is applied to the analysis of a simple diagnosis of task of the operating personnel in a nuclear power plant

  3. Basic researches for advancement of man-machine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    1994-01-01

    The historical development of plant instrumentation and control system accompanying the introduction of automation is shown by the example of nuclear power plants. It is explained, and the change in the role of operators in the man-machine system is mentioned. Human errors are the serious problem in various fields, and automation resolves it. But complex systems also caused various disasters due to the relation of men and machines. The problem of human factors in high risk system automation is considered as the heightening of reliability and the reduction of burden on workers by decreasing human participation, and the increase of the risk of large accidents due to the lowering of reliability of human elements and the strengthening of the training of workers. Human model and the framework of human error analysis, the development of the system for man-machine system design and information analysis and evaluation, the significance of physiological index measurement and the perspective of the application, the analysis of the behavior of subjects in the abnormality diagnosis experiment using a plant simulator, and the development to the research on mutual adaptation interface are discussed. In this paper, the problem of human factors in system safety, that technical advancement brings about is examined, and the basic research on the advancement of man-machine systems by the author is reported. (K.I.)

  4. The nuclear axis. Secret collaboration between West Germany and South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervenka, Z.; Rogers, B.

    1978-01-01

    Post-war international politics are examined, with particular reference to international collaboration in the nuclear energy field and to the proliferation of atomic weapons capability. The development of atomic energy programmes in West Germany and in South Africa is discussed. South African uranium resources are described. Reference is made to the British-Dutch-West German collaboration on uranium enrichment, and to the South African enrichment process. Political activities involving atomic energy considerations are also discussed with reference to the countries mentioned and,in addition, to USA, Israel, Iran and Brazil. (U.K.)

  5. Freaky: Collaborative Enactments of Emotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leahu, Lucian; Sengers, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    The field of CSCW is increasingly drawing on theories and approaches from feminist philosophy of science. To date such efforts have focused on understanding users and their practices. We present a research prototype showing that feminist theories can lead to novel design solutions. Freaky is a mo...... is a mobile, interactive system that collaborates with its users in the enactment of emotion. Informed by the feminist literature, the system introduces a novel approach to emotion: designing for human-machine co-production of emotion....

  6. The Human Factors System of VGB. The body of measures implemented by the NPP operating companies for HF management and optimisation of the man-machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisgruber, H.; Janssen, G.

    1999-01-01

    One way of ensuring high human reliability is to systematically record, analyse and optimise the identified human factors influencing the safety of operation of NPPs. There are two kinds of human factors to be considered: Those identified and characterised in their actual influence on the man-machine system after an event has happened, and the potential human factors, as far as they are known. The purpose of the paper presented is to: - explain the man-machine interface on the basis of the descriptions delivered by work science, as well as with the information model (acquisition, processing and application of information); - explain their influence on the human performance; - identify the organisational units/competences of a nuclear power plant with respect to responsibility for dealing with those factors influencing human performance; - describe suitable joint action of the responsible organisational units; - present results of HF system reviews and modifications. (orig./CB) [de

  7. Human-machine interface for a VR-based medical imaging environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapichler, Christian; Haubner, Michael; Loesch, Andreas; Lang, Manfred K.; Englmeier, Karl-Hans

    1997-05-01

    Modern 3D scanning techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) produce high- quality images of the human anatomy. Virtual environments open new ways to display and to analyze those tomograms. Compared with today's inspection of 2D image sequences, physicians are empowered to recognize spatial coherencies and examine pathological regions more facile, diagnosis and therapy planning can be accelerated. For that purpose a powerful human-machine interface is required, which offers a variety of tools and features to enable both exploration and manipulation of the 3D data. Man-machine communication has to be intuitive and efficacious to avoid long accustoming times and to enhance familiarity with and acceptance of the interface. Hence, interaction capabilities in virtual worlds should be comparable to those in the real work to allow utilization of our natural experiences. In this paper the integration of hand gestures and visual focus, two important aspects in modern human-computer interaction, into a medical imaging environment is shown. With the presented human- machine interface, including virtual reality displaying and interaction techniques, radiologists can be supported in their work. Further, virtual environments can even alleviate communication between specialists from different fields or in educational and training applications.

  8. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D.

  9. Minutes of the Seventieth Meeting of the Nuclear Physics European Collaboration Committee - NuPECC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The objective of NuPECC is to strengthen European Collaboration in nuclear science through the promotion of nuclear physics and its trans-disciplinary use and application in collaborative ventures between research groups within Europe and particularly those from countries linked to the ESF (European Science Foundation). In pursuing this objective the Committee shall: -) define a network of complementary facilities within Europe and encourage optimisation of their usage; -) provide a forum for the discussion of the provision of future facilities and instrumentation; and -) provide advice and make recommendations to the ESF and to other bodies on the development, organisation, and support of European nuclear research and of particular projects. The activities of NuPECC for the last six months are reviewed in the first part of the document. The second part gathers the 5 presentations made during the committee meeting and concerning respectively: nuclear physics infrastructures, the status of the Hadron-Physics2 project, the activities of ENSAR, the draft poster for EuNPC 2012, and the Asian Nuclear Physics Association (ANPhA)

  10. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D

  11. Analyzing the effects of human-aware motion planning on close-proximity human-robot collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasota, Przemyslaw A; Shah, Julie A

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this work was to examine human response to motion-level robot adaptation to determine its effect on team fluency, human satisfaction, and perceived safety and comfort. The evaluation of human response to adaptive robotic assistants has been limited, particularly in the realm of motion-level adaptation. The lack of true human-in-the-loop evaluation has made it impossible to determine whether such adaptation would lead to efficient and satisfying human-robot interaction. We conducted an experiment in which participants worked with a robot to perform a collaborative task. Participants worked with an adaptive robot incorporating human-aware motion planning and with a baseline robot using shortest-path motions. Team fluency was evaluated through a set of quantitative metrics, and human satisfaction and perceived safety and comfort were evaluated through questionnaires. When working with the adaptive robot, participants completed the task 5.57% faster, with 19.9% more concurrent motion, 2.96% less human idle time, 17.3% less robot idle time, and a 15.1% greater separation distance. Questionnaire responses indicated that participants felt safer and more comfortable when working with an adaptive robot and were more satisfied with it as a teammate than with the standard robot. People respond well to motion-level robot adaptation, and significant benefits can be achieved from its use in terms of both human-robot team fluency and human worker satisfaction. Our conclusion supports the development of technologies that could be used to implement human-aware motion planning in collaborative robots and the use of this technique for close-proximity human-robot collaboration.

  12. The Properties of Intelligent Human-Machine Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Alfimtsev

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent human-machine interfaces based on multimodal interaction are developed separately in different application areas. No unified opinion exists about the issue of what properties should these interfaces have to provide an intuitive and natural interaction. Having carried out an analytical survey of the papers that deal with intelligent interfaces a set of properties are presented, which are necessary for intelligent interface between an information system and a human: absolute response, justification, training, personification, adaptiveness, collectivity, security, hidden persistence, portability, filtering.

  13. Humanizing machines: Anthropomorphization of slot machines increases gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Paolo; Sacchi, Simona; Brambilla, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Do people gamble more on slot machines if they think that they are playing against humanlike minds rather than mathematical algorithms? Research has shown that people have a strong cognitive tendency to imbue humanlike mental states to nonhuman entities (i.e., anthropomorphism). The present research tested whether anthropomorphizing slot machines would increase gambling. Four studies manipulated slot machine anthropomorphization and found that exposing people to an anthropomorphized description of a slot machine increased gambling behavior and reduced gambling outcomes. Such findings emerged using tasks that focused on gambling behavior (Studies 1 to 3) as well as in experimental paradigms that included gambling outcomes (Studies 2 to 4). We found that gambling outcomes decrease because participants primed with the anthropomorphic slot machine gambled more (Study 4). Furthermore, we found that high-arousal positive emotions (e.g., feeling excited) played a role in the effect of anthropomorphism on gambling behavior (Studies 3 and 4). Our research indicates that the psychological process of gambling-machine anthropomorphism can be advantageous for the gaming industry; however, this may come at great expense for gamblers' (and their families') economic resources and psychological well-being. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Building an integrated nuclear engineering and nuclear science human resources pipeline at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneed, A.; Sikorski, B.; Lineberry, M.; Jolly, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In 2002, the US Department of Energy (US DOE) transferred sponsorship of the INEEL and ANL-W to the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology and designated the INEEL and ANL-W as the nation's lead laboratories for nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel cycle research and development. This transfer acknowledged the laboratories' history, infrastructure, expertise and commitment to collaborate broadly in order to fulfill its assigned role as the nation's center for nuclear energy research and development. Key to this role is the availability of well-educated and trained nuclear engineers, professionals from other disciplines of engineering, nuclear scientists, and others with advanced degrees in supporting disciplines such as physics, chemistry, and math. In 2005 the INEEL and ANL-W will be combined into the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). One of US DOE's objectives for the INL will be for it to take a strong role in the revitalization of nuclear engineering and nuclear science education in the US. Responding to this objective for the INL and the national need to rejuvenate nuclear engineering and nuclear science research and education, ISU, University of Idaho (UI), Boise State University, the INEEL, and ANL-W are all supporting a new Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (INSE), initially proposed by and to be administered by ISU. The Institute will rely on the resources of both universities and the INL to create a US center for reactor and fuel cycle research to development and attract outstanding faculty and students to Idaho and to the INL. The Institute and other university based education development efforts represent only one component of a viable Human Resources Pipeline from university to leading edge laboratory researcher. Another critical component is the successful integration of new graduates into the laboratory research environment, the transfer of knowledge from senior researchers, and the development of these individuals into

  15. Computer-based diagnostic monitoring to enhance the human-machine interface of complex processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.

    1992-02-01

    There is a growing interest in introducing an automated, on-line, diagnostic monitoring function into the human-machine interfaces (HMIs) or control rooms of complex process plants. The design of such a system should be properly integrated with other HMI systems in the control room, such as the alarms system or the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). This paper provides a conceptual foundation for the development of a Plant-wide Diagnostic Monitoring System (PDMS), along with functional requirements for the system and other advanced HMI systems. Insights are presented into the design of an efficient and robust PDMS, which were gained from a critical review of various methodologies developed in the nuclear power industry, the chemical process industry, and the space technological community

  16. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Deng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  18. A machine learning model with human cognitive biases capable of learning from small and biased datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Hidetaka; Sato, Hiroshi; Shirakawa, Tomohiro

    2018-05-09

    Human learners can generalize a new concept from a small number of samples. In contrast, conventional machine learning methods require large amounts of data to address the same types of problems. Humans have cognitive biases that promote fast learning. Here, we developed a method to reduce the gap between human beings and machines in this type of inference by utilizing cognitive biases. We implemented a human cognitive model into machine learning algorithms and compared their performance with the currently most popular methods, naïve Bayes, support vector machine, neural networks, logistic regression and random forests. We focused on the task of spam classification, which has been studied for a long time in the field of machine learning and often requires a large amount of data to obtain high accuracy. Our models achieved superior performance with small and biased samples in comparison with other representative machine learning methods.

  19. Confronting human papilloma virus/oropharyngeal cancer: a model for interprofessional collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Jacquelyn L

    2014-06-01

    A collaborative practice model related to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) associated oropharyngeal cancer highlights the role of the dental hygienist in addressing this condition. The incidence of HPV associated head and neck cancer is rising. Multiple professionals including the dental hygienist can work collaboratively to confront this growing public health concern. A critical review applies the growth and utilization of interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration (IPC) to multi-disciplinary models addressing the human papilloma virus and oropharyngeal cancers. A model related to HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer addresses an oral systemic condition that supports the inclusion of a dental hygienist on collaborative teams addressing prevention, detection, treatment and cure of OPC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Balancing the roles of humans and machines in power plant control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.

    1989-05-01

    A number of factors are leading to a re-examination of the balance between the roles of the operators and the machine in controlling nuclear power plants. Some of these factors are: the advent of new and advanced computer technologies; increased plant complexity, placing heavy workloads and stress on the control room operator; and increasing concerns about the role of human reliability in industrial mishaps. In light of the changing control aspects, we examine the meaning of automation, we discuss a proposed model of the control process, the concept of control within a few defined reactor states, a decision-making sequence; and we identify some possible problem areas in implementing new control technologies. Significant benefits should come from the new control methods and these opportunities should be exploited as soon as prudence allows, taking great care that the safety of the plants is improved

  1. Aspects of the engineering design of whole-body nuclear magnetic resonance machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.; Collins, A.G.; Hall, A.S.; Harman, R.R.; Butson, P.C.; Gilderdale, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The paper on whole-body nuclear magnetic resonance machines reviews the basic physics very briefly, then examines the design requirements and engineering constraints for the major components of such a system. The paper concludes with a brief resume of the techniques used, and a short presentation of the type of results that are achieved. (author)

  2. JSPS-CAS Core University Program seminar on summary of 10-year collaborations in plasma and nuclear fusion research area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, Kazuo; Wang Kongjia

    2011-07-01

    The JSPS-CAS Core University Program (CUP) seminar on “Summary of 10-year Collaborations in Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Research Area” was held from March 9 to March 11, 2011 in the Okinawa Prefectural Art Museum, Naha city, Okinawa, Japan. The collaboration program on plasma and nuclear fusion started from 2001 under the auspices of Japanese Society of Promotion of Science (JSPS) and Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). This year is the last year of the CUP. This seminar was organized in the framework of the CUP. In the seminar, 29 oral talks were presented, having 14 Chinese and 30 Japanese participants. These presentations covered key topics related to the collaboration categories: (1) improvement of core plasma properties, (2) basic research on fusion reactor technologies, and (3) theory and numerical simulation. This seminar aims at summarizing the results obtained through the collaborations for 10 years, and discussing future prospects of China-Japan collaboration in plasma and nuclear fusion research areas. (author)

  3. Nuclear power in Czechoslovakia and its development within the CMEA collaboration framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavel, S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of and prospects for the development of nuclear pwer and energy machine building in Czechoslovakia are considered. In 1980 the NPPs generated 1.5% of the country's energy. It is envisaged that by 1990 the share of NPPs will rise to 9.2% and by 2000 to 15%. Since 1974, when an agreement with the Soviet Union was signed on cooperation and specialization in producing equipment for NPPs, a new industry, nuclear power machine building, has been successfully developed in Czechoslovakia. The production of steam generators, volume compensators, main gate valves, pipelines, special fittings, special pumps and auxiliary systems of the primary circuit has been mastered. Presently, the Czechoslovakian industry is capable of manufacturing above 80% of the whole servicing equipment of WWER-440 power units. Alongside with the USSR, Czechoslovakia has become the second greatest supplier of equipment for NPPs among the COMECON member-states. By 2000 it is planned to put into operation 12 WWER-440 power unit and 6 WWER-1000 power units with the total capacity of 11280 MW. An experimental agro-nuclear complex will soon be constructed in which NPP heat will be utilized for growing vegetables, fruit, mushrooms and for breeding fish

  4. Quantitative evaluation of impedance perception characteristics of humans in the man-machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onish, Keiichi; Kim, Young Woo; Obinata, Goro; Hase, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    We investigated impedance perception characteristics of humans in the man-machine interface. Sensibility or operational feel about physical properties of machine dynamics is obtained through perception process. We evaluated the impedance perception characteristics of humans who are operating a mechanical system, based on extended Scheffe's subjective evaluation method in full consideration of the influence of impedance level, impedance difference, experiment order, individual difference and so on. Constant method based quantitative evaluation was adopted to investigate the influence of motion frequency and change of the impedance on human impedance perception characteristics. Experimental results indicate that humans perceive impedance of mechanical systems based on comparison process of the dynamical characteristics of the systems. The proposed method can be applied to quantify the design requirement of man-machine interface. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through experimental results.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of impedance perception characteristics of humans in the man-machine interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onish, Keiichi [Yamaha Motor Co., Shizuoka (Japan); Kim, Young Woo [Daegu Techno Park R and D Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Obinata, Goro [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Hase, Kazunori [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-05-15

    We investigated impedance perception characteristics of humans in the man-machine interface. Sensibility or operational feel about physical properties of machine dynamics is obtained through perception process. We evaluated the impedance perception characteristics of humans who are operating a mechanical system, based on extended Scheffe's subjective evaluation method in full consideration of the influence of impedance level, impedance difference, experiment order, individual difference and so on. Constant method based quantitative evaluation was adopted to investigate the influence of motion frequency and change of the impedance on human impedance perception characteristics. Experimental results indicate that humans perceive impedance of mechanical systems based on comparison process of the dynamical characteristics of the systems. The proposed method can be applied to quantify the design requirement of man-machine interface. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified through experimental results.

  6. Learning Semantics of Gestural Instructions for Human-Robot Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Dadhichi; Erkent, Özgür; Piater, Justus

    2018-01-01

    Designed to work safely alongside humans, collaborative robots need to be capable partners in human-robot teams. Besides having key capabilities like detecting gestures, recognizing objects, grasping them, and handing them over, these robots need to seamlessly adapt their behavior for efficient human-robot collaboration. In this context we present the fast, supervised Proactive Incremental Learning (PIL) framework for learning associations between human hand gestures and the intended robotic manipulation actions. With the proactive aspect, the robot is competent to predict the human's intent and perform an action without waiting for an instruction. The incremental aspect enables the robot to learn associations on the fly while performing a task. It is a probabilistic, statistically-driven approach. As a proof of concept, we focus on a table assembly task where the robot assists its human partner. We investigate how the accuracy of gesture detection affects the number of interactions required to complete the task. We also conducted a human-robot interaction study with non-roboticist users comparing a proactive with a reactive robot that waits for instructions. PMID:29615888

  7. Learning Semantics of Gestural Instructions for Human-Robot Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Dadhichi; Erkent, Özgür; Piater, Justus

    2018-01-01

    Designed to work safely alongside humans, collaborative robots need to be capable partners in human-robot teams. Besides having key capabilities like detecting gestures, recognizing objects, grasping them, and handing them over, these robots need to seamlessly adapt their behavior for efficient human-robot collaboration. In this context we present the fast, supervised Proactive Incremental Learning (PIL) framework for learning associations between human hand gestures and the intended robotic manipulation actions. With the proactive aspect, the robot is competent to predict the human's intent and perform an action without waiting for an instruction. The incremental aspect enables the robot to learn associations on the fly while performing a task. It is a probabilistic, statistically-driven approach. As a proof of concept, we focus on a table assembly task where the robot assists its human partner. We investigate how the accuracy of gesture detection affects the number of interactions required to complete the task. We also conducted a human-robot interaction study with non-roboticist users comparing a proactive with a reactive robot that waits for instructions.

  8. An Augmented Discrete-Time Approach for Human-Robot Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peidong Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human-robot collaboration (HRC is a key feature to distinguish the new generation of robots from conventional robots. Relevant HRC topics have been extensively investigated recently in academic institutes and companies to improve human and robot interactive performance. Generally, human motor control regulates human motion adaptively to the external environment with safety, compliance, stability, and efficiency. Inspired by this, we propose an augmented approach to make a robot understand human motion behaviors based on human kinematics and human postural impedance adaptation. Human kinematics is identified by geometry kinematics approach to map human arm configuration as well as stiffness index controlled by hand gesture to anthropomorphic arm. While human arm postural stiffness is estimated and calibrated within robot empirical stability region, human motion is captured by employing a geometry vector approach based on Kinect. A biomimetic controller in discrete-time is employed to make Baxter robot arm imitate human arm behaviors based on Baxter robot dynamics. An object moving task is implemented to validate the performance of proposed methods based on Baxter robot simulator. Results show that the proposed approach to HRC is intuitive, stable, efficient, and compliant, which may have various applications in human-robot collaboration scenarios.

  9. A Brief Comparative Study on R and D Collaboration Strategy in US and French nuclear utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sung Tae; Park, Jong Eun [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    So far KHNP's R and D strategy has been evaluated as 2.5th generation R and D management and R and D investments are focused to the key technologies such as Korea's own nuclear reactor design(like APR1400) development, engineering gap lists elimination(plants trouble shooting), construction/operation process enhancement, etc. But when we compare our R and D strategy with US and France utilities, we can find a lot of differences and the need of improvement to accelerate overseas export of nuclear power plants(technologies) and to be a world top class nuclear operator. One of prominent difference is R and D collaboration strategy. The definition of R and D collaboration has evolved over the years, but for this paper I use it to mean the process where multiple parts of an organization or stake holder work together toward a set of common goals. And by co-funding or cost sharing, collaborative R and D can reduces financial and technical risk and encourages knowledge exchange, supply chain development and in return, collaborative R and D can produce more advanced, complex, effective, efficient R and D products in relatively short time with relatively less budget. UK's technology strategy board estimated that Each we invest in collaborative R and D typically returns around in GVA(Gross Value Added)

  10. Utilizing the Human, Machine, and Environment Matrix in investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curry, David; McKinney, John M.

    2006-01-01

    'How did we get into this situation?' How many times has this question been asked at the outset of an investigation, or more importantly, at the completion of an investigation? If the answer is not readily and thoroughly apparent, the investigation is not complete. Subsequently, those who will have the responsibility for correction of the conditions leading to the incident will not have all the information necessary to properly complete their task. For many years, in many writings, the Human/Machine interaction and its impact on process design has been discussed. The same impact should be examined when performing incident investigations. Consideration of the interaction of human and machine along with the environment in which they are used has long been recommended by the National Safety Council, in both design and investigation

  11. Man-machine interfaces analysis system based on computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoming; Gao Zuying; Zhou Zhiwei; Zhao Bingquan

    2004-01-01

    The paper depicts a software assessment system, Dynamic Interaction Analysis Support (DIAS), based on computer simulation technology for man-machine interfaces (MMI) of a control room. It employs a computer to simulate the operation procedures of operations on man-machine interfaces in a control room, provides quantified assessment, and at the same time carries out analysis on operational error rate of operators by means of techniques for human error rate prediction. The problems of placing man-machine interfaces in a control room and of arranging instruments can be detected from simulation results. DIAS system can provide good technical supports to the design and improvement of man-machine interfaces of the main control room of a nuclear power plant

  12. Complementary Machine Intelligence and Human Intelligence in Virtual Teaching Assistant for Tutoring Program Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih-Yueh; Huang, Bau-Hung; Lin, Chi-Jen

    2011-01-01

    This study proposes a virtual teaching assistant (VTA) to share teacher tutoring tasks in helping students practice program tracing and proposes two mechanisms of complementing machine intelligence and human intelligence to develop the VTA. The first mechanism applies machine intelligence to extend human intelligence (teacher answers) to evaluate…

  13. Observing tutorial dialogues collaboratively: insights about human tutoring effectiveness from vicarious learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Michelene T H; Roy, Marguerite; Hausmann, Robert G M

    2008-03-01

    The goals of this study are to evaluate a relatively novel learning environment, as well as to seek greater understanding of why human tutoring is so effective. This alternative learning environment consists of pairs of students collaboratively observing a videotape of another student being tutored. Comparing this collaboratively observing environment to four other instructional methods-one-on-one human tutoring, observing tutoring individually, collaborating without observing, and studying alone-the results showed that students learned to solve physics problems just as effectively from observing tutoring collaboratively as the tutees who were being tutored individually. We explain the effectiveness of this learning environment by postulating that such a situation encourages learners to become active and constructive observers through interactions with a peer. In essence, collaboratively observing combines the benefit of tutoring with the benefit of collaborating. The learning outcomes of the tutees and the collaborative observers, along with the tutoring dialogues, were used to further evaluate three hypotheses explaining why human tutoring is an effective learning method. Detailed analyses of the protocols at several grain sizes suggest that tutoring is effective when tutees are independently or jointly constructing knowledge: with the tutor, but not when the tutor independently conveys knowledge. 2008 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  14. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open Innovation Successes and Collaborative Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, which resulted in the development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the open innovation successes and collaborative projects developed over this timeframe, including the efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC), which was established to advance human health and performance innovations for spaceflight and societal benefit via collaboration in new markets.

  15. HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE (HMI) EVALUATION OF ROOMS TA-50-1-60/60A AT THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY (RLWTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Walter E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stender, Kerith K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-29

    This effort addressed an evaluation of human machine interfaces (HMIs) in Room TA-50-1-60/60A of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). The evaluation was performed in accordance with guidance outlined in DOE-STD-3009, DOE Standard Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, 2006 [DOE 2006]. Specifically, Chapter 13 of DOE 2006 highlights the 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, 2012, [CFR 2012] and DOE G 421.1-2 [DOE 2001a] requirements as they relate to the human factors process and, in this case, the safety of the RLWTF. The RLWTF is a Hazard Category 3 facility and, consequently, does not have safety-class (SSCs). However, safety-significant SSCs are identified. The transuranic (TRU) wastewater tanks and associated piping are the only safety-significant SSCs in Rooms TA-50-1-60/60A [LANL 2010]. Hence, the human factors evaluation described herein is only applicable to this particular assemblage of tanks and piping.

  16. Strength analysis of refueling machine for large PWR in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Xiaofeng; Zhou Guofeng; Bi Xiangjun; Ji Shunying

    2010-01-01

    The refueling machine of PWR plays important roles in nuclear power plant operation,and the dynamic analysis and strength assessment should be carried out to check its safety. In this paper, the finite element model (FEM) was established with the software ANSYS 12 for the refueling machine structure of large 1 000 MW PWR. The dynamic computations were performed under three work conditions, i.e. normal (cart starting and braking), abnormal (OBE) and accident(SSE) conditions, respectively. The structure responses (internal force and stress) of refueling machine under earthquake response spectrum in three directions were combined with the method of square root of square sum (SRSS). Moreover, the static response under gravity was also considered to construct the most critical conditions. With the simulated results, the strength of main structure, bold and weld joint,and the stability of landing leg for additional crane were assessed based on the RCCM code. At last, the local stress analysis of finger-form hook, which function is to take fuel assemblies, was also analyzed, while its strength was also assessed. The results show that the strengths of the refueling machine under various working conditions can meet the safety requirements. (authors)

  17. The development of fully dynamic rotating machine models for nuclear training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birsa, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    Prior to beginning the development of an enhanced set of electrical plant models for several nuclear training simulators, an extensive literature search was conducted to evaluate and select rotating machine models for use on these simulators. These models include the main generator, diesel generators, in-plant electric power distribution and off-side power. Form the results of this search, various models were investigated and several were selected for further evaluation. Several computer studies were performed on the selected models in order to determine their suitability for use in a training simulator environment. One surprising result of this study was that a number of established, classical models could not be made to reproduce actual plant steady-state data over the range necessary for a training simulator. This evaluation process and its results are presented in this paper. Various historical, as well as contemporary, electrical models of rotating machines are discussed. Specific criteria for selection of rotating machine models for training simulator use are presented

  18. Support services for new nuclear power plant projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, Alberto B.; Cazorla, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    TECNATOM is a spanish engineering company with more than 50 years of experience working for the nuclear industry all over the world. TECNATOM has worked in over 30 countries in activities related to the Operation and Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants. It started to work in the design of new Nuclear Power Plants in the early 90s and since then has continued collaborating with different suppliers in the design and licensing of new reactors specially in the areas of plant systems design, Man-Machine Interface design, Main Control Room simulators building, training, qualification of equipment and PSI/ISI engineering services. (author)

  19. Advanced man-machine system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masui, Takao; Naito, Norio; Kato, Kanji.

    1990-01-01

    Recent development of artificial intelligence(AI) seems to offer new possibility to strengthen the performance of the operator support system. From this point of view, a national project of Advanced Man-Machine System Development for Nuclear Power Plant (MMS-NPP) has been carried out since 1984 as 8-year project. This project aims at establishing advanced operator support functions which support operators in their knowledge-based behaviors and smoother interface with the system. This paper describes the role of MMS-NPP, the support functions and the main feature of the MMS-NPP detailed design with its focus placed on the realization methods using AI technology of the support functions for BWR and PWR plants. (author)

  20. Nuclear fuel pellet loading machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dazen, J.R.; Denero, J.V.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear fuel pellet loading machine is described including an inclined rack mounted on a base and having parallel spaced grooves on its upper surface arranged to support fuel rods. A fuel pellet tray is adapted to be placed on a table spaced from the rack, the tray having columns of fuel pellets which are in alignment with the open ends of fuel rods located in the rack grooves. A transition plate is mounted between the fuel rod rack and the fuel pellet tray to receive and guide the pellets into the open ends of the fuel rods. The pellets are pushed into the fuel rods by a number of mechanical fingers mounted on a motor operated block which is moved along the pellet tray length by a drive screw driven by the motor. To facilitate movement of the pellets in the fuel rods the rack is mounted on a number of spaced vibrators which vibrate the fuel rods during fuel pellet insertion. A pellet sensing device movable into an end of each fuel rod indicates to an operator when each rod has been charged with the correct number of pellets

  1. Cognitive Technologies: The Design of Joint Human-Machine Cognitive Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, David D.

    1985-01-01

    This article explores the implications of one type of cognitive technology, techniques and concepts to develop joint human-machine cognitive systems, for the application of computational technology by examining the joint cognitive system implicit in a hypothetical computer consultant that outputs some form of problem solution. This analysis reveals some of the problems can occur in cognitive system design-e.g., machine control of the interaction, the danger of a responsibility-authority doubl...

  2. Machine medical ethics

    CERN Document Server

    Pontier, Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    The essays in this book, written by researchers from both humanities and sciences, describe various theoretical and experimental approaches to adding medical ethics to a machine in medical settings. Medical machines are in close proximity with human beings, and getting closer: with patients who are in vulnerable states of health, who have disabilities of various kinds, with the very young or very old, and with medical professionals. In such contexts, machines are undertaking important medical tasks that require emotional sensitivity, knowledge of medical codes, human dignity, and privacy. As machine technology advances, ethical concerns become more urgent: should medical machines be programmed to follow a code of medical ethics? What theory or theories should constrain medical machine conduct? What design features are required? Should machines share responsibility with humans for the ethical consequences of medical actions? How ought clinical relationships involving machines to be modeled? Is a capacity for e...

  3. Review of human factors R and D in the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parris, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    The history of human factors (HF) R and D in the nuclear power industry can clearly be divided into two phases: pre- and post-Three Mile Island (TMI). Pre-TMI, most people in the industry were unfamiliar with the discipline and its contributions to military and space system designs, and the number of HF professionals involved with nuclear power could essentially be counted on the fingers of two hands. Consequently, there was little research into the improvement of plant man/machine interfaces. The picture changed dramatically in the aftermath of TMI as investigation after investigation pointed to deficiencies in the operator/control room interface, training, procedures, communications, and organizational effectiveness. This paper first outlines pre-TMI events, then examines the post-TMI scenario, and concludes with summary observations and suggestions for future efforts

  4. Potential human factors research relating to modern technology in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketchel, J.; Fink, R.; Hanes, L.; Williges, R.; Williges, B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses proposed human factors research to address advanced human-machine interface technology in nuclear power plants. It relates to a current EPRI project to identify a prioritized list of specific research issues that could be assessed to improve control room and other user interface areas. The project seeks to bridge the gap between the functional requirements of advanced design initiatives and the human factors research needed to support them. It seeks to identify potential benefits to be expected, as well as potential problems that might be introduced by advanced technology. It provides an organized approach to identifying human factors research needs, information already available, and measures of performance and effectiveness that might be used to assess the value of potential improvements. Those parts of the proposed plan that are subsequently approved by EPRI management and by the utility advisory committee will provide a basis for recommending research priorities

  5. Machine Translation Effect on Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mika Yasuoka; Bjørn, Pernille

    2011-01-01

    Intercultural collaboration facilitated by machine translation has gradually spread in various settings. Still, little is known as for the practice of machine-translation mediated communication. This paper investigates how machine translation affects intercultural communication in practice. Based...... on communication in which multilingual communication system is applied, we identify four communication types and its’ influences on stakeholders’ communication process, especially focusing on establishment and maintenance of common ground. Different from our expectation that quality of machine translation results...

  6. HUMAN DECISIONS AND MACHINE PREDICTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, Jon; Lakkaraju, Himabindu; Leskovec, Jure; Ludwig, Jens; Mullainathan, Sendhil

    2018-02-01

    Can machine learning improve human decision making? Bail decisions provide a good test case. Millions of times each year, judges make jail-or-release decisions that hinge on a prediction of what a defendant would do if released. The concreteness of the prediction task combined with the volume of data available makes this a promising machine-learning application. Yet comparing the algorithm to judges proves complicated. First, the available data are generated by prior judge decisions. We only observe crime outcomes for released defendants, not for those judges detained. This makes it hard to evaluate counterfactual decision rules based on algorithmic predictions. Second, judges may have a broader set of preferences than the variable the algorithm predicts; for instance, judges may care specifically about violent crimes or about racial inequities. We deal with these problems using different econometric strategies, such as quasi-random assignment of cases to judges. Even accounting for these concerns, our results suggest potentially large welfare gains: one policy simulation shows crime reductions up to 24.7% with no change in jailing rates, or jailing rate reductions up to 41.9% with no increase in crime rates. Moreover, all categories of crime, including violent crimes, show reductions; and these gains can be achieved while simultaneously reducing racial disparities. These results suggest that while machine learning can be valuable, realizing this value requires integrating these tools into an economic framework: being clear about the link between predictions and decisions; specifying the scope of payoff functions; and constructing unbiased decision counterfactuals. JEL Codes: C10 (Econometric and statistical methods and methodology), C55 (Large datasets: Modeling and analysis), K40 (Legal procedure, the legal system, and illegal behavior).

  7. Designing Computer Agents With Facial Personality To Improve Human-Machine Collaboration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tidball, Brian E

    2006-01-01

    .... This study examined whether people perceive personality in static digital faces that portray expressions of emotion, and if the digital faces would influence human performance on a simple human...

  8. A support vector machine integrated system for the classification of operation anomalies in nuclear components and systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocco S, Claudio M.; Zio, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    A support vector machine (SVM) approach to the classification of transients in nuclear power plants is presented. SVM is a machine-learning algorithm that has been successfully used in pattern recognition for cluster analysis. In the present work, single- and multiclass SVM are combined into a hierarchical structure for distinguishing among transients in nuclear systems on the basis of measured data. An example of application of the approach is presented with respect to the classification of anomalies and malfunctions occurring in the feedwater system of a boiling water reactor. The data used in the example are provided by the HAMBO simulator of the Halden Reactor Project

  9. Advancement on safety management system of nuclear power for safety and non-anxiety of society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    2004-01-01

    Advancement on safety management system is investigated to improve safety and non-anxiety of society for nuclear power, from the standpoint of human machine system research. First, the recent progress of R and D works of human machine interface technologies since 1980 s are reviewed and then the necessity of introducing a new approach to promote technical risk communication activity to foster safety culture in nuclear industries. Finally, a new concept of Offsite Operation and Maintenance Support Center (OMSC) is proposed as the core facility to assemble human resources and their expertise in all organizations of nuclear power, for enhancing safety and non-anxiety of society for nuclear power. (author)

  10. Framework for Human-Automation Collaboration: Conclusions from Four Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Le Blanc, Katya L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Hara, John [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Joe, Jeffrey C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Whaley, April M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Medema, Heather [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The Human Automation Collaboration (HAC) research project is investigating how advanced technologies that are planned for Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMR) will affect the performance and the reliability of the plant from a human factors and human performance perspective. The HAC research effort investigates the consequences of allocating functions between the operators and automated systems. More specifically, the research team is addressing how to best design the collaboration between the operators and the automated systems in a manner that has the greatest positive impact on overall plant performance and reliability. Oxstrand et al. (2013 - March) describes the efforts conducted by the researchers to identify the research needs for HAC. The research team reviewed the literature on HAC, developed a model of HAC, and identified gaps in the existing knowledge of human-automation collaboration. As described in Oxstrand et al. (2013 – June), the team then prioritized the research topics identified based on the specific needs in the context of AdvSMR. The prioritization was based on two sources of input: 1) The preliminary functions and tasks, and 2) The model of HAC. As a result, three analytical studies were planned and conduced; 1) Models of Teamwork, 2) Standardized HAC Performance Measurement Battery, and 3) Initiators and Triggering Conditions for Adaptive Automation. Additionally, one field study was also conducted at Idaho Falls Power.

  11. A friend man-machine interface for thermo-hydraulic simulation codes of nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo Filho, F. de; Belchior Junior, A.; Barroso, A.C.O.; Gebrim, A.

    1994-01-01

    This work presents the development of a Man-Machine Interface to the TRAC-PF1 code, a computer program to perform best estimate analysis of transients and accidents at nuclear power plants. The results were considered satisfactory and a considerable productivity gain was achieved in the activity of preparing and analyzing simulations. (author)

  12. A human-machine cooperation route planning method based on improved A* algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengsheng; Cai, Chao

    2011-12-01

    To avoid the limitation of common route planning method to blindly pursue higher Machine Intelligence and autoimmunization, this paper presents a human-machine cooperation route planning method. The proposed method includes a new A* path searing strategy based on dynamic heuristic searching and a human cooperated decision strategy to prune searching area. It can overcome the shortage of A* algorithm to fall into a local long term searching. Experiments showed that this method can quickly plan a feasible route to meet the macro-policy thinking.

  13. Collaborative mining and interpretation of large-scale data for biomedical research insights.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Tsiliki

    Full Text Available Biomedical research becomes increasingly interdisciplinary and collaborative in nature. Researchers need to efficiently and effectively collaborate and make decisions by meaningfully assembling, mining and analyzing available large-scale volumes of complex multi-faceted data residing in different sources. In line with related research directives revealing that, in spite of the recent advances in data mining and computational analysis, humans can easily detect patterns which computer algorithms may have difficulty in finding, this paper reports on the practical use of an innovative web-based collaboration support platform in a biomedical research context. Arguing that dealing with data-intensive and cognitively complex settings is not a technical problem alone, the proposed platform adopts a hybrid approach that builds on the synergy between machine and human intelligence to facilitate the underlying sense-making and decision making processes. User experience shows that the platform enables more informed and quicker decisions, by displaying the aggregated information according to their needs, while also exploiting the associated human intelligence.

  14. DISTRIBUTED SYSTEM FOR HUMAN MACHINE INTERACTION IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Obed Chan-Canche

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The communication networks built by multiple devices and sensors are becoming more frequent. These device networks allow human-machine interaction development which aims to improve the human performance generating an adaptive environment in response to the information provided by it. The problem of this work is the quick integration of a device network that allows the development of a flexible immersive environment for different uses.

  15. Machine vs. human translation of SNOMED CT terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Stefan; Bernhardt-Melischnig, Johannes; Kreuzthaler, Markus; Daumke, Philipp; Boeker, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In the context of past and current SNOMED CT translation projects we compare three kinds of SNOMED CT translations from English to German by: (t1) professional medical translators; (t2) a free Web-based machine translation service; (t3) medical students. 500 SNOMED CT fully specified names from the (English) International release were randomly selected. Based on this, German translations t1, t2, and t3 were generated. A German and an Austrian physician rated the translations for linguistic correctness and content fidelity. Kappa for inter-rater reliability was 0.4 for linguistic correctness and 0.23 for content fidelity. Average ratings of linguistic correctness did not differ significantly between human translation scenarios. Content fidelity was rated slightly better for student translators compared to professional translators. Comparing machine to human translation, the linguistic correctness differed about 0.5 scale units in favour of the human translation and about 0.25 regarding content fidelity, equally in favour of the human translation. The results demonstrate that low-cost translation solutions of medical terms may produce surprisingly good results. Although we would not recommend low-cost translation for producing standardized preferred terms, this approach can be useful for creating additional language-specific entry terms. This may serve several important use cases. We also recommend testing this method to bootstrap a crowdsourcing process, by which term translations are gathered, improved, maintained, and rated by the user community.

  16. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.

    2009-08-01

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. · Investigation and analysis of the international and domestic trends related to future nuclear system · To maximize the national interests by the strategic participation of GIF meeting - To participate of GIF meeting and to support of relative work - To investigate the System R and D Arrangement and to inform its progress situation · To maximize the propulsion results of Korea/U.S nuclear energy joint research(I-NERI) - To support a delegation by the review of agenda in aspect of the technical/legal point - To participate of BINERIC meeting and to support of relative work · Streamline the nuclear energy R and D due to the effective connection between domestic R and D and international collaboration The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  17. DOE, IAEA collaborate to put decades of nuclear research online

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Decades of nuclear research supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies are being made searchable on the World Wide Web, as part of a collaborative effort between the DOE and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The project aims to give researchers, academics, and the general public access to vast volumes of valuable nuclear-related research over the internet. As part of its knowledge preservation mandate, the IAEA' s International Nuclear Information System(INIS) works to preserve nuclear knowledge by digitizing historic nuclear energy research documents dating from 1970 through the early 1990s. Collections from over 29 countries are now digitally available and several additional digital preservation projects are ongoing or are being established, particularly in the Latin America and Caribbean regions. ''Thanks to the collaborative work of the IAEA and its Member States, scientists and students in the nuclear field now have instant access to important research and technical information over the internet,'' said IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Energy Yury Sokolov. ''Our INIS programme continues to work to preserve and provide access to publications and documents on the peaceful applications of nuclear technology.'' The DOE project is one of the larger programmes in the INIS project, and includes more than 180,000 documents from the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). OSTI is the U.S. representative to INIS and has had its own digitization focus in recent years. The novel partnership highlights the longstanding mutual benefits of DOE participation in INIS. In essence, it opens up previous research on the safe and peaceful uses of nuclear energy by making it freely and quickly available to scientists and engineers. By making scientific data electronically available, the INIS database helps scientists and students to attain volumes of data that are otherwise inaccessible

  18. Cognitive task analysis of nuclear power plant operators for man-machine interface design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, J.I.; Yoshimura, S.; Ohtsuka, T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper aims to ascertain and further develop design guidelines for a man-machine interface compatible with plant operators' problem solving strategies. As the framework for this study, operator's information processing activities were modeled, based on J. Rasmussen's framework for cognitive task analysis. Two experiments were carried out. One was an experiment aimed at gaining an understanding of internal mechanisms involved in mistakes and slips which occurred in operators' responses to incidents and accidents. As a result of fifteen cases of operator performance analysis, sixty one human errors were identified. Further analysis of the errors showed that frequently occurring error mechanisms were absent-mindedness, lack of recognition of patterns in diagnosis and failed procedure formulation due to memory lapses. The other kind of experiment was carried out to identify the envelope of trajectories for the operator's search in the problem space consisting of the two dimensions of means-ends and whole-part relations while dealing with transients. Two cases of experimental sessions were conducted with the thinking-aloud method. From analyses based on verbal protocols, trajectories of operator's search were derived, covering from the whole plant level through the component level in the whole-part dimension and covering from the functional purpose level through the physical form level in the means-ends dimension. The findings obtained from these analyses serve as a basis for developing design guidelines for man-machine interfaces in control rooms of nuclear power plants

  19. Personal view of educating two-phase flow and human resource development as a nuclear engineer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Akitoshi

    2010-01-01

    As an engineer who has devoted himself in the nuclear industry for almost three decades, the author gave a personal view on educating two-phase flow and developing human resources. An expected role of universities in on-going discussions of collaboration among industry-government-academia is introduced. Reformation of two-phase flow education is discussed from two extreme viewpoints, the basic structure of physics and the practical system analysis. (author)

  20. Learning collaborative teamwork: an argument for incorporating the humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Pippa; Brajtman, Susan; Weaver, Lynda; Grassau, Pamela Anne; Varpio, Lara

    2014-11-01

    A holistic, collaborative interprofessional team approach, which includes patients and families as significant decision-making members, has been proposed to address the increasing burden being placed on the health-care system. This project hypothesized that learning activities related to the humanities during clinical placements could enhance interprofessional teamwork. Through an interprofessional team of faculty, clinical staff, students, and patient representatives, we developed and piloted the self-learning module, "interprofessional education for collaborative person-centred practice through the humanities". The module was designed to provide learners from different professions and educational levels with a clinical placement/residency experience that would enable them, through a lens of the humanities, to better understand interprofessional collaborative person-centred care without structured interprofessional placement activities. Learners reported the self-paced and self-directed module to be a satisfactory learning experience in all four areas of care at our institution, and certain attitudes and knowledge were significantly and positively affected. The module's evaluation resulted in a revised edition providing improved structure and instruction for students with no experience in self-directed learning. The module was recently adapted into an interactive bilingual (French and English) online e-learning module to facilitate its integration into the pre-licensure curriculum at colleges and universities.

  1. Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Diane E.

    1990-01-01

    As scientists seek to develop machines that can "learn," that is, solve problems by imitating the human brain, a gold mine of information on the processes of human learning is being discovered, expert systems are being improved, and human-machine interactions are being enhanced. (SK)

  2. International Nuclear Management Academy Requirements for University Master’s Programmes in Nuclear Technology Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosbois, J. de; Hirose, H.; Adachi, F.; Liu, L.; Hanamitsu, K.; Kosilov, A.; Roberts, J.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The development of any national nuclear energy programme is dependent on the successful development of qualified human resources, through a sustainable nuclear education and training programmes supported by government and industry. Among the broad range of specialists needed for the continued safe and economic utilization of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, are a most vital component—managers. The International Nuclear Management Academy (INMA) is an IAEA facilitated collaboration framework in which universities provide master’s degree programmes focusing on the management aspect for the nuclear sector. INMA master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management (NTM) specify a common set of competency requirements that graduates should acquire to prepare them to become competent managers. This paper presents an overview of the INMA collaboration framework and the requirements for partner universities to implement master’s programmes in Nuclear Technology Management. (author

  3. Reflections on current nuclear safety problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teillac, J.

    1981-01-01

    After operations totalling more than 2000 reactor-years, the safety balance is undeniably positive: no nuclear power plant in the world has so far caused significant damage to populations or to the environment. The paper reviews the darker and brighter aspects of recent analyses, in particular since the Harrisburg accident, and suggests three general lines of action: maintenance of a high level of technical competence in safety, systematic analysis of operational incidents and, finally, increased attention to the ''human factor'' as regards both the man/machine relationship and the training of personnel. With regard to the last-mentioned point, it is suggested that the greatest possible profit should be drawn from the tests carried out at the time of plant commissioning. International collaboration is particularly necessary both to ensure progress in the technical aspects of safety and to place the credibility of specialists on a firmer foundation. Finally, it is essential to assist countries which are embarking on nuclear power programmes. Nuclear safety is not always correctly perceived by public opinion, which will not definitively accept this new source of energy without having complete confidence in those who are promoting it. A clear and firm position on the part of those in positions of political responsibility is an important element in gaining public confidence. (author)

  4. Fuel-handling machine tests at the Institute for Nuclear Research - Pitesti. Computer and software research and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, Cezar; Predescu, Darie; Maiorescu, Oliviu; Dobrescu, Sorin

    2003-01-01

    management and maintenance tools and procedures to make the data safely and consistently available to concurrent software processes at run time including data acquisition during the f/h machine calibration process and data presentation to human; - robust real time controller core sw based on OS9/68k OS and ISaGRAF target kernel with reliable inter-process synchronization and data management via OS9 data modules assuring safely cooperation mechanisms between different tasks were developed under different programming environments; - I/O management in the real-time data acquisition tasks and acquisition process test tools; - system and technological comprehensive loggers and flexible presentation tools; - run-time remote cross debugging tools (both for sw development and as an alternate for technological process monitoring or simulation); - technological operator oriented HMI with local or remote access for online and offline tasks; - integrated user and group policies management tools and procedures using both native OS9 and application mechanisms; - error handling management for safe technological control and for application sw maintenance; - technological job definition and execution management tools. The result is a highly flexible and maintainable working system that is now the core controlling the test and calibration process of f/h machine stand. The complex system computer-software was successfully used in the first tests of the f/h machine at the Institute for Nuclear Research - Pitesti

  5. Human capital in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    On June 7, 2010, as part of the Atomexpo 2010 exhibition, a round-table discussion took place on the topic Human capital in the nuclear industry: challenges and solutions. The article summarizes reports made during the meeting. Tatiana Kozhevnikova, deputy director general of the Rosatom Corporation, made a report about the strategy and best human resource management practices in member companies of the Corporation. She briefly described the state of the human capital in the Russian nuclear industry and outlined the key provisions of the human resource management strategy. Attendees to the round-table discussion elaborated further on the key statements of the report. The discussion has given an evidence that the Russian nuclear industry is giving an enormous importance to human resource management and is firmly intended on successfully tacking the issues associated with the provision of sufficient staff for the industry's safe and efficient development [ru

  6. Development of a Pilot Program for Human Factors Management in Operating Nuclear Power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Woon; Lee, Yong-Hee; Jang, Tong-Il; Kim, Dae-Ho

    2007-01-01

    The human factors of operating NPPs have been reviewed as a part of Periodic Safety Reviews (PSRs). This human factors PSR covers a wide range of human factors including control room man-machine interfaces (MMIs), procedures, working conditions, qualification, training, information requirements and workload. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has performed human factors PSRs from the first PSR for Kori 1. It was determined in 2005 that for a Continuous Operation of the Korean NPPs an enhanced PSR should be performed and issues raised from the PSRs should be resolved. From the results of the PSR for Kori 1, several safety enhancement issues related to human factors were raised. KAERI is working on a resolution of some of the human factors issues for the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. (KHNP). As a part of the resolution, we are developing a human factors management program (HFMP) for Kori 1. This paper introduces the status of our development of HFMP

  7. Human Machine Interfaces for Teleoperators and Virtual Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlach, Nathaniel I. (Compiler); Sheridan, Thomas B. (Compiler); Ellis, Stephen R. (Compiler)

    1991-01-01

    In Mar. 1990, a meeting organized around the general theme of teleoperation research into virtual environment display technology was conducted. This is a collection of conference-related fragments that will give a glimpse of the potential of the following fields and how they interplay: sensorimotor performance; human-machine interfaces; teleoperation; virtual environments; performance measurement and evaluation methods; and design principles and predictive models.

  8. Nuclear Measurements, Evaluations and Applications (NEMEA-7) Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO). Workshop Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, Mark; Plompen, Arjan; ); Emmeric Dupont; )

    2014-01-01

    The 7. workshop on Nuclear Measurements, Evaluations and Applications (NEMEA) focused on international collaboration in nuclear data by hosting the kick-off meeting of the pilot project of the Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO). CIELO aims at fostering nuclear data advances by using the joint expertise of the nuclear data community under the auspices of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The workshop aimed at status reviews of planned and completed contributions and related developments for the CIELO pilot isotopes. The workshop further sought to facilitate in-depth discussions on nuclear data issues which are being addressed in the framework of European Commission projects like ERINDA, EUFRAT, ANDES and CHANDA. The 7. workshop on Nuclear Measurements, Evaluations and Applications (NEMEA) provided an opportunity for the Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organisation (CIELO) to meet and advance its objectives to improve our understanding of neutron reactions on key isotopes that are especially important in nuclear applications, especially in the area of criticality safety and reactors. CIELO is focusing initially on six nuclides ( 1 H, 16 O, 56 Fe, 235 U, 238 U and 239 Pu). These nuclides are important in the aforementioned applications, and despite decades of work many open questions remain to be solved. In some cases, the existing evaluations need improvement because the underlying experimental measurements are either lacking or contradictory. In other cases, nuclear theory work is needed to better advance predictions. In yet other cases, information from cross-section measurements is proving difficult to reconcile with information from integral nuclear criticality experiments or neutron shielding experiments. The main challenges to be faced are as follows: For oxygen, new work is needed to better define the total and elastic cross-sections at lower energies and neutron scattering angular distributions. An outstanding

  9. Efforts for nuclear energy human resource development by industry-government-academic sectors cooperation. Nuclear Energy Human Resource Development Council Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    The report consists of eighteen sections such as the present conditions of nuclear energy, decreasing students in the department of technology and decreasing numbers of nuclear-related subjects, The Nuclear Energy Human Resources Development Program (HRD Program), The Nuclear Energy Human Resources Development Council (HRD Council), the industry-academia partnership for human resource development, the present situation of new graduates in the nuclear field, new workers of nuclear industry, the conditions of technical experts in the nuclear energy industry, long-range forecast of human resource, increasing international efforts, nuclear energy human resources development road map, three points for HRD, six basic subjects for HRD, the specific efforts of the industrial, governmental and academic sectors, promoting a better understanding of nuclear energy and supporting job hunting and employment, students to play an active part in the world, and support of the elementary and secondary schools. Change of numbers of nuclear-related subjects of seven universities, change of number of new graduates in nuclear field of various companies from 1985 to 2006, number of people employed by nuclear industries from 1998 to 2007, number of technical experts in the electric companies and the mining and manufacturing industries and forecast of number of technical experts in total nuclear industries are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  10. A Prototyping Environment for Research on Human-Machine Interfaces in Process Control: Use of Microsoft WPF for Microworld and Distributed Control System Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Thomas A. Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    Operators of critical processes, such as nuclear power production, must contend with highly complex systems, procedures, and regulations. Developing human-machine interfaces (HMIs) that better support operators is a high priority for ensuring the safe and reliable operation of critical processes. Human factors engineering (HFE) provides a rich and mature set of tools for evaluating the performance of HMIs, but the set of tools for developing and designing HMIs is still in its infancy. Here we propose that Microsoft Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is well suited for many roles in the research and development of HMIs for process control.

  11. Human capabilities in space. [man machine interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Man's ability to live and perform useful work in space was demonstrated throughout the history of manned space flight. Current planning envisions a multi-functional space station. Man's unique abilities to respond to the unforeseen and to operate at a level of complexity exceeding any reasonable amount of previous planning distinguish him from present day machines. His limitations, however, include his inherent inability to survive without protection, his limited strength, and his propensity to make mistakes when performing repetitive and monotonous tasks. By contrast, an automated system does routine and delicate tasks, exerts force smoothly and precisely, stores, and recalls large amounts of data, and performs deductive reasoning while maintaining a relative insensitivity to the environment. The establishment of a permanent presence of man in space demands that man and machines be appropriately combined in spaceborne systems. To achieve this optimal combination, research is needed in such diverse fields as artificial intelligence, robotics, behavioral psychology, economics, and human factors engineering.

  12. Nuclear power in human medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The public widely associate nuclear power with the megawatt dimensions of nuclear power plants in which nuclear power is released and used for electricity production. While this use of nuclear power for electricity generation is rejected by part of the population adopting the polemic attitude of ''opting out of nuclear,'' the application of nuclear power in medicine is generally accepted. The appreciative, positive term used in this case is nuclear medicine. Both areas, nuclear medicine and environmentally friendly nuclear electricity production, can be traced back to one common origin, i.e. the ''Atoms for Peace'' speech by U.S. President Eisenhower to the U.N. Plenary Assembly on December 8, 1953. The methods of examination and treatment in nuclear medicine are illustrated in a few examples from the perspective of a nuclear engineer. Nuclear medicine is a medical discipline dealing with the use of radionuclides in humans for medical purposes. This is based on 2 principles, namely that the human organism is unable to distinguish among different isotopes in metabolic processes, and the radioactive substances are employed in amounts so small that metabolic processes will not be influenced. As in classical medicine, the application of these principles serves two complementary purposes: diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  13. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2013 - March 31, 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-07-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the FY2013. In FY2013, we flexibly designed special training courses corresponding with the outside training needs, while organizing the annually scheduled regular training programs. We also actively addressed the challenging issues on human resource development, such as to enhance the collaboration with academia and to organize international training for Asian countries. The number of trainees who participated in the domestic regular training courses in 2013 was more than 300 persons. Besides these regular courses, we also organized the special training courses based on the outside needs, e.g. the training courses on radiation survey and decontamination work in Fukushima prefecture for the subcontracting companies of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) working to respond to the TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities. In respect of the cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, we accepted nuclear major students and cooperatively conducted lectures and practical exercises for one year. In terms of the collaboration network with universities, the joint course was successfully held with six universities through utilizing the remote education system. Furthermore, the intensive course at Okayama University, University of Fukui, and practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA were also conducted. In respect of International training, we continuously implemented the Instructor Training Program (ITP) by receiving the annual sponsorship from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. In fiscal year 2013, eight countries (i.e. Bangladesh, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam) joined this Instructor training courses. Furthermore, we organized nuclear

  14. TORUS: Theory of Reactions for Unstable iSotopes.Topical Collaboration for Nuclear Theory Project. Period: June 1, 2010 - May 31, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbanas, Goran [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Elster, Charlotte [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Escher, Jutta [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nunes, Filomena [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thompson, Ian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    The work of this collaboration during its existence is summarized. The mission of the TORUS Topical Collaboration was to develop new methods that advance nuclear reaction theory for unstable isotopes by using three-body techniques to improve direct reaction calculations. This multi-institution collaborative effort was and remains directly relevant to three areas of interest: the properties of nuclei far from stability, microscopic studies of nuclear input parameters for astrophysics, and microscopic nuclear reaction theory. The TORUS project focused on understanding the details of (d,p) reactions for neutron transfer to heavier nuclei. The bulk of the work fell into three areas: coupled channel theory, modeling (d,p) reactions with a Faddeev-AGS approach, and capture reactions.

  15. The human factors issue in the next generation nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noviello, L.; Bolognini, G.; Nobile, M.

    1992-01-01

    The national Energy Plan approved by the Italian Government in 1988, soon after the public referendum on nuclear issues held in the wake of the Chernobyl accident, requested the start of a research program to study next generation nuclear plants. These new reactors should feature some important and innovative characteristics to have a chance to be considered for future constructions, should the politicians decide the conditions for such a step are again re-established in Italy. The most important of these characteristics is certainly the fact that no evaluation nor land set a-side shall be required even in case of the most severe conceivable accident. This challenging objective should be reached through: a) the simplification of the nuclear plant as a whole b) the extensive use of passive components and/or inherent safety features in the design of the engineering safeguard systems c) a containment designed to cope with any conceivable accident sequence without releasing any major quantity of radioactive products into the environment. d) the upgrading of the man-machine interface and the introduction of computerized aids both for operational and maintenance activities. This paper deals in particular with the improvements, described in point d), that aim at greatly reducing the probability of human errors, widely recognized as one of the most important aspects to be pursued to increase nuclear plant safety. (author)

  16. New man-machine interfaces in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Taking into account the acknowledgment that human factors significantly contribute to abnormal events during nuclear power plants operation, this report presents new trends in control rooms human factors engineering. International experience is given in finding a proper balance between data richness and keeping an uppermost vigilance. Alarm computerization and expert systems are speeding, but no certification procedure is able to evaluate their reliability. (D.L.). 13 refs., figs., tabs

  17. A Collaborative Approach to Identifying Social Media Markers of Schizophrenia by Employing Machine Learning and Clinical Appraisals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Michael L; Ernala, Sindhu Kiranmai; Rizvi, Asra F; De Choudhury, Munmun; Kane, John M

    2017-08-14

    Linguistic analysis of publicly available Twitter feeds have achieved success in differentiating individuals who self-disclose online as having schizophrenia from healthy controls. To date, limited efforts have included expert input to evaluate the authenticity of diagnostic self-disclosures. This study aims to move from noisy self-reports of schizophrenia on social media to more accurate identification of diagnoses by exploring a human-machine partnered approach, wherein computational linguistic analysis of shared content is combined with clinical appraisals. Twitter timeline data, extracted from 671 users with self-disclosed diagnoses of schizophrenia, was appraised for authenticity by expert clinicians. Data from disclosures deemed true were used to build a classifier aiming to distinguish users with schizophrenia from healthy controls. Results from the classifier were compared to expert appraisals on new, unseen Twitter users. Significant linguistic differences were identified in the schizophrenia group including greater use of interpersonal pronouns (P<.001), decreased emphasis on friendship (P<.001), and greater emphasis on biological processes (P<.001). The resulting classifier distinguished users with disclosures of schizophrenia deemed genuine from control users with a mean accuracy of 88% using linguistic data alone. Compared to clinicians on new, unseen users, the classifier's precision, recall, and accuracy measures were 0.27, 0.77, and 0.59, respectively. These data reinforce the need for ongoing collaborations integrating expertise from multiple fields to strengthen our ability to accurately identify and effectively engage individuals with mental illness online. These collaborations are crucial to overcome some of mental illnesses' biggest challenges by using digital technology. ©Michael L Birnbaum, Sindhu Kiranmai Ernala, Asra F Rizvi, Munmun De Choudhury, John M Kane. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http

  18. Development of remote control decontamination machines for BWR nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, Minoru; Nozawa, Katsuro; Yamada, Masuji; Mizutani, Takeshi; Onozuka, Kazuaki

    1981-01-01

    The dose rate of radiation on the surfaces of equipments and in rooms tends to increase as radioactive substances accumulate with the continuous operation of nuclear power stations. The decontamination works to remove radioactive substances are carried out to prevent the exposure of workers in the case of inspection and repair. In order to reduce the exposure of decontamination workers, to save labor and to shorten decontamination time, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., has developed the decontamination machines for the walls of reactor wells, the walls and bottoms of equipment pits, the internal surfaces of suppression chambers, and the internal surfaces of tanks. The decontamination machines have several remote-handling functions: (a) brushing up with sprinkling against complicate surface such as a wall with step, (b) vertical transfer of brushing position with sucking force, (c) sucking out slurries under the water of storage pool or inside the pressure-supression pool, (d) horizontal transfer of suction position with electric motors. (J.P.N.)

  19. Development of a machine treating removed shells and others in thermal and nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daiho, Koichi; Iwao, Takenobu

    1981-01-01

    The living things removed form the cooling water systems in thermal and nuclear power stations, such as shells and jelly fish, have been disposed by burying in the premises, but it is the actual situation that the occurrence of bad smell and the securing of land for burying are the worries. Accordingly, a machine for deodorizing the removed living things was manufactured for trial, and the treatment experiment was carried out in Chita Power Station. This treating machine dries the removed living things around 200 deg C, and makes the deodorizing treatment. The treated products can be utilized effectively as fertilizer, and the prospect to put this machine in practical use as a waste treatment machine of resource re-utilization type was obtained. General Technical Research Institute, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., has developed a machine treating abandoned fish for making organic fertilizer, and its principle was applied to the development of this treating machine. The treating capacity of this machine is 1 t/day, and the power consumption is 9.3 kW. The waste oil from power stations of about 15 l/h is used as the fuel. A crusher, a constant feed screw conveyer and a rotary kiln for drying are used. In the treating experiment, about 30 t of shells and others were treated during 51 days. The results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive cha...

  1. Design of HumanMachine Interface and Altering of Pelvic Obliquity with RGR Trainer

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrusinski, Maciej; Unluhisarcikli, Ozer; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Cajigas, Iahn; Bonato, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer targets secondary gait deviations in stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. Using an impedance control strategy and a linear electromagnetic actuator, the device generates a force field to control pelvic obliquity through a Human-Machine Interface (i.e. a lower body exoskeleton). Herein we describe the design of the RGR Trainer Human-Machine Interface (HMI) and we demonstrate the system’s ability to alter the pattern of movement of the pelvis...

  2. Designing human-robot collaborations in industry 4.0: explorative case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadir, Bzhwen A; Broberg, Ole; Souza da Conceição, Carolina

    2018-01-01

    We are experiencing an increase in human-robot interactions and the use of collaborative robots (cobots) in industrial work systems. To make full use of cobots, it is essential to understand emerging challenges and opportunities. In this paper, we analyse three successful industrial case studies...... of cobots’ implementation. We highlight the top three challenges and opportunities, from the empirical evidence, relate them to current available literature on the topic, and use them to identify key design factor to consider when designing industrial work system with human-robot collaborations....

  3. [Re-signification of the human in the context of the "ciborgzation": a look at the human being-machine relationship in intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de O; Meyer, Dagmar Estermann

    2005-06-01

    This study discusses the human being-machine relationship in the process called "cyborgzation" of the nurse who works in intensive care, based on post-structuralist Cultural Studies and highlighting Haraway's concept of cyborg. In it, manuals used by nurses in Intensive Care Units have been examined as cultural texts. This cultural analysis tries to decode the various senses of "human" and "machine", with the aim of recognizing processes that turn nurses into cyborgs. The argument is that intensive care nurses fall into a process of "technology embodiment" that turns the body-professional into a hybrid that makes possible to disqualify, at the same time, notions such as machine and body "proper", since it is the hybridization between one and the other that counts there. Like cyborgs, intensive care nurses learn to "be with" the machine, and this connection limits the specificity of their actions. It is suggested that processes of "cyborgzation" such as this are useful for questioning - and to deal with in different ways - the senses of "human" and "humanity" that support a major part of knowledge/action in health.

  4. Human factors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes some of the human factors problems in nuclear power plants and the technology that can be employed to reduce those problems. Many of the changes to improve the human factors in existing plants are inexpensive, and the expected gain in human reliability is substantial. The human factors technology is well-established and there are practitioners in most countries that have nuclear power plants. (orig.) [de

  5. Man as a safety element in the operation of a nuclear power plant. IAEA international conference on man-machine interface in the nuclear industry - review paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegame, R.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power generation has been steadily developing worldwide and is now playing a very important part in total energy supply. In order to further promote nuclear power generation harmoniously, it is essential to secure the trust of the public by keeping safe and stable operation and to make constant efforts not to repeat such severe accidents as TMI and Chernobyl. These two accidents have caused us to recognize the substantial importance of the Man-Machine interface. With this as a background, the International Conference on the Man-Machine Interface in the Nuclear Industry was held in Tokyo for four days from February 15 th 1988, organized by IAEA and in cooperation with OECD/NEA as well as CEC. I would like to review this conference, for which I was the Vice Chairman of the Japanese Organizing Committee, and to explain my opinion about this issue

  6. Nuclear power newsletter Vol. 1, no. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-12-01

    The newsletter provides information on: Nuclear Power Plant Operating Performance and Life Cycle Management; Improving Human Performance, Quality and Technical Infrastructure Co-ordination of International Collaboration for the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technology; Technology Developments and Applications for Advanced Reactors

  7. Nuclear axis. Secret collaboration between West Germany and South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervenka, Z.; Rogers, B.

    1978-01-01

    Today there is virtually no doubt that the white racist minority government in Pretoria has-or shortly will have-its finger on the nuclear button, introducing a new and extremely volatile element into African politics and threatening the peace of the whole world. This book is the sinister story of how they are getting the bomb and who has helped them. Relying on hitherto top-secret government documents, informants, and the public record, Zdenek Cervenka of the Scandinavian Institute of Africa Affairs, and Barbara Rogers, formerly of the British Foreign Office and a consultant to the United Nations and the Congressional Subcommittee on Southern Africa, have pieced together the story of the clandestine collaboration between West Germany, and South Africa to develop operational nuclear weapons. The authors trace Germany's rise as a military nuclear power (only thirty years after unconditional surrender); the growth of its atomic cooperation with South Africa; the transfer of secret technological data; the way in which other countries-including the United States, Britain, France, Israel-have been involved. The authors show that the Germans, pledged never to develop nuclear weapons, have become a major nuclear power, and, together with the South African military-industrial complex, now have the power to alter the course of modern history in Europe, Africa, and the rest of the world. The authors conclude with a discussion of how the international system of nuclear safeguards failed and how the Western allies acquiesced in that failure

  8. 1981 NRC/BNL/IEEE standards workshop on human factors and nuclear safety. The man-machine interface and human reliability: an assessment and projection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, R.E.; Fragola, J.R.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.

    1981-09-01

    The role of the human in the safety of nuclear power plant operations was addressed in a meeting held in Myrtle Beach, SC in August 1981. Presentation were made on Control Room reviews, safety parameter display systems, the integration of human factors in the entire design process, and the use of automated control features. A need was shown for the development of a taxonomy or model to structure future data gathering and the need for models and data to address the issue of cognitive behavior. The primary effect of this behavior on risk was identified. Discussion sessions on the human impact on reliability, and control room design and evaluation were included

  9. The main activities and scientific collaboration possibilities at Ankara Nuclear research and training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucel, H.; Turhan, S.; Zararsiz, A.; Oksuz, B.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Founded in 1964, Ankara Nuclear Research and Training Center (ANRTC) conducts and facilitates the scientific activities including training (summer practice, MSc and Ph D studies in physics and chemistry, IAEA fellowship programs etc.), research and other studies in nuclear and related fields. As it's a part of main duties, ANRTC has analysis on the variety of samples, and radiation protection services commercially, for radiation workers in state, public and private sectors. Research, development and application projects implemented in this Center have mostly been supported by State Planning Organization (SPO) and Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA). In addition to the projects there are on going collaborative studies with some national Universities and International Atomic Energy Agency. The main activities carried out in ANRTC can be summarized as: studies on experimental nuclear physics, application of nuclear techniques such as XRF, XRD, Gamma, Alpha, etc. for environmental pollutants, archaeological and geological dating, elemental and crystal structural analyses, studies on the detection of irradiated foodstuff by ESR, development of accident dosimeters to be used in the case of a nuclear or radiological accident, and radiation matter interaction studies. In near future, for young scientists, there will be new collaboration possibilities related to accelerator-based applications, especially the new production methods of radioisotopes and their radiopharmaceuticals by using a cyclotron when our 30 MeV p / 15MeV d cyclotron facility project is underway

  10. 23 February 2010 - Polish Under Secretary of State, Ministry of Science and Higher Education, J. Szwed visiting CERN installations with sLHC Project Office T. Kurtyka and Machine Protection and Electrical Integrity Group Leader A. Siemko.

    CERN Multimedia

    Michel Blanc

    2010-01-01

    Tirage 1002023-01: In LHCb experimental area with Machine Protection and Electrical Integrity Group Leader A. Siemko; Mission Counselor M. Cichucka; Counselor to the Minister M. Klimkiewicz, Under Secretary of State J. Szwed; LHCb Collaboration, national group leader, Henryk Niewodniczanski Institut of Nuclear Physics G. Polok, Collaboration Spokesperson A. Golutvin and Delegate to CERN Council A. Zalewska. Tirage 28: Visiting the Computing Centre with IT Department Head F. Hemmer Tirage 49: In CMS Control centre, buiding 354 with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and CMS Collaboration, national group leader, University of Warsaw J. Krolikowski. Tirage 62: visiting ALICE exhibition area and counting room with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft. Tirage 82-99: Under Secretary of State address to the Polish Community Tirage 82: Machine Protection and Electrical Integrity Group Leader A. Siemko Tirage 83: Polish Delegate to CERN Council A. Zalewska. Tirage 85: Directorate Office E. Rondio Tirage 86: ATLA...

  11. Human-Robot Teaming: Communication, Coordination, and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terry

    2017-01-01

    In this talk, I will describe how NASA Ames has been studying how human-robot teams can increase the performance, reduce the cost, and increase the success of a variety of endeavors. The central premise of our work is that humans and robots should support one another in order to compensate for limitations of automation and manual control. This principle has broad applicability to a wide range of domains, environments, and situations. At the same time, however, effective human-robot teaming requires communication, coordination, and collaboration -- all of which present significant research challenges. I will discuss some of the ways that NASA Ames is addressing these challenges and present examples of our work involving planetary rovers, free-flying robots, and self-driving cars.

  12. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2011 - March 31, 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2011. In this fiscal year, we flexibly designed and conducted training courses corresponding with the needs from outside, while conducting the annually scheduled training programs, and also actively addressed the challenge of human resource development, such as to enhance the collaboration with academia and to organize international training for Asian countries. The number of trainees who completed the domestic training courses in 2011 was increased to 387, which is 14 percent more than the previous year. And also, in order to respond to the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO)'s Fukushima No.1 nuclear power plant accident, we also newly designed and organized the special training courses on radiation survey for the subcontracting companies working with TEPCO, and the training courses on decontamination work for the construction companies in Fukushima prefecture. The total number of attendees in these special courses was 3,800 persons. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities. In respect of the cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, we accepted 17 students and cooperatively conducted practical exercises for nuclear major. Furthermore, we also actively continued cooperation on practical exercises for students of universities which were signed in Nuclear HRD Program. In terms of the collaboration network with universities, the joint course was held with six universities through utilizing the remote education system. Furthermore, the intensive course at Okayama University and practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA were also conducted. In respect of International training, NuHRDeC continuously implemented the Instructor Training Program (ITP) by receiving the annual sponsorship from MEXT. In fiscal year 2011, seven countries (i.e. Bangladesh

  13. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2012 - March 31, 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-03-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year 2012. In this fiscal year, we flexibly designed training courses corresponding with the needs from outside, while organizing the annually scheduled training programs, and also actively addressed the challenging issues on human resource development, such as to enhance the collaboration with academia and to organize international training for Asian countries. The number of trainees who completed the domestic training courses in 2012 was increased to 525, which is 30 percent more than the previous year. And also, in order to respond to the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO)'s Fukushima No.1 nuclear power plant accident, we also organized the special training courses on radiation survey for the subcontracting companies working with TEPCO, and the training courses on decontamination work for the construction companies in Fukushima prefecture. The total number of attendees in these special courses was more than 4,000 persons. JAEA continued its cooperative activities with universities. In respect of the cooperation with graduate school of University of Tokyo, we accepted 14 students and cooperatively conducted practical exercises for nuclear major. Furthermore, we also actively continued cooperation on practical exercises for students of universities which were signed in Nuclear HRD Program. In terms of the collaboration network with universities, the joint course was held with six universities through utilizing the remote education system. Furthermore, the intensive course at Okayama University, Fukui University, and practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA were also conducted. In respect of International training, NuHRDeC continuously implemented the Instructor Training Program (ITP) by receiving the annual sponsorship from MEXT. In fiscal year 2012, eight countries (i

  14. UNEDF: Advanced Scientific Computing Collaboration Transforms the Low-Energy Nuclear Many-Body Problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, H; Stoitsov, M; Nazarewicz, W; Hagen, G; Kortelainen, M; Pei, J C; Bulgac, A; Maris, P; Vary, J P; Roche, K J; Schunck, N; Thompson, I; Wild, S M

    2012-01-01

    The demands of cutting-edge science are driving the need for larger and faster computing resources. With the rapidly growing scale of computing systems and the prospect of technologically disruptive architectures to meet these needs, scientists face the challenge of effectively using complex computational resources to advance scientific discovery. Multi-disciplinary collaborating networks of researchers with diverse scientific backgrounds are needed to address these complex challenges. The UNEDF SciDAC collaboration of nuclear theorists, applied mathematicians, and computer scientists is developing a comprehensive description of nuclei and their reactions that delivers maximum predictive power with quantified uncertainties. This paper describes UNEDF and identifies attributes that classify it as a successful computational collaboration. We illustrate significant milestones accomplished by UNEDF through integrative solutions using the most reliable theoretical approaches, most advanced algorithms, and leadership-class computational resources.

  15. Advice taking from humans and machines: an fMRI and effective connectivity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Goodyear

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With new technological advances, advice can come from different sources such as machines or humans, but how individuals respond to such advice and the neural correlates involved need to be better understood. We combined functional MRI and multivariate Granger causality analysis with an X-ray luggage-screening task to investigate the neural basis and corresponding effective connectivity involved with advice utilization from agents framed as experts. Participants were asked to accept or reject good or bad advice from a human or machine agent with low reliability (high false alarm rate. We showed that unreliable advice decreased performance overall and participants interacting with the human agent had a greater depreciation of advice utilization during bad advice compared to the machine agent. These differences in advice utilization can be perceivably due to reevaluation of expectations arising from association of dispositional credibility for each agent. We demonstrated that differences in advice utilization engaged brain regions that may be associated with evaluation of personal characteristics and traits (precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, temporoparietal junction and interoception (posterior insula. We found that the right posterior insula and left precuneus were the drivers of the advice utilization network that were reciprocally connected to each other and also projected to all other regions. Our behavioral and neuroimaging results have significant implications for society because of progressions in technology and increased interactions with machines.

  16. Cybernics fusion of human, machine and information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Cybernics plays a significant role in coping with an aging society using state-of-the-art technologies from engineering, clinical medicine and humanities. This new interdisciplinary field studies technologies that enhance, strengthen, and support physical and cognitive functions of human beings, based on the fusion of human, machine, and information systems. The design of a seamless interface for interaction between the interior and exterior of the human body is described in this book from diverse aspects such as the physical, neurophysiological, and cognitive levels. It is the first book to cover the many aspects of cybernics, allowing readers to understand the life support robotics technology for the elderly, including remote, in-home, hospital, institutional, community medical welfare, and vital-sensing systems. Serving as a valuable resource, this volume will interest not only graduate students, scientists, and engineers but also newcomers to the field of cybernics.

  17. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. {Omicron} Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress {Omicron} Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  18. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. Ο Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system Ο Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system Ο Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress Ο Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  19. A human-machine interface evaluation method: A difficulty evaluation method in information searching (DEMIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jun Su; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2009-01-01

    A human-machine interface (HMI) evaluation method, which is named 'difficulty evaluation method in information searching (DEMIS)', is proposed and demonstrated with an experimental study. The DEMIS is based on a human performance model and two measures of attentional-resource effectiveness in monitoring and detection tasks in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Operator competence and HMI design are modeled to be most significant factors to human performance. One of the two effectiveness measures is fixation-to-importance ratio (FIR) which represents attentional resource (eye fixations) spent on an information source compared to importance of the information source. The other measure is selective attention effectiveness (SAE) which incorporates FIRs for all information sources. The underlying principle of the measures is that the information source should be selectively attended to according to its informational importance. In this study, poor performance in information searching tasks is modeled to be coupled with difficulties caused by poor mental models of operators or/and poor HMI design. Human performance in information searching tasks is evaluated by analyzing the FIR and the SAE. Operator mental models are evaluated by a questionnaire-based method. Then difficulties caused by a poor HMI design are evaluated by a focused interview based on the FIR evaluation and then root causes leading to poor performance are identified in a systematic way.

  20. Numerical simulator of the CANDU fueling machine driving desk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doca, Cezar

    2008-01-01

    As a national and European premiere, in the 2003 - 2005 period, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti two CANDU fueling machine heads, no.4 and no.5, for the Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda - Unit 2 were successfully tested. To perform the tests of these machines, a special CANDU fueling machine testing rig was built and was (and is) available for this goal. The design of the CANDU fueling machine test rig from the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti is a replica of the similar equipment operating in CANDU 6 type nuclear power plants. High technical level of the CANDU fueling machine tests required the using of an efficient data acquisition and processing Computer Control System. The challenging goal was to build a computer system (hardware and software) designed and engineered to control the test and calibration process of these fuel handling machines. The design takes care both of the functionality required to correctly control the CANDU fueling machine and of the additional functionality required to assist the testing process. Both the fueling machine testing rig and staff had successfully assessed by the AECL representatives during two missions. At same the time, at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti was/is developed a numerical simulator for the CANDU fueling machine operators training. The paper presents the numerical simulator - a special PC program (software) which simulates the graphics and the functions and the operations at the main desk of the computer control system. The simulator permits 'to drive' a CANDU fueling machine in two manners: manual or automatic. The numerical simulator is dedicated to the training of operators who operate the CANDU fueling machine in a nuclear power plant with CANDU reactor. (author)

  1. All printed touchless human-machine interface based on only five functional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheipl, G.; Zirkl, M.; Sawatdee, A.; Helbig, U.; Krause, M.; Kraker, E.; Andersson Ersman, P.; Nilsson, D.; Platt, D.; Bodö, P.; Bauer, S.; Domann, G.; Mogessie, A.; Hartmann, Paul; Stadlober, B.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate the printing of a complex smart integrated system using only five functional inks: the fluoropolymer P(VDF:TrFE) (Poly(vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene) sensor ink, the conductive polymer PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4 ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonic acid) ink, a conductive carbon paste, a polymeric electrolyte and SU8 for separation. The result is a touchless human-machine interface, including piezo- and pyroelectric sensor pixels (sensitive to pressure changes and impinging infrared light), transistors for impedance matching and signal conditioning, and an electrochromic display. Applications may not only emerge in human-machine interfaces, but also in transient temperature or pressure sensing used in safety technology, in artificial skins and in disposable sensor labels.

  2. Comparing statistical and machine learning classifiers: alternatives for predictive modeling in human factors research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Brian; Meyer, Gérard; Kuntz, Lois-Ann

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate classification models play an increasingly important role in human factors research. In the past, these models have been based primarily on discriminant analysis and logistic regression. Models developed from machine learning research offer the human factors professional a viable alternative to these traditional statistical classification methods. To illustrate this point, two machine learning approaches--genetic programming and decision tree induction--were used to construct classification models designed to predict whether or not a student truck driver would pass his or her commercial driver license (CDL) examination. The models were developed and validated using the curriculum scores and CDL exam performances of 37 student truck drivers who had completed a 320-hr driver training course. Results indicated that the machine learning classification models were superior to discriminant analysis and logistic regression in terms of predictive accuracy. Actual or potential applications of this research include the creation of models that more accurately predict human performance outcomes.

  3. NASA Human Health and Performance Center: Open innovation successes and collaborative projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Elizabeth E.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2014-11-01

    In May 2007, what was then the Space Life Sciences Directorate published the 2007 Space Life Sciences Strategy for Human Space Exploration, setting the course for development and implementation of new business models and significant advances in external collaboration over the next five years. The strategy was updated on the basis of these accomplishments and reissued as the NASA Human Health and Performance Strategy in 2012, and continues to drive new approaches to innovation for the directorate. This short paper describes the successful execution of the strategy, driving organizational change through open innovation efforts and collaborative projects, including efforts of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC).

  4. Man/machine interface for a nuclear cask remote handling control station: system design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, M.M.; Kreifeldt, J.G.; Draper, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Design requirements are presented for a control station of a proposed semi-automated facility for remote handling of nuclear waste casks. Functional and operational man/machine interface: controls, displays, software format, station architecture, and work environment. In addition, some input is given to the design of remote sensing systems in the cask handling areas. 18 references, 9 figures, 12 tables

  5. Digitized operator evaluation system for main control room of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Yan Shengyuan; Chen Wenlong

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the human-machine system matching relation of main control room in nuclear power plant accurately and efficiently, the expression and parameters of operator human body model were analyzed, and the evaluation required function of digital operator was determined. Based on the secondary development technology, the digital operator evaluation body model was developed. It could choose generation, gender, operation posture, single/eyes horizon, and left/right hand up to the domain according to the needs of specific evaluation, it was used to evaluate whether display information can be visible and equipment can be touch, and it also has key evaluation functions such as workspace and character visibility at the same time. The examples show that this method can complete the evaluation work of human-machine matching relation for main control room of nuclear power plant accurately, efficiently and quickly, and achieve the most optimal human-machine coordination relationship. (authors)

  6. Techniques and applications for binaural sound manipulation in human-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R.; Wenzel, Elizabeth M.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of binaural sound to speech and auditory sound cues (auditory icons) is addressed from both an applications and technical standpoint. Techniques overviewed include processing by means of filtering with head-related transfer functions. Application to advanced cockpit human interface systems is discussed, although the techniques are extendable to any human-machine interface. Research issues pertaining to three-dimensional sound displays under investigation at the Aerospace Human Factors Division at NASA Ames Research Center are described.

  7. Nuclear innovation through collaboration. 35th Annual CNS conference and 39th CNS/CNA student conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) held its 35th Annual Conference in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada on May 31 to June 3, 2015, combined with the 39th Annual CNS/CNA Student Conference. With the theme of the conference, 'Nuclear Innovation through Collaboration', more than 425 delegates, exhibitors and students were in attendance. The conference commenced with two strong plenary sessions on Utility Collaborations to Improve Lifetime Performance; and, Performance Improvement Programs: Goals and Experience. The second day consisted of the panel discussions on International Developments in Used Nuclear Fuel Repository Programs, and two plenary sessions on: Enterprise Risk Management; and, Vendor Role in a Continuously Improving Industry. The third day contained a number of interesting features, including plenary sessions on Waste Management and Decommissioning; Developing Technologies and Resources, and a panel discussion on the Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel. All three days of the conference also contained parallel sessions with over 100 technical papers presented at the main and student sessions. The technical session titles were: Refurbishment and Life Extension; Thermalhydraulics; Nuclear Materials; WMD - Radiation Monitoring; Safety and Licensing; Communication; Safety and Licensing; Instrumentation and Control; Advanced Reactor Designs; WMD - Deep Geological Repository Packaging; Reactor Physics; Chemistry and Materials; Advanced Fuel Cycles; Waste Management and Decommissioning; and, Medical Physics and Radiation Biology.

  8. Evaluating Interdisciplinary Collaborative Learning and Assessment in the Creative Arts and Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Melissa; Rainbird, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article responds to the rising emphasis placed on interdisciplinary collaborative learning and its implications for assessment in higher education. It presents findings from a research project that examined the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary collaborative student symposium as an assessment task in an art school/humanities environment.…

  9. Basic research on human reliability in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Deng Zhiliang

    1996-10-01

    Human reliability in nuclear power plants is one of key factors in nuclear safety and economic operation. According to cognitive science, behaviour theory and ergonomic and on the bases of human cognitive behaviour characteristics, performance shaping factors, human error mechanisms and organization management, the project systematically studied the human reliability in nuclear power plant systems, established the basic theory and methods for analyzing human factor accidents and suggested feasible approaches and countermeasures for precaution against human factor accidents and improving human reliability. The achievement has been applied in operation departments, management departments and scientific research institutions of nuclear power, and has produced guiding significance and practical value to design, operation and management in nuclear power plants. (11 refs.)

  10. Nuclear power newsletter Vol. 2, no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This newsletter presents information on the following topics: 7th meeting of the INPRO Steering Committee; Nuclear Power Plant Operating Performance and Life Cycle Management; Improving Human Performance, Quality and Technical Infrastructure; Co-ordination of International Collaboration for the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technology; Technology Developments and Applications for Advanced Reactors; 1st European Nuclear Assembly

  11. Future for nuclear data research. Human resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    A comment is given on the problem of human resources to support the future nuclear data activity which will be indispensable for advanced utilization of nuclear energy and radiations. Emphasis is put in the importance of the functional organization among the nuclear data center (JAEA), industries and universities for provision of human resources. (author)

  12. Task 3: new man-machine interfaces in nuclear power plants. Part 1 executive summary and summary of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The present document summarises the reports provided by the member countries reflecting the actual status of consideration of Human Factors principles for the nuclear power plants. The adoption of Human Factor principles, in conjunction with the availability of advanced digital technology, has already led to the addition of computerised operator aids to almost all the operating plants in the member countries and to the study and the design of fully digitized control rooms for the future plants in some of them. As regards the licensing issue, many uncertainties still exist on the methodology and tools to be used and no internationally accepted standards have been established by now, especially for the software to be used in safety systems of nuclear power plants. The licensing of Man-Machine Interfaces (MMIs) is, in conclusion, at the very beginning of the process as in the past not enough attention has been given to human factor and software licensing aspects. In some countries the preparation of new ad hoc guidelines, or the updating of the existing one for digital equipment, are under way. Several examples of licensing of MMIs in countries where control room systems are safety classified, are described in the report highlighting the different approaches adopted. Important aspects of the design and implementation process of MMIs are the evaluation / validation phase, the provision of advanced alarm system supporting the operator in his supervisory tasks (and avoiding at the same time the problems related to information overload); the use of Artificial Intelligence under the form of Expert Systems is another opportunity that can be applied to several areas of plant supervision and control such as real time diagnostics, decision support, emergency response in order to enhance operator understanding of the plant status in whatever situation and therefore to help him in the operational decision-making process. The proper balance between automation and human actions is

  13. NASA-ONERA Collaboration on Human Factors in Aviation Accidents and Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ashok N.; Fabiani, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This is the first annual report jointly prepared by NASA and ONERA on the work performed under the agreement to collaborate on a study of the human factors entailed in aviation accidents and incidents, particularly focused on the consequences of decreases in human performance associated with fatigue. The objective of this agreement is to generate reliable, automated procedures that improve understanding of the levels and characteristics of flight-crew fatigue factors whose confluence will likely result in unacceptable crew performance. This study entails the analyses of numerical and textual data collected during operational flights. NASA and ONERA are collaborating on the development and assessment of automated capabilities for extracting operationally significant information from very large, diverse (textual and numerical) databases; much larger than can be handled practically by human experts.

  14. An investigative study towards constructing anthropocentric Man-Machine System design evaluation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, H.; Gofuku, A.; Itoh, T.; Sasaki, K.

    1992-01-01

    A methodological investigation has been conducted for evaluating the reliability of man-machine interaction in the total Man-Machine System (MMS) from the view-point of safety maintenance for emergent situations of nuclear power plant. Basic considerations in our study are: (i) what are the MMS design data to be evaluated, (ii) how are those MMS design data should be treated, and (iii) how the introduction effects of various operator support tools can be evaluated. The methods of both qualitative and quantitative MMS design evaluation are summarized in this paper, with the system architecture based on man-machine interaction simulation and the related cognitive human error factor analysis. (author)

  15. Intelligent Human Machine Interface Design for Advanced Product Life Cycle Management Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2010-01-01

    Designing and implementing an intelligent and user friendly human machine interface for any kind of software or hardware oriented application is always be a challenging task for the designers and developers because it is very difficult to understand the psychology of the user, nature of the work and best suit of the environment. This research paper is basically about to propose an intelligent, flexible and user friendly machine interface for Product Life Cycle Management products or PDM Syste...

  16. A review of warship man-machine-environment system engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yumei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Warship Man-Machine-Environment System Engineering (MMESE is an integral part of the overall design, and its design principles were proposed according to safety, efficiency, comfort and pleasure. The typical characteristics of MMESE are summarized. The operating environment is extremely terrible on long voyages. High level collaboration is required due to the complex task system and large manpower demand. Owing to the dense computer interface information, the mental cognitive burden on the crew is heavy. The MMESE technology system is divided into four parts:man-machine coordinated, man-environment coordinated, the evaluation of man-machine-environment characteristics and the ergonomic simulation. Based on the MMESE development venation in this paper, the overseas and domestic research statuses are expounded. Interactive optimization can be realized according to the following aspects:researching the basic human characteristics of the crew, applying this to the warship's overall design, and formulating relevant ergonomic standards and norms. Next, Human System Integration (HSI professional engineering was introduced comprehensively into the marines in order to achieve an optimal system. On this basis, we completed the future development trend analysis. All these studies and results have some reference meaning for guiding the integrated optimization of warships as a whole, downsizing the manpower and improving efficiency.

  17. Devising and Interdisciplinary Teaching: A Case Study in Collaboration between Theatre and Humanities Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Kristin; Brown, Rich

    2013-01-01

    We use an experimental course collaboration that occurred in the winter of 2012 as a case study for an approach to interdisciplinary collaboration between Theatre and Humanities courses, and we argue that the theatre methodology of "devising" can serve as a particularly rich locus for collaboration between Theatre students and other…

  18. Human factors in nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, A.D.

    1980-08-01

    This report describes some of the human factors problems in nuclear power plants and the technology that can be employed to reduce those problems. Many of the changes to improve the human factors in existing plants are inexpensive, and the expected gain in human reliability is substantial. The human factors technology is well-established and there are practitioners in most countries that have nuclear power plants

  19. The Concept of Human Error and the Design of Reliable Human-Machine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1995-01-01

    The concept of human error is unreliable as a basis for design of reliable human-machine systems. Humans are basically highly adaptive and 'errors' are closely related to the process of adaptation and learning. Therefore, reliability of system operation depends on an interface that is not designed...... so as to support a pre-conceived operating procedure, but, instead, makes visible the deep, functional structure of the system together with the boundaries of acceptable operation in away that allows operators to 'touch' the boundaries and to learn to cope with the effects of errors in a reversible...... way. The concepts behind such 'ecological' interfaces are discussed, an it is argued that a 'typology' of visualization concepts is a pressing research need....

  20. Human Resource Managements as a part of the Human Factors Management Program(HFMP) for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, DaeHo; Lee, YongHee; Lee, JungWoon; Kim, Younggab

    2007-01-01

    Programs for the effective implementation and management of human factor issues in nuclear power plants (NPPs) should contain technical criteria, an establishment of a job process, and activities for job improvements and be a system through which human factors can be managed in an integrated way. Human factors to be managed should include those related to an operation of plants as well as those related to a plant design as mentioned in NUREG-0800(2004), NUREG- 0711(2004), and NUREG-0700(2002). Human factor items to be managed for an operation of plants are listed in the PSR (Periodic Safety Review) items defined in the Enforcement of Regulation of the Atomic Energy Act. They are procedures, a work management system including a shift work management, a qualification management of plant personnel, training, a work amount assessment, a MMI (Man Machine Interface), and the use of experience. Among these factors, factors related to a human resource management include work management systems and the status of a work management including shift work, a qualification management ensuring qualified workers on duty at all times, and the systems for and the status of training and education. This paper addresses the scope of a human resource management, guidelines and procedures to be developed for a human resource management, and considerations critical in the development of guidelines and procedures

  1. Human factors analysis and design methods for nuclear waste retrieval systems. Volume II. A compendium of human factors design data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, S.M.

    1980-04-01

    This document is a compilation of human factors engineering design recommendations and data, selected and organized to assist in the design of a nuclear waste retrieval system. Design guidelines from a variety of sources have been evaluated, edited, and expanded for inclusion in this document, and, where appropriate, portions of text from selected sources have been included in their entirety. A number of human factors engineering guidelines for equipment designers have been written over the past three decades, each tailored to the needs of the specific system being designed. In the case of this particular document, a review of the preliminary human operator functions involved in each phase of the retrieval process was performed, resulting in the identification of areas of design emphasis upon which this document should be based. Documents containing information and design data on each of these areas were acquired, and data and design guidelines related to the previously identified areas of emphasis were extracted and reorganized. For each system function, actions were first assigned to operator and/or machine, and the operator functions were then described. Separate lists of operator functions were developed for each of the areas of retrieval activities - survey and mapping, remining, floor flange emplacement, plug and canister overcoring, plug and canister removal and transport, and CWSRS activity. These functions and the associated man-machine interface were grouped into categories based on task similarity, and the principal topics of human factors design emphasis were extracted. These topic areas are reflected in the contents of the 12 sections of this document

  2. Development of simulation-based evaluation system for iterative design of HMI to reduce human workload of operating crew in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo; Kameda, Akiyuki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Wu, Wei; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    2001-01-01

    Human workload is one of the key factors to reduce the human error during the operation in the commercialized nuclear power plants (NPP). In order to produce a high quality design of human machine interface (HMI), the evaluation and simulation method was developed to analyze operator's workload, where the model of operator crew was adopted on the basis of the model proposed by Reason. The workload such as length of the eye movement and moving length of the operators were visualized in the CRT image as well as the movie-file during the simulation. The developed computer code system was named simulation-based evaluation and analysis support system for man-machine interface design (SEAMAID), which was a simulation-based evaluation and analysis support system for man-machine interface design in the domain of NPP. The SEAMAID simulates the interaction between the operating crew and HMI, thus supports to evaluate the HMI by using the simulation results. The case study was conducted to evaluate the conventional central control room design. As a consequence, the authors were confirmed that SEAMAID was a useful tool to improve HMI design evaluating the workload data among several iterative design. (author)

  3. Nuclear safety and human competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Petre

    2001-01-01

    , organizational model, human - machine interface and from developing and utilization of practical skills. A model for analysis of operator activity is presented highlighting the items: - activation state; - observation state; - identification; - diagnosis; - evaluation and selection; - task defining; - procedure defining; - execution

  4. Report of the 17th international workshop on nuclear safety and simulation technology (IWNSST17)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    The 17th International Workshop on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology (IWNSST17) was held in January 21, 2014 at Kyoto University, in Kyoto, Japan. This one-day workshop was motivated to exploit advanced safety researches for nuclear power plant (NPP) , by a unique synergetic collaboration of basically two different disciplines: material science and systems sciences. There were ten invited presentations at the ISSNP2013, and the subject of the presentations ranges from (1) material corrosion issue of NPP components, (2) application of augmented reality technology for NPP decommission, (3) functional modeling method for plant control system, (4) intrinsic understanding of Fukushima Daiichi accident phenomena based on simple physical model, (5) system reliability evaluation method for PWR safety system, (6) automatic control system design for small modular reactor, and (7) validation of computerized human-machine interface and digital I and C for PWR plant. This article provides the overview of the IWNSST17 with giving condensed summaries of all invited presentations given by international experts. (author)

  5. Overview of space nuclear technologies and the American Nuclear Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleterry, R.C. Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) has seen an aspect of the universe where nuclear technology is the best energy source available for power, transportation, etc. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been exploiting this aspect of the universe by sending machines and humans into it and exploring, colonizing, industrializing, developing, inhabiting, etc. Space is the final frontier, and nuclear technology is the best suited for today's or the next century's space exploration and development. Many aspects of nuclear technology and its uses in space will be needed. ANS encompasses these and many more aspects of nuclear technology, and all have some role to play in the exploration and development of space. It should be ANS's intent to be an advisory body to NASA on the nuclear aspects of space exploration

  6. A collaboration on development of requirements and guidelines for proliferation resistance of future nuclear system in the IAEA INPRO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Keun Bae; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Hyun Jun; Jeong, Ik; Yang, Myung Seung; Ko, Won Il

    2003-10-01

    This study surveyed and analyzed the existing activities and international status concerning proliferation resistance of nuclear energy systems, reviewed the features of proliferation resistance, and derived the requirements of future innovative nuclear energy systems. In IAEA INPRO, guidance for the evaluation of innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles on proliferation resistance was finalized through collaboration of member countries including Korea in reviewing technological status and developing the methodology for evaluation of proliferation resistance. This report, first, describes the progress of INPRO and the participation status of Korea in the project, and briefly summarizes the report of phase IA of INPRO. Next, features of proliferation resistance of nuclear systems, collaboration in the GIF and the INPRO for development of requirements and guidelines for proliferation resistance, and the final result of guidance for the evaluation of proliferation resistance were described. Finally, this study proposed measures for participation of further progress of the INPRO

  7. Human factors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, J.; Bohr, E.

    1976-04-01

    This annotated bibliography is a first attempt to give a survey of the kind of literature which is relevant for the ergonomic working conditions in nuclear power plants. Such a survey seems to be useful in view of the fact that the 'factor human being' comes recently more and more to the fore in nuclear power plants. In this context, the necessity is often pointed out to systematically include our knowledge of the performance capacity and limits of human beings when designing the working conditions for the personnel of nuclear power plants. For this reason, the bibliography is so much intended for the ergonomics experts as for the experts of nuclear engineering. (orig./LN) [de

  8. Nuclear innovation through collaboration. 35th Annual CNS conference and 39th CNS/CNA student conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) held its 35th Annual Conference in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada on May 31 to June 3, 2015, combined with the 39th Annual CNS/CNA Student Conference. With the theme of the conference, 'Nuclear Innovation through Collaboration', more than 425 delegates, exhibitors and students were in attendance. The conference commenced with two strong plenary sessions on Utility Collaborations to Improve Lifetime Performance; and, Performance Improvement Programs: Goals and Experience. The second day consisted of the panel discussions on International Developments in Used Nuclear Fuel Repository Programs, and two plenary sessions on: Enterprise Risk Management; and, Vendor Role in a Continuously Improving Industry. The third day contained a number of interesting features, including plenary sessions on Waste Management and Decommissioning; Developing Technologies and Resources, and a panel discussion on the Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel. All three days of the conference also contained parallel sessions with over 100 technical papers presented at the main and student sessions. The technical session titles were: Refurbishment and Life Extension; Thermalhydraulics; Nuclear Materials; WMD - Radiation Monitoring; Safety and Licensing; Communication; Safety and Licensing; Instrumentation and Control; Advanced Reactor Designs; WMD - Deep Geological Repository Packaging; Reactor Physics; Chemistry and Materials; Advanced Fuel Cycles; Waste Management and Decommissioning; and, Medical Physics and Radiation Biology.

  9. Where humans meet machines innovative solutions for knotty natural-language problems

    CERN Document Server

    Markowitz, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Where Humans Meet Machines: Innovative Solutions for Knotty Natural-Language Problems brings humans and machines closer together by showing how linguistic complexities that confound the speech systems of today can be handled effectively by sophisticated natural-language technology. Some of the most vexing natural-language problems that are addressed in this book entail   recognizing and processing idiomatic expressions, understanding metaphors, matching an anaphor correctly with its antecedent, performing word-sense disambiguation, and handling out-of-vocabulary words and phrases. This fourteen-chapter anthology consists of contributions from industry scientists and from academicians working at major universities in North America and Europe. They include researchers who have played a central role in DARPA-funded programs and developers who craft real-world solutions for corporations. These contributing authors analyze the role of natural language technology in the global marketplace; they explore the need f...

  10. The nuclear envelopathies and human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The nuclear envelope (NE consists of two membrane layers that segregate the nuclear from the cytoplasmic contents. Recent progress in our understanding of nuclear-lamina associated diseases has revealed intriguing connections between the envelope components and nuclear processes. Here, we review the functions of the nuclear envelope in chromosome organization, gene expression, DNA repair and cell cycle progression, and correlate deficiencies in envelope function with human pathologies.

  11. Control System Design for Automatic Cavity Tuning Machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcagno, R.; Khabiboulline, T.; Kotelnikov, S.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Nogiec, J.; Ross, M.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab; Goessel, A.; Iversen, J.; Klinke, D.; /DESY

    2009-05-01

    A series of four automatic tuning machines for 9-cell TESLA-type cavities are being developed and fabricated in a collaborative effort among DESY, FNAL, and KEK. These machines are intended to support high-throughput cavity fabrication for construction of large SRF-based accelerator projects. Two of these machines will be delivered to cavity vendors for the tuning of XFEL cavities. The control system for these machines must support a high level of automation adequate for industrial use by non-experts operators. This paper describes the control system hardware and software design for these machines.

  12. Control System Design for Automatic Cavity Tuning Machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcagno, R.; Khabiboulline, T.; Kotelnikov, S.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Nogiec, J.; Ross, M.; Schappert, W.; Goessel, A.; Iversen, J.; Klinke, D.

    2009-01-01

    A series of four automatic tuning machines for 9-cell TESLA-type cavities are being developed and fabricated in a collaborative effort among DESY, FNAL, and KEK. These machines are intended to support high-throughput cavity fabrication for construction of large SRF-based accelerator projects. Two of these machines will be delivered to cavity vendors for the tuning of XFEL cavities. The control system for these machines must support a high level of automation adequate for industrial use by non-experts operators. This paper describes the control system hardware and software design for these machines.

  13. Investigation for calculation methods used in analyzing the physics characteristics of nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Tuan Khai; Hoang Van Khanh; Phan Quoc Vuong; Tran Viet Phu; Tran Vinh Thanh; Nguyen Thi Mai Huong; Nguyen Thi Dung; Le Tran Chung; Nguyen Minh Tuan; Tran Quoc Duong

    2014-01-01

    The project aims at nuclear human resource development and enhancement in research capability in reactor physics and kinetics at Nuclear Energy Center (Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology) and Nuclear Reactor Center (Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat). The main research items of the project can be summarized as follows: i) Considering possibility on using modern calculation techniques and methods in investigating neutronic characteristics and neutronics-thermal hydraulics coupling. This item is proposed to carry out based on international collaboration with Prof. Le Trong Thuy, San Jose University, US; ii) Carrying out the collaborative activities in research and training between Nuclear Energy Center (Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology) and Nuclear Reactor Center (Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat); iii) Opening two-week training course on nuclear reactor engineering (25 Nov - 12 Dec 2013) in collaboration with Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). (author)

  14. The 15-Country Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardis, E; Vrijheid, M; Blettner, M

    2007-01-01

    A 15-Country collaborative cohort study was conducted to provide direct estimates of cancer risk following protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. Analyses included 407,391 nuclear industry workers monitored individually for external radiation and 5.2 million person-years of follow-up. A sign...

  15. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  16. Scoping Study of Machine Learning Techniques for Visualization and Analysis of Multi-source Data in Nuclear Safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Yonggang

    2018-05-07

    In implementation of nuclear safeguards, many different techniques are being used to monitor operation of nuclear facilities and safeguard nuclear materials, ranging from radiation detectors, flow monitors, video surveillance, satellite imagers, digital seals to open source search and reports of onsite inspections/verifications. Each technique measures one or more unique properties related to nuclear materials or operation processes. Because these data sets have no or loose correlations, it could be beneficial to analyze the data sets together to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards processes. Advanced visualization techniques and machine-learning based multi-modality analysis could be effective tools in such integrated analysis. In this project, we will conduct a survey of existing visualization and analysis techniques for multi-source data and assess their potential values in nuclear safeguards.

  17. Mankind, machines and people

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugli, A

    1984-01-01

    The following questions are addressed: is there a difference between machines and men, between human communication and communication with machines. Will we ever reach the point when the dream of artificial intelligence becomes a reality. Will thinking machines be able to replace the human spirit in all its aspects. Social consequences and philosophical aspects are addressed. 8 references.

  18. [A new machinability test machine and the machinability of composite resins for core built-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, N

    2001-06-01

    A new machinability test machine especially for dental materials was contrived. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of grinding conditions on machinability of core built-up resins using this machine, and to confirm the relationship between machinability and other properties of composite resins. The experimental machinability test machine consisted of a dental air-turbine handpiece, a control weight unit, a driving unit of the stage fixing the test specimen, and so on. The machinability was evaluated as the change in volume after grinding using a diamond point. Five kinds of core built-up resins and human teeth were used in this study. The machinabilities of these composite resins increased with an increasing load during grinding, and decreased with repeated grinding. There was no obvious correlation between the machinability and Vickers' hardness; however, a negative correlation was observed between machinability and scratch width.

  19. Managing Human Performance to Improve Nuclear Facility Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. IAEA Nuclear Energy Series No. NG-G-2.1, Managing Human Resources in the Field of Nuclear Energy, was published in 2009. In that publication, four interrelated objectives of the management of human resources were identified and discussed: ensuring that nuclear industry personnel have the necessary competence for their jobs; effectively organizing work activities; anticipating human resource needs; and monitoring and continually improving performance. This publication addresses the fourth objective and, in particular, summarizes good practices in the area of managing human performance

  20. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design and prototyping of a machine for laser treatment of metallic vacuum chamber walls for electron cloud mitigation at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design and prototyping of a machine for laser treatment of metallic vacuum chamber walls for electron cloud mitigation at the High Luminosity LHC

  1. Nuclear safety culture and integrated risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joksimovich, V.; Orvis, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    A primary focus of nuclear safety is the prevention of large releases of radioactivity in the case of low-probability severe accidents. An analysis of the anatomy of nuclear (Chernobyl, Three Mile Island Unit 2) and nonnuclear (Challenger, Bhopal, Piper Alpha, etc.) severe accidents yields four broad categories of root causes: human (operating crew response), machine (design with its basic flaws), media (natural phenomena, operational considerations, political environment, commercial pressures, etc.)-providing triggering events, and management (basic organizational safety culture flaws). A strong management can minimize the contributions of humans, machines, and media to the risk arising from the operation of hazardous facilities. One way that management can have a powerful positive influence is through the establishment of a proper safety culture. The term safety culture is used as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Safety Advisory Group

  2. CMS Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faridah Mohammad Idris; Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan Abdullah; Zainol Abidin Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: CMS Collaboration is an international scientific collaboration located at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Switzerland, dedicated in carried out research on experimental particle physics. Consisting of 179 institutions from 41 countries from all around the word, CMS Collaboration host a general purpose detector for example the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) for members in CMS Collaboration to conduct experiment from the collision of two proton beams accelerated to a speed of 8 TeV in the LHC ring. In this paper, we described how the CMS detector is used by the scientist in CMS Collaboration to reconstruct the most basic building of matter. (author)

  3. Machine vision applications for physical security, quality assurance and personnel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, S.; Shrikhande, S.V.; Suresh Babu, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Machine vision is the technology used to provide imaging-based solutions to variety of applications, relevant to nuclear facilities and other industries. It uses computerized image analysis for automatic inspection, process control, object sorting, parts assembly, human identity authentication, and so on. In this article we discuss the in-house developed machine vision systems at EISD, BARC for three specific areas: Biometric recognition for physical security, visual inspection for QA of fuel pellets, and fast neutron personnel dosimetry. The advantages in using these systems include objective decision making, reduced man-rem, operational consistency, and capability of statistical quantitative analysis. (author)

  4. Routine human-competitive machine intelligence by means of genetic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koza, John R.; Streeter, Matthew J.; Keane, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Genetic programming is a systematic method for getting computers to automatically solve a problem. Genetic programming starts from a high-level statement of what needs to be done and automatically creates a computer program to solve the problem. The paper demonstrates that genetic programming (1) now routinely delivers high-return human-competitive machine intelligence; (2) is an automated invention machine; (3) can automatically create a general solution to a problem in the form of a parameterized topology; and (4) has delivered a progression of qualitatively more substantial results in synchrony with five approximately order-of-magnitude increases in the expenditure of computer time. Recent results involving the automatic synthesis of the topology and sizing of analog electrical circuits and controllers demonstrate these points.

  5. IAEA Nuclear Security Human Resource Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, A.

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA is at the forefront of international efforts to strengthen the world's nuclear security framework. The current Nuclear Security Plan for 2006-2009 was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors in September 2005. This Plan has three main points of focus: needs assessment, prevention, detection and response. Its overall objective is to achieve improved worldwide security of nuclear and other radioactive material in use, storage and transport, and of their associated facilities. This will be achieved, in particular, through the provision of guidelines and recommendations, human resource development, nuclear security advisory services and assistance for the implementation of the framework in States, upon request. The presentation provides an overview of the IAEA nuclear security human resource development program that is divided into two parts: training and education. Whereas the training program focuses on filling gaps between the actual performance of personnel working in the area of nuclear security and the required competencies and skills needed to meet the international requirements and recommendations described in UN and IAEA documents relating to nuclear security, the Educational Program in Nuclear Security aims at developing nuclear security experts and specialists, at fostering a nuclear security culture and at establishing in this way sustainable knowledge in this field within a State. The presentation also elaborates on the nuclear security computer based learning component and provides insights into the use of human resource development as a tool in achieving the IAEA's long term goal of improving sustainable nuclear security in States. (author)

  6. Training Humanities Doctoral Students in Collaborative and Digital Multimedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensslin, Astrid; Slocombe, Will

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on the pedagogic rationale, didactic design and implications of an AHRC-funded doctoral training scheme in collaborative and digital multimedia in the humanities. In the second part of this article we discuss three areas of provision that were identified as particularly significant and/or controversial. These include (1) desktop…

  7. A sample application of nuclear power human resources model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurgen, A.; Ergun, S.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important issues for a new comer country initializing the nuclear power plant projects is to have both quantitative and qualitative models for the human resources development. For the quantitative model of human resources development for Turkey, “Nuclear Power Human Resources (NPHR) Model” developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory was used to determine the number of people that will be required from different professional or occupational fields in the planning of human resources for Akkuyu, Sinop and the third nuclear power plant projects. The number of people required for different professions for the Nuclear Energy Project Implementation Department, the regulatory authority, project companies, construction, nuclear power plants and the academy were calculated. In this study, a sample application of the human resources model is presented. The results of the first tries to calculate the human resources needs of Turkey were obtained. Keywords: Human Resources Development, New Comer Country, NPHR Model

  8. Education and Training Networks as a Tool for Nuclear Security Human Resource Development and Capacity Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, D.

    2014-01-01

    Human Resource Development for Capacity Building for Nuclear Security: • Comprehensive Training Programme Objective: To raise awareness, to fill gaps between the actual performance of personnel and the required competencies and skills and, to build-up qualified instructors/trainers. • Promoting Nuclear Security Education Objective: To support the development of teaching material, faculty expertise and preparedness, and the promotion of nuclear security education in collaboration with the academic and scientific community. Ultimate Goal: To develop capabilities for supporting sustainable implementation of the international legal instruments and IAEA guidelines for nuclear security worldwide, and to foster nuclear security culture. Education priorities for the future: • Incorporate feedback from the first pilot program into future academic activities in nuclear security; • Based on feedback from pilot program: • Revise the NSS12 guidance document; • Update educational materials and textbooks. • Support INSEN members, which consider launching MSc programs at their institutions; • Continue promoting nuclear security education as part of existing degree programs (through certificate or concentration options); • Support the use of new forms of teaching and learning in nuclear security education: • Online e-learning degree programmes and modules; • Learning by experience; • Problem-oriented learning tailored to nuclear security functions

  9. Collaborative Video Search Combining Video Retrieval with Human-Based Visual Inspection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudelist, M.A.; Cobârzan, C.; Beecks, C.; van de Werken, Rob; Kletz, S.; Hürst, W.O.; Schoeffmann, K.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel video browsing approach that aims at optimally integrating traditional, machine-based retrieval methods with an interface design optimized for human browsing performance. Advanced video retrieval and filtering (e.g., via color and motion signatures, and visual concepts) on a

  10. A collaborative brain-computer interface for improving human performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Wang

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG based brain-computer interfaces (BCI have been studied since the 1970s. Currently, the main focus of BCI research lies on the clinical use, which aims to provide a new communication channel to patients with motor disabilities to improve their quality of life. However, the BCI technology can also be used to improve human performance for normal healthy users. Although this application has been proposed for a long time, little progress has been made in real-world practices due to technical limits of EEG. To overcome the bottleneck of low single-user BCI performance, this study proposes a collaborative paradigm to improve overall BCI performance by integrating information from multiple users. To test the feasibility of a collaborative BCI, this study quantitatively compares the classification accuracies of collaborative and single-user BCI applied to the EEG data collected from 20 subjects in a movement-planning experiment. This study also explores three different methods for fusing and analyzing EEG data from multiple subjects: (1 Event-related potentials (ERP averaging, (2 Feature concatenating, and (3 Voting. In a demonstration system using the Voting method, the classification accuracy of predicting movement directions (reaching left vs. reaching right was enhanced substantially from 66% to 80%, 88%, 93%, and 95% as the numbers of subjects increased from 1 to 5, 10, 15, and 20, respectively. Furthermore, the decision of reaching direction could be made around 100-250 ms earlier than the subject's actual motor response by decoding the ERP activities arising mainly from the posterior parietal cortex (PPC, which are related to the processing of visuomotor transmission. Taken together, these results suggest that a collaborative BCI can effectively fuse brain activities of a group of people to improve the overall performance of natural human behavior.

  11. ELFE: New machine proposed for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of non-perturbative QCD (the physics of quark and gluon interactions at large coupling) is one of the most challenging problems of modern physics. The two phenomena of quark confinement, which binds quarks permanently inside hadrons, and the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry, which gives us pion physics and more massive constituent quarks of low energy QCD, define the interface of nuclear and particle physics. The Electron Laboratory for Europe project - ELFE - is the European machine initiative proposed as the optimum experimental tool to study this ''Confinement Physics'', which is virgin territory for both particle and nuclear physicists. Until recently, lack of data in the confinement domain had led to slow theoretical progress in understanding the quark structure of nuclear and hadronic matter. This situation has improved considerably, with new discoveries in high energy deep inelastic scattering experiments together with important advances in large acceptance detector technology and continuous electron beams at low energies. At high energies, the CERN muon beam experiments in deep inelastic scattering (probing the remote interior of nucleons) opened an exciting new window on nucleon structure with the discovery of three unexpected effects: the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) nuclear and spin effects, and the observation of a surprisingly large difference between the the number of anti-up and anti-down quarks in nucleons. In 1983, the EMC nuclear effect showed that the quark structure of the free nucleon is modified in the nuclear environment. The EMC spin effect (or proton spin problem) is the discovery that it looks as though quark spin contributes only 22% of that of the nucleon (July 1994, page 19)

  12. Precision machining commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    To accelerate precision machining development so as to realize more of the potential savings within the next few years of known Department of Defense (DOD) part procurement, the Air Force Materials Laboratory (AFML) is sponsoring the Precision Machining Commercialization Project (PMC). PMC is part of the Tri-Service Precision Machine Tool Program of the DOD Manufacturing Technology Five-Year Plan. The technical resources supporting PMC are provided under sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of PMC is to minimize precision machining development time and cost risk for interested vendors. PMC will do this by making available the high precision machining technology as developed in two DOE contractor facilities, the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory of the University of California and the Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division, Y-12 Plant, at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  13. The mission execution crew assistant : Improving human-machine team resilience for long duration missions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerincx, M.A.; Lindenberg, J.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Bos, A.; Breebaart, L.; Grant, T.; Olmedo-Soler, A.; Brauer, U.; Wolff, M.

    2008-01-01

    Manned long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars set high operational, human factors and technical demands for a distributed support system, which enhances human-machine teams' capabilities to cope autonomously with unexpected, complex and potentially hazardous situations. Based on a situated

  14. Collaborative Robots and Knowledge Management - A Short Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mușat, Flaviu-Constantin; Mihu, Florin-Constantin

    2017-12-01

    Because the requirements of the customers are more and more high related to quality, quantity, delivery times at lowest costs possible, the industry had to come with automated solutions to improve these requirements. Starting from the automated lines developed by Ford and Toyota, we have now developed automated and self-sustained working lines, which is possible nowadays-using collaborative robots. By using the knowledge management system we can improve the development of the future of this kind of area of research. This paper shows the benefits and the smartness use of the robots that are performing the manipulation activities that increases the work place ergonomically and improve the interaction between human - machine in order to assist in parallel tasks and lowering the physically human efforts.

  15. ADVANCED MMIS TOWARD SUBSTANTIAL REDUCTION IN HUMAN ERRORS IN NPPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POONG HYUN SEONG

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to give an overview of the methods to inherently prevent human errors and to effectively mitigate the consequences of such errors by securing defense-in-depth during plant management through the advanced man-machine interface system (MMIS. It is needless to stress the significance of human error reduction during an accident in nuclear power plants (NPPs. Unexpected shutdowns caused by human errors not only threaten nuclear safety but also make public acceptance of nuclear power extremely lower. We have to recognize there must be the possibility of human errors occurring since humans are not essentially perfect particularly under stressful conditions. However, we have the opportunity to improve such a situation through advanced information and communication technologies on the basis of lessons learned from our experiences. As important lessons, authors explained key issues associated with automation, man-machine interface, operator support systems, and procedures. Upon this investigation, we outlined the concept and technical factors to develop advanced automation, operation and maintenance support systems, and computer-based procedures using wired/wireless technology. It should be noted that the ultimate responsibility of nuclear safety obviously belongs to humans not to machines. Therefore, safety culture including education and training, which is a kind of organizational factor, should be emphasized as well. In regard to safety culture for human error reduction, several issues that we are facing these days were described. We expect the ideas of the advanced MMIS proposed in this paper to lead in the future direction of related researches and finally supplement the safety of NPPs.

  16. Advanced MMIS Toward Substantial Reduction in Human Errors in NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Poong Hyun; Kang, Hyun Gook [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Na, Man Gyun [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyun [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yoensub [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    This paper aims to give an overview of the methods to inherently prevent human errors and to effectively mitigate the consequences of such errors by securing defense-in-depth during plant management through the advanced man-machine interface system (MMIS). It is needless to stress the significance of human error reduction during an accident in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Unexpected shutdowns caused by human errors not only threaten nuclear safety but also make public acceptance of nuclear power extremely lower. We have to recognize there must be the possibility of human errors occurring since humans are not essentially perfect particularly under stressful conditions. However, we have the opportunity to improve such a situation through advanced information and communication technologies on the basis of lessons learned from our experiences. As important lessons, authors explained key issues associated with automation, man-machine interface, operator support systems, and procedures. Upon this investigation, we outlined the concept and technical factors to develop advanced automation, operation and maintenance support systems, and computer-based procedures using wired/wireless technology. It should be noted that the ultimate responsibility of nuclear safety obviously belongs to humans not to machines. Therefore, safety culture including education and training, which is a kind of organizational factor, should be emphasized as well. In regard to safety culture for human error reduction, several issues that we are facing these days were described. We expect the ideas of the advanced MMIS proposed in this paper to lead in the future direction of related researches and finally supplement the safety of NPPs.

  17. Advanced MMIS Toward Substantial Reduction in Human Errors in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Poong Hyun; Kang, Hyun Gook; Na, Man Gyun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Heo, Gyunyoung; Jung, Yoensub

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to give an overview of the methods to inherently prevent human errors and to effectively mitigate the consequences of such errors by securing defense-in-depth during plant management through the advanced man-machine interface system (MMIS). It is needless to stress the significance of human error reduction during an accident in nuclear power plants (NPPs). Unexpected shutdowns caused by human errors not only threaten nuclear safety but also make public acceptance of nuclear power extremely lower. We have to recognize there must be the possibility of human errors occurring since humans are not essentially perfect particularly under stressful conditions. However, we have the opportunity to improve such a situation through advanced information and communication technologies on the basis of lessons learned from our experiences. As important lessons, authors explained key issues associated with automation, man-machine interface, operator support systems, and procedures. Upon this investigation, we outlined the concept and technical factors to develop advanced automation, operation and maintenance support systems, and computer-based procedures using wired/wireless technology. It should be noted that the ultimate responsibility of nuclear safety obviously belongs to humans not to machines. Therefore, safety culture including education and training, which is a kind of organizational factor, should be emphasized as well. In regard to safety culture for human error reduction, several issues that we are facing these days were described. We expect the ideas of the advanced MMIS proposed in this paper to lead in the future direction of related researches and finally supplement the safety of NPPs

  18. Integrating human and machine intelligence in galaxy morphology classification tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Melanie R.; Scarlata, Claudia; Fortson, Lucy F.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, B. D.; Galloway, Melanie A.; Willett, Kyle W.; Dickinson, Hugh; Masters, Karen L.; Marshall, Philip J.; Wright, Darryl

    2018-06-01

    Quantifying galaxy morphology is a challenging yet scientifically rewarding task. As the scale of data continues to increase with upcoming surveys, traditional classification methods will struggle to handle the load. We present a solution through an integration of visual and automated classifications, preserving the best features of both human and machine. We demonstrate the effectiveness of such a system through a re-analysis of visual galaxy morphology classifications collected during the Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2) project. We reprocess the top-level question of the GZ2 decision tree with a Bayesian classification aggregation algorithm dubbed SWAP, originally developed for the Space Warps gravitational lens project. Through a simple binary classification scheme, we increase the classification rate nearly 5-fold classifying 226 124 galaxies in 92 d of GZ2 project time while reproducing labels derived from GZ2 classification data with 95.7 per cent accuracy. We next combine this with a Random Forest machine learning algorithm that learns on a suite of non-parametric morphology indicators widely used for automated morphologies. We develop a decision engine that delegates tasks between human and machine and demonstrate that the combined system provides at least a factor of 8 increase in the classification rate, classifying 210 803 galaxies in just 32 d of GZ2 project time with 93.1 per cent accuracy. As the Random Forest algorithm requires a minimal amount of computational cost, this result has important implications for galaxy morphology identification tasks in the era of Euclid and other large-scale surveys.

  19. Digital-image processing improves man-machine communication at a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.A.; Harrington, T.P.; Toffer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The application of digital image processing to improve man-machine communication in a nuclear reactor control room is illustrated. At the Hanford N Reactor, operated by UNC Nuclear Industries for the United States Department of Energy, in Richland, Washington, digital image processing is applied to flow, temperature, and tube power data. Color displays are used to present the data in a clear and concise fashion. Specific examples are used to demonstrate the capabilities and benefits of digital image processing of reactor data. N Reactor flow and power maps for routine reactor operations and for perturbed reactor conditions are displayed. The advantages of difference mapping are demonstrated. Image processing techniques have also been applied to results of analytical reactor models; two examples are shown. The potential of combining experimental and analytical information with digital image processing to produce predictive and adaptive reactor core models is discussed. The applications demonstrate that digital image processing can provide new more effective ways for control room personnel to assess reactor status, to locate problems and explore corrective actions. 10 figures

  20. Human factors in nuclear safety oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.

    1989-01-01

    The mission of the nuclear safety oversight function at the Savannah River Plant is to enhance the process and nuclear safety of site facilities. One of the major goals surrounding this mission is the reduction of human error. It is for this reason that several human factors engineers are assigned to the Operations assessment Group of the Facility Safety Evaluation Section (FSES). The initial task of the human factors contingent was the design and implementation of a site wide root cause analysis program. The intent of this system is to determine the most prevalent sources of human error in facility operations and to assist in determining where the limited human factors resources should be focused. In this paper the strategy used to educate the organization about the field of human factors is described. Creating an awareness of the importance of human factors engineering in all facets of design, operation, and maintenance is considered to be an important step in reducing the rate of human error

  1. Development of AI (Artificial Intelligence)-based simulation system for man-machine system behavior in accidental situations of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Yokobayashi, Masao; Tanabe, Fumiya; Kawase, Katumi.

    1996-01-01

    A prototype version of a computer simulation system named JACOS (JAeri COgnitive Simulation system) has been developed at JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) to simulate the man-machine system behavior in which both the cognitive behavior of a human operator and the plant behavior affect each other. The objectives of this system development is to provide man-machine system analysts with detailed information on the cognitive process of an operator and the plant behavior affected by operator's actions in accidental situations of an NPP (nuclear power plant). The simulation system consists of an operator model and a plant model which are coupled dynamically. The operator model simulates an operator's cognitive behavior in accidental situations based on the decision ladder model of Rasmussen, and is implemented using the AI-techniques of the distributed cooperative inference method with the so-called blackboard architecture. Rule-based behavior is simulated using knowledge representation with If-Then type of rules. Knowledge-based behavior is simulated using knowledge representation with MFM (Multilevel Flow Modeling) and qualitative reasoning method. Cognitive characteristics of attentional narrowing, limitation of short-term memory, and knowledge recalling from long-term memory are also modeled. The plant model of a 3-loop PWR is also developed using a best estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis code RELAP5/MOD2. Some simulations of incidents were performed to verify the human model. It was found that AI-techniques used in the human model are suitable to simulate the operator's cognitive behavior in an NPP accident. The models of cognitive characteristics were investigated in the effects on simulated results of cognitive behaviors. (author)

  2. Differential Targeting of Hsp70 Heat Shock Proteins HSPA6 and HSPA1A with Components of a Protein Disaggregation/Refolding Machine in Differentiated Human Neuronal Cells following Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Brown

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (Hsps co-operate in multi-protein machines that counter protein misfolding and aggregation and involve DNAJ (Hsp40, HSPA (Hsp70, and HSPH (Hsp105α. The HSPA family is a multigene family composed of inducible and constitutively expressed members. Inducible HSPA6 (Hsp70B' is found in the human genome but not in the genomes of mouse and rat. To advance knowledge of this little studied HSPA member, the targeting of HSPA6 to stress-sensitive neuronal sites with components of a disaggregation/refolding machine was investigated following thermal stress. HSPA6 targeted the periphery of nuclear speckles (perispeckles that have been characterized as sites of transcription. However, HSPA6 did not co-localize at perispeckles with DNAJB1 (Hsp40-1 or HSPH1 (Hsp105α. At 3 h after heat shock, HSPA6 co-localized with these members of the disaggregation/refolding machine at the granular component (GC of the nucleolus. Inducible HSPA1A (Hsp70-1 and constitutively expressed HSPA8 (Hsc70 co-localized at nuclear speckles with components of the machine immediately after heat shock, and at the GC layer of the nucleolus at 1 h with DNAJA1 and BAG-1. These results suggest that HSPA6 exhibits targeting features that are not apparent for HSPA1A and HSPA8.

  3. On the applicability of brain reading for predictive human-machine interfaces in robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Elsa Andrea; Kim, Su Kyoung; Straube, Sirko; Seeland, Anett; Wöhrle, Hendrik; Krell, Mario Michael; Tabie, Marc; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The ability of today's robots to autonomously support humans in their daily activities is still limited. To improve this, predictive human-machine interfaces (HMIs) can be applied to better support future interaction between human and machine. To infer upcoming context-based behavior relevant brain states of the human have to be detected. This is achieved by brain reading (BR), a passive approach for single trial EEG analysis that makes use of supervised machine learning (ML) methods. In this work we propose that BR is able to detect concrete states of the interacting human. To support this, we show that BR detects patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG) that can be related to event-related activity in the EEG like the P300, which are indicators of concrete states or brain processes like target recognition processes. Further, we improve the robustness and applicability of BR in application-oriented scenarios by identifying and combining most relevant training data for single trial classification and by applying classifier transfer. We show that training and testing, i.e., application of the classifier, can be carried out on different classes, if the samples of both classes miss a relevant pattern. Classifier transfer is important for the usage of BR in application scenarios, where only small amounts of training examples are available. Finally, we demonstrate a dual BR application in an experimental setup that requires similar behavior as performed during the teleoperation of a robotic arm. Here, target recognition processes and movement preparation processes are detected simultaneously. In summary, our findings contribute to the development of robust and stable predictive HMIs that enable the simultaneous support of different interaction behaviors.

  4. On the applicability of brain reading for predictive human-machine interfaces in robotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Andrea Kirchner

    Full Text Available The ability of today's robots to autonomously support humans in their daily activities is still limited. To improve this, predictive human-machine interfaces (HMIs can be applied to better support future interaction between human and machine. To infer upcoming context-based behavior relevant brain states of the human have to be detected. This is achieved by brain reading (BR, a passive approach for single trial EEG analysis that makes use of supervised machine learning (ML methods. In this work we propose that BR is able to detect concrete states of the interacting human. To support this, we show that BR detects patterns in the electroencephalogram (EEG that can be related to event-related activity in the EEG like the P300, which are indicators of concrete states or brain processes like target recognition processes. Further, we improve the robustness and applicability of BR in application-oriented scenarios by identifying and combining most relevant training data for single trial classification and by applying classifier transfer. We show that training and testing, i.e., application of the classifier, can be carried out on different classes, if the samples of both classes miss a relevant pattern. Classifier transfer is important for the usage of BR in application scenarios, where only small amounts of training examples are available. Finally, we demonstrate a dual BR application in an experimental setup that requires similar behavior as performed during the teleoperation of a robotic arm. Here, target recognition processes and movement preparation processes are detected simultaneously. In summary, our findings contribute to the development of robust and stable predictive HMIs that enable the simultaneous support of different interaction behaviors.

  5. Disparities in collaborative patient-provider communication about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jennifer L; Gilkey, Melissa B; Rimer, Barbara K; Brewer, Noel T

    2016-06-02

    Healthcare providers may vary their communications with different patients, which could give rise to differences in vaccination coverage. We examined demographic disparities in parental report of collaborative provider communication and implications for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Participants were 4,124 parents who completed the National Immunization Survey-Teen about daughters ages 13-17. We analyzed disparities in collaborative communication (mutual information exchange, deliberation, and decision) and whether they mediated the relationship between demographic characteristics and HPV vaccine initiation. Half of parents (53%) in the survey reported collaborative communication. Poor, less educated, Spanish-speaking, Southern, and rural parents, and parents of non-privately insured and Hispanic adolescents, were least likely to report collaborative communication (all pcommunication accounted for geographic variation in HPV vaccination, specifically, the higher rates of uptake in the Northeast versus the South (mediation z=2.31, pcommunication showed widespread disparities, being least common among underserved groups. Collaborative communication helped account for differences-and lack of differences-in HPV vaccination among some subgroups of adolescent girls. Leveraging patient-provider communication, especially for underserved demographic groups, could improve HPV vaccination coverage.

  6. Classifying injury narratives of large administrative databases for surveillance-A practical approach combining machine learning ensembles and human review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marucci-Wellman, Helen R; Corns, Helen L; Lehto, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    Injury narratives are now available real time and include useful information for injury surveillance and prevention. However, manual classification of the cause or events leading to injury found in large batches of narratives, such as workers compensation claims databases, can be prohibitive. In this study we compare the utility of four machine learning algorithms (Naïve Bayes, Single word and Bi-gram models, Support Vector Machine and Logistic Regression) for classifying narratives into Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Injury and Illness event leading to injury classifications for a large workers compensation database. These algorithms are known to do well classifying narrative text and are fairly easy to implement with off-the-shelf software packages such as Python. We propose human-machine learning ensemble approaches which maximize the power and accuracy of the algorithms for machine-assigned codes and allow for strategic filtering of rare, emerging or ambiguous narratives for manual review. We compare human-machine approaches based on filtering on the prediction strength of the classifier vs. agreement between algorithms. Regularized Logistic Regression (LR) was the best performing algorithm alone. Using this algorithm and filtering out the bottom 30% of predictions for manual review resulted in high accuracy (overall sensitivity/positive predictive value of 0.89) of the final machine-human coded dataset. The best pairings of algorithms included Naïve Bayes with Support Vector Machine whereby the triple ensemble NB SW =NB BI-GRAM =SVM had very high performance (0.93 overall sensitivity/positive predictive value and high accuracy (i.e. high sensitivity and positive predictive values)) across both large and small categories leaving 41% of the narratives for manual review. Integrating LR into this ensemble mix improved performance only slightly. For large administrative datasets we propose incorporation of methods based on human-machine pairings such as

  7. Human factors in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pack, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has started research in human factors in nuclear power plants. One project, completed in March 1977, reviewed human factors problems in operating power plants and produced a report evaluating those problems. A second project developed computer programs for evaluating operator performance on training simulators. A third project is developing and evaluating control-room design approaches. A fourth project is reviewing human factors problems associated with power-plant maintainability and instrumentation and control technician activities. Human factors engineering is an interdisciplinary specialty concerned with influencing the design of equipment systems, facilities, and operational environments to promote safe, efficient, and reliable operator performance. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken four projects studying the application of human factors engineering principles to nuclear power plants. (author)

  8. Development of machine vision system for PHWR fuel pellet inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamalesh Kumar, B.; Reddy, K.S.; Lakshminarayana, A.; Sastry, V.S.; Ramana Rao, A.V. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh (India); Joshi, M.; Deshpande, P.; Navathe, C.P.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex, a constituent of Department of Atomic Energy; India is responsible for manufacturing nuclear fuel in India . Over a million Uranium-di-oxide pellets fabricated per annum need visual inspection . In order to overcome the limitations of human based visual inspection, NFC has undertaken the development of machine vision system. The development involved designing various subsystems viz. mechanical and control subsystem for handling and rotation of fuel pellets, lighting subsystem for illumination, image acquisition system, and image processing system and integration. This paper brings out details of various subsystems and results obtained from the trials conducted. (author)

  9. Investigation of human system interface design in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan; Zhang Yunbo; Wang Zhongqiu

    2012-01-01

    The paper introduces the importance of HFE in designing nuclear power plant, and introduces briefly the content and scope of HFE, discusses human system interface design of new built nuclear power plants. This paper also describes human system interface design of foreign nuclear power plant, and describes in detail human system interface design of domestic nuclear power plant. (authors)

  10. Analysed a defective of the machine for a cap-tube nuclear fuel element ME-27 from its electricity point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achmad Suntoro

    2009-01-01

    It has been analysed a defective of the machine for a cap-tube nuclear fuel element ME-27 from its electricity point of view. The machine uses magnetic force resistance welding technique. A short circuit was happened within the machine because the nut for tightening high voltage cable for welding transformer was broken so that the cable touched the machine body and produced the short circuit. This condition made both the primary circuit breaker in the building down and produced high voltage pulse induction to the electronic circuit within the machine so that one of its electronic components was defective. This case becomes warnings on how important of tightening a nut according to its strength specification (using wrench torque) and the necessity of voltage transient limitation circuit to be installed. Both of the warnings are necessary for any equipment consuming high electric current oriented such as the ME-27 machine. (author)

  11. Machine Ethics: Creating an Ethical Intelligent Agent

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Michael; Anderson, Susan Leigh

    2007-01-01

    The newly emerging field of machine ethics (Anderson and Anderson 2006) is concerned with adding an ethical dimension to machines. Unlike computer ethics -- which has traditionally focused on ethical issues surrounding humans' use of machines -- machine ethics is concerned with ensuring that the behavior of machines toward human users, and perhaps other machines as well, is ethically acceptable. In this article we discuss the importance of machine ethics, the need for machines that represent ...

  12. A study on the human factors of nuclear power plants man-machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Kook; Lee, Jeong Woon; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Suk; Park, Geun Ok

    1991-01-01

    Approaches of the MMIS design were analysed in this project. Both systems approach and experimental approach were studied. In addition, guidelines for the design of MMI are discussed. The methodology of experimental approach studied in this project can be useful for establishing experimental criteria on MMI design items. The framework of a computer code was developed by utilizing function-based task analysis and procedure information requirements. This can be further developed as a tool useful for the verification and validation of MMI designs. A test facility was designed in compliance with the purpose of experimental approach by considering specific conditions and factors inherent in nuclear power plants. Test facility can be used for conducting experiments which provide detailed human performance and characteristics data at the low level of systems approach. An experimental study was performed to obtain a range of illumination levels suitable for the operation in VDU-based control rooms. Existing design guidelines were tested by this experimental study. A conceptual design of MMIS was developed in accordance with the established MMIS design approach and was evaluated through the comparison to other advanced control room designs. (Author)

  13. Nuclear human resources management in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Videnovic, I.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Over the past fifty years Serbia passed a way from a founder of the International Atomic Energy Agency and a country with an extensive nuclear program which was supported by the knowledgeable and experienced expert human sources, to the period followed by political and economic difficulties and major changes. They, among the other factors, caused a considerable modification in the scope of the nuclear program and a range of its activities which were diminished. Inherited nuclear infrastructure, as a legacy of the past, comprises nowadays significant and complex issues to be solved in a serious and urgent manner in the forthcoming period, what requires a high level of knowledge and sufficient and adequate human sources. Brain drain, aging workforce, absence of a well established nuclear education system and strategy and a lack of younger experts to which the experience could be transferred are, gradually, but certainly, leading to a loss of knowledge and capabilities to handle and cope with the existing requests and the ones of the future overall development of nuclear energy and its application in the peaceful purposes. To overcome this situation, an active approach and serious consideration of all the relating elements with a goal to define future directions and prospective in the nuclear human resource management in Serbia are therefore a task to be undertaken by the state without a delay and a prerequisite for a future development. (author)

  14. A code for simulation of human failure events in nuclear power plants: SIMPROC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil, Jesus; Fernandez, Ivan; Murcia, Santiago; Gomez, Javier; Marrao, Hugo; Queral, Cesar; Exposito, Antonio; Rodriguez, Gabriel; Ibanez, Luisa; Hortal, Javier; Izquierdo, Jose M.; Sanchez, Miguel; Melendez, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Over the past years, many Nuclear Power Plant organizations have performed Probabilistic Safety Assessments to identify and understand key plant vulnerabilities. As part of enhancing the PSA quality, the Human Reliability Analysis is essential to make a realistic evaluation of safety and about the potential facility's weaknesses. Moreover, it has to be noted that HRA continues to be a large source of uncertainty in the PSAs. Within their current joint collaborative activities, Indizen, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid and Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear have developed the so-called SIMulator of PROCedures (SIMPROC), a tool aiming at simulate events related with human actions and able to interact with a plant simulation model. The tool helps the analyst to quantify the importance of human actions in the final plant state. Among others, the main goal of SIMPROC is to check the Emergency Operating Procedures being used by operating crew in order to lead the plant to a safe shutdown plant state. Currently SIMPROC is coupled with the SCAIS software package, but the tool is flexible enough to be linked to other plant simulation codes. SIMPROC-SCAIS applications are shown in the present article to illustrate the tool performance. The applications were developed in the framework of the Nuclear Energy Agency project on Safety Margin Assessment and Applications (SM2A). First an introductory example was performed to obtain the damage domain boundary of a selected sequence from a SBLOCA. Secondly, the damage domain area of a selected sequence from a loss of Component Cooling Water with a subsequent seal LOCA was calculated. SIMPROC simulates the corresponding human actions in both cases. The results achieved shown how the system can be adapted to a wide range of purposes such as Dynamic Event Tree delineation, Emergency Operating Procedures and damage domain search.

  15. Nuclear human resource projection up to 2030 in KOREA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Byung Joo; Lee, Man Ki; Nam, Kee Yung; Jeong, Ki Ho

    2011-01-01

    The prospects for growth of the nuclear power industry in Korea have improved remarkably as the demand for energy increases in stride with economic development. Meanwhile, as nuclear energy development is enhanced, nuclear technology has also improved evolutionarily and innovatively in the areas of reactor design and safety measures. As nuclear technology development in Korea advances, more human resources are required. Accordingly, the need for a well-managed program of human resource development (HRD) aimed at assuring needed capacities, skills, and knowledge and maintaining valuable human resources through education and training in various nuclear-related fields has been recognized. A well-defined and object-oriented human resource development and management (HRD and M) is to be developed in order to balance between the dynamics of supply and demand of the workforce in the nuclear industry. The HRD and M schemes include a broad base of disciplines, education, sciences, and technologies within a framework of national sustainable development goals, which are generally considered to include economics, environment, and social concerns. In this study, the projection methodology considering a variety of economic, social, and environmental factors was developed. Using the developed methodology, medium- and long-term nuclear human resources projections up to 2030 were conducted in compliance with the national nuclear technology development programmes and plans

  16. Human Machine Interfaces for Teleoperators and Virtual Environments Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    In a teleoperator system the human operator senses, moves within, and operates upon a remote or hazardous environment by means of a slave mechanism (a mechanism often referred to as a teleoperator). In a virtual environment system the interactive human machine interface is retained but the slave mechanism and its environment are replaced by a computer simulation. Video is replaced by computer graphics. The auditory and force sensations imparted to the human operator are similarly computer generated. In contrast to a teleoperator system, where the purpose is to extend the operator's sensorimotor system in a manner that facilitates exploration and manipulation of the physical environment, in a virtual environment system, the purpose is to train, inform, alter, or study the human operator to modify the state of the computer and the information environment. A major application in which the human operator is the target is that of flight simulation. Although flight simulators have been around for more than a decade, they had little impact outside aviation presumably because the application was so specialized and so expensive.

  17. The Countermeasures against the Human Errors in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Kwon, Ki Chun; Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Hyun; Jang, Tong Il

    2009-10-01

    Due to human error, the failure of nuclear power facilities essential for the prevention of accidents and related research in ergonomics and human factors, including the long term, comprehensive measures are considered technology is urgently required. Past nuclear facilities for the hardware in terms of continuing interest over subsequent definite improvement even have brought, now a nuclear facility to engage in people-related human factors for attention by nuclear facilities, ensuring the safety of its economic and industrial aspects. The point of the improvement is urgently required. The purpose of this research, including nuclear power plants in various nuclear facilities to minimize the possibility of human error by ensuring the safety for human engineering aspects will be implemented in the medium and long term preventive measures is to establish comprehensive

  18. The Countermeasures against the Human Errors in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Kwon, Ki Chun; Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Hyun; Jang, Tong Il

    2009-10-15

    Due to human error, the failure of nuclear power facilities essential for the prevention of accidents and related research in ergonomics and human factors, including the long term, comprehensive measures are considered technology is urgently required. Past nuclear facilities for the hardware in terms of continuing interest over subsequent definite improvement even have brought, now a nuclear facility to engage in people-related human factors for attention by nuclear facilities, ensuring the safety of its economic and industrial aspects. The point of the improvement is urgently required. The purpose of this research, including nuclear power plants in various nuclear facilities to minimize the possibility of human error by ensuring the safety for human engineering aspects will be implemented in the medium and long term preventive measures is to establish comprehensive.

  19. Flexible human machine interface for process diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reifman, J.; Graham, G.E.; Wei, T.Y.C.; Brown, K.R.; Chin, R.Y.

    1996-01-01

    A flexible human machine interface to design and display graphical and textual process diagnostic information is presented. The system operates on different computer hardware platforms, including PCs under MS Windows and UNIX Workstations under X-Windows, in a client-server architecture. The interface system is customized for specific process applications in a graphical user interface development environment by overlaying the image of the process piping and instrumentation diagram with display objects that are highlighted in color during diagnostic display. Customization of the system is presented for Commonwealth Edison's Braidwood PWR Chemical and Volume Control System with transients simulated by a full-scale operator-training simulator and diagnosed by a computer-based system

  20. Modeling human-machine interactions for operations room layouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Keith C.; Edwards, Jack L.; Beevis, David

    2000-11-01

    The LOCATE layout analysis tool was used to analyze three preliminary configurations for the Integrated Command Environment (ICE) of a future USN platform. LOCATE develops a cost function reflecting the quality of all human-human and human-machine communications within a workspace. This proof- of-concept study showed little difference between the efficacy of the preliminary designs selected for comparison. This was thought to be due to the limitations of the study, which included the assumption of similar size for each layout and a lack of accurate measurement data for various objects in the designs, due largely to their notional nature. Based on these results, the USN offered an opportunity to conduct a LOCATE analysis using more appropriate assumptions. A standard crew was assumed, and subject matter experts agreed on the communications patterns for the analysis. Eight layouts were evaluated with the concepts of coordination and command factored into the analysis. Clear differences between the layouts emerged. The most promising design was refined further by the USN, and a working mock-up built for human-in-the-loop evaluation. LOCATE was applied to this configuration for comparison with the earlier analyses.

  1. Nuclear data and human society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuketa, Toyojiro

    2002-01-01

    Necessity and significance of nuclear data activities are discussed with background of the world typical aspects at the end of the 20th century. We have to overcome the worldwide adverse wind to nuclear power production with a view to preserving global environment including natural resources and climate. The nuclear data activities should be promoted further to achieve more and more wide comprehension and integrity of evaluated nuclear databases. The comprehensive evaluated nuclear databases which link microscopic world to macroscopic world may be of use to link science and technology with perception of the public, and to link science and technology with the other fields of learning, hence of use to coordinate and integrate natural, human, and social sciences. (author)

  2. Design of Human-Machine Interface and altering of pelvic obliquity with RGR Trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrusinski, Maciej; Unluhisarcikli, Ozer; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Cajigas, Iahn; Bonato, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer targets secondary gait deviations in stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. Using an impedance control strategy and a linear electromagnetic actuator, the device generates a force field to control pelvic obliquity through a Human-Machine Interface (i.e. a lower body exoskeleton). Herein we describe the design of the RGR Trainer Human-Machine Interface (HMI) and we demonstrate the system's ability to alter the pattern of movement of the pelvis during gait in a healthy subject. Results are shown for experiments during which we induced hip-hiking - in healthy subjects. Our findings indicate that the RGR Trainer has the ability of affecting pelvic obliquity during gait. Furthermore, we provide preliminary evidence of short-term retention of the modified pelvic obliquity pattern induced by the RGR Trainer. © 2011 IEEE

  3. Enabling Collaborative Human-Machine (H-M) Decision Making in Time-critical Activities

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Self-adjusting autonomous systems (SAS) are spreading from well-defined control activities, such as manufacturing, to complex activities with multi-faceted human...

  4. Candida and Fusarium species known as opportunistic human pathogens from customer-accessible parts of residential washing machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babič, Monika Novak; Zalar, Polona; Ženko, Bernard; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Džeroski, Sašo; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2015-03-01

    Energy constraints have altered consumer practice regarding the use of household washing machines. Washing machines were developed that use lower washing temperatures, smaller amounts of water and biodegradable detergents. These conditions may favour the enrichment of opportunistic human pathogenic fungi. We focused on the isolation of fungi from two user-accessible parts of washing machines that often contain microbial biofilms: drawers for detergents and rubber door seals. Out of 70 residential washing machines sampled in Slovenia, 79% were positive for fungi. In total, 72 strains belonging to 12 genera and 26 species were isolated. Among these, members of the Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium solani species complexes, Candida parapsilosis and Exophiala phaeomuriformis represented 44% of fungi detected. These species are known as opportunistic human pathogens and can cause skin, nail or eye infections also in healthy humans. A machine learning analysis revealed that presence of detergents and softeners followed by washing temperature, represent most critical factors for fungal colonization. Three washing machines with persisting malodour that resulted in bad smelling laundry were analysed for the presence of fungi and bacteria. In these cases, fungi were isolated in low numbers (7.5 %), while bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Sphingomonas species prevailed. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inter-professional collaboration as a health human resources strategy: moving forward with a western provinces research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Grace; Suter, Esther; Deutschlander, Siegrid; Bainbridge, Lesley; Harrison, Liz; Grymonpre, Ruby; Hepp, Shelanne

    2012-01-01

    The current gap in research on inter-professional collaboration and health human resources outcomes is explored by the Western Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (WCIHC). In a recent research planning workshop with the four western provinces, 82 stakeholders from various sectors including health, provincial governments, research and education engaged with WCIHC to consider aligning their respective research agendas relevant to inter-professional collaboration and health human resources. Key research recommendations from a recent knowledge synthesis on inter-professional collaboration and health human resources as well as current provincial health priorities framed the discussions at the workshop. This knowledge exchange has helped to consolidate a shared current understanding of inter-professional education and practice and health workforce planning and management among the participating stakeholders. Ultimately, through a focused research program, a well-aligned approach between sectors to finding health human resources solutions will result in sustainable health systems reform. Copyright © 2013 Longwoods Publishing.

  6. Automatic welding machine for piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takaichi; Iizuka, Tomio; Ito, Yoshitoshi; Takami, Katsumi.

    1978-01-01

    A remotely controlled automatic special welding machine for piping was developed. This machine is utilized for long distance pipe lines, chemical plants, thermal power generating plants and nuclear power plants effectively from the viewpoint of good quality control, reduction of labor and good controllability. The function of this welding machine is to inspect the shape and dimensions of edge preparation before welding work by the sense of touch, to detect the temperature of melt pool, inspect the bead form by the sense of touch, and check the welding state by ITV during welding work, and to grind the bead surface and inspect the weld metal by ultrasonic test automatically after welding work. The construction of this welding system, the main specification of the apparatus, the welding procedure in detail, the electrical source of this welding machine, the cooling system, the structure and handling of guide ring, the central control system and the operating characteristics are explained. The working procedure and the effect by using this welding machine, and the application to nuclear power plants and the other industrial field are outlined. The HIDIC 08 is used as the controlling computer. This welding machine is useful for welding SUS piping as well as carbon steel piping. (Nakai, Y.)

  7. Evaluation and optimization of the man-machine interface in nuclear power plants using the HEROS procedure in PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richei, A.; Koch, M.K.; Unger, H.; Hauptmanns, U.

    1998-01-01

    For the probabilistic evaluation and optimization of the man-machine-system a new procedure is developed. This and the resulting expert system, which is based on the fuzzy set theory, is called HEROS, an acronym for Human Error Rate Assessment and Optimizing System. There are several existing procedures for the probabilistic evaluation of human errors, which have several disadvantages. However, in all of these procedures fuzzy verbal expressions are often used for the evaluation of human factors, also in the best known procedures. This use of verbal expressions for describing performance-shaping factors, enabling the evaluation of human factors is the basic approach for HEROS. A model of a modem man-machine-system is the basis of the procedure. Results from ergonomic studies are used to establish a rule-based expert system. HEROS simplifies the importance analysis for the evaluation of human factors, which is necessary for the optimization of the man-machine-system. It can be used in all areas of probabilistic safety assessment. The application of HEROS in the scope of accident management procedures and the comparison with the results of other procedures as an example for the usefulness and substantially more extensive applicability of this new procedure will be shown. (author)

  8. Design of an Adaptive Human-Machine System Based on Dynamical Pattern Recognition of Cognitive Task-Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Yin, Zhong; Wang, Rubin

    2017-01-01

    This paper developed a cognitive task-load (CTL) classification algorithm and allocation strategy to sustain the optimal operator CTL levels over time in safety-critical human-machine integrated systems. An adaptive human-machine system is designed based on a non-linear dynamic CTL classifier, which maps a set of electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) related features to a few CTL classes. The least-squares support vector machine (LSSVM) is used as dynamic pattern classifier. A series of electrophysiological and performance data acquisition experiments were performed on seven volunteer participants under a simulated process control task environment. The participant-specific dynamic LSSVM model is constructed to classify the instantaneous CTL into five classes at each time instant. The initial feature set, comprising 56 EEG and ECG related features, is reduced to a set of 12 salient features (including 11 EEG-related features) by using the locality preserving projection (LPP) technique. An overall correct classification rate of about 80% is achieved for the 5-class CTL classification problem. Then the predicted CTL is used to adaptively allocate the number of process control tasks between operator and computer-based controller. Simulation results showed that the overall performance of the human-machine system can be improved by using the adaptive automation strategy proposed.

  9. Human-Machine Systems concepts applied to Control Engineering Education

    OpenAIRE

    Marangé , Pascale; Gellot , François; Riera , Bernard

    2008-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we interest us to Human-Machine Systems (HMS) concepts applied to Education. It is shown how the HMS framework enables to propose original solution in matter of education in the field of control engineering. We focus on practical courses on control of manufacturing systems. The proposed solution is based on an original use of real and large-scale systems instead of simulation. The main idea is to enable the student, whatever his/her level to control the ...

  10. The socio-technical system and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Petre; Mihailescu, Nicolae; Dragusin, Octavian

    1999-01-01

    In the field of nuclear safety there have been defined notions like 'technical factors' and 'human factors'. The technical factors depend on designing and manufacturing of components/equipment, actually depend on the people's work. The study of human factors consists in analyzing and recommending the terms that allow an individual to be a reliable and safety agent. Accordingly, he/she is placed in working conditions corresponding to human abilities, associating the means of three levels: - designing, i.e. the action upon the technical system and upon work organization; - correction, i.e. the action upon the evolution of the technical system and organizing; - formation/training, i.e. action upon operators. The paper presents a characterization of the socio-technical system and on this basis discusses the issue of individual adjustment to the socio-technical system and reciprocally, the issue of the socio-technical system adjustment to the individual. Concepts as: ergonomics, physical medium, man/machine interface and support of the operator, man/machine task sharing, the work organizing are put in relation with the central subject, the nuclear safety

  11. Leveraging human oversight and intervention in large-scale parallel processing of open-source data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, Enrico; Suri, Niranjan; Bradshaw, Jeffrey M.

    2015-05-01

    The popularity of cloud computing along with the increased availability of cheap storage have led to the necessity of elaboration and transformation of large volumes of open-source data, all in parallel. One way to handle such extensive volumes of information properly is to take advantage of distributed computing frameworks like Map-Reduce. Unfortunately, an entirely automated approach that excludes human intervention is often unpredictable and error prone. Highly accurate data processing and decision-making can be achieved by supporting an automatic process through human collaboration, in a variety of environments such as warfare, cyber security and threat monitoring. Although this mutual participation seems easily exploitable, human-machine collaboration in the field of data analysis presents several challenges. First, due to the asynchronous nature of human intervention, it is necessary to verify that once a correction is made, all the necessary reprocessing is done in chain. Second, it is often needed to minimize the amount of reprocessing in order to optimize the usage of resources due to limited availability. In order to improve on these strict requirements, this paper introduces improvements to an innovative approach for human-machine collaboration in the processing of large amounts of open-source data in parallel.

  12. The human factor in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, Armand

    1998-01-01

    After having evoked the progressive reduction and stabilization of significant incidents occurring every year in French nuclear power plants, and the challenges faced by nuclear energy (loss of public confidence, loss of competitiveness), and then outlined the importance of safety to overcome these challenges, the author comments EDF's approach to the human factor. He first highlights the importance of information and communication towards the population. He briefly discusses the meaning of human factors for the nuclear industry, sometimes perceived as the contribution people to the company's safety and performance. He comments the evolution observed in the perception of human error in different industrial or technical environments and situations, and outlines what is at stake to reduce the production of faults and organize a 'hunt for latent defects'

  13. Simulation of Digital Control Computer of Nuclear Power Plant Based on Virtual Machine Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Xue Yan; Li, Shu; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Based on analyzing DCC (Digital Control Computer) instruction sets, memory map, display controllers and I/O system, virtual machine of DCC (abbr. VM DCC) has been developed. The executive and control programs, same as running on NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) unit's DCC, can run on the VM DCC smoothly and get same control results. Dual VM DCC system has been successfully applied in NPP FSS(Full Scope Simulator) training. It not only improves FSS's fidelity but also makes maintaining easier

  14. Research on operation and maintenance support system adaptive to human recognition and understanding in human-centered plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, Masayoshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Mitomo, N.

    2004-01-01

    As a human-centered plant, advanced nuclear power plant needs appropriate role sharing between human and mobile intelligent agents. Human-machine cooperation for plant operation and maintenance activities is also required with an advanced interface. Plant's maintenance is programmed using mobile robots working under the radiation environments instead of human beings. Operation and maintenance support system adaptive to human recognition and understanding should be developed to establish adequate human and machine interface so as to induce human capabilities to the full and enable human to take responsibility for plan's operation. Plant's operation and maintenance can be cooperative activities between human and intelligent automonous agents having surveillance and control functions. Infrastructure of multi-agent simulation system for the support system has been investigated and developed based on work plans derived from the scheduler. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Design on human supervisory control of safety management for advance NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugroho, D.H.; Soentono, S.; Taryo, T.; Wahyon, P.I.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Characteristics of an advance NPP related with economic and safety enhancement was represented on capabilities in intelligent control and diagnostic to provide nearly autonomous operation with anticipatory maintenance. An autonomous control system should enable automatic operation while adapting to component faults and system variable upsets. It needs therefore to have many intelligent capabilities, such as modeling, analysis, self-validation, diagnosis and decision. This paper describes a human supervisory control design for nuclear reactor fault management which collaborates between human and autonomous control. The beneficial of collaboration is provided based on belief of information value evaluated from Dempster's rule of evidence. The belief of the collaboration is better compared with single usage. The collaboration was conducted in which agent will autonomously and periodically be conducting surveillance by checking the component abnormalities in the plant if anomalies occur. The anomalies were determined using fault detection module. Thereby the system will be able to conduct preventive maintenance. In the situation of accident happened, hence the system will diagnose to determine the location of component failure autonomously. A human supervisor will then determine the action of decison making based on the prediction result. The decision making will be conducted based on the 4th Sheridan's autonomous level in which the autonomous control will execute the duty autonomously when the plant is in normal condition, or in the predictable accident range. But if the unpredictable accident occurs in the plant, the supervisor will then take over the role to control the plant, and the machine will do what commanded by the supervisor. Sistematically, the system explained before was represented by Traveling Salesman Problem-based surveillance, modified ART-2 artificial neural networks-based fault detection and Bayesian Networks-based fault

  16. Reactor refueling machine simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohosky, T.L.; Swidwa, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes in combination: a nuclear reactor; a refueling machine having a bridge, trolley and hoist each driven by a separate motor having feedback means for generating a feedback signal indicative of movement thereof. The motors are operable to position the refueling machine over the nuclear reactor for refueling the same. The refueling machine also has a removable control console including means for selectively generating separate motor signals for operating the bridge, trolley and hoist motors and for processing the feedback signals to generate an indication of the positions thereof, separate output leads connecting each of the motor signals to the respective refueling machine motor, and separate input leads for connecting each of the feedback means to the console; and a portable simulator unit comprising: a single simulator motor; a single simulator feedback signal generator connected to the simulator motor for generating a simulator feedback signal in response to operation of the simulator motor; means for selectively connecting the output leads of the console to the simulator unit in place of the refueling machine motors, and for connecting the console input leads to the simulator unit in place of the refueling machine motor feedback means; and means for driving the single simulator motor in response to any of the bridge, trolley or hoist motor signals generated by the console and means for applying the simulator feedback signal to the console input lead associated with the motor signal being generated by the control console

  17. Nuclear Human Resources Development Program using Educational Core Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yu Sun; Hong, Soon Kwan

    2015-01-01

    KHNP-CRI(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.-Central Research Institute) has redesigned the existing Core Simulator(CoSi) used as a sort of training tools for reactor engineers in operating nuclear power plant to support Nuclear Human Resources Development (NHRD) Program focusing on the nuclear department of Dalat university in Vietnam. This program has been supported by MOTIE in Korea and cooperated with KNA(Korea Nuclear Association for International Cooperation) and HYU(Hanyang University) for enhancing the nuclear human resources of potential country in consideration with Korean Nuclear Power Plant as a next candidate energy sources. KHNP-CRI has provided Edu-CoSi to Dalat University in Vietnam in order to support Nuclear Human Resources Development Program in Vietnam. Job Qualification Certificates Program in KHNP is utilized to design a training course for Vietnamese faculty and student of Dalat University. Successfully, knowhow on lecturing the ZPPT performance, training and maintaining Edu-CoSi hardware are transferred by several training courses which KHNP-CRI provides

  18. Nuclear Human Resources Development Program using Educational Core Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yu Sun; Hong, Soon Kwan [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KHNP-CRI(Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co.-Central Research Institute) has redesigned the existing Core Simulator(CoSi) used as a sort of training tools for reactor engineers in operating nuclear power plant to support Nuclear Human Resources Development (NHRD) Program focusing on the nuclear department of Dalat university in Vietnam. This program has been supported by MOTIE in Korea and cooperated with KNA(Korea Nuclear Association for International Cooperation) and HYU(Hanyang University) for enhancing the nuclear human resources of potential country in consideration with Korean Nuclear Power Plant as a next candidate energy sources. KHNP-CRI has provided Edu-CoSi to Dalat University in Vietnam in order to support Nuclear Human Resources Development Program in Vietnam. Job Qualification Certificates Program in KHNP is utilized to design a training course for Vietnamese faculty and student of Dalat University. Successfully, knowhow on lecturing the ZPPT performance, training and maintaining Edu-CoSi hardware are transferred by several training courses which KHNP-CRI provides.

  19. Collaboration in the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddow, Gaby; Xia, Jianhong; Willson, Michele

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the first large-scale quantitative investigation into collaboration, demonstrated in co-authorship, by Australian humanities, arts and social sciences (HASS) researchers. Web of Science data were extracted for Australian HASS publications, with a focus on the softer social sciences, over the period 2004-2013. The findings…

  20. Using Machine Learning for Risky Module Estimation of Safety-Critical Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Mi; Jeong, Choong Heui

    2009-01-01

    With the rapid development of digital computer and information processing technologies, nuclear I and C (Instrument and Control) system which needs safety critical function has adopted digital technologies. Software used in safety-critical system must have high dependability. Highly dependable software needs strict software testing and V and V activities. These days, regulatory demands for nuclear power plants are more and more increasing. But, human resources and time for regulation are limited. So, early software risky module prediction is very useful for software testing and regulation activities. Early estimation can be built from a collection of internal metrics during early development phase. Internal metrics are measures of a product derived from assessment of the product itself, and external metrics are measures of a product derived from assessment of the behavior of the systems. Internal metrics can be collected more easily and early than external metrics. In addition, internal metrics can be useful for estimating fault-prone software modules using machine learning. In this paper, we introduce current research status and techniques related to estimating risky software module using machine learning techniques. Section 2 describes the overview of the estimation model using machine learning and section 3 describes processes of the estimation model. Section 4 describes several estimation models using machine leanings. Section 5 concludes the paper

  1. Annual report of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center. April 1, 2015 - March 31, 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-07-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities of Nuclear Human Resource Development Center (NuHRDeC) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the fiscal year (FY) 2015. In FY 2015, we were actively engaged in organizing special training courses in response to external training needs, cooperating with universities, and offering international training courses for Asian countries in addition to the regular training programs at NuHRDeC. In accordance to the annual plan for national training, we conducted training courses for radioisotopes and radiation engineers, nuclear energy engineers, and national qualification examinations, as well as for officials in Nuclear Regulatory Authority and prefectural and municipal officials in Fukushima as outreach activities in order to meet the training needs from the external organizations. We continued to enhance cooperative activities with universities, such as the acceptance of postdoctoral researchers, the cooperation according to the cooperative graduate school system, including the acceptance of students from Nuclear Professional School of University of Tokyo. Furthermore, through utilizing the remote education system, the joint course was successfully held with seven universities, and the intensive summer course and the practical exercise at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories were also conducted as part of the collaboration network with universities. The Instructor Training Program (ITP) was continually offered to the ITP participating countries (Bangladesh, China, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Turkey and Viet Nam) in FY2015 under contact with Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. As part of the ITP, the Instructor Training Course and the Nuclear Technology Seminar were organized at NuHRDeC such as “Reactor Engineering Course” and “Basic Radiation Knowledge for School Education Seminar”. Eight and eleven countries

  2. Dr Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, State Secretary for Education and Research of the Swiss Confederation visit the ATLAS Cavern and the LHC Machine with with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Dr Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, State Secretary for Education and Research of the Swiss Confederation visit the ATLAS Cavern and the LHC Machine with with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

  3. Strengths of common resources for managing emergencies in the Spanish nuclear power plants (CAE y UME)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blas, J. de

    2014-01-01

    Following the accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi power plants, the electrical sector of nuclear generation recognised the need to reinforce the capacities that the nuclear power plants already had and which they were developing in order to satisfy the requisites of the stress tests, with the additional support of equipment and human resources common to all of them. Thus the idea arose to create a Spanish emergency Support centre. Its scope included an intervention unit, pumping equipment and electrical generation, a centralised warehouse and transfer logistics. UNESA-UME Collaboration Protocol With the collaboration of the CSN as a mediator, the UME reached an agreement with the nuclear electrical sector (UNESA) in order to be able to increase knowledge about the Spanish nuclear power plants and establish a means of collaboration to be able to act with their own human and equipment resources at a site that might suffer an accident such as the one at the Japanese plants of Fukushima-Daiichi. (Author)

  4. Collaborative Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Steve

    Collaborative Data Mining is a setting where the Data Mining effort is distributed to multiple collaborating agents - human or software. The objective of the collaborative Data Mining effort is to produce solutions to the tackled Data Mining problem which are considered better by some metric, with respect to those solutions that would have been achieved by individual, non-collaborating agents. The solutions require evaluation, comparison, and approaches for combination. Collaboration requires communication, and implies some form of community. The human form of collaboration is a social task. Organizing communities in an effective manner is non-trivial and often requires well defined roles and processes. Data Mining, too, benefits from a standard process. This chapter explores the standard Data Mining process CRISP-DM utilized in a collaborative setting.

  5. Measuring the differences between human-human and human-machine dialogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David GRIOL

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we assess the applicability of user simulation techniques to generate dialogs which are similar to real human-machine spoken interactions.To do so, we present the results of the comparison between three corpora acquired by means of different techniques. The first corpus was acquired with real users.A statistical user simulation technique has been applied to the same task to acquire the second corpus. In this technique, the next user answer is selected by means of a classification process that takes into account the previous dialog history, the lexical information in the clause, and the subtask of the dialog to which it contributes. Finally, a dialog simulation technique has been developed for the acquisition of the third corpus. This technique uses a random selection of the user and system turns, defining stop conditions for automatically deciding if the simulated dialog is successful or not. We use several evaluation measures proposed in previous research to compare between our three acquired corpora, and then discuss the similarities and differences with regard to these measures.

  6. Simulation of Digital Control Computer of Nuclear Power Plant Based on Virtual Machine Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Xue Yan; Li, Shu; Li, Qing [China Nuclear Power Operation Technology Co., Wuhan (China)

    2011-08-15

    Based on analyzing DCC (Digital Control Computer) instruction sets, memory map, display controllers and I/O system, virtual machine of DCC (abbr. VM DCC) has been developed. The executive and control programs, same as running on NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) unit's DCC, can run on the VM DCC smoothly and get same control results. Dual VM DCC system has been successfully applied in NPP FSS(Full Scope Simulator) training. It not only improves FSS's fidelity but also makes maintaining easier.

  7. Nuclear pore complex protein mediated nuclear localization of dicer protein in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinari Ando

    Full Text Available Human DICER1 protein cleaves double-stranded RNA into small sizes, a crucial step in production of single-stranded RNAs which are mediating factors of cytoplasmic RNA interference. Here, we clearly demonstrate that human DICER1 protein localizes not only to the cytoplasm but also to the nucleoplasm. We also find that human DICER1 protein associates with the NUP153 protein, one component of the nuclear pore complex. This association is detected predominantly in the cytoplasm but is also clearly distinguishable at the nuclear periphery. Additional characterization of the NUP153-DICER1 association suggests NUP153 plays a crucial role in the nuclear localization of the DICER1 protein.

  8. Human monitoring and decision-making in man/machine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, G.

    1979-01-01

    Monitoring and decision-making together are very well characterizing the role of the human operator in highly automated systems. In this report, the analysis of human monitoring and decision-making behavior as well as its modeling are described. The goal is to present a survey. 'Classic' and optimal control theoretic monitoring models are dealt with. The relationship between attention allocation and eye movements is discussed. As an example for applications, the evaluation of predictor displays by means of the optimal control model is explained. Fault detection in continuous signals and decision-making behavior of the human operator in fault diagnosis during different operation and maintenance situations are illustrated. The computer-aided decision-making is considered as a queueing problem. It is shown to what extent computer-aiding may be based on the state of human activity as measured by psychophysiological quantities. Finally, management information systems for different application areas are mentioned. As an appendix, the report includes an English-written paper in which the possibilities of mathematical modeling of human behavior in complex man-machine systems are critically assessed. (orig.) 891 GL/orig. 892 MKO [de

  9. Intelligent operation system for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Toshihiko; Fukumoto, Akira; Suto, Osamu; Naito, Norio.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power plants consist of many systems and are operated by skillful operators with plenty of knowledge and experience of nuclear plants. Recently, plant automation or computerized operator support systems have come to be utilized, but the synthetic judgment of plant operation and management remains as human roles. Toshiba is of the opinion that the activities (planning, operation and maintenance) should be integrated, and man-machine interface should be human-friendly. We have begun to develop the intelligent operation system aiming at reducing the operator's role within the fundamental judgment through the use of artificial intelligence. (author)

  10. AfterMath: the work of proof in the age of human-machine collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Stephanie

    2011-09-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, a team of Automated Theorem Proving researchers at the Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago developed the Automated Reasoning Assistant, or AURA, to assist human users in the search for mathematical proofs. The resulting hybrid humans+AURA system developed the capacity to make novel contributions to pure mathematics by very untraditional means. This essay traces how these unconventional contributions were made and made possible through negotiations between the humans and the AURA at Argonne and the transformation in mathematical intuition they produced. At play in these negotiations were experimental practices, nonhumans, and nonmathematical modes of knowing. This story invites an earnest engagement between historians of mathematics and scholars in the history of science and science studies interested in experimental practice, material culture, and the roles of nonhumans in knowledge making.

  11. Analysis and prevention of human failure in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xinshuan

    2001-01-01

    Based on the performances in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant and the common experience from the world nuclear industry, the features and usual kinds of human failures in nuclear power plants are highlighted and the prominent factors on the personal, external and decision problems which might cause the human failures are analyzed. Effective preventive measures have been proposed respectively. Some successful human-failure-prevention practices applied in the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant are illustrated specifically

  12. Software and man-machine interface considerations for a nuclear plant computer replacement and upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, G.; Robinson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the key software functions and Man-Machine Interface considerations in a computer replacement and upgrade project for a nuclear power plant are described. The project involves the installation of two separate computer systems: an Emergency Response Facilities Computer System (ERFCS) and a Plant Process Computer System (PPCS). These systems employ state-of-the-art computer hardware and software. The ERFCS is a new system intended to provide enhanced functions to meet NRC post-TMI guidelines. The PPCS is intended to replace and upgrade an existing obsolete plant computer system. A general overview of the hardware and software aspects of the replacement and upgrade is presented. The work done to develop the upgraded Man-Machine Interface is described. For the ERFCS, a detailed discussion is presented of the work done to develop logic to evaluate the readiness and performance of safety systems and their supporting functions. The Man-Machine Interface considerations of reporting readiness and performance to the operator are discussed. Finally, the considerations involved in the implementation of this logic in real-time software are discussed.. For the PPCS, a detailed discussion is presented of some new features

  13. The human factors specialist in nuclear control centre design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.B.; Beattie, J.D.

    The main focus at Ontario Hydro for man-machine interface design is in the design of control centres. Because the control of a nuclear generating unit is highly centralized there is an increasing need for effective information display and control layout. Control panel design innovations such as the use of CRT displays and the extended use of computerized control in the Darlington station have made it possible for Ontario Hydro to continue to have one first operator for each generating unit. The human factors specialist involved in control panel design must deal with people who know much more about the specific systems being controlled, and must become a generalist in all these systems as well. Designers have to use conceptual techniques such as task analysis, systems design, panel mock-ups, anthropometric data, and personal judgement based on experience as they design panels. They must find a balance between becoming locked into existing technology and methods, slavishly following the latest technological trends, and forgetting that real people will be using what they design

  14. Interactive machine learning for health informatics: when do we need the human-in-the-loop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Machine learning (ML) is the fastest growing field in computer science, and health informatics is among the greatest challenges. The goal of ML is to develop algorithms which can learn and improve over time and can be used for predictions. Most ML researchers concentrate on automatic machine learning (aML), where great advances have been made, for example, in speech recognition, recommender systems, or autonomous vehicles. Automatic approaches greatly benefit from big data with many training sets. However, in the health domain, sometimes we are confronted with a small number of data sets or rare events, where aML-approaches suffer of insufficient training samples. Here interactive machine learning (iML) may be of help, having its roots in reinforcement learning, preference learning, and active learning. The term iML is not yet well used, so we define it as "algorithms that can interact with agents and can optimize their learning behavior through these interactions, where the agents can also be human." This "human-in-the-loop" can be beneficial in solving computationally hard problems, e.g., subspace clustering, protein folding, or k-anonymization of health data, where human expertise can help to reduce an exponential search space through heuristic selection of samples. Therefore, what would otherwise be an NP-hard problem, reduces greatly in complexity through the input and the assistance of a human agent involved in the learning phase.

  15. Development of human resources for Indian nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, R.B.; Puri, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The continuing research and development on nuclear technology by research establishments in the country and maturing of Indian industry have brought the nuclear energy programme in India to a stage where it is poised to take a quantum leap forward. The vision of expansion of nuclear power also requires a well-structured specialized human resource development programme. This paper discusses the requirements of the human resource development programme for nuclear energy, the challenges in the way of its realization, its national and international status and traces the history of nuclear education in the country. It brings out the linkage of human resource development programme with the nuclear energy programme in the country. It also describes the initiatives by the university system in the area of nuclear education and support provided by the Department of Atomic Energy to the university system by way of extra-mural funding and by providing access to research facilities. (author)

  16. Humanity cannot survive a nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author documents the unprecedented disaster that a nuclear war would wreak. He and his colleagues conclude that a nuclear war may mean the end of the human species. The environment that will confront most human beings and other organisms after a thermonuclear holocaust will be so altered, and so malign, that extreme and widespread damage to living systems is inevitable. It is, for example, entirely possible that the biological impacts of a war, apart from those resulting directly from a blast, fire, and prompt radiation, could result in the end of civilization in the Northern Hemisphere. The author's primary task in this paper is to give some technical background to explain why numerous biologists, especially ecologists, are convinced that decision-makers in many nations vastly underrate the potential risks of nuclear war

  17. Analyzing the Effects of Human-Aware Motion Planning on Close-Proximity Human–Robot Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this work was to examine human response to motion-level robot adaptation to determine its effect on team fluency, human satisfaction, and perceived safety and comfort. Background: The evaluation of human response to adaptive robotic assistants has been limited, particularly in the realm of motion-level adaptation. The lack of true human-in-the-loop evaluation has made it impossible to determine whether such adaptation would lead to efficient and satisfying human–robot interaction. Method: We conducted an experiment in which participants worked with a robot to perform a collaborative task. Participants worked with an adaptive robot incorporating human-aware motion planning and with a baseline robot using shortest-path motions. Team fluency was evaluated through a set of quantitative metrics, and human satisfaction and perceived safety and comfort were evaluated through questionnaires. Results: When working with the adaptive robot, participants completed the task 5.57% faster, with 19.9% more concurrent motion, 2.96% less human idle time, 17.3% less robot idle time, and a 15.1% greater separation distance. Questionnaire responses indicated that participants felt safer and more comfortable when working with an adaptive robot and were more satisfied with it as a teammate than with the standard robot. Conclusion: People respond well to motion-level robot adaptation, and significant benefits can be achieved from its use in terms of both human–robot team fluency and human worker satisfaction. Application: Our conclusion supports the development of technologies that could be used to implement human-aware motion planning in collaborative robots and the use of this technique for close-proximity human–robot collaboration. PMID:25790568

  18. Stimulating collaboration between human and veterinary health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eussen, Björn G M; Schaveling, Jaap; Dragt, Maria J; Blomme, Robert Jan

    2017-06-13

    Despite the need to control outbreaks of (emerging) zoonotic diseases and the need for added value in comparative/translational medicine, jointly addressed in the One Health approach [One health Initiative (n.d.a). About the One Health Initiative. http://www.onehealthinitiative.com/about.php . Accessed 13 September 2016], collaboration between human and veterinary health care professionals is limited. This study focuses on the social dilemma experienced by health care professionals and ways in which an interdisciplinary approach could be developed. Based on Gaertner and Dovidio's Common Ingroup Identity Model, a number of questionnaires were designed and tested; with PROGRESS, the relation between collaboration and common goal was assessed, mediated by decategorization, recategorization, mutual differentiation and knowledge sharing. This study confirms the Common Ingroup Identity Model stating that common goals stimulate collaboration. Decategorization and mutual differentiation proved to be significant in this relationship; recategorization and knowledge sharing mediate this relation. It can be concluded that the Common Ingroup Identity Model theory helps us to understand how health care professionals perceive the One Health initiative and how they can intervene in this process. In the One Health approach, professional associations could adopt a facilitating role.

  19. Managing human resources in the field of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear field, comprising industry, government authorities, regulators, R and D organizations and educational institutions, relies heavily on a specialized, highly trained and motivated workforce for its sustainability. An ageing workforce, declining student enrolment and the resultant risk of losing accumulated nuclear knowledge and experience for expanding or newly established nuclear programmes are all serious challenges that influence the management of human resources (HR) in the nuclear field. The management of human resources requires particular attention in the field of nuclear energy, both because of the high standards of performance expected in this field and the considerable time needed to develop such specialists. The peaceful uses of nuclear energy were primarily developed during the second half of the twentieth century. The nuclear field is now at a mature stage of development, with those who were pioneers in the field having retired and their responsibilities handed over to subsequent generations. For those aspects of the nuclear field related to nuclear power, a great deal of effort has been devoted to managing and continuing to improve the safety and operational performance of existing facilities. However, indications are that the next decades may see considerable expansion to meet increasing energy needs, while responding to concerns about the environment, including global warming. Thus, in the nuclear field, those Member States with existing nuclear power programmes may be forced to replace a large part of their current workforce, while also attracting, recruiting and preparing a fresh workforce for the new facilities being planned. At the same time, those who will be initiating nuclear power programmes, or other peaceful applications, will be developing HR for their programmes. In the past, the development of human resources in the nuclear field has depended on considerable support from organizations in the country of origin of the technology

  20. A Study to Promote a Collaboration of R and D for Nuclear Energy Technology Development between Korea and Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryh, Sipyo; Kim, Cheoljung; Yoo, Bungduk; Lee, Yongjoo; Kim, Hansoo; Yoon, Sungwon; Jeong, Hwansam; Jeong, Gijung

    2005-01-15

    The ultimate goal of this investigation to promote a collaboration of R and D for Nuclear Energy Technology Development between Korea and Kazakhstan. To understand the research power of the Kazakhstan, we visited the INP(Institute of Nuclear Physics) which is one of the branch of Nation Cuclear Center-Repunlic Kazakhstan. We presented the present status of the nuclear energy related research in KAERI. The director of international cooperation in the ministry of Mineral resources, the director of INP and vice director of IAE had visited KAERI, KIRAM and discussed about potential cooperation in nuclear research related field.

  1. Nuclear physics research requirements for electron and heavy ion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, E.

    1983-03-01

    There has been a great deal of interest in a variety of new machines intended to probe atomic nuclei for hadronic and quark aspects which lie beyond the familiar shell model view of nuclei. This paper gives the physics perspective within which the proposals for such machines have arisen and discusses the two classes of tools - high energy cw electron machines and relativistic heavy ion machines - which lie at opposite ends of the arsenal being gathered for the pursuit of QCD in nuclei. The electron machines present a reasoned analytic approach to the simplest systems and the heavy ion machines a major thrust for starting new physics in the quark-gluon sea

  2. Unconventional wind machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheff, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to introduce an unconventional wind machine which has economics comparable with nuclear power and is already available in the public market place. Specifically, up to about 17 MWE could be saved for other uses such as sale in most 1000 MWE plants of any type - nuclear, oil, gas, peat, or wood - which use conventional electrically driven fans in their cooling towers. 10 refs

  3. Collaborative Educational Leadership: The Emergence of Human Interactional Sense-Making Process as a Complex System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäppinen, Aini-Kristiina

    2014-01-01

    The article aims at explicating the emergence of human interactional sense-making process within educational leadership as a complex system. The kind of leadership is understood as a holistic entity called collaborative leadership. There, sense-making emerges across interdependent domains, called attributes of collaborative leadership. The…

  4. Status of the intergovernmental collaboration in development of the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannum, W [Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development, 75 - Paris (France)

    1979-01-01

    While it has been proposed to adopt all possible means to satisfy energy demand taking resource protection in consideration, the nuclear industry is worried about the fear of nuclear proliferation and regulation. Instead of the problems concerning the possibility of utilizing atomic energy, now the urgent necessity to cope with various problems accompanying the completion of nuclear fuel cycle, especially the managements of wastes and plutonium, and the method of solving the problems caused by the international distributions of resources, technologies and industrial capabilities, which are not as situations demand, have been investigated internationally. The activities by CEC and IAEA in the field of atomic energy are important as are well known. As for the fields of active intergovernmental collaboration, the securing of uranium resources and the balance of the supply and demand, safety and radiation protection, the scientific aspect of atomic energy, the management of wastes and others are discussed. As the most important conclusions concerning waste management, considerable misunderstanding was seen on the technical side many countries exert the efforts to establish the waste management policy, and it is necessary to help the technical development and the legal and institutional approaches at the intergovernmental level.

  5. Proceedings of the Nuclear Engineering Science and Technology - NESTeT 2011 Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This important European Nuclear Society (ENS) conference is dedicated to networking in nuclear education and training across the fields of engineering, science and technology. It is organised as a back-to-back event with the European Nuclear Young Generation Forum (ENYGF) which will attract over 150 Young Professionals from all over Europe. Exchange of information on available expertise, capacity, infrastructure and needs, together with networking and collaboration between all stakeholders involved is crucial for the development of an efficient education and training system that is able to provide adequately skilled workforce for a dynamically evolving sector. NESTet is designed to facilitate an exchange of information, collaboration and the sharing of best practices in nuclear education and training in engineering science and technology. It is an important networking opportunity for better co-ordination and collaboration between different stakeholders. The conference is targeted at all stakeholders responsible for human resources and skills development and stakeholders responsible for the development of education and training programmes in the nuclear sector. (authors)

  6. Human Factor on Gravelines Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duboc, Gerard

    1998-01-01

    In a first part, the documents describes the commitments by EDF nuclear power plan operations to demands made by the Safety Authority regarding actions in the field of human factors (concerns expressed by the Authority, in-depth analysis, positions on different points raised by the Authority). In a second part, it presents the various actions undertaken in the Gravelines nuclear power station regarding human factors: creation of an 'operator club' (mission and objectives, methods and means, first meetings, tracking file), development of risk analysis strategy, setting up of a human factor engineering mission and example of action in case of a significant event

  7. Towards a Plant Bio-Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nichele, Stefano; Risi, Sebastian; Tufte, Gunnar

    2018-01-01

    as a proof of concept that sensing capabilities of plants are a viable option for the development of plant bio-machines. Different future scenarios (some speculative) are discussed. The work herein is carried out as a collaboration between the EU project Flora Robotica and the EU project NASCENCE....

  8. Nuclear safety regulation on nuclear safety equipment activities in relation to human and organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tianshu

    2013-01-01

    Based on years of knowledge in nuclear safety supervision and experience of investigating and dealing with violation events in repair welding of DFHM, this paper analyzes major faults in manufacturing and maintaining activities of nuclear safety equipment in relation to human and organizational factors. It could be deducted that human and organizational factors has definitely become key features in the development of nuclear energy and technology. Some feasible measures to reinforce supervision on nuclear safety equipment activities have also been proposed. (author)

  9. International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN) and the Nuclear Security Training and Support Centre (NSSC) Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, Dmitriy

    2013-01-01

    International Nuclear Security Education Network established in 2010: A partnership between the IAEA and universities, research institutions and other stakeholders - •Promotion of nuclear security education; • Development of educational materials; • Professional development for faculty members; • Collaborative research and resource sharing. Currently over 90 members from 38 member states. Mission: to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. Nuclear Security Support Centre: Primary objectives are: • Develop human resources through the implementation of a tailored training programme; • Develop a network of experts; • Provide technical support for lifecycle equipment management and scientific support for the detection of and the response to nuclear security events

  10. Current status and issues of nuclear human resource development/General activities of Japan nuclear human resource development network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki; Hino, Sadami; Tsuru, Hisanori

    2013-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Human Resource Development Network (JN-HRD Net) was established in November 2010 with the aim of developing a framework for mutual cooperation and information sharing among nuclear-related organizations. Although the tasks and goals of developing human resources in the nuclear field have been shifted since the accident at the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the necessity of fostering capable personnel in this field stays unchanged and the importance of our network activities has further emphasized. The meeting of JN-HRD Net was held on the 5th of February 2013, where its activities by each field were reported and views and opinions were actively exchanged between more than 90 participants. This paper briefly describes current status and issues of JN-HRD Net and its general activities conducted by the JN-HRD Net secretariat. (J.P.N.)

  11. Instrumentation and Control and Human Machine Interface Science and Technology Roadmap in Support of Advanced Reactors and Fuel Programs in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Don W.; Arndt, Steven A.; Dudenhoeffer, Donald D.; Hallbert, Bruce P.; Bond, Leonard J.; Holcomb, David E.; Wood, Richard T.; Naser, Joseph A.; O'Hara, John M.; Quinn, Edward L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current status of the Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface (ICHMI) Science and Technology Roadmap (Reference xi) that was developed to address the major challenges in this technical area for the Gen IV and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiatives that support future deployments of nuclear energy systems. Reliable, capable ICHMI systems will be necessary for the advanced nuclear plants to be economically competitive. ICHMI enables measurement, control, protection, monitoring, and maintenance for processes and components. Through improvements in the technologies and demonstration of their use to facilitate licensing, ICHMI can contribute to the reduction of plant operations and maintenance costs while helping to ensure high plant availability. The impact of ICHMI can be achieved through effective use of the technologies to improve operational efficiency and optimize use of human resources. However, current licensing experience with digital I and C systems has provided lessons learned concerning the difficulties that can be encountered when introducing advanced technologies with expanded capabilities. Thus, in the development of advanced nuclear power designs, it will be important to address both the technical foundations of ICHMI systems and their licensing considerations. The ICHMI roadmap will identify the necessary research, development and demonstration activities that are essential to facilitate necessary technology advancement and resolve outstanding issues

  12. Humans and Machines in the Evolution of AI in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2016-01-01

    Artificial intelligence in Korea is currently prospering. The media is regularly reporting AI-enabled products such as smart advisors, personal robots, autonomous cars, and human-level intelligence machines. The IT industry is investing in deep learning and AI to maintain the global competitive edge in their services and products. The Ministry of Science, ICT, and Future Planning (MSIP) has launched new funding programs in AI and cognitive science to implement the government’s newly adopted e...

  13. Design of HumanMachine Interface and Altering of Pelvic Obliquity with RGR Trainer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrusinski, Maciej; Unluhisarcikli, Ozer; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Cajigas, Iahn; Bonato, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The Robotic Gait Rehabilitation (RGR) Trainer targets secondary gait deviations in stroke survivors undergoing rehabilitation. Using an impedance control strategy and a linear electromagnetic actuator, the device generates a force field to control pelvic obliquity through a Human-Machine Interface (i.e. a lower body exoskeleton). Herein we describe the design of the RGR Trainer Human-Machine Interface (HMI) and we demonstrate the system’s ability to alter the pattern of movement of the pelvis during gait in a healthy subject. Results are shown for experiments during which we induced hip-hiking – in healthy subjects. Our findings indicate that the RGR Trainer has the ability of affecting pelvic obliquity during gait. Furthermore, we provide preliminary evidence of short-term retention of the modified pelvic obliquity pattern induced by the RGR Trainer. PMID:22275693

  14. Late Print Culture’s Social Media Revolution: Authorship, Collaboration and Copy Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Eichhorn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the impact of copy machines on late twentieth-century print cultures. Specifically, this article makes a case for “dry copying,” the method of print reproduction perfected by Xerox in the late 1950s, as a unique medium rather than a weak imitation of other printing methods. Following the claim that the widespread availability of copy machines in the late twentieth century represented the arrival of a new medium, this article further examines how understandings of authorship, established with print culture, came undone in the era of the copy machine. Finally, this paper makes a case for understanding copy machines as a form of “social media” that opened up opportunities for writers, readers and publishers to create, share, exchange and comment on texts and images in communities and networks of their own making in the decades preceding the development of the web.

  15. Human survival depends on nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbertson, J.

    1977-01-01

    Both the Wall Street Journal and the New York Times published feature articles Dec. 1 advertising a report by the U.S. government's General Accounting Office as evidence that the breeder reactor component of this nation's nuclear energy program was properly on its way to the scrap heap. According to the author, these and similar press accounts are intended to further legitimize the widely believed (and totally false) notion that increased plutonium use and nuclear fission generally represent a danger to humanity. Purposefully ignored in such accounts, he says, is the evidence that the elimination of plutonium as a nuclear fuel will mean the demise of the entire U.S. nuclear power industry and ultimately the human race itself. At stake in the short term, in addition to the breeder reactor program, is the well-established use of light water reactors for generating electricity, since these must, within a matter of years, be fueled with plutonium. The attack is also directed at the more advanced, more capital-intensive nuclear fusion technology, since the elimination of fission programs will wipe out the trained cadre force of engineers, scientists, technicians, and skilled workers needed to develop fusion power. The growth of fission power over the next two decades is absolutely necessary for the transition to a full fusion-based economy, according to Mr. Gilbertson. Only nuclear fusion has the inherent capability of transforming industry to the necessary higher mode of production and output, as well as providing a limitless source of usable power in several forms, thus insuring the survival of the human race beyond this century. Fission power and conventional fossil power must be expanded and possibly even exhausted during this transition in order to guarantee the achievement of this goal, he says

  16. Cognitive Human-Machine Interface Applied in Remote Support for Industrial Robot Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kosicki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is currently being made to widely introduce industrial robots to Small-Medium Enterprises (SMEs. Since the enterprises usually employ too small number of robot units to afford specialized departments for robot maintenance, they must be provided with inexpensive and immediate support remotely. This paper evaluates whether the support can be provided by means of Cognitive Info-communication – communication in which human cognitive capabilities are extended irrespectively of geographical distances. The evaluations are given with an aid of experimental system that consists of local and remote rooms, which are physically separated – a six-degree-of-freedom NACHI SH133-03 industrial robot is situated in the local room, while the operator, who supervises the robot by means of audio-visual Cognitive Human-Machine Interface, is situated in the remote room. The results of simple experiments show that Cognitive Info-communication is not only efficient mean to provide the support remotely, but is probably also a powerful tool to enhance interaction with any data-rich environment that require good conceptual understanding of system's state and careful attention management. Furthermore, the paper discusses data presentation and reduction methods for data-rich environments, as well as introduces the concepts of Naturally Acquired Data and Cognitive Human-Machine Interfaces.

  17. Collaborative Supervised Learning for Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration methods for distributed machine-learning algorithms involve the specification of communication protocols for the learners, which can query other learners and/or broadcast their findings preemptively. Each learner incorporates information from its neighbors into its own training set, and they are thereby able to bootstrap each other to higher performance. Each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. After being seeded with an initial labeled training set, each learner proceeds to learn in an iterative fashion. New data is collected and classified. The learner can then either broadcast its most confident classifications for use by other learners, or can query neighbors for their classifications of its least confident items. As such, collaborative learning combines elements of both passive (broadcast) and active (query) learning. It also uses ideas from ensemble learning to combine the multiple responses to a given query into a single useful label. This approach has been evaluated against current non-collaborative alternatives, including training a single classifier and deploying it at all nodes with no further learning possible, and permitting learners to learn from their own most confident judgments, absent interaction with their neighbors. On several data sets, it has been consistently found that active collaboration is the best strategy for a distributed learner network. The main advantages include the ability for learning to take place autonomously by collaboration rather than by requiring intervention from an oracle (usually human), and also the ability to learn in a distributed environment, permitting decisions to be made in situ and to yield faster response time.

  18. Human Resources Development Challenges for Nuclear Newcomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrette, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion and take away messages: • HRD solution is dependent upon country’s economical, societal, industrial situation and development strategy. • HRD to be integrated in the global HCB approach (education and training, KM, knowledge networks). • Maximum local benefit with national development. • International collaboration and partnership with competent and experienced partners is recommended (lever effect). • Anticipation is key. → HRD for a nuclear program is challenging but achievable. Countries already did it and are ready to build long term partnerships

  19. The development of human behavior analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Yong Hee; Park, Geun Ok; Cheon, Se Woo; Suh, Sang Moon; Oh, In Suk; Lee, Hyun Chul; Park, Jae Chang.

    1997-07-01

    In this project, which is to study on man-machine interaction in Korean nuclear power plants, we developed SACOM (Simulation Analyzer with a Cognitive Operator Model), a tool for the assessment of task performance in the control rooms using software simulation, and also develop human error analysis and application techniques. SACOM was developed to assess operator's physical workload, workload in information navigation at VDU workstations, and cognitive workload in procedural tasks. We developed trip analysis system including a procedure based on man-machine interaction analysis system including a procedure based on man-machine interaction analysis and a classification system. We analyzed a total of 277 trips occurred from 1978 to 1994 to produce trip summary information, and for 79 cases induced by human errors time-lined man-machine interactions. The INSTEC, a database system of our analysis results, was developed. The MARSTEC, a multimedia authoring and representation system for trip information, was also developed, and techniques for human error detection in human factors experiments were established. (author). 121 refs., 38 tabs., 52 figs

  20. The development of human behavior analysis techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Yong Hee; Park, Geun Ok; Cheon, Se Woo; Suh, Sang Moon; Oh, In Suk; Lee, Hyun Chul; Park, Jae Chang

    1997-07-01

    In this project, which is to study on man-machine interaction in Korean nuclear power plants, we developed SACOM (Simulation Analyzer with a Cognitive Operator Model), a tool for the assessment of task performance in the control rooms using software simulation, and also develop human error analysis and application techniques. SACOM was developed to assess operator`s physical workload, workload in information navigation at VDU workstations, and cognitive workload in procedural tasks. We developed trip analysis system including a procedure based on man-machine interaction analysis system including a procedure based on man-machine interaction analysis and a classification system. We analyzed a total of 277 trips occurred from 1978 to 1994 to produce trip summary information, and for 79 cases induced by human errors time-lined man-machine interactions. The INSTEC, a database system of our analysis results, was developed. The MARSTEC, a multimedia authoring and representation system for trip information, was also developed, and techniques for human error detection in human factors experiments were established. (author). 121 refs., 38 tabs., 52 figs.

  1. Collaborative Russian-US work in nuclear material protection, control and accounting at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveenko, I.P.; Pshakin, G.M.; Mozhaev, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) is a leading research center under the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation. IPPE encompasses many installations and many specialists who perform fundamental and applied investigations in nuclear power and technology for the national nuclear program. IPPE has a key role in the national nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC ampersand A) system both as a nuclear facility and also as a training center for MPC ampersand A. As a participant in the US-Russian Laboratory-to-Laboratory Cooperative Program in MPC ampersand A, IPPE is conducting several tasks in collaboration with US Department of Energy national laboratories. The main goal of these tasks is the rapid improvement of MPC ampersand A at one of the most sensitive operating IPPE installations, the BFS critical facility, which has large numbers of fuel items containing highly enriched uranium and weapons-grade plutonium. After the completion of several test, evaluation, and demonstration tasks, it is hoped that the tested and adopted methods and procedures can be applied not only to the entire population of BFS fuel items, but also to other facilities at IPPE and other Russian nuclear institutes and operating facilities. The collaborative tasks cover seven areas: computerized nuclear material accounting, entry control and portals, item control and inventory, design evaluation and analysis, gamma and neutron assay, an integrated demonstration, and physical protection elements and test bed

  2. Human-machine cooperative telerobotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, R.V.; Everett, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the increasing number of work sites that are hazardous or merely inaccessible, remote manipulation has become more and more important. Nuclear, underwater, and space applications, exemplify a few of the dangerous environments in which work may be desired, while micromanipulation, which has become of more interest lately, is an example of an inherently inaccessible environment. The past 50 yr have seen great advances in remote manipulation technology, from the pioneering work of Ray Goertz in the 1950s to the ongoing development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) of the modular light-duty utility arm (MLDUA), which is a long-reach manipulator for use in the cleanup of the waste storage tanks. Mainly, research has either focused on the improvement of manually operated remote manipulators or teleoperators, in which a human is an integral part of the control loop, or autonomous robots, which have the required decision-making capability and sensors. However, in the past few years, it has become increasingly evident that there are limitations in each of these modalities, which make them individually unsuited for certain tasks. While a human operator may be required to make high-level decisions, fatigue and tedium can result from repetitive tasks. On the other hand, computers can provide fast and efficient operation but are limited by their currently inadequate decision-making abilities as well as inaccuracies in the utilized sensors. An ideal teleoperator would be one in which the human is involved in the operation only to the extent that high-level decisions must be made and corrections must be made to account for inaccuracies in the sensors. Responsibilities such as gross alignment and repetitive motions would be delegated to computer control

  3. Man-machine systems research at the OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owre, F.; Bjorlo, T.J.; Haugset, K.

    1994-01-01

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project is a jointly financed research programme under the auspices of the OECD - Nuclear Energy Agency with fifteen participating countries. One of the main research topics focuses on man-machine systems. Particular attention is paid to the operator's tasks in the reactor control room environment. The overall objective of the research in this field is to provide a basis for improving today's control rooms through the introduction of computer-based solutions for the effective and safe execution of surveillance and control functions in normal as well as off-normal plant situations. The programme comprises four main activities: the verification and validation of safety critical software systems; man-machine interaction research emphasizing improvements in man-machine interfaces on the basis of human factors studies; computerised operator support systems assisting the operator in fault detection/diagnosis and planning of control actions; and control room development providing a basis for retrofitting of existing control rooms and for the design of advanced concepts

  4. A novel device for head gesture measurement system in combination with eye-controlled human machine interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chern-Sheng; Ho, Chien-Wa; Chang, Kai-Chieh; Hung, San-Shan; Shei, Hung-Jung; Yeh, Mau-Shiun

    2006-06-01

    This study describes the design and combination of an eye-controlled and a head-controlled human-machine interface system. This system is a highly effective human-machine interface, detecting head movement by changing positions and numbers of light sources on the head. When the users utilize the head-mounted display to browse a computer screen, the system will catch the images of the user's eyes with CCD cameras, which can also measure the angle and position of the light sources. In the eye-tracking system, the program in the computer will locate each center point of the pupils in the images, and record the information on moving traces and pupil diameters. In the head gesture measurement system, the user wears a double-source eyeglass frame, so the system catches images of the user's head by using a CCD camera in front of the user. The computer program will locate the center point of the head, transferring it to the screen coordinates, and then the user can control the cursor by head motions. We combine the eye-controlled and head-controlled human-machine interface system for the virtual reality applications.

  5. Development of intelligent physical start-up system for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Canhui; Li Xiang; Huang Liyuan; Fu Guoen; Hu Hai

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the Intelligent physical start-up system for nuclear reactor introduced the system composing, hardware design and software design. The system has some merits such as handy operation, fast and accurate mathematic and nicer human-machine interface. (authors)

  6. As-Built Verification Plan Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister Storage Building MCO Handling Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    This as-built verification plan outlines the methodology and responsibilities that will be implemented during the as-built field verification activity for the Canister Storage Building (CSB) MCO HANDLING MACHINE (MHM). This as-built verification plan covers THE ELECTRICAL PORTION of the CONSTRUCTION PERFORMED BY POWER CITY UNDER CONTRACT TO MOWAT. The as-built verifications will be performed in accordance Administrative Procedure AP 6-012-00, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project As-Built Verification Plan Development Process, revision I. The results of the verification walkdown will be documented in a verification walkdown completion package, approved by the Design Authority (DA), and maintained in the CSB project files

  7. Allocation of functions to man and machine in the automated control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulliam, R.; Price, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    A practical framework and set of methodologic tools are discussed which could be used by a design team in allocating nuclear power plant control functions to either man or machine control. It is concluded that allocations of functions must eventually become a formal step in control system design, i.e., it will become increasingly necessary to invest in human factors analysis as an integral part of the design process

  8. Gorilla endoscopic sinus surgery: a life-saving collaboration between human and veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Greg E; Baik, Fred M; Liddell, Robert M; Ayars, Andrew G; Branch, Kelley R; Pottinger, Paul S; Hillel, Allen D; Helmick, Kelly; Collins, Darin

    2018-03-23

    Chronic rhinosinusitis is a common disease process in humans; however, in the primate population of gorillas, it has rarely been described. This case describes lifesaving sinus surgery on a critically ill gorilla performed by a human otolaryngology team in collaboration with the gorilla's veterinary medicine team. The 35-year-old western silverback gorilla was treated for 3 months with aggressive medical therapy for a worsening sinus infection. When his condition became severe, a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed showing advanced chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps vs other masses and some bone erosion. As his condition deteriorated further, a tertiary otolaryngology team performed sinus surgery using the latest technology available, including image guidance, steroid-eluting sinus stents, and balloon sinus dilation. The postoperative course was complicated by subcutaneous infection and eventual fistulization. Fortunately, with culture-directed antibiotic therapy his condition gradually improved. One year later he required revision sinus surgery. At that point allergy testing was performed followed by appropriate allergy medical therapy. Now, 3 years out from his initial surgery, he continues to do well and has fathered a young female gorilla. This case represents a unique collaboration between human physicians and veterinarians. The combined medical approach was critical to heal this ailing gorilla. This case discusses many of the challenges and offers recommendations for physicians who may be involved with similar care of animals in the future. The success of the surgical and medical treatment of this gorilla's life-threatening sinus infection required many experts, careful planning, and corporate generosity. The interaction between human and animal medicine would not have been successful without the close and trusting collaborations between human and veterinary health providers. We encourage human healthcare providers to seek volunteer

  9. Improved Collaborative Representation Classifier Based on l2-Regularized for Human Action Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirui Huo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human action recognition is an important recent challenging task. Projecting depth images onto three depth motion maps (DMMs and extracting deep convolutional neural network (DCNN features are discriminant descriptor features to characterize the spatiotemporal information of a specific action from a sequence of depth images. In this paper, a unified improved collaborative representation framework is proposed in which the probability that a test sample belongs to the collaborative subspace of all classes can be well defined and calculated. The improved collaborative representation classifier (ICRC based on l2-regularized for human action recognition is presented to maximize the likelihood that a test sample belongs to each class, then theoretical investigation into ICRC shows that it obtains a final classification by computing the likelihood for each class. Coupled with the DMMs and DCNN features, experiments on depth image-based action recognition, including MSRAction3D and MSRGesture3D datasets, demonstrate that the proposed approach successfully using a distance-based representation classifier achieves superior performance over the state-of-the-art methods, including SRC, CRC, and SVM.

  10. Effect of prior machining deformation on the development of tensile residual stresses in weld-fabricated nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevey, P.S.; Mason, P.W.; Hornbach, D.J.; Molkenthin, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Austenitic alloy weldments in nuclear systems may be subject to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) failure if the sum of residual and applied stresses exceeds a critical threshold. Residual stresses developed by prior machining and welding may either accelerate or retard SCC, depending on their magnitude and sign. A combined x-ray diffraction and mechanical procedure was used to determine the axial and hoop residual stress and yield strength distributions into the inside-diameter surface of a simulated Alloy 600 penetration J-welded into a reactor pressure vessel. The degree of cold working and the resulting yield strength increase caused by prior machining and weld shrinkage were calculated from the line-broadening distributions. Tensile residual stresses on the order of +700 MPa were observed in both the axial and the hoop directions at the inside-diameter surface in a narrow region adjacent to the weld heat-affected zone. Stresses exceeding the bulk yield strength were found to develop due to the combined effects of cold working of the surface layers during initial machining and subsequent weld shrinkage. The residual stress and cold work distributions produced by prior machining were found to influence strongly the final residual stress state developed after welding

  11. Rule-based machine translation for Aymara

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coler, Matthew; Homola, Petr; Jones, Mari

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the ongoing result of an approach developed by the collaboration of a computational linguist with a field linguist that addresses one of the oft-overlooked keys to language maintenance: the development of modern language-learning tools. Although machine translation isn’t commonly

  12. Materials and optimized designs for human-machine interfaces via epidermal electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Woong; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Akhtar, Aadeel; Norton, James J S; Kwack, Young-Jin; Li, Shuo; Jung, Sung-Young; Su, Yewang; Lee, Woosik; Xia, Jing; Cheng, Huanyu; Huang, Yonggang; Choi, Woon-Seop; Bretl, Timothy; Rogers, John A

    2013-12-17

    Thin, soft, and elastic electronics with physical properties well matched to the epidermis can be conformally and robustly integrated with the skin. Materials and optimized designs for such devices are presented for surface electromyography (sEMG). The findings enable sEMG from wide ranging areas of the body. The measurements have quality sufficient for advanced forms of human-machine interface. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Candu 600 fuelling machine testing, the romanian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeca, S.; Doca, C.; Iorga, C.

    2013-01-01

    The Candu 600 Fuelling Machine is a complex mechanism which must run in safety conditions and with high reliability in the Candu Reactor. The testing and commissioning process of this nuclear equipment meets the high standards of NPPs requirements using special technological facilities, modern measurement instruments as well the appropriate IT resources for data acquisition and processing. The paper presents the experience of the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Romania, in testing Candu 600 Fuelling Machines, inclusive the implied facilities, and in development of four simulators: two dedicated for the training of the Candu 600 Fuelling Machine Operators, and another two to simulate some process signals and actions. (authors)

  14. Turning men into machines? Scientific management, industrial psychology, and the "human factor".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derksen, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    In the controversy that broke out in 1911 over Frederick W. Taylor's scientific management, many critics contended that it ignored "the human factor" and reduced workers to machines. Psychologists succeeded in positioning themselves as experts of the human factor, and their instruments and expertise as the necessary complement of Taylor's psychologically deficient system. However, the conventional view that the increasing influence of psychologists and other social scientists "humanized" management theory and practice needs to be amended. Taylor's scientific management was not less human than later approaches such as Human Relations, but it articulated the human factor differently, and aligned it to its own instruments and practices in such a way that it was at once external to them and essential to their functioning. Industrial psychologists, on the other hand, at first presented themselves as engineers of the human factor and made the human mind an integral part of management. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Risk management and nuclear human resources management in construction nuclear power plants in the Gulf Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed Hakami; Salim Almarmary

    2009-01-01

    The countries of the Gulf region have the capacity to rapidly expand their economic growth and gross domestic product (GDP). Also, one may observe that their growth rate is very high. To match this, they need a mix of energy sources for this economic growth. Nuclear power plants can have a significant role as a source of energy in the Gulf countries. Although, some of the Gulf countries signed contracts to construct nuclear power plants, they still require high a level of education as well as sufficient and adequate human resources in order to solve complex issues which may happen at nuclear power plants. The objective of this paper is to identify the complex issues that may arise at a nuclear site. Then the paper goes on to discuss how to evaluate these issues. Finally, the paper studies how to manage and control such complex issues in the work place. The advantage of highly educated people as well as sufficient and adequate human resource can increasingly protect and save human health and the natural environment from issues relating to the use of nuclear energy. There are vast theories, strategies and tools that have discussed in regards to human resources management in the nuclear industries. However, this paper chiefly provides a new risk management methodology. This methodology helps to highlight the risk factors and their consequences at nuclear sites. This paper is intended to decrease risks; to protect human health in the work place at nuclear power plants and save the environment within and beyond national borders and for future generations. It aims to increase safety from the use of nuclear energy, particularly in the Gulf countries.(Author)

  16. Roadmap for human resources for expanded Indian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Srinivasan, G.R.; Goyal, O.P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with detailed requirement of human resources for all phases of nuclear power plant, for the manufacturing sector and the probable roadmap for achieving India's target. The accident in Fukushima has brought out that only nuclear power that avoids being a threat to the health and safety of the population and the environmental will be acceptable to the society and for this to be achieved human resources could be a single major contributor. India has ambitious plan of achieving 20,000MW by 2020 and 63,000MW by 2050. It is felt out of the three resources men, material and money; the critical shortage would be human resources both in quality and quantity. As per IAEA report (Publication of 2008 edition of energy, electricity and nuclear power estimates for the period of 2030), nuclear capacity must grow to at least 1.8 times current capacity by 2030 if global temperature rises are to be kept at 2°C. Objective of recruiting and training human resources for Indian Industry can be as follows: a) For catering domestic market. b) For catering international market later on for nuclear industries outside India. As India will be an important future international player. The above would require a multiplication of human resources by nearly seven times. In addition it has to be wholesome covering all levels and all skills and all disciplines and stages covering the whole nuclear cycle including regulators. Human resources are required for design and engineering, construction, commissioning, operation, manufacturing and for support services. The manpower for these has to be trained to achieve high quality of nuclear standards. Presently Indian Department of Atomic Energy(DAE) runs several training schools giving one year Post Graduate, tailor made courses. This needs to be multiplied by Joint efforts. Training should be on 'SAT (Systematic Approach to Training)' methodology to ensure focussed, specific, needed to culminate in safe, reliable and viable operation of

  17. Roadmap for human resources for expanded Indian nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Indian Nuclear Society (India); Srinivasan, G.R.; Goyal, O.P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with detailed requirement of human resources for all phases of nuclear power plant, for the manufacturing sector and the probable roadmap for achieving India's target. The accident in Fukushima has brought out that only nuclear power that avoids being a threat to the health and safety of the population and the environmental will be acceptable to the society and for this to be achieved human resources could be a single major contributor. India has ambitious plan of achieving 20,000MW by 2020 and 63,000MW by 2050. It is felt out of the three resources men, material and money; the critical shortage would be human resources both in quality and quantity. As per IAEA report (Publication of 2008 edition of energy, electricity and nuclear power estimates for the period of 2030), nuclear capacity must grow to at least 1.8 times current capacity by 2030 if global temperature rises are to be kept at 2°C. Objective of recruiting and training human resources for Indian Industry can be as follows: a) For catering domestic market. b) For catering international market later on for nuclear industries outside India. As India will be an important future international player. The above would require a multiplication of human resources by nearly seven times. In addition it has to be wholesome covering all levels and all skills and all disciplines and stages covering the whole nuclear cycle including regulators. Human resources are required for design and engineering, construction, commissioning, operation, manufacturing and for support services. The manpower for these has to be trained to achieve high quality of nuclear standards. Presently Indian Department of Atomic Energy(DAE) runs several training schools giving one year Post Graduate, tailor made courses. This needs to be multiplied by Joint efforts. Training should be on 'SAT (Systematic Approach to Training)' methodology to ensure focussed, specific, needed to culminate in safe, reliable and

  18. Human Factors Evaluation of Man-Machine Interface for Periodic Safety Review of Yonggwang Unit no. 1, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the research results of human factors assessment on the MMI(Man Machine Interface) equipment as part of Periodic Safety Review(PSR) of Yonggwang Unit no. 1, 2. As MMI is a key factor among human factors to be reviewed in PSR, we reviewed the MMI components of nuclear power plants in aspect of human factors engineering. The availability, suitability, and effectiveness of the MMI devices were chosen to be reviewed. The MMI devices were investigated through the review of design documents related to the MMI, survey of control panels, evaluation of experts, and experimental assessment. Checklists were used to perform this assessment and record the review results. The items mentioned by the expert comments to review in detail in relation with task procedures were tested by experiments with operators' participation. For some questionable issues arisen during this MMI review, operator workload and possibility of errors in operator actions were analysed. The reviewed MMI devices contain MCR(Main Control Room), SPDS(Safety Parameter Display System), RSP(Remote Shutdown Panel), and the selected LCBs(Local Control Boards) importantly related to safety. As results of the assessments, any significant problem challenging the safety was not found on human factors in the MMI devices. However, several small items to be changed and improved in suitability of MMI devices were discovered. An action plan is recommended to accommodate the suggestions and review comments. It will enhance the plant safety on MMI area

  19. Human Factors Evaluation of Man-Machine Interface for Periodic Safety Review of Yonggwang Unit no. 1, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang (and others)

    2006-01-15

    This report describes the research results of human factors assessment on the MMI(Man Machine Interface) equipment as part of Periodic Safety Review(PSR) of Yonggwang Unit no. 1, 2. As MMI is a key factor among human factors to be reviewed in PSR, we reviewed the MMI components of nuclear power plants in aspect of human factors engineering. The availability, suitability, and effectiveness of the MMI devices were chosen to be reviewed. The MMI devices were investigated through the review of design documents related to the MMI, survey of control panels, evaluation of experts, and experimental assessment. Checklists were used to perform this assessment and record the review results. The items mentioned by the expert comments to review in detail in relation with task procedures were tested by experiments with operators' participation. For some questionable issues arisen during this MMI review, operator workload and possibility of errors in operator actions were analysed. The reviewed MMI devices contain MCR(Main Control Room), SPDS(Safety Parameter Display System), RSP(Remote Shutdown Panel), and the selected LCBs(Local Control Boards) importantly related to safety. As results of the assessments, any significant problem challenging the safety was not found on human factors in the MMI devices. However, several small items to be changed and improved in suitability of MMI devices were discovered. An action plan is recommended to accommodate the suggestions and review comments. It will enhance the plant safety on MMI area.

  20. Overview of EPRI's human factors research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.F.; Parris, H.L.

    1981-01-01

    The human factors engineering program in the Nuclear Power Division, EPRI is dedicated to the resolution of man-machine interface problems specific to the nuclear power industry. Particularly emphasis is placed on the capabilities and limitations of the people who operate and maintain the system, the tasks they must perform, and what they need to accomplish those tasks. Six human factors R and D projects are being conducted at the present time. In addition, technical consultation is being furnished to a study area, operator aids, being funded by another program area outside the human factors program area. All of these activities are summarized

  1. Instrumentation and control and human machine interface science and technology road-map in support of advanced reactors and fuel programs in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D. W.; Arndt, S. A.; Bond, L. J.; Dudenhoeffer, D.; Hallbert, B.; Holcomb, D. E.; Wood, R. T.; Naser, J. A.; O'Hara, J.; Quinn, E. L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current status of the Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface (ICHMI) Science and Technology road-map being developed to address the major challenges in this technical area for the Gen IV and other U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) initiatives that support future deployments of nuclear energy systems. Reliable, capable ICHMI systems will be necessary for the advanced nuclear plants to be economically competitive. ICHMI enables measurement, control, protection, monitoring, and maintenance for processes and components. Through improvements in the technologies and demonstration of their use to facilitate licensing, ICHMI can contribute to the reduction of plant operations and maintenance costs while helping to ensure high plant availability. The impact of ICHMI can be achieved through effective use of the technologies to improve operational efficiency and optimize use of human resources. However, current licensing experience with digital I and C systems has provided lessons learned concerning the difficulties that can be encountered when introducing advanced technologies with expanded capabilities. Thus, in the development of advanced nuclear power designs, it will be important to address both the technical foundations of ICHMI systems as well as their licensing considerations. The ICHMI road-map will identify the necessary research, development and demonstration activities that are essential to facilitate necessary technology advancement and resolve outstanding issues. (authors)

  2. Instrumentation and control and human machine interface science and technology Road-map in support of advanced reactors and fuel programs in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D. W.; Arndt, S. A.; Dudenhoeffer, D.; Hallbert, B.; Bond, L. J.; Holcomb, D. E.; Wood, R. T.; Naser, J. A.; O'Hara, J.; Quinn, E. L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the current status of the Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface (ICHMI) Science and Technology Road-map (Reference xi) that was developed to address the major challenges in this technical area for the Gen IV and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiatives that support future deployments of nuclear energy systems. Reliable, capable ICHMI systems will be necessary for the advanced nuclear plants to be economically competitive. ICHMI enables measurement, control, protection, monitoring, and maintenance for processes and components. Through improvements in the technologies and demonstration of their use to facilitate licensing, ICHMI can contribute to the reduction of plant operations and maintenance costs while helping to ensure high plant availability. The impact of ICHMI can be achieved through effective use of the technologies to improve operational efficiency and optimize use of human resources. However, current licensing experience with digital I and C systems has provided lessons learned concerning the difficulties that can be encountered when introducing advanced technologies with expanded capabilities. Thus, in the development of advanced nuclear power designs, it will be important to address both the technical foundations of ICHMI systems and their licensing considerations. The ICHMI Road-map will identify the necessary research, development and demonstration activities that are essential to facilitate necessary technology advancement and resolve outstanding issues. (authors)

  3. Man-machine communication based on the computerized operator support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Y.; Fukumoto, A.; Seki, E.; Tai, I.; Mori, N.; Tsuchida, M.; Sato, N.

    1985-01-01

    Development of a man-machine communication system in a nuclear power plant has been performed, utilizing the new communication technologies and an advanced diagnosis system. In the course of elaborating the communication concept, selection and rearrangement of communication functions in a control room were made based on the human factors engineering. Guidelines and criteria for information display system and operational equipments were also studied and evaluated. The outline of the communication concept and some evaluation test results are described. (author)

  4. Human reliability analysis of Lingao Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Huang Shudong; Yang Hong; He Aiwu; Huang Xiangrui; Zheng Tao; Su Shengbing; Xi Haiying

    2001-01-01

    The necessity of human reliability analysis (HRA) of Lingao Nuclear Power Station are analyzed, and the method and operation procedures of HRA is briefed. One of the human factors events (HFE) is analyzed in detail and some questions of HRA are discussed. The authors present the analytical results of 61 HFEs, and make a brief introduction of HRA contribution to Lingao Nuclear Power Station

  5. Nuclear power newsletter. Vol. 1, no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    This first issue of newsletter describes the Nuclear Power Division of the Department of Nuclear Energy responsible for implementation of the IAEA programme on Nuclear Power. The mission of the Division is to increase the capability of interested Member States to implement and maintain competitive and sustainable nuclear power programmes and to develop and apply advanced nuclear technologies. The topics covered in this publication are: Engineering and Management Support for Competitive Nuclear Power; Improving Human Performance, Quality and Technical Infrastructure; Co-ordination of International Collaboration for the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technology; Technology Developments and Applications for Advanced Reactors; The International Conference on 'Fifty Years of Nuclear Power - the Next Fifty Years'. A list of documents published recently by the Nuclear Power Division in enclosed

  6. Mechanically Compliant Electronic Materials for Wearable Photovoltaics and Human-Machine Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Timothy Francis, III

    Applications of stretchable electronic materials for human-machine interfaces are described herein. Intrinsically stretchable organic conjugated polymers and stretchable electronic composites were used to develop stretchable organic photovoltaics (OPVs), mechanically robust wearable OPVs, and human-machine interfaces for gesture recognition, American Sign Language Translation, haptic control of robots, and touch emulation for virtual reality, augmented reality, and the transmission of touch. The stretchable and wearable OPVs comprise active layers of poly-3-alkylthiophene:phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3AT:PCBM) and transparent conductive electrodes of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and devices could only be fabricated through a deep understanding of the connection between molecular structure and the co-engineering of electronic performance with mechanical resilience. The talk concludes with the use of composite piezoresistive sensors two smart glove prototypes. The first integrates stretchable strain sensors comprising a carbon-elastomer composite, a wearable microcontroller, low energy Bluetooth, and a 6-axis accelerometer/gyroscope to construct a fully functional gesture recognition glove capable of wirelessly translating American Sign Language to text on a cell phone screen. The second creates a system for the haptic control of a 3D printed robot arm, as well as the transmission of touch and temperature information.

  7. Remote filter handling machine for Sizewell B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, D.

    1993-01-01

    Two Filter Handling machines (FHM) have been supplied to Nuclear Electric plc for use at Sizewell B Power Station. These machines have been designed and built following ALARP principles with the functional objective being to remove radioactive filter cartridges from a filter housing and replace them with clean filter cartridges. Operation of the machine is achieved by the prompt of each distinct task via an industrial computer or the prompt of a full cycle using the automatic mode. The design of the machine features many aspects demonstrating ALARP while keeping the machine simple, robust and easy to maintain. (author)

  8. A video, text, and speech-driven realistic 3-d virtual head for human-machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Wang, Zeng-Fu

    2015-05-01

    A multiple inputs-driven realistic facial animation system based on 3-D virtual head for human-machine interface is proposed. The system can be driven independently by video, text, and speech, thus can interact with humans through diverse interfaces. The combination of parameterized model and muscular model is used to obtain a tradeoff between computational efficiency and high realism of 3-D facial animation. The online appearance model is used to track 3-D facial motion from video in the framework of particle filtering, and multiple measurements, i.e., pixel color value of input image and Gabor wavelet coefficient of illumination ratio image, are infused to reduce the influence of lighting and person dependence for the construction of online appearance model. The tri-phone model is used to reduce the computational consumption of visual co-articulation in speech synchronized viseme synthesis without sacrificing any performance. The objective and subjective experiments show that the system is suitable for human-machine interaction.

  9. Maintenance Of The EPS 3000 Electron Beam Machine As Part Of Quality Assurance Program For Irradiation Service At ALURTRON, Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Aiasah Hashim; Shari Jahar; Ayub Muhammad; Azmi Ali; Abdul Basit Shafiei; Sarada Idris

    2012-01-01

    The EPS 3000 electron beam machine is the first of its kind in the country and was installed in Nuclear Malaysia in 1991. It was manufactured by Nissin High Voltage having variable energies from 0.5 to 3.0 MeV and maximum power of 90 kW. The machine is currently used for commercial irradiation that serves local industries. The Alurtron facility where the EPS is housed is an ISO 9000 certified plant. Maintenance program for the EPS is an essential part of Alurtron's Quality Assurance program. This is to ensure that the machine is in good condition and can serve the customer as the demand requires. Preventive maintenance is carried out at scheduled period based on recommendation of the machine's manufacturer. Corrective maintenance and repairs are carried out in-house by Alurtron's technical staff. Assistance may be sought from the manufacturer if necessary. Over the years, Alurtron had built its own capabilities in term of operation and maintenance of Cockcroft Walton type electron beam machine. (author)

  10. Social cobots: Anticipatory decision-making for collaborative robots incorporating unexpected human behaviors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Can Görür, O

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose an architecture as a robot’s decision-making mechanism to anticipate a human’s state of mind, and so plan accordingly during a human-robot collaboration task. At the core of the architecture lies a novel stochastic decision...

  11. Error analysis of nuclear power plant operator cognitive behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xuhong; Zhao Bingquan; Chen Yulong

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear power plant is a complex human-machine system integrated with many advanced machines, electron devices and automatic controls. It demands operators to have high cognitive ability and correct analysis skill. The author divides operator's cognitive process into five stages to analysis. With this cognitive model, operator's cognitive error is analysed to get the root causes and stages that error happens. The results of the analysis serve as a basis in design of control rooms and training and evaluation of operators

  12. Human and organizational factors in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.; Barrientos, M.; Gil, B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear installations are socio technical systems where human and organizational factors, in both utilities and regulators, have a significant impact on safety. Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, original of several initiatives in the human factors field, nevertheless became a lost opportunity to timely acquire lessons related to the upper tiers of the system. Nowadays, Spanish nuclear installations have integrated in their processes specialists and activities in human and organizational factors, promoted by the licensees After many years of hard work, Spanish installations have achieved a better position to face new challenges, such as those posed by Fukushima. With this experience, only technology-centered action plan would not be acceptable, turning this accident in yet another lost opportunity. (Author)

  13. Mobile robotics application in the nuclear industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.L.; White, J.R. [REMOTEC, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Mobile robots have been developed to perform hazardous operations in place of human workers. Applications include nuclear plant inspection/maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning police/military explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), hostage/terrorist negotiations and fire fighting. Nuclear facilities have proven that robotic applications can be cost-effective solutions to reducing personnel exposure and plant downtime. The first applications of mobile robots in the nuclear industry began in the early 1980`s, with the first vehicles being one of a kind machines or adaptations of commercial EOD robots. These activities included efforts by numerous commercial companies, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, EPRI, and several national laboratories. Some of these efforts were driven by the recovery and cleanup activities at TMI which demonstrated the potential and need for a remote means of performing surveillance and maintenance tasks in nuclear plants. The use of these machines is now becoming commonplace in nuclear facilities throughout the world. The hardware maturity and the confidence of the users has progressed to the point where the applications of mobile robots is not longer considered a novelty. These machines are being used in applications where the result is to help achieve more aggressive goals for personnel radiation exposure and plant availability, perform tasks more efficiently, and allow plant operators to retrieve information from areas previously considered inaccessible. Typical examples include surveillance in high radiation areas (during operation and outage activities), radiation surveys, waste handling, and decontamination evolutions. This paper will discuss this evolution including specific applications experiences, examples of currently available technology, and the benefits derived from the use of mobile robotic vehicles in commercial nuclear power facilities.

  14. Mobile robotics application in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.L.; White, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Mobile robots have been developed to perform hazardous operations in place of human workers. Applications include nuclear plant inspection/maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning police/military explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), hostage/terrorist negotiations and fire fighting. Nuclear facilities have proven that robotic applications can be cost-effective solutions to reducing personnel exposure and plant downtime. The first applications of mobile robots in the nuclear industry began in the early 1980's, with the first vehicles being one of a kind machines or adaptations of commercial EOD robots. These activities included efforts by numerous commercial companies, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, EPRI, and several national laboratories. Some of these efforts were driven by the recovery and cleanup activities at TMI which demonstrated the potential and need for a remote means of performing surveillance and maintenance tasks in nuclear plants. The use of these machines is now becoming commonplace in nuclear facilities throughout the world. The hardware maturity and the confidence of the users has progressed to the point where the applications of mobile robots is not longer considered a novelty. These machines are being used in applications where the result is to help achieve more aggressive goals for personnel radiation exposure and plant availability, perform tasks more efficiently, and allow plant operators to retrieve information from areas previously considered inaccessible. Typical examples include surveillance in high radiation areas (during operation and outage activities), radiation surveys, waste handling, and decontamination evolutions. This paper will discuss this evolution including specific applications experiences, examples of currently available technology, and the benefits derived from the use of mobile robotic vehicles in commercial nuclear power facilities

  15. A transient search using combined human and machine classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Darryl E.; Lintott, Chris J.; Smartt, Stephen J.; Smith, Ken W.; Fortson, Lucy; Trouille, Laura; Allen, Campbell R.; Beck, Melanie; Bouslog, Mark C.; Boyer, Amy; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, Heather; Granger, Will; Magnier, Eugene A.; McMaster, Adam; Miller, Grant R. M.; O'Donnell, James E.; Simmons, Brooke; Spiers, Helen; Tonry, John L.; Veldthuis, Marten; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Waters, Chris; Willman, Mark; Wolfenbarger, Zach; Young, Dave R.

    2017-12-01

    Large modern surveys require efficient review of data in order to find transient sources such as supernovae, and to distinguish such sources from artefacts and noise. Much effort has been put into the development of automatic algorithms, but surveys still rely on human review of targets. This paper presents an integrated system for the identification of supernovae in data from Pan-STARRS1, combining classifications from volunteers participating in a citizen science project with those from a convolutional neural network. The unique aspect of this work is the deployment, in combination, of both human and machine classifications for near real-time discovery in an astronomical project. We show that the combination of the two methods outperforms either one used individually. This result has important implications for the future development of transient searches, especially in the era of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and other large-throughput surveys.

  16. Nuclear weapons headed for the trash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkin, W.M.; Durrant, D.; Kristensen, H.

    1991-01-01

    Whether he intended it or not, Bush has taken steps that mean the beginning of the end for nuclear weapons. His proposals significantly reduce the numbers of nuclear weapons and the burdens associated with deploying and controlling them. And although he retains many of the options for continuing and regenerating the nuclear arsenal, he has exposed the fact that there are no longer any grand justifications or doctrinal needs for nuclear weapons - and that the nuclear machine is choking on its economic, political, environmental, and human contradictions. The initiatives fundamentally altered the nuclear stance of both nations. Yet, as momentous as the changes were, they were set in motion in an almost businesslike manner. Neither leader truly framed the moves as an end to the nuclear age. But they didn't need to. The steps they have taken practically guarantee it

  17. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission human factors program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Human Factors Program Plan is to ensure that proper consideration is given to human factors in the design and operation of nuclear facilities. This revised plan addresses human factors issues related to the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). The three issues of concern are (1) the activities planned to provide the technical bases to resolve the remaining tasks related to human factors as described in NUREG-0660, The NRC Action Plan Developed as a Result of the TMI-2 Accident, and NUREG-0737, Clarification of TMI Action Plan Requirements; (2) the need to address the additional human factors efforts that were identified during implementation of the Action Plan; and (3) the actual fulfillment of those developmental activities specified in Revision 1 of this plan. The plan represents a systematic approach for addressing high priority human factors concerns important to NPP safety in FY 1986 through 1987

  18. Improving collaborative work and project management in a nuclear power plant design team: A human-centered design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Guy André; Jani, Gopal; Manera, Annalisa; Memmott, Matthew; Petrovic, Bojan; Rayad, Yassine; Stephane, Lucas; Suri, Neha

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a collaborative system, called SCORE, useful for a multi-disciplinary team designing a new nuclear power plant (NPP). It was developed during the first phase of the I 2 S-LWR project (Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor). SCORE enables the generation of design cards (DCs). A DC includes four main spaces (Boy, 2005): (1) a rationalization space where the various components of the system being designed (SBD) are described in terms of design rationale, integration and requirements; this space includes declarative and procedural descriptions and statements; (2) an activity space where the current version of the SBD is displayed; it includes static and dynamic features; this space enables SBD manipulation; (3) a structure space where the various components and their inter-relations are formally and declaratively described as systems of systems; (4) a function space where the various functions of the SBD are described in terms of procedural knowledge and dynamic processes involved; this space includes qualitative and quantitative physical and cognitive models. The rationalization space is informed using an adapted version of the QOC method (Questions, Options, Criteria), which was tested within the I 2 S-LWR design team. The activity space contains 3D models developed using AutoDesk Inventor, and transferred into the Unity game engine web player in order to facilitate integration within the DC spaces and enable intuitive manipulation of objects in the activity space. Two additional spaces were added: an instant messaging capability that allows design team members (DTMs) to exchange with one another on a DC; and a structured evaluation space. DCs are cooperatively created and refined by DTMs, and synthesized during periodic design meetings, the frequency of which may vary. Incrementally combining abstract explanations of designed elements and integration with their explicit visual representation improves mutual understanding among DTMs, and

  19. The mission execution crew assistant : Improving human-machine team resilience for long duration missions

    OpenAIRE

    Neerincx, M.A.; Lindenberg, J.; Smets, N.J.J.M.; Bos, A.; Breebaart, L.; Grant, T.; Olmedo-Soler, A.; Brauer, U.; Wolff, M.

    2008-01-01

    Manned long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars set high operational, human factors and technical demands for a distributed support system, which enhances human-machine teams' capabilities to cope autonomously with unexpected, complex and potentially hazardous situations. Based on a situated Cognitive Engineering (sCE) method, we specified a theoretical and empirical founded Requirements Baseline (RB) for such a system (called Mission Execution Crew Assistant; MECA), and its rational consi...

  20. Development of human factors engineering guide for nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Dangshi; Sheng Jufang

    1997-01-01

    'THE PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR APPLICATION OF HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING TO NUCLEAR POWER PROJECT (First Draft, in Chinese)', which was developed under a research program sponsored by National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) is described briefly. It is hoped that more conscious, more systematical and more comprehensive application of Human Factors Engineering to the nuclear power projects from the preliminary feasibility studies up to the commercial operation will benefit the safe, efficient and economical operations of nuclear power plants in China