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Sample records for cold-vapor atomic absorption

  1. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  2. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  3. Determination of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer in Tongkat Ali preparations obtained in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Hooi-Hoon; Lee, Ee-Lin; Cheang, Hui-Seong

    2004-01-01

    The DCA (Drug Control Authority), Malaysia, has implemented the phase 3 registration of traditional medicines on 1 January 1992, with special emphasis on the quality, efficacy, and safety (including the presence of heavy metals) in all pharmaceutical dosage forms of traditional medicine preparations. As such, a total of 100 products in various pharmaceutical dosage forms of a herbal preparation, containing Tongkat Ali, were analyzed for mercury content using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that 36% of the above products possessed 0.52 to 5.30 ppm of mercury and, therefore, do not comply with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia. Out of these 36 products, 5 products that possessed 1.05 to 4.41 ppm of mercury were in fact have already registered with the DCA, Malaysia. However, the rest of the products that contain 0.52 to 5.30 ppm of mercury still have not registered with the DCA, Malaysia. Although this study showed that only 64% of the products complied with the quality requirement for traditional medicines in Malaysia pertaining to mercury, they cannot be assumed safe from mercury contamination because of batch-to-batch inconsistency.

  4. Improved preparation of small biological samples for mercury analysis using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, B M; Cobb, G P

    1999-05-01

    Concentrations of mercury in biological samples collected for environmental studies are often less than 0.1 microgram/g. Low mercury concentrations and small organ sizes in many wildlife species (approximately 0.1 g) increase the difficulty of mercury determination at environmentally relevant concentrations. We have developed a digestion technique to extract mercury from small (0.1 g), biological samples at these relevant concentrations. Mean recoveries (+/- standard error) from validation trials of mercury fortified tissue samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy for analysis ranged from 102 +/- 4.3% (2.5 micrograms/L, n = 15) to 108 +/- 1.4% (25 micrograms/L, n = 15). Recoveries of inorganic mercury were 99 +/- 5 (n = 19) for quality assurance samples analyzed during environmental evaluations conducted during a 24 month period. This technique can be used to determine total mercury concentrations of 60 ng Hg/g sample. Samples can be analyzed in standard laboratories in a short time, at minimal cost. The technique is versatile and can be used to determine mercury concentrations in several different matrices, limiting the time and expense of method development and validation.

  5. Determination of mercury in phosphate fertilizers by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Robson M; Silva, Laiana O B; Castro, Jacira T; de Azevedo Neto, Andre D; de Jesus, Raildo M; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2013-03-15

    In this paper, a method for the determination of mercury in phosphate fertilizers using slurry sampling and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV QT AAS) is proposed. Because mercury (II) ions form strong complexes with phosphor compounds, the formation of metallic mercury vapor requires the presence of lanthanum chloride as a release agent. Thiourea increases the amount of mercury that is extracted from the solid sample to the liquid phase of the slurry. The method is established using two steps. First, the slurry is prepared using the sample, lanthanum chloride, hydrochloric acid solution and thiourea solution and is sonicated for 20 min. Afterward, mercury vapor is generated using an aliquot of the slurry in the presence of the hydrochloric acid solution and isoamylic alcohol with sodium tetrahydroborate solution as the reducing agent. The experimental conditions for slurry preparation were optimized using two-level full factorial design involving the factors: thiourea and lanthanum chloride concentrations and the duration of sonication. The method allows the determination of mercury by external calibration using aqueous standards with limits of detection and quantification of 2.4 and 8.2 μg kg(-1), respectively, and precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, of 6.36 and 5.81% for two phosphate fertilizer samples with mercury concentrations of 0.24 and 0.57 mg kg(-1), respectively. The accuracy was confirmed by the analysis of a certified reference material of phosphate fertilizer that was provided by the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST). The method was applied to determine mercury in six commercial samples of phosphate fertilizers. The mercury content varied from 33.97 to 209.28 μg kg(-1). These samples were also analyzed employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS results were consistent with the results from our proposed method.

  6. Comparison of Adsorbed Mercury Screening Method With Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry for Determination of Mercury in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterling, Donald F.; Hovanitz, Edward S.; Street, Kenneth W.

    2000-01-01

    A field screening method for the determination of elemental mercury in environmental soil samples involves the thermal desorption of the mercury from the sample onto gold and then the thermal desorption from the gold to a gold-film mercury vapor analyzer. This field screening method contains a large number of conditions that could be optimized for the various types of soils encountered. In this study, the conditions were optimized for the determination of mercury in silty clay materials, and the results were comparable to the cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometric method of determination. This paper discusses the benefits and disadvantages of employing the field screening method and provides the sequence of conditions that must be optimized to employ this method of determination on other soil types.

  7. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Abdollahi Atousa; Amirkavehei Mooud; Gheisari Mohammad Mehdi; Tadayon Fariba

    2014-01-01

    A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap). The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically ...

  8. Methylmercury determination using a hyphenated high performance liquid chromatography ultraviolet cold vapor multipath atomic absorption spectrometry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Reinaldo C.; Gonçalves, Rodrigo A.; Brandão, Geisamanda P.; Azevedo, Marlo S.; Oliveira, Fabiana; Wasserman, Julio

    2009-06-01

    The present work investigates the use of a multipath cell atomic absorption mercury detector for mercury speciation analysis in a hyphenated high performance liquid chromatography assembly. The multipath absorption cell multiplies the optical path while energy losses are compensated by a very intense primary source. Zeeman-effect background correction compensates for non-specific absorption. For the separation step, the mobile phase consisted in a 0.010% m/v mercaptoethanol solution in 5% methanol (pH = 5), a C 18 column was used as stationary phase, and post column treatment was performed by UV irradiation (60 °C, 13 W). The eluate was then merged with 3 mol L - 1 HCl, reduction was performed by a NaBH 4 solution, and the Hg vapor formed was separated at the gas-liquid separator and carried through a desiccant membrane to the detector. The detector was easily attached to the system, since an external gas flow to the gas-liquid separator was provided. A multivariate approach was used to optimize the procedure and peak area was used for measurement. Instrumental limits of detection of 0.05 µg L - 1 were obtained for ionic (Hg 2+) and HgCH 3+, for an injection volume of 200 µL. The multipath atomic absorption spectrometer proved to be a competitive mercury detector in hyphenated systems in relation to the most commonly used atomic fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detectors. Preliminary application studies were performed for the determination of methyl mercury in sediments.

  9. Methylmercury determination using a hyphenated high performance liquid chromatography ultraviolet cold vapor multipath atomic absorption spectrometry system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Reinaldo C. [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: rccampos@puc-rio.br; Goncalves, Rodrigo A.; Brandao, Geisamanda P.; Azevedo, Marlo S. [Department of Chemistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, Fabiana; Wasserman, Julio [Institut of Geosciences, Fluminense Federal University, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza, s/n, 24.210-340, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    The present work investigates the use of a multipath cell atomic absorption mercury detector for mercury speciation analysis in a hyphenated high performance liquid chromatography assembly. The multipath absorption cell multiplies the optical path while energy losses are compensated by a very intense primary source. Zeeman-effect background correction compensates for non-specific absorption. For the separation step, the mobile phase consisted in a 0.010% m/v mercaptoethanol solution in 5% methanol (pH = 5), a C{sub 18} column was used as stationary phase, and post column treatment was performed by UV irradiation (60 deg. C, 13 W). The eluate was then merged with 3 mol L{sup -1} HCl, reduction was performed by a NaBH{sub 4} solution, and the Hg vapor formed was separated at the gas-liquid separator and carried through a desiccant membrane to the detector. The detector was easily attached to the system, since an external gas flow to the gas-liquid separator was provided. A multivariate approach was used to optimize the procedure and peak area was used for measurement. Instrumental limits of detection of 0.05 {mu}g L{sup -1} were obtained for ionic (Hg{sup 2+}) and HgCH{sub 3}{sup +}, for an injection volume of 200 {mu}L. The multipath atomic absorption spectrometer proved to be a competitive mercury detector in hyphenated systems in relation to the most commonly used atomic fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detectors. Preliminary application studies were performed for the determination of methyl mercury in sedi0011men.

  10. Evaluation of the memory effect on gold-coated silica adsorption tubes used for the analysis of gaseous mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Brown, Richard J C; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-On; Phan, Nhu-Thuc

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the experimental bias involved in the analysis of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(o)), the blank response from gold-coated adsorption tubes has been investigated using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Our study has been compared with our recent investigation on memory effect in a cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). The pattern of blank responses was quantified after loading different amounts of mercury and after different time intervals of 1, 14, and 45 days. In case of the one day interval, the result of five to six instant blank heating cycles confirmed successful liberation of mercury following the second and third blank heating cycles. The results of 14 or 45 days generally suggest that liberation of excess mercury is affected by both the initial loading amount and the length of storage time prior to analysis. We have demonstrated a possibly effective way to reduce memory effects. Some similarities of these results with those from CVAFS experiment suggests that the blank response is caused by a combination of mercury absorbed within the bulk gold and micro- and nanoparticles liberated during heating and not from coabsorbing interfering gaseous species.

  11. Evaluation of the Memory Effect on Gold-Coated Silica Adsorption Tubes Used for the Analysis of Gaseous Mercury by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahmudur Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to reduce the experimental bias involved in the analysis of gaseous elemental mercury (Hgo, the blank response from gold-coated adsorption tubes has been investigated using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS. Our study has been compared with our recent investigation on memory effect in a cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS. The pattern of blank responses was quantified after loading different amounts of mercury and after different time intervals of 1, 14, and 45 days. In case of the one day interval, the result of five to six instant blank heating cycles confirmed successful liberation of mercury following the second and third blank heating cycles. The results of 14 or 45 days generally suggest that liberation of excess mercury is affected by both the initial loading amount and the length of storage time prior to analysis. We have demonstrated a possibly effective way to reduce memory effects. Some similarities of these results with those from CVAFS experiment suggests that the blank response is caused by a combination of mercury absorbed within the bulk gold and micro- and nanoparticles liberated during heating and not from coabsorbing interfering gaseous species.

  12. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water after preconcentration and separation by DLLME-SFO method coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi Atousa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO for simultaneous separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of mercury was used. A method based on amalgamation was used for collection of gaseous mercury on gold coated sand (Gold trap. The concentration of mercury was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS. The DLLME-SFO behavior of mercury by using dithizone as complexing agent was systematically investigated. The factors influencing, the complex formation and extraction of DLLME-SFO method such as type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH, concentration of salt, centrifuging time and concentration of the chelating agent were optimized. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in drinking and natural water and satisfactory relative recoveries (95–105% were achieved. The proposed procedure was based on very low consumption of organic solvents. The other benefits of the system were sensitive, simple, friendly to the environment, rejection of matrix constituent, low cost, the time consuming and high enrichment factor.

  13. Determination of Hg(II) in waters by on-line preconcentration using Cyanex 923 as a sorbent — Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Taicheng; Song, Xuejie; Xu, Jingwei; Guo, Pengran; Chen, Hangting; Li, Hongfei

    2006-09-01

    Using a solid phase extraction mini-column home-made from a neutral extractant Cyanex 923, inorganic Hg could be on-line preconcentrated and simultaneously separated from methyl mercury. The preconcentrated Hg (II) was then eluted with 10% HNO 3 and subsequently reduced by NaBH 4 to form Hg vapor before determination by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal conditions for and interferences on the Hg preconcentration and measurement were at 1% HCl, for a 25 mL sample uptake volume and a 10 mL min - 1 sample loading rate. The detection limit was 0.2 ng L - 1 and much lower than that of conventional method (around 15.8 ng L - 1 ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) is 1.8% for measurements of 40 ng L - 1 of Hg and the linear working curve is from 20 to 2000 ng L - 1 (with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996). The method was applied in determination of inorganic Hg in city lake and deep well water (from Changchun, Jilin, China), and recovery test results for both samples were satisfactory.

  14. Determination of Hg(II) in waters by on-line preconcentration using Cyanex 923 as a sorbent - Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Taicheng [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, National Research Center of Electroanalytical and Spectroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Song Xuejie [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, National Research Center of Electroanalytical and Spectroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Xu Jingwei [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, National Research Center of Electroanalytical and Spectroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Guo Pengran [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, National Research Center of Electroanalytical and Spectroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Chen Hangting [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, National Research Center of Electroanalytical and Spectroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)]. E-mail: htchen@ciac.jl.cn; Li Hongfei [Laboratory of Rare Earth Chemistry and Physics, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2006-09-15

    Using a solid phase extraction mini-column home-made from a neutral extractant Cyanex 923, inorganic Hg could be on-line preconcentrated and simultaneously separated from methyl mercury. The preconcentrated Hg (II) was then eluted with 10% HNO{sub 3} and subsequently reduced by NaBH{sub 4} to form Hg vapor before determination by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal conditions for and interferences on the Hg preconcentration and measurement were at 1% HCl, for a 25 mL sample uptake volume and a 10 mL min{sup -1} sample loading rate. The detection limit was 0.2 ng L{sup -1} and much lower than that of conventional method (around 15.8 ng L{sup -1}). The relative standard deviation (RSD) is 1.8% for measurements of 40 ng L{sup -1} of Hg and the linear working curve is from 20 to 2000 ng L{sup -1} (with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996). The method was applied in determination of inorganic Hg in city lake and deep well water (from Changchun, Jilin, China), and recovery test results for both samples were satisfactory.

  15. Trace mercury determination in drinking and natural water samples by room temperature ionic liquid based-preconcentration and flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinis, Estefania M.; Berton, Paula [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, CC. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Olsina, Roberto A. [INQUISAL-CONICET, Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Altamirano, Jorgelina C. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, CC. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina); Wuilloud, Rodolfo G., E-mail: rwuilloud@lab.cricyt.edu.ar [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, CC. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina)

    2009-08-15

    A liquid-liquid extraction procedure (L-L) based on room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was developed for the preconcentration and determination of mercury in different water samples. The analyte was quantitatively extracted with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}]) under the form of Hg-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (Hg-5-Br-PADAP) complex. A volume of 500 {mu}l of 9.0 mol L{sup -1} hydrochloric acid was used to back-extract the analyte from the RTIL phase into an aqueous media prior to its analysis by flow injection-cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-CV-AAS). A preconcentration factor of 36 was achieved upon preconcentration of 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under the optimal conditions was 2.3 ng L{sup -1} and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for 10 replicates at 1 {mu}g L{sup -1} Hg{sup 2+} was 2.8%, calculated with peaks height. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in river, sea, mineral and tap water samples and a certified reference material (CRM).

  16. Automatic flow-batch system for cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey from Argentina using online sample treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Marina A; Grünhut, Marcos; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Di Nezio, María S; Centurión, María E

    2012-05-16

    An automatic flow-batch system that includes two borosilicate glass chambers to perform sample digestion and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy determination of mercury in honey samples was designed. The sample digestion was performed by using a low-cost halogen lamp to obtain the optimum temperature. Optimization of the digestion procedure was done using a Box-Behnken experimental design. A linear response was observed from 2.30 to 11.20 μg Hg L(-1). The relative standard deviation was 3.20% (n = 11, 6.81 μg Hg L(-1)), the sample throughput was 4 sample h(-1), and the detection limit was 0.68 μg Hg L(-1). The obtained results with the flow-batch method are in good agreement with those obtained with the reference method. The flow-batch system is simple, allows the use of both chambers simultaneously, is seen as a promising methodology for achieving green chemistry goals, and is a good proposal to improving the quality control of honey.

  17. An analytical method for determination of mercury by cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy; Determinazione di mercurio. Metodo per spettrometria di assorbimento atomico a vapori freddi (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, L. [Rome Univ. La Sapienza, Rome (Italy); Mastroianni, D.; Capri, S.; Pettine, M. [CNR, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Ricerca sulle Acque; Spezia, S.; Bettinelli, M. [ENEL, Unified Modelling Language, Piacenza (Italy)

    1999-09-01

    An analytical procedure for the determination of total mercury in wastewaters and natural waters is described. Aqueous samples are fast digested with nitric acid by using the microwave-oven technique; the analysis of mercury is then performed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS) using two possible instrumental apparatus (batch system or flow injection). Sodium borohydride is used as the reducing agent for mercury in solution (Method A). The use of amalgamation traps on gold for the preconcentration of mercury lowers the detection limit of the analyte (Method B). [Italian] Viene descritta una procedura analitica per la determinazione del mercurio totale in acque di scarico e naturali. Il campione acquoso viene sottoposto a mineralizzazione con acido nitrico in forno a microonde e analizzato mediante spettroscopia di assorbimento atomico a vapori freddi (CV-AAS) in due possibili configurazioni strumentali (sistema batch oppure flow injection), utilizzando sodio boro idruro come agente riducente del mercurio (metodo A). L'impiego della trappola di oro per la preconcentrazione del mercurio mediante amalgama consente di determinare l'analita a livelli di pochi ng/L (metodo B).

  18. Total Mercury Determination in Petroleum Green Coke and Oily Sludge Samples by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Camera, Adriana S; Maranhão, Tatiane A; Oliveira, Fernando J. S; Silva, Jessee S. A; Frescura, Vera L. A

    2015-01-01

    ...+ before the atomic vapor formation. Accuracy of the method was evaluated through certified reference material, for green coke, and comparison with cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS), for oily sludge...

  19. Development of a method for total Hg determination in oil samples by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry after its extraction induced by emulsion breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicentino, Priscila de O; Brum, Daniel M; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the development of a novel extraction method for total Hg determination in oil samples. After extracting Hg from samples it was quantified in the extracts by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS), employing a laboratory-made gas-liquid separator (GLS) and NaBH4 as reducing agent. The extraction of Hg from samples was carried out by extraction induced by emulsion breaking (EIEB), which is based on the formation and breaking of water-in-oil emulsion between the oil samples and an extractant solution containing an emulsifying agent (surfactant) and nitric acid. Operational parameters of the GLS were evaluated in order to set the best performance of the measurement system. In these studies it was proven that the volume of sample and the concentration of HCl added to the sample extracts had significant influence on Hg response. The best conditions were achieved by adding 0.5 mL of a 0.3 mol L(-1) HCl solution on 1 mL of sample extract. The extraction conditions were also optimized. The highest efficiency was observed when 4 mL of a solution containing 2.5% triton X-100 and 15% v/v HNO3 were employed for the extraction of Hg contained in 20 mL of sample. Emulsion breaking was performed by heating at 80 °C and took approximately 20 min. The limit of quantification of the method was 1.9 µg L(-1) and recovery percentages between 80% and 103% were observed when spiked samples (2 and 10 µg L(-1)) of diesel oil, biodiesel and mineral oil were analyzed.

  20. Evaluation of the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide gel (Nite White on mercury release from Iranian and foreign spherical and admixed amalgams by cold vapor atomic absorption method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasraie Sh.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nowadays, esthetic dentistry has become an important part of modern dentistry. Bleaching is considered as a conservative, safe and effective way for treatment of discolored teeth. Although bleaching is commonly used on anterior teeth, the bleaching gel may come into contact with patient's former amalgam restorations and result in corrosive effects, dissolution of amalgam phases and increasing release of mercury. Mercury released from dental amalgam during mouthguard bleaching can be absorbed and increase the total mercury body burden. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of mercury released from Iranian and foreign brands of amalgams with spherical and admixed particles, polished and unpolished, after 16%carbamide peroxide gel application.Materials and Methods: This experimental in vitro study was performed on 256 Iranian and foreign amalgam samples with spherical and admixed particles. The provided samples were put in distilled water and classified according to the type of amalgam, shape of particles and quality of surface polishing. The test samples were placed in Nite White 16% carbamid peroxide gel and control samples were put in phosphate buffer (Ph=6.5 for 14 and 28 hours. The amount of released mercury was calculated using AVA-440 Mercury Analysis System (Thermo Jarrell Ash model SH/229 with cold-vapor atomic absorption. Data were analyzed using t-test, four way and three way ANOVA tests with P<0.05 as the level of significance.Results: 16% Nite White carbamide peroxide gel caused a significant increase in amount of mercury released from amalgams in all groups (P<0.05. Mercury release from Iranian amalgam was higher than that from the foreign brands (P<0.05. There was no significant difference in mercury released from spherical and admixed amalgams (P>0.05. The amount of mercury released from Iranian and foreign amalgams was time dependent (P<0.05. Furthermore, the amount of mercury released from

  1. Differential Determination of Organic Mercury and Inorganic Mercury in Sediment, Soil and Aquatic Organisms by Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TOMIYASU, Takashi; NAGANO, Ayako; SAKAMOTO, Hayao; YONEHARA, Norinobu

    1996-01-01

    A method has been proposed for the differential determination of inorganic and organic mercury in environmental and biological materials, based on their successive extraction followed by a cold vapor...

  2. Analysis of trace mercury in water by solid phase extraction using dithizone modified nanometer titanium dioxide and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new method for analysis of trace mercury in water samples was developed, based on the combination of preconcentration/separation using dithizone-modified nanometer titanium dioxide (TiO2) as a solid phase extractant and determination by cold vapor atomic adsorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Dithizone was dissolved with alcohol and loaded on the surface of nano-sized TiO2 powders by stirring. The static adsorption behavior of Hg2+ on the dithizone-modified nanoparticles was investigated in detail. It was found that excellent adsorption ratio for Hg2+ could be obtained in the pH range of 7-8 with an oscillation time of 15 min, and a 5 mL of 3.5 mol·L-1 HCl solution could quantitatively elute Hg2+ from nanometer TiO2 powder. Common coexisting ions caused no obvious influence on the determination of mercury. The mechanisms for the adsorption and desorption were discussed. The detection limit (3σ) for Hg2+ was calculated to be 5 ng·L-1. The proposed method was applied to the determination of Hg2+ in a mineral water sample and a Zhujiang River water sample. By the standard addition method, the average recoveries were found to be 94.4%-108.3% with RSD (n = 5) of 2.9%-3.5%.

  3. Validação de metodologia analítica para determinação de mercúrio total em amostras de urina por espectrometria de absorção atômica com geração de vapor frio (CV-AAS): estudo de caso Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS): case study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sabine Neusatz Guilhen; Maria Aparecida Faustino Pires; Elizabeth Sonoda Keiko Dantas; Fernanda Villibor Xavier

    2010-01-01

    .... One of its more dubious uses is in dental amalgam restorations. It is possible to measure very small concentrations of this metal in the urine of exposed subjects by the cold vapor atomic absorption technique...

  4. Determination of mercury in rice by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Maria Jose da [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Edificio de Investigacion, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50740-550 Recife, PE (Brazil); Paim, Ana Paula S. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, 50740-550 Recife, PE (Brazil); Pimentel, Maria Fernanda [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Cervera, M. Luisa, E-mail: m.luisa.cervera@uv.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Edificio de Investigacion, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Guardia, Miguel de la [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Edificio de Investigacion, University of Valencia, 50 Dr. Moliner Street, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-05-14

    A cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry method (CV-AFS) has been developed for the determination of Hg in rice samples at a few ng g{sup -1} concentration level. The method is based on the previous digestion of samples in a microwave oven with HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} followed by dilution with water containing KBr/KBrO{sub 3} and hydroxylamine and reduction with SnCl{sub 2} in HCl using external calibration. The matrix interferences and the effect of nitrogen oxide vapors have been evaluated and the method validated using a certified reference material. The limit of detection of the method was 0.9 ng g{sup -1} with a recovery percentage of 95 {+-} 4% at an added concentration of 5 ng g{sup -1}. The concentration level of Hg found in 24 natural rice samples from different origin ranged between 1.3 and 7.8 ng g{sup -1}.

  5. Validação de metodologia analítica para determinação de mercúrio total em amostras de urina por espectrometria de absorção atômica com geração de vapor frio (CV-AAS: estudo de caso Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Neusatz Guilhen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is a toxic metal used in a variety of substances over the course history. One of its more dubious uses is in dental amalgam restorations. It is possible to measure very small concentrations of this metal in the urine of exposed subjects by the cold vapor atomic absorption technique. The present work features the validation as an essential tool to confirm the suitability of the analytical method chosen to accomplish such determination. An initial analysis will be carried out in order to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in 39 members of the auxiliary dental staff at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaína (TO.

  6. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina para espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method's performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 +- 11,70)mug.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10{mu}g.L{sup -1}. The

  7. Validation of an analytical method for the determination of total mercury in urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS); Validacao de metodologia analitica para determinacao de mercurio total em amostras de urina por espectrometria de absorcao atomica com geracao de vapor frio (CV-AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz

    2009-07-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal applied to a variety of products and processes, representing a risk to the health of occupationally or accidentally exposed subjects. Dental amalgam is a restorative material composed of metallic mercury, which use has been widely debated in the last decades. Due to the dubiety of the studies concerning dental amalgam, many efforts concerning this issue have been conducted. The Tropical Medicine Foundation (Tocantins, Brazil) has recently initiated a study to evaluate the environmental and occupational levels of exposure to mercury in dentistry attendants at public consulting rooms in the city of Araguaina (TO). In collaboration with this study, the laboratory of analysis at IPEN's Chemistry and Environment Center is undertaking the analysis of mercury levels in exposed subjects' urine samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. This analysis requires the definition of a methodology capable of generating reliable results. Such methodology can only be implemented after a rigorous validation procedure. As part of this work, a series of tests were conducted in order to confirm the suitability of the selected methodology and to assert that the laboratory addresses all requirements needed for a successful implementation of the methodology. The following parameters were considered in order to test the method’s performance: detection and quantitation limits, selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy and precision. The assays were carried out with certified reference material, which assures the traceability of the results. Taking into account the estimated parameters, the method can be considered suitable for the afore mentioned purpose. The mercury concentration found for the reference material was of (95,12 ± 11,70)μg.L{sup -1} with a recovery rate of 97%. The method was also applied to 39 urine samples, six of which (15%) showing urinary mercury levels above the normal limit of 10μg.L{sup −1}. The obtained

  8. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu, E-mail: ftibi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mihaltan, Alin I., E-mail: alinblaj2005@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ponta, Michaela, E-mail: mponta@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Darvasi, Eugen, E-mail: edarvasi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Frentiu, Maria, E-mail: frentiu.maria@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordos, Emil, E-mail: emilcordos@gmail.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Use of a miniaturized analytical system with microtorch plasma for Hg determination. {yields} Determination of Hg in non- and biodegradable materials using cold vapor generation. {yields} Figures of merit and advantages of the miniaturized system for Hg determination. - Abstract: A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min{sup -1} Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl{sub 2} reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml{sup -1} or 0.08 {mu}g g{sup -1} in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg{sup -1}, while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 {+-} 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  9. Study on the Solid Sorbent Tube for Capturing Mercury in the Workplace Air and Determination by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometry%固体吸附管捕集冷原子吸收光谱法测定工作场所空气中汞的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄振侬; 孙毅; 阮小林; 吴邦华; 张爱华; 黄钧宜; 黄燕玲; 黄汉林

    2014-01-01

    A new KMnO4-MnO2 solid multisorbent tube for capturing mercury in workplace air was developed .Experimental conditions for solid multisorbent tube ,efficiency of sampling ,desorption efficiency and stability were studied .Mercury and its compounds in air were captured by solid KMnO4-MnO2 sorbent filled tube and desorbed with 0.90 mol · L -1 sulfuric acid solu-tion .Mercury and its compounds were quantitatively analyzed according to the method of GBZ /T 160.14-2004 cold vapor atom-ic absorption spectrometry .The linear range of the proposed method was 0.000 2~0.015 0 mg · L -1 with r=0.999 1 ,the aver-age efficiency of sampling was 99.9% ~100.0% in the concentration range of 0.001~2.820 mg · m -3 ,and the breakthrough capacity was more than 505.4μg for 300 mg KMnO4-MnO2 solid multisorbent ,the average recovery rate was 96.4% ~103.8% , the intra-day and inter-day precision was 3.0% ~3.3% and 3.5% ~5.2% respectively ,the limit of detection was 0.0013 mg · m -3 (7.5 L of air ) and 0.000 6 mg · m -3 (96 L of air) ,after sampling ,and the solid multisorbent tube could be kept at least 30 d at room temperature without significant loss .The present method was simple and suitable for capturing mercury and its com-pounds in the workplace air and ambient air .The solid multisorbent tube was useful for personal sampling and time weighted av-erage sampling .%建立了工作场所空气中汞及其化合物的高锰酸钾-二氧化锰混合固体吸附管捕集、冷原子吸收测定方法。用高锰酸钾与二氧化锰按质量比1∶1混合后填装玻璃管制成固体吸附管捕集工作场所空气中汞,并以0.90 mol · L -1的硫酸溶液解吸后冷原子吸收光谱法测定,与高锰酸钾-硫酸吸收液法的采样效率、样品稳定性、穿透容量进行了比对。在0.0002~0.0150 mg · L -1的浓度范围内线性关系良好,相关系数为0.9991,空气中汞在0.001~2.820 mg · m -3范围内,平均采样效率为99.9%~100.0

  10. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-10-15

    A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min(-1) Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl(2) reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4) mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml(-1) or 0.08 μg g(-1) in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg(-1), while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  11. Determinação de mercúrio total em amostras de água, sedimento e sólidos em suspensão de corpos aquáticos por espectrofotometria de absorção atômica com gerador de vapor a frio Determination of total mercury in water, sediments and solids in suspension in aquatic systems by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. F. Vieira

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available O emprego de mercúrio metálico nos processos de extração do ouro libera toneladas de mercúrio ao meio ambiente, provocando um aumento considerável nas concentrações presentes. Com a finalidade de prevenir a exposição humana a concentrações excessivas, o que poderá resultar em graves episódios de intoxicação mercurial, bem como avaliar a possibilidade de sedimentos tornarem-se fontes potenciais de contaminação para os seres vivos, é de fundamental importância a monitorização do mercúrio em diversos compartimentos ambientais. Efetuou-se a padronização de uma metodologia analítica para determinação de mercúrio total em amostras de água, sólidos em suspensão e sedimentos de corpos aquáticos para monitorização ambiental do xenobiótico. Posteriormente, foram analisadas amostras oriundas de regiões garimpeiras, com vistas a avaliar o desempenho do método em amostras reais e efetuar levantamento preliminar sobre a contaminação mercurial na área de estudo.The use of metallic mercury in the extraction and concentration of gold causes the discarding of tons of this metal in the environment, leading to a considerable increase in the natural levels of the same and the contamination of the surrounding areas. Thus it is extremely important to monitor the presence of this metal in various sectors of the environment with a view aiming to previnting human exposure to excessive concentrations which can result in serious episodes of mercury poisoning. It is also important to estimate the possibility of river sediments becoming potential sources of contamination of human beings. The determination of total mercury was undertaken by using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. River waters, as well as sediments and suspended solids were used as samples for the standardization of the analytical procedure. Later on, this method was tested on samples originating in gold mining areas for the purpose of assessing its validity.

  12. Ionic liquid-based zinc oxide nanofluid for vortex assisted liquid liquid microextraction of inorganic mercury in environmental waters prior to cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amde, Meseret; Liu, Jing-Fu; Tan, Zhi-Qiang; Bekana, Deribachew

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanofluid (ZnO-NF) based vortex assisted liquid liquid microextraction (ZnO-NF VA-LLME) was developed and employed in extraction of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in environmental water samples, followed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS). Unlike other dispersive liquid liquid microextraction techniques, ZnO-NF VA-LLME is free of volatile organic solvents and dispersive solvent consumption. Analytical signals were obtained without back-extraction from the ZnO-NF phase prior to CV-AFS determination. Some essential parameters of the ZnO-NF VA-LLME and cold vapor generation such as composition and volume of the nanofluid, vortexing time, pH of the sample solution, amount of the chelating agent, ionic strength and matrix interferences have been studied. Under optimal conditions, efficient extraction of 1ng/mL of Hg(2+) in 10mL of sample solution was achieved using 50μL of ZnO-NF. The enrichment factor before dilution, detection limits and limits of quantification of the method were about 190, 0.019 and 0.064ng/mL, respectively. The intra and inter days relative standard deviations (n=8) were found to be 4.6% and 7.8%, respectively, at 1ng/mL spiking level. The accuracy of the current method was also evaluated by the analysis of certified reference materials, and the measured Hg(2+) concentration of GBW08603 (9.6ng/mL) and GBW(E)080392 (8.9ng/mL) agreed well with their certified value (10ng/mL). The method was applied to the analysis of Hg(2+) in effluent, influent, lake and river water samples, with recoveries in the range of 79.8-92.8% and 83.6-106.1% at 1ng/mL and 5ng/mL spiking levels, respectively. Overall, ZnO-NF VA-LLME is fast, simple, cost-effective and environmentally friendly and it can be employed for efficient enrichment of the analyte from various water samples.

  13. Solid Phase Extraction of Inorganic Mercury Using 5-Phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline and Determination by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy in Natural Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daye, Mirna; Halwani, Jalal; Hamzeh, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) was chosen as a powerful ligand for Hg solid phase extraction. Among several chelating resins based on 8-HQ, 5-phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline (5Ph8HQ) is used for mercury extraction in which the adsorption dynamics were fully studied. It has been shown that Hg(II) is totally absorbed by 5Ph8HQ within the first 30 minutes of contact time with t1/2 5 minutes, following Langmuir adsorption model. At pH 4, the affinity of mercury is unchallenged by other metals except, for Cu(II), which have shown higher Kd value. With these latter characteristics, 5Ph8HQ was examined for the preconcentration of trace levels of Hg(II). The developed method showed quantitative recoveries of Hg(II) with LOD = 0.21 pg mL−1 and RSD = 3–6% using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CV-AFS) with a preconcentration factor greater than 250. PMID:24459417

  14. Solid Phase Extraction of Inorganic Mercury Using 5-Phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline and Determination by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectroscopy in Natural Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Daye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ was chosen as a powerful ligand for Hg solid phase extraction. Among several chelating resins based on 8-HQ, 5-phenylazo-8-hydroxyquinoline (5Ph8HQ is used for mercury extraction in which the adsorption dynamics were fully studied. It has been shown that Hg(II is totally absorbed by 5Ph8HQ within the first 30 minutes of contact time with t1/2 5 minutes, following Langmuir adsorption model. At pH 4, the affinity of mercury is unchallenged by other metals except, for Cu(II, which have shown higher Kd value. With these latter characteristics, 5Ph8HQ was examined for the preconcentration of trace levels of Hg(II. The developed method showed quantitative recoveries of Hg(II with LOD = 0.21 pg mL−1 and RSD = 3–6% using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CV-AFS with a preconcentration factor greater than 250.

  15. Methylmercury in water samples at the pg/L level by online preconcentration liquid chromatography cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius; Chen, Bin; Corns, Warren T.; Feldmann, Jörg; Krupp, Eva M.

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-traces of methylmercury at the sub-ppt level can be magnified in the foodweb and is of concern. In environmental monitoring a routine robust analytical method is needed to determine methylmercury in water. The development of an analytical method for ultra-trace speciation analysis of methylmercury (MeHg) in water samples is described. The approach is based on HPLC-CV-AFS with on-line preconcentration of water samples up to 200 mL, resulting in a detection limit of 40 pg/L (ppq) for MeHg, expressed as Hg. The unit consists of an optimized preconcentration column filled with a sulfur-based sorption material, on which mercury species are preconcentrated and subsequently eluted, separated and detected via HPLC-CV-AFS (high performance liquid chromatography-cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry). During the method development a type of adsorbate material, the pH dependence, the sample load rate and the carry-over were investigated using breakthrough experiments. The method shows broad pH stability in the range of pH 0 to 7, without the need for buffer addition and shows limited matrix effects so that MeHg is quantitatively recovered from sewage, river and seawater directly in the acidified samples without sample preparation.

  16. Methylmercury in water samples at the pg/L level by online preconcentration liquid chromatography cold vapor-atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombach, Christoph-Cornelius [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Chen, Bin; Corns, Warren T. [PS Analytical, Arthur House, Crayfields Industrial Estate, Main Road, Orpington, Kent BR5 3HP (United Kingdom); Feldmann, Jörg [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom); Krupp, Eva M., E-mail: e.krupp@abdn.ac.uk [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Meston Walk, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3UE (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-traces of methylmercury at the sub-ppt level can be magnified in the foodweb and is of concern. In environmental monitoring a routine robust analytical method is needed to determine methylmercury in water. The development of an analytical method for ultra-trace speciation analysis of methylmercury (MeHg) in water samples is described. The approach is based on HPLC-CV-AFS with on-line preconcentration of water samples up to 200 mL, resulting in a detection limit of 40 pg/L (ppq) for MeHg, expressed as Hg. The unit consists of an optimized preconcentration column filled with a sulfur-based sorption material, on which mercury species are preconcentrated and subsequently eluted, separated and detected via HPLC-CV-AFS (high performance liquid chromatography–cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry). During the method development a type of adsorbate material, the pH dependence, the sample load rate and the carry-over were investigated using breakthrough experiments. The method shows broad pH stability in the range of pH 0 to 7, without the need for buffer addition and shows limited matrix effects so that MeHg is quantitatively recovered from sewage, river and seawater directly in the acidified samples without sample preparation. - Highlights: • We demonstrate that a novel mixture of thiourea-thiolsilica shows an excellent trapping of MeHg between a broad pH range 1–6. • We develop the method so that it can potentially be automated for inorganic and methyl-mercury. • The method is matrix independent with highly accurate results for MeHg in hair CRM extracts and spiked water samples • The limit of detection is around 40 pg/L when just 200 mL sample is used, without any intensive preparation.

  17. Determination of thiomersal by flow injection coupled with microwave-assisted photochemical online oxidative decomposition of organic mercury and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, Beatrice; Onor, Massimo; Mascherpa, Marco Carlo; D’Ulivo, Alessandro [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Ferrari, Carlo [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, INO–UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Bramanti, Emilia, E-mail: bramanti@pi.iccom.cnr.it [National Research Council of Italy, C.N.R., Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organo Metallici-ICCOM-UOS Pisa, Area di Ricerca, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Thiomersal was determined on line using FI-MW/UV-CVGAFS. •MW/UV allows a “green” on line oxidation of organic mercury to Hg{sup II}. •Each measure requires less than 5 min with a LOD of 3 ng mL{sup −1} (as mercury). •Hg concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranges between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}. -- Abstract: We developed a flow injection (FI) method for the determination of thiomersal (sodium ethylmercurithiosalicylate, C{sub 9}H{sub 9}HgNaO{sub 2}S) based on the UV/microwave (MW) photochemical, online oxidation of organic mercury, followed by cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVG-AFS) detection. Thiomersal was quantitatively converted in the MW/UV process to Hg(II), with a yield of 97 ± 3%. This reaction was followed by the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) performed in a knotted reaction coil with NaBH{sub 4} solution, and AFS detection in an Ar/H{sub 2} miniaturized flame. The method was linear in the 0.01–2 μg mL{sup −1} range, with a LOD of 0.003 μg mL{sup −1}. This method has been applied to the determination of thiomersal in ophthalmic solutions, with recoveries ranging between 97% and 101%. We found a mercury concentration in commercial ophthalmic solutions ranging between 7.5 and 59.0 μg mL{sup −1}.

  18. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-08-01

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given. (WHK)

  19. 硼氢化钾还原冷原子荧光测定大米中的汞%Determination of mercury in rice by potassium borohydride reduction cold vapor atomic fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛荐; 刘忠胜

    2011-01-01

    本方法采用硝酸-过氧化氢微波消解,硼氢化钾还原冷原子荧光测定大米中的汞,消解液无需赶酸,直接测汞,方法简便快捷,实验检出限浓度为0.024μg/L,线性范围0~40 ng/ml,经国家一级标准物质验证,方法准确可靠。%This method uses nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide microwave digestion,potassium borohydride reduction of rice in cold vapor atomic fluorescence of mercury,acid digestion solution without the need to catch,direct measurement of mercury,the method is quick and easy experimental detection limit concentration of 0.024 μg / L,the linear range of 0 ~ 40 ng / ml,The method is accurate and reliable verified by the national standard.

  20. Organic and total mercury determination in sediments by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry: methodology validation and uncertainty measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson L. Franklin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to validate a method for organic Hg determination in sediment. The procedure for organic Hg was adapted from literature, where the organomercurial compounds were extracted with dichloromethane in acid medium and subsequent destruction of organic compounds by bromine chloride. Total Hg was performed according to 3051A USEPA methodology. Mercury quantification for both methodologies was then performed by CVAAS. Methodology validation was verified by analyzing certified reference materials for total Hg and methylmercury. The uncertainties for both methodologies were calculated. The quantification limit of 3.3 µg kg-1 was found for organic Hg by CVAAS.

  1. [Study on lead absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Sun, Yong-Dong; Chen, Bi-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2008-07-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of lead absorption in pumpkin via atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that lead absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time, but the absorption rate decreased with time; And the lead absorption amount reached the peak in pH 7. Lead and cadmium have similar characteristic of absorption in pumpkin.

  2. [Study on cadmium absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Jing, Rui-Jun; Dong, Wei-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng; Liu, Hong

    2006-08-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of cadmium absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results show that the cadmium absorption amount in pumpkin increased with the increase in cadmium concentration. Meanwhile the cadmium absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time. Eight hours after being cultured in the liquid, the cadmium absorption amount became saturated. The cadmium absorption rate reached the peak after 2 hours, then the absorption rate gradually reduced. The cadmium absorption amount in pumpkin is less in acid or alkali compared with neutral condition. And the absorption amount became minimum in pH 3, while maximum in pH 7.

  3. Atomic absorption spectroscopy in ion channel screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovich, Larisa; Wicks, David; Despotovski, Sasko; Liang, Dong

    2004-10-01

    This article examines the utility of atomic absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with cold flux assays, to ion channel screening. The multiplicity of ion channels that can be interrogated using cold flux assays and atomic absorption spectroscopy is summarized. The importance of atomic absorption spectroscopy as a screening tool is further elaborated upon by providing examples of the relevance of ion channels to various physiological processes and targeted diseases.

  4. Optimized absorption imaging of mesoscopic atomic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessel, Wolfgang; Strobel, Helmut; Joos, Maxime; Nicklas, Eike; Stroescu, Ion; Tomkovič, Jiří; Hume, David B.; Oberthaler, Markus K.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the optimization of high-intensity absorption imaging for small Bose-Einstein condensates. The imaging calibration exploits the linear scaling of the quantum projection noise with the mean number of atoms for a coherent spin state. After optimization for atomic clouds containing up to 300 atoms, we find an atom number resolution of atoms, mainly limited by photon shot noise and radiation pressure.

  5. Absorption imaging of a single atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streed, Erik W.; Jechow, Andreas; Norton, Benjamin G.; Kielpinski, David

    2012-07-01

    Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in a vacuum. The optical properties of atoms are thoroughly understood, so a single atom is an ideal system for testing the limits of absorption imaging. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens. The observed image contrast of 3.1 (3)% is the maximum theoretically allowed for the imaging resolution of our set-up. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing. Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and X-ray regimes.

  6. Atomic absorption spectroscopy for mercury, automated by sequential injection and miniaturized in lab-on-valve system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erxleben, Holger; Ruzicka, Jaromir

    2005-08-15

    Sodium borohydride-based hydride generation was automated by using programmable flow within the lab-on-valve module. Mercury vapor, generated in the reaction mixture, was extracted in a gas/liquid separator. The gas-expansion separator was miniaturized and compared with the performance of a novel gas separator that exploits the combination of Venturi effect and reduced pressure. Cold vapor atomic spectroscopy was used as a model system, with detection of mercury by absorption at 254 nm and limit of detection of 9 microg of Hg/L, using 300 microL of sample and 100 microL of borohydride. This work introduces, for the first time, sequential injection technique for hydride generation, highlights advantages of using programmable flow, and outlines means for miniaturization of assays based on spectroscopy of volatile species.

  7. Absorption imaging of a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Streed, E W; Norton, B G; Kielpinski, D

    2012-01-01

    Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebula. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in vacuum. The simplicity of this system lets us compare our results directly to quantum theory, unlike recent work on absorption imaging of single molecules. The observed image contrast of 3.1(3)% achieved the maximum allowed by quantum theory for our setup, while the imaging resolution was on the order of the 370 nm illumination wavelength. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing (QIP). Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and x-ray regimes. In particular, the dynamics of chromatin in living cells could be imaged without delivering a lethal UV dose.

  8. [Biological material sampling for atomic absorption analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, N P; Ganebnykh, E V

    2007-01-01

    The optimum conditions have been chosen for mineralization of biological material for the atomic absorption determination of toxic metals, by using a [Russian characters: see text]-01 laboratory furnace (Gefest) upon exposure to high temperature, pressure, and microwave field. The completeness of dissection of biological material by microwave mineralization is shown under the optimal conditions.

  9. Purge and Trap Gas Chromatography-Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Determination of Methyl Mercury and Ethyl Mercury in Marine Animals%P & T-GC-CVAFS法测定海产动物中的甲基汞和乙基汞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔颖; 肖亚兵; 王禹; 高健会

    2016-01-01

    Marine animals sample was extracted with 30%nitric acid solution , and then adjusted the pH with 2 mol/L sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer solution. The eluate obtained was determined and identified by purge and trap gas chromatography-cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (P&T-GC-CVAFS). The propylation derivatization converted Methyl mercury (MeHg) to the more volatile methyl propyl mercury (MeHgPr), Ethyl mercury(EtHg) to the more volatile ethyl propyl mercury(EtHgPr), which could be concentrated through purge and trap system with a further clean-up of matrix. Tests for recovery were made by addition of standard MeHg and EtHg solutions at 3 different concentration levels to blank marine animals sample matrixes, values of MeHg recovery found were in the range from 80.5%to 103.2%, with RSDs (n=6) in the range from 1.7%to 6.9%;values of EtHg recovery found were in the range from 84.2%to 103.7%, with RSDs(n=6) in the range from 2.3%to 7.0%.%海产动物样品经过30%硝酸溶液提取,用2 mol/L醋酸钠-醋酸缓冲溶液调节pH后,用吹扫捕集-气相色谱-冷原子荧光光谱仪联用系统测定其中的甲基汞和乙基汞的含量。使用衍生试剂,将甲基汞转化为甲基丙基汞,乙基汞转化为乙基丙基汞,吹扫捕集进行富集并进一步消除基体干扰。以空白样品为基体,添加3种浓度水平的甲基汞和乙基汞标准溶液,测得甲基汞的回收率为80.5%~103.2%,相对标准偏差(n=6)为1.7%~6.9%;乙基汞的回收率在84.2%~103.7%,相对标准偏差(n=6)为2.3%~7.0%。

  10. Determination of mercury in an assortment of dietary supplements using an inexpensive combustion atomic absorption spectrometry technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Keith E; Levine, Michael A; Weber, Frank X; Hu, Ye; Perlmutter, Jason; Grohse, Peter M

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of mercury in forty, commercially available dietary supplements, were determined using a new, inexpensive analysis technique. The method involves thermal decomposition, amalgamation, and detection of mercury by atomic absorption spectrometry with an analysis time of approximately six minutes per sample. The primary cost savings from this approach is that labor-intensive sample digestion is not required prior to analysis, further automating the analytical procedure. As a result, manufacturers and regulatory agencies concerned with monitoring lot-to-lot product quality may find this approach an attractive alternative to the more classical acid-decomposition, cold vapor atomic absorption methodology. Dietary supplement samples analyzed included astragalus, calcium, chromium picolinate, echinacea, ephedra, fish oil, ginger, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, goldenseal, guggul, senna, St John's wort, and yohimbe products. Quality control samples analyzed with the dietary supplements indicated a high level of method accuracy and precision. Ten replicate preparations of a standard reference material (NIST 1573a, tomato leaves) were analyzed, and the average mercury recovery was 109% (2.0% RSD). The method quantitation limit was 0.3 ng, which corresponded to 1.5 ng/g sample. The highest found mercury concentration (123 ng/g) was measured in a concentrated salmon oil sample. When taken as directed by an adult, this product would result in an approximate mercury ingestion of 7 mug per week.

  11. Various applications of Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, H.

    1978-06-01

    The application of the Zeeman effect to atomic absorption spectroscopy has been studied over the past several years. This technique has a larger area of application than conventional AAS because of its high degree of selectivity. The ZAA technique can be used for organometallic species determination by interfacing with a high-pressure liquid chromatograph. Various kinds of eluents can be directly introduced in the ZAA system; even organic solvents or high-concentration salt solutions. For example, the Co atom in the functional center of Vitamin B12 molecule was separately analyzed in the presence of much larger amounts of inorganic Co. In the ZAA technique, interference caused by direct spectral overlap can also be corrected. As a typical example, the Sb line at 217.02 nm overlaps the Pb absorption line at 217.00 nm. However, 1000 ppM of Pb did not cause any interference signal in the Sb analysis by ZAA. This is especially important in the analysis of gun powder residue that is often carried out by chemists working in the forensic field. In the determination of trace elements in matrices of unknown composition, the ZAA technique achieved highly reliable results by employing the standard addition method to correct for chemical interferences, because any nonspecific absorption or emission does not give rise to interference signals with this technique.

  12. The absorptive line shape of hadronic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ericson, Torleif Eric Oskar

    1977-01-01

    The exact line shape for all energies is derived analytically in the limit of negligible nuclear dimensions. The shape deviates from the Breit-Wigner form. The high-energy tail of the line has a universal shape, independent of the absorptive strength. The tails are different for different initial states, however. The integrated line strength diverges logarithmically. Renormalization of the hadron wavefunction by strong interactions leads to the usual shape near resonance and restores convergence for very large energies. The results resolve a logical inconsistency in the normal analysis of hadronic atoms and are of practical importance. It is shown that bound hadronic states (e.g. Y/sub 0/*) give natural contributions in the high energy region. Numerical illustrations are given. (6 refs).

  13. A detailed study of thermal decomposition, amalgamation/ atomic absorption spectrophotometry methodology for the quantitative analysis of mercury in fish and hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Steven J M; Scanlan, Larry P; Chaudhuri, Sanwat N

    2006-11-01

    The analytical method for determining the concentration of mercury in fish by thermal decomposition, amalgamation/ atomic absorption spectrophotometry was thoroughly studied. Specific issues addressed were accurate modeling of instrumental response, the use of quartz and nickel boats, carryover effects, software limitations, and troubleshooting. The DMA-80 Direct Mercury Analyzer instrument was calibrated using a total of 22 points, and the resultant curves statistically analyzed. At minimum, second-order polynomials were required to adequately model the data. TORT-2 standard reference material was analyzed in both quartz and nickel boats and found to give equivalent performance in both types of vessels and well within the 95% confidence interval. DOLT-3 standard reference material also yielded values well within the 95% confidence interval, but the DORM-2 standard reference material did not. Carryover effects were found to be minimal with a new catalyst tube but increased with catalyst age. Blanks should be run after the analysis of high mercury content samples; however, when the catalyst has aged, two blanks are required to reduce apparent mercury signals to nominal blank values. Comparable results between thermal decomposition, amalgamation/atomic absorption spectrophotometry and cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry were demonstrated. The feasibility of using this instrument to analyze hair was also explored and found to be suitable. Software problems and limitations have been noted when attempting to implement a high-throughput methodology. Instrumental drift was found to be minimal when operated over long periods. Blank values can provide important diagnostic indicators.

  14. Evaluation of Mercury in Environmental Samples by a Supramolecular SolventBased Dispersive LiquidLiquid Microextraction Method Before Analysis by a Cold Vapor Generation Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Jamshed; Tuzen, Mustafa; Kazi, Tasneem G

    2017-02-01

    Supramolecular solvent–based dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction was used as a preconcentration method for the determination of trace levels of Hg. This simple method accurately measured oxidized HgII content in claystone and sandstone samples obtained from the Thar Coalfield in Pakistan. Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry was used as the detection technique because it is reliable and accurate. The HgII in acidic media forms a complex with dithizone (DTz) in the presence of supramolecular solvent (tetrahydrofuran and 1-undecanol), forming reverse micelles. Formation of the Hg-DTz complex was achieved to increase the interactions with the supramolecular solvent phase at pH 2.5 under the optimized experimental conditions. After addition of the supramolecular solvent to the aqueous solution, the micelles were uniformly mixed using a vortex mixer. The cloudy solution was centrifuged, and the Hg-DTz complex was extracted into the supramolecular solvent phase. Under optimized experimental conditions, the LOD and enrichment factor were found to be 5.61 ng/L and 77.8, respectively. Accuracy of the developed method was checked with Certified Reference Materials. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of HgII in claystone and sandstone samples from the Block VII and Block VIII areas of the Thar Coalfield on the basis of depth.

  15. [Digestion-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Hu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Rui-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Min; Narenhua

    2008-01-01

    A microwave digestion-flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) method was developed for the determination of metal elements Na, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ca and Mg in Mongolian patents. The instrument parameters for the determination were optimized, and the appropriate digestion solvent was selected. The recovery of the method was between 95.8% and 104.3%, and the RSD was between 1.6% and 4.2%. The accuracy and precision of the method was tested by comparing the values obtained from the determination of the standard sample, bush twigs and leaves (GSV-1) by this method with the reference values of GSV-1. The determination results were found to be basically consistent with the reference values. The microwave digestion technique was applied to process the samples, and the experimental results showed that compared to the traditional wet method, the present method has the merits of simplicity, saving agents, rapidness, and non-polluting. The method was accurate and reliable, and could be used to determine the contents of seven kinds of metal elements in mongolian patents.

  16. Metal and trace element assessment of estuary sediments from Santos, Brazil, by neutron activation and atomic absorption techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amorim, Eduardo P.; Favaro, Deborah I.T. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: ducamorim@yahoo.com.br; defavaro@ipen.br; Berbel, Glaucia B.B.; Braga, Elisabete S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. Oceanografico. Lab. de Nutrientes, Micronutrientes e Tracos nos Oceanos - LABNUT]. E-mail: edsbraga@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    In order to better understanding geochemical and environmental processes and their possible changes due to anthropogenic activities trace metal analyses and their distribution in marine sediments are commonly undertaken. The present study reports result concerning the distribution of some major, trace and rare earth elements in the Santos estuarine marine sediments. Thirteen bottom sediment samples (SV0501 to SV0513) were collected in this estuary, including regions of Sao Vicente, Santos, Cubatao, Vicente de Carvalho and Santos' Bay, in the summer of 2005. Multielemental analysis was carried out by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). For total mercury determination cold vapor atomic absorption technique (CV AAS) was employed. In both cases methodology validation was performed by certified reference material analyses. The results obtained for multielemental concentrations in the sediment samples were compared with NASC (North American Shale Composite) values. The concentration values obtained for As and metals Cr, Hg and Zn in the sediment samples were compared to Canadian Council of Minister of the Environment (CCME) oriented values (TEL and PEL values). In general, the samples located near the Cubatao region showed higher concentrations for all elements analyzed probably due to the high impact of industrial activities. (author)

  17. Atomic-absorption determination of copper and zinc in ferroboron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinina, R.D.; Toropova, L.S.

    1986-03-01

    This paper reports on the development of an atomic-absorption method for determining copper and zinc impurities in ferroboron, used for alloying steels and special alloys. The work was done on a Model 503 Perkin-Elmer atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Effects of perchloric acid and alloy macrocomponents on zinc and copper atomization were studied. Results by atomic absorption spectrometry were compared with those found by polarography, using a PPT-6016 ac polarograph. Compared with the GOST 14021.7-78 method for determining copper, the proposed procedure is more rapid and decreases the detection limit from 1 X 10/sup -2/ to 5 X 10/sup -3/ wt. %.

  18. Absorption imaging of ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David A.; Aigner, Simon; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Imaging ultracold atomic gases close to surfaces is an important tool for the detailed analysis of experiments carried out using atom chips. We describe the critical factors that need be considered, especially when the imaging beam is purposely reflected from the surface. In particular we present...... methods to measure the atom-surface distance, which is a prerequisite for magnetic field imaging and studies of atom surface-interactions....

  19. Two-dimensional atom localization via probe absorption in a four-level atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Ping; Ge Qiang; Ruan Yu-Hua; Yu Ben-Li

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the two-dimensional (2D) atom localization via probe absorption in a coherently driven fourlevel atomic system by means of a radio-frequency field driving a hyperfine transition.It is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D atom localization can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters.As a result,our scheme may be helpful in laser cooling or the atom nano-lithography via atom localization.

  20. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  1. Graviton Emission and Absorption by Atomic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Rothman, S B T

    2006-01-01

    Graviton absorption cross sections and emission rates for hydrogen are calculated by both semi-classical and field theoretic methods. We point out several mistakes in the literature concerning spontaneous emission of gravitons and related phenomena, some of which are due to a subtle issue concerning gauge invariance of the linearized interaction Hamiltonian.

  2. Heralded single photon absorption by a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Piro, Nicolas; Schuck, Carsten; Almendros, Marc; Huwer, Jan; Ghosh, Joyee; Haase, Albrecht; Hennrich, Markus; Dubin, Francois; Eschner, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    The emission and absorption of single photons by single atomic particles is a fundamental limit of matter-light interaction, manifesting its quantum mechanical nature. At the same time, as a controlled process it is a key enabling tool for quantum technologies, such as quantum optical information technology [1, 2] and quantum metrology [3, 4, 5, 6]. Controlling both emission and absorption will allow implementing quantum networking scenarios [1, 7, 8, 9], where photonic communication of quantum information is interfaced with its local processing in atoms. In studies of single-photon emission, recent progress includes control of the shape, bandwidth, frequency, and polarization of single-photon sources [10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17], and the demonstration of atom-photon entanglement [18, 19, 20]. Controlled absorption of a single photon by a single atom is much less investigated; proposals exist but only very preliminary steps have been taken experimentally such as detecting the attenuation and phase shift o...

  3. Sequential flow injection analysis system on-line coupled to high intensity focused ultrasound: green methodology for trace analysis applications as demonstrated for the determination of inorganic and total mercury in waters and urine by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, C; Conceição, Antonio C L; Rial-Otero, R; Vaz, C; Capelo, J L

    2006-04-15

    A new concept is presented for green analytical applications based on coupling on-line high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with a sequential injection/flow injection analysis (SIA/FIA) system. The potential of the SIA/HIFU/FIA scheme is demonstrated by taking mercury as a model analyte. Using inorganic mercury, methylmercury, phenylmercury, and diphenylmercury, the usefulness of the proposed methodology for the determination of inorganic and total mercury in waters and urine was demonstrated. The procedure requires low sample volumes and reagents and can be further applied to all chemical reactions involving HIFU. The inherent advantages of SIA, FIA, and HIFU applications in terms of high throughput, automation, low reagent consumption, and green chemistry are accomplished together for the first time in the present work.

  4. Principles and calibration of collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Toivonen, Juha

    2014-06-01

    The kinetics of signal formation in collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy (CPFAAS) are discussed, and theoretical equations describing the relation between the concentration of the target molecule and the detected atomic absorption in case of pure and impure samples are derived. The validity of the equation for pure samples is studied experimentally by comparing measured target molecule concentrations to concentrations determined using two other independent techniques. Our study shows that CPFAAS is capable of measuring target molecule concentrations from parts per billion (ppb) to hundreds of parts per million (ppm) in microsecond timescale. Moreover, the possibility to extend the dynamic range to cover eight orders of magnitude with a proper selection of fragmentation light source is discussed. The maximum deviation between the CPFAAS technique and a reference measurement technique is found to be less than 5 %. In this study, potassium chloride vapor and atomic potassium are used as a target molecule and a probed atom, respectively.

  5. A geração química de vapor em espectrometria atômica Chemical vapor generation in atomic spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iracema Takase

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The historical development of atomic spectrometry techniques based on chemical vapor generation by both batch and flow injection sampling formats is presented. Detection via atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS, microwave induced plasma optical emission spectrometry (MIP-OES, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES , inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry (FANES are considered. Hydride generation is separately considered in contrast to other methods of generation of volatile derivatives. Hg ¾ CVAAS (cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry is not considered here. The current state-of-the-art, including extension, advantages and limitations of this approach is discussed.

  6. Electromagnetically induced absorption in metastable 83Kr atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Kale, Y B; Mishra, S R; Singh, S; Rawat, H S

    2015-01-01

    We report electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) resonances of sub-natural linewidth (FWHM) in metastable noble gas 83Kr* atoms using degenerate two level schemes (DTLSs). This is the first observation of EIA effect in a metastable noble gas atoms. Using these spectrally narrow EIA signals obtained corresponding to the closed hyperfine transition from 4p55s[3/2]2 to 4p55p[5/2]3 hyperfine manifolds of 83Kr* atoms, we have measured the Lande's g-factor (gF) for the lower level (F = 13/2) of the closed transition accurately with small applied magnetic fields of few Gauss.

  7. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  8. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  9. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  10. [Burner head with high sensitivity in atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Yang, Y

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents a burner head with gas-sample separate entrance and double access, which is used for atomic absorption spectroscopy. According to comparison and detection, the device can improve sensitivity by a factor of 1 to 5. In the meantime it has properties of high stability and resistance to interference.

  11. Precision atomic beam density characterization by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Paul; Wihbey, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical details of a simple technique to determine absolute line-of-sight integrated atomic beam densities based on resonant laser absorption. In our experiments, a thermal lithium beam is chopped on and off while the frequency of a laser crossing the beam at right angles is scanned slowly across the resonance transition. A lock-in amplifier detects the laser absorption signal at the chop frequency from which the atomic density is determined. The accuracy of our experimental method is confirmed using the related technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy. For beams which absorb of order 1% of the incident laser light, our measurements allow the beam density to be determined to an accuracy better than 5% and with a precision of 3% on a time scale of order 1 s. Fractional absorptions of order 10-5 are detectable on a one-minute time scale when we employ a double laser beam technique which limits laser intensity noise. For a lithium beam with a thickness of 9 mm, we have measured atomic densities as low as 5 × 104 atoms cm-3. The simplicity of our technique and the details we provide should allow our method to be easily implemented in most atomic or molecular beam apparatuses.

  12. ANALYSIS OF UNCERTAINTY MEASUREMENT IN ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEHA S.MAHAJAN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A spectrophotometer is a photometer that can measure intensity as a function of the light source wavelength. The important features of spectrophotometers are spectral bandwidth and linear range of absorption or reflectance measurement. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS is a very common technique for detecting chemical composition of elements in metal and its alloy. It is very reliable and simple to use. Quality of result (accuracy depends on the uncertainty of measurement value of the test. If uncertainty of measurement is more there may be doubt of about the final result. The final result of Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer gets affected by the number of parameters; we should take in to account will calculating the final result. This paper deal with the methodology of evaluating the uncertainty of measurement of chemical composition using AAS. The study is useful for quality of measurement equipment and testing process.

  13. Absorption spectrum of very low pressure atomic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Moret-Bailly, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Spectra of quasars result primarily from interactions of natural light with atomic hydrogen. A visible absorption of a sharp and saturated spectral line in a gas requires a low pressure, so a long path without blushing as a cosmological redshift. Burbidge and Karlsson observed that redshifts of quasars result from fundamental redshifts, written 3K and 4K, that cause a shift of absorbed beta and gamma lines of H to alpha gas line. Thus absorbed spectrum is shifted until an absorbed line overlaps with Lyman alpha line of gas: redshift only occurs if an alpha absorption pumps atoms to 2P state. Thus, space is divided into spherical shells centered on the quasar, containing or not 2P atoms. Neglecting collisional de-excitations in absorbing shells, more and more atoms are excited until amplification of a beam having a long path in a shell, thus perpendicular to the observed ray, is large enough for a superradiant flash at alpha frequency. Energy is provided by atoms and observed ray, absorbing a line at local Lym...

  14. Quantitative analysis of immobilized metalloenzymes by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opwis, Klaus; Knittel, Dierk; Schollmeyer, Eckhard

    2004-12-01

    A new, sensitive assay for the quantitative determination of immobilized metal containing enzymes has been developed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). In contrast with conventionally used indirect methods the described quantitative AAS assay for metalloenzymes allows more exact analyses, because the carrier material with the enzyme is investigated directly. As an example, the validity and reliability of the method was examined by fixing the iron-containing enzyme catalase on cotton fabrics using different immobilization techniques. Sample preparation was carried out by dissolving the loaded fabrics in sulfuric acid before oxidising the residues with hydrogen peroxide. The iron concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after calibration of the spectrometer with solutions of the free enzyme at different concentrations.

  15. [Measurement of trace elements in blood serum by atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogul'skiĭ, Iu V; Danil'chenko, S N; Lushpa, A P; Sukhodub, L F

    1997-09-01

    Describes a method for measuring trace elements Cr, Mn, Co, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mo in the blood serum using non-flame atomization (KAC 120.1 complex). Optimal conditions for preparing the samples were defined, temperature regimens for analysis of each element selected, and original software permitting automated assays created. The method permits analysis making use of the minimal samples: 0.1 ml per 10 parallel measurements, which is 100 times less than needed for atomic absorption spectroscopy with flame atomization of liquid samples. Metrological characteristics of the method are assessed.

  16. Cinchocaine hydrochloride determination by atomic absorption spectrometry and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghani, Nour T; Youssef, Ahmed F A; Awady, Mohamed A

    2005-05-01

    Two sensitive spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrometric procedures have been developed for determination of cinchocaine hydrochloride (Cin.Cl) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The spectrophotometric method was based on formation of an insoluble colored ion-associate between the cited drug and tetrathiocyanatocobaltate (CoTC) or hexathiocyanatochromate (CrTC) which dissolved and extracted in an organic solvent. The optimal experimental conditions for quantitative extraction such as pH, concentration of the reagents and solvent were studied. Toluene and iso-butyl alcohol proved to be the most suitable solvents for quantitative extraction of Cin-CoTC and Cin-CrTC ion-associates with maximum absorbance at 620 and 555 nm, respectively. The optimum concentration ranges, molar absorptivities, Ringbom ranges and Sandell sensitivities were also evaluated. The atomic absorption spectrometric method is based on measuring of the excess cobalt or chromium in the aqueous solution, after precipitation of the drug, at 240.7 and 357.9 nm, respectively. Linear application ranges, characteristic masses and detection limits were 57.99-361.9, 50.40 and 4.22 microg ml(-1) of Cin.Cl, in case of CoTC, while 37.99-379.9, 18.94 and 0.81 microg ml(-1) in case of CrTC.

  17. A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyca, T. W.; Bautista, M. A.; Hasoglu, M. F.; Garcia, J.; Gatuzz, E.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kallman, T. R.; Manson, S. T.; Mendoza, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; de Vries, C. P.; Zatsarinny, O.

    2013-01-01

    An analytical formula is developed to accurately represent the photoabsorption cross section of atomic Oxygen for all energies of interest in X-ray spectral modeling. In the vicinity of the K edge, a Rydberg series expression is used to fit R-matrix results, including important orbital relaxation effects, that accurately predict the absorption oscillator strengths below threshold and merge consistently and continuously to the above-threshold cross section. Further, minor adjustments are made to the threshold energies in order to reliably align the atomic Rydberg resonances after consideration of both experimental and observed line positions. At energies far below or above the K-edge region, the formulation is based on both outer- and inner-shell direct photoionization, including significant shake-up and shake-off processes that result in photoionization-excitation and double-photoionization contributions to the total cross section. The ultimate purpose for developing a definitive model for oxygen absorption is to resolve standing discrepancies between the astronomically observed and laboratory-measured line positions, and between the inferred atomic and molecular oxygen abundances in the interstellar medium from XSTAR and SPEX spectral models.

  18. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  19. Old and New Flavors of Flame (Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amália Geiza Gama Dionísio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some recent applications of Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS to different matrices and samples. The time window selected was from 2006 up to March, 2011, and several aspects related to food, biological fluids, environmental, and technological samples analyses were reported and discussed. In addition, the chemometrics application for FAAS methods development was also taken into account, as well as the use of metal tube atomizers in air/acetylene flame. Preconcentration methods coupled to FAAS were discussed, and several approaches related to speciation, flotation, ionic liquids, among others were discussed. This paper can be interesting for researchers and FAAS users in order to see the state of the art of this technique.

  20. Spectrofluorimetric, Atomic Absorption Spectrometric and Spectrophotometric Determination of Some Fluoroquinolones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Salem

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple, accurate, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric, atomic absorption spectrometric and spectrophotometric methods are described for the quantitative determination of ten fluoroquinolones (amifloxacin, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, difloxacin hydrochloride, enoxacin, enrofloxacin, lomefloxacin hydrochloride, levofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin mesylate. The first method was a spectrofluorimetric method in which samples of the studied drugs in 0.1 N H2SO4 showed native fluorescence at 450 nm when excitation was at 290 nm. The calibration graph was rectilinear from 0.3-1.4 μg mL-1 (method I. Cobalt sulphate was used for precipitation of the ion associates formed from the reaction with the cited drugs. The formation and solubility of the solid complexes at the optimum conditions of pH and ionic strength values have been studied. The method depends on direct determination of the ions in the precipitate or indirect determination of the ions in the filtrate by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for precipitation were carefully studied. Rectilinear calibration graphs were obtained in the range of 3-30 μg mL-1 for each of the investigated drugs. The molar ratios of the formed chelats were determined by Job's method and their association constants were also calculated (method II. Ammonium vanadate was used for the spectrophotometric determination of the selected fluoroquinolones by oxidation in sulphuric acid medium resulting in the development of a greenish blue colour measured at 766 nm which was attributed to the vanadium (IV produced by reduction of vanadium (V by the selected drugs. The optimum conditions for heating time, reagent concentration and sulphuric acid concentration were carefully studied. The accuracy and precision of the proposed method was confirmed by estimating five or six replicates within Beer's law limits were obtained in the range 10-40 μg mL-1 for each of the investigated drugs

  1. Ultratrace determination of tin by hydride generation in-atomizer trapping atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Průša, Libor [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Hlavova 8, Prague 2, CZ 128 43 Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •In-atomizer trapping HG-AAS was optimized for Sn. •A compact quartz trap-and-atomizer device was employed. •Generation, preconcentration and atomization steps were investigated in detail. •Hundred percent preconcentration efficiency for tin was reached. •Routine analytical method was developed for Sn determination (LOD of 0.03 ng mL{sup −1} Sn). -- Abstract: A quartz multiatomizer with its inlet arm modified to serve as a trap (trap-and-atomizer device) was employed to trap tin hydride and subsequently to volatilize collected analyte species with atomic absorption spectrometric detection. Generation, atomization and preconcentration conditions were optimized and analytical figures of merit of both on-line atomization as well as preconcentration modes were quantified. Preconcentration efficiency of 95 ± 5% was found. The detection limits reached were 0.029 and 0.14 ng mL{sup −1} Sn, respectively, for 120 s preconcentration period and on-line atomization mode without any preconcentration. The interference extent of other hydride forming elements (As, Se, Sb and Bi) on tin determination was found negligible in both modes of operation. The applicability of the developed preconcentration method was verified by Sn determination in a certified reference material as well as by analysis of real samples.

  2. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC, ATOMIC ABSORPTION AND CONDUCTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Anis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Six simple and sensitive spectroscopic and conductometric procedures (A-F were developed for the determination of tramadol hydrochloride. Methods A, B and C are based on the reaction of cobalt (II thiocyanate with tramadol to form a stable ternary complex, which could be measured by spectrophotometric (method A, atomic absorption (method B or conductometric (method C procedures. Methods D and E depend on the reaction of molybdenum thiocyanate with tramadol to form a stable ternary complex, measured by spectrophotometric means (method D or by atomic absorption procedures (method E, while method F depends on the formation of an ion pair complex between the studied drug and bromothymol blue which is extractable into methylene chloride. Tramadol hydrochloride could be assayed in the range of 80-560 and 40-–220 μg ml-1, 1-15 mg ml-1 and 2.5-22.5, 1.25-11.25 and 5-22 μg ml-1 using methods A,B,C,D,E and F, respectively. Various experimental conditions were studied. The results obtained showed good recoveries. The proposed procedures were applied successfully to the analysis of tramadol in its pharmaceutical preparations and the results were favorably comparable with the official method.

  3. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  4. Antimony quantification in Leishmania by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W L; Rainey, P M

    1993-05-15

    Tri- and pentavalent antimony were quantified in Leishmania mexicana pifanoi amastigotes and promastigotes by atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization. Leishmania grown in axenic culture were treated with either potassium antimony tartrate [Sb(III)] or sodium stibogluconate [Sb(V)]. The parasites were collected, digested with nitric acid, and subjected to atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method was linear from 0 to 7 ng of antimony. The interassay coefficients of variation were 9.6 and 5.7% (N = 5) for 0.52 and 3.7-ng samples of leishmanial antimony, respectively. The limit of detection was 95 pg of antimony. The assay was used to characterize Sb(III) and Sb(V) influx and efflux kinetics. Influx rates were determined at antimony concentrations that produced a 50% inhibition of growth (IC50). The influx rates of Sb(V) into amastigotes and promastigotes were 4.8 and 12 pg/million cells/h, respectively, at 200 micrograms antimony/ml. The influx rate of Sb(III) into amastigotes was 41 pg/million cells/h at 20 micrograms antimony/ml. Influx of Sb(III) into promastigotes at 1 microgram antimony/ml was rapid and reached a plateau of 175 pg/million cells in 2 h. Efflux of Sb(III) and Sb(V) from amastigotes and promastigotes exhibited biphasic kinetics. The initial (alpha) half-life of Sb(V) efflux was less than 4 min and that of Sb(III) was 1-2 h. The apparent terminal (beta) half-lives ranged from 7 to 14 h.

  5. Determination of Lead in Blood by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selander, Stig; Cramér, Kim

    1968-01-01

    Lead in blood was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, using a wet ashing procedure and a procedure in which the proteins were precipitated with trichloroacetic acid. In both methods the lead was extracted into isobutylmethylketone before measurement, using ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate as chelator. The simpler precipitation procedure was shown to give results identical with those obtained with the ashing technique. In addition, blood specimens were examined by the precipitation method and by spectral analysis, which method includes wet ashing of the samples, with good agreement. All analyses were done on blood samples from `normal' persons or from lead-exposed workers, and no additions of inorganic lead were made. The relatively simple protein precipitation technique gave accurate results and is suitable for the large-scale control of lead-exposed workers. PMID:5663425

  6. Atomic absorption method for the determination of lead in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szivos, K.; Polos, L.; Feher, I.; Pungor, E.

    1974-01-01

    An atomic absorption method for the determination of lead in air was used to analyze air quality at a busy area of Budapest. The air was sampled by a personal sampler carried by persons on street duty at one of the busiest spots in Budapest. The air sample was pumped through a membrane filter type Synpor-3. The filter was destroyed in th 3:2 mixture of strong nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide, the acid was distilled, and the residue was then dried and filled to 2 ml with an 0.5% tartaric acid solution. The results were evaluated by means of calibration curves. The method gave a standard deviation of 3 to 5% in 1 to 3 micrograms/ml concentration. In 0.5% tartaric acid solution, the sensitivity was 0.65 micrograms lead/ml 1% absorption. The presence of tartarate increased the sensitivity of the determination by 10 to 13%. A historgram was constructed of the lead contamination in air at one of the busiest spots of Budapest in 1971. The lead content of air was lower in the summer, probably due to the more intense air currents. The samples contained 0.6 to 13 micrograms of lead, depending on the amount and on the pollution of the air driven through the sampler.

  7. Determination of Lead in Urine by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selander, Stig; Cramé, Kim

    1968-01-01

    A method for the determination of lead in urine by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) is described. A combination of wet ashing and extraction with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate into isobutylmethylketone was used. The sensitivity was about 0·02 μg./ml. for 1% absorption, and the detection limit was about 0·02 μg./ml. with an instrumental setting convenient for routine analyses of urines. Using the scale expansion technique, the detection limit was below 0·01 μg./ml., but it was found easier to determine urinary lead concentrations below 0·05 μg./ml. by concentrating the lead in the organic solvent by increasing the volume of urine or decreasing that of the solvent. The method was applied to fresh urines, stored urines, and to urines, obtained during treatment with chelating agents, of patients with lead poisoning. Urines with added inorganic lead were not used. The results agreed well with those obtained with a colorimetric dithizone extraction method (r = 0·989). The AAS method is somewhat more simple and allows the determination of smaller lead concentrations. PMID:5647975

  8. Determination of Mercury in Milk by Cold Vapor Atomic Fluorescence: A Green Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Green analytical chemistry principles were introduced to undergraduate students in a laboratory experiment focused on determining the mercury concentration in cow and goat milk. In addition to traditional goals, such as accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and limits of detection in method selection and development, attention was paid to the…

  9. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  10. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific, real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of the sensors are strongly affected by the long-term and short term baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability which has not been previously considered or corrected by existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5%, which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  11. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingge, E-mail: yingge.du@pnnl.gov [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Chambers, Scott A. [Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  12. Determination of Aluminum Concentration in Seawater by Colorimetry and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-11-30

    this was also high. 5 . ,Irj ~ - • lri*; llo. TALLE 2 ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY DETEPIJINATION OF ALUMINU1 CONCENTRATIO11 OF SEAWATER OCEAN...Concentration in Seawater by Colorimetr-y and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Charles A. Greene, Jr. and Everett N. Jones Ocean Science Department T14

  13. Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric Determination of Lead in White Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherryl M. Montalbo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the heavy metal content of rice from various parts of the world have alarmed rice-eating nations, including the Philippines. In 2013, Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice reported that rice in the Philippines needs to be evaluated to determine whether these contain heavy metals such as lead. This research aimed to assess the presence of lead in the three highest selling rice varieties harvested in Oriental Mindoro and sold in Batangas City public markets. It was done to asses if the lead concentration in the raw and cooked rice samples conform to the maximum acceptable level in food established by Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA Program Codex Alimentarius Commission. Survey analysis showed that the three highest selling rice varieties during the period when this study was conducted were Sinandomeng, Dinorado and C-4 Dinorado respectively. Lead analysis of rice samples was carried out using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The lead content in both the raw and cooked rice samples were not detected, meaning that the lead concentration were either not present or may be present but is less than the detection limit of the instrument used. The lead concentration in the rice samples from Oriental Mindoro conformed to the standards for food safety for lead content in rice, which is 0.2 mg/kg or 0.2 ppm, set by the Codex Alimentarius Commission.

  14. Determination of gold in geologic materials by solvent extraction and atomic-absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Claude; Mensik, J.D.; Riley, L.B.

    1967-01-01

    The two methods presented for the determination of traces of gold in geologic materials are the cyanide atomic-absorption method and the fire-assay atomic-absorption method. In the cyanide method gold is leached with a sodium-cyanide solution. The monovalent gold is then oxidized to the trivalent state and concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to estimation by atomic absorption. In the fire-assay atomic-absorption method, the gold-silver bead obtained from fire assay is dissolved in nitric and hydrochloric acids. Gold is then concentrated by extracting into methyl isobutyl ketone prior to determination by atomic absorption. By either method concentrations as low as 50 parts per billion of gold can be determined in a 15-gram sample.

  15. Feasibility of filter atomization in high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Uwe; Becker-Ross, Helmut; Katskov, Dmitri

    2006-03-01

    A prototype spectrometer for high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS AAS), built at ISAS Berlin, Germany, was combined with a graphite filter atomizer (GFA), earlier developed at TUT, Pretoria, South Africa. The furnace and auto-sampler units from a commercial AA spectrometer, model AAS vario 6 (Analytik Jena AG, Jena, Germany), were employed in the instrument. Instead of conventional platform tube, the GFA was used to provide low measurement susceptibility to interferences and short determination cycle. The GFA was modified according to the design of the furnace unit and optimal physical parameters of its components (filter and collector) found. Afterwards, optimal GFA was replicated and tested to outline analytical performances of the HR-CS GFA AA spectrometer in view of prospects of multi-element analysis. In particular, reproducibility of performances, repeatability of analytical signals, lifetime, temperature limit and duration of the measurement cycle were examined, and elements available for determination justified. The results show that the peak area of the atomic absorption signal is reproduced in various GFA copies within ± 4% deviation range. The GFA can stand temperatures of 2800 °C with 6 s hold time for 55 temperature cycles, and 2700 °C (8 s) for about 200 cycles. Only the external tube is prone to destruction while the filter and collector do not show any sign of erosion caused by temperature or aggressive matrix. Analytical signals are affected insignificantly by tube aging. Repeatability of the peak area remains within 1.1-1.7% RSD over more than hundred determination cycles. Peak areas are proportional to the sample volume of injected organic and inorganic liquids up to at least 50 μL. The drying stage is combined with hot sampling and cut down to 15-20 s. The list of metals available for determination with full vapor release includes Al, Co, Cr, Ni, Pt as well as more volatile metals. Characteristic masses at

  16. Uranium isotopes quantitatively determined by modified method of atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, G. H.

    1967-01-01

    Hollow-cathode discharge tubes determine the quantities of uranium isotopes in a sample by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Dissociation of the uranium atoms allows a large number of ground state atoms to be produced, absorbing the incident radiation that is different for the two major isotopes.

  17. Non-Dispersive Atomic Absorption System for Engine Health Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, construct and test a first implementation of a non-dispersive technique for the measurement of atomic absorption in the plumes of liquid rocket...

  18. Determination of urinary manganese by the direct chelation-extraction method and flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Tokunaga, R; Iwahana, T; Tati, M; Ikeda, M

    1978-01-01

    The direct chelation-extraction method, originally developed by Hessel (1968) for blood lead analysis, has been successfully applied to urinalysis for manganese. The analyses of 35 urine samples containing up to 100 microgram/1 of manganese from manganese-exposed workers showed that the data obtained by this method agree well with those by wet digestion-flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and also by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. PMID:629893

  19. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17) cm(exp -3). The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  20. Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Measurements of Atomic Oxygen in a Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Scott Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of vacuum ultraviolet light by atomic oxygen has been measured in the Electric Arc-driven Shock Tube (EAST) Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center. This investigation demonstrates the instrumentation required to determine atomic oxygen concentrations from absorption measurements in impulse facilities. A shock wave dissociates molecular oxygen, producing a high temperature sample of atomic oxygen in the shock tube. A probe beam is generated with a Raman-shifted ArF excimer laser. By suitable tuning of the laser, absorption is measured over a range of wavelengths in the region of the atomic line at 130.49 nm. The line shape function is determined from measurements at atomic oxygen densities of 3 x 10(exp 17) and 9 x 10(exp 17)/cu cm. The broadening coefficient for resonance interactions is deduced from this data, and this value is in accord with available theoretical models.

  1. Theoretical analysis on two-photon absorption spectroscopy in a confined four-level atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanyuan Li; Jintao Bai; Li Li; Yanpeng Zhang; Xun Hou

    2009-01-01

    We investigate theoretically two-photon absorption spectroscopy modified by a control field in a confined Y-type four-level system. Dicke-narrowing effect occurs both in two-photon absorption lines and the dips of transparency against two-photon absorption due to enhanced contribution of slow atoms. We also find that the suppression and the enhancement of two-photon absorption can be modified by changing the strength of the control field and the detuning of three laser fields. This control of two-photon absorption may have some applications in information processing and optical devices.

  2. Understanding the mechanism of H atom absorption in the Pd(1 1 0) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padama, Allan Abraham B. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences and Physics, College of Arts and Sciences, University of the Philippines Los Baños, Los Baños, Laguna 4031 (Philippines); Kasai, Hideaki, E-mail: kasai@dyn.ap.eg.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Center for Continuing Professional Development, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • This study elucidates the absorption of H in Pd(1 1 0) (1 × 2) missing-row surface. • Electronic structure depicts the stronger adsorption on ridge than on trough site. • The geometry of missing-row Pd(1 1 0) allows Pd atoms to accommodate H and H{sub 2}. • Assisted absorption is facilitated by the repulsion between H atoms. - Abstract: The underlying mechanism of H atom absorption in the Pd(1 1 0) (1 × 2) missing-row reconstructed surface is investigated by performing density functional theory based calculations. The stronger binding energy of H on ridge than on trough site of the missing-row surface is due to the more pronounced creation of derived bonding state as had been depicted from the electronic structure of the system. Hydrogen absorption takes place with the involvement of other incoming H atoms through an assisted absorption process that is facilitated by the repulsion between the incoming H and the absorbing H. The geometry of the missing-row surface enables the Pd atoms to accommodate the H atoms efficiently leading to H absorption as well as H{sub 2} dissociation.

  3. Bioavailability study of calcium sandoz-250 by atomic absorption spectroscopy in albino rats

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Bimalkumar N.; Krishnaveni, N.; Jivani, Nurrrudin P.; Khodakiya, Akruti S.; Khodakiya, Moorti S.; Parida, Saswat K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Calcium sandoz-250 is an Ayurvedic calcium supplement, containing Khatika Churna. Bioavailability study of the formulation is essential for estimation of peak plasma concentration (C max), time to C max and rate of absorption. Aim: To evaluate the absorption parameters of calcium sandoz-250 in albino rats by atomic absorption spectroscopic (AAS) method. Materials and Methods: Study was carried out as a single dose, open-label, randomized study. Estimation of calcium was carried ou...

  4. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  5. Optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of F=1 atomic gases

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sooshin; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Shin, Y

    2016-01-01

    We report our study of the optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of $^{23}$Na atoms in the $F=1$ hyperfine spin states. Solving a set of rate equations for the spin populations under a probe beam, we obtain an analytic expression for the optical signal of the $F=1$ absorption imaging. Furthermore, we verify the result by measuring the absorption spectra of $^{23}$Na Bose-Einstein condensates prepared in various spin states with different probe beam pulse durations. The analytic result can be used in quantitative analysis of $F=1$ spinor condensate imaging and readily applied to other alkali atoms with $I=3/2$ nuclear spin such as $^{87}$Rb.

  6. Reduction of interference fringes in absorption imaging of cold atom cloud using eigenface method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolin Li; Min Ke; Bo Yan; Yuzhu Wang

    2007-01-01

    Eigenface method used in face recognition is introduced to reduce the pattern of interference fringes appearing in the absorption image of cold rubidium atom cloud trapped by an atom chip. The standard method for processing the absorption image is proposed, and the origin of the interference fringes is analyzed. Compared with the standard processing method which uses only one reference image, we take advantage of fifty reference images and reconstruct a new reference image which is more similar to the absorption image than all of the fifty original reference images. Then obvious reduction of interference fringes can be obtained.

  7. Determination of cadmium in biodiesel using microemulsion and electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Adriana S; Silva, Deise G; Teixeira, Leonardo S G

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare biodiesel microemulsions for the subsequent quantification of cadmium via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The biodiesel samples were prepared using n-propanol as an emulsifier, 10% (v/v) nitric acid as the aqueous phase, and biodiesel. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to determine the microemulsion region with the specified components. The optimized conditions for microemulsion formation were 57.6% (v/v) n-propanol, 21.2% (v/v) biodiesel, and 21.2% (v/v) nitric acid solution. The stability of the microemulsified system was investigated using aqueous and organic standards, and the system was found to be stable for at least 240 min. The applied pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800 and 2000 °C, respectively, and 5 μg of aluminum was used as the chemical modifier. The obtained limits of detection and quantification were 0.2 and 0.5 μg kg(-1), respectively, and the characteristic mass was 1.6 pg. The precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation (% R.S.D., n = 10), was 2.5% for a sample with a cadmium concentration of 6.5 μg kg(-1). The accuracy was determined from addition and recovery experiments, with results varying from 93 to 108% recovery. This study demonstrates that the proposed method based on the use of a microemulsion formation in sample preparation can be applied as an efficient alternative for the determination of cadmium in biodiesel by GFAAS. Cadmium determination in biodiesel samples of different origins (soybean, corn, cotton, and sunflower) was evaluated after acid digestion using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, and the obtained results were compared to the results obtained using the proposed method. The paired t test (95% confidence level) did not show significant differences. The concentrations of cadmium found ranged from 5.3 to 8.0 μg kg(-1).

  8. Reliability of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reducing the interference problems by various techniques [12]. ... Slit (nm). 0.7. 0.7. Lamp type. EDL. EDL. Pyrolysis temp/Atomization temp. (oC). 1200/2000. 900 ..... AOAC Guidelines for Single-Laboratory Validation of. Chemical Methods for ...

  9. Gold volatile species atomization and preconcentration in quartz devices for atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Yasin [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Mehmet Akif Ersoy University, Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Chemistry Department, 15030 Burdur (Turkey); Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Kratzer, Jan [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Dědina, Jiří, E-mail: dedina@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-01

    The on-line atomization of gold volatile species was studied and the results were compared with thermodynamic calculations in several quartz atomizers, namely: diffusion flame, flame-in-gas-shield, flame-in-plain-tube, externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. Atomization mechanism in the explored devices is proposed, where volatile species are converted to thermodynamically stable AuH at elevated temperature over 500 °C and then atomized by an interaction with a cloud of hydrogen radicals. Because of its inherent simplicity and robustness, diffusion flame was employed as a reference atomizer. It yielded atomization efficiency of 70 to 100% and a very good long time reproducibility of peak area sensitivity: 1.6 to 1.8 s μg{sup −1}. Six and eleven times higher sensitivity, respectively, was provided by atomizers with longer light paths in the observation volume, i.e. externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. The latter one, offering limit of detection below 0.01 μg ml{sup −1}, appeared as the most prospective for on-line atomization. Insight into the mechanism of atomization of gold volatile species, into the fate of free atoms and into subsequent analyte transfer allowed to assess possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species: it is unfeasible with quartz atomizers but a sapphire tube atomizer could be useful in this respect. - Highlights: • On-line atomization of gold volatile species for AAS in quartz devices was studied. • Atomization mechanism was proposed and atomization efficiency was estimated. • Possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species were assessed.

  10. Atomic absorption determination of tin in foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, E R; Sulek, A

    1979-09-01

    Samples of green beans, applesauce, and a fruit juice were fortified with tin at 3 levels. Collaborators were asked to digest the samples, using HNO3-H2SO4, add methanol to enhance the absorption signal, and aspirate directly, using a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Results were received from 8 laboratories including 4 from Europe. However, only 6 laboratories used the prescribed methodology. All results were considered acceptable. The method has been adopted as interim official first action.

  11. Absorption Spectra of a Three-Level Atom Embedded in a PBG Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ke; ZHANG Han-Zhuang

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the 'decay rate' terms into the density matrix equations of an atom embedded in a photonic band gap (PSG)reservoir successfully.By utilizing the master equations,the probe absorption spectra and the refractivity properties of a three-level atom in the PBG reservoir are obtained.The interaction between the atom and the PBG reservoir as well as the effects of the quantum interference on the absorption of the atom has also been taken into account.It is interesting that two different types of the anomalous dispersion relations of refractivity are exhibited in one dispersion line.The methodology used here can be applied to theoretical investigation of quantum interference effects of other atomic models embedded in a PBG reservoir.

  12. Flameless Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: Effects of Nitrates and Sulfates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    oxide by graphite followed by sublimation of the metal. Frech and Cedergren investigated high temperature equilibria in graphite furnace atomizers. 1 4...Acta, 72, 49 (1974). 13. R.E. Sturgeon, C.L. Chakrabarti, and C.H. Langford, Anal. Chem., 48, 1792 (1976). 14. W. Frech and A. Cedergren , Anal. Chim...Acta, 82, 83 (1976). 15. W. Frech, Anal. Chim. Acta, 77, 43 (1975). 16. W. Frech and A. Cedergren , Anal. Chim. Acta, 88, 57 (1977). CHAPTER III

  13. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma atomizer for hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry—Performance evaluation for selenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duben, Ondřej [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the CAS, v.v.i., Veveří 97, CZ-602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Charles University in Prague, Hlavova 8, Prague, CZ 128 43 Czech Republic (Czech Republic); Boušek, Jaroslav [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Communications, Brno University of Technology, Technická 1058/10, 61600 Brno (Czech Republic); Dědina, Jiří [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the CAS, v.v.i., Veveří 97, CZ-602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the CAS, v.v.i., Veveří 97, CZ-602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-09-01

    Atomization of selenium hydride in a quartz dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer was optimized and its performance was compared to that of the externally heated quartz multiatomizer. Argon was found as the best DBD discharge gas employing a flow rate of 75 ml min{sup −1} Ar while the DBD power was optimized at 14 W. The detection limits reached 0.24 ng ml{sup −1} Se in the DBD and 0.15 ng ml{sup −1} Se in the multiatomizer. The tolerance of DBD to interferences is even better than with the multiatomizer. - Highlights: • SeH{sub 2} atomization in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was optimized for AAS. • Atomizer performance was compared for DBD and externally heated quartz atomizer. • Detection limits were quantified and interferences were studied in both atomizers. • Atomization efficiency in the DBD was estimated.

  14. Chlorine Analysis by Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim Koch; Aleksandr Zybin; Kay Niemax

    2000-01-01

    The general characteristics of Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (DLAAS) in low pressure plasmas particulary with respect to the detection of non-metals are comprehensively recapitulated and discussed. Furthermore, a detector, which is based on DLAAS in a microwave-induced low pressure plasma as an alternative technique for halogene-specific analysis of volatile compounds and polymeric matrices is described. The analytical capability of the technique is demonstrated on the chlorine-specific analysis of ablated polymer fragments as well as gas chromatographically separated hydrocarbons. Since the measurements were carried out by means of a balanced-heterodyne detection scheme, different technical noise contributions, such as laser excess and RAM noise could efficiently be suppressed and the registered absorption was limited only by the principal shot noise. Thus, in the case of the polymer analysis a chlorine-specific absolute detection limit of 10 pg could be achieved. Furthermore, fundamental investigations concerning the influence of hydrocarbons on the dissociation capability of the microwave induced plasma were performed. For this purpose, the carbon-, chlorine-and hydrogen-specific stoichiometry of the compounds were empirically determined. Deviations from the exspected proportions were found to be insignificant, implying the possibility of internal standardization relative to the response of a reference sample.

  15. Flow Injection and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FI-AAS) -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1996-01-01

    One of the advantages of the flow injection (FI) concept is that it is compatible with virtually all detection techniques. Being a versatile vehicle for enhancing the performance of the individual detection devices, the most spectacular results have possibly been obtained in conjunction with atomic...... the point of sample injection/introduction to the point of detection. Hence, in FI-fAAS this feature allows not only to obtain improved repeatability but also improved accuracy, and because the wash to sample ratio is high it permits the handling of samples with elevated salt contents - which...

  16. Determination of antimony by using tungsten trap atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titretir, Serap; Kendüzler, Erdal; Arslan, Yasin; Kula, İbrahim; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O. Yavuz.

    2008-08-01

    An electrically heated tungsten coil was used as a trap in the determination of antimony. The technique consists of three steps. Initially, SbH 3 is formed by hydride generation procedure; then the analyte species in vapor form are transported to W-coil trap heated at 370 °C. Following the preconcentration step, the trap is heated to 895 °C; analyte species are revolatilized and transported to the flame-heated quartz atom cell where atomization and the formation of signal take place. The experimental parameters were optimized both for trap and no-trap studies. The most important experimental parameters are concentrations of HCl and NaBH 4 solutions, H 2 and Ar gas flow rates, and collection and revolatilization temperatures of W-coil. Accuracy was tested using a certified reference material, waste water EU-L-1. Limit of detection for the system is 16 ng l - 1 using a sample of 36 ml collected in 4.0 min. Enhancement factor in sensitivity was 17.

  17. Determination of antimony by using tungsten trap atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titretir, Serap [Department of Chemistry, Inoenue University, 44065 Malatya (Turkey); Kenduezler, Erdal [Department of Primary Education, Faculty of Education, Ahi Evran University, 40100 Kirsehir (Turkey); Arslan, Yasin [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Atatuerk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Kula, Ibrahim [Department of Chemistry, Mugla University, 48000 Mugla (Turkey); Bakirdere, Sezgin [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, 67100 Zonguldak (Turkey); Ataman, O. Yavuz. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ataman@metu.edu.tr

    2008-08-15

    An electrically heated tungsten coil was used as a trap in the determination of antimony. The technique consists of three steps. Initially, SbH{sub 3} is formed by hydride generation procedure; then the analyte species in vapor form are transported to W-coil trap heated at 370 deg. C. Following the preconcentration step, the trap is heated to 895 deg. C; analyte species are revolatilized and transported to the flame-heated quartz atom cell where atomization and the formation of signal take place. The experimental parameters were optimized both for trap and no-trap studies. The most important experimental parameters are concentrations of HCl and NaBH{sub 4} solutions, H{sub 2} and Ar gas flow rates, and collection and revolatilization temperatures of W-coil. Accuracy was tested using a certified reference material, waste water EU-L-1. Limit of detection for the system is 16 ng l{sup -1} using a sample of 36 ml collected in 4.0 min. Enhancement factor in sensitivity was 17.

  18. Entanglement-preserving absorption of single SPDC photons by a single atom

    CERN Document Server

    Huwer, J; Piro, N; Schug, M; Dubin, F; Eschner, J

    2011-01-01

    We study the controlled interaction between a single trapped Ca40+ ion and single photons belonging to entangled photon pairs. The ion is prepared as a polarization-sensitive single-photon absorber; the absorption of one photon from a pair is marked by a quantum jump of the atomic state and heralded by the coincident detection of the entangled partner photon. For three polarization basis settings of absorption and detection of the herald, we find maximum coincidences always for orthogonal polarizations. Tomographic reconstruction of the biphoton quantum state from the absorption-herald coincidences reveals 93% overlap with the maximally entangled state. This proves that the polarization entanglement shared by the photon pair is preserved in the absorption process and converted to transient photon-atom entanglement.

  19. Infrared absorption on a complex comprising three equivalent hydrogen atoms in ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herklotz, F.; Hupfer, A.; Johansen, K. M.; Svensson, B. G.; Koch, S. G.; Lavrov, E. V.

    2015-10-01

    A hydrogen-related defect in ZnO which causes two broad IR absorption bands at 3303 and 3321 cm-1 is studied by means of infrared absorption spectroscopy and first-principles theory. In deuterated samples, the defect reveals two sharp absorption lines at 2466 and 2488 cm-1 accompanied by weaker sidebands at 2462 and 2480 cm-1. Isotope substitution experiments with varying concentrations of H and D together with polarization-sensitive measurements strongly suggest that these IR absorption lines are due to stretch local vibrational modes of a defect comprising three equivalent hydrogen atoms. The zinc vacancy decorated by three hydrogen atoms, VZnH3 , and ammonia trapped at the zinc vacancy, (NH3)Zn, are discussed as a possible origin for the complex.

  20. A sapphire tube atomizer for on-line atomization and in situ collection of bismuthine for atomic absorption spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Musil, S. (Stanislav); Dědina, J. (Jiří)

    2013-01-01

    Sapphire was tested as a new material for volatile species atomizers and bismuthine was chosen as a convenient model for volatile species. Its performance was compared with a quartz atomizer in both modes of operation - on-line atomization versus in situ collection.

  1. Observing random walks of atoms in buffer gas through resonant light absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Kenichiro

    2016-01-01

    Using resonant light absorption, random walk motions of rubidium atoms in nitrogen buffer gas are observed directly. The transmitted light intensity through atomic vapor is measured and its spectrum is obtained, down to orders of magnitude below the shot noise level to detect fluctuations caused by atomic motions. To understand the measured spectra, the spectrum for atoms performing random walks in a gaussian light beam is computed and its analytical form is obtained. The spectrum has $1/f^2$ ($f$: frequency) behavior at higher frequencies, crossing over to a different, but well defined behavior at lower frequencies. The properties of this theoretical spectrum agree excellently with the measured spectrum. This understanding also enables us to obtain the diffusion constant, the photon cross section of atoms in buffer gas and the atomic number density, from a single spectral measurement. We further discuss other possible applications of our experimental method and analysis.

  2. Micro determination of plasma and erythrocyte copper by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomfield, Jeanette; Macmahon, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    The free and total plasma copper and total erythrocyte copper levels have been determined by simple, yet sensitive and highly specific methods, using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. For total copper determination, the copper was split from its protein combination in plasma or red cells by the action of hydrochloric acid at room temperature. The liberated copper was chelated by ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and extracted into n-butyl acetate by shaking and the organic extract was aspirated into the atomic absorption spectrophotometer flame. The entire procedure was carried out in polypropylene centrifuge tubes, capped during shaking. For the free plasma copper measurement the hydrochloric acid step was omitted. Removal of the plasma or erythrocyte proteins was found to be unnecessary, and, in addition, the presence of trichloracetic acid caused an appreciable lowering of absorption. Using a double-beam atomic absorption spectrophotometer and scale expansion × 10, micro methods have been derived for determining the total copper of plasma or erythrocytes with 0·1 ml of sample, and the free copper of plasma with 0·5 ml. The macro plasma copper method requires 2 ml of plasma and is suitable for use with single-beam atomic absorption spectrophotometers. With blood from 50 blood donors, normal ranges of plasma and erythrocyte copper have been determined. PMID:5776543

  3. Comparison of liposome entrapment parameters by optical and atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoss, N L; Popescu, O; Pop, V I; Porutiu, D; Kummerow, F A; Benga, G

    1985-01-01

    Methods for the complete characterization of liposomes prepared by ether-injection are described in detail. The validity of atomic absorption spectrophotometry for measuring markers of trapped volume was checked by comparative determinations of markers with established optical spectrophotometrical methods. The favorable results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry to quantitate the marker Mn2+ are of particular relevance as manganese ion is also the paramagnetic probe in n.m.r. measurements of water permeability of liposomes; our results indicate that in such measurements no other marker need be incorporated.

  4. Direct determination of selenoproteins in polyvinylidene difluoride membranes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidenius, U; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2000-01-01

    A method for the direct determination of selenoproteins in plastic membranes after protein separation by gel electrophoresis was developed. Quantification was based on the determination of the selenium content of the proteins by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) after manual...... were excised and chemical modifier was added on top of the excised membrane prior to atomic absorption measurement. Acceptable linearity was achieved in the range 2-10 ng Se, corresponding to selenium concentrations close to 1 mg/L, when aqueous solutions of selenomethionine standard as well...

  5. The Application of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and Optical Microscopy to the Characterization of Sized Airborne Particulate in Dayton, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    PERIOD COVERED " AneT Appication of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy ’ and Optical Microscopy to the Characterization of THESIS/DISSERTATION 4 Sized...1978 U I HEREBY REC04MEND THAT THE THESIS PREPARED ’NDER MY SUPERVISION BY Lorelei Ann Krebs ENTITLED The Application of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and...acid and diluted with distilled water in a 25 milliliter volumetric flask. Atomic absorption . spectroscopy was used to analyze the solutions for

  6. Determination of vanadium in food and traditional Chinese medicine by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Various experimental conditions were described for the vanadium determination by graphite furnace atomic ab-sorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). The experiments showed that when atomization took place under the conditions where thecombination of a pyrolytic coating graphite tube and fast raising temperature were used and the temperature was stable, thesignal peak shapes could be improved, the sensitivity was enhanced, and the memory effect was removed. The vanadium infood and traditional Chinese medicinal herbs can be accurately determined using the standard curve method.

  7. Padronização interna em espectrometria de absorção atômica Internal standardization in atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly G. Fernandes

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a review on internal standardization in atomic absorption spectrometry with emphasis to the systematic and random errors in atomic absorption spectrometry and applications of internal standardization in flame atomic absorption spectrometry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The rules for selecting an element as internal standard, limitations of the method, and some comments about the application of internal standardization in atomic absorption spectrometry and the future of this compensation strategy are critically discussed.

  8. Absorption spectroscopy of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Shu-Bin; Liu Tao; Geng Tao; Zhang Tian-Cai; Peng Kun-Chi; Wang Jun-Min

    2004-01-01

    Absorption spectra of cold caesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap are measured around D2 line at 852nm with a weak probe beam. Absorption reduction dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)effect induced by the cooling/trapping field in a V-type three-level system and a gain peak near the cycling transition are clearly observed. Several mechanisms mixed with EIT effect in a normal V-type three-level system are briefly discussed. A simple theoretical analysis based on a dressed-state model is presented for interpretation of the absorption spectra.

  9. A new heating strategy in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for better absorbance-time curves at high atomization rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torsi, Giancarlo [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna, Via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: giancarlo.torsi@unibo.it; Zattoni, Andrea [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna, Via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Locatelli, Clinio [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna, Via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Valcher, Sergio [Department of Chemistry G. Ciamician, University of Bologna, Via F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2005-03-31

    The results previously obtained by using fast heating in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry are considerably improved by using a new heating sequence which can be summarized as transverse-longitudinal heating mode. The absorbance vs. time curves, obtained with the new heating mode, follow almost perfectly a simple model in which only diffusion is considered as the force acting on the atomic vapor. From the fitting of the experimental absorbance vs. time data points with theoretical values, it is possible to calculate both the absorbance, when all atoms injected are assumed to be present, and their diffusion coefficient. Both values can be calculated by a simple software approach without the operator intervention. The asymptotic absorbance calculated in this way is the maximum absorbance physically obtainable and is the basis for standardless analysis.

  10. High sensitivity probe absorption technique for time-of-flight measurements on cold atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mohapatra; C S Unnikrishnan

    2006-06-01

    We report on a phase-sensitive probe absorption technique with high sensitivity, capable of detecting a few hundred ultra-cold atoms in flight in an observation time of a few milliseconds. The large signal-to-noise ratio achieved is sufficient for reliable measurements on low intensity beams of cold atoms. We demonstrate the high sensitivity and figure of merit of the simple method by measuring the time-of-flight of atoms moving upwards from a magneto-optical trap released in the gravitational field.

  11. The Use of an Air-Natural Gas Flame in Atomic Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci, Robert C.

    1983-01-01

    Points out that excellent results are obtained using an air-natural gas flame in atomic absorption experiments rather than using an air-acetylene flame. Good results are obtained for alkali metals, copper, cadmium, and zinc but not for the alkaline earths since they form refractory oxides. (Author/JN)

  12. Exploiting flow Injection and sequential injection schemes for trace metal determinations by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    Determination of low or trace-level amounts of metals by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) often requires the use of suitable preconcentration and/or separation procedures in order to attain the necessary sensitivity and selectivity. Such schemes are advantageously executed...

  13. Chemical modifiers in electrothermal atomic absorption determination of Platinum and Palladium containing preparations in blood serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аntonina Alemasova

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological liquids matrixes influence on the characteristic masses and repeatability of Pt and Pd electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS determination was studied. The chemical modifiers dimethylglyoxime and ascorbic acid for matrix interferences elimination and ETAAS results repeatability improvement were proposed while bioliquids ETAAS analysis, and their action mechanism was discussed.

  14. Determination of platinum, palladium, and lead in biological samples by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, J B; Johnson, D E

    1975-01-01

    A flameless atomic absorption method for the coextraction of platinum and palladium from biological and environmental samples by high molecular weight amine (HMWA) is given. Also, methods for lead determination in biological samples by use of extraction flameless analysis and direct aspiration-flame analysis are reported. A study of lead contamination of Vacutainer tubes is given. PMID:1227857

  15. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  16. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  17. Point defect absorption by grain boundaries in α -iron by atomic density function modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapikranian, O.; Zapolsky, H.; Patte, R.; Pareige, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2015-12-01

    Using the atomic density function theory (ADFT), we examine the point defect absorption at [110] symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in body-centered cubic iron. It is found that the sink strength strongly depends on misorientation angle. We also show that the ADFT is able to reproduce reasonably well the elastic properties and the point defect formation volume in α -iron.

  18. X-ray absorption studies of atomic environments in semiconductor nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Boscherini, F

    2003-01-01

    The use of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in the investigation of the atomic environment in semiconductor nanostructures is illustrated. After a description of the experimental apparatus two specific examples are reported: the detection of Si-Ge intermixing in Ge quantum dots and the relation between long range elasticity and local distortions in strained InGaAs epilayers.

  19. Photon absorption and emission statistics of a two-level atom in a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang J. [Sun Moon University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The absorption and the emission of photons by an atom involves quantum jumps between states. We investigate the quantum jump statistics for the system of a two-level atom and a single-mode cavity field. We use the Jaynes-Cummings model for this problem, perform Monte Carlo numerical simulations, and give a detailed exact analysis on these simulations. These studies reveal that the waiting-time distribution (WTD) for photon absorptions (emissions) has a unique novel statistic, and that the photon absorption (emission) rate is not uniform, but counter-intuitively depends on the position in the Rabi cycle. The effects of the nonclassical nature of the field on the WTD is discussed.

  20. Optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of F =1 atomic gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sooshin; Seo, Sang Won; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Shin, Y.

    2016-08-01

    We report our study of the optical pumping effect in absorption imaging of 23Na atoms in the F =1 hyperfine spin states. Solving a set of rate equations for the spin populations in the presence of a probe beam, we obtain an analytic expression for the optical signal of the F =1 absorption imaging. Furthermore, we verify the result by measuring the absorption spectra of 23Na Bose-Einstein condensates prepared in various spin states with different probe-beam pulse durations. The analytic result can be used in the quantitative analysis of F =1 spinor condensate imaging and readily applied to other alkali-metal atoms with I =3 /2 nuclear spin such as 87Rb.

  1. Atomization mechanisms and gas phase reactions in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frech, W.; Lindberg, A.O.; Lundberg, E.; Cedergren, A.

    1986-04-01

    The amounts of carbon monoxide as well as the total amounts of hydrocarbons generated in different types of graphite tubes were investigated under various experimental conditions. Depending on whether or not a matrix like 50 ..mu..g of sodium nitrate was added the amount of carbon monoxide formed during atomization at 1,700 K in a pyrocoated tube was in the range 60 to 600 nmoles when using a thermal pretreatment temperature of 1,200 K. The corresponding values for an uncoated tube were 250 to 1,300 nmoles. The effect of carbon monoxide on the atomization behaviour of silver, bismuth, chromium, copper and lead was investigated experimentally and the results were evaluated by means of thermodynamically based models. In accordance with theoretical predications, only lead, bismuth and chromium, which are assumed to be atomized by oxide decomposition, showed substantial shifts in their appearance temperatures in different gas mixtures, and changes in activation energies.

  2. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  3. Determination of cadmium and lead in urine by derivative flame atomic absorption spectrometry using the atom trapping technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han-wen, Sun; De-qiang, Zhang; Li-li, Yang; Jian-min, Sun

    1997-06-01

    A method is described for the determinations of cadmium and lead in urine by derivative flame atomic absorption spectrometry with a modified water-cooled stainless steel atom trapping tube. The effects of the trap position, the flame conditions, the coolant flow rates, and the collection time were studied. With a 1 min collection time, the characteristic concentrations (derivative absorbance of 0.0044) for cadmium and lead were 0.028 and 1.4 μg L -1, the detection limits (3σ) were 0.02 and 0.27 μg L -1, respectively. The detection limits and sensitivities of the proposed method were 2 and 3 orders of magnitude higher for 1-3 min collection time than those of conventional flame atomic absorption spectrometry for cadmium and lead, respectively. Urine samples from a small population of normal individuals have been analyzed for cadmium and lead by the proposed method. Satisfactory recoveries of 91-110% and 91-106%, for Cd and Pb were obtained with these urine samples.

  4. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  5. Hydride generation – in-atomizer collection of Pb in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device for atomic absorption spectrometry – an interference study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotný, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); High School in Hořice, Husova 1414, 508 01 Hořice (Czech Republic); Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v.v.i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-01-01

    Interferences of selected hydride forming elements (As, Sb, Bi, Se and Sn) on lead determination by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were extensively studied in both on-line atomization and preconcentration (collection) modes. The commonly used on-line atomization mode was found free of significant interferences, whereas strong interference from Bi was observed when employing the preconcentration mode with plumbane collection in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device. Interference of Bi seems to take place in the preconcentration step. Interference of Bi in the collection mode cannot be reduced by increased hydrogen radical amount in the trap and/or the atomizer. - Highlights: ► Interference study on Pb determination by in-atomizer trapping was performed for the first time. ► Bi was found as a severe interferent in the preconcentration mode (Pb:Bi ratio 1:100). ► No interference was found in the on-line atomization (no preconcentration). ► Bi interference occurs during preconcentration.

  6. Quantitative Determination of Arsenic in Bottled Drinking Water Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Guţu Claudia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many studies have been performed in the past few years, to determine arsenic speciation in drinking water, food chain and environment, arsenic being a well-recognized carcinogenic and toxic agent mainly in its inorganic species. The instrumental techniques used for arsenic determination, such as hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, can provide a great sensitivity only on the total amount. Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a simple and rapid method and to analyze the concentration of total inorganic arsenic in bottled drinking water. Methods: Total arsenic was determined in samples from six different types of commercially available bottled drinking water using atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal or hydride generation vaporisation. All drinking water samples were acidified with 0.1M nitric acid to match the acidity of the standards. Results: The method was linear within the studied range (1-5 μg/L, R = 0.9943. The quantification limits for arsenic determination were 0.48 μg/L (HGAAS and 0.03 μg/L (GFAAS. The evaluated arsenic content in drinking water was within the accepted limits provided by law. Conclusions: A simple and sensitive method for the quantification of arsenic in drinking water using atomic absorbtion spectroscopy was described, which can be further used in toxicological studies. As an additional advantage, the system is very fast, efficient and environmental friendly

  7. Absorption of copper(II) by creosote bush (Larrea tridentata): use of atomic and x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardea-Torresdey, J L; Arteaga, S; Tiemann, K J; Chianelli, R; Pingitore, N; Mackay, W

    2001-11-01

    Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a common North American native desert shrub, exhibits the ability to take up copper(II) ions rapidly from solution. Following hydroponic studies, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 200.3 was used to digest the plant samples, and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) was used to determine the amount of copper taken up in different parts of the plant. The amount of copper(II) found within the roots, stems, and leaves was 13.8, 1.1, and 0.6 mg/g, respectively, after the creosote bush was exposed to a 63.5-ppm copper(II) solution for 48 h. When the plant was exposed to a 635-ppm copper(II) solution, the roots, stems, and leaves contained 35.0, 10.5, and 3.8 mg/g, respectively. In addition to FAAS analysis, x-ray microfluorescence (XRMF) analysis of the plant samples provided further confirmation of copper absorption by the various plant parts. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) elucidated the oxidation state of the copper absorbed by the plants. The copper(II) absorbed from solution remained as copper(II) bound to oxygen-containing ligands within the plant samples. The results of this study indicate that creosote bush may provide a useful and novel method of removing copper(II) from contaminated soils in an environmentally friendly manner.

  8. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Y., E-mail: yingge.du@pnnl.gov, E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A., E-mail: yingge.du@pnnl.gov, E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Li, G. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  9. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Y.; Droubay, T. C.; Liyu, A. V.; Li, G.; Chambers, S. A.

    2014-04-01

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. A new atomic absorption spectral assay for the determination of trace IgG using immunonanogold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yafang; Jiang, Caina; Liang, Aihui; Li, Jishun; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2011-05-01

    Nanogold in size of 10 nm was used to label goat anti-human IgG (GIgG) to obtain an immunonanogold probe (AuGIgG) for IgG. In pH 6.8 phosphate buffer solution and in the presence of immunoprecipitator polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000), IgG reacted with the probe (AuGIgG) to form AuGIgG-IgG-PEG immunocomplex. After the centrifugation to remove the immunocomplex, AuGIgG in the supernatant can be measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry at gold absorption line 242.8 nm. The results showed that the absorption value decreased as the concentration of IgG increased, and the decreased absorption value was linear to IgG concentration in the range 0.025-0.375 μg/mL, with a detection limit of 0.008 μg/mL. On this base, a new nanogold-labeled atomic absorption spectral assay for IgG was established. The assay was applied to determine IgG in human serum sample with satisfactory results.

  12. Electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead in urine: results of an interlaboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Patrick J.; Slavin, Walter

    1999-05-01

    Results of an interlaboratory study are reported for the determination of lead in urine. Two levels of a lyophilized material containing biologically-bound lead were prepared using pooled urine obtained from lead-poisoned children undergoing the CaNa 2EDTA mobilization test. The materials were circulated to a group of reference laboratories that participate in the `New York State Proficiency Testing Program for Blood Lead'. Results of the initial round-robin gave all-method consensus target values of 145±22 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 17 and 449±43 μg/l (S.D.) for lot 20. The interlaboratory exercise was repeated some 5 years later and consensus target values were re-calculated using the grand mean (excluding outliers) of results reported by laboratories using electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The re-calculated target values were 139±10 μg/l (S.D.) and 433±12 μg/l (S.D.). The urine reference materials were also analyzed for lead by several laboratories using other instrumental techniques including isotope dilution (ID), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), flame atomic absorption with extraction, ICP-atomic emission spectrometry, ID-gas chromatography MS and flow injection-hydride generation AAS, thus providing a rich source of analytical data with which to characterize them. The materials were also used in a long-term validation study of an ETAAS method developed originally for blood lead determinations that has since been used unmodified for the determination of lead in urine also. Recently, urine lead method performance has been tracked in a proficiency testing program specifically for this analysis. In addition, a number of commercial control materials have been analyzed and evaluated.

  13. A double cell for X-ray absorption spectrometry of atomic Zn

    CERN Document Server

    Mihelic, A; Arcon, I; Padeznik-Gomilsek, J; Borowski, M

    2002-01-01

    A high-temperature cell with a double wall design has been constructed for X-ray absorption spectrometry of metal vapors. The inner cell, assembled from a corundum tube and thin plates without welding or reshaping, serves as a container of the vapor sample. It is not vacuum tight: instead, the outer tube provides inert atmosphere. Several spectra of K-edge atomic absorption of Zn were obtained in the stationary working regime below the Zn boiling point. The K-edge profile shows an extremely strong resonance and, above the continuum threshold, coexcitations of the outer electrons.

  14. Determination of zinc in serum, blood, and ultrafiltrate fluid from patients on hemofiltration by graphite furnace/atomic absorption spectroscopy or flow injection analysis/atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blas, O J; Rodriguez, R S; Mendez, J H; Tomero, J A; Gomez, B de L; Gonzalez, S V

    1994-01-01

    Two methods were optimized for the determination of zinc in samples of blood, serum, and ultrafiltrate fluid from patients with chronic renal impairment undergoing hemofiltration. In the first procedure, after acid digestion of the samples, Zn in blood and serum is determined by a system coupled to flow injection analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method is rapid, automated, simple, needs small amounts of sample, and has acceptable analytical characteristics. The analytical characteristics obtained were as follows: determination range of method, 0.05-2.0 ppm of Zn; precision as coefficient of variation (CV), 5.3%; recovery, 95-105%; and detection limit (DL), 0.02 ppm. The second method is optimized for ultrafiltrate fluid because the sensitivity of the first procedure is not suitable for the levels of Zn (ppb or ng/mL) in these samples. The technique chosen was atomic absorption spectroscopy with electrothermal atomization in a graphite furnace. The analytical characteristics obtained were as follows: determination range of method, 0.3-2.0 ppb Zn; CV, 5.7%; recovery, 93-107%; and DL, 0.12 ppb. The methods were used to determine zinc in samples of blood, serum, and ultrafiltrate fluid from 5 patients with chronic renal impairment undergoing hemofiltration to discover whether there were significant differences in the zinc contents of blood, serum, and ultrafiltrate fluid after the hemofiltration process. An analysis of variance of the experimental data obtained from a randomly selected group of 5 patients showed that zinc concentrations in the ultrafiltrate fluid, venous blood, and venous serum do not vary during hemofiltration (p < 0.05), whereas in arterial blood and serum, the time factor has a significant effect.

  15. Absorption-Dispersion Properties in a Four-Level Atomic System with Vacuum-Induced Coherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEIHua; LIJia-Hua; ZHANZhi-Ming; PENGJu-Cun

    2005-01-01

    We discuss and analyze absorption-dispersion response for the probe field in a typical four-level atomic system with vacuum-induced coherence (VIC) arising from the cross coupling pathways associated with a pair of upper excited hyperfine levels. We find that VIC effect can preserve electromagnetically induced transparency (FIT) by using the detailed numerical simulations based on the density-matrix equations and analytical calculations in the dressed-state picture. We also show that the atomic hyperfine structure cannot be a hindrance to obtaining EIT.

  16. Absorption-Dispersion Properties in a Four-Level Atomic System with Vacuum-Induced Coherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hua; LI Jia-Hua; ZHAN Zhi-Ming; PENG Ju-Cun

    2005-01-01

    We discuss and analyze absorption-dispersion response for the probe field in a typical four-level atomic system with vacuum-induced coherence (VIC) arising from the cross coupling pathways associated with a pair of upper excited hyperfine levels. We find that VIC effect can preserve electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) by using the detailed numerical simulations based on the density-matrix equations and analytical calculations in the dressed-state picture. We also show that the atomic hyperfine structure cannot be a hindrance to obtaining EIT.

  17. Unraveling the absorption spectra of alkali metal atoms attached to helium nanodroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünermann, Oliver; Droppelmann, Georg; Hernando, Alberto; Mayol, Ricardo; Stienkemeier, Frank

    2007-12-13

    The absorption spectra of the first electronic exited state of alkali metal atoms on helium nanodroplets formed of both 4He and 3He isotopes were studied experimentally as well as theoretically. In the experimental part new data on the 2palkali metal atoms with helium nanodroplets, a model calculation was performed. New helium density profiles as well as a refined model allowed us to achieve good agreement with the experimental findings. For the first time the red-shifted intensities in the lithium and sodium spectra are explained in terms of enhanced binding configurations in the excited state displaced spatially from the ground state configurations.

  18. Absorptive reduction and width narrowing in A-type atoms confined between two dielectric walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yuan-Yuan; Hou Xun; Bai Jin-Tao; Yan Jun-Feng; Gan Chen-Li; Zhang Yan-Peng

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the absorptive reduction and the width narrowing of electromagnetically induced trans- parency (EIT) in a thin vapour film of A-type atoms confined between two dielectric walls whose thickness is comparable with the wavelength of the probe field. The absorptive lines of the weak probe field exhibit strong reductions and very narrow EIT dips, which mainly results from the velocity slow-down effects and transient behaviour of atoms in a con-fined system. It is also shown that the lines are modified by the strength of the coupling field and the ratio of L/λ, with L the film thickness and A the wavelength of the probe field. A simple robust recipe for EIT in a thin medium is achievable in experiment.

  19. Determination of copper, zinc and iron in broncho-alveolar lavages by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlyk, C; Mccourt, J; Bordin, G; Rodriguez, A R; van der Eeckhout, A

    1997-11-01

    Concentrations of Zn, Cu and Fe were measured in 157 broncho-alveolar lavages (BAL), before and after centrifugation, collected at the Leuven University Hospital (Belgium). Zn was measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy, using direct calibration, while Cu and Fe were determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy, using the method of standard additions. For Fe only 56 samples were measured. Most of the studied elements are present in the liquid phase (supernatant). About 90% of Cu concentrations lie between 0 and 15 micrograms/kg, while 90% of Zn concentrations are lower than 230 micrograms/kg, with 30% between 30 and 70 micrograms/kg, and 50% between 100 and 200 micrograms/kg. There seems to be a reverse relationship between Cu and Zn levels with high Cu going along with low Zn and vice versa.

  20. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Determination of Trace Iron in High Purity Sodium Fluoride by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for the direct determination of iron in high purity sodium fluoride using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Interferences caused by the matrix are investigated. It is shown that the ashing temperature can be increased to 1 400°C and matrix interferences eliminated, the sensi tivity of iron increased in 1.27 fold by the addition of nickel nitrate. The method is applied to the determina tion of iron in sodium fluoride and satisfactory results are obtained.

  2. Determination of diethyllead in the urine by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Turlakiewicz, Z; Jakubowski, M.; Chmielnicka, J

    1985-01-01

    A method for the determination of diethyllead in urine by flameless atomic absorption spectrometry after chelation with glyoxal-bis (2-hydroxyanil) and extraction of the formed complex with methyl isobutyl ketone is described. The method is specific in relation to both triethyllead and inorganic lead. The limit of detection was 3.2 micrograms Pb/l and the relative standard deviation in the concentration range 20-100 micrograms Pb/l was 0.076.

  3. Analysis of Mercurial Preservatives in Bacterins, Vaccines, and Antisera by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Paul W.; Pemberton, John R.

    1974-01-01

    A flameless atomic absorption method was developed for the determination of mercurial preservatives in biologicals. The assay was based on a quantitative determination of the mercury content of these preservatives. This method was used to analyze a variety of samples and yielded reproducible results with satisfactory recoveries. The procedure is presented in a simplified block diagram and described in detail relating its suitability for routine assay of large numbers of samples. PMID:4833363

  4. Literature study of microwave-assisted digestion using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R; Das, A K; Cervera, M L; De La Guardia, M

    1996-05-01

    The literature on the use of microwave-assisted digestion procedures for subsequent sample analysis by means of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is reviewed. The literature survey reveals that this digestion technique has been applied mainly for biological materials. The elements most extensively determined by this method are cadmium and lead followed by copper, chromium, nickel and iron. The microwave digestion conditions, ETAAS furnace programmes and analytical details of the developed methodologies have been carefully revised.

  5. EVALUATION OF HEAVY METALS CONTENT IN EDIBLE MUSHROOMS BY MICROWAVE DIGESTION AND FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiana Radulescu; Claudia Stihi; Valerica Gh. Cimpoca; Popescu, Ion V.; Gabriela Busuioc; Ana Irina Gheboianu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the heavy metal (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Mn, Zn, Fe and Cu) content of the fruiting bodies (cap and stipe) of four species (Amanita caesarea, Pleurotus ostreatus, Fistulina hepatica and Armillariella mellea) and their substrate, collected from forest sites in Dâmboviţa County, Romania. The elements were determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS) after microwave assisted digestion. From the same collecting point were taken n = 5 samples of young and...

  6. Direct microcomputer controlled determination of zinc in human serum by flow injection atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Nielsen, Bent; Jensen, Arne

    1986-01-01

    A procedure is described for the direct determination of zinc in human serum by fully automated, microcomputer controlled flow injection atomic absorption spectrometry (Fl-AAS). The Fl system is pumpless, using the negative pressure created by the nebuliser. It only consists of a three-way valve......, programmable from the microcomputer, to control the sample volume. No pre-treatment of the samples is necessary. The limit of detection is 0.14 mg l–1, and only small amounts of serum (

  7. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  8. Radiation trapping in atomic absorption spectroscopy at lead determination in different matricies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Gohary, Z. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Menoufia University, Shebin El-Koom (Egypt)]. E-mail: zhelgohary@yahoo.com

    2005-08-15

    The determination of lead by flame atomic absorption analysis in the presence of Sn and Fe atoms and different matrices such as OH and SO{sub 3} was investigated with the objective of understanding the spectral interference processes at the analytical lines 283.31 nm for a wide range of concentration. The radiation trapping factor was interpreted and evaluated assuming Voigt distribution of the atomic and rotational lines in the flame. The radiation trapping factor was increased by increasing the number density (plasma of the absorbing medium is optically thick). In plasma, there is a certain point of equilibrium between the trapping and the escaping of radiation, which is relevant to 50% of absorption. The spectral background interference can cause a variation of the number density at equilibrium point as a result of the degree of overlap with the analytical line. The spectral background interference can be easily avoided by using another resonance absorption line for the analysis. The chemical modification of the matrix is applied to minimize the interference effect. Nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and magnesium nitrate are most commonly recommended as matrix modifiers.

  9. Radiation trapping in atomic absorption spectroscopy at lead determination in different matricies

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gohary, Z.

    2005-08-01

    The determination of lead by flame atomic absorption analysis in the presence of Sn and Fe atoms and different matrices such as OH and SO3 was investigated with the objective of understanding the spectral interference processes at the analytical lines 283.31 nm for a wide range of concentration. The radiation trapping factor was interpreted and evaluated assuming Voigt distribution of the atomic and rotational lines in the flame. The radiation trapping factor was increased by increasing the number density (plasma of the absorbing medium is optically thick). In plasma, there is a certain point of equilibrium between the trapping and the escaping of radiation, which is relevant to 50% of absorption. The spectral background interference can cause a variation of the number density at equilibrium point as a result of the degree of overlap with the analytical line. The spectral background interference can be easily avoided by using another resonance absorption line for the analysis. The chemical modification of the matrix is applied to minimize the interference effect. Nitric acid, ammonium nitrate and magnesium nitrate are most commonly recommended as matrix modifiers.

  10. Absorption and dispersion control in a five-level M-type atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Hong; Yan Dong; Zhang Mei; Fang Bo; Zhang Yan; Wu Jin-Hui

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the steady optical response of a coherently driven five-level M-type atomic system in three different situations.When all three coupling fields have the same zero detuning,we just find one deep transparency window accompanied by a steep normal dispersion in the probe absorption and dispersion spectra.When two coupling fields are detuned from the relevant transitions to the same extent,however,a second deep transparency window may be observed in the presence of a narrow absorption line of linewidth ~ 50 kHz.In this case,two single-photon far-detuned transitions can be replaced by a two-photon resonant transition,so the five-level M system in fact reduces into a four-level quasi-A system.Finally,we note that no deep transparency windows and no narrow absorption lines can be found when all three coupling fields have unequal detunings.

  11. Self-assembly based plasmonic arrays tuned by atomic layer deposition for extreme visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Carl; Zeltzer, Gabriel; Ruiz, Ricardo; Thomann, Isabell; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Brongersma, Mark L; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-07-10

    Achieving complete absorption of visible light with a minimal amount of material is highly desirable for many applications, including solar energy conversion to fuel and electricity, where benefits in conversion efficiency and economy can be obtained. On a fundamental level, it is of great interest to explore whether the ultimate limits in light absorption per unit volume can be achieved by capitalizing on the advances in metamaterial science and nanosynthesis. Here, we combine block copolymer lithography and atomic layer deposition to tune the effective optical properties of a plasmonic array at the atomic scale. Critical coupling to the resulting nanocomposite layer is accomplished through guidance by a simple analytical model and measurements by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thereby, a maximized absorption of light exceeding 99% is accomplished, of which up to about 93% occurs in a volume-equivalent thickness of gold of only 1.6 nm. This corresponds to a record effective absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) in the visible region, far exceeding those of solid metals, graphene, dye monolayers, and thin film solar cell materials. It is more than a factor of 2 higher than that previously obtained using a critically coupled dye J-aggregate, with a peak width exceeding the latter by 1 order of magnitude. These results thereby substantially push the limits for light harvesting in ultrathin, nanoengineered systems.

  12. Time-resolved Absorption Spectra of the Laser-dressed Hydrogen Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-05-01

    A theoretical study of the transient absorption spectra for the laser-dressed hydrogen atom based on the accurate numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is presented. The timing of absorption is controlled by the time delay between an isolated extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse and a dressing infrared (IR) field. We identify two different kinds of physical processes in the spectra. One is the formation of dressed states, signified by the appearance of sidebands between the XUV absorption lines separated by one IR-photon energy. We show that their population is maximized when the XUV pulse coincides with the zero-crossing of the IR field, and that their energy can be manipulated by using a chirped IR field. The other process is the dynamical AC Stark shift induced by the IR field and probed by the XUV pulse. Our calculations indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen atom leads to the multiple splittings of each XUV absorption line whose separations change in response to a slowly-varying IR envelope. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 states using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional 3-level model that neglects the dynamical AC Stark effects.

  13. Some problems connected with boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy and the sensitivity improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JELENA J. SAVOVIC

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Two atomizers were compared: an N2O–C2H2 flame and a stabilized U-shaped DC arc with aerosol supply. Both the high plasma temperature and the reducing atmosphere obtained by acetylene addition to the argon stream substantially increase the sensitivity of boron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS when the arc atomizer is used. The results were compared with those for silicon as a control element. The experimental characteristic concentrations for both elements were compared with the computed values. The experimentally obtained characteristic concentration for boron when using the arc atomizer was in better agreement with the calculated value. It was estimated that the influence of stable monoxide formation on the sensitivity for both elements was about the same, but reduction of analyte and formation of non-volatile carbide particles was more important for boron, which is the main reason for the low sensitivity of boron determination using a flame atomizer. The use of an arc atomizer suppresses this interference and significantly improves the sensitivity of the determination.

  14. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  15. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R.S. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pozebon, Dirce [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)], E-mail: dircepoz@iq.ufrgs.br; Mello, Paola A.; Flores, Erico M.M. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, UFSM, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2007-10-17

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 {mu}g g{sup -1} of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES)

  16. Determination of trace elements in paints by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentlin, Fabrina R S; Pozebon, Dirce; Mello, Paola A; Flores, Erico M M

    2007-10-17

    A direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric (DS-GFAAS) method for the determination of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu in paints has been developed. Serigraphy, acrylic and tattoo paints were analysed. Approaches like pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, modifiers and sample mass introduced in the atomizer were studied. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions pipetted onto the platform. The sample mass introduced in the graphite tube ranged from 0.02 to 8.0 mg. Palladium was used as modifier for Cd, Pb and Cu, while Mg(NO3)2 was used for Co. For Ni determination, the graphite platform was covered with carbon powder. The characteristic masses of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu were 1.4, 22.5, 7.9, 11.0, 9.6 and 12.5 pg, while the limits of detection were 0.0004, 0.001, 0.03, 0.22, 0.11 and 0.05 microg g(-1) of Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Co and Cu, respectively. The accuracy was determined by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), using liquid sampling of digests. For matrix characterization, major and minor elements (Al, Mg, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti and Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES).

  17. Variations of Positive and Negative Dispersions in Both Highly and Weakly Absorptive Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Salloum, Tony; Snell, Scott; Davis, Jon; Narducci, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Positive and negative dispersive media are essential in subluminal, superluminal and negative group velocity pulse propagation applications. Three-level atomic media at resonance, especially the Lambda configuration, are positively dispersive and transparent. In contrast, two-level atomic systems are negatively dispersive and opaque. In this work we study higher level atomic systems comprised of three fields coupled to three levels (double lambda) or four levels (N-Scheme). We explore the systems of interest for critical features such as negative dispersion and transparency, a combination that is needed in numerous applications, e.g. optical gyroscopes. We solve the time dependent equations perturbatively and compare them to well established behavior in three-level systems. Some of the results are analyzed in terms of resonances which control the different features of the observed dispersive and absorptive behaviors.

  18. [Application of solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry to mensuration of brain iron content in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Sheng, Qing-hai; Shi, Zhen-hua; Zhang, Zhi-guo; Duan, Xiang-lin; Chang, Yan-zhong

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, the authors performed the solid sampling and detected the iron levels in cortex, hippocampus and striatum of rat brain by GFAAS. The authors' results showed that there are no remarkable difference between the data obtained by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption and liquid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption. Compared to liquid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption, the sample pre-treatment stage was obviously simplified, the cost was reduced significantly, and the time was shortened significantly in the solid sampling GFAAS. This study will be beneficial to the mensuration of iron content in micro-tissue of animal by solid sampling GFASS.

  19. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzan, Ezequiel; Piano, Ornela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel, E-mail: tudino@qi.fcen.uba.ar

    2012-11-15

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 {mu}g mL{sup -1}, sensitivity: 0.306 ({mu}g mL{sup -1}){sup -1}, RSD% (n = 10, 1 {mu}g mL{sup -1}): 2.5, linear range: 0.01-4 {mu}g mL{sup -1} and sample throughput: 72 h{sup -1}. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quartz tubes as furnaces in TS-FFAAS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Small tubes for controlling radial dispersion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improved figures of merit for gold determination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of homeopathic medicines.

  20. Determination of total magnesium in biological samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulanicki, Adam; Godlewska, Beata; Brzóska, Malgorzata

    1995-11-01

    Magnesium content is an important diagnostic parameter in medicine. It is recognized that its determination in one compartment is not sufficient for reliable information about the magnesium status in the body. In addition to the common procedures of magnesium determination in blood by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, the procedure of electrothermal atomization has also been developed and applied to the analysis of blood fractions, mononuclear cells and isolated nuclei of liver cells. Electrothermal atomization is preferred in cases where the sample size is limited and the magnesium content low. The total errors are in the order of 3-4%. Various techniques of sample pretreatment have been tested and direct dilution with 0.05 mol l -1 nitric acid was optimal when the samples were not mineralized. The calibration graph based on standards containing albumin was found to give the best results, as the form of magnesium in the samples may influence the ashing and atomization processes. Good agreement was obtained for determination of magnesium in standard serum. The results are compared with those obtained by the standard flame atomization technique.

  1. Method 200.12 - Determination of Trace Elements in Marine Waters by StabilizedTemperature Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    This method provides procedures for the determination of total recoverable elements by graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) in marine waters, including estuarine, ocean and brines with salinities of up to 35 ppt.

  2. Alternative approaches to correct interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasias, I.N.; Pappa, Ch.; Katsarou, V.; Thomaidis, N.S., E-mail: ntho@chem.uoa.gr; Piperaki, E.A.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to propose alternative techniques and methods in combination with the classical chemical modification to correct the major matrix interferences in the determination of boron in shrimps. The performance of an internal standard (Ge) for the determination of boron by the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry was tested. The use of internal standardization increased the recovery from 85.9% to 101% and allowed a simple correction of errors during sampling preparation and heating process. Furthermore, a new preparation procedure based on the use of citric acid during digestion and dilution steps improved the sensitivity of the method and decreased the limit of detection. Finally, a comparative study between the simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry with a longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction system, equipped with a transversely-heated graphite atomizer and the single element atomic absorption spectrometry with a D{sub 2} background correction system, equipped with an end-heated graphite atomizer was undertaken to investigate the different behavior of boron in both techniques. Different chemical modifiers for the determination of boron were tested with both techniques. Ni-citric acid and Ca were the optimal chemical modifiers when simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry and single-element atomic absorption spectrometry were used, respectively. By using the single-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the calculated characteristic mass was 220 pg and the calculated limit of detection was 370 μg/kg. On the contrary, with simultaneous multi-element atomic absorption spectrometry, the characteristic mass was 2200 pg and the limit of detection was 5.5 mg/kg. - Highlights: • New approaches were developed to cope with interferences of B determination by ETAAS • Ge was used as internal standard for the determination of B by simultaneous ETAAS • Citric acid was used during

  3. Direct determination of arsenic in petroleum derivatives by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between filter and platform atomizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Emilene; Rampazzo, Roger T.; Dessuy, Morgana B. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R., E-mail: mgrvale@ufrgs.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq - INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Silva, Marcia M. da [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves, 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Welz, Bernhard [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq - INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Katskov, Dmitri A. [Tshwane University of Technology (TUT), Faculty of Science, Chemistry Department, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2011-05-15

    In the present work a direct method for the determination of arsenic in petroleum derivatives has been developed, comparing the performance of a commercial transversely heated platform atomizer (THPA) with that of a transversely heated filter atomizer (THFA). The THFA results in a reduction of background absorption and an improved sensitivity as has been reported earlier for this atomizer. The mixture of 0.1% (m/v) Pd + 0.03% (m/v) Mg + 0.05% (v/v) Triton X-100 was used as the chemical modifier for both atomizers. The samples (naphtha, gasoline and petroleum condensate) were stabilized in the form of a three-component solution (detergentless microemulsion) with the sample, propan-1-ol and 0.1% (v/v) HNO{sub 3} in a ratio of 3.0:6.4:0.6. The characteristic mass of 13 pg found in the THFA was about a factor of two better than that of 28 pg obtained with the THPA; however, the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were essentially the same for both atomizers (1.9 and 6.2 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively, for THPA, and 1.8 and 5.9 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively, for THFA) due to the increased noise observed with the THFA. A possible explanation for that is a partial blockage of the radiation from the hollow cathode lamp by the narrow inner diameter of this tube and the associated loss of radiation energy. Due to the lack of an appropriate certified reference material, recovery tests were carried out with inorganic and organic arsenic standards and the results were between 89% and 111%. The only advantage of the THFA found in this work was a reduction of the total analysis time by about 20% due to the 'hot injection' that could be realized with this furnace. The arsenic concentrations varied from < LOQ to 43.3 {mu}g L{sup -1} in the samples analyzed in this work.

  4. Novel atomic absorption spectrometric and rapid spectrophotometric methods for the quantitation of paracetamol in saliva: Application to pharmacokinetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel atomic absorption spectrometric method and two highly sensitive spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of paracetamol. These techniques based on the oxidation of paracetamol by iron (III (method I; oxidation of p-aminophenol after the hydrolysis of paracetamol (method II. Iron (II then reacts with potassium ferricyanide to form Prussian blue color with a maximum absorbance at 700 nm. The atomic absorption method was accomplished by extracting the excess iron (III in method II and aspirates the aqueous layer into air-acetylene flame to measure the absorbance of iron (II at 302.1 nm. The reactions have been spectrometrically evaluated to attain optimum experimental conditions. Linear responses were exhibited over the ranges 1.0-10, 0.2-2.0 and 0.1-1.0 µg/ml for method I, method II and atomic absorption spectrometric method, respectively. A high sensitivity is recorded for the proposed methods I and II and atomic absorption spectrometric method value indicate: 0.05, 0.022 and 0.012 µg/ml, respectively. The limit of quantitation of paracetamol by method II and atomic absorption spectrometric method were 0.20 and 0.10 µg/ml. Method II and the atomic absorption spectrometric method were applied to demonstrate a pharmacokinetic study by means of salivary samples in normal volunteers who received 1.0 g paracetamol. Intra and inter-day precision did not exceed 6.9%.

  5. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  6. Determination of ruthenium in pharmaceutical compounds by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiujuan; Wang, Tiebang; Bu, Xiaodong; Tu, Qiang; Spencer, Sandra

    2006-04-11

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption (GFAA) spectrometric method for the determination of ruthenium (Rh) in solid and liquid pharmaceutical compounds has been developed. Samples are dissolved or diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) without any other treatment before they were analyzed by GFAA with a carefully designed heating program to avoid pre-atomization signal loss and to achieve suitable sensitivity. Various inorganic and organic solvents were tested and compared and DMSO was found to be the most suitable. In addition, ruthenium was found to be stable in DMSO for at least 5 days. Spike recoveries ranged from 81 to 100% and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was determined to be 0.5 microg g(-1) for solid samples or 0.005 microg ml(-1) for liquid samples based a 100-fold dilution. The same set of samples was also analyzed by ICP-MS with a different sample preparation method, and excellent agreement was achieved.

  7. [Determination of trace selenium in edible fungi with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Mei; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jing; Jing, Kui; Zang, Shu-liang; Li, Hua-wei

    2006-01-01

    In the present article, samples were digested by a quartz high-pressure digestion pot, reducing the loss of selenium in digestion. The content of selenium in edible fungi was determined by using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and the results showed that when the content of selenium in edible fungi was determined by using 1% Ni(NO3)2 as a matrix modifier, ashing temperature of 500 degreed C, and atomization temperature of 2 500 degrees C, and rectifying background by deuterium light, the recovery was in the range of 92.1%-115.5%, the relative standard deviation of the method was 1.28%, and the limit of detection was 15.8 microg x L(-1). The method was suitable for the determination of trace selenium in edible fungi with the advantages of being simple, rapid, sensitive, stable and accurate etc., and the results were satisfactory.

  8. Determination of vanadium in mussels by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry without chemical modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saavedra, Y.; Fernandez, P. [Centro de Control do Medio Marino, Peirao de Vilaxoan s/n, Vilagarcia de Arousa, 36611 Pontevedra (Spain); Gonzalez, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, 15706, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2004-05-01

    A method was developed for the quantitative determination of total vanadium concentration in mussels via electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). After the microwave digestion of the samples, a program using temperatures of 1600 C and 2600 C for ashing and atomization respectively, without any matrix modifiers, allowed us to obtain results that were satisfactory since they agreed closely with certified reference material values. The detection limit was 0.03 mg kg{sup -1} (dry weight), indicating that the method is suitable for the analysis of mussel samples. This determination was compared with matrix modifiers that have been reported previously. The method was applied to various cultivated and wild mussels from the Galician coast, yielding levels below 1 mg kg{sup -1} (wet weight). (orig.)

  9. Determination of traces of silver in waters by anion exchange and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Fishman, M. J.; Ball, J.W.

    1969-01-01

    A method has been developed for the accurate determination of 0.1-1 ??g of silver per liter of water. The method permits stabilization of silver in water without loss to container walls. Optimum conditions have been established for the complete recovery of silver from water with an anion-exchange column, for quantitative elution of silver from the resin, and for measurement of silver by atomic absorption spectrophotometry after chelation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and extraction of the chelate with MIBK. Silver in the 1-10 ??g 1 range can be determined by extraction without pre-concentration on an ion-exchange resin. ?? 1969.

  10. Estimation of calcium and magnesium in serum and urine by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thin, Christian G.; Thomson, Patricia A.

    1967-01-01

    A method has been described for the estimation of calcium and magnesium in serum and urine using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The precision and accuracy of the techniques have been determined and were found to be acceptable. The range of values for calcium and magnesium in the sera of normal adults was found to be: serum calcium (corrected to a specific gravity of 1·026) 8·38-10·08 mg. per 100 ml.; serum magnesium 1·83-2·43 mg. per 100 ml. PMID:5602562

  11. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  12. Iron analysis in atmospheric water samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in water-methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, A M; Colin, J L; Desboeufs, K V; Losno, R

    2004-01-01

    To distinguish between Fe(II) and Fe(III) species in atmospheric water samples, we have adapted an analytical procedure based on the formation of a specific complex between Fe(II) and ferrozine (FZ) on a chromatographic column. After elution of Fe(III), the Fe(II) complex is recovered with water-methanol (4:1). The possibility of trace iron measurements in this complex medium by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry has been investigated. A simplex optimization routine was required to complete the development of the analytical method.

  13. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fara, M.; Novak, F. [EGU Prague, PLC, Bichovice, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  14. Exploiting flow Injection and sequential injection schemes for trace metal determinations by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    Determination of low or trace-level amounts of metals by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) often requires the use of suitable preconcentration and/or separation procedures in order to attain the necessary sensitivity and selectivity. Such schemes are advantageously executed....../preconcentration procedures have been suggested and applied, such as liquid-liquid extraction, (co)precipitation with collection in knotted reactors, adsorption, hydride generation, or ion-exchange. Selected examples of some of these procedures will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the use of FI...

  15. Neutral atomic absorption lines and far-UV extinction: Possible implications for depletions and grain parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers examine nine lines of sight within the Galaxy and one in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) for which data on both neutral atomic absorption lines (Snow 1984; White 1986; Welty, Hobbs, and York 1989) and far UV extinction (Bless and Savage 1972; Jenkins, Savage, and Spitzer 1986) are available, in order to test the assumption that variations in gamma/alpha will cancel in taking ratios of the ionization balance equation, and to try to determine to what extent that assumption has affected the aforementioned studies of depletions and grain properties.

  16. Method for the determination of cobalt from biological products with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfir, Oana-Liliana; Ionicǎ, Mihai; Caragea, Genica; Radu, Simona; Vlǎdescu, Marian

    2016-12-01

    Cobalt is a chemical element with symbol Co and atomic number 27 and atomic weight 58.93. 59 Co is the only stable cobalt isotope and the only isotope to exist naturally on Earth. Cobalt is the active center of coenzymes called cobalamin or cyanocobalamin the most common example of which is vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 deficiency can potentially cause severe and irreversible damage, especially to the brain and nervous system in the form of fatigue, depression and poor memory or even mania and psychosis. In order to study the degree of deficiency of the population with Co or the correctness of treatment with vitamin B12, a modern optoelectronic method for the determination of metals and metalloids from biological samples has been developed, Graphite Furnace - Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (GF- AAS) method is recommended. The technique is based on the fact that free atoms will absorb light at wavelengths characteristic of the element of interest. Free atoms of the chemical element can be produced from samples by the application of high temperatures. The system GF-AAS Varian used as biological samples, blood or urine that followed the digest of the organic matrix. For the investigations was used a high - performance GF-AAS with D2 - background correction system and a transversely heated graphite atomizer. As result of the use of the method are presented the concentration of Co in the blood or urine of a group of patient in Bucharest. The method is sensitive, reproducible relatively easy to apply, with a moderately costs.

  17. Determination of Copper by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: A Student Exercise in Instrumental Methods of Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses a student exercise which requires the optimizing of the charring and atomization temperatures by producing a plot of absorbance versus temperature for each temperature parameter. Notes that although the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy technique has widespread industrial use, there are no published, structured experiments…

  18. Low-resolution continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: steps into practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katskov, Dmitri, E-mail: katskovda@tut.ac.za

    2015-03-01

    The theory and practical problems of continuum source simultaneous multi-element electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SMET AAS) are discussed by the example of direct analysis of underground water. The experimental methodology is based on pulse vaporization of the sample in a fast heated graphite tube and measurement of transient absorption of continuum spectrum radiation from D{sub 2} and Xe lamps within 200–400 nm wavelengths range with a low resolution spectral instrument and linear charge-coupled device. The setup permits the acquisition of 200 spectra during 1 s atomization pulse. Respective data matrix absorbance vs wavelength/time is employed for the quantification of elements in the sample. The calculation algorithm developed includes broad band and continuum background correction, linearization of function absorbance vs. concentration of atomic vapor and integration of thus modified absorbance at the resonance lines of the elements to be determined. Practical application shows that the method can be employed for the direct simultaneous determination of about 20 elements above microgram per liter level within 3–5 orders of the magnitude concentration range. The investigated sources of measurement errors are mainly associated with the atomization and vapor transportation problems, which are aggravated for the simultaneous release of major and minor sample constituents. Respective corrections concerning the selection of analytical lines, optimal sampling volume, matrix modification and cleaning of the atomizer have been introduced in the SMET AAS analytical technology. Under the optimized experimental conditions the calibration curves in Log-Log coordinates for all the investigated analytes in the single or multi-element reference solutions are approximated by the first order equations. The use of these equations as permanent characteristics of the setup enables instant quantification of Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Ni in the underground

  19. Shock-tube measurements of excited oxygen atoms using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nations, Marcel; Wang, Shengkai; Goldenstein, Christopher S; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-10-10

    We report the use of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using two distributed feedback diode lasers near 777.2 and 844.6 nm for sensitive, time-resolved, in situ measurements of excited-state populations of atomic oxygen in a shock tube. Here, a 1% O2/Ar mixture was shock-heated to 5400-8000 K behind reflected shock waves. The combined use of a low-finesse cavity, fast wavelength scanning of the lasers, and an off-axis alignment enabled measurements with 10 μs time response and low cavity noise. The CEAS absorption gain factors of 104 and 142 for the P35←S520 (777.2 nm) and P0,1,23←S310 (844.6 nm) atomic oxygen transitions, respectively, significantly improved the detection sensitivity over conventional single-pass measurements. This work demonstrates the potential of using CEAS to improve shock-tube studies of nonequilibrium electronic-excitation processes at high temperatures.

  20. [The application of atomic absorption spectrometry in automatic transmission fault detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-dan; Chen, Kai-kao

    2012-01-01

    The authors studied the innovative applications of atomic absorption spectrometry in the automatic transmission fault detection. After the authors have determined Fe, Cu and Cr contents in the five groups of Audi A6 main metal in automatic transmission fluid whose travel course is respectively 10-15 thousand kilometers, 20-26 thousand kilometers, 32-38 thousand kilometers, 43-49 thousand kilometers, and 52-58 thousand kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the authors founded the database of primary metal content in the Audi A6 different mileage automatic transmission fluid (ATF). The research discovered that the main metal content in the automatic transmission fluid increased with the vehicles mileage and its normal metal content level in the automatic transmission fluid is between the two trend lines. The authors determined the main metal content of automatic transmission fluid which had faulty symptoms and compared it with its database value. Those can not only judge the wear condition of the automatic transmission which had faulty symptoms but also help the automobile detection and maintenance personnel to diagnose automatic transmission failure reasons without disintegration. This reduced automobile maintenance costs, and improved the quality of automobile maintenance.

  1. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of some fluoroquinolone antibacterials using ammonium reineckate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghannam, Sheikha M.

    2008-04-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of gatifloxacin (GTF), moxifloxacin (MXF) and sparfloxacin (SPF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. Optimum concentration ranges for the determination of GTF, MXF and SPF were 5.0-150, 40-440 μg mL -1 and 0.10-1.5 mg mL -1 using atomic absorption (AAS), conductometric and colorimetric methods, respectively. Detection and quantification limits are ranges from 1.5 to 2.3 μg mL -1 using AAS method or 30-45 μg mL -1 using colorimetric method. The proposed procedures have been applied successfully to the analysis of these drugs in pharmaceutical formulations and the results are favourably comparable to the reference methods.

  2. Slurry analysis after lead collection on a sorbent and its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baysal, Asli; Tokman, Nilgun [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, 34469 Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey); Akman, Suleyman [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Science and Letters, Department of Chemistry, 34469 Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: akmans@itu.edu.tr; Ozeroglu, Cemal [Istanbul University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, 34320 Avcilar-Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-02-11

    In this study, in order to eliminate the drawbacks of elution step and to reach higher enrichment factors, a novel preconcentration/separation technique for the slurry analysis of sorbent loaded with lead prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry was described. For this purpose, at first, lead was collected on ethylene glycol dimethacrylate methacrylic acid copolymer (EGDMA-MA) treated with ammonium pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) by conventional batch technique. After separation of liquid phase, slurry of the sorbent was prepared and directly pipetted into graphite furnace of atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Optimum conditions for quantitative sorption and preparation of the slurry were investigated. A 100-fold enrichment factor could be easily reached. The analyte element in certified sea-water and Bovine-liver samples was determined in the range of 95% confidence level. The proposed technique was fast and simple and the risks of contamination and analyte loss were low. Detection limit (3{delta}) for Pb was 1.67 {mu}g l{sup -1}.

  3. Determination of Elements by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in Medicinal Plants Employed to Alleviate Common Cold Symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F Zehra Küçükbay; Ebru Kuyumcu

    2014-01-01

    Eleven important medicinal plants generally used by the people of Turkey for the treatment of com-mon cold have been studied for their mineral contents .Eleven minor and major elements (essential ,non-essen-tial and toxic) were identified in the Asplenium adiantum-nigrum L .,Althaea of ficinalis L .,Verbascum phlomoides L .,Euphorbiachamaesyce L .,Zizyphus jujube Miller ,Peganum harmala L .,Arum dioscori-dis Sm .,Sambucus nigra L .,Piper longum L .,Tussilago farfara L .and Elettariacardamomum Maton by employing flame atomic absorption and emission spectrometry and electro-thermal atomic absorption spectrom-etry .Microwave digestion procedure for total concentration was applied under optimized conditions for dissolu-tion of medicinal plants .Plant based biological certified reference materials (CRMs) served as standards for quantification .These elements are found to be present in varying concentrations in the studied plants .The baseline data presented in this work can be used in understanding the role of essential ,non-essential and toxic elements in nutritive ,preventive and therapeutic properties of medicinal plants .

  4. [Studies on cold resistance of hazel determined and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiu-Xia; Liu, Cheng-Cai; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Shao, Hong; Wu, Heng-Mei; Wang, Zhong; Yang, Yong-Nian; Li, Ji-Lin

    2010-06-01

    Using annual branch of hazel as the experimental materials, the K(+)-leakage and relative electric conductivity of three hazel species (six hazel clones) which had been treated with different low temperature were determined by electro-conductivity gauge and atomic absorption spectrometry. Regression models were established for low temperature to the K(+)-leakage or the relative electric conductivity of six hazel clones. The results showed that there was the same result of cold resistance for all clones using the two methods of comprehensive evaluation, and the indicator of K(+)-leakage rate determined by atomic absorption spectrometry can be used as a means of early identification of cold resistance of hazel clones. There were obvious differences among the clones in the ability of cold resistance. The order of the ability of cold resistance for the six hazel clones was C7R7 > Z-9-40 > C6R1 > CS2R1 > Z-9-22 > Z-9-30, and the order of the ability of cold resistance for the three hazel species was C. heterophylla > C. heterophyllax X (C. heterophylla X C. avellana) > C. heterophylla X C. avellana. The median lethal temperature of tissue for all clones is -26(-)-40 degrees "C.

  5. Quantitation of a novel metalloporphyrin drug in plasma by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, K L; Feng, M R; Rossi, D T

    1999-03-01

    A bioanalytical method to quantify cobalt mesoporphyrin (CoMP), a novel therapeutic agent, in plasma has been developed and validated. The approach involves atomic absorption spectroscopy to determine total cobalt in a sample and a back-calculation of the amount of compound present. Endogenous plasma cobalt concentrations were small ( <0.2 ng/ml(-1) Co in rat plasma) in comparison to the quantitation limit (4.5 ng/ml(-1) Co). The inter-day imprecision of the method was 10.0% relative standard deviation (RSD) and the inter-day bias was +/- 8.0% relative error (RE) over a standard curve range of 4.5- 45.0 ng/ml(-1) Co. Because it quantifies total cobalt, the method cannot differentiate between parent drug and metabolites, but negligible metabolism allows reliable estimates of the actual parent drug concentration. A correlation study between the atomic absorption method and 14C-radiometry demonstrated excellent agreement (r = 0.9868, slope = 1.041 +/- 0.028, intercept = 223.7 +/- 190.0) and further substantiated the accuracy of the methods. Methodology was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of CoMP in rat, with pharmacokinetic parameter estimation. The elimination half-lives, after intra-muscular and subcutaneous administration, were 7.7 and 8.8 days, respectively.

  6. Determination of metal concentration in fat supplements for swine nutrition by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, Marina; Faeti, Valerio; Manfredini, Matteo; Manzini, Daniela; Marchetti, Andrea; Sighinolfi, Simona

    2005-01-01

    The presence of some essential and toxic metals in fat supplements for swine diet was investigated. Collected samples represented a relevant production of the Italian industry. In particular, some samples were enriched with antioxidants or waste cooking oils. The method for the determination of Ca, Cu, Cd, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn in fat samples was developed by means of a certified reference material (CRM 186) and a representative fatty sample (RFS). All samples were digested in closed vessels in a microwave oven and then analyzed by flame atomic absorption or graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The entire analytical method provided a satisfactory repeatability and reproducibility confirmed by agreement between the experimental recovery data obtained for the CRM 186 sample and, with the method of standard additions, for the RFS material. The samples generally showed a small amount of metals compared with the recommended daily intake for the essential elements. On the other hand, some samples contained a significant concentration, from an analytical point of view, of Cd, Ni, and Pb. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to inspect the experimental data obtained from samples analysis. Basically no differences were detected in terms of metal concentration among the fat supplements analyzed.

  7. Use of flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy in immune cytolysis for nonradioactive determination of killer cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, P; Bargellini, A; Salvioli, S; Cossarizza, A

    1996-02-01

    We describe here a novel method to evaluate natural killer (NK) cytolytic activity by use of flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS). This technique may be adopted for use in laboratories equipped with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometers. Nonradioactive Cr as Na2CrO4 was used to label target cells (K562), and cell lysis was evaluated by measuring Cr released after 4 h of incubation with the effectors. We selected 520 micrograms/L as the optimal dose for labeling targets, between 12 and 20 h as the optimal incubation time, and 10(4) cells as the optimal target size. Advantages of this method include: (a) exclusion of radioactive tracer, with no risk for workers; (b) limited costs; (c) high sensitivity and reproducibility; (d) possibility to store samples; and (e) better control of Cr used for labeling cells due to well-determined, fixed Cr concentrations in the range of nontoxic and linear cellular uptake. Comparison with data obtained by conventional 51Cr labeling of targets killed by the same effectors was excellent, yielding comparable results and corroborating the method.

  8. Pressure broadening of atomic oxygen two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Daniil; Drag, Cyril; Blondel, Christophe; Guaitella, Olivier; Golda, Judith; Klarenaar, Bart; Engeln, Richard; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-12-01

    Atomic oxygen, considered to be a determining reactant in plasma applications at ambient pressure, is routinely detected by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Here, pressure broadening of the (2p 4 3 P 2  →  3p 3 P J=0,1,2) two-photon transition in oxygen atoms was investigated using a high-resolution TALIF technique in normal and Doppler-free configurations. The pressure broadening coefficients determined were {γ{{\\text{O}2}}}   =  0.40  ±  0.08  cm-1/bar for oxygen molecules and {γ\\text{He}}   =  0.46  ±  0.03 cm-1/bar for helium atoms. These correspond to pressure broadening rate constants k\\text{PB}{{\\text{O}2}}   =  9 · 10-9 cm3 s-1 and k\\text{PB}\\text{He}   =  4 · 10-9 cm3 s-1, respectively. The well-known quenching rate constants of O(3p 3 P J ) by O2 and He are at least one order of magnitude smaller, which signifies that non-quenching collisions constitute the main line-broadening mechanism. In addition to providing new insights into collisional processes of oxygen atoms in electronically excited 3p 3 P J state, reported pressure broadening parameters are important for quantification of oxygen TALIF line profiles when both collisional and Doppler broadening mechanisms are important. Thus, the Doppler component (and hence the temperature of oxygen atoms) can be accurately determined from high resolution TALIF measurements in a broad range of conditions.

  9. Atomic oxygen adsorption and absorption on Rh(111) and Ag(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouin, Jonathan D.

    A central question in the field of heterogeneous catalysis is how surface structure and subsurface species influence catalytic behavior. One key to answering that question is determining which surface structures and subsurface species are present under catalytically relevant conditions. This dissertation presents results of Auger electron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption, and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments on oxidized Rh(111) and Ag(111) crystals. Exposing Rh(111) to O2 produced a predominately (2 x 1) adlayer, but even after extended dosing, (2 x 2) domains were also present. Exposing Rh(111) to atomic oxygen yielded O coverages greater than 0.5 ML and (1 x 1) domains were observed to form along terrace step edges. However, (2 x 1) and (2 x 2) domains were still present. Atomic oxygen was used to oxidize Ag(111) in order to study the effect of sample temperature as well as oxygen flux and energy. When atomic oxygen was generated using a lower temperature thermal cracker, a variety of previously reported surface structures were observed. When O was generated using a higher filament temperature, the surface became highly corrugated, layers of Ag 2O appeared to form, and little subsurface oxygen was observed. To investigate the role of sample temperature, the Ag(111) sample was held at various temperatures while being exposed to atomic oxygen. For short doses, sample temperature had minimal effect on surface reconstruction. For longer doses, changes in sample temperature in the range of 490 K to 525 K had a substantial impact on surface reconstruction and subsurface oxygen absorption. Higher temperature dosing yielded the same surface structures which were observed after short doses. Lower temperature dosing with atomic oxygen resulted in subsurface oxygen formation and new structures which covered the surface. The results indicate the rich complexity of oxygen/transition metal interactions and illustrate how

  10. Rhodium as permanent modifier for atomization of lead from biological fluids using tungsten filament electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Parsons, Patrick J.; Aldous, Kenneth M.; Brockman, Paul; Slavin, Walter

    2002-04-01

    Rhodium (Rh) was investigated as a permanent modifier for the atomization of Pb from biological fluids in W-filament atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Heating the W-filament with a Rh solution provided a protective coating for subsequent determinations of Pb in blood and urine matrices. The W-filament AAS instrumentation used was based on a prototype design that utilized self-reversal background correction scheme and peak area measurements. We found that Rh not only stabilized Pb during the pyrolysis step, but also facilitated the removal of carbonaceous residues during the cleaning step, requiring much less power than with phosphate modifier. Thus, the filament lifetime was greatly extended to over 300 firings. Periodic reconditioning with Rh was necessary every 30 firings or so. Conditioning the filament with Rh also permitted direct calibration using simple aqueous Pb standards. The method detection limit for blood Pb was approximately 1.5 μg dl -1, similar to that reported previously. Potential interferences from concomitants such as Na, K, Ca and Mg were evaluated. Accuracy was verified using lead reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the New York State Department of Health. Blood lead results below 40 μg dl -1 were within ±1 μg dl -1 of certified values, and within ±10% above 40 μg dl -1; within-run precision was ±10% or better. Additional validation was reported using proficiency test materials and human blood specimens. All blood lead results were within the acceptable limits established by regulatory authorities in the US. When measuring Pb in urine, sensitivity was reduced and matrix-matched calibration became necessary. The method of detection limit was 27 μg l -1 for urine Pb. Urine lead results were also validated using an acceptable range comparable to that established for blood lead by US regulatory agencies.

  11. Effect of Atomic Coherence on Absorption in Four-level Systems: an Analytical study

    CERN Document Server

    Sandhya, S N

    2006-01-01

    Absorption profile of a four-level ladder atomic system interacting with three driving fields is studied perturbatively and analytical results are presented. Numerical results where the driving field strengths are treated upto all orders are presented. The absorption features is studied in two regimes, i) the weak middle transition coupling, i.e. $\\Omega_2 \\Omega_{1,3}$ and ii) the strong middle transition coupling $\\Omega_2 \\Omega_{1,3}$. In case i), it is shown that the ground state absorption and the saturation characteristics of the population of level 2 reveal deviation due to the presence of upper level couplings. In particular, the saturation curve for the population of level 2 shows a dip for $\\Omega_1 = \\Omega_3$. While the populations of levels 3 and 4 show a maxima when this resonance condition is satisfied. Thus the resonance condition provides a criterion for maximally populating the upper levels. A second order perturbation calculation reveals the nature of this minima (maxima). In the second ca...

  12. Slurry sampling techniques for the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Arifur; Kaneco, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tohru; Katsumata, Hideyuki; Ohta, Kiyohisa

    2005-05-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with a metal tube atomizer has been applied to the determination of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples. The slurry sampling conditions, such as slurry stabilizing agent, slurry concentration, pyrolysis temperature for the slurried fish samples, particle size and ultrasonic agitation time, were optimized for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry with the Mo tube atomizer. Thiourea was used as the chemical modifier for the interference of matrix elements. The detection limit was 53 fg (3S/N). The determined amount of lead in Bangladeshi fish samples was consistent with those measured in the dissolved acid-digested samples. The advantages of the proposed methods are easy calibration, simplicity, low cost and rapid analysis.

  13. Determination of mercury in coal by isotope dilution cold-vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Stephen E; Kelly, W Robert

    2002-04-01

    A method based on isotope dilution cold-vapor inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-CV-ICPMS) has been developed for high-accuracy determinations of mercury in bituminous and sub-bituminous coals. A closed-system digestion process employing a Carius tube is used to completely oxidize the coal matrix and chemically equilibrate the mercury in the sample with a 201Hg isotopic spike. The digestates are diluted with high-purity quartz-distilled water, and the mercury is released as a vapor by reduction with tin(II) chloride. Measurements of 201Hg/202Hg isotope ratios are made using a quadrupole ICPMS system in time-resolved analysis mode. The new method has some significant advantages over existing methods. The instrument detection limit is less than 1 pg/mL. The average blank (n = 17) is 30 pg, which is roughly 1 order of magnitude lower than the equivalent microwave digestion procedure. The detection limit in coal is blank limited and is approximately 40 pg/g. Memory effects are very low. The relative reproducibility of the analytical measurements is approximately 0.5% for mercury concentrations in the range 10-150 ng/g. The method has been used to measure mercury concentrations in six coal reference materials, SRM 1632b (77.4 ng/g), SRM 1632c (94.3 ng/g), BCR 40 (433.2 ng/g), BCR 180 (125.0 ng/g), BCR 181 (135.8 ng/g), and SARM 20 (252.6 ng/g), as well as a coal fly ash, SRM 1633b (143.1 ng/g). The method is equally applicable to other types of fossil fuels including both crude and refined oils.

  14. Determination of mercury in coal by isotope dilution cold-vapor generation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, S.E.; Kelly, W.R.

    2002-04-01

    A method based on isotope dilution cold-vapor inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-CV-ICPMS) has been developed for high-accuracy determinations of mercury in bituminous and sub-bituminous coals. A closed-system digestion process employing a Carius tube is used to completely oxidize the coal matrix and chemically equilibrate the mercury in the sample with a Hg-201 isotopic spike. The digestates are diluted with high-purity quartz-distilled water, and the mercury is released as a vapor by reduction with tin chloride. Measurements of Hg-201/Hg-202 isotope ratios are made using a quadrupole ICPMS system in time-resolved analysis mode. The new method has some significant advantages over existing methods. The instrument detection limit is less than 1 pg/mL. The average blank (n = 17) is 30 pg, which is roughly 1 order of magnitude lower than the equivalent microwave digestion procedure. The detection limit in coal is blank limited and is similar to 40 pg/g. Memory effects are very low. The relative reproducibility of the analytical measurements is similar to 0.5% for mercury concentrations in the range 10-150 ng/g. The method has been used to measure mercury concentrations in six coal reference materials, SRM 1632b (77.4 ng/g), SRM 1632c (94.3 ng/g), BCR 40 (433.2 ng/g), BCR 180 (125.0 ng/g), BCR 181 (135.8 ng/g), and SARM 20 (252.6 ng/g), as well as a coal fly ash, SRM 1633b (143.1 ng/g). The method is equally applicable to other types of fossil fuels including both crude and refined oils.

  15. Handling complex effects in slurry-sampling-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry by multivariate calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M. [Dept. Analytical Chemistry. University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Cal-Prieto, M.J. [Dept. Analytical Chemistry. University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Gomez-Carracedo, M.P. [Dept. Analytical Chemistry. University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Andrade, J.M. [Dept. Analytical Chemistry. University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain)]. E-mail: andrade@udc.es; Carlosena, A. [Dept. Analytical Chemistry. University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain); Prada, D. [Dept. Analytical Chemistry. University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071 A Coruna (Spain)

    2006-07-07

    Analysis of solid samples by slurry-sampling-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-ETAAS) can imply spectral and chemical interferences caused by the large amount of concomitants introduced into the graphite furnace. Sometimes they cannot be solved using stabilized temperature platform furnace (STPF) conditions or typical approaches (previous sample ashing, use of chemical modifiers, etc.), which are time consuming and quite expensive. A new approach to handle interferences using multivariate calibrations (partial least squares, PLS, and artificial neural networks, ANN) is presented and exemplified with a real problem consisting on determining Sb in several solid matrices (soils, sediments and coal fly ash) as slurries by ETAAS. Experimental designs were implemented at different levels of Sb to develop the calibration matrix and assess which concomitants (seven ions were considered) modified the atomic signal mostly. They were Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} and they induced simultaneous displacement, depletion (enhancement) and broadening of the atomic peak. Here it is shown that these complex effects can be handled in a reliable, fast and cost-effective way to predict the concentration of Sb in slurry samples of several solid matrices. The method was validated predicting the concentrations of five certified reference materials (CRMs) and studying its robustness to current ETAAS problems. It is also shown that linear PLS can handle eventual non-linearities and that its results are comparable to more complex (non-linear) models, as those from ANNs.

  16. Slurry sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: determination of trace metals in mineral coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, M M; Goreti, M; Vale, R; Caramão, E B

    1999-12-06

    A procedure for lead, cadmium and copper determination in coal samples based on slurry sampling using an atomic absorption spectrometer equipped with a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer is proposed. The slurries were prepared by weighing the samples directly into autosampler cups (5-30 mg) and adding a 1.5 ml aliquot of a diluent mixture of 5% v/v HNO(3), 0.05% Triton X-100 and 10% ethanol. The slurry was homogenized by manual stirring before measurement. Slurry homogenization using ultrasonic agitation was also investigated for comparison. The effect of particle size and the use of different diluent compositions on the slurry preparation were investigated. The temperature programmes were optimized on the basis of pyrolysis and atomization curves. Absorbance characteristics with and without the addition of a palladium-magnesium modifier were compared. The use of 0.05% m/v Pd and 0.03% m/v Mg was found satisfactory for stabilizing Cd and Pb. The calibration was performed with aqueous standards. In addition, a conventional acid digestion procedure was applied to verify the efficiency of the slurry sampling. Better recoveries of the analytes were obtained when the particle size was reduced to <37 mum. Several certified coal reference materials (BCR Nos. 40, 180, and 181) were analyzed, and good agreement was obtained between the results from the proposed slurry sampling method and the certificate values.

  17. Silicic acid (Si(OH)(4)) is a significant influence upon the atomic absorption signal of aluminium measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C; Exley, C

    2001-11-01

    We have identified silicic acid (Si(OH)(4)) as an important modifier of the absorbance signal of aluminium measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The presence of Si(OH)(4) enhanced the signal by as much as 50%. The extent of the enhancement was dependent upon both [Al] and [Si(OH)(4)] and was maximal when [Al] or =0.50 mmol dm(-3). The enhancement of the Al absorbance signal was not linearly related to [Si(OH)(4)] and the effect was, generally, saturated, for all [Al] tested, at [Si(OH)(4)]> or =0.50 mmol dm(-3). Si(OH)(4) was significantly more effective in enhancing the Al absorbance signal than Mg(NO(3))(2). However, the co-occurrence of 10 mmol dm(-3) Mg(NO(3))(2) and 2 mmol dm(-3) Si(OH)(4) in samples abolished the enhancement due to Si(OH)(4). The presence of Si(OH)(4) in samples could result in an overestimation of the Al content of those samples by as much as 50%. Errors in the measurement of Al in samples containing Si(OH)(4) could be prevented using matrix-matched calibration standards. Our observation could have serious implications for the determination of Al in aqueous samples of both geochemical and biological interest. It may also point towards the application of Si(OH)(4) as a novel and effective matrix modifier in the determination of Al by GFAAS since the inclusion of Si(OH)(4) in standards and samples improved the limit of detection of Al from ca 8 nmol dm(-3) to 3 nmol dm(-3).

  18. Atomic Oxygen Abundance in Molecular Clouds: Absorption Toward Sagittarius B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, D. C.; Keene, Jocelyn; Phillips, T. G.; Schilke, P.; Werner, M. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 35 km/s) spectra toward the molecular cloud Sgr B2 at 63 micrometers, the wavelength of the ground-state fine-structure line of atomic oxygen (O(I)), using the ISO-LWS instrument. Four separate velocity components are seen in the deconvolved spectrum, in absorption against the dust continuum emission of Sgr B2. Three of these components, corresponding to foreground clouds, are used to study the O(I) content of the cool molecular gas along the line of sight. In principle, the atomic oxygen that produces a particular velocity component could exist in any, or all, of three physically distinct regions: inside a dense molecular cloud, in the UV illuminated surface layer (PDR) of a cloud, and in an atomic (H(I)) gas halo. For each of the three foreground clouds, we estimate, and subtract from the observed O(I) column density, the oxygen content of the H(I) halo gas, by scaling from a published high-resolution 21 cm spectrum. We find that the remaining O(I) column density is correlated with the observed (13)CO column density. From the slope of this correlation, an average [O(I)]/[(13)CO] ratio of 270 +/- 120 (3-sigma) is derived, which corresponds to [O(I)]/[(13)CO] = 9 for a CO to (13)CO abundance ratio of 30. Assuming a (13)CO abundance of 1x10(exp -6) with respect to H nuclei, we derive an atomic oxygen abundance of 2.7x10(exp -4) in the dense gas phase, corresponding to a 15% oxygen depletion compared to the diffuse ISM in our Galactic neighborhood. The presence of multiple, spectrally resolved velocity components in the Sgr B2 absorption spectrum allows, for the first time, a direct determination of the PDR contribution to the O(I) column density. The PDR regions should contain O(I) but not (13)CO, and would thus be expected to produce an offset in the O(I)-(13)CO correlation. Our data do not show such an offset, suggesting that within our beam O(I) is spatially coexistent with the molecular gas, as traced by (13)CO

  19. Multicomutation flow system for manganese speciation by solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiasz, Anna; Sołtys, Monika; Kurys, Ewa; Domagała, Karolina; Dudek-Adamska, Danuta; Walas, Stanisław

    2017-08-01

    In the paper an application of solid phase extraction technique for speciation analysis of manganese in water samples with the use of flame atomic absorption spectrometry is presented. Two types of sorbents, activated silica gel and Dowex 1 × 4, were used respectively for simultaneously Mn2 + and MnO42 - retention and preconcentration. The whole procedure was realized in multicomutation flow system. Different conditions like: type and concentration of eluent, sample pH and loading time were tested during the study. Under appropriate conditions, it was possible to obtained enrichment factors of 20 and 16 for Mn(II) and Mn(VII), respectively. Precision of the procedure was close to 4% (measured as relative standard deviation), whereas the detection limit (3σ) was 1.4 μg·L- 1 for Mn(II) and 4.8 μg·L- 1 for Mn(VII).

  20. Neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the analysis of fresh, pasteurised and powder milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasim, M.; Rehman, S.; Arif, M.; Fatima, I.; Zaidi, J.H. [Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan). Chemistry Div.

    2012-07-01

    This study shows the application of semi-absolute k{sub 0} instrumental neutron activation analysis (k{sub 0}-INAA), epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) for the determination of 21 elements (Br, Ca, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hf, I, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sc Sr, and Zn) in different types of milk samples. The ENAA was required for the determination of iodine, AAS for Cu, Ni and Pb and the rest of the elements were measured by k{sub 0}-INAA. Thirteen elements (Br, Ca, Cl, Cs, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P, Rb, Sr and Zn) were identified in all milk samples. Ni was detected in eleven and Pb in two samples. Concentrations of most of the elements were within the ranges of the world reported data. The data was further explored by principal component analysis to find relationships between samples and elements. (orig.)

  1. ANALYSIS OF VARIOUS METAL IONS IN SOME MEDICINAL PLANTS USING ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.L. Ramachandra*, C. Ashajyothi and Padmalatha S. Rai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Metal ions such as iron , lead, copper, nickel, cadmium , chromium and zinc were investigated in medicinally important plants Alstonia scholaris, Tabernaemontana coronariae, Asparagus racemosus, Mimosa pudica, Leucas aspera and Adhatoda vasica applying atomic absorption spectrophotometer techniques. The purpose of this study was to standardize various metal ion Contamination in indigenous medicinal plants. Maximum concentration of lead was present in Leucas aspera and Adhatoda vasica followed by Alstonia scholaris, Tabernaemontana coronariae and Asparagus racemosus. The concentration of lead in Mimosa pudica was below the detectable level. The maximum concentration of zinc was detected in Adhatoda vasica followed by Leucas aspera, Asparagus racemosus, Tabernaemontana coronariae, Alstonia scholaris and Mimosa pudica. The concentration of Cadmium, nickel and chromium was below the detectable level.

  2. DETERMINATION OF NICKLE CONTENTS IN SELECTED VANASPATI GHEE THROUGH ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waqas Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To convert vegetable edible oils into vanaspati ghee, nickel is used as a catalyst in the hydrogenation process. A simple and fast method for the trace level determination of nickel in ghee is reported. In this different methods were applied for the extraction of residual nickel from ghee samples. Using toluene, as organic solvents, an acid mixture was used for the extraction of nickel. Extracted nickel was quantified with atomic absorption. Among the organic solvents, toluene proved to be the best solvent mediating a 95% extraction of nickel from ghee samples. Nickel was extracted and determined in ten different brands of ghee and in all samples its amount was well above the permissible limit of WHO (0.2 μg/g. Other metals like lead, zinc, copper, and cadmium were also determined and their concentrations were found to be much below the WHO permissible limits.

  3. Preconcentration of Vanadium(Ⅴ) on Crosslinked Chitosan and Determination by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new method is proposed for the preconcentration of vanadium(Ⅴ) with crosslinked chitosan (CCTS) and determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The adsorption rate of vanadium(Ⅴ) by CCTS was 97% at pH 4.0, and vanadium(Ⅴ) was eluted from crosslinked chitosan with 2 mL 2.0 mol*L-1 chlorhydric acid and determined by GFAAS. The detection limit (3σ,n=7) for vanadium(Ⅴ) was 4.8×1 0-12g and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D) at concentration level of 2.6 μg*L-1 is less than 3.6%. The method shows a good selectivity and high sensitivity, and it was applied to determination of vanadium(Ⅴ) in oyster and water samples. The analytic recoveries are (97±5)%.

  4. Determination of sodium in foods by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion: NMKL interlaboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julshamn, Kaare; Lea, Per; Norli, Hilde Skaar

    2005-01-01

    Nine laboratories participated in an interlaboratory method performance (collaborative) study of a method for the determination of sodium in foods by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after wet digestion, using a microwave oven technique. Before the study, the laboratories were able to practice on samples with defined sodium levels (pretrial test). The method was tested on a total of 6 foods (broccoli, carrot, bread, saithe fillet, pork, and cheese) with sodium concentrations of 1480-8260 mg/kg. The materials were presented to the participants in the study as blind duplicates, and the participants were asked to perform single determinations for each sample. The repeatability relative standard deviations (RSDr) for sodium ranged from 1.9 to 6.5%. The reproducibility relative standard deviations (RSDR) ranged from 4.2 to 6.9%. The HorRat values ranged from 0.9 to 1.6.

  5. Preconcentration and Determination of Chromium Species Using Octadecyl Silica Membrane Disks and Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOGHIMI Ali; SABER-TEHRANI Mohammad; WAQIF-HUSAIN Syed; MOHAMMADHOSSEINI Majid

    2007-01-01

    A novel and selective method for the fast determination of trace amounts of chromium species in water samples has been developed.The procedure is based on the selective formation of chromium diethyldithiocarbamate complexes at different pH in the presence of Mn(Ⅱ) as an enhancement agent of chromium signals followed by elutionwith organic eluents and determination by atomic flame absorption spectrometry.The maximum capacity of the employed disks was found to be (3964±3) μg and (376±2) μg for Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ),respectively.The detection limit of the proposed method is 49 and 43 ng·L-1 for Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ),respectively.The proposed method was successfully applied for determination of chromium species Cr(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅵ) in different water samples.

  6. Cloud point extraction for the determination of copper in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Shokrollahi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple cloud point extraction procedure is presented for the preconcentration of copper in various samples. After complexation by 4-hydroxy-2-mercapto-6-propylpyrimidine (PTU, copper ions are quantitatively extracted into the phase rich in Triton X-114 after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.5 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS. Analytical parameters including concentrations for PTU, Triton X-114 and HNO3, bath temperature, centrifugation rate and time were optimized. The influences of the matrix ions on the recoveries of copper ions were investigated. The detection limits (3SDb/m, n=4 of 1.6 ng mL-1 along with enrichment factors of 30 for Cu were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of environmental samples.

  7. [Determination of inorganic elements in different parts of Sonchus oleraceus L by flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nai-Xing; Cui, Xue-Gui; Du, Ai-Qin; Mao, Hong-Zhi

    2007-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry with air-acetylene flame was used for the determination of inorganic metal elements in different parts ( flower, leaf, stem and root) of Sonchus oleraceus L. The contents of Ca, Mg, K, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cr, Co, Ni, Pb and Cd in the flower, leaf, stem and root of Sonchus oleraceus L were compared. The order from high to low of the additive weight (microg x g(-1)) for the 13 kinds of metal elements is as follows: leaf (77 213.72) > flower (47 927.15) > stem(42 280.99) > root (28 131.18). From the experimental results it was found that there were considerable differences in the contents of the metal elements in different parts, and there were richer contents of Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu in root and flower, which are necessary to human health, than in other parts.

  8. Removal of iron interferences by solvent extraction for geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Iron is a common interferent in the determination of many elements in geochemical samples. Two approaches for its removal have been taken. The first involves removal of iron by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from hydrochloric acid medium, leaving the analytes in the aqueous phase. The second consists of reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) by ascorbic acid to minimize its extraction into MIBK, so that the analytes may be isolated by extraction. Elements of interest can then be determined using the aqueous solution or the organic extract, as appropriate. Operating factors such as the concentration of hydrochloric acid, amounts of iron present, number of extractions, the presence or absence of a salting-out agent, and the optimum ratio of ascorbic acid to iron have been determined. These factors have general applications in geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1985.

  9. [Determination of trace elements in Aloe barbadensis Miller irrigated with seawater by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Hui; Wang, Chang-Hai; Liu, Zhao-Pu

    2008-03-01

    The dry leaves of Aloe barbadensis Miller irrigated with seawater were dissolved in nitric acid and then oxygenated by perchloric acid. Nine kinds of trace elements in the samples were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, including calcium, potassium, magnesium, sodium, manganese, zinc, iron, copper and lead, with added lanthanum chloride as releaser to eliminate the interference of co-existent ions. The recoveries were 96.58%-104.31%, and the relative standard deviations of sample determination (10 times) were less than 2%. This method is simple, sensitive and rapid with satisfactory results and good reproducibility. The results indicated that there were rich Ca, Mg, K and Na, and moderate Mn, Zn and Fe elements in the Aloe barbadensis Miller irrigated with seawater. However, the concentrations of Cu and Pb were low. Therefore, Aloe barbadensis Miller irrigated with seawater has officinal and economic values. These results provide data for further research on Aloe barbadensis Miller irrigated with seawater.

  10. Determination of cyanide by a flow injection analysis-atomic absorption spectrometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Gómez, A V; Martínez Calatayud, J

    1998-10-01

    A new flow injection analysis (FIA) procedure is proposed for the indirect atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cyanide. The FIA manifold is based on the insertion of the sample into a distilled water carrier, then the sample flows through a solid-phase reactor filled with silver iodide entrapped in polymeric resin beads. The calibration graph is linear over the range 0.2-6.0 mg l-1 of cyanide (correlation coefficient 0.9974), the detection limit is 0.1 mg l-1, the sample throughput is 193 h-1 and the RSD is 0.8%. The method is simple, quick and more selective than other published FIA procedures. The reproducibility obtained by using different solid-phase reactors and solutions is in the range 2.2-3.1% (RSD). The method was applied to the determination of cyanide in commercial samples such as pharmaceutical formulations and industrial electrolytic baths.

  11. Determination of thallium in wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after extraction preconcentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, Julijana; Arpadjan, Sonja; Karadjova, Irina; Stafilov, Trajče

    2002-06-01

    A simple method for extraction electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) determination of Tl in wine is described. The wine sample is decomposed with a mixture of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide and both thallium species Tl(I) and Tl(III) are extracted from 0.5 mol l -1 KI solution into iso-butyl methyl ketone (IBMK). Optimal parameters for ETAAS measurement of the iodide complexes extracted were defined for two different instruments: Perkin Elmer Zeeman 3030 (HGA 600) and Varian SpectrAA-880 (GTA-100). Modifiers of tartaric acid, Pd [ammoniumtetrachloropaladate (II)] or Ag (silver nitrate) were investigated for thermal stabilization of such extremely volatile species as iodide complexes of Tl. The analytical procedure developed permits 50-fold preconcentration and determination of 0.05 μg l -1 Tl in wine. The relative standard deviation ranges from 6 to 12% for the concentration range 0.2-1 μg l -1 Tl in wine.

  12. Determination of palladium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy without matrix matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X; Wang, T; Wu, J

    2001-05-30

    A graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of the palladium (Pd) content in bulk pharmaceutical drug substances and their intermediates prepared in aqueous solutions is extended to samples prepared in acetonitrile (ACN) and ACN-water mixtures as well to samples prepared in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and DMSO-water mixtures. The Pd content in samples solubilized in these solvents can be accurately determined with calibration established with standards prepared in aqueous solutions without matrix matching or using the method of standard additions. The validity of this method is demonstrated by spike recovery studies and by the agreement with results for the same samples prepared in these solvents, in concentrated nitric acid, and prepared by a microwave digestion system.

  13. Determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc in unused lubricating oils by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, A P

    1995-12-01

    Varying concentrations of lanthanum and strontium were added to solutions of ashed unused lubricating oils for the determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc content using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. At least 3000 mug g(-1) of lanthanum or strontium was required to completely overcome the interference of the phosphate ion, PO(3-)(4), and give peak values for calcium. The presence of lanthanum or strontium did not cause an appreciable increase in the amount of magnesium and zinc obtained from the analyses. The method is fast and reproducible, and the coefficients of variation calculated for the elements using one of the samples were 1.6% for calcium, 3.5% for magnesium and 0.2% for zinc. Results obtained by this method were better than those obtained by other methods for the same samples.

  14. Application of atomic absorption spectroscopy for detection of multimetal traces in low-voltage electrical marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubeniene, Marija; Zakaras, Algirdas; Minkuviene, Zita Nijole; Benoshys, Alvydas

    2006-08-10

    Application of atomic absorption spectroscopy to detect multimetal traces in injured skin is a promising tool for investigation of fatalities caused by electrocution. The present paper is aimed at testing the reliability of this method for metal traces detection in electric current marks and is focused on study of peculiarities of metal penetration into the skin exposed to a current impact. Bare aluminum wire, tin-lead coated copper multistrand wire, and zinc-plated steel rope were used to make electrical marks on pig skin. It is demonstrated that amount of copper, zinc, lead, and iron may serve as statistically reliable indicators for the type of wire, which caused the electrical mark, in spite of the background content of these metals in the skin without injury. Different penetration rates for different metals contained in the wire inflicting an electrical mark were observed.

  15. Determination of barium in bottled drinking water by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagioli, F.; Locatelli, C.; Lanciotti, E.; Vallone, G.; Mazzotta, D.; Mugelli, A.

    1988-11-01

    In relation to the wide environmental spread of barium and to its cardiovascular effects, barium levels were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry in 60 different brands of bottled water marketed in Italy. Matrix interferences were investigated in order to evaluate the use of an analytical calibration function rather than the much more time consuming addition technique. The barium content ranged from limit of detection C/sub L/ (7.0 ..mu..g/1) up to 660 ..mu..g/1, the median value being 80 ..mu..g/l, while the recovery tests varied between 90 and 110% and the precision of the method (s/sub yx/) was 2.5%.

  16. Assessing the engagement, learning, and overall experience of students operating an atomic absorption spectrophotometer with remote access technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Daniel J; Brewer, Sharon E; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The use of internet-based technologies in the teaching of laboratories has emerged as a promising education tool. This study evaluated the effectiveness of using remote access technology to operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer in analyzing the iron content in a crude myoglobin extract. Sixty-two students were surveyed on their level of engagement, learning, and overall experience. Feedback from students suggests that the use of remote access technology is effective in teaching students the principles of chemical analysis by atomic absorption spectroscopy. © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Analytical application of 2f-wavelength modulation for isotope selective diode laser graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizemann, H D

    2000-01-01

    Experiences in the analytical application of the 2f-wavelength modulation technique for isotope selective atomic absorption spectroscopy in a graphite furnace are reported. Experimental as well as calculated results are presented, mainly for the natural lithium isotopes. Sensitivity, linearity, and (isotope) selectivity are studied by intensity modulation and wavelength modulation. High selectivities can be attained, however, on the cost of detection power. It is shown that the method enables the measurement of lithium isotope ratios larger than 2000 by absorption in a low-pressure graphite tube atomizer.

  18. Direct analysis of silica by means of solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resano, M.; Mozas, E.; Crespo, C.; Pérez, J.; García-Ruiz, E.; Belarra, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports on the use of solid sampling-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the direct analysis of synthetic amorphous silica. In particular, determination of hazardous elements such As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Sb is investigated, as required by regulations of the food industry. The conclusion of the work is that, after proper optimization of the working conditions, paying particular attention to the atomization temperature and the use of proper modifiers (graphite powder, HNO3 or Pd), it is possible to develop suitable procedures that rely on the use of aqueous standard solutions to construct the calibration curves for all the elements investigated. The proposed method shows important benefits for the cost-effective analysis of such difficult samples in routine labs, permitting fast screening of those elements that are very rarely present in this type of sample, but also accurate quantification of those often found, while offering low limits of detection (always below 0.1 mg g- 1) that comply well with legal requirements, and precision levels that are fit for the purpose (approx. 6-9% R.S.D.).

  19. Determination of mercury in hair: Comparison between gold amalgamation-atomic absorption spectrometry and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanico, Francesco; Forte, Giovanni; Majorani, Costanza; Senofonte, Oreste; Petrucci, Francesco; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2016-09-29

    Mercury is a heavy metal that causes serious health problems in exposed subjects. The most toxic form, i.e., methylmercury (MeHg), is mostly excreted through human hair. Numerous analytical methods are available for total Hg analysis in human hair, including cold vapour atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal decomposition amalgamation atomic absorption spectrometry (TDA-AAS). The aim of the study was to compare the TDA-AAS with the ICP-MS in the Hg quantification in human hair. After the washing procedure to minimize the external contamination, from each hair sample two aliquots were taken; the first was used for direct analysis of Hg by TDA-AAS and the second was digested for Hg determination by the ICP-MS. Results indicated that the two data sets were fully comparable (median; TDA-AAS, 475ngg(-1); ICP-MS, 437ngg(-1)) and were not statistically different (Mann-Whitney test; p=0.44). The two techniques presented results with a good coefficient of correlation (r=0.94) despite different operative ranges and method limits. Both techniques satisfied internal performance requirements and the parameters for method validation resulting sensitive, precise and reliable. Finally, the use of the TDA-AAS can be considered instead of the ICP-MS in hair analysis in order to reduce sample manipulation with minor risk of contamination, less time consuming due to the absence of the digestion step and cheaper analyses.

  20. Determination of selenium in human spermatozoa and prostasomes using base digestion and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suistomaa, U; Saaranen, M; Vanha-Perttula, T

    1987-10-15

    A method for the determination of selenium in human spermatozoa and prostasomes is described. The samples were digested with 25% (w/v) tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in methanol and analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization and Zeeman background correction (ET-AAS). Nickel was used as a matrix modifier. Calibration was performed using the matrix-based calibration curve. The TMAH-digestion method agreed well with a conventional digestion procedure using concentrated nitric acid. The TMAH-digestion does not require heating or strong acids and it was suitable for small biological samples. The average recovery of added selenium in spermatozoan digests was 95.1 +/- 5.2% (n = 5). The coefficient of variation was 9.1% (n = 21). The accuracy of the method tested with the NBS standard 1577 (bovine liver, certified at 1.1 +/- 0.1 micrograms Se/g) resulted in a value of 0.98 +/- 0.10 micrograms Se/g (n = 16). The method was further tested in an interlaboratory comparison study.

  1. Speciation of mercury in fish samples by flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanlin; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2012-04-01

    A rapid flow injection catalytic cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometric (FI-CCV-AAS) method is described for speciation and determination of mercury in biological samples. Varying concentrations of NaBH(4) were employed for mercury vapour generation from inorganic and mixture of inorganic and organic (total) Hg. The presence of Fe(3+), Cu(2+) and thiourea had catalytic effect on mercury vapour generation from methylmercury (MeHg) and, when together, Cu(2+) and thiourea had synergistic catalytic effect on the vapour generation. Of the two metal ions, Fe(3+) gave the best sensitivity enhancement, achieving the same sensitivity for MeHg and inorganic Hg(2+). Due to similarity of resulting sensitivity, Hg(2+) was used successfully as a primary standard for quantification of inorganic and total Hg. The catalysis was homogeneous in nature, and it was assumed that the breaking of the C-Hg bond was facilitated by the delocalization of the 5d electron pairs in Hg atom. The extraction of MeHg and inorganic mercury (In-Hg) in fish samples were achieved quantitatively with hydrochloric acid in the presence of thiourea and determined by FI-CCV-AAS. The application of the method to the quantification of mercury species in a fish liver reference material DOLT-4 gave 91.5% and 102.3% recoveries for total and methyl mercury, respectively. The use of flow injection enabled rapid analysis with a sample throughput of 180 h(-1).

  2. Determination of lead in fine particulates by slurry sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J C; Ho, K F; Lee, S C

    2001-01-02

    A simple method for determining lead in fine particulates (PM2.5) by using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) has been developed. Particulates collected on Nuclepore filter by using a dichotomous sampler were suspended in diluted nitric acid after ultrasonic agitation. The dislodging efficiency is nearly 100% after agitation for 5 min. In order to study the suspension behavior of PM2.5 in solvents, a Brookhaven ZetaPlus Particle Size Analyzer was used to determine the particle size distribution and suspension behavior of air particulates in the solvent. The pre-digestion and modification effect of nitric acid would be discussed. Palladium was added as a chemical modifier and the temperature program of ETAAS was changed in order to improve the recovery. The slurry was introduced directly into a graphite tube for atomization. The metal content in the sample was determined by the standard addition method. In addition, a conventional acid digestion procedure was applied to verify the efficiency of the slurry sampling method. It offers a quick and efficient alternative method for heavy metal characterization in fine particulates.

  3. NARROW Na AND K ABSORPTION LINES TOWARD T TAURI STARS: TRACING THE ATOMIC ENVELOPE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascucci, I.; Simon, M. N. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Edwards, S. [Five College Astronomy Department, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Heyer, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Rigliaco, E. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Hillenbrand, L. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D., E-mail: pascucci@lpl.arizona.edu [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    We present a detailed analysis of narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines toward nearly 40 T Tauri stars in Taurus with the goal of clarifying their origin. The Na i λ5889.95 line is detected toward all but one source, while the weaker K i λ7698.96 line is detected in about two-thirds of the sample. The similarity in their peak centroids and the significant positive correlation between their equivalent widths demonstrate that these transitions trace the same atomic gas. The absorption lines are present toward both disk and diskless young stellar objects, which excludes cold gas within the circumstellar disk as the absorbing material. A comparison of Na i and CO detections and peak centroids demonstrates that the atomic gas and molecular gas are not co-located, the atomic gas being more extended than the molecular gas. The width of the atomic lines corroborates this finding and points to atomic gas about an order of magnitude warmer than the molecular gas. The distribution of Na i radial velocities shows a clear spatial gradient along the length of the Taurus molecular cloud filaments. This suggests that absorption is associated with the Taurus molecular cloud. Assuming that the gradient is due to cloud rotation, the rotation of the atomic gas is consistent with differential galactic rotation, whereas the rotation of the molecular gas, although with the same rotation axis, is retrograde. Our analysis shows that narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines are useful tracers of the atomic envelope of molecular clouds. In line with recent findings from giant molecular clouds, our results demonstrate that the velocity fields of the atomic and molecular gas are misaligned. The angular momentum of a molecular cloud is not simply inherited from the rotating Galactic disk from which it formed but may be redistributed by cloud–cloud interactions.

  4. Determination of trace impurities in titanium dioxide by direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Docekal, Bohumil [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Veveri 97, CZ-61142, Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: docekal@iach.cz; Vojtkova, Blanka [Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Purkynova 118, CZ-61200 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-03-15

    A true direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method with Zeeman-effect background correction (Analytik Jena ZEEnit 60 AAS) was developed for the determination of As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn in powdered titanium dioxide of pharmaceutical, food and cosmetics grade. The interaction of the titanium matrix and graphite surface of the sample carrier boat in a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer was investigated. Conversion of titanium dioxide to interfering TiO{sub 2}-TiC-liquid phase, running out the sampling boat, was observed at temperatures above 2000 deg. C. The temperature program was optimized accordingly for these volatile analytes in atomization and cleaning steps in order to prevent this interference and to prolong significantly the analytical lifetime of the boat to more than one thousand runs. For all elements, calibration by aqueous standard addition method, by wet-chemically analyzed samples with different content of analytes and/or by dosing one sample in different amounts, were proved as adequate quantification procedures. Linear dynamic calibration working ranges can be considerably expanded up to two orders of magnitude within one measurement run by applying three-field dynamic mode of the Zeeman background correction system. The results obtained by true direct solid sampling technique are compared with those of other independent, mostly wet-chemical methods. Very low limits of detection (3{sigma} criterion) of true solid sampling technique of 21, 0.27, 24, 3.9, 6.3 and 0.9 ng g{sup -1} were achieved for As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb and Zn, respectively.

  5. Determination of some antihistaminic drugs by atomic absorption spectrometry and colorimetric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kousy, N; Bebawy, L I

    1999-08-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and colourimetric methods have been developed for the determination of pizotifen (I), ketotifen (II) and loratadine (III). The first method depends on the reaction of the three drugs (I); (II) and (III) with cobalt thiocyanate reagent at pH 2 to give ternary complexes. These complexes are readily extracted with organic solvent and estimated by indirect atomic absorption method via the determination of the cobalt content in the formed complex after extraction in 0.1 M hydrochloric acid. It was found that the three drugs can be determined in the concentration ranges from 10 to 74, 12 to 95 and 10 to 93 microg ml(-1) with mean percentage recovery of 99.71+/-0.87, 99.70+/-0.79 and 99.62+/-0.75%, respectively. The second method is based on the formation of orange red ion pairs as a result of the reaction between (I); (II) and (III) and molybdenum thiocyanate with maximum absorption at 469.5 nm in dichloromethane. Appropriate conditions were established for the colour reaction. Under the proposed conditions linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 3.5-25, 5-37.5 and 2.5-22.5 microg ml(-1) with mean percentage recovery of 99.60+/-0.41, 100.11+/-0.43 and 99.31+/-0.47% for (I): (II) and (III), respectively. The third method depends on the formation of radical ion using 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ). The colour formed was measured at 588 nm for the three drugs (I); (II) and (III), respectively. The method is valid in concentration range 10-80 microg ml(-1) with mean percentage recovery 99.75+/-0.44, 99.94+/-0.72 and 99.17+/-0.36% for (I); (II) and (III), respectively. The proposed methods were applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical preparations. The results obtained were statistically analysed and compared with those obtained by applying the official and reference methods.

  6. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  7. Sensitive determination of mercury in tap water by cloud point extraction pre-concentration and flow injection-cold vapor-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wuilloud, Jorgelina C. A.; Wuilloud, Rodolfo G.; Silva, María. F.; Olsina, Roberto A.; Martinez, Luis D.

    2002-02-01

    A pre-concentration and determination methodology for mercury at trace levels in water samples was developed. Cloud point extraction was successfully employed for the pre-concentration of mercury prior to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry coupled to a flow injection with cold vapor generation system. The mercury was extracted as mercury-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol [Hg(II)-(5-Br-PADAP)] complex, at pH 9.2 mediated by micelles of the non-ionic surfactant polyethyleneglycolmono- p-nonylphenylether (PONPE 5). Cold vapor generation was developed from 100 μl of the extracted surfactant-rich phase by means of a stannous chloride (SnCl 2) solution as reluctant. An exhaustive study of the variables affecting the cloud point extraction with PONPE 5 and cold vapor mercury generation from the surfactant phase was performed. The 50-ml sample solution pre-concentration allowed us to raise an enrichment factor of 200-fold. The lower limit of detection obtained under the optimal conditions was 4 ng l -1. The precision for 10 replicate determinations at the 0.5-μg l -1 Hg level was 3.4% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.), calculated with the peak heights. The calibration graph using the pre-concentration system for mercury was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 50 μg l -1. The method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in tap water samples.

  8. Absorption-Amplification Response with or Without Spontaneously Generated Coherence in a Coherent Four-Level Atomic Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; YANG Wen-Xing; PENG Ju-Cun

    2004-01-01

    We discuss and analyze the absorption-amplification properties of a weak probe field in a typical four-level atomic system in the presence of an additional coherence term, the spontaneously generated coherence term. Theinfluences of the spontaneously generated coherence and a coherent pump field on the probe absorption (amplification)are investigated in detail. We show that the absorption of such a weak probe field can be dramatically enhanced dueto the presence of the spontaneously generated coherence. At the same time, the probe-absorption profile exhibitsthe double-peak structure and the probe-absorption peak gradually decreases as the pump intensity increases. On thecontrary, the amplification of such a weak probe field near the line center of the probe transition can be achieved byadjusting the coherent pump field intensity in the absence of the spontaneously generated coherence.

  9. Absorption-amplification response with or without spontaneously generated coherence effect in a four-level atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiahua Li(李家华); Wenxing Yang(杨文星); Jucun Peng(彭菊村)

    2004-01-01

    We discuss and analyze the absorption properties of a weak probe field in a typical four-level atomic system in the presence of a spontaneously generated coherence (SGC) term. The influences of the SGC and a coherent pump field on the probe absorption-amplification are investigated. The results show that the absorption of such a weak probe field can be dramatically enhanced due to the SGC effect. At the same time, the probe-absorption profile exhibits a two-peak structure and the probe-absorption peak gradually decreases as the pump intensity increases. On the contrary, the amplification of such a weak probe field near the line center of the probe transition can be achieved by adjusting the coherent pump field intensity in the absence of the SGC effect.

  10. Absorption-Amplification Response with or Without Spontaneously Generated Coherence in a Coherent Four-Level Atomic Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJia-Hua; YANGWen-Xing; PENGJu-Cun

    2004-01-01

    We discuss and analyze the absorption-amplification properties of a weak probe field in a typical fourlevel atomic system in the presence of an additional coherence term, the spontaneously generated coherence term. The influences of the spontaneously generated coherence and a coherent pump field on the probe absorption (amplification) are investigated in detail. We show that the absorption of such a weak probe field can be dramatically enhanced due to the presence of the spontaneously generated coherence. At the same time, the probe-absorption profile exhibits the double-peak structure and the probe-absorption peak gradually decreases as the pump intensity increases. On the contrary, the amplification of such a weak probe field near the line center of the probe transition can be achieved by adiusting the coherent Dump field intensity in the absence of the spontaneously generated coherence.

  11. Hg0 absorption in potassium persulfate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Qun-feng; WANG Cheng-yun; WANG Da-hui; SUN Guan; XU Xin-hua

    2006-01-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) by potassium persulfate (KPS) catalyzed by Ag+was investigated using a glass bubble column reactor. Concentration of gaseous mercury and potassium persulfate were measured by cold vapor atom absorption (CVAA) and ion chromatograph (IC), respectively. The effects of pH value, concentration of potassium persulfate and silver nitrate (SN), temperature, Hg0 concentration in the reactor inlet and tertiary butanol (TBA), free radical scavenger, on the removal efficiency of Hg0 were studied. The results showed that the removal efficiency of Hg0 increased with increasing concentration of potassium persulfate and silver nitrate, while temperature and TBA were negatively effective. Furthermore, the removal efficiency of Hg0 was much better in neutral solution than in both acidic and alkaline solution. But the influence of pH was almost eliminated by adding AgNO3. High Hg0 concentration has positive effect. The possible reaction mechanism of gaseous mercury was also discussed.

  12. Autler-Townes doublet in the absorption spectra for the transition between excited states of cold cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Qiang-Bing; Yang Bao-Dong; Yang Jian-Feng; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2010-01-01

    Autler-Townes splitting in absorption spectra of the excited states 6 2P3/2 - 82S1/2 of cold cesium atoms confined in a magneto-optical trap has been observed.Experimental data of the Autler-Townes splitting fit well to the dressedatom theory,by which the fact of the cold atoms dressed by cooling/trapping laser beams is revealed.The results of the theoretical fitting with experiment not only told us the effective Rabi frequency cold atoms experienced,but also could be used for measuring the probability amplitudes of the dressed states.

  13. Simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead in wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi, Gian P. G.; Dakuzaku, Carolina S.; de Moraes, Mercedes; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Gomes Neto, José A.

    2001-10-01

    A method has been developed for the direct simultaneous determination of Cd and Pb in white and red wine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) using a transversely heated graphite tube atomizer (THGA) with longitudinal Zeeman-effect background correction. The thermal behavior of both analytes during pyrolysis and atomization stages were investigated in 0.028 mol l -1 HNO 3 and in 1+1 v/v diluted wine using mixtures of Pd(NO 3) 2+Mg(NO 3) 2 and NH 4H 2PO 4+Mg(NO 3) 2 as chemical modifiers. With 5 μg Pd+3 μg Mg as the modifiers and a two-step pyrolysis (10 s at 400°C and 10 s at 600°C), the formation of carbonaceous residues inside the atomizer was avoided. For 20 μl of sample (wine+0.056 mol l -1 HNO 3, 1+1, v/v) dispensed into the graphite tube, analytical curves in the 0.10-1.0 μg l -1 Cd and 5.0-50 μg l -1 Pb ranges were established. The characteristic mass was approximately 0.6 pg for Cd and 33 pg for Pb, and the lifetime of the tube was approximately 400 firings. The limits of detection (LOD) based on integrated absorbance (0.03 μg l -1 for Cd, 0.8 μg l -1 for Pb) exceeded the requirements of Brazilian Food Regulations (decree #55871 from Health Department), which establish the maximum permissible level for Cd at 200 μg l -1 and for Pb at 500 μg l -1. The relative standard deviations ( n=12) were typically wine samples varied from 88 to 107% and 93 to 103%, respectively. The accuracy of the direct determination of Cd and Pb was checked for 10 table wines by comparing the results with those obtained for digested wine using single-element ET-AAS, which were in agreement at the 95% confidence level.

  14. Sapphire: a better material for atomization and in situ collection of silver volatile species for atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, Stanislav, E-mail: stanomusil@biomed.cas.cz; Matoušek, Tomáš; Dědina, Jiří

    2015-06-01

    Sapphire is presented as a high temperature and corrosion resistant material of an optical tube of an atomizer for volatile species of Ag generated by the reaction with NaBH{sub 4}. The modular atomizer design was employed which allowed to carry out the measurements in two modes: (i) on-line atomization and (ii) in situ collection (directly in the optical tube) by means of excess of O{sub 2} over H{sub 2} in the carrier gas during the trapping step and vice versa in the volatilization step. In comparison with quartz atomizers, the sapphire tube atomizer provides a significantly increased atomizer lifetime as well as substantially improved repeatability of the Ag in situ collection signals shapes. In situ collection of Ag in the sapphire tube atomizer was highly efficient (> 90%). Limit of detection in the on-line atomization mode and in situ collection mode, respectively, was 1.2 ng ml{sup −1} and 0.15 ng ml{sup −1}. - Highlights: • Sapphire was tested as a new material of an atomizer tube for Ag volatile species. • Two measurement modes were investigated: on-line atomization and in situ collection. • In situ collection of Ag was highly efficient (> 90%) with LOD of 0.15 ng ml{sup −1}. • No devitrification of the sapphire tube observed in the course of several months.

  15. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in high-power gap breakdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FILUK,A.B.; BAILEY,JAMES E.; CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; NASH,THOMAS J.; NOACK,DONALD D.; MARON,Y.

    2000-03-20

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently-discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. The authors describe a newly-developed diagnostic tool that provides the first direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1 mm spatial resolution in the 10 mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO{sub 2} gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50--100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption is seen, setting upper limits of 0.12--1.5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}3} for ground state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of 0.16--1.2 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization throughout the gap as a breakdown mechanism. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  16. Influence of phosphorus and calcium on flame atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of lead in canned fish products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, T M; Serrano, J F

    1984-01-01

    Lead was determined in the presence of whole multiples of the P/Ca ratio found in Portuguese canned fish by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry with and without using an ashing aid. Under our experimental conditions, use of the ashing aid eliminates P and Ca interference. Results with real samples, spiked with 1, 2, 3, and 4 ppm lead, are presented and statistically treated.

  17. Identifying Student and Teacher Difficulties in Interpreting Atomic Spectra Using a Quantum Model of Emission and Absorption of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two…

  18. Determination of nickel by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after separation by adsorption of its nioxime complex on microcrystalline naphthalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahiro, T; Puri, B K; Katyal, M; Satake, M

    1984-11-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of nickel in alloys by flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometry after formation of a water-insoluble complex, its adsorption on microcrystalline naphthalene, and dissolution of the complex and naphthalene in nitric acid and xylene.

  19. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  20. A COMPARISON OF A SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC (QUERCETIN) METHOD AND AN ATOMIC-ABSORPTION METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF TIN IN FOOD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Å

    1973-01-01

    Procedures for the determination of tin in food, which involve a spectrophotometric method (with the quercetin-tin complex) and an atomic-absorption method, are described. The precision of the complete methods and of the individual analytical steps required is evaluated, and the parameters...

  1. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, H., E-mail: nakano@nifs.ac.jp; Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 5095292 (Japan); Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K. [Graduate school of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 0608628 (Japan)

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  2. Comparisons of selected methods for the determination of kinetic parameters from electrothermal atomic absorption data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rodney W.; Pfefferkorn, Lisa L.; Holcombe, James A.

    1994-12-01

    Three of the methods available for the determination of kinetic parameters for atom formation in ETAAS were compared. In the approach of mcnally and holcombe [ Anal. Chem. 59, 1015 (1987)], Arrhenius-type plots are used to extract activation energy values while an approximation of the order of release is obtained by studying the alignment of the absorption maxima at increasing analyte concentrations. In the method of rojas and olivares [ Spectrochim. Acta47B, 387 (1992)], plots are prepared for different orders of release, with the correct order yielding a longer linear region from whose slope the activation energy is calculated. The method of yan et al. [ Spectrochim. Acta48B, 605 (1993)] uses a single absorption profile for the calculations. Activation energy and the order of release are obtained from the slope and intercept, respectively, on their graph. All three methods assume linear heating rate, constant activation energies, and furnace isothermality. The methods were tested with the same experimental data sets for Cu, Au and Ni using a spatially isothermal cuvette. Since intensive mathematical treatments commonly have deleterious effects on the uncertainty of the final result, the methods were compared using both the original data and a smoothed version of it. In general, the three methods yielded comparable results for the metals studied. However, choosing the most linear plot to determine the correct order of release when using Rojas and Olivares' method was sometimes subjective, and McNally and Holcombe's method provided only estimates for the orders of release that were neither zero nor unity.

  3. [Determination of nine mineral elements in hulless barley by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flame atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Zhang, Huai-Gang

    2010-04-01

    The contents of nine mineral elements, including sulphur, zinc, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, iron, copper and manganese in five hulless barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. nudum Hook. f.) lines were determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry and flames atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). For the determination of sulphur, the samples were dissolved by magnesia and anhydrous sodium carbonate at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 3 h in the muffle furnace, and then a certain amount of barium chloride was put into the sample solution for colorimetry of the UV-Vs spectrophotometer. For the determination of other eight mineral elements, all of the samples were dissolved by a kind of incinerating method: first, the sample was put into the muffle furnace at 250 degrees C for 0. 5 h and at 550 degrees C for 2.5 h, then two droplets of 50%HNO3 were distributed into each sample, and the last step was putting the sample into the muffle furnace at 550 degrees C for 0.5 h. And then all of the ash was dissolved by 50%HNO3 to 50 milliliter and determined by flames atomic absorption spectrometry. The precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability of the method were discussed too. The results showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were between 1.2% and 3.7%; The average recoveries were 97.44%-101.52% and the relative standard deviations (RSD) of sample determination were 1.3%-3.8%. The repeatability experiment showed that the relative standard deviations (RSD) were 2.6%-6.1%. And the content of each mineral element was the same after 24 hours; All these showed that the method has a good precision, accuracy, repeatability and stability. In all the hulless barley samples, the average contents were in the order of K > S > Mg > Ca > Fe > Na > Zn > Mn > Cu, and the contents of zinc, iron and manganese closely related to people's health were relatively higher than other crops. The data of the experiment could provide an accurate and credible evidence

  4. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Farnsworth, Paul B., E-mail: paul_farnsworth@byu.edu [Brigham Young University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s {sup 3}S{sub 1} metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.011 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} and 0.97 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges. - Highlights: • We determine He metastable number densities for four plasma types • The highest number densities were observed in a dielectric barrier discharge • No helium metastable atoms were observed downstream from the exits of glow discharges.

  5. High purity polyimide analysis by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rafael F.; Carvalho, Gabriel S.; Duarte, Fabio A.; Bolzan, Rodrigo C.; Flores, Erico M. M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni were determined in high purity polyimides (99.5%) by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (SS-GFAAS) using Zeeman effect background correction system with variable magnetic field, making possible the simultaneous measurement at high or low sensitivity. The following analytical parameters were evaluated: pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, feasibility of calibration with aqueous solution, linear calibration range, sample mass range and the use of chemical modifier. Calibration with aqueous standard solutions was feasible for all analytes. No under or overestimated results were observed and up to 10 mg sample could be introduced on the platform for the determination of Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni. The relative standard deviation ranged from 3 to 20%. The limits of detection (LODs) achieved using the high sensitivity mode were as low as 7.0, 2.5, 1.7, 17 and 0.12 ng g- 1 for Cr, Cu, Mn, Na and Ni, respectively. No addition of chemical modifier was necessary, except for Mn determination where Pd was required. The accuracy was evaluated by analyte spike and by comparison of the results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion in a single reaction chamber system and also by neutron activation analysis. No difference among the results obtained by SS-GFAAS and those obtained by alternative analytical methods using independent techniques. SS-GFAAS method showed some advantages, such as the determination of metallic contaminants in high purity polyimides with practically no sample preparation, very low LODs, calibration with aqueous standards and determination in a wide range of concentration.

  6. Gas chromatography coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry — a sensitive instrumentation for mercury speciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emteborg, Håkan; Sinemus, Hans-Werner; Radziuk, Bernard; Baxter, Douglas C.; Frech, Wolfgang

    1996-07-01

    New instrumentation for the speciation of mercury is described, and is applied to the analysis of natural water samples. The separation of mercury species is effected using gas chromatography of derivatized mercury species on a widebore capillary column. The solvent is vented using a bypass valve and the separated mercury species are pyrolysed on-line at 800°C for production of mercury atoms. These are then detected by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) at the 253.7 and 184.9 nm lines simultaneously in a quartz cuvette. The use of the 184.9 nm line provides a more than five-fold increase in sensitivity compared with the conventional 253.7 nm line and an absolute detection limit of 0.5 pg of mercury. The dynamic range of the combined analytical lines provides a linear response over more than three orders of magnitude. A number of organic compounds not containing mercury are also detected following pyrolysis, especially at the 184.9 nm line. These background species must not co-elute at the retention times for methyl- and inorganic mercury, as otherwise a positive interference would result. By maximizing the chromatographic resolution and minimizing the band broadening in the cuvette by use of a make-up gas, the retention times of interest are freed from co-eluting background peaks. The instrumentation has been applied to the determination of ng l -1 concentrations of methyl- and inorganic mercury in Lake Constance, Germany and within the Lake Constance drinking water supply organization, Bodenseewasserversorgung (BWV). The accuracy for the sum of methyl- and inorganic mercury has been assessed by comparison with an independent method for total mercury based on AAS detection implemented at BWV. Relative detection limits using 1 litre water samples and 15 ml injections of the final hexane extract were 0.03 ng l -1 for methylmercury and 0.4 ng l -1 for inorganic mercury based on the 3j criterion.

  7. [Atomic absorption spectrophotometry study of copper ion release by copper-bearing intrauterine devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthou, J; Chrétien, F C; Driguez, P A

    1998-11-01

    Copper release from copper-bearing IUD's was studied in vitro and in vivo using atomic absorption spectrophotometry in deionized water, normal saline solution and normal ovulatory cervical mucus. In these media, copper release from a 375 mm2 DIU occurs without latency, showing comparable amounts for identical time intervals. Daily copper release was shown to be respectively 8 and 11 times higher in cervical mucus and normal saline solution than in deionized water. Although copper ions are detectable in ovulatory cervical mucus under physiological conditions, the copper content appears 5 to 6 times higher in women bearing a copper IUD. Obviously, the copper amount is dependent on the copper exposed surface: the daily in vitro release from a 250 mm2 IUD is 18% inferior to that observed from a 375 mm2 model. In vivo, the daily copper release in ovulatory mucus of 380 or 200 mm2 IUD users is respectively 5 and 3.5 times higher than in controls.

  8. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry in assessment of biomonitor plants for lead, cadmium and copper pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Kaya; Mehmet, Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Eleven plant species were collected from the vicinity of lead-battery plant in the city of Gaziantep, Turkey. Lead, cadmium and copper concentrations in the soil and leaves of plants were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead, Cd and Cu concentrations in the soil samples taken from battery area were found to be in the ranges of 304-602, 0.4-0.44 and 31-37 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Significantly increased lead concentration up to 2 750 mg x kg(-1) was found in the leaves of Eleagnus angustifolia L. plant. The lead concentrations in the other plant leaves taken from 50 m around battery factory followed the order Ailanthus altissima > Morus sp. > Juglans regia L. > Ficus carica L. > Cydonia oblonga Miller > Prunus x domestica L. The plants, Populus nigra L. , Eleagnus angustifolia L. and Salix sp. were found useful for Cd, and the plant, Eleagnus angusti folia L. for Pb, to be considered as potential biomonitor. Especially, leaves of trees and plants taken from the distance of 50 m from battery plant have relatively higher Pb concentrations. Therefore, people who and animals which live in this area and benefit from these soil and plants have vital risks.

  9. Fitness analysis method for magnesium in drinking water with atomic absorption using quadratic curve calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Pérez-López

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Because of the importance of quantitative chemical analysis in research, quality control, sales of services and other areas of interest , and the limiting of some instrumental analysis methods for quantification with linear calibration curve, sometimes because the short linear dynamic ranges of the analyte, and sometimes by limiting the technique itself, is that there is a need to investigate a little more about the convenience of using quadratic curves for analytical quantification, which seeks demonstrate that it is a valid calculation model for chemical analysis instruments. To this was taken as an analysis method based on the technique and atomic absorption spectroscopy in particular a determination of magnesium in a sample of drinking water Tacares sector Northern Grecia, employing a nonlinear calibration curve and a curve specific quadratic behavior, which was compared with the test results obtained for the same analysis with a linear calibration curve. The results show that the methodology is valid for the determination referred to, with all confidence, since the concentrations are very similar, and as used hypothesis testing can be considered equal.

  10. Highly sensitive fiber grating chemical sensors: An effective alternative to atomic absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxmeshwar, Lata. S.; Jadhav, Mangesh S.; Akki, Jyoti. F.; Raikar, Prasad; Kumar, Jitendra; prakash, Om; Raikar, U. S.

    2017-06-01

    Accuracy in quantitative determination of trace elements like Zinc, present in drinking water in ppm level, is a big challenge and optical fiber gratings as chemical sensors may provide a promising solution to overcome the same. This paper presents design of two simple chemical sensors based on the principle of shift in characteristic wavelength of gratings with change in their effective refractive index, to measure the concentration of Zinc in drinking water using etched short period grating (FBG) and Long period grating (LPG) respectively. Three samples of drinking water from different places have been examined for presence of Zinc. Further, the results obtained by our sensors have also been verified with the results obtained by a standard method, Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The whole experiment has been performed by fixing the fibers in a horizontal position with the sensor regions at the center of the fibers, making it less prone to disturbance and breaking. The sensitivity of LPG sensor is about 205 times that of the FBG sensor. A few advantages of Fiber grating sensors, besides their regular features, over AAS have also been discussed, that make our sensors potential alternatives for existing techniques in determination of trace elements in drinking water.

  11. Determination of iron in natural and mineral waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROLANDAS KAZLAUSKAS

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple methods for the determination of Fe in natural and mineral waters by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS are suggested. The results of the investigation of selectivity of the proposed AAS method proved that this procedure is not affected by high concentrations of other metals. The calibration graph for iron was linear at levels near the detection limit up to at least 0.10 mg ml-1. For the determination of microamounts of iron in mineral waters, an extraction AAS technique was developed. Iron was retained as Fe-8-oxyquinoline complex and extracted into chloroform. The optimal conditions for the extraction of the iron complex were determined. The AAS method was applied to the determination of Fe in mineral waters and natural waters from different areas of Lithuania. The accuracy of the developed method was sufficient and evaluated in comparison with a photometric method. The obtained results demonstrated that the procedure could be successfully applied for the analysis of water samples with satisfactory accuracy.

  12. [Determination of trace elements in new food sources by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li E; Ding, Li; Qi, Min; Han, Xiu Li; Zhang, Hong-Quan

    2007-07-01

    Samples were digested by HNO3 + HClO4. Flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) was successfully used to determine copper, zinc and iron in new resource food. Under our experimental conditions, the recovery ratio was 94.66%-108.80%; the precision was 0.71%-4.78%. This method of measuring elements is convenient, rapid and accurate. The results showed that there are profitable elements, such as copper, zinc and iron in new resourse food in Henan province. By F test and SNK test, the content sequence of metal elements was found as follows: copper, Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat = Silkworm pupa > flowers of Pueraria lobata Ohwin = Wheat germ = Codonopsis lanceolata = roots of Pueraria lobata Ohwi > Opuntia dillenii Haw. Zinc, Opuntia dillenii Haw > Silkworm pupa = flowers of Pueraria lobata Ohwi = roots of Pueraria lobata Ohwi = Wheat germ = Codonopsis lanceolata = Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. Iron, Silkworm pupa = C hrysanthemum morifolium Ramat = roots of Pueraria lobata Ohwi > flowers of Pueraria lobata Ohwi = Wheat germ = Codonopis lanceolata = Opuntia dillenii Haw.

  13. Comparative study of heavy metals in dried and fluid milk in Peshawar by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfullah, Ghosia; Khan, Abid Ali; Amjad, Azra Yasmeen; Perveen, Sajida

    2014-01-01

    Various essential and toxic heavy metals (Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni) contents in various types of dried (infant formula and powdered) and fluid (fresh and processed) cow milk were assessed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The milk samples were collected from local markets of different parts of Peshawar city, Pakistan. Heavy metal concentrations varied significantly depending upon the type of milk. The heavy metal concentrations in most of the samples were within normal and permissible ranges. It was observed that the samples contained considerable amounts of calcium, while magnesium levels were well above the required levels. The results also revealed that copper levels were slightly lower than the permissible limits. The concentration of zinc in dried milk samples was greater than the values for the liquid milk types. Infant milk formulae had higher iron levels as compared to other milk samples because of the added constituents. Significant differences were observed in the mean values of manganese and cadmium in different types of milk. The toxic metals were within the acceptable limits and did not show significant levels leading to toxicity.

  14. [The determination of chromium in feeds by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Jia, Bin; Guo, Li-ping; Lin, Qiu-ping

    2005-07-01

    Chromium in feeds is regulated by China Standard GB 13078-2001. A method of flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of Cr in feeds has been developed in allusion to shortage of China standard method. Several acetylene flow-rate, burner-high and the additive of interference suppressor NH4Cl were studied respectively on the effect of sensitivities of Cr(III) and Cr(VI). The two sets analytical average results of Cr in feed sample determined by calibration curves of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were tested by t test, no marked discrepancy was found. Optimum instrumental conditions of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) with same sensitivity were confirmed. Sensitivity was 0.014 microg x mL(-1) with detection limit 0.70 mg x kg(-1). The recoveries were 94.4%-104.9%. Relative standard deviation of sample determination (5-6 times) was 1.90%-4.08%. This method is simply, fast and exact, the detection limit was answered for Cr limit in feeds regulated by GB 13078-2001, it can be applied to the analysis of Cr in feeds.

  15. Speciation Analysis of Serum Copper by Ultrafiltration Com-bined with Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Hua; MA Hui-Min; MA Quan-Li; LIANG Shu-Chuan

    2001-01-01

    UItrafiltration combined with graphite furnace atomic absorp-tion spectrometry(GFAAS)was used to study protein binding and speciation of copper in human serum..UItrafiltration was carried out using a cell unit ultrafiltration membraoes having a nominal cut-off of 10,000Dalton.The effects of var-ious experimental factors including the kind and concentration of electrolyte,sample storge,pH,pressure and the precon-ditioning of the membranes on the speciation analysis of serum copper by ultrafiltration were examined.It was observed that 4.5±2.3% of the total copper in serum was ultrafiltrable and this value did not seem to be influenced by the total serum ele-mental concentration,the PH (6.5——10) adn the pressure(≤1.5kg/cm2).the preconditioning of the ultrafiltration system with 0.1mol/L calcium nitrate can overcome the adsorption loss of copper effectively,and the addition of tris-HCI sohtion (pH 7.4)to serum accelerates the ultrafiltration.The present method was proved to be suitable for speciation analysis for its simplicity,rapidity,small sample reuqirement and easy con-trol.The results obtained with the method are accurate and reliable.

  16. Direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the analysis of high-purity niobium pentaoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M D; Krivan, V

    2000-01-01

    A direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SoS-ETAAS) method for ultratrace analysis of powdered niobium pentaoxide for Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni and Zn has been developed. The elements K, Mg, Na and Zn could be determined without any chemical modification. However, in the determination of the elements Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni, serious matrix-caused non-spectral interferences and background occurred which made their determination impossible. This problem was remedied by conversion of the niobium pentaoxide matrix into the thermally stable niobium carbide by using methane atmosphere during the pyrolysis stage. The development resulted in establishing an extraordinary powerful method for the analysis of niobium pentaoxide in term of limits of detection, accuracy, simplicity and analysis time. Quantification was performed using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions. The accuracy was checked by comparing the results with those obtained by ETAAS in analysis of slurries and digests of the sample. Due to almost complete freedom of blank and high applicable sample amounts (up to 15 mg), extremely low limits of detection (0.5-2 ng/g) were achieved.

  17. Speciation analysis of iron in traditional Chinese medicine by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shun-Xing; Deng, Nan-Sheng

    2003-04-24

    In view of octanol, a long-chain alkanol, resembled as the configuration of carbohydrate and adipose in human body, the octanol-solubility and water-solubility were used to define the species of iron in medicine, to identify the lipophily and bioavailability of coordinated iron complex, and octanol-water system was adopted to study the distribution of iron in decoction of eight single medicines and compatibility of semen persicae and flos carthami in stomach and intestine. To study the effect of compatibility of medicines, the different acidity of stomach and intestine on the species of iron in phytomedicine decoction, the total concentration, octanol- and water-solubility concentration of iron in medicinal materials or decoctions under gastric and intestinal acidity, were determined, respectively, by flame atomic absorption spectrometry, analyzed and compared. The different acidity of digestive site, the different composition of medicine, and the compatibility of medicines, have greatly affected the species of iron, the pharmacological activity of coordinated iron complex in decoctions. Such factors, especially the concentration of octanol-solubility iron, could be the basis of the dosage to avoid iron overload.

  18. An indirect atomic absorption spectrometric determination of ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin and diclofenac sodium in pharmaceutical formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMOUD MOHAMED ISSA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive indirect atomic absorption spectrophotometric (AAS method has been developed for the determination of very low concentrations of ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin and diclofenac sodium. The method is based on the oxidation of these drugs with iron(III. The excess of iron(III was extracted into diethyl ether and then the iron(II in the aqueous layer was aspirated into an air–acetylene flame and determined by AAS. The linear concentration ranges were 25–400, 50–500 and 60–600 ng ml-1 for ciprofloxacin, amoxycillin and diclofenac sodium, respectively. The results were statistically compared with the official method using t- and f-test at p < 0.05. There were insignificant interferences from most of the excipients present. The intra- and inter-day assay coefficients of variation were less than 6.1 % and the recoveries ranged from 95 to 103 %. The method was applied for the analysis of these drug substances in their commercial pharmaceutical formulations.

  19. Determination of calcium and magnesium in hydroethanolic extracts of propolis by atomic absorption flame spectrophotometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Q. SANTANA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Propolis is a natural product collected by honeybees and has a large range of pharmacological activity, including antimicrobial, antitumoral, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory. Its use as a popular medicine is increasing all over the world, creating a need for quality control of the commercial products. In this study the levels of calcium and magnesium in commercial hydroalcoholic propolis extracts from varios states of Brazil were determined by atomic absorption flame spectrophotometry and different values were obtained for northern and southern states. This study can be extended to the analysis of metals that are harmful to health. The results showed that the calibration curves were linear over a wide concentration range (0.5-4.0 µg.mL-1 for calcium and 0.05-0.4 µg.mL-1 for magnesium with good correlation coefficients (0.999 and 0.988, respectively. Good analytical recovery (94% was obtained. The proposed method showed adequate precision and relative standard deviation lower than 2 %. The method is accurate and precise as well as having advantages such as simplicity and speed. Keywords: hydroalcoholic propolis extract; mineralization; analysis; calcium; magnesium.

  20. Atomic Structure of Pt3Ni Nanoframe Electrocatalysts by in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Nigel; Kang, Yijin; Chen, Chen; Resasco, Joaquin; Kornienko, Nikolay; Guo, Jinghua; Markovic, Nenad M; Somorjai, Gabor A; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-12-23

    Understanding the atomic structure of a catalyst is crucial to exposing the source of its performance characteristics. It is highly unlikely that a catalyst remains the same under reaction conditions when compared to as-synthesized. Hence, the ideal experiment to study the catalyst structure should be performed in situ. Here, we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as an in situ technique to study Pt3Ni nanoframe particles which have been proven to be an excellent electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The surface characteristics of the nanoframes were probed through electrochemical hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide electrooxidation, which showed that nanoframe surfaces with different structure exhibit varying levels of binding strength to adsorbate molecules. It is well-known that Pt-skin formation on Pt-Ni catalysts will enhance ORR activity by weakening the binding energy between the surface and adsorbates. Ex situ and in situ XAS results reveal that nanoframes which bind adsorbates more strongly have a rougher Pt surface caused by insufficient segregation of Pt to the surface and consequent Ni dissolution. In contrast, nanoframes which exhibit extremely high ORR activity simultaneously demonstrate more significant segregation of Pt over Ni-rich subsurface layers, allowing better formation of the critical Pt-skin. This work demonstrates that the high ORR activity of the Pt3Ni hollow nanoframes depends on successful formation of the Pt-skin surface structure.

  1. Determination of nickel in active pharmaceutical ingredients by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubnič, Zoran; Urleb, Uroš; Kreft, Katjuša; Veber, Marjan

    2010-03-01

    An electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric procedure for the determination of nickel in active pharmaceutical ingredients was developed. Since the recoveries of nickel by the direct dissolution of samples in diluted nitric acid were low and caused errors in the determination of Ni in pharmaceutical samples, different approaches for sample pre-treatment were examined. It was found that the microwave digestion was the most suitable way for sample preparation. Various combinations of digestion agents and different microwave conditions were tested. The combination of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide was found to be the most appropriate. The validity of the method was evaluated by recovery studies of spiked samples and by the comparison of the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The recovery ranged from 87.5 to 104.0% and a good agreement was achieved between both methods. The detection limit and the limit of quantification were 0.6 and 2.1 µg g-1 respectively. The precision of the method was confirmed by the determination of Ni in the spiked samples and was below 4%, expressed in terms of a relative standard deviation. The method was applied to the determination of nickel in production samples of active pharmaceutical ingredients and intermediates.

  2. Determination of arsenic in a nickel alloy by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, C. P.; Tyson, J. F.; Offley, S. G.

    1992-08-01

    The development of a method for the direct determination of trace arsenic quantities in nickel alloy digests, by flow injection hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, is described. An optimization study of the manifold and chemical parameters produced system performance, in terms of tolerance of the nickel matrix and sensitivity, such that matrix removal and pre-reduction of As(V) to As (III) prior to arsine generation were eliminated. Full recovery of the As(V) signal from a solution containing 5 ng ml -1 in the presence of 60 μg ml -1 nickel was obtained. Validation of the method was achieved by analyzing a British Chemical Standard (BCS) Certified Reference Material (CRM) #346 IN nickel alloy containing arsenic at a concentration of 50 μg g -1. Following dissolution in nitric and hydrofluoric acids by a microwave assisted procedure, the only subsequent preparation required was dilution by the appropriate factor. Up to 60 injections h -1 may be made, with a detection limit of 0.5 ng ml -1 arsenic (250 pg absolute) as As(V) in a 500 μl sample. The peak height characteristic concentration is 0.46 ng ml -1, with a relative standard deviation of 3.5% for a 10 ng ml -1 As(V) standard ( n = 6).

  3. Comparative Study of Heavy Metals in Dried and Fluid Milk in Peshawar by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfullah, Ghosia; Khan, Abid Ali; Amjad, Azra Yasmeen; Perveen, Sajida

    2014-01-01

    Various essential and toxic heavy metals (Ca, Mg, Cu, Zn, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ni) contents in various types of dried (infant formula and powdered) and fluid (fresh and processed) cow milk were assessed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The milk samples were collected from local markets of different parts of Peshawar city, Pakistan. Heavy metal concentrations varied significantly depending upon the type of milk. The heavy metal concentrations in most of the samples were within normal and permissible ranges. It was observed that the samples contained considerable amounts of calcium, while magnesium levels were well above the required levels. The results also revealed that copper levels were slightly lower than the permissible limits. The concentration of zinc in dried milk samples was greater than the values for the liquid milk types. Infant milk formulae had higher iron levels as compared to other milk samples because of the added constituents. Significant differences were observed in the mean values of manganese and cadmium in different types of milk. The toxic metals were within the acceptable limits and did not show significant levels leading to toxicity. PMID:24967439

  4. Use of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in Assessment of Biomonitor Plants for Lead, Cadmium and Copper Pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gokce Kaya; Mehmet Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Eleven plant species were collected from the vicinity of lead-battery plant in the city of Gaziantep,Turkey.Lead,cadmium and copper concentrations in the soil and leaves of plants were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.Lead,Cd and Cu concentrations in the soil samples taken from battery area were found to be in the ranges of 304~602,0.4~0.44 and 31~37 mg · kg-1,respectively.Significantly increased lead concentration up to 2 750 mg · kg-1 was found in the leaves of Eleagnus angustifolia L.plant.The lead concentrations in the other plant leaves taken from 50 m around battery factory followed the order Ailanthus altissima >Morus sp.> Juglans regia L.> Ficus carica L.>Cydonia oblonga Miller> Prunus x domestica L.The plants,Populus nigra L.,Eleagnus angustifolia L.and Salix sp.were found useful for Cd,and the plant,Eleagnus angustifolia L.for Pb,to be considered as potential biomonitor.Especially,leaves of trees and plants taken from the distance of 50 m from battery plant have relatively higher Pb concentrations.Therefore,people who and animals which live in this area and benefit from these soil and plants have vital risks.

  5. Speciation of iron (II) and (III) by using solvent extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, Mehmet [Department of Chemistry, Science and Arts Faculty, Firat University, Elazig (Turkey)]. E-mail: myaman@firat.edu.tr; Kaya, Gokce [Department of Chemistry, Science and Arts Faculty, Firat University, Elazig (Turkey)

    2005-05-17

    A method for speciation, preconcentration and separation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in different matrices was developed using solvent extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry. PAN as complexing reagent for Fe{sup 2+} and chloroform as organic solvent were used. The complex of Fe{sup 2+}-PAN was extracted into chloroform phase in the pH range of 0.75-4.0 and Fe{sup 3+} remains in water phase in the pH range 0.75-1.25. The optimum conditions for maximum recovery of Fe{sup 2+} and minimum recovery of Fe{sup 3+} were determined as pH = 1, the stirring time of 20 min, the PAN amount of 0.5 mg and chloroform volume of 8 mL. The developed method was applied to the determination of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} in tea infusion, fruit juice, cola and pekmez. It is seen that there is high bioavailable iron (Fe{sup 2+}) in pekmez. The developed method is sensitive, simple and need the shorter time in comparison with other similar studies.

  6. [Determination of thirteen metal elements in the plant Foeniculum vulgare Mill. by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Guo-qing; Liu, Qing; Han, Yu-qi; Wei, Hui-guang; Dong, Ting

    2006-10-01

    The objective of the paper is to determine the amount of metal elements of Na, K, Mg, Ca, Cu, Zn, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cd, Cr and Pb in the planted Foeniculum vulgare Mill. by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS), after the cinefaction and the digestion with HNO3-HClO4 (phi 4:1) at 90-95 degrees C and normal pressure. The optimum parameters of FAAS and the effects of solution medium on the results were investigated. The analytical results show that the amount of Na, K, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb was 1508.7, 27653.0, 2036.0, 4848.1, 24.8, 323.5, 15.2, 23.7 and 10.8 microg x g(-1), respectively, and that of Co, Ni, Cd and Cr was not checked out in the samples. The recovery of standard addition is 97.45%-102.50%, the relative standard deviation (n=9) was 0.34%-2.77%. The characteristic method is quick, simple and convenient and the results are satisfactory.

  7. Assessment of toxic metals in raw and processed milk samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Jalbani, Nusrat; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Arain, Mohammad Balal; Jamali, Mohammad Khan; Shah, Abdul Qadir

    2009-09-01

    Milk and dairy products have been recognized all over the world for their beneficial influence on human health. The levels of toxic metals (TMs) are an important component of safety and quality of milk. A simple and efficient microwave assisted extraction (MAE) method has been developed for the determination of TMs (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb), in raw and processed milk samples. A Plackett-Burman experimental design and 2(3)+star central composite design, were applied in order to determine the optimum conditions for MAE. Concentrations of TMs were measured by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated by standard addition method and conventional wet acid digestion method (CDM), for comparative purpose. No significant differences were observed (P>0.05), when comparing the values obtained by the proposed MAE method and CDM (paired t-test). The average relative standard deviation of the MAE method varied between 4.3% and 7.6% based on analyte (n=6). The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of understudy TMs in milk samples. The results of raw and processed milk indicated that environmental conditions and manufacturing processes play a key role in the distribution of toxic metals in raw and processed milk.

  8. Determination of selenium and tellurium in the gas phase using specific columns and atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muangnoicharoen, S.; Chiou, K.Y.; Manuel, O.K.

    1986-11-01

    Total selenium and tellurium in the gas phase were analyzed after adsorption on gold-coated beads and charcoal. The thermally eluting gas was trapped on columns filled with quartz beads that were cooled in an ice bath. The beads were boiled in dilute HCl, and the resulting solution was analyzed for Se and Te by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Their results demonstrate that gold-coated beads efficiently trap gaseous Se and Te at a low gas flow rate, but at higher flow rates charcoal traps are more expedient. With charcoal traps, it was found that local air samples contain Se in the range of 0.92-3.05 ng m/sup -3/ and Te in the range of 0.10-0.34 ng m/sup -3/. Detection limits down to about 0.1 ng m/sup -3/ allow the ready detection of Se and Te in rural air with a precision of about +/- 6% at the nanogram level of Te and about +/- 4% at the nanogram level of Se.

  9. Determination of toxic metals in some herbal drugs through atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hina, Bushra; Rizwani, Ghazala Hafeez; Naseem, Shahid

    2011-07-01

    This study presents a picture of occurrence of heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, Co, Fe, Ni, Zn) in some selected valuable herbal drugs (G. glabra, O. bracteatum, V. odorata , F. vulgare, C. cyminum, C. sativum, and Z. officinalis) purchased from three different zones (southern, eastern, and western) of Karachi city using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metal concentrations in these drugs were found in the range of: 3.26-30.46 for Pb, 1.6-4.91 for Cd, 0.65-120.21 for Cu, 83.74-433.76 for Zn, 1.61-186.75 for Cr, 0.48-76.97 for Ni, 5.54-77.97 for Co and 65.68-1652.89 µg/g for Fe. Percentage of heavy metals that were found beyond the permissible limits were: 71.4% for Pb, 28.51% for Cd, 14.2% for Cu, and 9.5 % for Cr. Significant difference was noticed for each heavy metal among herbal drugs as well as their zones of collection using two way ANOVA followed by least significant (LSD) test at p<0.05.Purpose of this research is to detect each type of heavy metal contaminant of herbal drugs by environmental pollution, as well as to highlight the health risks associated with the use of such herbal drugs that contain high levels of toxic heavy metals.

  10. Speciation of methylmercury in market seafood by thermal degradation, amalgamation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-de-Cenzano, Manuela; Rochina-Marco, Arancha; Cervera, M Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    Sample thermal decomposition followed by mercury amalgamation and atomic absorption has been employed for the determination of methylmercury (MeHg) in fish. The method involves HBr leaching of MeHg, extraction into toluene, and back-extraction into an aqueous l-cysteine solution. Preliminary studies were focused on the extraction efficiency, losses, contaminations, and species interconversion prevention. The limit of detection was 0.018µgg(-1) (dry weight). The intraday precision for three replicate analysis at a concentration of 4.2µgg(-1) (dry weight) was 3.5 percent, similar to the interday precision according to analysis of variance (ANOVA). The accuracy was guaranteed by the use of fortified samples involving 83-105 percent recoveries, and certified reference materials TORT-2 (lobster hepatopancreas) and DORM-3 (dogfish liver), providing 107 and 98 percent recovery of certified values. The greenness of the method was also evaluated with the analytical eco-scale being obtained a final score of 73 points which means an acceptable green analysis. The method was applied to fifty-seven market samples of different fish acquired from local markets in several sampling campaigns. The content of MeHg found varied between 0.0311 and 1.24µgg(-1) (wet weight), with values that involve 33-129 percent of the total mercury content. Some considerations about food safety were also done taking into account data about Spanish fish consume and Tolerable Weekly Intake (TWI) established for MeHg.

  11. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum.

  12. Determination of firing distance. Lead analysis on the target by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano-Candela, Roberto; Colucci, Anna P; Napoli, Salvatore

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports a method for the determination of the firing distance. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to determine the lead (Pb) pattern around bullet holes produced by shots on test targets from the gun. Test shots were made with a Colt 38 Special at 5, 10, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 60, 80, and 100 cm target distance. The target was created with sheets of Whatman no. 1 paper on a polystyrene support. The target was subdivided into three carefully cut out rings (1, 2, and 3; with external diameters of 1.4 cm; 5 cm; 10.2 cm, respectively). Each sample was analyzed with graphite furnace AAS. Lead values analysis performed for each ring yielded a linear relation between the firing distance (cm) and the logarithm of lead amounts (microg/cm(2)) in definite target areas (areas 2 + 3): [ln dPb(2+3) = a(0) + a(1)l]; where dPb(2+3) = lead microg/cm(2) of area 2 + 3; a(0) and a(1) are experimentally calculated; l = distance in cm.

  13. Measurement of nickel, cobalt and chromium in toy make-up by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Monica; Baldo, Federica; Pagnoni, Antonella; Miscioscia, Roberta; Virgili, Annarosa

    2009-01-01

    Cosmetics should not contain more than 5 ppm of nickel, chromium or cobalt and, in order to minimize the risk of sensitization in very sensitive subjects, the target amount should be as low as 1 ppm. However, there are no published reports on the presence of these metals in toy make-up. This study analysed 52 toy make-ups using atomic absorption spectroscopy. More than 5 ppm of nickel was present in 14/52 (26.9%) samples. Chromium exceeded 5 ppm in 28/52 (53.8%) samples, with values over 1000 ppm in 3 eye shadows. Cobalt was present in amounts over 5 ppm in 5/52 (9.6%) samples. Powdery toy make-up (eye shadows) had the highest levels of metals, and "creamy" toy make-up (lip gloss and lipsticks) the lowest. Toy make-ups are potentially sensitizing items, especially for atopic children, who have a damaged skin barrier that may favour penetration of allergens.

  14. Determination of Anionic Surfactants Using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and Anodic Stripping Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Richard; Lord, Daniel

    1999-09-01

    An experiment has been developed for our undergraduate analytical chemistry course that demonstrates the indirect analysis of anionic surfactants by techniques normally associated with metal ion determination; that is, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). The method involves the formation of an extractable complex between the synthetic surfactant anion and the bis(ethylenediamine)diaqua copper(II) cation. This complex is extracted into chloroform and then back-extracted into dilute acid. The resulting Cu(II) ions are determined by AAS and ASV. Students are required to determine the concentration of a pre-prepared "unknown" anionic surfactant solution and to collect and analyze a real sample of their choice. After the two extraction processes, students typically obtain close to 100% analytical recovery. Correlation between student AAS and ASV results is very good, indicating that any errors that occur probably result from their technique (dilutions, extractions, preparation of standards, etc.) rather than from the end analyses. The experiment is a valuable demonstration of the following analytical principles: indirect analysis; compleximetric analysis; liquid-liquid (solvent) extraction; back-extraction (into dilute acid); analytical recovery; and metal ion analysis using flame-AAS and ASV.

  15. EVALUATION OF HEAVY METALS CONTENT IN EDIBLE MUSHROOMS BY MICROWAVE DIGESTION AND FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Radulescu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the heavy metal (Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Mn, Zn, Fe and Cu content of the fruiting bodies (cap and stipe of four species (Amanita caesarea, Pleurotus ostreatus, Fistulina hepatica and Armillariella mellea and their substrate, collected from forest sites in Dâmboviţa County, Romania. The elements were determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS after microwave assisted digestion. From the same collecting point were taken n = 5 samples of young and mature fruiting bodies of mushrooms and their substrate. The high concentrations of lead, chrome and cadmium (Pb: 0.25 – 1.89 mg.kg-1, Cr: 0.36 – 1.94 mg.kg-1, Cd: 0.23 – 1.13 mg.kg-1 for all collected wild edible mushrooms, were determined. These data were compared with maximum level for certain contaminants in foodstuffs established by the commission of the European Committees (EC No 466/2001. A quantitative evaluation of the relationship of element uptake by mushrooms from substrate was made by calculating the accumulation coefficient (Ka. The moderately acid pH value of soil influenced the accumulation of Zn and Cd inside of the studied species. The variation of heavy metals content between edible mushrooms species is dependent upon the ability of the species to extract elements from the substrate and on the selective uptake and deposition of metals in tissue.

  16. Ion-exchange preconcentration and determination of vanadium in milk samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Ignacio; Viñas, Pilar; Romero-Romero, Rafael; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2009-06-15

    A new method for the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of vanadium in milk and infant formulas using suspensions to avoid the need for previous dissolution of samples is described. Sensitivity is improved by a procedure based on preconcentration and removal of the matrix, using ion-exchange (Dowex 1X8-100). Suspensions of 15% (m/v) infant formula samples were prepared in a medium containing 0.05M sodium citrate (pH 7.2) and passed through the ion exchange column. Vanadium was eluted from the column using 1M hydrochloric acid and injected in the graphite furnace using a mixture of hydrofluoric acid plus magnesium nitrate as chemical modifiers. Calibration was carried out using multiple injection and aqueous standards prepared in the same medium. Detection limits were 0.2 ng g(-1) for infant formulas and 0.02 microg L(-1) for cow milk samples. The reliability of the procedure was checked by comparing the results obtained with those found using a previous mineralization stage and by analyzing five certified reference materials.

  17. High-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Linearization of the calibration curves within a broad concentration range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katskov, Dmitri, E-mail: katskovda@tut.ac.za [Tshwane University of Technology, Chemistry Department, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Hlongwane, Miranda [Tshwane University of Technology, Chemistry Department, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Heitmann, Uwe [German Aerospace Center, Rose-Luxemburg Str. 2, 10178 Berlin (Germany); Florek, Stefan [ISAS-Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9,12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The calculation algorithm suggested provides linearization of the calibration curves in high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The algorithm is based on the modification of the function wavelength-integrated absorbance vs. concentration of analyte vapor in the absorption volume. According to the suggested approach, the absorption line is represented by a triangle for low and trapezium for high analyte vapor concentration in the absorption volume. The respective semi-empirical formulas include two linearization parameters, which depend on properties of the absorption line and characteristics of the atomizer and spectrometer. The parameters can be approximately evaluated from the theory and determined in practice from the original broad-range calibration curve. The parameters were found and the proposed calculation algorithm verified in the experiments on direct determination of Ag, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Pb in the solutions within a concentration ranges from 0.15 to 625 {mu}g{center_dot}L{sup -1} using tube, platform tube and filter furnace atomizers. The use of various atomizers, lines, elements and atomization temperatures made possible the simulation of various practical analytical conditions. It was found that the algorithm and optimal linearization parameters made it possible to obtain for each line and atomizer linear approximations of the calibration curves within 3-4 orders of magnitude with correlation coefficients close to 0.999. The algorithm makes possible to employ a single line for the direct element determination over a broad concentration range. The sources of errors and the possibility of a priori theoretical evaluation of the linearization parameters are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New calculation algorithm for HR-CS ET AAS measurements was proposed and applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The suggested formulas include two parameters to be determined experimentally. Black

  18. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  19. Temperature-controlled electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry using a pyrometric feedback system in conjunction with a background monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deijck, W.; Roelofsen, A. M.; Pieters, H. J.; Herber, R. F. M.

    The construction of a temperature-controlled feedback system for electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) using an optical pyrometer applied to the atomization stage is described. The system was used in conjunction with a fast-response background monitoring device. The heating rate of the furnace amounted to 1400° s -1 with a reproducibility better than 1%. The precision of the temperature control at a steady state temperature of 2000°C was 0.1%. The analytical improvements offered by the present system have been demonstrated by the determination of cadmium and lead in blood and finally by the determination of lead in serum. Both the sensitivity and the precision of the method have been improved. The accuracy of the method was checked by determining the lead content for a number of scrum samples both by ETA-AAS and differential pulse anodic stripping voltametry (DPASV) and proved to be satisfactory.

  20. Determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil by direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Alexandre de; Zmozinski, Ariane Vanessa [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Damin, Isabel Cristina Ferreira [Faculdade Dom Bosco de Porto Alegre, 90520-280, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Silva, Marcia Messias, E-mail: mmsilva@iq.ufrgs.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti Rodrigues [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CNPq, INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2012-05-15

    In this work, a direct sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry method has been developed for the determination of arsenic and cadmium in crude oil samples. The samples were weighed directly on the solid sampling platforms and introduced into the graphite tube for analysis. The chemical modifier used for both analytes was a mixture of 0.1% Pd + 0.06% Mg + 0.06% Triton X-100. Pyrolysis and atomization curves were obtained for both analytes using standards and samples. Calibration curves with aqueous standards could be used for both analytes. The limits of detection obtained were 5.1 {mu}g kg{sup -1} for arsenic and 0.2 {mu}g kg{sup -1} for cadmium, calculated for the maximum amount of sample that can be analyzed (8 mg and 10 mg) for arsenic and cadmium, respectively. Relative standard deviations lower than 20% were obtained. For validation purposes, a calibration curve was constructed with the SRM 1634c and aqueous standards for arsenic and the results obtained for several crude oil samples were in agreement according to paired t-test. The result obtained for the determination of arsenic in the SRM against aqueous standards was also in agreement with the certificate value. As there is no crude oil or similar reference material available with a certified value for cadmium, a digestion in an open vessel under reflux using a 'cold finger' was adopted for validation purposes. The use of paired t-test showed that the results obtained by direct sampling and digestion were in agreement at a 95% confidence level. Recovery tests were carried out with inorganic and organic standards and the results were between 88% and 109%. The proposed method is simple, fast and reliable, being appropriated for routine analysis. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A direct sampling GF AAS method to determine As and Cd in crude oil was proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conventional chemical modifier Pd/Mg has been used to stabilize As and Cd. Black

  1. Determination of cadmium and lead in edible oils by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after reverse dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, Ignacio; Vicente-Martínez, Yesica; Hernández-Córdoba, Manuel

    2014-06-01

    The dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of edible oils with a low volume of an acidic solution in the presence of isopropyl alcohol allows cadmium and lead to be completely separated into the aqueous phase. After centrifugation, the metals are determined by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry using a palladium salt for chemical modification in the heating cycle. Using a 10 g oil sample, the enrichment factor is 140, which permits detection limits of 0.6 and 10 ng kg(-1) for cadmium and lead, respectively. The results agree with those obtained after sample mineralization. Data for the cadmium and lead levels for 15 samples of different characteristics are given.

  2. PRECONCENTRATION OF CADMIUM USING AMBERLITE XAD-4 PRIOR TO ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Shahtaheri, M. Khadem, F. Golbabaei, A. Rahimi Froushani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is an important environmental constituent widely used in industrial processes for production of synthetic materials and therefore can be released in the environment causing public exposure especially around the industrial residence area. For evaluation of human exposure to trace toxic metal of Cd (II, environmental and biological monitoring are essential processes, in which, preparation of such samples is one of the most time-consuming and error-prone aspects prior to analysis. The use of solid-phase extraction (SPE has grown and is a fertile technique of sample preparation as it provides better results than those produced by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE. To evaluate factors influencing quantitative analysis scheme of cadmium in water samples, solid phase extraction using mini columns filled with XAD-4 resin was optimized with regard to sample pH, ligand concentration, loading flow rate, elution solvent, sample volume (up to 500 ml, elution volume, amount of resins, and sample matrix interferences. Cadmium was retained on solid sorbent and eluted followed by simple determination of analytes by using flame atomic absorption spectrometery. Obtained recoveries of the metal ion were more than 92%. The amount of the analyte detected after simultaneous preconcentration was basically in agreement with the added amounts. The optimized procedure was also validated with three different pools of spiked urine samples and showed a good reproducibility over six consecutive days as well as six within-day experiments. The developed method promised to be applicable for evaluation of other metal ions present in different environmental and occupational samples as suitable results were obtained for relative standard deviation (less than 10%; therefore, it is concluded that, this optimized method can be considered to be successful in simplifying sample preparation for trace residue analysis of Cd in different matrices for evaluation of occupational and

  3. Chemical modifiers in arsenic determination in biological materials by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhn, C G; Huerta, V N; Neira, J Y

    2004-01-01

    Palladium, iridium, and rhodium are evaluated as possible chemical modifiers in the determination of As in digest solutions of biological materials (human hair and clam) by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry (TCA-AAS). The modifier in solution was applied onto the coil and thermally pre-reduced; the pre-reduction conditions, the amount of modifier, and the thermal program were optimized. Palladium was not satisfactory, whereas Ir and Rh were effective modifiers and rendered better relative sensitivity for As by a factor of 1.4 and 1.9, respectively compared to the case without modifier. Upon optimization of thermal conditions for As in pre-reduced Ir (2.0 microg) and Rh (2.0 microg) modifiers and in the digest solutions of the study matrices, Rh (2.0 microg) was more effective modifier and was selected as such. The mean within-day repeatability was 2.8% in consecutive measurements (25-100 microg L(-1)) (3 cycles, each of n=6) and confirmed good short-term stability of the absorbance measurements. The mean reproducibility was 4.4% (n=20 in a 3-day period) and the detection limit (3 sigmablank/slope) was 29 pg (n=15). The useful coil lifetime in Rh modifier was extended to 300-400 firings. Validation was by determination of As in the certified reference material (CRM) of "Oyster tissue" solution with a percentage relative error (Erel%) of 2% and percentage relative standard deviation (RSD%) of 3% (n=4), and by analytical recovery of As spiked in CRM of human hair [94 +/- 8% (n=4)]. The methodology is simple, fast (sample readout frequency 21 h(-1)), reliable, of low cost, and was applied to the determination of As in hair samples of exposed and unexposed workers.

  4. Determination of copper in powdered chocolate samples by slurry-sampling flame atomic-absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Walter N.L. dos; Silva, Erik G.P. da; Fernandes, Marcelo S.; Araujo, Rennan G.O.; Costa, Anto' ' enio C.S.; Ferreira, Sergio L.C. [Nucleo de Excelencia em Quimica Analitica da Bahia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Quimica, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Vale, M.G.R. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal da Bahia do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

    2005-06-01

    Chocolate is a complex sample with a high content of organic compounds and its analysis generally involves digestion procedures that might include the risk of losses and/or contamination. The determination of copper in chocolate is important because copper compounds are extensively used as fungicides in the farming of cocoa. In this paper, a slurry-sampling flame atomic-absorption spectrometric method is proposed for determination of copper in powdered chocolate samples. Optimization was carried out using univariate methodology involving the variables nature and concentration of the acid solution for slurry preparation, sonication time, and sample mass. The recommended conditions include a sample mass of 0.2 g, 2.0 mol L{sup -1} hydrochloric acid solution, and a sonication time of 15 min. The calibration curve was prepared using aqueous copper standards in 2.0 mol L{sup -1} hydrochloric acid. This method allowed determination of copper in chocolate with a detection limit of 0.4 {mu}g g{sup -1} and precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), of 2.5% (n=10) for a copper content of approximately 30 {mu}g g{sup -1}, using a chocolate mass of 0.2 g. The accuracy was confirmed by analyzing the certified reference materials NIST SRM 1568a rice flour and NIES CRM 10-b rice flour. The proposed method was used for determination of copper in three powdered chocolate samples, the copper content of which varied between 26.6 and 31.5 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The results showed no significant differences with those obtained after complete digestion, using a t-test for comparison. (orig.)

  5. Simple analysis of total mercury and methylmercury in seafood using heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Keisuke; Anh, Hoang Thi Van; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Koriyama, Chihaya; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Nakano, Atsuhiro; Yamamoto, Megumi

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a simpler method for determining total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in biological samples by using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) in the degreasing step. The fat in the samples was extracted by MIBK to the upper phase. T-Hg transferred into the water phase. This was followed by the extraction of MeHg from the water phase using HBr, CuCl2 and toluene. The MeHg fraction was reverse-extracted into L-cysteine-sodium acetate solution from toluene. The concentrations of T-Hg and MeHg were determined by heating vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry. Certified reference materials for T-Hg and MeHg in hair and fish were accurately measured using this method. This method was then applied to determine T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the muscle, liver and gonads of seafood for the risk assessment of MeHg exposure. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in squid eggs were 0.023 and 0.022 µg/g, and in squid nidamental glands 0.052 and 0.049 µg/g, respectively. The MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the eggs and nidamental glands of squid were 94.4% and 96.5%, respectively. The mean T-Hg and MeHg concentrations in the gonads of sea urchins were 0.043 and 0.001 µg/g, respectively, with a MeHg/T-Hg ratio of 3.5%. We developed an efficient analytical method for T-Hg and MeHg using MIBK in the degreasing step. The new information on MeHg concentration and MeHg/T-Hg ratios in the egg or nidamental glands of squid and gonads of sea urchin will also be useful for risk assessment of mercury in seafood.

  6. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in Wilson's Disease and Its Comparison with Other Laboratory Tests and Paraclinical Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoub, Fatemeh; Fereiduni, Rana; Jahanzad, Isa; Farahmand, Fatemeh; Monajemzadeh, Maryam; Najafi, Mehri

    2012-01-01

    Objective Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disease with genetic abnormality on chromosome 13 causing defect in copper metabolism and increased copper concentration in liver, central nervous system and other organs, which causes different clinical manifestations. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of different clinical and paraclinical tests for diagnosis of Wilson's disease. Methods Paraffin blocks of liver biopsy from 41 children suspicious of WD were collected. Hepatic copper concentrations were examined with atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Australian GBC, model: PAL 3000). Fifteen specimens had hepatic copper concentration (dry weight) more than 250μg/g. Clinical and laboratory data and histologic slides of liver biopsies of these 15 children were reviewed retrospectively. Liver tissue was examined for staging and grading of hepatic involvement and also stained with rubeonic acid method for copper. Findings Patients were 5-15 years old (mean age=9.3 years, standard deviation=2.6) with slight male predominance (9/15=60%). Five (33%) patients were 10 years old. Three (20%) of them were referred for icterus, 8 (54%) because of positive family history, 2 (13%) due to abdominal pain and 2 (13%) because of hepatosplenomegaly and ascites. Serum AST and ALT levels were elevated at the time of presentation in all patients. In liver biopsy, histological grade and stage was 0-8 and 0-6 respectively, 2 (13%) had cirrhosis, 1 (7%) had normal biopsy and 12 (80%) showed chronic hepatitis. Hepatic copper concentrations were between 250 and 1595 μg/g dry weight. The sensitivity of various tests were 85% for serum copper, 83% for serum ceruloplasmin, 53% for urinary copper excretion, 44% for presence of KF ring and 40% for rubeonic acid staining on liver biopsies. Conclusion None of the tests stated in the article were highly sensitive for diagnosis of WD, so we suggest that diagnosis should be based on combination of family history

  7. Atomic absorption techniques for determining vanadium and nickel in crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grizzle, P.L.; Wilson, C.A.; Ferrero, E.P.; Coleman, H.J.

    1977-05-01

    Four different techniques for sample preparation were evaluated for determining vanadium and nickel in crude oils by atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy: (1) The flame-analyzed dilution method which consists of direct-flame AA analysis after diluting the sample with a suitable organic solvent; (2) the flame-analyzed, wet-ashing method in which the sample is combusted and the residue is then dissolved before flame analysis; (3) the flameless, dilution method which involves flameless AA analysis of the sample following dilution with a suitable organic solvent; and (4) the direct, flameless method in which the crude oil or residue is directly analyzed by flameless AA. The flame-analyzed dilution method yielded erratic and inaccurate analytical results for samples of crude oils as well as for a residual sample containing standard amounts of vanadium and nickel; hence, it is unsatisfactory for oil-identification. Similarly, the direct, flameless method is unsatisfactory owing to the small concentration range available for analysis (less than approximately 15 ppM). Both the flame-analyzed, wet-ashing and flameless-dilution methods yield reliable and reproducible (better than 10%) quantitative data for nickel and vanadium in crude oils and crude oil residues. Results demonstrate that the error associated with the loss of volatile metal containing compounds upon wet-ashing is within the reproducibility of the technique. Although wet-ashing may be slightly more reproducible, the flameless-dilution method is much simpler and faster and is recommended as the better of the two procedures for routine determinations of trace metals for oil identification.

  8. Determination of Inorganic Arsenic Species by Electrochemical Hydride Generation Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Selective Electrochemical Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xun; WANG Zheng-Hao

    2007-01-01

    A new direct procedure for the determination of inorganic arsenic species was developed by electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (EcHG-AAS) with selective electrochemical reduction. The determination of inorganic arsenic species is based on the fact that As(Ⅲ) shows significantly higher absorbance at low electrolytic currents than As(Ⅴ) in 0.3 mol·L-1 H2SO4.The electrolytic current used for the determination of As(Ⅲ) without considerable interferences of As(V) was 0.4 A, whereas the current for the determination of As(Ⅲ)and As(V) was 1.2 A. For equal concentrations of As(Ⅲ) and As(V) in a sample, the interferences of As(V) during the As(Ⅲ) determination were smaller than 5%. The absorbance for As(V) could be calculated by subtracting that for As(Ⅲ) measured at 0.4 A from the total absorbance for As(Ⅲ) and As(V) measured at 1.2 A, and then the concentration of As(V) can be obtained by its calibration curve at 1.2 A. The methodology developed provided the detection limits of 0.3 and 0.6 ng·ml-1 for As(Ⅲ) and As(V) respectively.The relative standrad deviations were of 3.5% for 20 ng·ml-1 As(Ⅲ) and 302% for 20 ng·ml-1 As(V).The method was successfully applied to determination of soluble inorganic arsenic species in Chinese medicine.

  9. Chemical modifiers in arsenic determination in biological materials by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, C.G.; Huerta, V.N.; Neira, J.Y. [Departamento de Analisis Instrumental, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Concepcion, P.O. Box 237, Concepcion (Chile)

    2004-01-01

    Palladium, iridium, and rhodium are evaluated as possible chemical modifiers in the determination of As in digest solutions of biological materials (human hair and clam) by tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry (TCA-AAS). The modifier in solution was applied onto the coil and thermally pre-reduced; the pre-reduction conditions, the amount of modifier, and the thermal program were optimized. Palladium was not satisfactory, whereas Ir and Rh were effective modifiers and rendered better relative sensitivity for As by a factor of 1.4 and 1.9, respectively compared to the case without modifier. Upon optimization of thermal conditions for As in pre-reduced Ir (2.0 {mu}g) and Rh (2.0 {mu}g) modifiers and in the digest solutions of the study matrices, Rh (2.0 {mu}g) was more effective modifier and was selected as such. The mean within-day repeatability was 2.8% in consecutive measurements (25-100 {mu}g L{sup -1}) (3 cycles, each of n=6) and confirmed good short-term stability of the absorbance measurements. The mean reproducibility was 4.4% (n=20 in a 3-day period) and the detection limit (3{sigma}{sub blank}/slope) was 29 pg (n=15). The useful coil lifetime in Rh modifier was extended to 300-400 firings. Validation was by determination of As in the certified reference material (CRM) of ''Oyster tissue'' solution with a percentage relative error (E{sub rel}%) of 2% and percentage relative standard deviation (RSD%) of 3% (n=4), and by analytical recovery of As spiked in CRM of human hair [94{+-}8% (n=4)]. The methodology is simple, fast (sample readout frequency 21 h{sup -1}), reliable, of low cost, and was applied to the determination of As in hair samples of exposed and unexposed workers. (orig.)

  10. Role of strongly modulated coherence in transient evolution dynamics of probe absorption in a three-level atomic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchadhyayee, Pradipta

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the dynamical behaviour of atomic response in a closed three-level V-type atomic system with the variation of different relevant parameters to exhibit transient evolution of absorption, gain and transparency in the probe response. The oscillations in probe absorption and gain can be efficiently modulated by changing the values of the Rabi frequency, detuning and the collective phase involved in the system. The interesting outcome of the work is the generation of coherence controlled loop-structure with varying amplitudes in the oscillatory probe response of the probe field at various parameter conditions. The prominence of these structures is observed when the coherence induced in a one-photon excitation path is strongly modified by two-step excitations driven by the coherent fields operating in closed interaction contour. In contrast to purely resonant case, the time interval between two successive loops gets significantly reduced with the application of non-zero detuning in the coherent fields.

  11. Identifying student and teacher difficulties in interpreting atomic spectra using a quantum model of emission and absorption of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall-Alemany, Francisco; Domènech-Blanco, Josep Lluís; Guisasola, Jenaro; Martínez-Torregrosa, Joaquín

    2016-06-01

    Our study sets out to identify the difficulties that high school students, teachers, and university students encounter when trying to explain atomic spectra. To do so, we identify the key concepts that any quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation must include to account for the gas spectra and we then design two questionnaires, one for teachers and the other for students. By analyzing the responses, we conclude that (i) teachers lack a quantum model for the emission and absorption of electromagnetic radiation capable of explaining the spectra, (ii) teachers and students share the same difficulties, and (iii) these difficulties concern the model of the atom, the model of radiation, and the model of the interaction between them.

  12. Matrix effects on the determination of manganese in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry under different flame conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    Suppression caused by five of the seven matrix elements studied (Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg) was observed in the atomic-absorption determination of manganese in geological materials, when synthetic solutions and the recommended oxidizing air-acetylene flame were used. The magnitude of the suppression effects depends on (1) the kind and concentration of the interfering elements, (2) the type of acid medium, and (3) the concentration of manganese to be determined. All interferences noted are removed or alleviated by using a reducing nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The atomic-absorption method using this flame can be applied to the determination of total and extractable manganese in a wide range of geological materials without interferences. Analyses of six U.S. Geological Survey rock standards for manganese gave results in agreement with the reported values. ?? 1978.

  13. Metastable argon atom density in complex argon/acetylene plasmas determined by means of optical absorption and emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, Vladimir; Herrendorf, Ann-Pierra; Hippler, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    Optical emission and absorption spectroscopy has been utilized to investigate the instability of acetylene-containing dusty plasmas induced by growing nano-particles. The density of Ar(1s5) metastable atoms was derived by two methods: tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy and with the help of the branching ratio method of emitted spectral lines. Results of the two techniques agree well with each other. The density of Ar(1s3) metastable atoms was also measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy. The observed growth instability leads to pronounced temporal variations of the metastable and other excited state densities. An analysis of optical line ratios provides evidence for a depletion of free electrons during the growth cycle but no indication for electron temperature variations.

  14. Effects of spontaneously induced coherence on absorption of a ladder-type atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hong-Mei; Gong Shang-Qing; Sun Zhen-Rong; Li Ru-Xin; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of spontaneously induced coherence on absorption properties in a nearly equispaced three-level ladder-type system driven by two coherent fields. It find that the absorption properties of this system with the probe field applied on the lower transition can be significantly modified if this coherence is optimized. In the case of small spontaneous decay rate in the upper excited state, it finds that such coherence does not destroy the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). Nevertheless, the absorption peak on both sides of zero detuning and the linewidth of absorption line become larger and narrower than those in the case corresponding to the effects of spontaneously induced coherence; while in the case of large decay rate, it finds that, instead of EIT with low resonant absorption, a sharp absorption peak at resonance appears. That is, electromagnetically induced absorption in the nearly equispaced ladder-type system can occur due to such coherent effects.

  15. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant ( Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae ( Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 °C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 °C and atomization temperature 2100 °C) with 1.5 μg Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 μmol of zirconium and then with 0.10 μmol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely overcome by standard additions technique. Calibration by means of CRMs has

  16. Arsenic in marine tissues - The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria); Serafimovski, Ivan [Food Institute, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, P.O. Box 95, MK-1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Stafilov, Trajce [Institute of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Sts. Cyril and Methodius University, P.O. Box 162, MK-1000, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Tsalev, Dimiter L. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1 James Bourchier Blvd., Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)], E-mail: tsalev@chem.uni-sofia.bg

    2007-03-15

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant (Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae (Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 deg. C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 deg. C and atomization temperature 2100 deg. C) with 1.5 {mu}g Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 {mu}mol of zirconium and then with 0.10 {mu}mol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely

  17. Determination of As, Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb in biological samples by modern electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardans, Jordi, E-mail: j.sardans@creaf.uab.ca [Ecophysiological and Global Change Unit CSIC-CREAF, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain); Montes, Fernando [Departamento de Ciencias Analiticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia (UNED), C/ Senda del Rey 9. 28040 Madrid (Spain); Penuelas, Josep [Ecophysiological and Global Change Unit CSIC-CREAF, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193, Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Pollution from heavy metals has increased in recent decades and has become an important concern for environmental agencies. Arsenic, cadmium, copper, mercury and lead are among the trace elements that have the greatest impact and carry the highest risk to human health. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) has long been used for trace element analyses and over the past few years, the main constraints of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) methods, namely matrix interferences that provoked high background absorption and interferences, have been reduced. The use of new, more efficient modifiers and in situ trapping methods for stabilization and pre-concentration of these analytes, progress in control of atomization temperatures, new designs of atomizers and advances in methods to correct background spectral interferences have permitted an improvement in sensitivity, an increase in detection power, reduction in sample manipulation, and increase in the reproducibility of the results. These advances have enhanced the utility of Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) for trace element determination at mug L{sup -1} levels, especially in difficult matrices, giving rise to greater reproducibility, lower economic cost and ease of sample pre-treatment compared to other methods. Moreover, the recent introduction of high resolution continuum source Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-ETAAS) has facilitated direct solid sampling, reducing background noise and opening the possibility of achieving even more rapid quantitation of some elements. The incorporation of flow injection analysis (FIA) systems for automation of sample pre-treatment, as well as chemical vapor generation renders (ETAAS) into a feasible option for detection of As and Hg in environmental and food control studies wherein large numbers of samples can be rapidly analyzed. A relatively inexpensive approach with low sample consumption provide additional advantages

  18. Computer programs in BASIC language for atomic absorption flame spectroscopy. Part 2. Documentation. [SEMIAUTOMATIC, RANDOM, and BRACKET codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, W.G. Jr.

    1977-10-28

    There are three computer programs, written in the BASIC language, used for taking data from an atomic absorption spectrophotometer operating in the flame mode. The programs are divided into logical sections, and these have been flow-charted. The general features, the structure, the order of subroutines and functions, and the storage of data are discussed. In addition, variables are listed and defined, and a complete listing of each program with a symbol occurrence table is provided.

  19. Determination of the total iron content of used lubricating oils by atomic-absorption with use of emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, A; de la Guardia, M; Berenguer, V

    1983-12-01

    A new method is proposed for the determination of the total iron content of used lubricating oils. It is based on treatment of the samples with a mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids (without destruction of the organic matter) and emulsification, followed by atomic-absorption measurement. This allows the use of aqueous standards and provides a simple, rapid, inexpensive and accurate method, that is not affected by the particle size of the solids in the oil.

  20. Determination of Mercury in an Assortment of Dietary Supplements Using an Inexpensive Combustion Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Keith E.; Levine, Michael A.; Weber, Frank X.; Hu, Ye; Perlmutter, Jason; Grohse, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of mercury in forty, commercially available dietary supplements, were determined using a new, inexpensive analysis technique. The method involves thermal decomposition, amalgamation, and detection of mercury by atomic absorption spectrometry with an analysis time of approximately six minutes per sample. The primary cost savings from this approach is that labor-intensive sample digestion is not required prior to analysis, further automating the analytical procedure. As a res...

  1. Single-Drop Solution Electrode Discharge-Induced Cold Vapor Generation Coupling to Matrix Solid-Phase Dispersion: A Robust Approach for Sensitive Quantification of Total Mercury Distribution in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Lin, Yao; Tian, Yunfei; Wu, Li; Yang, Lu; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2017-02-07

    Sensitive quantification of mercury distribution in fish is challenging because of insufficient sensitivities of conventional analytical methods, the limited mass of organs (tens of micrograms to several milligrams), and dilution of analyte concentration from sample digestion. In this work, a simple and robust approach coupling multiwall carbon nanotubes assisted matrix solid-phase dispersion (MWCNTs-MSPD) to single-drop solution electrode glow discharge-induced cold vapor generation (SD-SEGD-CVG) was developed for the sensitive determination of mercury in limited amount of sample. Mercury species contained in a limited amount of sample can be efficiently extracted into a 100 μL of eluent by MWCNTs-MSPD, which are conveniently converted to Hg(0) by SD-SEGD-CVG and further transported to atomic fluorescence spectrometry for their determination. Therefore, analyte dilution resulted from sample preparation is avoided and sensitivity is significantly improved. On the basis of consumption of 1 mg of sample, a limit of detection of 0.01 μg L(-1) (0.2 pg) was obtained with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 5.2% and 4.6% for 2 and 20 μg L(-1), respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated by analysis of three Certified Reference Materials with satisfying results. To confirm that SD-SEGD-CVG-AFS coupling to MWCNTs-MSPD is a promising method to quantify mercury distribution in fish, this method was successfully applied for the sensitive determination of mercury in seven organs of common carps (muscle, gill, intestine, liver, gallbladder, brain, and eye) after dietary of mercury species. The proposed method provides advantages of minimum sample dilution, low blank, high sample introduction efficiency, high sensitivity, and minimum toxic chemicals and sample consumption.

  2. Nonlinear Absorption-Gain Response and Population Dynamics in a Laser-Driven Four-Level Dense Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jia-Hua; LIU Ji-Bing; LUO Jin-Ming; XIE Xiao-Tao

    2006-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the response of nonlinear absorption and population dynamics in optically dense media of four-level atoms driven by a single-mode probe laser, via taking the density-dependent near dipoledipole (NDD) interactions into consideration. The influence of the NDD effects on the absorption of the probe field and population dynamics is predicted via numerical calculations. It is shown that the NDD effects can reduce gradually to transient absorption with the increase of the strengths of the NDD interactions, and transient amplification can be achieved. In the steady-state limit, the probe field exhibits transparency for strong NDD interactions. Alternatively, the population entirely remains at the ground state due to the NDD effects.

  3. Absorption and Recurrence Spectra of Nonhydrogenic Rydberg Atom Near a Metal Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jun; WANG De-Hua; XUE Chun-Hua; QI Yi-Hong; LOU Sen-Yue

    2008-01-01

    Multielectron atoms near a metal surface are essentially more complicated than hydrogen atom with regard to theoretical treatments. By using the semicalssical closed orbit theory generalized to the multielecton atoms, we study the dynamical properties of the Rydberg lithium atom near a metal surface. The photoabsorption spectra and recurrence spectra of this system have also been calculated. Considering the effect of the ionic core potential of the Rydberg lithium atom, the number of the closed orbits increases, which leads to more peaks in the recurrence spectra than the case of hydrogen atom near a metal surface. This result shows that the core-scattered effects play an important role in nonhydrogenic atoms. This study is a new application of the dosed-orbit theory and is of potential experimental interest.

  4. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeini Jahromi, Elham [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bidari, Araz [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Assadi, Yaghoub [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: y_assadi@iust.ac.ir; Milani Hosseini, Mohammad Reza [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamali, Mohammad Reza [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Electroanalytical Chemistry Research Center, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-03-07

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique was successfully used as a sample preparation method for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS). In this extraction method, 500 {mu}L methanol (disperser solvent) containing 34 {mu}L carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) and 0.00010 g ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (chelating agent) was rapidly injected by syringe into the water sample containing cadmium ions (interest analyte). Thereby, a cloudy solution formed. The cloudy state resulted from the formation of fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride, which have been dispersed, in bulk aqueous sample. At this stage, cadmium reacts with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and therefore, hydrophobic complex forms which is extracted into the fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride. After centrifugation (2 min at 5000 rpm), these droplets were sedimented at the bottom of the conical test tube (25 {+-} 1 {mu}L). Then a 20 {mu}L of sedimented phase containing enriched analyte was determined by GF AAS. Some effective parameters on extraction and complex formation, such as extraction and disperser solvent type and their volume, extraction time, salt effect, pH and concentration of the chelating agent have been optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor 125 was obtained from only 5.00 mL of water sample. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 2-20 ng L{sup -1} with detection limit of 0.6 ng L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.s) for ten replicate measurements of 20 ng L{sup -1} of cadmium was 3.5%. The relative recoveries of cadmium in tap, sea and rivers water samples at spiking level of 5 and 10 ng L{sup -1} are 108, 95, 87 and 98%, respectively. The characteristics of the proposed method have been compared with cloud point extraction (CPE), on-line liquid-liquid extraction, single drop microextraction (SDME), on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) and co-precipitation based on bibliographic data

  5. [Speciation analysis of trace elements Cu, Fe and Zn in serum by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Chang, Yao-Ming; Gao, Shuang-Bin; Hai, Chun-Xu; Li, Jin-Sheng; Xie, Xiao-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Since biological functions of the elements are generally different, depending on their chemical forms, chemical speciation analysis is really important in metallomics research. Thus, multielement analysis and chemical speciation of the elements in serum were carried out in the present work. A hyphenated technique was developed for high-throughput speciation analysis of the copper, iron and zinc in serum by molecular biology technology and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Here, Cu, Fe and Zn in serum were classifyied as the forms of combination and non-combination. The serum protein was precipitated by 60% concentration of ethanol under hypothermy. The forms of combination of Cu, Fe and Zn in serum which combined with proteins were in precipitations, and the forms of non-combination of Cu, Fe and Zn in serum, which were free ions, were in supernatant. The total amount of Cu, Fe and Zn in serum and the amount of the forms of non-combination of Cu, Fe and Zn were analyzed by AAS. The amount of the forms of combination of Cu, Fe and Zn was obtained by calculation. The detection limit of Cu in serum by the method is around and 9.84 x 10(-3) microg x mL(-1). For Fe and Zn, the detection limit is about 2.76 x 10(-2) microg x mL(-1) and 1.06 x 10(-3) microg x mL(-1), respectively. The percentage recovery of trace elements Cu, Fe and Zn by the proposed procedure is in the range 95.0%-101.0%, 95.0%-102.0% and 95.0%-103.0%, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) of trace elements Cu, Fe and Zn in the serum is in the range 1.88%-2.26%, 0.56%-1.59% and 0.34%-1.36%, respectively. Speciation of trace elements Cu, Fe and Zn in the serum of SD rat were analyzed by the method.

  6. [Study on determination of eight metal elements in Hainan arecanut leaf by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-yun; Wang, Ping; Feng, Mei-li; Dong, Zhi-guo; Li, Jie

    2008-12-01

    Arecanut is a sort of palm that is important economic crop for the farmers in Hainan province of China, wherein there are many kinds of metal elements such as K, Ca, Na, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn etc. These elements are important nutrition for the growth of arecanut. It is very valuable to study on the content of these metal elements in arecanut leaf in terms of plant nutriology of arecanut. The arecanut leaf in Wangling county, Hainan province of China was sampled by diagonal-field-sampling method. Refering to other plant sample determination by FAAS, the detailed studies are done with different digestion and determination methods. In the present paper the effects of mixed acid of HNO3-HClO4 digestion method on determining the amount of metal elements in the arecanut leaf by FAAS is reported, and another one is incineration digestion method. FAAS method was established for the determination of K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn The samples were incinerated or heated with HNO3-HClO4 (4:1). In the meantime, the optimum parameters of FAAS and effects of different digestion methods on the results were discussed. The recovery rate of standard addition is 98.36%-102.38% in the first method; RSD is 0.42%-2.328% (n=6); The recovery rate of standard addition is 99.22%-103.72% in the second method; RSD is 0.58%-1.283 (n=6). The metal amount determined by the first method is lower than the second method, the ratio is 0.9703-0.9934. The two methods are satisfied, but the latter is better. It is precise enough to common experiment to use flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry with digestion by incineration If the especially precise experiment is required, the digestion methods with mixed acid of HNO3-HClO4 may be introduced. The paper introduced methods dependable for determination of some metal elements in order to study on some nutrient effects of these metal elements in arecanut.

  7. [Ferric iron absorption in deltar p f F xoo, a gene deletion mutant of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, assayed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lei; Wu, Mao-Sen; He, Chen-Yang

    2010-04-01

    The ferric iron absorption is one of the most important limiting factors of bacterial growth of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. It has been previously speculated that r p f F xoo might be involved in the ferric iron metabolism of the pathogen. In the present study, deltar p f F xoo, a gene deletion mutant, was generated from the wild-type strain PXO99A of Xoo through the homologous recombination, and Fe content was assayed using flame atomic absorption in PXO99A and deltar p f F xoo. The results indicated that the recovery was 99.7% and the relative standard deviation was 1.89 under optimized AAS operating conditions. The increase in Fe absorption in PXO99A and deltar p f F xoo was observed with the increasing time. However, the ferric content of deltar p f F xoo was significantly lower than that of PXO99A (P < 0.05). It is suggested that r p f F xoo is involved in iron metabolism in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

  8. Study of the roles of chemical modifiers in determining boron using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and optimization of the temperature profile during atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuhei; Shirasaki, Toshihiro; Yonetani, Akira; Imai, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The measurement conditions for determining boron using graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) were investigated. Differences in the boron absorbance profiles were found using three different commercially available GF-AAS instruments when the graphite atomizers in them were not tuned. The boron absorbances found with and without adjusting the graphite atomizers suggested that achieving an adequate absorbance for the determination of boron requires a sharp temperature profile that overshoots the target temperature during the atomization process. Chemical modifiers that could improve the boron absorbance without the need for using coating agents were tested. Calcium carbonate improved the boron absorbance but did not suppress variability in the peak height. Improvement of boron absorbance was comparatively less using iron nitrate or copper nitrate than using calcium carbonate, but variability in the peak height was clearly suppressed using iron nitrate or copper nitrate. The limit of detection was 0.0026 mg L(-1) when iron nitrate was used. It appears that iron nitrate is a useful new chemical modifier for the quick and simple determination of boron using GF-AAS.

  9. Handbook of theoretical atomic physics data for photon absorption, electron scattering, and vacancies decay

    CERN Document Server

    Amusia, Miron Ya; Yarzhemsky, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present highly accurate and extensive theoretical Atomic data and to give a survey of selected calculational methods for atomic physics, used to obtain these data. The book presents the results of calculations of cross sections and probabilities of a broad variety of atomic processes with participation of photons and electrons, namely on photoabsorption, electron scattering and accompanying effects. Included are data for photoabsorption and electron scattering cross-sections and probabilities of vacancy decay formed for a large number of atoms and ions. Attention is also given to photoionization and vacancy decay in endohedrals and to positron-atom scattering. The book is richly illustrated. The methods used are one-electron Hartree-Fock and the technique of Feynman diagrams that permits to include many-electron correlations. This is done in the frames of the Random Phase approximation with exchange and the many-body perturbation theory. Newly obtained and previously collected atomi...

  10. Spontaneous absorption of an accelerated hydrogen atom near a conducting plane in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, H; Yu, Hongwei; Zhu, Zhiying

    2006-01-01

    We study, in the multipolar coupling scheme, a uniformly accelerated multilevel hydrogen atom in interaction with the quantum electromagnetic field near a conducting boundary and separately calculate the contributions of the vacuum fluctuation and radiation reaction to the rate of change of the mean atomic energy. It is found that the perfect balance between the contributions of vacuum fluctuations and radiation reaction that ensures the stability of ground-state atoms is disturbed, making spontaneous transition of ground-state atoms to excited states possible in vacuum with a conducting boundary. The boundary-induced contribution is effectively a nonthermal correction, which enhances or weakens the nonthermal effect already present in the unbounded case, thus possibly making the effect easier to observe. An interesting feature worth being noted is that the nonthermal corrections may vanish for atoms on some particular trajectories.

  11. Estimation of lead, cadmium and nickel content by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in dry fruit bodies of some macromycetes growing in Poland. II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Grzybek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The content of lead, cadmium, and nickel in dry fruit bodies of 34 species of macromyoetes collected in Poland from 72 natural babitats by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS was estimated.

  12. Quantitative estimatation of lead, cadmium. and nickel contents by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in fruitbodies of some macromycetes in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Grzybek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The contents of lead, cadmium and nickel in dry fruitbodies of 13 species of macromycetes collected in Poland from 33 natural habitats by means of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS were estimated.

  13. Preconcentration and determination of cadmium in water and food samples by in situ surfactant-based solid-phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jamali, Mohammad Reza; Boromandi, Afsaneh

    2014-01-01

    In situ surfactant-based solid-phase extraction (ISS-SPE) is proposed as a preconcentration procedure for the determination of cadmium in water and food samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry...

  14. Lead determination at ng/mL level by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a tantalum coated slotted quartz tube atom trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş, İlknur; Bakırdere, Sezgin; Ataman, O Yavuz

    2015-06-01

    Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) still keeps its importance despite the relatively low sensitivity; because it is a simple and economical technique for determination of metals. In recent years, atom traps have been developed to increase the sensitivity of FAAS. Although the detection limit of FAAS is only at the level of µg/mL, with the use of atom traps it can reach to ng/mL. Slotted quartz tube (SQT) is one of the atom traps used to improve sensitivity. In atom trapping mode of SQT, analyte is trapped on-line in SQT for few minutes using ordinary sample aspiration, followed by the introduction of a small volume of organic solvent to effect the revolatilization and atomization of analyte species resulting in a transient signal. This system is economical, commercially available and easy to use. In this study, a sensitive analytical method was developed for the determination of lead with the help of SQT atom trapping flame atomization (SQT-AT-FAAS). 574 Fold sensitivity enhancement was obtained at a sample suction rate of 3.9 mL/min for 5.0 min trapping period with respect to FAAS. Organic solvent was selected as 40 µL of methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). To obtain a further sensitivity enhancement inner surface of SQT was coated with several transition metals. The best sensitivity enhancement, 1650 fold enhancement, was obtained by the Ta-coated SQT-AT-FAAS. In addition, chemical nature of Pb species trapped on quartz and Ta surface, and the chemical nature of Ta on quartz surface were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman Spectroscopy. Raman spectrometric results indicate that tantalum is coated on SQT surface in the form of Ta2O5. XPS studies revealed that the oxidation state of Pb in species trapped on both bare and Ta coated SQT surfaces is +2. For the accuracy check, the analyses of standard reference material were performed by use of SCP SCIENCE EnviroMAT Low (EU-L-2) and results for Pb were to be in good agreement with

  15. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution

  16. A comparison of simultaneous plasma, atomic absorption, and iron colorimetric determinations of major and trace constituents in acid mine waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three water samples collected during June to October 1982 from the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin were originally analyzed by simultaneous multielement direct-current plasma (DCP) atomic-emission spectrometry, flame atomic-absorption spectrometry, graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) (thallium only), ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry.Determinations were made for the following metallic and semi-metallic constituents: AI, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe(11), Fe(total), Li, Pb, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, K, Sb, Se, Si, Na, Sr, TI, V, and Zn. These samples were re-analyzed later by simultaneous multielement inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-emission spectrometry and Zeeman-corrected GFAAS to determine the concentrations of many of the same constituents with improved accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. The result of this analysis has been the generation of comparative concentration values for a significant subset of the solute constituents. Many of the more recently determined values replace less-than-detection values for the trace metals; others constitute duplicate analyses for the major constituents. The multiple determinations have yielded a more complete, accurate, and precise set of analytical data. They also have resulted in an opportunity to compare the performance of the plasma-emission instruments operated in their respective simultaneous multielement modes. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for Na and K and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for As because of their lower detection limit and relative freedom from interelement spectral effects. Colorimetric determination using ferrozine as the color agent was judged most accurate, precise, and sensitive for Fe. Cadmium, lead, and vanadium concentrations were too low in this set of samples to enable a determination of whether ICP or DCP is a more suitable technique. Of

  17. Absorption and Recurrence Spectra of Sodium Rydberg Atom in a Strong External Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Hua; LIN Sheng-Lu

    2004-01-01

    Using core-scattered closed-orbit theory, we calculate the photoabsorption and the scaled recurrence spectra of sodium Rydberg atom in strong magnetic field below ionization threshold. The non-Coulombic nature of the ionic core have been modified by a model potential, which includes an attractive Coulomb potential and a short-ranged core potential. A family of core-scattered nonhydrogenic closed orbits have also been discovered. The Fourier transformed spectra of sodium atom have allowed direct comparison between peaks in such plot and the scaled action values of closed orbits. The new peaks in the recurrence spectra of sodium atom have been considered as effects caused by the core scattering of returning waves at the ionic core. The results are compared with those of hydrogen case, which show that the core-scattered effects play an important role in alkali-metal atoms.

  18. Absorption and Recurrence Spectra of Sodium Rydberg Atom in a Strong External Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGDe-Hua; LINSheng-Lu

    2004-01-01

    Using core-scattered closed-orbit theory, we calculate the photoabsorption and the scaled recurrence spectra of sodium Rydberg atom in strong magnetic fied below ionization threshoM. The non-Coulombic nature of the ionic core have been modified by a model potential, which includes an attractive Coulomb potential and a short-ranged core potential. A family of core-scattered nonhydrogenic closed orbits have also been discovered. The Fourier transformed spectra of sodium atom have allowed direct comparison between peaks in such plot and the scaled action values of closed orbits. The new peaks in the recurrence spectra of sodium atom have been considered as effects caused by the core scattering of returning waves at the ionic core. The results are compared with those of hydrogen case, which show that the core-scattered effects play an important role in alkali-metal atoms.

  19. A New Cross-Shaped Graphite Furnace with Ballast Body for Reduction of Interferences in Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Asweisi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A new crossed graphite furnace for atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS was designed and installed in heated graphite atomizer (HGA500 combined with Perkin-Elmer spectrometer (AAS1100. The Tungsten ballast body was inserted inside one part of the crossed furnace in a way perpendicular to light path. The analyzed sample was injected manually on the ballast body inside the cross and pushed into the measuring zone using the original inner and additional purge gas. The sample was adsorbed strongly on the ballast and evaporated and transferred with different rates at different temperatures during the temperature program allowing the separation of analyte and matrix signals. Analysis of middle volatile element such as copper and manganese in standard urine sample (seronorm 2525 showed complete separation of analyte and background signals with good sensitivity and repeatability.

  20. Determination of cadmium by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion of animal tissues and sewage sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R; Das, A K; Cervera, M L; De La Guardia, M

    1996-04-01

    The determination of cadmium in different sample types has been carried out by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry with D(2)-background correction using a unpyrocoated graphite tube, after pressurized microwave-assisted digestion. Five chemical modifiers [(NH(4))(2)HPO(4), Pd(NO)(3))(2), Ni(NO(3))(2), thiourea and Triton X-100] have been assayed and nickel nitrate has been found to be most effective for an accurate determination of cadmium in mussel tissue, pig kidney and sewage sludge. The characteristic mass of the method is of the order of 1 pg and the limit of detection is lower than 0.1 ng/ml.

  1. Microwave-assisted extraction and ultrasonic slurry sampling procedures for cobalt determination in geological samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipe-Sotelo, M; Carlosena, A; Fernández, E; López-Mahía, P; Muniategui, S; Prada, D

    2004-06-17

    Slurry sampling is compared to microwave-assisted acid digestion for cobalt determination in soil/sediment samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Furnace temperature programs and appropriate amounts of three chemical modifiers were optimised in order to get the highest signals and good separations between the atomic and background signals. Using nitric acid (0.5% (v/v)) as liquid medium, no chemical modifier was needed. The detection limit, based on integrated absorbance, was 0.04mugg(-1) for digests and slurries. Within-batch precision and analytical recoveries were satisfactory for both procedures. Accuracy was tested by analysing a reference soil and a sediment from IRMM. The methods were further compared employing a set of roadside soils and estuarine sediments. As no significant differences (95% confidence) were found, practical analytical properties were suggested in order to select one of them.

  2. Determination of gold in copper-bearing sulphide ores and metallurgical flotation products by atomic-absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, B; Murray-Smith, R

    1974-12-01

    A method is described which is specific for the determination of gold in sulphide copper ores and concentrates. Direct decomposition with aqua regia was found to be incomplete. A carefully controlled roasting stage followed by treatment with hydrochloric acid and then aqua regia was effective for dissolving all the gold. The gold is extracted into 4-methylpentan-2-one (methyli-sobutylketone) then aspirated into a very lean air-acetylene flame and the gold determined by atomic-absorption spectrometry. No interferences were observed from large concentrations of copper, iron or nickel.

  3. Direct determination of lead in human urine and serum samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and permanent modifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Andrada,Daniel; Pinto,Frederico G.; Magalhães, Cristina Gonçalves; Nunes,Berta R.; Franco,Milton B.; Silva,José Bento Borba da

    2006-01-01

    The object of the present study was the development of alternative methods for the direct determination of lead in undigested samples of human urine and serum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). Thus, some substances have been investigated to act as chemical modifiers. Volumes of 20 µL of diluted samples, 1 + 1, v/v for urine and 1 + 4, v/v for serum, with HNO3 1% v/v and 0.02% v/v of cetil trimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) were prepared directly in the autosampler cup...

  4. An abbreviated fire-assay atomic-absorption method for the determination of gold and silver in ores and concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloughney, P E

    1977-02-01

    A simplified scheme, combining aspects of the classical fire-assay with an atomic-absorption finish, is presented for the determination of gold and silver in ores and concentrates. The lead assay button is scorified to approximately 2 g and then parted in nitric acid. The filtrate is analysed by AAS for silver; the residue is dissolved in aqua regia and subsequently analysed for gold by AAS. The precision and accuracy of the method have been established by application to four diverse certified reference materials. The proposed method eliminates the need for such time-consuming steps as inquartation, multiple scorifications, and cupellation.

  5. Determination of silver in soils, sediments, and rocks by organic-chelate extraction and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Ball, J.W.; Nakagawa, H.M.

    1971-01-01

    A useful method for the determination of silver in soil, sediment, and rock samples in geochemical exploration has been developed. The sample is digested with concentrated nitric acid, and the silver extracted with triisooctyl thiophosphate (TOTP) in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) after dilution of the acid digest to approximately 6 M. The extraction of silver into the organic extractant is quantitative and not affected by the nitric acid concentration from 4 M to 8 M, or by different volumes of TOTP-MIBK. The extracted silver is stable and remains in the organic phase up to several days. The silver concentration is determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1971.

  6. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry--a novel method to quantify blood volume in experimental models of intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashefiolasl, Sepide; Foerch, Christian; Pfeilschifter, Waltraud

    2013-02-15

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10% of all strokes and has a significantly higher mortality than cerebral ischemia. For decades, ICH has been neglected by experimental stroke researchers. Recently, however, clinical trials on acute blood pressure lowering or hyperacute supplementation of coagulation factors in ICH have spurred an interest to also design and improve translational animal models of spontaneous and anticoagulant-associated ICH. Hematoma volume is a substantial outcome parameter of most experimental ICH studies. We present graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis (AAS) as a suitable method to precisely quantify hematoma volumes in rodent models of ICH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Determination of Pb and Al in blood and hair of child using transverse heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Feng-lan; Xie, Wen-bing; Li, Chen-xu; Dong, Wei-yan

    2005-04-01

    Pb and Al in blood and hair of child were determined by transverse heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with NH4H2PO4 and Mg(NO3)2 as a modifier, which enhanced the temperature of ashing, eliminated the matrix interference and memorial effect. The method is rapid, simple and accurate. The characteristic mass of the method was 2.3 x 10(-11) g and 2.2 x 10(-11) g for Pb and Al respectively. The relative standard deviation of Pb and Al was 3.0% and 11.4%, respectively, and the recovery was 96%-102%.

  8. Arsenic speciation by hydride generation-quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Optimization of analytical parameters and application to environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenat, N.; Astruc, A.; Holeman, M.; Pinel, R. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bioinorganique et Environnement, Dept. de Chimie, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 64 - Pau (France); Maury, G. [Montpellier-2 Univ., 34 (France). Dept. de Chimie Organique Fine

    1999-11-01

    Analytical parameters of hydride generation, trapping, gas chromatography and atomic absorption spectrometry detection in a quartz cell furnace (HG/GC/QFAAS) device have been optimized in order to develop an efficient and sensitive method for arsenic compounds speciation. Good performances were obtained with absolute detection limits in the range of 0.1 - 0.5 ng for arsenite, arsenate, mono-methyl-arsonic acid (MMAA), dimethyl-arsinic acid (DMAA) and trimethyl-arsine oxide (TMAO). A pH selective reduction for inorganic arsenic speciation was successfully reported. Application to the accurate determination of arsenic compounds in different environmental samples was performed. (authors)

  9. Dosage de l'arsenic dans les charges de reformage catalytique par absorption atomique sans flamme Titration of Arsenic by Flameless Atomic Absorption in Catalytic Reforming Feedstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Villa F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Nous décrivons une méthode de dosage de l'arsenic dans les charges de reformage catalytique par absorption atomique sans flamme. Après traitement de l'échantillon par une solution d'iode dans le toluène, l'arsenic est extrait par de l'acide nitrique dilué. L'addition de nitrate de magnésium a pour but de rendre l'arsenic extrait moins volatil. La méthode décrite permet d'atteindre une limite de détection de un microgramme par litre. Elle peut être appliquée à d'autres types de naphtas que les charges de reformage catalytique. This article describes a method for titrating arsenic in catalytic reforming feedstocks by flameless atomic absorption. After the sample has been treated by an iodine solution in toluene, the arsenic is extracted by diluted nitric acid. Magnesium nitrate is added sa as ta make the extracted arsenic less volatile. This method is capable of attaining a detection limit of one microgrom per liter. It con be applied to types of naphthos other than catalytic reforming feedstocks.

  10. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  11. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  12. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  13. Application of methane as a gaseous modifier for the determination of silicon using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, Hans-Joachim, E-mail: hans-joachim.heinrich@bam.de; Kipphardt, Heinrich

    2012-04-15

    For determination of silicon in aqueous solutions by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry methane/argon mixtures as a gaseous modifier were applied during the pyrolysis step to improve the analytical performance. The beneficial effects observed on thermal stabilization, signal enhancement and shape of absorbance signals were attributed to the thermal decomposition products of methane, which were hydrogen and carbon black (soot). Using a 5% CH{sub 4} mixture with argon, the optimized pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1350 Degree-Sign C and 2450 Degree-Sign C, respectively. A flushing step following the pyrolysis was mandatory to avoid background absorption and accelerated deposition of pyrolytic graphite. Characteristic masses of 50 and 30 pg were obtained for standard transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) tubes and end-capped THGA tubes, respectively, which were lower than with other previously applied modifiers. A limit of detection of 0.2 {mu}g L{sup -1} (3 s, n = 10) has been obtained. In addition, this gaseous modifier did not contribute to contamination which often was significant when a liquid modifier solution was co-injected. The proposed method has been applied to the determination of silicon in ultrapure water, nitric and hydrochloric acids. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CH{sub 4}/Ar gas mixtures act as new modifier in the determination of Si using ET AAS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CH{sub 4} improved thermal stabilization, atomization efficiency and signal shape of Si. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum performance by addition of 5% CH{sub 4} during pyrolysis at 1350 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gaseous modifier does not contribute to blank values. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized method suitable for determination of Si in ultrapure reagents.

  14. Simple Atomic Absorption Spectroscopic and Spectrophotometric Methods for Determination of Pioglitazone Hydrochloride and Carvedilol in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf A. Abdelmonem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study represents simple atomic absorption spectroscopic and spectrophotometric methods for determination of pioglitazone hydrochloride (PGZ-HCl and carvedilol (CRV based on formation of ion-pair associates between drugs and inorganic complex, bismuth(III tetraiodide (Method A and between drugs and organic acidic dyes, fast green and orange G (Method B. Method A is based on formation of ion-pair associate between drugs and bismuth(III tetraiodide in acidic medium to form orange-red ion-pair associates, which can be quantitatively determined by two different procedures. The formed ion-pair associate is extracted by methylene chloride, dissolved in acetone, dried, and then decomposed by hydrochloric acid, and bismuth content is determined by direct atomic absorption spectrometric technique (Procedure 1 or extracted by methylene chloride, dissolved in acetone, and quantified spectrophotometrically at 490 nm (Procedure 2. Method B is based on formation of ion-pair associate between drugs and either fast green dye or orange G dye in acidic medium to form ion-pair associates. The formed ion-pair associate is extracted by methylene chloride and quantified spectrophotometrically at 630 nm (for fast green dye method or 498 nm (for orange G dye method. Optimal experimental conditions have been studied. Both methods are applied for determination of the drugs in tablets without interference.

  15. [Determination of trace silver in water samples by solid phase extraction portable tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guang-yu; Jiang, Xiao-ming; Zheng, Cheng-bin; Hou, Xian-deng; Xu, Kai-lai

    2011-07-01

    A simple method has been developed for the determination of silver in environmental water samples using solid phase extraction with tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Silica gel was used as an adsorbent and packed into a syringe barrel for solid phase extraction of silver prior to its determination by using a portable tungsten-coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer. Optimum conditions for adsorption and desorption of silver ion, as well as interferences from co-existing ions, were investigated. A sample pH value of 6.0, a sample loading flow rate of 4.0 mL x min(-1), and the mixture of 4% (m/v) thiourea and 2% (phi) nitrate acid with the eluent flow rate of 0.5 mL x min(-1) for desorption were selected for further studies. Under optimal conditions, a linear range of 0.20-4.00 ng x mL(-1), a limit of detection (3sigma) of 0.03 ng x mL(-1) and a preconcentration factor of 94 were achieved. The proposed method was validated by testing three environmental water samples with satisfactory results.

  16. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection.

  17. A preconcentration system for determination of copper and nickel in water and food samples employing flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzen, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr; Citak, Demirhan [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Ferreira, Hadla S.; Korn, Maria G.A. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Quimica, 40170-290 Salvador (Brazil); Bezerra, Marcos A. [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia, 45200-190 Jequie (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    A separation/preconcentration procedure using solid phase extraction has been proposed for the flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of copper and nickel at trace level in food samples. The solid phase is Dowex Optipore SD-2 resin contained on a minicolumn, where analyte ions are sorbed as 5-methyl-4-(2-thiazolylazo) resorcinol chelates. After elution using 1 mol L{sup -1} nitric acid solution, the analytes are determinate employing flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimization step was performed using a full two-level factorial design and the variables studied were: pH, reagent concentration (RC) and amount of resin on the column (AR). Under the experimental conditions established in the optimization step, the procedure allows the determination of copper and nickel with limit of detection of 1.03 and 1.90 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively and precision of 7 and 8%, for concentrations of copper and nickel of 200 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The effect of matrix ions was also evaluated. The accuracy was confirmed by analyzing of the followings certified reference materials: NIST SRM 1515 Apple leaves and GBW 07603 Aquatic and Terrestrial Biological Products. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of copper and nickel in real samples including human hair, chicken meat, black tea and canned fish.

  18. Contents of cadmium, mercury and lead in fish from the Atlantic sea (Morocco) determined by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahid, Adil; Hilali, Mustapha; Benlhachimi, Abdeljalil; Bouzid, Taoufiq

    2014-03-15

    As a part of a specific monitoring program, lead (Pb) cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg) concentrations in important species of fish from various fishing ports of the southern Kingdom of Morocco (Sardina pilchardus, Scomber scombrus, Plectorhinchus mediterraneus, Trachurus trachurus, Octopus vulgaris, Boops boops, Sarda sarda, Trisopterus capelanus, and Conger conger) were investigated by the Moroccan Reference Laboratory (NRL) for trace elements in foodstuffs of animal origin. The samples were analysed for lead and cadmium by a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS); and for mercury by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). The results were expressed as μg/g of wet weight (w/w). The levels of Cd, Pb and Hg in muscles of fish were 0.009-0.036, 0.013-0.114 and 0.049-0.194 μg/g, respectively. The present study showed that different metals were present in the sample at different levels but within the maximum residual levels prescribed by the EU for the fish and shellfish from these areas, in general, should cause no health problems for consumers.

  19. Chromium speciation by solid phase extraction on Dowex M 4195 chelating resin and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saygi, Kadriye Ozlem; Tuzen, Mustafa [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: msoylak@gmail.com; Elci, Latif [Pamukkale University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)

    2008-05-30

    A solid phase extraction procedure has been established for chromium speciation in natural water samples prior to determination by atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the solid phase extraction of the Cr(VI)- Dowex M 4195 chelating resin. After oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) by using H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the presented method was applied to the determination of the total chromium. The level of Cr(III) is calculated by difference of total chromium and Cr(VI) levels. The procedure was optimized for some analytical parameters including pH, eluent type, flow rates of sample and eluent, matrix effects, etc. The presented method was applied for the speciation of chromium in natural water samples with satisfactory results (recoveries >95%, RSDs <10%). In the determinations of chromium species, flame atomic absorption spectrometer was used. The results were checked by using NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07603 Bush branched and leaves.

  20. MERCURY QUANTIFICATION IN SOILS USING THERMAL DESORPTION AND ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY: PROPOSAL FOR AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD OF ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Catone Soares

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the considerable environmental importance of mercury (Hg, given its high toxicity and ability to contaminate large areas via atmospheric deposition, little is known about its activity in soils, especially tropical soils, in comparison with other heavy metals. This lack of information about Hg arises because analytical methods for determination of Hg are more laborious and expensive compared to methods for other heavy metals. The situation is even more precarious regarding speciation of Hg in soils since sequential extraction methods are also inefficient for this metal. The aim of this paper is to present a technique of thermal desorption associated with atomic absorption spectrometry, TDAAS, as an efficient tool for quantitative determination of Hg in soils. The method consists of the release of Hg by heating, followed by its quantification by atomic absorption spectrometry. It was developed by constructing calibration curves in different soil samples based on increasing volumes of standard Hg2+ solutions. Performance, accuracy, precision, and quantification and detection limit parameters were evaluated. No matrix interference was detected. Certified reference samples and comparison with a Direct Mercury Analyzer, DMA (another highly recognized technique, were used in validation of the method, which proved to be accurate and precise.

  1. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of the atomic structure of nanoparticles in different metallic matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Gurman, S J; Binns, C

    2009-05-06

    It has been appreciated for some time that the novel properties of particles in the size range 1-10 nm are potentially exploitable in a range of applications. In order to ultimately produce commercial devices containing nanosized particles, it is necessary to develop controllable means of incorporating them into macroscopic samples. One way of doing this is to embed the nanoparticles in a matrix of a different material, by co-deposition for example, to form a nanocomposite film. The atomic structure of the embedded particles can be strongly influenced by the matrix. Since some of the key properties of materials, including magnetism, strongly depend on atomic structure, the ability to determine atomic structure in embedded nanoparticles is very important. This review focuses on nanoparticles, in particular magnetic nanoparticles, embedded in different metal matrices. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) provides an excellent means of probing atomic structure in nanocomposite materials, and an overview of this technique is given. Its application in probing catalytic metal clusters is described briefly, before giving an account of the use of EXAFS in determining atomic structure in magnetic nanocomposite films. In particular, we focus on cluster-assembled films comprised of Fe and Co nanosized particles embedded in various metal matrices, and show how the crystal structure of the particles can be changed by appropriate choice of the matrix material. The work discussed here demonstrates that combining the results of structural and magnetic measurements, as well as theoretical calculations, can play a significant part in tailoring the properties of new magnetic cluster-assembled materials.

  2. DETERMINATION OF COPPER AND ZINC IN MINERAL WATERS BY ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROPHOTOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Mitina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The content of copper and zinc in mineral waters were determined by atomic spectroscopy with preliminary extraction of metals. Validation of the technique was carried out by the method of standard additions and proved the reliability of analytical data.

  3. Simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrzycka-Szelewa, Elżbieta; Lulewicz, Marta; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2017-07-01

    In the present paper a fast, simple and sensitive analytical method for simultaneous determination of rhodium and ruthenium by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GFAAS) was developed. Among six pairs of absorption atomic lines of Rh and Ru, which are close enough to enable their simultaneous detection, two pairs were selected for further studies. Best results were obtained for measurements of the resonance line of rhodium at 343.489 nm and the adjacent secondary line of ruthenium at 343.674 nm (23% intensity of this line). For evaluated lines, the absorbance values were obtained using three pixels. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 1200 °C and 2600 °C, respectively. Under these conditions the limits of detection achieved for Rh and Ru were found to be 1.0 μg L- 1 and 1.9 μg L- 1, respectively. The characteristic mass was 12.9 pg for Rh and 71.7 pg for Ru. Repeatability of the results expressed as a relative standard deviation was typically below 6%. The trueness of the method was confirmed by analysis of the certified reference material - platinum ore (SARM 76). The recovery of Rh and Ru from the platinum ore was 93.0 ± 4.6% and 90.1 ± 2.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to the direct simultaneous determination of trace amounts of rhodium and ruthenium in spiked river water, road runoff, and municipal sewage. Separation of interfering matrix on cation exchange resin was required before analysis of road dust and tunnel dust (CW-7) by HR-CS GFAAS.

  4. Fabrication of a selective mercury sensor based on the adsorption of cold vapor of mercury on carbon nanotubes: determination of mercury in industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Maleki, Norouz; Doroodmand, Mohammad Mahdi

    2010-01-15

    A new sensor for the determination of mercury at microg ml(-1) levels is proposed based on the adsorption of mercury vapor on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The changes in the impedance of SWCNTs were monitored upon adsorption of mercury vapor. The adsorption behaviour of mercury on SWCNTs was compared with that on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Cold vapor of mercury was generated at 65 degrees C using Sn(II) solution as a reducing agent. The limit of detection was 0.64 microg ml(-1) for Hg(II) species. The calibration curve for Hg(II) was linear from 1.0 to 30.0 microg ml(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) of eight replicate analyses of 15 microg ml(-1) of Hg(II) was 2.7%. The results showed no interfering effects from many foreign species and hydride forming elements. The system was successfully applied to the determination of the mercury content of different types of wastewater samples.

  5. Application of microemulsions in determination of chromium naphthenate in gasoline by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, B; Wei, Q; Wang, S; Yu, W

    1997-10-01

    A new method using microemulsified samples is presented. It is for the determination of chromium naphthenate in gasoline by flame absorption spectroscopy. The method has the advantage of simplicity, speed and the use of aqueous standards for calibration instead of organic standards. Coexistent elements do not disturb the determination. Results obtained by this method were better than those obtained by other methods for the same samples.

  6. Determination of cadmium in rice and water by tungsten coil electrothermal vaporization-atomic fluorescence spectrometry and tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Xiaodong [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Wu Peng [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Chen Li [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Hou Xiandeng, E-mail: houxd@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, 29 Wangjiang Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)

    2009-09-14

    In this work, the microsampling nature of tungsten coil electrothermal vaporization Ar/H{sub 2} flame atomic fluorescence spectrometry (W-coil ETV-AFS) as well as tungsten coil electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (W-coil ET-AAS) was used with cloud point extraction (CPE) for the ultrasensitive determination of cadmium in rice and water samples. When the temperature of the extraction system is higher than the cloud point temperature of the selected surfactant Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium with dithizone can be quantitatively extracted into the surfactant-rich phase and subsequently separated from the bulk aqueous phase by centrifugation. The main factors affecting the CPE, such as concentration of Triton X-114 and dithizone, pH, equilibration temperature and incubation time, were optimized for the best extract efficiency. Under the optimal conditions, the limits of detection for cadmium by W-coil ETV-AFS and W-coil ET-AAS were 0.01 and 0.03 {mu}g L{sup -1}, with sensitivity enhancement factors of 152 and 93, respectively. The proposed methods were applied to the determination of cadmium in certified reference rice and water samples with analytical results in good agreement with certified values.

  7. Nickel and strontium nitrates as modifiers for the determination of selenium in wine by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, J; Stafilov, T; Mihajlović, D

    2001-08-01

    A mixed matrix modifier of nickel and strontium nitrates was used as a chemical modifier for the determination of selenium in wines by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Wine samples were heated on a boiling water bath with small amounts of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide. For complete elimination of interference, especially from sulfates and phosphates, selenium is complexed with ammonium pyrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDTC), extracted into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK), and measured by ETAAS. The graphite furnace temperature program was optimized for both aqueous and organic solutions. Pyrolysis temperatures of 1300 degrees C and 800 degrees C were chosen for aqueous and organic solutions, respectively; 2700 degrees C and 2100 degrees C were used as optimum atomization temperatures for aqueous and organic solutions, respectively. The optimum modifier mass established is markedly lower than those presented in the literature. The platform atomization ensures pretreatment stabilization up to 1100 degrees C and 1600 degrees C, respectively, for organic and aqueous selenium solutions. The procedure was verified by the method of standard addition. The investigated wine samples originated from the different regions of the Republic of Macedonia. The selenium concentration varied from not detectable to 0.93 microg L(-1).

  8. Determination of Ultratrace Amounts of Copper(Ⅱ) in Water Samples by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry After Cloud Point Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach was developed for the determination of ultratrace amounts of copper in water samples by using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after cloud point extraction (CPE). 1-( 2-Pyridylazo)-2-naphthol was used as the chelating reagent and Triton X-114 as the micellar-forming surfactant. CPE was conducted in a pH 8.0 medium at 40 ℃ for 10 min. After the separation of the phases by centrifugation, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with 1 mL of a methanol solution of 0. 1 mol/L HNO3. Then 20 μL of the diluted surfactant-rich phase was injected into the graphite furnace for atomization in the absence of any matrix modifier. Various experimental conditions that affect the extraction and atomization processes were optimized. A detection limit of 5 ng/L was obtained after preconcentration. The linear dynamic range of the copper mass concentration was found to be 0-2.0ng/mL, and the relative standard deviation was found to be less than 3.1% for a sample containing 1.0 ng/mL Cu(Ⅱ). This developed method was successfully applied to the determination of ultratrace amounts of Cu in drinking water, tap water, and seawater samples.

  9. Direct determination of cadmium in Orujo spirit samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: Comparative study of different chemical modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar Farinas, M. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Barciela Garcia, J. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Garcia Martin, S. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Pena Crecente, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain); Herrero Latorre, C. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Campus de Lugo, 27002 Lugo (Spain)]. E-mail: cherrero@lugo.usc.es

    2007-05-22

    In this work, several analytical methods are proposed for cadmium determination in Orujo spirit samples using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Permanent chemical modifiers thermally coated on the platforms inserted in pyrolytic graphite tubes (such as W, Ir, Ru, W-Ir and W-Ru) were comparatively studied in relation to common chemical modifier mixtures [Pd-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and (NH{sub 4})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}-Mg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] for cadmium stabilization. Different ETAAS Cd determination methods based on the indicated modifiers have been developed. In each case, pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, atomization shapes, characteristic masses and detection limits as well as other analytical characteristics have been determined. All the assayed modifiers (permanent and conventional) were capable of achieving the appropriate stabilization of the analyte, with the exception of Ru and W-Ru. Moreover, for all developed methods, recoveries (99-102%) and precision (R.S.D. lower than 10%) were acceptable. Taking into account the analytical performance (best detection limit LOD = 0.01 {mu}g L{sup -1}), the ETAAS method based on the use of W as a permanent modifier was selected for further direct Cd determinations in Orujo samples from Galicia (NW Spain). The chosen method was applied in the determination of the Cd content in 38 representative Galician samples. The cadmium concentrations ranged

  10. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as a routine method for the quantification of beryllium in blood and serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brousseau Pauline

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A routine method for the quantification of beryllium in biological fluids is essential for the development of a chelation therapy for Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD. We describe a procedure for the direct determination of beryllium in undigested micro quantities of human blood and serum using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Blood and serum samples are prepared respectively by a simple 8-fold and 5-fold dilution with a Nash Reagent. Three experimental setups are compared: using no modifier, using magnesium nitrate and using palladium/citric acid as chemical modifiers. Results In serum, both modifiers did not improve the method sensitivity, the optimal pyrolysis and atomization temperatures are 1000°C and 2900°C, respectively. In blood, 6 μg of magnesium nitrate was found to improve the method sensitivity. The optimal pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were 800°C and 2800°C respectively. Conclusion In serum, the method detection limit was 2 ng l-1, the characteristic mass was 0.22 (± 0.07 pg and the accuracy ranged from 95 to 100%. In blood, the detection limit was 7 ng l-1, the characteristic mass was 0.20 (± 0.02 pg and the accuracy ranged from 99 to 101%.

  11. Tunable electronic and magnetic properties in stanene by 3d transition metal atoms absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dan-Xu; Ren, Ceng-Ceng; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Feng, Yong; Chen, Xin-Lian; Zhang, Chang-Wen; Wang, Pei-Ji

    2017-03-01

    The electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal (TM) atoms (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) adsorption on stanene are investigated by first-principles calculations. The results indicate that the TM atoms prefer to be relaxed on a H site on stanene except V atom which lies on the valley site. Fe-absorbed stanene is a spin gapless semiconductor with up-spin electron and down-spin hole carriers allowing the coexistence of charge current and the pure spin current. Co-absorbed stanene lies in the half metal phase. The V-, Cr-, Mn-, and Cu-absorbed stanene turn the stanene into metal, while Ni- and Zn-absorbed stanene open a narrow band gap. For V-, Cr-, Mn-, Fe-, and Co-absorbed stanene, the magnetic moment of the TM will survive while the Ni-, Cu-, and Zn-absorbed stanene will be non-magnetic material. These findings may have great potential in the design of new electrically controllable spintronic devices.

  12. Theory of x-ray absorption by laser-dressed atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Buth, C; Buth, Christian; Santra, Robin

    2006-01-01

    An ab initio theory is devised for the x-ray photoabsorption cross section of atoms in the field of a moderately intense optical laser (10^13 W/cm^2). The laser dresses the core-excited atomic states, which introduces a dependence of the cross section on the angle between the polarization vectors of the two linearly polarized radiation sources. We use the Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation to describe the atomic many-body problem in conjunction with a non-relativistic quantum-electrodynamic approach to treat the photon-electron interaction. The continuum wave functions of ejected electrons are treated with a complex absorbing potential that is derived from smooth exterior complex scaling. The solution to the two-color (x-ray plus laser) problem is discussed in terms of a direct diagonalization of the complex symmetric matrix representation of the Hamiltonian. Alternative treatments with time-independent and time-dependent non-Hermitian perturbation theories are presented that exploit the weak interaction stren...

  13. Determination of Mercury in Fish: A Low-Cost Implementation of Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorbance for the Undergraduate Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niece, Brian K.; Hauri, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Mercury is a known neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to children and unborn fetuses. Consumption of contaminated fish is one major route of mercury exposure. This laboratory experiment gives students an opportunity to measure mercury concentrations in store-bought seafood and compare the results to suggested exposure limits. The U.S.…

  14. Determination of Mercury in Fish: A Low-Cost Implementation of Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorbance for the Undergraduate Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niece, Brian K.; Hauri, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Mercury is a known neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to children and unborn fetuses. Consumption of contaminated fish is one major route of mercury exposure. This laboratory experiment gives students an opportunity to measure mercury concentrations in store-bought seafood and compare the results to suggested exposure limits. The U.S.…

  15. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  16. Determination of silicon and aluminum in silicon carbide nanocrystals by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravecz, Gabriella; Bencs, László; Beke, Dávid; Gali, Adam

    2016-01-15

    The determination of Al contaminant and the main component Si in silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystals with the size-distribution of 1-8nm dispersed in an aqueous solution was developed using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS-GFAAS). The vaporization/atomization processes were investigated in a transversally heated graphite atomizer by evaporating solution samples of Al and Si preserved in various media (HCl, HNO3). For Si, the best results were obtained by applying a mixture of 5µg Pd plus 5µg Mg, whereas for Al, 10µg Mg (each as nitrate solution) was dispensed with the samples, but the results obtained without modifier were found to be better. This way a maximum pyrolysis temperature of 1200°C for Si and 1300°C for Al could be used, and the optimum (compromise) atomization temperature was 2400°C for both analytes. The Si and Al contents of different sized SiC nanocrystals, dispersed in aqueous solutions, were determined against aqueous (external) calibration standards. The correlation coefficients (R values) of the calibrations were found to be 0.9963 for Si and 0.9991 for Al. The upper limit of the linear calibration range was 2mg/l Si and 0.25mg/l Al. The limit of detection was 3µg/l for Si and 0.5µg/l for Al. The characteristic mass (m0) was calculated to be 389pg Si and 6.4pg Al. The Si and Al content in the solution samples were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.7mg/l and 0.1-0.25mg/l, respectively.

  17. Optical detection of potassium chloride vapor using collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Saarela, Jaakko; Toivonen, Juha

    2012-10-01

    A sensitive and selective optical technique to detect potassium chloride (KCl) vapor is introduced. The technique is based on the photofragmentation of KCl molecules, using a pulsed UV laser, and optical probing of the temporarily increased amount of potassium atoms with a near-infrared laser. The two laser beams are aligned to go through the sample volume along the same optical path. The performance of the technique is demonstrated by detecting KCl concentrations from 25 ppb to 30 ppm in a temperature-controlled cell.

  18. Flow Injection and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry - An Effective and Attractive Analytical Chemical Combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald; Nielsen, Steffen

    1998-01-01

    One of the advantages of the flow injection (FI) concept is that it is compatible with virtually all detection techniques. Being a versatile vehicle for enhancing the performance of the individual detection devices, the most spectacular results have possibly been obtained in conjunction with atomic...... is subjected to in FI from the point of injection/introduction to the point of detection, which in turn allows suitable on-line pretreatments to be effected. The present paper will - via a number of selected examples - point to some of the potentials at hand, encompassing the use of FI as a suitable vehicle...

  19. Rapid quantitative analysis of magnesium stearate in pharmaceutical powders and solid dosage forms by atomic absorption: method development and application in product manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisawa, Keiichi; Kaneko, Takashi; Sago, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Tomonobu

    2009-04-05

    The distribution of magnesium stearate (MgSt) in tablet granule has a significant impact on the compression process. A rapid quantitative method for evaluating magnesium stearate content by atomic absorption was established. The MgSt was extracted from the granule in 0.1 mol/L nitric acid and the resulting free magnesium ion quantitated by atomic absorption. The total analysis time was significantly shortened in comparison to the previously used sample ignition method. This newly established method was evaluated with several drug products and several types of blender. The analytical method was also applied to tablets with poor compression (rough tablet surface). The MgSt content in these rough surface tablets was significantly lower than in tablets with smooth surfaces from the same batch. From these results, this atomic absorption method is considered to be an accurate and useful method for evaluating MgSt distribution and can be applied to tablet manufacturing process validation.

  20. Design and evaluation of a continuous flow, integrated nebulizer-hydride generator for flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Murillo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the performance of a continuous flow hydride generator-nebulizer for flame atomic absorption spectrometry was carried out. Optimization of nebulizer gas flow rate, sample acid concentration, sample and tetrahydroborate uptake rates and reductant concentration, on the As and Se absorbance signals was carried out. A hydrogen-argon flame was used. An improvement of the analytical sensitivity relative to the conventional bead nebulizer used in flame AA was obtained (2 (As and 4.8 (Se µg L-1. Detection limits (3σb of 1 (As and 1.3 (Se µg L-1 were obtained. Accuracy of the method was checked by analyzing an oyster tissue reference material.

  1. Determination of Zinc Ions in Environmental Samples by Dispersive Liquid- Liquid Micro Extraction and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Arabi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work preconcentration of the Zn ions was investigated in water sample by Dispersive liquid- liquid micro extraction (DLLME using chloroform as an extraction solvent, methanol as a disperser solvent and 8-Hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. The determination of extracted ions was done by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The influence of various analytical parameters including pH, extraction and disperser solvent type and volume and concentration of the chelating agent on the extraction efficiency of analyses was investigated. After extraction, the enrichment factor was 26 and the detection limit of the method was 0.0033 µg l-1 and the relative standard deviations (R.S.D for five determinations of 1 ng/ml Zn were 7.41%. 

  2. Controlling multi-wave mixing signals via photonic band gap of electromagnetically induced absorption grating in atomic media

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Huaibin; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate dressed multi-wave mixing (MWM) and the reflection of the probe beam due to electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) grating can coexist in a five-level atomic ensemble. The reflection is derived from the photonic band gap (PBG) of EIA grating, which is much broader than the PBG of EIT grating. Therefore, EIA-type PBG can reflect more energy from probe than EIT-type PBG does, which can effectively affect the MWM signal. The EIA-type as well as EIT-type PBG can be controlled by multiple parameters including the frequency detunings, propagation angles and powers of the involved light fields. Also, the EIA-type PBG by considering both the linear and third-order nonlinear refractive indices is also investigated. The theoretical analysis agrees well with the experimental results. This investigation has potential applications in all-optical communication and information processing.

  3. Coprecipitation of trace amounts of silicon with aluminum hydroxide and the determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardeshir Shokrollahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple preconcentration method of silicon based on coprecipitation with aluminum hydroxide prior to its flame atomic absorption (FAAS determination was established. The recovery values of analyte ion was higher than 95%. The parameters including types of hydroxide ion source for precipitation, acid type for dissolution step, amount of aluminum ion as collector, pH, temperature, standing and centrifuge time, and sample volume were optimized for the quantitative recovery of the analyte. The influences of matrix ions were also examined. The relative standard deviation was found to be 3.2%. The limit of detection was calculated as (0.1 mg L-1. The preconcentration factor is 100 for (200 mL solution. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of silicon in some water and alloy samples.

  4. Membrane filtration of nickel(II) on cellulose acetate filters for its preconcentration, separation, and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soylak, Mustafa [Chemistry Dept., Faculty of Science Arts, University of Erciyes, Kayseri (Turkey); Unsal, Yunus Emre; Aydin, Ayse [Fen Bilimleri Enstitusu, University of Erciyes, Kayseri (Turkey); Kizil, Nebiye [Saglik Bilimleri Enstitusu, University of Erciyes, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2010-01-15

    An enrichment method for trace amounts of Ni(II), as 8-hydroxyquinoline chelates, has been established on a cellulose acetate membrane filter. Ni(II)-8-hydroxyquinoline chelates adsorbed on a membrane filter were eluted using 5 mL of 1 M HNO{sub 3}. The eluent nickel concentration was determined by a flame atomic absorption spectrometer. The influence of some analytical parameters, including pH, amount of reagent, sample volume, etc., on recovery was investigated. The interference of co-existent ions was studied. The nickel detection limit was 4.87 {mu}g/L. The method was applied to real samples for the determination of nickel(II) ions. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in geologic materials by atomic absorption spectrometry with tricaprylylmethylammonium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Interferences commonly encountered in the determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc at crustal abundance levels are effectively eliminated using a rapid, sensitive, organic extraction technique. A potassium chlorate-hydrochloric acid digestion solubilizes the metals not tightly bound in the silicate lattice of rocks, soils, and stream sediments. The six metals are selectively extracted into a 10% Aliquat 336-MIBK organic phase in the presence of ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. Metals in the organic extract are determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry to the 0.02-ppm level for silver, cadmium, copper, and zinc and to the 0.2-ppm level for bismuth and lead with a maximum relative standard deviation of 18.8% for known reference samples. An additional hydrofluoric acid digestion may be used to determine metals substituted in the silicate lattice.

  6. Determination of mercury in estuarine sediments by flow injection-cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Garcia, M.L.; Carlosena, A.; Lopez-Mahia, P.; Muniategui, S.; Prada, D. [University of La Coruna (Spain). Dept. Analytical Chemistry

    1999-01-01

    A flow injection-cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometric (CVAAS) method was developed for the determination of mercury at trace level in estuarine sediments using sodium tetra-hydro-borate (III) as reductant. The mercury was solubilized with nitric acid in closed vessels nd microwave oven heating. Instrumental and operational conditions (volume and concentration of reagents, reaction time, etc.) were optimized. The effect of several ions on the analytical signal was also studied; no interferences were recorded excepting for copper and nickel which caused a serious depressing effect. The detection limit obtained was 0.01 {mu}g g{sup -1}. The validation of the method was performed analyzing a certified reference sediment, BCR CRM 277 Estuarine Sediment. Good recovery (c.a. 98 %) and precision (< 3 %, RSD) were achieved. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of mercury in sediment samples from Ares-Betanzos Estuary (Galicia, NW Spain). (authors) 19 refs.

  7. Cloud point extraction thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peng; Zhang, Yunchang; Lv, Yi; Hou, Xiandeng

    2006-12-01

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) for separation/preconcentration and thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was proposed for the determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of analyte-entrapped surfactant micelles by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution and a Triton X-114 solution. When the temperature of the system was higher than the cloud point of Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium-PDC entered the surfactant-rich phase and thus separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection was 0.04 μg/L for cadmium with a sample volume of 10 mL. The analytical results of cadmium in water and urine samples agreed well with those by ICP-MS.

  8. Cloud point extraction-thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Peng [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Zhang Yunchang [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Lv Yi [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China); Hou Xiandeng [Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China) and College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)]. E-mail: houxd@scu.edu.cn

    2006-12-15

    A simple, low cost and highly sensitive method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) for separation/preconcentration and thermospray flame quartz furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was proposed for the determination of ultratrace cadmium in water and urine samples. The analytical procedure involved the formation of analyte-entrapped surfactant micelles by mixing the analyte solution with an ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) solution and a Triton X-114 solution. When the temperature of the system was higher than the cloud point of Triton X-114, the complex of cadmium-PDC entered the surfactant-rich phase and thus separation of the analyte from the matrix was achieved. Under optimal chemical and instrumental conditions, the limit of detection was 0.04 {mu}g/L for cadmium with a sample volume of 10 mL. The analytical results of cadmium in water and urine samples agreed well with those by ICP-MS.

  9. Cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cadmium and nickel in drinking and wastewater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeemullah; Kazi, Tasneem G; Shah, Faheem; Afridi, Hassan I; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Soomro, Abdul Sattar

    2013-01-01

    A simple method for the preconcentration of cadmium (Cd) and nickel (Ni) in drinking and wastewater samples was developed. Cloud point extraction has been used for the preconcentration of both metals, after formation of complexes with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and extraction with the surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114). Dilution of the surfactant-rich phase with acidified ethanol was performed after phase separation, and the Cd and Ni contents were measured by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The experimental variables, such as pH, amounts of reagents (8-HQ and Triton X-114), temperature, incubation time, and sample volume, were optimized. After optimization of the complexation and extraction conditions, enhancement factors of 80 and 61, with LOD values of 0.22 and 0.52 microg/L, were obtained for Cd and Ni, respectively. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily for the determination of both elements in drinking and wastewater samples.

  10. Development of a cloud point extraction and preconcentration method for Cd and Ni prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzoori, Jamshid L. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: manzoori@tabrizu.ac.ir; Karim-Nezhad, Ghasem [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2004-09-13

    In this work a new cloud point extraction (CPE) methodology was developed for the separation and preconcentration of cadmium and nickel. The analyte in the initial aqueous solution was complexed with dithizone and Triton X-114 was added as surfactant. After phase separation, based on the cloud point of the mixture, and dilution of the surfactant-rich phase with tetrahydrofuran (THF), the enriched analytes were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. After optimization of the complexation and extraction conditions and preconcentration of only 10 ml of sample in the presence of 0.05% Triton X-114, the enhancement factors of 52 and 39 and the detection limits of 0.31 {mu}g l{sup -1} and 1.2 {mu}g l{sup -1} were obtained for cadmium and nickel respectively. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily to the determination of cadmium and nickel in water samples.

  11. Speciation determination of chromium(III) and (VI) using preconcentration cloud point extraction with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, K. [Department of Environmental Sciences, S.V. University, Tirupati, 517502 A.P. (India); Kumar, K. Suresh; Prasad, B.; Suvardhan, K. [Department of Chemistry, S. V. University, Tirupati, 517502 A.P. (India); Lekkala, Ramesh Babu [Department of Environmental Sciences, S.V. University, Tirupati, 517502 A.P. (India); Janardhanam, K. [Department of Environmental Sciences, S.V. University, Tirupati, 517502 A.P. (India)], E-mail: Kandukurijanardhanam@gmail.com

    2008-02-11

    bis-[2-Hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde] thiourea was synthesized and preconcentration cloud point extraction (CPE) for speciation determination of chromium(III) and (VI) in various environmental samples with flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been developed. Chromium(III) complexes with bis-[2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde] thiourea is subsequently entrapped in the surfactant micelles. After complexation of chromium(III) with reagent, the analyte was quantitatively extracted to the surfactant-rich phase in the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 after centrifugation. The effect of pH, concentration of chelating agent, surfactant, equilibration temperature and time on CPE was studied. The relative standard deviation was 2.13% and the limits of detection were around 0.18 {mu}g L{sup -1}.

  12. The application of solid sorbents for the purification of aluminum contaminated chemicals used as modifiers in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulska, E; Pyrzyńska, K

    1996-06-01

    Various microcolumns with solid sorbents (ion exchange resins, functionalised cellulose sorbents, chelating resins) have been tested with respect to their ability for the purification of aluminum contaminated chemicals used as modifiers in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The purification of NaNO(3), Mg(NO(3))(2), K(2)SO(4) and (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) has been the most effective with an almost 100% efficiency, when Spheron-Oxine was used as chelating resin. The sorption of aluminum from KOH solution has been found to be very high (around 90%) for all investigated sorbents. However, the best results have been obtained with anion-exchange resins. It has been difficult to purify concentrated mineral acids (HCl, H(2)SO(4)). A retention of aluminum above 80% has been achieved only when Cellex P, Chelex 100 or Amberlite XAD-2 have been used.

  13. Evaluation of trace elements in chewing tobacco and snuff using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waheed, S.; Siddique, N.; Rahman, S. [Chemistry Div., Directorate of Science, Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Tech., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2009-07-01

    Nine samples of chewing tobacco, snuff, tobacco leaf and ash were analyzed using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). Almost all samples of chewing tobacco and snuff studied in this work contain substantial amounts of Mg, Mn, Na, K. V. Sc, Rb and Fe. Furthermore, varying amounts of Al, Ba, Ca, Ce, Co and Zn were also detected in all tobacco samples. Of the toxic elements which were determined using INAA. As, Sb and Hg were quantified in only few tobacco samples. However, other toxic elements, which were determined using AAS, such as Cu, Pb and Cd were detected in almost all samples of chewing tobacco and snuff. The concentration of majority of the detected elements is high in ash samples which imply that most elements in chewing tobacco and snuff may originate from the addition of ash. (orig.)

  14. Solid phase extraction for evaluation of occupational exposure to Pb (II) using XAD-4 sorbent prior to atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahtaheri, Seyed Jamaleddin; Khadem, Monireh; Golbabaei, Farideh; Rahimi-Froushan, Abbas; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz

    2007-01-01

    Lead is an important constituent widely used in different industrial processes. For evaluation of workers' exposure to trace toxic metal of Pb (II), solid-phase extraction (SPE) was optimized. SPE using mini columns filled with XAD-4 resin was developed with regard to sample pH, ligand concentration, loading flow rate, elution solvent, sample volume, elution volume, the amount of resins, and sample matrix interferences. Lead ions were retained on a solid sorbent and then eluted, followed by a simple determination of analytes with flame atomic absorption spectrometery. The obtained recoveries of metal ions were greater than 92%. This method was validated with 3 different pools of spiked urine samples; it showed a good reproducibility over 6 consecutive days as well as 6 within-day experiments. This optimized method can be considered successful in simplifying sample preparation for a trace residue analysis of lead in different matrices when evaluating occupational and environmental exposures is required.

  15. Extraction and analysis of lead in sweeteners by flow-injection Donnan dialysis with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, A; Allen, L B

    2001-10-01

    Flow-injection Donnan dialysis is demonstrated for the extraction of lead in sweeteners using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). For spiked concentrations in the low microgram per gram range, recoveries were greater than 90%, and the relative standard deviation was typically less than 10% for a 15-min dialysis procedure. The method detection limit is 350 ng/g. Donnan dialysis is shown to be successful for the extraction of lead in sucrose, corn syrup, and honey but limited in performance for molasses and artificial syrup. This paper also includes a comparison to other procedures for the determination of lead in sweeteners and presents options for realizing improved method performance with Donnan dialysis.

  16. Solid phase extraction of gold(III) on Amberlite XAD-2000 prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elci, Latif; Sahan, Derya; Basaran, Aydan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2007-09-01

    A solid phase extraction method for the determination of gold(III) at trace levels by flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS) was developed. The method was based on retention of gold as chloro complexes through the Amberlite XAD-2000. The effect of some analytical parameters including hydrochloric acid concentration, sample volume, sample and eluent flow rates, eluent volume, eluent concentration and interfering ions on the recovery of gold(III) was investigated. The retention of gold(III) from 1.5 mol l(-1) HCl solution and the recovery of gold with 0.07 mol l(-1) NH3 solution were quantitative (>or=95%). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was calculated as 3.2% (n = 10). The detection limit for gold was 2 microg l(-1). The accuracy was checked with the determination of gold spiked an artificial seawater and a pure copper samples.

  17. Determination of total arsenic content in water by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) using vapour generation assembly (VGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behari, Jai Raj; Prakash, Rajiv

    2006-03-01

    Analysis of arsenic in water is important in view of contamination of ground water with arsenic in some parts of the world including West Bengal in India and neighboring country Bangladesh. WHO has fixed the threshold for arsenic in drinking water to 10ppb (microg/l) level, hence the methodology for determination of arsenic is required to be sensitive at ppb level. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry with vapour generation assembly (AAS-VGA) is well known technique for the trace analysis of arsenic. However, total arsenic analysis [As(III)+As(V)] is very crucial and it requires reduction of As(V) to As(III) for correct analysis. As(III) is reduced to AsH3 vapours and finally to free As atoms, which are responsible for absorption signal in AAS. To accomplish this the vapour generation assembly attached to AAS has acid channel filled with 10 M HCl and the reduction channel with sodium borohydride. Further sample can be reduced either before aspiration for analysis, using potassium iodide (KI) or the sample can be introduced in the instrument directly and KI can be added in the reduction channel along with the sodium borohydride. The present work shows that samples prepared in 3 M HCl can be reduced with KI for 30 min before introduction in the instrument. Alternatively samples can be prepared in 6 M HCl and directly aspirated in AAS using KI in VGA reduction channel. The latter methodology is more useful when the sample size is large and time cycle is difficult to maintain. It is observed that the acid concentration of the sample in both the situations plays an important role. Further reduction in acid concentration and analysis time is achieved for the arsenic analysis by using modified method. Analysis in both the methods is sensitive at ppb level.

  18. High-contrast sub-Doppler absorption spikes in a hot atomic vapor cell exposed to a dual-frequency laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Hafiz, Moustafa; Brazhnikov, Denis; Coget, Grégoire; Taichenachev, Alexei; Yudin, Valeriy; de Clercq, Emeric; Boudot, Rodolphe

    2017-07-01

    The saturated absorption technique is an elegant method widely used in atomic and molecular physics for high-resolution spectroscopy, laser frequency standards and metrology purposes. We have recently discovered that a saturated absorption scheme with a dual-frequency laser can lead to a significant sign reversal of the usual Doppler-free dip, yielding a deep enhanced-absorption spike. In this paper, we report detailed experimental investigations of this phenomenon, together with a full in-depth theoretical description. It is shown that several physical effects can support or oppose the formation of the high-contrast central spike in the absorption profile. The physical conditions for which all these effects act constructively and result in very bright Doppler-free resonances are revealed. Apart from their theoretical interest, results obtained in this manuscript are of great interest for laser spectroscopy and laser frequency stabilization purposes, with applications in laser cooling, matter-wave sensors, atomic clocks or quantum optics.

  19. Detection of copper in water using on-line plasma-excited atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porento, Mika; Sutinen, Veijo; Julku, Timo; Oikari, Risto

    2011-06-01

    A measurement method and apparatus was developed to measure continuously toxic metal compounds in industrial water samples. The method was demonstrated by using copper as a sample metal. Water was injected into the sample line and subsequently into a nitrogen plasma jet, in which the samples comprising the metal compound dissolved in water were decomposed. The transmitted monochromatic light was detected and the absorbance caused by copper atoms was measured. The absorbance and metal concentration were used to calculate sensitivity and detection limits for the studied metal. The sensitivity, limit of detection, and quantification for copper were 0.45 ± 0.02, 0.25 ± 0.01, and 0.85 ± 0.04 ppm, respectively.

  20. Unusual calibration curves observed for iron using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welz, Bernhard, E-mail: w.bernardo@terra.com.b [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CMPq-INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador-BA (Brazil); Santos, Lisia M.G. dos [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saude-INCQS-Fiocruz, 21040-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Araujo, Rennan G.O. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianopolis-SC (Brazil); Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, 49100-000 Sao Cristovao-SE (Brazil); Jacob, Silvana do C. [Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saude-INCQS-Fiocruz, 21040-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Vale, Maria Goreti R. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do CMPq-INCT de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-115 Salvador-BA (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre-RS (Brazil); Okruss, Michael; Becker-Ross, Helmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaften-ISAS-Department Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The simultaneous determination of cadmium and iron in plant and soil samples has been investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The primary cadmium resonance line at 228.802 nm and an adjacent secondary iron line at 228.726 nm, which is within the spectral interval covered by the charge-coupled device (CCD) array detector, have been used for the investigations. Due to the very high iron content in most of the soil samples the possibility has been investigated to reduce the sensitivity and extend the working range by using side pixels for measurement at the line wings instead of the line core. It has been found that the calibration curves measured at all the analytically useful pixels of this line consisted of two linear parts with distinctly different slopes. This effect has been independent of the positioning of the wavelength, i.e., if the Cd line or the Fe line was in the center of the CCD array. The most likely explanation for this unusual behavior is a significant difference between the instrument width DELTAlambda{sub Instr} and the absorption line width DELTAlambda{sub Abs}, which is quite pronounced in the case of Fe. Using both parts of the calibration curves and simultaneous measurement at the line center and at the wings made it possible to extend the working range for the iron determination to more than three orders of magnitude.

  1. The response of a neutral atom to a strong laser field probed by transient absorption near the ionisation threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, E R; Austin, D R; Diveki, Z; Hutchinson, S E E; Siegel, T; Ruberti, M; Averbukh, V; Miseikis, L; Strüber, C; Chipperfield, L; Marangos, J P

    2015-01-01

    We present transient absorption spectra of an extreme ultraviolet attosecond pulse train in helium dressed by an 800 nm laser field with intensity ranging from $2\\times10^{12}$ W/cm$^2$ to $2\\times10^{14}$ W/cm$^2$. The energy range probed spans 16-42 eV, straddling the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). By changing the relative polarisation of the dressing field with respect to the attosecond pulse train polarisation we observe a large change in the modulation of the absorption reflecting the vectorial response to the dressing field. With parallel polarized dressing and probing fields, we observe significant modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. With perpendicularly polarized dressing and probing fields, the modulations of the harmonics above the ionisation threshold are significantly suppressed. A full-dimensionality solution of the single-atom time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation obtained using the recently developed ab-initio time-dependent B-spline...

  2. Determination of total arsenic in fish by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry: method validation, traceability and uncertainty evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, W. C.; Elishian, C.; Ketrin, R.

    2017-03-01

    Fish containing arsenic compound is one of the important indicators of arsenic contamination in water monitoring. The high level of arsenic in fish is due to absorption through food chain and accumulated in their habitat. Hydride generation (HG) coupled with atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS) detection is one of the most popular techniques employed for arsenic determination in a variety of matrices including fish. This study aimed to develop a method for the determination of total arsenic in fish by HG-AAS. The method for sample preparation from American of Analytical Chemistry (AOAC) Method 999.10-2005 was adopted for acid digestion using microwave digestion system and AOAC Method 986.15 - 2005 for dry ashing. The method was developed and validated using Certified Reference Material DORM 3 Fish Protein for trace metals for ensuring the accuracy and the traceability of the results. The sources of uncertainty of the method were also evaluated. By using the method, it was found that the total arsenic concentration in the fish was 45.6 ± 1.22 mg.Kg-1 with a coverage factor of equal to 2 at 95% of confidence level. Evaluation of uncertainty was highly influenced by the calibration curve. This result was also traceable to International Standard System through analysis of Certified Reference Material DORM 3 with 97.5% of recovery. In summary, it showed that method of preparation and HG-AAS technique for total arsenic determination in fish were valid and reliable.

  3. Production mechanism of atomic nitrogen in atmospheric pressure pulsed corona discharge measured using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Ryo [Department of Advanced Energy, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 227-8568 (Japan); Oda, Tetsuji [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    To study the production mechanism of atomic nitrogen, the temporal profile and spatial distribution of atomic nitrogen are measured in atmospheric pressure pulsed positive corona discharge using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. The absolute atomic nitrogen density in the streamer filaments is estimated from decay rate of atomic nitrogen in N{sub 2} discharge. The results indicate that the absolute atomic nitrogen density is approximately constant against discharge energy. When the discharge voltage is 21.5 kV, production yield of atomic nitrogen produced by an N{sub 2} discharge pulse is estimated to be 2.9 - 9.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} atoms and the energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production is estimated to be about 1.8 - 6.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} atoms/J. The energy efficiency of atomic nitrogen production in N{sub 2} discharge is constant against the discharge energy, while that in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge increases with discharge energy. In the N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} discharge, two-step process of N{sub 2} dissociation plays significant role for atomic nitrogen production.

  4. Determination of Pb(Ⅱ) and Cu(Ⅱ) by Electrothermal Atomic Absorption Spectrometry after Preconcentration by a Schiff Base Adsorbed on Surfactant Coated Alumina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SABER TEHRANI Mohammad; RASTEGAR Faramarz; PARCHEHBAF Ayob; KHATAMIAN Masoomeh

    2006-01-01

    1,2-Bis(salicylidenamino)ethane loaded onto sodium dodecyl sulfate-coated alumina was used as a new chelating sorbent for the preconcentration of traces of Pb(Ⅱ) and Cu(Ⅱ) prior to atomic absorption spectrometric determination. The influence of pH, flow rates of sample and eluent solutions, and foreign ions on the recovery of Pb(Ⅱ)by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The data of limit of detection (3σ) for Pb(Ⅱ) and Cu(Ⅱ)posed method was successfully applied to determination of lead and copper in different water samples.

  5. Determination of vanadium in urine by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using hot injection and preconcentration into the graphite tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Kelly G.; Nobrega, Joaquim A. [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Nogueira, Ana Rita A. [Embrapa Pecuaria Sudeste, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: anarita@cppse.embrapa.br; Gomes Neto, Jose A. [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2004-10-01

    In this work it was developed a procedure for the determination of vanadium in urine samples by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using successive injections for preconcentration into a preheated graphite tube. Three 60 {mu}L volumes were sequentially injected into the atomizer preheated to a temperature of 110 deg C. Drying and pyrolysis steps were carried out after each injection. A chemical modifier, barium difluoride (100 mg L{sup -1}), and a surfactant, Triton X-100 (0.3% v v{sup -1}), were added to the urine sample. When injecting into a hot graphite tube, the sample flow-rate was 0.5 {mu} s{sup -1}. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.54 and 1.82 without preconcentration, and 0.11 and 0.37 {mu}g L{sup -1} with preconcentration, respectively. The accuracy of the procedure was evaluated by an addition-recovery experiment employing urine samples. Recoveries varied from 96.0 to 103% for additions ranging from 0.8 to 3.5 {mu}g L{sup -1} V. The developed procedure allows the determination of vanadium in urine without any sample pretreatment and with minimal dilution of the sample. (author)

  6. Spatial transport of atomic coherence in electromagnetically induced absorption with a paraffin-coated Rb vapor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Moon, Han Seb

    2014-06-30

    We report the spatial transport of spontaneously transferred atomic coherence (STAC) in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA), which resulted from moving atoms with the STAC of the 5S(1/2) (F = 2)-5P(3/2) (F' = 3) transition of (87)Rb in a paraffin-coated vapor cell. In our experiment, two channels were spatially separate; the writing channel (WC) generated STAC in the EIA configuration, and the reading channel (RC) retrieved the optical field from the spatially transported STAC. Transported between the spatially separated positions, the fast light pulse of EIA in the WC and the delayed light pulse in the RC were observed. When the laser direction of the RC was counter-propagated in the direction of the WC, we observed direction reversal of the transported light pulse in the EIA medium. Furthermore, the delay time, the magnitude, and the width of the spatially transported light pulse were investigated with respect to the distance between the two channels.

  7. Determination of total tin in geological materials by electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometry using a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Meier, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    An electrothermal atomic-absorption spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of total tin in geological materials, with use of a tungsten-impregnated graphite furnace. The sample is decomposed by fusion with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in 10% hydrochloric acid. Tin is then extracted into trioctylphosphine oxide-methyl isobutyl ketone prior to atomization. Impregnation of the furnace with a sodium tungstate solution increases the sensitivity of the determination and improves the precision of the results. The limits of determination are 0.5-20 ppm of tin in the sample. Higher tin values can be determined by dilution of the extract. Replicate analyses of eighteen geological reference samples with diverse matrices gave relative standard deviations ranging from 2.0 to 10.8% with an average of 4.6%. Average tin values for reference samples were in general agreement with, but more precise than, those reported by others. Apparent recoveries of tin added to various samples ranged from 95 to 111% with an average of 102%. ?? 1984.

  8. Determination of lead in wine and rum samples by flow injection-hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçi, Latif; Arslan, Zikri; Tyson, Julian F

    2009-03-15

    A method for direct determination of lead in wine and rum samples was developed, using a flow injection hydride generation system coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer with flame-quartz atomizer (FI-HG-AAS). Lead hyride (PbH(4)) was generated using potassium ferricyanide (K(3)Fe(CN)(6)), as oxidant and sodium tetrahydroborate (NaBH(4)) as reductant. Samples were acidified to 0.40% (v/v) HCl for wine and to 0.30% (v/v) HCl for rum, which were then mixed on-line with 3% (m/v) K(3)Fe(CN)(6) solution in 0.03% (v/v) HCl prior to reaction with 0.2% (m/v) alkaline NaBH(4) solution. Lead contents of a rum and two different red wine samples were determined by FI-HG-AAS agreed with those obtained by ICP-MS. The analytical figures of merit of method developed were determined. The calibration curve was linear up to 8.0 microg L(-1) Pb with a regression coefficient of 0.998. The relative error was lower than 4.58%. The relative standard deviation (n=7) was better than 12%. A detection limit of 0.16 microg L(-1) was achieved for a sample volume of 170 microL.

  9. Dosage du mercure dans le gaz naturel par absorption atomique sans flammes Mercury Titration in Natural Gas by Flameless Atomic Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Villa F.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article présente la méthode mise au point par l'Institut Français du Pétrole pour déterminer par absorption atomique sans flamme, les traces de mercure métallique contenu dans un gaz naturel. La méthode d'analyse nécessite une extraction du mercure soit sous forme d'ion mercurique en faisant passer le gaz dans une solution oxydante, soit sous forme d'amalgame avec de l'or ou de l'argent. Le premier mode opératoire s'applique aux échantillons dont la concentration en mercure est supérieure à I ttg/Nm3, le second pour des concentrations inférieures à 5 pg/Nm3. Les seuils de détection sont respectivement 10 ng (en solution et 0,3 ng (en amalgame. La répétabilité pour 100 ng de mercure (en amalgame est de ± 7% pour une probabilité de.95 %. En conclusion, dans un échantillon de gaz naturel, compte tenu du volume des prélèvements effectués, il est possible de détecter des concentrations de l'ordre du nanogramme de mercure par mètre cube de gaz. This article describes the method developed by IFP using flameless atomic absorption to determine metallic mercury traces in a natural gas. The analyst method requires a mercury extraction either in the form of mercuric ions by making the gas pass through an oxidizing solution or in the form of an amalgam with gold or silver. The former operating method applies ta samples having a mercury concentration greater than I !ag/Nm3, and the latter for concentrations smaller than 5 (-Lg/Nm3. Detection thresholds are respectively 10 ng (in solution and 0.3 ng (in amalgam. The repeatability for 100 ng of mercury (in amalgam is ± 7 % with a probability of 95%. To conclude, in a sample of natural gas, considering the volume of the samples taken, it is possible ta detect concentrations in the vicinity of one nanogrom of mercury per cubic meter of gas.

  10. Absorption Measurement of Zn Atom Density during ICP-assisted Magnetron Sputter-deposition of Al-doped ZnO Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the outlines of hollow cathode (HCD) lamp absorption system for the density measurement of sputtered metal atoms in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted sputter-deposition process of Al doped ZnO thin films. As a result, absorbance of about 6.5% was obtained, which corresponds to the Zn atom density of 1.5×1012 cm-3.

  11. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Tatiane De A.; Borges, Daniel L. G.; da Veiga, Márcia A. M. S.; Curtius, Adilson J.

    2005-06-01

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L-1 HNO3 was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 °C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 °C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3σB) of 6 and 40 ng g-1, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H2O2 and HNO3. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  12. Cloud point extraction for the determination of cadmium and lead in biological samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranhao, Tatiane de A. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borges, Daniel L.G. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: daniel@qmc.ufsc.br; Veiga, Marcia A.M.S. da [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05513-970, CP 26077, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Curtius, Adilson J. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2005-06-30

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of Cd and Pb from digested biological samples. After complexation with O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in hydrochloric acid medium, the analytes are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in the non-ionic surfactant octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114) after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). The adopted concentrations for DDTP, Triton X-114 and hydrochloric acid were all optimized. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures were optimized using the extracts and pyrolysis temperatures of 700 deg. C for both elements and atomization temperatures of 1400 and 1600 deg. C for cadmium and lead, respectively, were used without adding any modifier, which shows that considerable analyte stabilization is provided by the medium itself. A more detailed investigation was carried out to determine which components of the extract were responsible for the high thermal stability achieved and it revealed that the amount of DDTP added and the phosphorus content of the digested samples contributed significantly to this phenomenon. Detection limits (3{sigma} {sub B}) of 6 and 40 ng g{sup -1}, along with enrichment factors of 129 and 18 for Cd and Pb, respectively, were achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of five certified biological reference materials after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a mixture of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3}. Comparison with certified values was performed for accuracy evaluation, resulting in good agreement according to the t-test for a 95% confidence level. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of the studied analytes in complex matrices was, therefore, demonstrated.

  13. Direct determination of Pb in raw milk by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) with electrothermal atomization sampling from slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Tatiane Milão; Augusto Peres, Jayme; Lurdes Felsner, Maria; Cristiane Justi, Karin

    2017-08-15

    Milk is an important food in the human diet due to its physico-chemical composition; therefore, it is necessary to monitor contamination by toxic metals such as Pb. Milk sample slurries were prepared using Triton X-100 and nitric acid for direct analysis of Pb using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry - GF AAS. After dilution of the slurries, 10.00µl were directly introduced into the pyrolytic graphite tube without use of a chemical modifier, which acts as an advantage considering this type of matrix. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.64 and 2.14µgl(-1), respectively. The figures of merit studied showed that the proposed methodology without pretreatment of the raw milk sample and using external standard calibration is suitable. The methodology was applied in milk samples from the Guarapuava region, in Paraná State (Brazil) and Pb concentrations ranged from 2.12 to 37.36µgl(-1). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cosmological evolution of atomic gas and implications for 21 cm HI absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy disks are shown to contain a significant population of atomic clouds of 100pc linear size which are self-opaque in the 21cm transition. These objects have HI column densities as high as 10^23 and contribute to a global opacity correction factor of 1.34+/-0.05 that applies to the integrated 21cm emission to obtain a total HI mass estimate. Opacity-corrected images of the nearest external galaxies have been used to form a robust z=0 distribution function of HI, f(N_HI,X,z=0), the probability of encountering a specific HI column density per unit comoving distance. This is contrasted with previously published determinations of f(N_HI,X) at z=1 and 3. A systematic decline of moderate column density (1820.3) has also declined systematically over this redshift interval by a similar amount, while the cosmological mass density in such systems has declined by only a factor of two to its current, opacity corrected value of Omega_HI^DLA(z=0) = 5.4 +/- 0.9x10^-4. We utilize the tight, but strongly non-linear depend...

  15. Influence of Helium Atoms Absorption on the Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umaev, S. M.; Levchenko, A. A.; Kolesnikov, N. N.; Filatov, S. V.

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the emission properties of charge sources based on carbon nanotubes prepared by arc discharge deposition of nanotubes onto a flat copper substrate (Borisenko et al. in Instrum Exp Tech 57(6):755, 2014; Low Temp Phys 41(7):567, 2015). The charge sources were submerged into superfluid helium at temperature T=1.3 K. The collector fixed above the charge source at a distance of 0.3 mm was connected to an electrometer. The current of charges was measured by the electrometer when a high voltage was applied to the charge source. In the originally prepared source, the emission of charges (electrons) on the level of 10^{-10}A is observed at a negative voltage above U=80 V and increases with increasing voltage. If the source of charge was kept in liquid helium for 15 h, the current-voltage characteristic changed significantly. The current of charges on the same level of 10^{-10} A was registered at a voltage of U=150 V. Extraction of gases from the source placed in a vacuum chamber at room temperature for 48 h leads to the complete recovery of the emission properties. One can assume that the degradation of the emission properties of the sources is associated with the adsorption of helium atoms by carbon nanotubes at low temperatures. We did not observe any degradation of the emission properties of the charge sources in the case of positive charges injection into superfluid helium.

  16. Mapping atomic and diffuse interstellar band absorption across the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Mandy; Sarre, Peter J; Beckman, John E

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) trace warm neutral and weakly-ionized diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Here we present a dedicated, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic study of two of the strongest DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 \\AA, in optical spectra of 666 early-type stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, along with measurements of the atomic Na\\,{\\sc i}\\,D and Ca\\,{\\sc ii}\\,K lines. The resulting maps show for the first time the distribution of DIB carriers across large swathes of galaxies, as well as the foreground Milky Way ISM. We confirm the association of the 5797 \\AA\\ DIB with neutral gas, and the 5780 \\AA\\ DIB with more translucent gas, generally tracing the star-forming regions within the Magellanic Clouds. Likewise, the Na\\,{\\sc i}\\,D line traces the denser ISM whereas the Ca\\,{\\sc ii}\\,K line traces the more diffuse, warmer gas. The Ca\\,{\\sc ii}\\,K line has an additional component at $\\sim200$--220 km s$^{-1}$ seen towards both Magellanic Clouds; this may be associated with a pan-Magellanic ...

  17. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  18. Determination of serum aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between Zeeman and continuum background correction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Pamela C.; Parsons, Patrick J.

    2007-03-01

    Excessive exposure to aluminum (Al) can produce serious health consequences in people with impaired renal function, especially those undergoing hemodialysis. Al can accumulate in the brain and in bone, causing dialysis-related encephalopathy and renal osteodystrophy. Thus, dialysis patients are routinely monitored for Al overload, through measurement of their serum Al. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is widely used for serum Al determination. Here, we assess the analytical performances of three ETAAS instruments, equipped with different background correction systems and heating arrangements, for the determination of serum Al. Specifically, we compare (1) a Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 3110 AAS, equipped with a longitudinally (end) heated graphite atomizer (HGA) and continuum-source (deuterium) background correction, with (2) a PE Model 4100ZL AAS equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and longitudinal Zeeman background correction, and (3) a PE Model Z5100 AAS equipped with a HGA and transverse Zeeman background correction. We were able to transfer the method for serum Al previously established for the Z5100 and 4100ZL instruments to the 3110, with only minor modifications. As with the Zeeman instruments, matrix-matched calibration was not required for the 3110 and, thus, aqueous calibration standards were used. However, the 309.3-nm line was chosen for analysis on the 3110 due to failure of the continuum background correction system at the 396.2-nm line. A small, seemingly insignificant overcorrection error was observed in the background channel on the 3110 instrument at the 309.3-nm line. On the 4100ZL, signal oscillation was observed in the atomization profile. The sensitivity, or characteristic mass ( m0), for Al at the 309.3-nm line on the 3110 AAS was found to be 12.1 ± 0.6 pg, compared to 16.1 ± 0.7 pg for the Z5100, and 23.3 ± 1.3 pg for the 4100ZL at the 396.2-nm line. However, the instrumental detection limits (3

  19. Determination of serum aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: A comparison between Zeeman and continuum background correction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, Pamela C. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Parsons, Patrick J. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Lead Poisoning/Trace Elements Laboratory, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, P.O. Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States)], E-mail: patrick.parsons@wadsworth.org

    2007-03-15

    Excessive exposure to aluminum (Al) can produce serious health consequences in people with impaired renal function, especially those undergoing hemodialysis. Al can accumulate in the brain and in bone, causing dialysis-related encephalopathy and renal osteodystrophy. Thus, dialysis patients are routinely monitored for Al overload, through measurement of their serum Al. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is widely used for serum Al determination. Here, we assess the analytical performances of three ETAAS instruments, equipped with different background correction systems and heating arrangements, for the determination of serum Al. Specifically, we compare (1) a Perkin Elmer (PE) Model 3110 AAS, equipped with a longitudinally (end) heated graphite atomizer (HGA) and continuum-source (deuterium) background correction, with (2) a PE Model 4100ZL AAS equipped with a transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) and longitudinal Zeeman background correction, and (3) a PE Model Z5100 AAS equipped with a HGA and transverse Zeeman background correction. We were able to transfer the method for serum Al previously established for the Z5100 and 4100ZL instruments to the 3110, with only minor modifications. As with the Zeeman instruments, matrix-matched calibration was not required for the 3110 and, thus, aqueous calibration standards were used. However, the 309.3-nm line was chosen for analysis on the 3110 due to failure of the continuum background correction system at the 396.2-nm line. A small, seemingly insignificant overcorrection error was observed in the background channel on the 3110 instrument at the 309.3-nm line. On the 4100ZL, signal oscillation was observed in the atomization profile. The sensitivity, or characteristic mass (m{sub 0}), for Al at the 309.3-nm line on the 3110 AAS was found to be 12.1 {+-} 0.6 pg, compared to 16.1 {+-} 0.7 pg for the Z5100, and 23.3 {+-} 1.3 pg for the 4100ZL at the 396.2-nm line. However, the instrumental detection

  20. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  1. International comparison of Cd content in a quality control material of Navajuelas (Tagelus dombeii) determined by anodic stripping voltammetry, atomic absorption spectrometry and neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queirolo, F. (Universidad Catolica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile). Dept. of Chemistry Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physikalische Chemie Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry and Electrochemistry); Ostapczuk, P. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physikalische Chemie); Valenta, P.; Stegen, S. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physikalische Chemie Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry and Electrochemistry); Marin, C.; Vinagre, F.; Sanchez, A. (Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry and Electrochemistry)

    1991-05-01

    The determination of Cd was performed by neutron activation analysis (NAA), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) with flame or in the electrothermal mode and anodic stripping voltammetry in the differential pulse mode (DPASV) and the square wave mode (SWASV). (orig./EF).

  2. Determination of Pb in Biological Samples by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry: An Exercise in Common Interferences and Fundamental Practices in Trace Element Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudich, Thomas M.; Herrmann, Jennifer K.; Fietkau, Ronald; Edwards, Grant A.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to ascertain trace-level Pb in samples of bovine liver or muscle by applying graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAAS). The primary objective is to display the effects of physical and spectral intrusions in determining trace elements, and project the usual methods employed to minimize accuracy errors…

  3. An expression for the atomic fluorescence and thermal-emission intensity under conditions of near saturation and arbitrary self-absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J.D.; Alkemade, C.T.J.

    1975-01-01

    An expression for the effect of self-absorption on the fluorescence and thermal emission intensities is derived by taking into account stimulated emission. A simple, idealized case is considered, consisting of a two level atomic system, in a flame, homogeneous with respect to temperature and composi

  4. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  5. Determination of Fe Content of Some Food Items by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (FAAS): A Guided-Inquiry Learning Experience in Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakayode, Sayo O.; King, Angela G.; Yakubu, Mamudu; Mohammed, Abdul K.; Pollard, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a guided-inquiry (GI) hands-on determination of Fe in food samples including plantains, spinach, lima beans, oatmeal, Frosted Flakes cereal (generic), tilapia fish, and chicken using flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The utility of the GI experiment, which is part of an instrumental analysis laboratory course,…

  6. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of pyrolytically coated graphite platforms submitted to simulated electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Frine [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Benzo, Zully [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Quintal, Manuelita [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Garaboto, Angel [Laboratorio de Quimica Analitica, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Albornoz, Alberto [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela); Brito, Joaquin L. [Laboratorio de Fisicoquimica de Superficies, Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, IVIC, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela)]. E-mail: joabrito@ivic.ve

    2006-10-15

    The present work is part of an ongoing project aiming to a better understanding of the mechanisms of atomization on graphite furnace platforms used for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). It reports the study of unused pyrolytic graphite coated platforms of commercial origin, as well as platforms thermally or thermo-chemically treated under simulated ETAAS analysis conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to study the elements present at the surfaces of the platforms. New, unused platforms showed the presence of molybdenum, of unknown origin, in concentrations up to 1 at.%. Species in two different oxidations states (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 2+}) were detected by analyzing the Mo 3d spectral region with high resolution XPS. The analysis of the C 1s region demonstrated the presence of several signals, one of these at 283.3 eV related to the presence of Mo carbide. The O 1s region showed also various peaks, including a signal that can be attributed to the presence of MoO{sub 3}. Some carbon and oxygen signals were consistent with the presence of C=O and C-O- (probably C-OH) groups on the platforms surfaces. Upon thermal treatment up to 2900 deg. C, the intensity of the Mo signal decreased, but peaks due to Mo oxides (Mo{sup 6+} and Mo{sup 5+}) and carbide (Mo{sup 2+}) were still apparent. Thermo-chemical treatment with 3 vol.% HCl solutions and heating up to 2900 deg. C resulted in further diminution of the Mo signal, with complete disappearance of Mo carbide species. Depth profiling of unused platforms by Ar{sup +} ion etching at increasing time periods demonstrated that, upon removal of several layers of carbonaceous material, the Mo signal disappears suggesting that this contamination is present only at the surface of the pyrolytic graphite platform.

  7. UV-photochemical vapor generation of selenium for atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization and 75Se radiotracer efficiency study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybínová, Marcela; Musil, Stanislav; Červený, Václav; Vobecký, Miloslav; Rychlovský, Petr

    2016-09-01

    Volatile selenium compounds were generated UV-photochemically in the continuous flow mode using four UV-photoreactors differing in the material of the reaction coil; Teflon tubing and quartz tubes with various inner diameters and wall thicknesses were tested. Atomic absorption spectrometry with an externally heated quartz furnace atomizer was employed as the detector. The relevant experimental generation parameters were optimized and the basic analytical characteristics were determined. Using formic acid as the photochemical agent, limits of detection achieved for selenium were in the range 46-102 ng L- 1 in dependence on the type of UV-photoreactor employed. When nitric acid was also added to the photochemical agent, the limits of detection were reduced to 27-44 ng L- 1. The repeatability did not exceed 2.4% (5 μg L- 1 Se(IV), n = 10). Experiments with 75Se radiotracer have been performed for the first time to quantify the efficiency of UV-photochemical vapor generation (UV-PVG) of selenium. The highest efficiency of 67 ± 1% was obtained for a UV-photoreactor containing a quartz reaction coil (2.0 mm i.d., 4.0 mm o.d.). The generation efficiency of 61 ± 1% was obtained for a Teflon reaction coil (1.0 mm i.d., 1.4 mm o.d.). Mapping of the radiotracer distribution in the individual parts of the apparatus did not reveal substantial transport losses of the analyte in the UV-PVG system.

  8. Determination of platinum traces contamination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after preconcentration by cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappuy, M. [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France); Caudron, E., E-mail: eric.caudron@eps.aphp.fr [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France); Groupe de Chimie Analytique de Paris-Sud, EA 4041, IFR 141, School of Pharmacy, Univ Paris-Sud, 92296 Chatenay-Malabry (France); Bellanger, A. [Department of Pharmacy, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital (Paris Public Hospital Authority), 47 boulevard de l' hopital, 75013 Paris (France); Pradeau, D. [Analytical Development Laboratory, Pharmaceutical Establishment of Paris Hospitals, 7 rue du Fer a Moulin, 75005 Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    A simple and sensitive method is described for the determination of platinum surface contamination originating from cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. Following extraction from swabs and preconcentration with the cloud point extraction (CPE) method, detection was by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). After desorption of platinum compounds from the swab, CPE involved on preconcentration of platinum in aqueous solution with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as chelating agent and Triton X-114 as extraction medium. DDTC is not only a chelating agent, but may also be a good candidate for the inactivation of platinum compounds. DDTC is recommended by the Word Health Organization (WHO) for the destruction of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The main factors affecting CPE efficiency, pH of the sample solution, concentrations of DDTC and Triton X-114, equilibration temperature and incubation time, were evaluated in order to enhance sensitivity of the method. The desorption of platinum compounds from the swab was investigated in parallel. Since platinum is bound to DDTC, it must exchange with copper in order to enhance platinum atomizing by GFAAS. A preconcentration factor of 29 was obtained for 10 mL of a platinum solution at 10 {mu}g mL{sup -1}. In optimal conditions, the limit of detection was 0.2 ng mL{sup -1}, corresponding to 2.0 ng of platinum metal on the swab. Absorbance was linear between 0.7 and 15 ng mL{sup -1}. The proposed method was applied for the determination of surface contamination by platinum compounds with correct results.

  9. Determination of aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy in lubricating oils emulsified in a sequential injection analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguera, José L; Burguera, Marcela; Antón, Raquel E; Salager, Jean-Louis; Arandia, María A; Rondón, Carlos; Carrero, Pablo; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; Brunetto, Rosario; Gallignani, Máximo

    2005-12-15

    The sequential injection (SIA) technique was applied for the on-line preparation of an "oil in water" microemulsion and for the determination of aluminum in new and used lubricating oils by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) with Zeeman-effect background correction. Respectively, 1.0, 0.5 and 1.0ml of surfactants mixture, sample and co-surfactant (sec-butanol) solutions were sequentially aspirated to a holding coil. The sonication and repetitive change of the flowing direction improved the stability of the different emulsion types (oil in water, water in oil and microemulsion). The emulsified zone was pumped to fill the sampling arm of the spectrometer with a sub-sample of 200mul. Then, 10mul of this sample solution were introduced by means of air displacement in the graphite tube atomizer. This sequence was timed to synchronize with the previous introduction of 15mug of Mg(NO(3))(2) (in a 10mul) by the spectrometer autosampler. The entire SIA system was controlled by a computer, independent of the spectrometer. The furnace program was carried out by employing a heating cycle in four steps: drying (two steps at 110 and 130 degrees C), pyrolisis (at 1500 degrees C), atomization (at 2400 degrees C) and cleaning (at 2400 degrees C). The calibration graph was linear from 7.7 to 120mugAll(-1). The characteristic mass (mo) was 33.2pg/0.0044s and the detection limit was 2.3mugAll(-1). The relative standard (RSD) of the method, evaluated by replicate analyses of different lubricating oil samples varied in all cases between 1.5 and 1.7%, and the recovery values found in the analysis of spiked samples ranged from 97.2 to 100.4%. The agreement between the observed and reference values obtained from two NIST Standard Certified Materials was good. The method was simple and satisfactory for determining aluminum in new and used lubricating oils.

  10. Trace metal characterization and speciation in geothermal effluent by multiple scanning anodic stripping voltammetry and atomic absorption analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, B.R.

    1979-05-25

    Recent studies have shown geothermal power plants to have a significant environmental impact on the ground water of the area. The heavy metals arsenic and mercury are special problems, as both are concentrated by flora and fauna exposed to the effluent waters. Because the toxicity of these and other metallic pollutants present in geothermal effluent depends on the chemical form, or speciation, of the particular metal, any serious study of the environmental impact of a geothermal development should include studies of trace metal speciation, in addition to trace metal concentration. This proposal details a method for determining metal speciation in dilute waters. The method is based on ion-exchange and backed by atomic absorption spectrometry and multiple scanning anodic stripping voltammetry. Special laboratory studies will be performed on mercury, arsenic and selenium speciation in synthetic geothermal water. The method will be applied to three known geothermal areas in Washington and Oregon, with emphasis on the speciation of mercury, arsenic and selenium in these waters. The computer controlled electrochemical instrumentation was built and tested. Using this instrumentation, a new experimental procedure was developed to determine the chemical form (speciation) of metal ions in very dilute solutions (ng/ml). This method was tested on model systems including Pb, Cd, and As with C1/sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ and glycine ligands. Finally, the speciation of lead in a geothermal water was examined and the PbC1/sup +/ complex was observed and quantified.

  11. Investigation of the levels of some element in edible oil samples produced in Turkey by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendil, Durali, E-mail: dmendil@gop.edu.tr [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Uluoezlue, Ozguer Dogan; Tuezen, Mustafa [Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Chemistry Department, 60250 Tokat (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Erciyes University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-06-15

    The element contents (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, Co, Cd, Na, K, Ca and Mg) in edible oils (olive oil, hazelnut oil, sunflower oil, margarine, butter and corn oil) from Turkey were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave digestion. The concentrations of trace element in the samples were found to be 291.0-52.0, 1.64-0.04, 3.08-1.03, 0.71-0.05, 0.03-0.01, 1.30-0.50, 84.0-0.90, 50.1-1.30, 174.2-20.8 and 20.8-0.60 {mu}g/g for iron, manganese, zinc, copper, lead, cobalt, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium, respectively. Cadmium was found to be 4.57-0.09 {mu}g/kg. The high heavy metal and minerals accumulation levels in the samples were found in olive oil for Cu, Pb, Co, margarine for Fe, K, corn oil for Zn, Mn, butter for Na, Mg, sunflower oil for Ca and hazelnut oil for Cd, respectively.

  12. [Study on adsorption behavior of crosslinked polyarylonitrile for copper, lead, cadmium and zinc ions by atomic absorption spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawket, Abliz; Peng, Yang; Wang, Ji-De; Ismayil, Nurulla

    2010-04-01

    The crosslinked polymer polyacrylonitrile was synthesized by suspension polymerization using acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. It has been used as adsorbent of some toxic heavy metals in environmental waters. Its adsorption for metals and the factors which affect the adsorption capacity were studied by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The experimental results showed that under the optimal adsorption conditions, the pH of adsorbate solution was 5-6, static adsorption time was 1.5-2 h, and adsorption procedure was carried out at room temperature, polyacrylonitrile as adsorbent has high adsorption capacity (mg x g(-1)) for Cu2+, Pb2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+, which can reach 26.6, 45.2, 39.7 and 32.5 separately. Adsorption rate (%) was 83.6, 87.1, 85.3 and 86.7 respectively during the 1.5-2 h static adsorption time. It will be more than five-hour static adsorption time before adsorption rate reaches more than 96%. Using 0.10 mol x L(-1) chloride acid as the best desorption solvent to desorb the adsorbates, the recovery of them reached 95%. At the same time the adsorption mechanism of polymer was studied.

  13. Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of cobalt, copper, lead and nickel traces in aragonite following flotation and extraction separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendelovska, D; Pavlovska, G; Cundeva, K; Stafilov, T

    2001-03-30

    A method of determination of Co, Cu, Pb and Ni in nanogram quantities from aragonite is presented. Flotation and extraction of Co, Cu, Pb and Ni is suggested as methods for elimination matrix interferences of calcium. The method of flotation is performed by iron(III) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Fe(HMDTC)(3), as a colloid precipitate collector. The liquid-liquid extraction of Co, Cu, Pb and Ni is carried out by sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, NaDDTC, as complexing reagent into methylisobutyl ketone, MIBK. The electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is used for determination of analytes. The detection limits of ETAAS followed by flotation are: 7.8 ng.g(-1) for Co, 17.1 ng.g(-1) for Cu, 7.2 ng.g(-1) for Pb and 9.0 mug.g(-1) for Ni. The detection limits of ETAAS followed by extraction are found to be: 12.0 ng.g(-1) for Co, 51.0 ng.g(-1) for Cu, 24.0 ng.g(-1) for Pb and 21.0 ng.g(-1) for Ni.

  14. The determination of wear metals in used lubricating oils by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using sulphanilic acid as ashing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanem, E J; Lori, J A; Thomas, S A

    1997-11-01

    A simple and reliable ashing procedure is proposed for the preparation of used lubricating oil samples for the determination of calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, chromium and nickel by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Sulphanilic acid was added to oil samples and the mixture coked and the coke ashed at 550 degrees C. The solutions of the ash were analysed by flame AAS for the metals. The release of calcium, zinc, iron and chromium was improved by the addition of sulphanilic acid to samples. The relative standard deviations of metal concentration results in the initial oil samples were 1.5% for Ca (1500 mg l(-1) level), 0.3% for Mg (100 mg l(-1) level), 3.1% for Zn (1500 mg l(-1) level), 0.7% for Fe (500 mg l(-1) level), 0.02% for Cr (50 mg l(-1) level) and 0.002% for Ni (10 mg l(-1) level). The optimum sample size for efficient metal release was 20 g while the optimum sulphanilic acid to oil ratio was 0.05 g per gram of oil for Zn and Cr and 0.10 g for Ca and Fe. Results obtained by this procedure were highly reproducible and comparable with those obtained for the same samples using standard procedures.

  15. A method optimization study for atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of total zinc in insulin using direct aspiration technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Ata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, reliable and relative fast method has been developed for the determination of total zinc in insulin by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. This designed study was used to optimize the procedures for the existing methods. Spectrograms of both standard and sample solutions of zinc were recorded by measuring the absorbance at 213.9 nm for determination of total zinc. System suitability parameters were evaluated and were found to be within the limits. Linearity was evaluated through graphical representation of concentration versus absorbance. Repeatability (intra-day and intermediate precision (inter-day were assessed by analyzing working standard solutions. Accuracy and robustness were experimented from the standard procedures. The percentage recovery of zinc was found to be 99.8%, relative standard deviation RSD 1.13%, linearity of determination LOD 0.0032 μg/mL, and limit of quantization LOQ 0.0120 μg/mL. This developed and proposed method was then validated in terms of accuracy, precision, linearity and robustness which can be successfully used for the quantization of zinc in insulin.

  16. Cloud point extraction for the preconcentration of silver and palladium in real samples and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Yazdandoust, Saeed; Yazdandoust, Mozhdeh [Department of Chemistry, Payame Noor University (PNU), Shiraz (Iran)

    2010-03-15

    A cloud point extraction procedure is presented for the preconcentration and simultaneous determination of Ag{sup +} and Pd{sup 2+} in various samples. After complexation with 2-((2-((1H-benzo[d]imidazole-2-yl)methoxy)phenoxy)methyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol (BIMPI), which was used as a new chelating agent, analyte ions were quantitatively extracted to a phase rich in Triton X-114 following centrifugation, and determination was carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Under the optimum experimental conditions (i. e., pH = 7.0, 15.0.10{sup -5} mol/L BIMPI and 0.036% (w/v) Triton X-114), calibration graphs were linear in the range of 28.0-430.0 {mu}g/L and 57.0-720.0 {mu}g/L with detection limits of 10.0 and 25.0 {mu}g/L for Ag{sup +} and Pd{sup 2+}, respectively. The enrichment factors were 35.0 and 28.0 for Ag{sup +} and Pd{sup 2+}, respectively. The method has been successfully applied to evaluate these metals in some real samples, including waste water, soil and hydrogenation catalyst samples. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Analysis of trace element in intervertebral disc by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry techniques in degenerative disc disease in the Polish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Nowakowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Although trace elements are regarded crucial and their content has been determined in number of tissue there are only few papers addressing this problem in intervertebral disc in humans. Most of the trace elements are important substrates of enzymes influencing metabolism and senescence process. Others are markers of environmental pollution. Therefore the aim of the research was to analyzed of the trace element content in the intervertebral disc, which may be a vital argument recognizing the background of degenerative changes to be the effect of the environment or metabolic factors. Materials and methods. Material consist of 18 intervertebral disc from 15 patients, acquired in surgical procedure of due to the degenerative disease with Atomic Absorption Spectrometry content of Al, Cd, Co, Pb, Cu, Ni, Mo, Mg, Zn was evaluated. Results. Only 4 of the trace elements were detected in all samples. The correlation analysis showed significant positive age correlation with Al and negative in case of Co. Among elements significant positive correlation was observed between Al/Pb, Co/Mo, Al/Mg, Al/Zn Pb/Zn and Mg/Zn. Negative correlation was observed in Al/Co, Cd/Mg, Co/Mg, Mo/Mg, Co/Zn and Mo/Zn. Conclusions. This study is the first to our knowledge that profiles the elements in intervertebral disc in patients with degenerative changes. We have confirmed significant differences between the trace element contents in intervertebral disc and other tissue. It can be ground for further investigation.

  18. Atomic absorption spectroscopic, conductometric and colorimetric methods for determination of fluoroquinolone antibiotics using ammonium reineckate ion-pair complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, Gamal H.; Amin, Alaa S.

    2004-03-01

    Three accurate, rapid and simple atomic absorption spectrometric, conductometric and colorimetric methods were developed for the determination of norfloxacin (NRF), ciprofloxacin (CIP), ofloxacin (OFL) and enrofloxacin (ENF). The proposed methods depend upon the reaction of ammonium reineckate with the studied drugs to form stable precipitate of ion-pair complexes, which was dissolved in acetone. The pink coloured complexes were determined either by AAS or colorimetrically at λmax 525 nm directly using the dissolved complex. Using conductometric titration, the studied drugs could be evaluated in 50% (v/v) acetone in the range 5.0-65, 4.0-48, 5.0-56 and 6.0-72 μg ml -1 of NRF, CPF, OFL and ENF, respectively. The optimizations of various experimental conditions were described. The results obtained showed good recoveries of 99.15±1.15, 99.30±1.40, 99.60±1.50, and 99.00±1.25% with relative standard deviations of 0.81, 1.06, 0.97, and 0.69% for NRF, CPF, OFL, and ENF, respectively. Applications of the proposed methods to representative pharmaceutical formulations are successfully presented.

  19. The use of a sequential extraction procedure for heavy metal analysis of house dusts by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Huseyin; Dundar, Mustafa Sahin; Doganci, Secil; Celik, Muhammed; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    In general, dust is considered as house or street dust. Indoor dust, as a contamination source, has been studied for many years. In this work, the original Community Bureau of Reference of the European Commission (BCR) three-stage sequential extraction procedure was applied to the fractionation of Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn in 20 house dust samples from five different areas of Sakarya, Turkey. Acetic acid, hydroxylammonium chloride, and hydrogen peroxide plus ammonium acetate were used for the first, second, and third steps of the BCR method, respectively. The extracts were analyzed for the studied heavy metals using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Validation of the results was performed by using a standard reference material (BCR 701 Sediment) to certify the experimental results obtained and to evaluate the reliability of the method used. The elemental loadings typically increased in magnitude according to the area order: Izmit Caddesi>Ankara Caddesi >Erenler>Karaman>Korucuk. The results were in agreement with values reported in the literature.

  20. Lead concentrations and isotope ratios in street dust determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageotte, S M; Day, J P

    1998-01-01

    A major source of environmental lead, particularly in urban areas, has been from the combustion of leaded petrol. Street dust has previously been used to assess urban lead contamination, and the dust itself can also be a potential source of lead ingestion, particularly to children. The progressive reduction of lead in petrol, in recent years, would be expected to have been reflected in a reduction of lead in urban dust. We have tested this hypothesis by repeating an earlier survey of Manchester street dust and carrying out a comparable survey in Paris. Samples were collected from streets and parks, lead was extracted by digestion with concentrated nitric acid and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead isotope ratios were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Results for Manchester show that lead concentrations have fallen by about 40% (street dust averages, 941 micrograms g-1 (ppm) in 1975 down to 569 ppm in 1997). In Paris, the lead levels in street dust are much higher and significant differences were observed between types of street (not seen in Manchester). Additionally, lead levels in parks were much lower than in Manchester. Samples collected under the Eiffel Tower had very high concentrations and lead isotope ratios showed that this was unlikely to be fallout from motor vehicles but could be due to the paint used on the tower. Isotope ratios measurements also revealed that lead additives used in France and the UK come from different sources.

  1. Non-patchy strategy for inter-atomic distances from Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gu; Li, Guifang; LI, Xianya; Liang, Yi; Feng, Zhechuan

    2017-01-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) has been one of the few structural probes available for crystalline, non-crystalline and even highly disordered specimens. However, the data analysis involves a patchy and tinkering process, including back-and-forth fitting and filtering, leading to ambiguous answers sometimes. Here we try to resolve this long standing problem, to extract the inter-atomic distances from the experimental data by a single step minimization, in order to replace the tedious and tinkering process. The new strategy is built firmly by the mathematical logic, and made straightforward and undeniable. The finding demonstrates that it is possible to break off from the traditional patchy model fitting, and to remove the logical confusion of a priori prediction of the structure to be matched with experimental data, making it a much more powerful technique than the existing methods. The new method is expected to benefit EXAFS users covering all disciplines. Also, it is anticipated that the current work to be the motivation and inspiration to the further efforts. PMID:28181529

  2. On-line preconcentration of copper as its pyrocatechol violet complex on Chromosorb 105 for flame atomic absorption spectrometric determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buke, Berrin [Chemistry Department, Science and Arts Faculty, Pamukkale University, 20020 Denizli (Turkey); Divrikli, Umit [Chemistry Department, Science and Arts Faculty, Pamukkale University, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)], E-mail: udivrikli@pamukkale.edu.tr; Soylak, Mustafa [Chemistry Department, Science and Arts Faculty, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Elci, Latif [Chemistry Department, Science and Arts Faculty, Pamukkale University, 20020 Denizli (Turkey)

    2009-04-30

    An on-line solid phase extraction method for the preconcentration and determination of Cu(II) by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been described. It is based on the adsorption of copper(II) ion onto a home made mini column of Chromosorb 105 resin loaded with pyrocatechol violet at the pH range of 5.0-8.0, then eluted with 1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3}. Several parameters, such as pH of the sample solution, amount of Chromosorb 105 resin, volume of sample and eluent, type of eluent, flow rates of sample and eluent, governing the efficiency and throughput of the method were evaluated. The concentration of the copper ion detected after preconcentration was in agreement with the added amount. At optimized conditions, for 15 min of preconcentration time (30 mL of sample volume), the system achieved a detection limit of 0.02 {mu}g L{sup -1}, with relative standard deviation 1.1% at 0.03 {mu}g mL{sup -1} copper. The present method was found to be applicable to the preconcentration of Cu(II) in natural water samples.

  3. Separation and enrichment of gold(III) from environmental samples prior to its flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senturk, Hasan Basri; Gundogdu, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Bulut, Volkan Numan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 28049 Giresun (Turkey); Duran, Celal [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)], E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr; Elci, Latif [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Pamukkale University, 20020 Denizli (Turkey); Tufekci, Mehmet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2007-10-22

    A simple and accurate method was developed for separation and enrichment of trace levels of gold in environmental samples. The method is based on the adsorption of Au(III)-diethyldithiocarbamate complex on Amberlite XAD-2000 resin prior to the analysis of gold by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after elution with 1 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} in acetone. Some parameters including nitric acid concentration, eluent type, matrix ions, sample volume, sample flow rate and adsorption capacity were investigated on the recovery of gold(III). The recovery values for gold(III) and detection limit of gold were greater than 95% and 16.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. The preconcentration factor was 200. The relative standard deviation of the method was <6%. The adsorption capacity of the resin was 12.3 mg g{sup -1}. The validation of the presented procedure was checked by the analysis of CRM-SA-C Sandy Soil certified reference material. The presented procedure was applied to the determination of gold in some environmental samples.

  4. Determination of total arsenic in coal and wood using oxygen flask combustion method followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Wenhua; Furuzono, Takuya; Nakajima, Tsunenori; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Ohki, Akira

    2010-04-15

    A simple and sensitive procedure for the determination of total arsenic in coal and wood was conducted by use of oxygen flask combustion (OFC) followed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). The effect of various items (composition of absorbent, standing time between the combustion and filtration, particle size and mass of sample) was investigated. Under the optimized conditions of the OFC method, nine certified reference materials were analyzed, and the values of arsenic concentration obtained by this method were in good accordance with the certified values. The limit of detection (LOD) and relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method were 0.29 microg g(-1) and less than 8%, respectively. In addition, eight kinds of coals and four chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood wastes were analyzed by the present method, and the data were compared to those from the microwave-acid digestion (MW-AD) method. The determination of arsenic in solid samples was discussed in terms of applicable scope and concentration range of arsenic.

  5. Non-patchy strategy for inter-atomic distances from Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gu; Li, Guifang; Li, Xianya; Liang, Yi; Feng, Zhechuan

    2017-02-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) has been one of the few structural probes available for crystalline, non-crystalline and even highly disordered specimens. However, the data analysis involves a patchy and tinkering process, including back-and-forth fitting and filtering, leading to ambiguous answers sometimes. Here we try to resolve this long standing problem, to extract the inter-atomic distances from the experimental data by a single step minimization, in order to replace the tedious and tinkering process. The new strategy is built firmly by the mathematical logic, and made straightforward and undeniable. The finding demonstrates that it is possible to break off from the traditional patchy model fitting, and to remove the logical confusion of a priori prediction of the structure to be matched with experimental data, making it a much more powerful technique than the existing methods. The new method is expected to benefit EXAFS users covering all disciplines. Also, it is anticipated that the current work to be the motivation and inspiration to the further efforts.

  6. Determination of molybdenum in plants by vortex-assisted emulsification solidified floating organic drop microextraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oviedo, Jenny A.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A., E-mail: djan@terra.com.br

    2013-08-01

    A fast and sensitive procedure for extraction and preconcentration of molybdenum in plant samples based on solidified floating organic drop microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and discrete nebulization was developed. 8-Hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) was used as complexing agent. The experimental conditions established were: 0.5% m v{sup −1} of 8-HQ, 60 μL of 1-undecanol as the extractant phase, 2 min vortex extraction time, centrifugation for 2 min at 2000 rpm, 10 min into an ice bath and discrete nebulization by introducing 200 μL of solution. The calibration curve was linear from 0.02 to 4.0 mg L{sup −1} with a limit of detection of 4.9 μg L{sup −1} and an enhancement factor of 67. The relative standard deviations for ten replicate measurements of 0.05 and 1.0 mg L{sup −1} Mo were 6.0 and 14.5%, respectively. The developed procedure was applied for determining molybdenum in corn samples and accuracy was proved using certified reference materials. - Highlights: ► Molybdenum was determined in plants by flame AAS. ► Flame AAS sensitivity was improved using microextraction and discrete nebulization. ► The developed procedure can be easily implemented in routine analysis. ► Green chemistry principles are followed.

  7. Sequential injection ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for thallium preconcentration and determination with flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthemidis, Aristidis N.; Ioannou, Kallirroy-Ioanna G. [Aristotle University, Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2012-08-15

    A novel, automatic on-line sequential injection dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (SI-DLLME) method, based on 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([Hmim][PF{sub 6}]) ionic liquid as an extractant solvent was developed and demonstrated for trace thallium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The ionic liquid was on-line fully dispersed into the aqueous solution in a continuous flow format while the TlBr{sub 4} {sup -} complex was easily migrated into the fine droplets of the extractant due to the huge contact area of them with the aqueous phase. Furthermore, the extractant was simply retained onto the surface of polyurethane foam packed into a microcolumn. No specific conditions like low temperature are required for extractant isolation. All analytical parameters of the proposed method were investigated and optimized. For 15 mL of sample solution, an enhancement factor of 290, a detection limit of 0.86 {mu}g L{sup -1} and a precision (RSD) of 2.7% at 20.0 {mu}g L{sup -1} Tl(I) concentration level, was obtained. The developed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference materials while good recoveries from environmental and biological samples proved that present method was competitive in practical applications. (orig.)

  8. Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction of Bismuth in Various Samples and Determination by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teslima Daşbaşı

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for the determination of bismuth in various samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry is described. In this method, crystal violet was used as counter positive ion for BiCl4- complex ion, chloroform as extraction solvent, and ethanol as disperser solvent. The analytical parameters that may affect the extraction efficiency like acidity of sample, type and amount of extraction and disperser solvents, amount of ligand, and extraction time were studied in detail. The effect of interfering ions on the analyte recovery was also investigated. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 0.040–1.00 mg L−1 with detection limit of 4.0 μg L−1 (n=13. The precision as relative standard deviation was 3% (n=11, 0.20 mg L−1 and the enrichment factor was 74. The developed method was applied successfully for the determination of bismuth in various water, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic samples and the certified reference material (TMDA-64 lake water.

  9. Cloud point extraction for the determination of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Shokrollahi, A; Ahmadi, F; Rajabi, H R; Soylak, M

    2008-02-11

    A cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in various samples. After complexation with methyl-2-pyridylketone oxime (MPKO) in basic medium, analyte ions are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in Triton X-114 following centrifugation. 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO(3) nitric acid in methanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The adopted concentrations for MPKO, Triton X-114 and HNO(3), bath temperature, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. Detection limits (3 SDb/m) of 1.6, 2.1 and 1.9 ng mL(-1) for Cu(2+), Co(2+) and Ni(2+) along with preconcentration factors of 30 and for these ions and enrichment factor of 65, 58 and 67 for Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Co(2+), respectively. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of analytes in complex matrices was demonstrated. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of biological, natural and wastewater, soil and blood samples.

  10. Evaluation of arsenic, cobalt, copper and manganese in biological Samples of Steel mill workers by electrothermal atomic absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, H I; Kazi, T G; Kazi, N G; Jamali, M K; Arain, M B; Sirajuddin; Kandhro, G A; Shah, A Q; Baig, J A

    2009-02-01

    The determination of trace and toxic elements in biological samples (blood, urine and scalp hair samples) of human beings is an important clinical test. The aim of our present study was to determine the concentration of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), cobalt (Co) and manganese (Mn), in biological samples of male production workers (PW) and quality control workers (QW) of steel mill, with aged 25-55 years, to assess the possible influence of environmental exposure. For comparison purpose, the same biological samples of unexposed healthy males of same age group were collected as control subjects. The determination of all elements in biological samples was carried out by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, prior to microwave assisted acid digestion. The accuracy of the As, Cu, Co and Mn measurements was tested by simultaneously analyzing certified reference materials (CRMs) and for comparative purposes conventional wet acid digestion method was used on the same CRMs. No significant differences were observed between the analytical results and the certified values, using both methods (paired t-test at P > 0.05). The results indicate that concentrations of As, Cu, Co and Mn in all three biological samples of the exposed workers (QW and PW) were significantly higher than those of the controls. The possible correlation of these elements with the etiology of different physiological disorders is discussed. The results were also demonstrated the need of attention for improvements in workplace, ventilation and industrial hygiene practices.

  11. Preconcentration procedure using cloud point extraction in the presence of electrolyte for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luciana Melo; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes a micelle-mediated phase separation in the presence of electrolyte as a preconcentration method for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Cadmium was complexed with ammonium O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in an acidic medium (0.32 mol l- 1 HCl) using Triton X-114 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume (about 20 μl) of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. The chemical variables that affect the cloud point extraction, such as complexing time (0 20 min), Triton X114 concentration (0.043 0.87% w/v) and complexing agent concentration (0.01 0.1 mol l- 1), were investigated. The cloud point is formed in the presence of NaCl at room temperature (25 °C), and the electrolyte concentration (0.5 5% w/v) was also investigated. Under optimized conditions, only 8 ml of sample was used in the presence of 0.043% w/v Triton X-114 and 1% (w/v) NaCl. This method permitted limits of detection and quantification of 0.9 μg l- 1 and 2.9 μg l- 1 Cd, respectively, and a linear calibration range from 3 to 400 μg l- 1 Cd. The proposed method was applied to Cd determination in physiological solutions (containing 0.9% (w/v) of NaCl), mineral water, lake water and cigarette samples (tobacco).

  12. Cloud point extraction for the determination of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in environmental samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaedi, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Yasouj, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: m_ghaedi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Shokrollahi, A.; Ahmadi, F.; Rajabi, H.R. [Chemistry Department, University of Yasouj, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soylak, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Erciyes, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-02-11

    A cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of copper, nickel and cobalt ions in various samples. After complexation with methyl-2-pyridylketone oxime (MPKO) in basic medium, analyte ions are quantitatively extracted to the phase rich in Triton X-114 following centrifugation. 1.0 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} nitric acid in methanol was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The adopted concentrations for MPKO, Triton X-114 and HNO{sub 3}, bath temperature, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. Detection limits (3 SDb/m) of 1.6, 2.1 and 1.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Cu{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+} along with preconcentration factors of 30 and for these ions and enrichment factor of 65, 58 and 67 for Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}, respectively. The high efficiency of cloud point extraction to carry out the determination of analytes in complex matrices was demonstrated. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of biological, natural and wastewater, soil and blood samples.

  13. Determination of ultra-trace aluminum in human albumin by cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Mei, E-mail: sunmei@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences on Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, No. 96, Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu Qianghua [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2010-04-15

    A cloud point extraction (CPE) method for the preconcentration of ultra-trace aluminum in human albumin prior to its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) had been developed in this paper. The CPE method was based on the complex of Al(III) with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and Triton X-114 was used as non-ionic surfactant. The main factors affecting cloud point extraction efficiency, such as pH of solution, concentration and kind of complexing agent, concentration of non-ionic surfactant, equilibration temperature and time, were investigated in detail. An enrichment factor of 34.8 was obtained for the preconcentration of Al(III) with 10 mL solution. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of Al(III) was 0.06 ng mL{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (n = 7) of sample was 3.6%, values of recovery of aluminum were changed from 92.3% to 94.7% for three samples. This method is simple, accurate, sensitive and can be applied to the determination of ultra-trace aluminum in human albumin.

  14. Cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry combination for copper(II) ion in environmental and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokrollahi, Ardeshir [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: ashokrollahi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Ghaedi, Mehrorang [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: m_ghaedi@mail.yu.ac.ir; Hossaini, Omid; Khanjari, Narges [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soylak, Mustafa [Chemistry Department, University of Erciyes, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2008-12-30

    A cloud point extraction procedure was presented for the preconcentration of copper(II) ion in various samples. After complexation by 4-(phenyl diazenyl) benzene-1,3-diamine (PDBDM) (chrysoidine), copper(II) ions were quantitatively recovered in Triton X-114 after centrifugation. 0.5 ml of methanol acidified with 1.0 mol L{sup -1} HNO{sub 3} was added to the surfactant-rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The influence of analytical parameters including ligand, Triton X-114 and HNO{sub 3} concentrations, bath temperature, heating time, centrifuge rate and time were optimized. The effect of the matrix ions on the recovery of copper(II) ions was investigated. The detection limit (3S.D.{sub b}/m, n = 10) of 0.6 ng mL{sup -1} along with preconcentration factor of 30 and enrichment factor of 41.1 with R.S.D. of 1.0% for Cu was achieved. The proposed procedure was applied to the analysis of various environmental and biological samples.

  15. Cloud point extraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry method for preconcentration and determination of trace cadmium in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Jinyan; Jiao, Yang; Zhao, Jiao; Meng, Lifen; Yang, Yaling

    2014-01-01

    A method based on cloud point extraction (CPE) separation/preconcentration of trace cadmium (Cd) as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry has been developed. Cadmium reacted with 8-hydroxyquinoline to form hydrophobic chelates, which were extracted into the micelles of nonionic surfactant oligoethylene glycol monoalkyl ether (Genapol X-080) in an alkaline medium. Octanol was used to depress the cloud point of Genapol X-080 in the extraction process. The chemical variables that affect the CPE, such as pH of complexation reaction, amount of chelating agent, Genapol X-080 and octanol were evaluated and optimized. Under optimized conditions, linearity was obeyed in the range of 10-500 μg/L, with the correlation coefficient of 0.9993. For 5 mL of sample solution, the enhancement factor was about 20. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of the method were 0.21 and 0.63 μg/L, respectively. The relative standard deviations (n = 6) was 3.2% for a solution containing 100 μg/L of Cd. The accuracy of the preconcentration system was evaluated by recovery measurements on spiked water samples. Recoveries of spiked samples varied in the range of 94.1-103.8%.

  16. Determination of trace nickel in water samples by cloud point extraction preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Zhimei [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Department of Chemistry and Biology, Huainan Normal University, Huainan 232001 (China); Liang Pei [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)]. E-mail: liangpei@mail.ccnu.edu.cn; Ding Qiong [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Cao Jing [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2006-09-21

    A new method based on the cloud point extraction (CPE) preconcentration and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection was proposed for the determination of trace nickel in water samples. When the micelle solution temperature is higher than the cloud point of surfactant p-octylpolyethyleneglycolphenyether (Triton X-100), the complex of Ni{sup 2+} with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP) could enter surfactant-rich phase and be concentrated, then determined by GFAAS. The main factors affecting the cloud point extraction were investigated in detail. An enrichment factor of 27 was obtained for the preconcentration of Ni{sup 2+} with 10 mL solution. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of Ni{sup 2+} is 0.12 ng mL{sup -1} with R.S.D. of 4.3% (n = 10, c = 100 ng mL{sup -1}). The proposed method was applied to determination of trace nickel in water samples with satisfactory results.

  17. Preconcentration and determination of zinc and lead ions by a combination of cloud point extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavallali, H. [Chemistry Department, Payamenore University, Shiraz (Iran); Shokrollahi, A.; Zahedi, M. [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj (Iran); Niknam, K. [Chemistry Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr (Iran); Soylak, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Erciyes, Kayseri (Turkey); Ghaedi, M.

    2009-04-15

    The phase-separation phenomenon of non-ionic surfactants occurring in aqueous solution was used for the extraction of lead(II) and zinc(II). After complexation with 3-[(4-bromophenyl) (1-H-inden-3-yl)methyl]-1 H-indene (BPIMI), the analytes were quantitatively extracted to a phase rich in Triton X-114 after centrifugation. Methanol acidified with 1 mol/L HNO{sub 3} was added to the surfactant rich phase prior to its analysis by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The concentration of bis((1H-benzo [d] imidazol-2yl)ethyl)sulfane, Triton X-114, pH and amount of surfactant were all optimized. Detection limits (3 SDb/m) of 2.5 and 1.6 ng/mL for Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} along with preconcentration factors of 30 and an enrichment factor of 32 and 48 for Pb{sup 2+}and Zn {sup 2+} ions were obtained, respectively. The proposed cloud point extraction was been successfully applied for the determination of these ions in real samples with complicated matrices such as food and soil samples, with high efficiency. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, Gurusharan; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure atomic oxygen number density [O] in an air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ). A novel technique based on photolysis of O2 is used to calibrate the TALIF system ensuring the same species (O) is probed during calibration and measurement. As a result, laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power region without affecting calibration reliability as any high intensity saturation effects will be identical for calibration and experiment. Higher laser intensity gives stronger TALIF signals helping overcome weak TALIF signals often experienced at atmospheric pressure due to collisional quenching. O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting [O] are both achieved within the same laser pulse. The photolysis [O] is spatially non-uniform and time varying. To allow valid comparison with [O] in a plasma, spatial and temporal correction factors are required. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I0(t), and wavelength allows correction factors to be found using a rate equation model. The air flow into the jet was fixed and the RF power coupled into the system varied. The resulting [O] was found to increase with RF power.

  19. FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION DETERMINATION OF COPPER IN CEREALS FOOD SAMPLES WITH THE PRECONCENTRATION OF POTASSIUM TETRATITANATE WHISKER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A simple and reliable method has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of copper ions in cereals food for subsequent measurement by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The Cu2+ ions are adsorbed selectively and quantitatively during the passage. The retained copper ions were desorbed from the potassium tetratitanate whisker with 10.0mL of 2mol/L sulphuric acid solutions as eluent and were determined by FAAS. The linear range was 0.05μg/mL~0.20μg/mL in the original solution with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The detection limit of the proposed method is 2.1ng/mL in the original solution (3σ, n=9). Determination of copper in standard ions showed that the proposed method has good accuracy (recovery was more than 95%). The method was successfully applied for recovery and determination of copper in cereals food samples.

  20. FLAME ATOMIC ABSORPTION DETERMINATION OF COPPER IN CEREALS FOOD SAMPLES WITH THE PRECONCENTRATION OF POTASSIUM TETRATITANATE WHISKER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wanzhen; ZHANG Xinghua; YAN Yongsheng; LIU Aiqin; JING Junjie

    2007-01-01

    A simple and reliable method has been developed for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of copper ions in cereals food for subsequent measurement by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The Cu2+ ions are adsorbed selectively and quantitatively during the passage. The retained copper ions were desorbed from the potassium tetratitanate whisker with 10.0mL of 2mol/L sulphuric acid solutions as eluent and were determined by FAAS. The linear range was 0.05μg/mL~0.20μg/mL in the original solution with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The detection limit of the proposed method is 2.1ng/mL in the original solution (3σ, n=9). Determination of copper in standard ions showed that the proposed method has good accuracy (recovery was more than 95%). The method was successfully applied for recovery and determination of copper in cereals food samples.

  1. Selective speciation of inorganic antimony on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel column and its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendil, Durali; Bardak, Hilmi; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-03-30

    A speciation system for antimony (III) and antimony (V) ions that based on solid phase extraction on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel has been established. Antimony was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). Analytical conditions including pH, sample volume, etc., were studied for the quantitative recoveries of Sb (III) and Sb (V). Matrix effects on the recovery were also investigated. The recovery values and detection limit for antimony (III) at optimal conditions were found as >95% and 0.020 μg L(-1), respectively. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 50. The capacity of adsorption for the tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel was 7.9 mg g(-1). The validation was checked by analysis of NIST SRM 1573a Tomato laves and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure was successfully applied to speciation of antimony in tap water, mineral water and spring water samples. Total antimony was determined in refined salt, unrefined salt, black tea, rice, tuna fish and soil samples after microwave digestion and presented enrichment method combination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of heavy metal contents by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in some medicinal plants from Pakistani and Malaysian origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Sobia; Najam, Rahila; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Abbas, Syed Atif

    2015-09-01

    This study depicts a profile of existence of heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, Hg, Mn, Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg) in some important herbal plants like (H. Integrifolia, D. regia, R. communis, C. equisetifolia, N. oleander, T. populnea, M. elengi, H. schizopetalus, P. pterocarpum) from Pakistan and an antidiabetic Malaysian herbal drug product containing (Punica granatum L. (Mast) Hook, Momordica charantia L., Tamarindus indica L., Lawsonia inermis L.) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metals in these herbal plants and Malaysian product were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppm of Cu, 0.00-0.02 ppm of Ni, 0.02-0.29 ppm of Zn, 0.00-0.04 ppm of Cd, 0.00-1.33 ppm of Hg, 0.00-0.54 ppm of Mn, 0.22-3.16 ppm of Fe, 0.00-9.17 ppm of Na, 3.27-15.63 ppm of Ca and 1.85-2.03 ppm of Mg. All the metals under study were within the prescribed limits except mercury. Out of 10 medicinal plants/product under study 07 were beyond the limit of mercury permissible limits. Purpose of this study is to determine heavy metals contents in selected herbal plants and Malaysian product, also to highlight the health concerns related to the presence of toxic levels of heavy metals.

  3. Determination of platinum and palladium in road dust after their separation on immobilized fungus by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Sylwia; Godlewska-Żyłkiewicz, Beata

    2011-07-01

    A flow solid phase extraction procedure based on biosorption of Pt(IV) and Pd(II) on Aspergillus sp. immobilized on cellulose resin Cellex-T was proposed for the separation and preconcentration of Pt and Pd before their determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The analytical conditions including sample pH, eluent type, flow rates of sample and eluent solutions were examined. The analytes were selectively retained on the biosorbent in acidic medium (pH 1) and subsequently eluted from the column with 1 mL of thiourea solution (0.25 mol L - 1 thiourea in 0.3 mol L - 1 HCl). The reproducibility of the procedure was below 5%. The limit of detection of the method was 0.020 ng mL - 1 for Pt and 0.012 ng mL - 1 for Pd. The method validation was performed by analysis of certified reference materials BCR-723 (tunnel dust) and SARM-76 (platinum ore). The developed separation procedure was applied to the determination of Pt and Pd in road dust samples by ETAAS. The applied biosorbent is characterized by high sorption capacity: 0.47 mg g - 1 for Pt and 1.24 mg g - 1 for Pd.

  4. Interlaboratory bias in the determination of mercury concentrations in commercially available fish utilizing thermal decomposition/amalgamation atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Steven J M; Scanlan, Larry P; Chaudhuri, Sanwat N; Perry, Deborah D; Taylor, Robert J

    2007-10-01

    Four commercially available fish fillets were freeze-dried, homogenized, and analyzed for mercury by the Texas A&M Trace Element Research Laboratory and the Utah Public Health Laboratory (UPHL) utilizing thermal decomposition/amalgamation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Two-way analysis of variance detected bias in the data between the two laboratories. Some of the bias could be attributed to different calibration curve quantitation and near detection limit quantitation, albeit causal explanations could be confounded with other effects. Knowledge of analytical bias will aid interpretation of interlaboratory data. The swordfish mercury content, as determined by both laboratories, was about 1 ppm, while mercury content found in the Atlantic salmon was about 0.021 ppm. For the Alaskan halibut, the Texas A&M measured a mercury concentration of 0.155 ppm, while the UPHL measured a mercury concentration of 0.181 ppm for the same fish. The Texas A&M determined that the Canadian-raised salmon contained about 0.019 ppm of mercury, while the UPHL determined a mercury content of about 0.025 ppm for the same fish. The mercury found within the fish fillets did not exceed nationwide mercury mean values determined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  5. Quantification of minerals and trace elements in raw caprine milk using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahavir; Yadav, Poonam; Garg, V K; Sharma, Anshu; Singh, Balvinder; Sharma, Himanshu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports minerals and trace elements quantification in raw caprine milk of Beetal breed, reared in Northern India and their feed, fodder & water using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry. The mineral and trace elements' concentration in the milk was in the order: K > Ca > Na > Fe > Zn > Cu. The results showed that minerals concentration in caprine milk was lesser than reference values. But trace elements concentration (Fe and Zn) was higher than reference values. Multivariate statistical techniques, viz., Pearsons' correlation, Cluster analysis (CA) and Principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to analyze the interdependences within studied variables in caprine milk. Significantly positive correlations were observed between Fe - Zn, Zn - K, Ca - Na and Ca - pH. The results of correlation matrix were further supported by Cluster analysis and Principal component analysis as primary cluster pairs were found for Ca - pH, Ca - Na and Fe - Zn in the raw milk. No correlation was found between mineral & trace elements content of the milk and feed.

  6. Flame Atomic Absorption Determination of Gold Ion in Aqueous Samples after Preconcentration Using 9-Acridinylamine Functionalized γ-Alumina Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and sensitive solid phase extraction utilizing 9-acridinylamine functionalized alumina nanoparticles was developed, and their potential use for preconcentration and subsequent determination of gold by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS was investigated. A number of parameters, namely, type, concentration, and volume of eluent, pH of the sample solution, flow rate of extraction, and volume of the sample, were evaluated. The effect of a variety of ions on preconcentration and recovery was also investigated. Gold ions were found to be recovered quantitatively at pH 3.0, with 0.1 mol L−1 thiourea in 2 mol L−1 H2SO4 as eluent. The limit of detection (LOD, defined as five times the standard deviation of the blank, was determined to be lower than 13.0 ppb. Under optimum conditions, the accuracy and precision (RSD% of the method were >98.0 and <1.5%, respectively. To gauge its ability in terms of application to real samples, the proposed method was successfully applied for determination of gold concentration in waste water samples and one soil standard material, and satisfactory results were obtained.

  7. Determination of trace nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gai

    2012-01-01

    Microwave digestion of hydrogenated cottonseed oil prior to trace nickel determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) is proposed here for the first time. Currently, the methods outlined in U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) or British Pharmacopeia (BP2003) are recommended as the official methods for analyzing nickel in hydrogenated cottonseed oil. With these methods the samples may be pre-treated by a silica or a platinum crucible. However, the samples were easily tarnished during sample pretreatment when using a silica crucible. In contrast, when using a platinum crucible, hydrogenated cottonseed oil acting as a reducing material may react with the platinum and destroy the crucible. The proposed microwave-assisted digestion avoided tarnishing of sample in the process of sample pretreatment and also reduced the cycle of analysis. The programs of microwave digestion and the parameters of ETAAS were optimized. The accuracy of the proposed method was investigated by analyzing real samples. The results were compared with the ones by pressurized-PTFE-bomb acid digestion and ones obtained by the U.S. Pharmacopeia 28 (USP28) method. The new method involves a relatively rapid matrix destruction technique compared with other present methods for the quantification of metals in oil.

  8. Localized holes and delocalized electrons in photoexcited inorganic perovskites: Watching each atomic actor by picosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santomauro, Fabio G.; Grilj, Jakob; Mewes, Lars; Nedelcu, Georgian; Yakunin, Sergii; Rossi, Thomas; Capano, Gloria; Al Haddad, André; Budarz, James; Kinschel, Dominik; Ferreira, Dario S.; Rossi, Giacomo; Gutierrez Tovar, Mario; Grolimund, Daniel; Samson, Valerie; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Smolentsev, Grigory; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Chergui, Majed

    2016-01-01

    We report on an element-selective study of the fate of charge carriers in photoexcited inorganic CsPbBr3 and CsPb(ClBr)3 perovskite nanocrystals in toluene solutions using time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 80 ps time resolution. Probing the Br K-edge, the Pb L3-edge, and the Cs L2-edge, we find that holes in the valence band are localized at Br atoms, forming small polarons, while electrons appear as delocalized in the conduction band. No signature of either electronic or structural changes is observed at the Cs L2-edge. The results at the Br and Pb edges suggest the existence of a weakly localized exciton, while the absence of signatures at the Cs edge indicates that the Cs+ cation plays no role in the charge transport, at least beyond 80 ps. This first, time-resolved element-specific study of perovskites helps understand the rather modest charge carrier mobilities in these materials. PMID:28083541

  9. Standard test method for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of lead and cadmium extracted from ceramic foodware

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS) to quantitatively determine lead and cadmium extracted by acetic acid at room temperature from the food-contact surface of foodware. The method is applicable to food-contact surfaces composed of silicate-based materials (earthenware, glazed ceramicware, decorated ceramicware, decorated glass, and lead crystal glass) and is capable of determining lead concentrations greater than 0.005 to 0.020 g/mL and cadmium concentrations greater than 0.0005 to 0.002 g/mL, depending on instrument design. 1.2 This test method also describes quality control procedures to check for contamination and matrix interference during GFAAS analyses and a specific sequence of analytical measurements that demonstrates proper instrument operation during the time period in which sample solutions are analyzed. 1.3 Cleaning and other contamination control procedures are described in this test method. Users may modify contamination cont...

  10. Determination of platinum and palladium in road dust after their separation on immobilized fungus by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woinska, Sylwia; Godlewska-Zylkiewicz, Beata, E-mail: bgodlew@uwb.edu.pl

    2011-07-15

    A flow solid phase extraction procedure based on biosorption of Pt(IV) and Pd(II) on Aspergillus sp. immobilized on cellulose resin Cellex-T was proposed for the separation and preconcentration of Pt and Pd before their determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The analytical conditions including sample pH, eluent type, flow rates of sample and eluent solutions were examined. The analytes were selectively retained on the biosorbent in acidic medium (pH 1) and subsequently eluted from the column with 1 mL of thiourea solution (0.25 mol L{sup -1} thiourea in 0.3 mol L{sup -1} HCl). The reproducibility of the procedure was below 5%. The limit of detection of the method was 0.020 ng mL{sup -1} for Pt and 0.012 ng mL{sup -1} for Pd. The method validation was performed by analysis of certified reference materials BCR-723 (tunnel dust) and SARM-76 (platinum ore). The developed separation procedure was applied to the determination of Pt and Pd in road dust samples by ETAAS. The applied biosorbent is characterized by high sorption capacity: 0.47 mg g{sup -1} for Pt and 1.24 mg g{sup -1} for Pd.

  11. Sensitive determination of cadmium in water samples by room temperature ionic liquid-based preconcentration and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinis, Estefania M. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, C.C. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Olsina, Roberto A. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis (Argentina); Altamirano, Jorgelina C. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, C.C. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina); Wuilloud, Rodolfo G. [Laboratory of Environmental Research and Services of Mendoza (LISAMEN), (CCT - CONICET - Mendoza), Av. Ruiz Leal S/N Parque General San Martin, C.C. 131, M 5502 IRA Mendoza (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina)], E-mail: rwuilloud@mendoza-conicet.gov.ar

    2008-10-17

    A sensitive preconcentration methodology for Cd determination at trace levels in water samples was developed in this work. 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([C{sub 4}MIM][PF{sub 6}]) room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) was successfully used for Cd preconcentration, as cadmium-2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol complex [Cd-5-Br-PADAP]. Subsequently, Cd was back-extracted from the RTIL phase with 500 {mu}L of 0.5 mol L{sup -1} nitric acid and determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). A preconcentration factor of 40 was achieved with 20 mL of sample. The limit of detection (LOD) obtained under optimum conditions was 3 ng L{sup -1} and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for 10 replicates at 1 {mu}g L{sup -1} Cd{sup 2+} concentration level was 3.5%, calculated at peak heights. The calibration graph was linear from concentration levels near the detection limits up to at least 5 {mu}g L{sup -1}. A correlation coefficient of 0.9997 was achieved. Validation of the methodology was performed by standard addition method and analysis of certified reference material (CRM). The method was successfully applied to the determination of Cd in river and tap water samples.

  12. [Investigation of determining strontium in M. nitida Benth. var. hirsutissima. Z. Wei. by flame atomic absorption spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Rao, Zhi-Jun; Guan, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Hai-Ming

    2010-12-01

    The present paper is aimed to establish the method of determining the strontium in M. nitida Benth. var. hirsutissima. Z. Wei. by means of air-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectra, and also provide reference for the determination of the strontium in other traditional Chinese medicine. M. Nitida Benthvarhirsutissima Z. Wei. was taken as the object. The authors used nitric-perchloric acid as digestion solution to digest samples by microwave which was controlled by pressure, and used EDTA-2Na as the releasing agent to add in the samples for determining the strontium in M. nitida Benth. var. hirsutissima. Z. Wei. by FAAS. The results showed that the samples were entirely digested by microwave. The working curve was Y = 0.036 5x -0.001 1, r = 0.999 4, the range was 0-1.6 microg x mL(-1), the average recovery rate was 101.5% with RSD 2.04%, and the method detection limit was 0.008 2 microg x mL(-1) (n = 21). It is concluded that this method is simple and accurate. It has high sensitivity and can be effectively used for determining the strontium in this traditional Chinese medicine.

  13. Determination of Trace Amounts of Nickel (Ⅱ) by Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Coupled with Cloud Point Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAH Syed Mazhar; WANG Hao-nan; SU Xing-guang

    2011-01-01

    A new method based on the cloud point extraction(CPE) for separation and preconcentration of nickel(Ⅱ)and its subsequent determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry(GFAAS) was proposed,8-hydroxyquinoline and Triton X-100 were usedl as the ligand and surfactant respectively. Nickel(Ⅱ) can form a hydrophobic complex with 8-hydroxyquinoline, the complex can be extracted into the small volume surfactant rich phase at the cloud point temperature(CPT) for GFAAS determination. The factors affecting the cloud point extraction,such as pH, ligand concentration, surfactant concentration, and the incubation time were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 12 ng/L and a relative standard deviation(RSD) of 2.9% were obtained for Ni(Ⅱ) determination. The enrichment factor was found to be 25. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of nickel(Ⅱ) in certified reference material and different types of water samples and the recovery was in a range of 95% 103%.

  14. [Analysis and comparison of trace elements of herba euphorbiae humifusae in different periods by microwave digestion-atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Cai, Miao-zhen; Wang, Hong; Yu, Rui-peng; Cheng, Cun-gui

    2010-07-01

    Herba euphorbiae humifusae is the dried whole plant of Euphorbia humi fusa Willd. that belongs to euphorbiaceae. In the present paper, the microwave digestion procedure was used to digest herba euphorbiae humifusae collected in different periods, and then flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was used to determine the contents of eight kinds of trace elements of herba euphorbiae humifusae in different periods, and the change in the contents of trace elements at different times was studied and analysed. The results showed that of all the trace elements of herba euphorbiae humifusae in different periods, element Fe was the highest in June, element K was in August at the highest level, element Mn reached the highest content in September, elements Na and Ca were dividedly at the highest content in October and November, and in December the highest content elements were Zn, Cu and Mg. In one word, the change of Na and Ca was jumping, while the change of Cu and Zn was comparatively mild. The results provide scientific basis for the time of collection of herba euphorbiae humifusae.

  15. [Determination of trace elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn from different habitat by microwave digestion-atomic absorption spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke; Xue, Yue-Qin; Gui, Ren-Yi; Sun, Su-Qin; Yin, Ming-Wen

    2010-03-01

    A method of microwave digestion technique was proposed to determine the content of Zn, Fe, Cu, Mn, K, Ca, Mg, Ni, Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Al, Se and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The RSD of the method was between 1.23% and 3.32%, and the recovery rates obtained by standard addition method were between 95.8% and 104.20%. The results of the study indicate that the proposed method has the advantages of simplicity, speediness and sensitivity. It is suitable for the determination of the contents of metal elements in Lophatherum gracile brongn. The experimental results also indicated that different areas' Lophantherum gracile brongn had different trace elements content. The content of trace elements K, Mg, Ca, Fe and Mn beneficial to the human body was rich. The content of the heavy metal trace element Pb in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Hunan province was slightly high. The content of the heavy metal trace element Cu in Lophantherum gracile brongn of Guangdong province and Anhui province is also slightly higher. Beside, the contents of harmful trace heavy metal elements Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb and As in Lophatherum gracile brongn of different habitat are all lower than the limits of Chinese Pharmacopoeia and Green Trade Standard for Importing and Exporting Medicinal Plant and Preparation and National Food Sanitation Standard. These determination results provided the scientific data for further discussing the relationship between the content of trace elements in Lophantherum gracile brongn and the medicine efficacy.

  16. Comparison of selenium determination in liver samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksa, Irina Rudik; Buckley, Carol L; Carpenter, Nancy P; Poppenga, Robert H

    2005-07-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element that is often deficient in the natural diets of domestic animal species. The measurement of Se in whole blood or liver is the most accurate way to assess Se status for diagnostic purposes. This study was conducted to compare hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy (HG-AAS) with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the detection and quantification of Se in liver samples. Sample digestion was accomplished with magnesium nitrate and nitric acid for HG-AAS and ICP-MS, respectively. The ICP-MS detection was optimized for 82Se with yttrium used as the internal standard and resulted in a method detection limit of 0.12 microg/g. Selenium was quantified by both methods in 310 samples from a variety of species that were submitted to the Toxicology Laboratory at New Bolton Center (Kennett Square, PA) for routine diagnostic testing. Paired measurements for each sample were evaluated by a mean difference plot method. Limits of agreement were used to describe the maximum differences likely to occur between the 2 methods. Results suggest that under the specified conditions ICP-MS can be reliably used in place of AAS for quantitation of tissue Se at or below 2 microg/g to differentiate between adequate and deficient liver Se concentrations.

  17. Standardization and validation of a new atomic absorption spectroscopy technique for determination and quantitation of aluminium adjuvant in immunobiologicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Arti; Bhalla, Sumir Rai; Rawat, Sameera; Bansal, Vivek; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kumar, Sunil

    2007-10-01

    In the present study, Aluminium quantification in immunobiologicals has been described using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) technique. The assay was found to be linear in 25-125 microg/ml Aluminium range. The procedure was found to be accurate for different vaccines with recoveries of external additions ranging between 93.26 and 103.41%. The mean Limit of Variation (L.V.) for both intra- and inter-assay precision was calculated to be 1.62 and 2.22%, respectively. Further the procedure was found to be robust in relation to digestion temperature, alteration in acid (HNO(3) and H(2)SO(4)) ratio used for sample digestion and storage of digested vaccine samples up to a period of 15 days. After validation, AAS method was compared for its equivalency with routinely used complexometric titration method. On simultaneously applying on seven different groups of both bacterial and viral vaccines, viz., DPT, DT, TT, Hepatitis-A and B, Antirabies vaccine (cell culture) and tetravalent DPT-Hib, a high degree of positive correlation (+0.85-0.998) among AAS and titration methods was observed. Further AAS method was found to have an edge over complexometric titration method that a group of vaccines, viz., ARV (cell culture, adsorbed) and Hepatitis-A, in which Aluminium estimation is not feasible by pharmacopoeial approved complexometric titration method (possibly due to some interference in the sample matrix), this newly described and validated AAS assay procedure delivered accurate and reproducible results.

  18. Immersed single-drop microextraction-electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy for the trace determination of mercury in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Habib; Naderi, Mehrnoush

    2009-06-15

    A new method based on single-drop microextraction (SDME) combined with electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETV-AAS) was developed for the trace determination of mercury in water samples. A microdrop of m-xylene was applied as the extraction solvent. After extraction, the microdrop was introduced, directly, into a graphite furnace of AAS. Some important extraction parameters such as type of solvent, volume of solvent, sample stirring, ionic strength, sample pH, chelating agent concentration, sample temperature, and extraction time were investigated and optimized. The highest possible microdrop volume of 10 microL, a sampling temperature of 27 degrees C, and use of m-xylene containing dithizone, as complexing agent, are major parameters led to achieve a high enrichment factor of 970. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the method was 0.01 microg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 6.1% (n=7). The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of Hg in two river water samples. The effects of interfering species such as Pt, Pd, Cu, Au, and Bi, having the tendency to form complexes with dithizone, at two concentration levels of 100 and 1000 microg L(-1) were also studied.

  19. Graphene for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of cobalt in water samples prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukun Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new sensitive and simple method was developed for the preconcentration of trace amounts of cobalt (Co using 1-(2-pyridylazo-2-naphthol (PAN as chelating reagent prior to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed method is based on the utilization of a column packed with graphene as sorbent. Several effective parameters on the extraction and complex formation were selected and optimized. Under optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear in the concentration range of 5.0–240.0 μg L−1 with a detection limit of 0.36 μg L−1. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate measurements of 20.0 and 100.0 μg L−1 of Co were 3.45 and 3.18%, respectively. Comparative studies showed that graphene is superior to other adsorbents including C18 silica, graphitic carbon, and single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the extraction of Co. The proposed method was successfully applied in the analysis of four real environmental water samples. Good spiked recoveries over the range of 95.8–102.6% were obtained.

  20. Electromagnetically induced absorption due to transfer of coherence and coherence population oscillation for the Fg = 3 →Fe = 4 transition in 85Rb atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Hafeez Ur; Mohsin, Muhammad Qureshi; Noh, Heung-Ryoul; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2016-12-01

    Lineshapes for the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of thermal 85Rb atoms in a degenerate two-level system have been investigated using matching (σ∥σ , π∥π) and orthogonal (σ ⊥ σ , π ⊥ π) polarization configurations of coupling and probe beams. EIA signals, which result from coherence population oscillation and transfer of coherence of the excited state, are obtained in detail theoretically and experimentally. The observed EIA linewidths, which are limited due to the decoherence rate between the magnetic sublevels in the ground state from transit-time relaxation, match well with the calculated ones. Decompositions of the absorption signals analyzed with respect to magnetic sublevels of the ground state show that enhanced or decreased absorption signals for each component of magnetic sublevels in the ground state depend on several factors. These factors include the decay rates and transition strengths, which determine the overall absorption spectral profile.

  1. On the opportunity of spectroscopic determination of absolute atomic densities in non-equilibrium plasmas from measured relative intensities within resonance multiplets distorted by self-absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, B P

    2007-01-01

    The opportunities of the application of the recently proposed approach in optical emission spectroscopy of non-equilibrium plasmas have been studied. The approach consists of several methods of the determination of {\\em absolute} particle densities of atoms from measured {\\em relative} intensities within resonance multiplets distorted by self-absorption. All available spectroscopic data concerning resonance spectral lines of atoms having multiplet ground states from boron up to gallium were analyzed. It is found that in the case of C, O, F, S and Cl atoms an application of the methods needs VUV technique, while densities of B, Al, Si, Sc, Ti, V, Co, Ni, Ga atoms may be obtained by means of the intensity measurements in UV and visible parts of emission spectra suitable for ordinary spectrometers used for optical diagnostics and monitoring of non-equilibrium plasmas including industrial plasma technologies.

  2. Electromagnetically induced absorption and transparency in degenerate two level systems of metastable Kr atoms and measurement of Landé g-factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Y. B.; Tiwari, V. B.; Mishra, S. R.; Singh, S.; Rawat, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    We report electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) and transparency (EIT) resonances of sub-natural linewidth in degenerate two level systems (DTLSs) of metastable 84Kr (84Kr*) and 83Kr (83Kr*) atoms. Using the spectrally narrow EIA signals obtained corresponding to the closed hyperfine transition 4p55s[3/2]2(F=13/2) to 4p55p[5/2]3(F‧ = 15 / 2) in 83Kr* atom, we have measured the Landé g-factor (gF) for the lower hyperfine level involved in this transition by application of small values of magnetic field of few Gauss.

  3. Coacervative extraction of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagarová, Ingrid, E-mail: hagarova@fns.uniba.sk; Bujdoš, Marek; Matúš, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a relatively simple and sensitive method for separation/preconcentration of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been proposed. The method is based on the extraction of Pb–dithizone chelate with coacervates made up of lauric acid in the presence of potassium ions and methanol. Several important factors affecting extraction efficiency such as pH, concentration of lauric acid and dithizone, ionic strength, incubation and centrifugation time were investigated and optimized. After separation of aqueous bulk solution from surfactant-rich phase, the final extract was redissolved by using 500 μl of methanol acidified with 0.2 mol l{sup −1} HNO{sub 3}. Under the optimized conditions (using initial sample volume of 10 ml), enrichment factor of 17.0, detection limit of 0.12 μg l{sup −1}, quantification limit of 0.38 μg l{sup −1}, relative standard deviation of 4.2% (for 2 μg l{sup −1} of Pb; n = 26), linearity of the calibration graph in the range of 0.5–4.0 μg l{sup −1} (with correlation coefficient better than 0.995) were achieved. The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material (TMDA-61). Extraction recoveries for the CRM, spiked model solutions and spiked natural water samples were in the range of 91–96%. Finally, the method was applied to the separation/preconcentration and determination of trace lead in natural waters. - Highlights: • The potential of coacervates for the extraction of metal ions is examined. • No difficulties in coupling of ETAAS with the proposed CAE are observed. • Achieved preconcentration factor results in enhanced sensitivity. • Analytical performance is confirmed by the reliable determination of trace Pb. • The proposed CAE is ecofriendly and efficient.

  4. Coacervative extraction of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagarová, Ingrid; Bujdoš, Marek; Matúš, Peter; Kubová, Jana

    2013-10-01

    In this work, a relatively simple and sensitive method for separation/preconcentration of trace lead from natural waters prior to its determination by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry has been proposed. The method is based on the extraction of Pb-dithizone chelate with coacervates made up of lauric acid in the presence of potassium ions and methanol. Several important factors affecting extraction efficiency such as pH, concentration of lauric acid and dithizone, ionic strength, incubation and centrifugation time were investigated and optimized. After separation of aqueous bulk solution from surfactant-rich phase, the final extract was redissolved by using 500 μl of methanol acidified with 0.2 mol l- 1 HNO3. Under the optimized conditions (using initial sample volume of 10 ml), enrichment factor of 17.0, detection limit of 0.12 μg l- 1, quantification limit of 0.38 μg l- 1, relative standard deviation of 4.2% (for 2 μg l- 1 of Pb; n = 26), linearity of the calibration graph in the range of 0.5-4.0 μg l- 1 (with correlation coefficient better than 0.995) were achieved. The method was validated by the analysis of certified reference material (TMDA-61). Extraction recoveries for the CRM, spiked model solutions and spiked natural water samples were in the range of 91-96%. Finally, the method was applied to the separation/preconcentration and determination of trace lead in natural waters.

  5. Determination of manganese in diesel, gasoline and naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry using microemulsion medium for sample stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Geisamanda Pedrini; de Campos, Reinaldo Calixto; de Castro, Eustáquio Vinicius Ribeiro; de Jesus, Honério Coutinho

    2008-08-01

    The determination of Mn in diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples at µg L - 1 level by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, after sample stabilization in a three-component medium (microemulsion) was investigated. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing appropriate volumes of sample, propan-1-ol and nitric acid aqueous solution, and a stable system was immediately and spontaneously formed. After multivariate optimization by central composite design the optimum microemulsion composition as well as the temperature program was defined. In this way, calibration using aqueous analytical solution was possible, since the same sensitivity was observed in the optimized microemulsion media and 0.2% v/v HNO 3. The use of modifier was not necessary. Recoveries at the 3 µg L - 1 level using both inorganic and organic Mn standards spiked solutions ranged from 98 to 107% and the limits of detection were 0.6, 0.5 and 0.3 µg L - 1 in the original diesel, gasoline and naphtha samples, respectively. The Mn characteristic mass 3.4 pg. Typical relative standard deviation ( n = 5) of 8, 6 and 7% were found for the samples prepared as microemulsions at concentration levels of 1.3, 0.8, and 1.5 µg L - 1 , respectively. The total determination cycle lasted 4 min for diesel and 3 min for gasoline and naphtha, equivalent to a sample throughput of 7 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in diesel and 10 h - 1 for duplicate determinations in gasoline and naphtha. Accuracy was also assessed by using other method of analysis (ASTM D 3831-90). No statistically significant differences were found between the results obtained with the proposed method and the reference method in the analysis of real samples.

  6. Determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc in lubricating oils by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using a three-component solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmozinski, Ariane V; de Jesus, Alexandre; Vale, Maria G R; Silva, Márcia M

    2010-12-15

    Lubricating oils are used to decrease wear and friction of movable parts of engines and turbines, being in that way essential for the performance and the increase of that equipment lifespan. The presence of some metals shows the addition of specific additives such as detergents, dispersals and antioxidants that improve the performance of these lubricants. In this work, a method for determination of calcium, magnesium and zinc in lubricating oil by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS) was developed. The samples were diluted with a small quantity of aviation kerosene (AVK), n-propanol and water to form a three-component solution before its introduction in the F AAS. Aqueous inorganic standards diluted in the same way have been used for calibration. To assess the accuracy of the new method, it was compared with ABNT NBR 14066 standard method, which consists in diluting the sample with AVK and in quantification by F AAS. Two other validating methods have also been used: the acid digestion and the certified reference material NIST (SRM 1084a). The proposed method provides the following advantages in relation to the standard method: significant reduction of the use of AVK, higher stability of the analytes in the medium and application of aqueous inorganic standards for calibration. The limits of detection for calcium, magnesium and zinc were 1.3 μg g(-1), 0.052 μg g(-1) and 0.41 μg g(-1), respectively. Concentrations of calcium, magnesium and zinc in six different samples obtained by the developed method did not differ significantly from the results obtained by the reference methods at the 95% confidence level (Student's t-test and ANOVA). Therefore, the proposed method becomes an efficient alternative for determination of metals in lubricating oil.

  7. Species selective preconcentration and quantification of gold nanoparticles using cloud point extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Georg, E-mail: georg.hartmann@tum.de [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schuster, Michael, E-mail: michael.schuster@tum.de [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We optimized cloud point extraction and ET-AAS parameters for Au-NPs measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A selective ligand (sodium thiosulphate) is introduced for species separation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A limit of detection of 5 ng Au-NP per L is achieved for aqueous samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement of samples with high natural organic mater content is possible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Real water samples including wastewater treatment plant effluent were analyzed. - Abstract: The determination of metallic nanoparticles in environmental samples requires sample pretreatment that ideally combines pre-concentration and species selectivity. With cloud point extraction (CPE) using the surfactant Triton X-114 we present a simple and cost effective separation technique that meets both criteria. Effective separation of ionic gold species and Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) is achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency for Au-NP ranged from 1.01 {+-} 0.06 (particle size 2 nm) to 0.52 {+-} 0.16 (particle size 150 nm). An enrichment factor of 80 and a low limit of detection of 5 ng L{sup -1} is achieved using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) for quantification. TEM measurements showed that the particle size is not affected by the CPE process. Natural organic matter (NOM) is tolerated up to a concentration of 10 mg L{sup -1}. The precision of the method expressed as the standard deviation of 12 replicates at an Au-NP concentration of 100 ng L{sup -1} is 9.5%. A relation between particle concentration and the extraction efficiency was not observed. Spiking experiments showed a recovery higher than 91% for environmental water samples.

  8. Determination of Cd, Pb and As in sediments of the Sava River by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONA MURKO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The applicability of nitric acid, palladium nitrate and a mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrate as matrix modifiers were estimated for the accurate and reproducible determination of cadmium (Cd, lead (Pb and arsenic (As in sediments of the Sava River by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, ETAAS. Decomposition of the samples was done in a closed vessel microwave-assisted digestion system using nitric, hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acids, followed by the addition of boric acid to convert the fluorides into soluble complexes. The parameters for the determination of Cd, Pb and As in sediments were optimised for each individual element and for each matrix modifier. In addition, two sediment reference materials were also analysed. In determination of Cd and Pb, nitric acid was found to be the most appropriate matrix modifier. The accurate and reliable determination of Cd and Pb in sediments was possible also in the presence of boric acid. The use of a mixture of palladium and magnesium nitrate efficiently compensated for matrix effects and enabled the accurate and reliable determination of As in the sediments. Quantification of Cd and As was performed by calibration using acid matched standard solutions, while the standard addition method was applied for the quantification of Pb. The repeatability of the analytical procedure for the determination of Cd, Pb and As in sediments was ±5 % for Cd, ±4 % for Pb and ±2 % for As. The LOD values of the analytical procedure were found to be 0.05 mg/kg for Cd and 0.25 mg/kg for Pb and As, while the LOQ values were 0.16 mg/kg for Cd and 0.83 mg/kg for Pb and As. Finally, Cd, Pb and As were successfully determined in sediments of the Sava River in Slovenia.

  9. Preconcentration of gold ions from water samples by modified organo-nanoclay sorbent prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afzali, Daryoush, E-mail: daryoush_afzali@yahoo.com [Nanochemistry Department, Research Institute of Environmental Sciences, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mostafavi, Ali [Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzaei, Mohammad [Nanochemistry Department, Research Institute of Environmental Sciences, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemistry Department, Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    In this work, the applicability of modified organo nanoclay as a new and easy prepared solid sorbent for the preconcentration of trace amounts of Au(III) ion from water samples is studied. The organo nanoclay was modified with 5-(4'-dimethylamino benzyliden)-rhodanine and used as a sorbent for separation of Au(III) ions. The sorption of gold ions was quantitative in the pH range of 2.0-6.0. Quantitative desorption occurred with 6.0 mL of 1.0 mol L{sup -1} Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The amount of eluted Au(III) was measured using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In the initial solution the linear dynamic range was in the range of 0.45 ng mL{sup -1} to 10.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1}, the detection limit was 0.1 ng mL{sup -1} and the preconcentration factor was 105. Also, the relative standard deviation was {+-}2.3% (n = 8 and C = 2.0 {mu}g mL{sup -1}) and the maximum capacity of the sorbent was 3.9 mg of Au(III) per gram of modified organo nanoclay. The influences of the experimental parameters including sample pH, eluent volume and eluent type, sample volume, and interference of some ions on the recoveries of the gold ion were investigated. The proposed method was applied for preconcentration and determination of gold in different samples.

  10. Selective cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of molybdenum (VI) ion in seawater samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filik, Hayati, E-mail: filik@istanbul.edu.tr [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey); Cengel, Tayfun; Apak, Resat [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Avcilar, 34320 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-09-30

    A cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract molybdenum from aqueous solutions was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of Mo(VI) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarine: QA) and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature, incubation and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for Mo(VI) was 7.0 ng L{sup -1} with an preconcentration factor of {approx}25 when 10 mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.4 mL. The proposed method (with extraction) showed linear calibration within the range 0.03-0.6 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 3.7% (C{sub Mo(VI)} = 0.05 {mu}g L{sup -1}, n = 5) for pure standard solutions, whereas RSD for the recoveries from real samples ranged between 2 and 8% (mean RSD = 3.9%). The method was applied to the determination of Mo(VI) in seawater and tap water samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 98-103%. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a certified reference water sample was analysed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values.

  11. Evidence for aluminum-binding erythropoietin by size-exclusion chromatography coupled to electrothermal absorption atomic spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Marlei; Bohrer, Denise; Noremberg, Simone; do Nascimento, Paulo C; de Carvalho, Leandro M

    2011-11-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a glycoprotein that stimulates erythropoiesis and is clinically used for treating anemia during chronic renal failure and for anemia in preterm infants. EPO formulations usually have elevated rates of contamination due to aluminum (Al), which is toxic to both types of patients. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) was employed to separate proteins and to quantify the amount of aluminum present in the elution volume corresponding to EPO and, therefore, to evaluate possible binding. Because EPO formulations contain human serum albumin (HSA), a chromatographic method was optimized for the separation of these proteins. Subsequent to the chromatographic separation, 1-mL fractions of the column effluent were collected, and the Al content in these aliquots was measured by GF AAS. EPO and HSA samples were incubated with Al for 4h at 4°C and 37°C as well as for 16 h at 4°C and 37°C. Afterwards, they were injected into the chromatographic system. These samples were also submitted to ultrafiltration (10 and 50 kDa membranes), and Al was measured in the ultrafiltrates. The results showed that Al was present in the eluent volume corresponding to the EPO peak but not in the HSA peak in the chromatograms. Temperature strengthened the interaction because the Al present in the EPO fraction was 3 times higher at 37°C compared to 4°C. Thirty-eight percent of the Al present in a 2.4 μg/mL EPO standard solution, and approximately 50% of the Al in formulation samples containing approximately 11 μg/mL EPO and either citrate or phosphate, were non-ultrafiltrable, which suggests that EPO is an effective Al acceptor in vitro.

  12. Atomic Absorption Spectrometry in Wilson’s Disease and Its Comparison with Other Laboratory Tests and Paraclinical Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Fereiduni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Wilson's disease (WD is an autosomal recessive disease with genetic abnormality on chromosome 13 causing defect in copper metabolism and increased copper concentration in liver, central nervous system and other organs, which causes different clinical manifestations. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of different clinical and paraclinical tests for diagnosis of Wilson’s disease.Methods: Paraffin blocks of liver biopsy from 41 children suspicious of WD were collected. Hepatic copper concentrations were examined with atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Australian GBC, model: PAL 3000. Fifteen specimens had hepatic copper concentration (dry weight more than 250μg/g. Clinical and laboratory data and histologic slides of liver biopsies of these 15 children were reviewed retrospectively. Liver tissue was examined for staging and grading of hepatic involvement and also stained with rubeonic acid method for copper.Findings: Patients were 5-15 years old (mean age=9.3 years, standard deviation=2.6 with slight male predominance (9/15=60%. Five (33% patients were 10 years old. Three (20% of them were referred for icterus, 8 (54% because of positive family history, 2 (13% due to abdominal pain and 2 (13% because of hepatosplenomegaly and ascites. Serum AST and ALT levels were elevated at the time of presentation in all patients. In liver biopsy, histological grade and stage was 0-8 and 0-6 respectively, 2 (13% had cirrhosis, 1 (7% had normal biopsy and 12 (80% showed chronic hepatitis. Hepatic copper concentrations were between 250 and 1595 μg/g dry weight. The sensitivity of various tests were 85% for serum copper, 83% for serum ceruloplasmin, 53% for urinary copper excretion, 44% for presence of KF ring and 40% for rubeonic acid staining on liver biopsies.

  13. Preconcentration procedure using cloud point extraction in the presence of electrolyte for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo Coelho, Luciana [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp), Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Arruda, Marco Aurelio Zezzi [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Unicamp), Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13084-971, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: zezzi@iqm.unicamp.br

    2005-06-30

    This paper describes a micelle-mediated phase separation in the presence of electrolyte as a preconcentration method for cadmium determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Cadmium was complexed with ammonium O,O-diethyldithiophosphate (DDTP) in an acidic medium (0.32 mol l{sup -} {sup 1} HCl) using Triton X-114 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume (about 20 {mu}l) of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. The chemical variables that affect the cloud point extraction, such as complexing time (0-20 min), Triton X114 concentration (0.043-0.87% w/v) and complexing agent concentration (0.01-0.1 mol l{sup -} {sup 1}), were investigated. The cloud point is formed in the presence of NaCl at room temperature (25 deg. C), and the electrolyte concentration (0.5-5% w/v) was also investigated. Under optimized conditions, only 8 ml of sample was used in the presence of 0.043% w/v Triton X-114 and 1% (w/v) NaCl. This method permitted limits of detection and quantification of 0.9 {mu}g l{sup -} {sup 1} and 2.9 {mu}g l{sup -} {sup 1} Cd, respectively, and a linear calibration range from 3 to 400 {mu}g l{sup -} {sup 1} Cd. The proposed method was applied to Cd determination in physiological solutions (containing 0.9% (w/v) of NaCl), mineral water, lake water and cigarette samples (tobacco)

  14. Simultaneous flow injection preconcentration of lead and cadmium using cloud point extraction and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Edson Luiz [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario, 303, CP 96, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: edsonqmc@hotmail.com; Santos Roldan, Paulo dos [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Centenario, 303, CP 96, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-15

    A flow injection (FI) micelle-mediated separation/preconcentration procedure for the determination of lead and cadmium by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been proposed. The analytes reacted with 1-(2-thiazolylazo)-2-naphthol (TAN) to form hydrophobic chelates, which were extracted into the micelles of 0.05% (w/v) Triton X-114 in a solution buffered at pH 8.4. In the preconcentration stage, the micellar solution was continuously injected into a flow system with four mini-columns packed with cotton, glass wool, or TNT compresses for phase separation. The analytes-containing micelles were eluted from the mini-columns by a stream of 3 mol L{sup -1} HCl solution and the analytes were determined by FAAS. Chemical and flow variables affecting the preconcentration of the analytes were studied. For 15 mL of preconcentrated solution, the enhancement factors varied between 15.1 and 20.3, the limits of detection were approximately 4.5 and 0.75 {mu}g L{sup -1} for lead and cadmium, respectively. For a solution containing 100 and 10 {mu}g L{sup -1} of lead and cadmium, respectively, the R.S.D. values varied from 1.6 to 3.2% (n = 7). The accuracy of the preconcentration system was evaluated by recovery measurements on spiked water samples. The method was susceptible to matrix effects, but these interferences were minimized by adding barium ions as masking agent in the sample solutions, and recoveries from spiked sample varied in the range of 95.1-107.3%.

  15. Determination of ultra trace arsenic species in water samples by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry after cloud point extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulusoy, Halil Ibrahim, E-mail: hiulusoy@yahoo.com [University of Cumhuriyet, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, TR-58140, Sivas (Turkey); Akcay, Mehmet; Ulusoy, Songuel; Guerkan, Ramazan [University of Cumhuriyet, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, TR-58140, Sivas (Turkey)

    2011-10-10

    Graphical abstract: The possible complex formation mechanism for ultra-trace As determination. Highlights: {yields} CPE/HGAAS system for arsenic determination and speciation in real samples has been applied first time until now. {yields} The proposed method has the lowest detection limit when compared with those of similar CPE studies present in literature. {yields} The linear range of the method is highly wide and suitable for its application to real samples. - Abstract: Cloud point extraction (CPE) methodology has successfully been employed for the preconcentration of ultra-trace arsenic species in aqueous samples prior to hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS). As(III) has formed an ion-pairing complex with Pyronine B in presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at pH 10.0 and extracted into the non-ionic surfactant, polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114). After phase separation, the surfactant-rich phase was diluted with 2 mL of 1 M HCl and 0.5 mL of 3.0% (w/v) Antifoam A. Under the optimized conditions, a preconcentration factor of 60 and a detection limit of 0.008 {mu}g L{sup -1} with a correlation coefficient of 0.9918 was obtained with a calibration curve in the range of 0.03-4.00 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The proposed preconcentration procedure was successfully applied to the determination of As(III) ions in certified standard water samples (TMDA-53.3 and NIST 1643e, a low level fortified standard for trace elements) and some real samples including natural drinking water and tap water samples.

  16. Quantifying uncertainty in the measurement of arsenic in suspended particulate matter by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with hydride generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuja Tarushee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arsenic is the toxic element, which creates several problems in human being specially when inhaled through air. So the accurate and precise measurement of arsenic in suspended particulate matter (SPM is of prime importance as it gives information about the level of toxicity in the environment, and preventive measures could be taken in the effective areas. Quality assurance is equally important in the measurement of arsenic in SPM samples before making any decision. The quality and reliability of the data of such volatile elements depends upon the measurement of uncertainty of each step involved from sampling to analysis. The analytical results quantifying uncertainty gives a measure of the confidence level of the concerned laboratory. So the main objective of this study was to determine arsenic content in SPM samples with uncertainty budget and to find out various potential sources of uncertainty, which affects the results. Keeping these facts, we have selected seven diverse sites of Delhi (National Capital of India for quantification of arsenic content in SPM samples with uncertainty budget following sampling by HVS to analysis by Atomic Absorption Spectrometer-Hydride Generator (AAS-HG. In the measurement of arsenic in SPM samples so many steps are involved from sampling to final result and we have considered various potential sources of uncertainties. The calculation of uncertainty is based on ISO/IEC17025: 2005 document and EURACHEM guideline. It has been found that the final results mostly depend on the uncertainty in measurement mainly due to repeatability, final volume prepared for analysis, weighing balance and sampling by HVS. After the analysis of data of seven diverse sites of Delhi, it has been concluded that during the period from 31st Jan. 2008 to 7th Feb. 2008 the arsenic concentration varies from 1.44 ± 0.25 to 5.58 ± 0.55 ng/m3 with 95% confidence level (k = 2.

  17. Sample preparation for arsenic speciation analysis in baby food by generation of substituted arsines with atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Charles S; Vale, Maria Goreti R; Dessuy, Morgana B; Svoboda, Milan; Musil, Stanislav; Dědina, Jiři

    2017-12-01

    A slurry sampling procedure for arsenic speciation analysis in baby food by arsane generation, cryogenic trapping and detection with atomic absorption spectrometry is presented. Several procedures were tested for slurry preparation, including different reagents (HNO3, HCl and tetramethylammonium hydroxide - TMAH) and their concentrations, water bath heating and ultrasound-assisted agitation. The best results for inorganic arsenic (iAs) and dimethylarsinate (DMA) were reached when using 3molL(-1) HCl under heating and ultrasound-assisted agitation. The developed method was applied for the analysis of five porridge powder and six baby meal samples. The trueness of the method was checked with a certified reference material (CRM) of total arsenic (tAs), iAs and DMA in rice (ERM-BC211). Arsenic recoveries (mass balance) for all samples and CRM were performed by the determination of the tAs by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after microwave-assisted digestion and its comparison against the sum of the results from the speciation analysis. The relative limits of detection were 0.44, 0.24 and 0.16µgkg(-1) for iAs, methylarsonate and DMA, respectively. The concentrations of the most toxic arsenic species (iAs) in the analyzed baby food samples ranged between 4.2 and 99µgkg(-1) which were below the limits of 300, 200 and 100µgkg(-1) set by the Brazilian, Chinese and European legislation, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Liquid chromatography-electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the separation and preconcentration of molybdenum in milk and infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-García, I; Viñas, P; Romero-Romero, R; Hernández-Córdoba, M

    2007-08-06

    Two procedures for the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of molybdenum in milk and infant formulas using slurried samples are described. For powdered milk samples, 10% (m/v) slurries were prepared in a medium containing 25 and 75% (v/v) concentrated hydrogen peroxide and hydrofluoric acid, respectively, and introduced directly into the furnace. Palladium (200 microg mL(-1)) was used as the modifier and calibration was carried out using aqueous standards prepared in the same medium. The detection limit was 0.02 microg g(-1) for powdered milk samples suspended at 10% (m/v) (equivalent to 2 microg L(-1)). The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for five measurements was 1.9%, the characteristic mass being 25 pg. For liquid milk samples, a procedure was proposed based on preconcentration and removal of the matrix, using ionic exchange (Amberlite IRA 743) and elution of molybdenum with 5% (m/v) NaOH. In this case, a 30-fold improvement in the calibration slope was achieved, leading to a detection limit of 0.04 microg L(-1) for liquid samples diluted to 10%. The R.S.D. was 3.5%. Using a size-based separation procedure, it was found that molybdenum is present in its inorganic form or associated to low molecular weight substances in cow milk, while in breast milk it is associated to proteins. The reliability of the procedure was checked by comparing the results obtained with those found using a previous mineralization stage and by analyzing three certified reference materials, namely, BCR 063R (skim milk powder), NBS 1549 (non-fat milk powder) and NBS 8435 (whole milk powder).

  19. Comparison of colorimetry and electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittangprasert, Piyada; Wilairat, Prapin; Pootrakul, Pensri

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a comparison of two analytical techniques, one employing bathophenanthrolinedisulfonate (BPT), a most commonly-used reagent for Fe (II) determination, as chromogen and an electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (ETAAS) for the quantification of non-transferrin bound iron (NTBI) in sera from thalassemic patients. Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was employed as the ligand for binding iron from low molecular weight iron complexes present in the serum but without removing iron from the transferrin protein. After ultrafiltration the Fe (III)-NTA complex was then quantified by both methods. Kinetic study of the rate of the Fe (II)-BPT complex formation for various excess amounts of NTA ligand was also carried out. The kinetic data show that a minimum time duration (> 60 minutes) is necessary for complete complex formation when large excess of NTA is used. Calibration curves given by colorimetric and ETAAS methods were linear over the range of 0.15-20 microM iron (III). The colorimetric and ETAAS methods exhibited detection limit (3sigma) of 0.13 and 0.14 microM, respectively. The NTBI concentrations from 55 thalassemic serum samples measured employing BPT as chromogen were statistically compared with the results determined by ETAAS. No significant disagreement at 95% confidence level was observed. It is, therefore, possible to select any one of these two techniques for determination of NTBI in serum samples of thalassemic patients. However, the colorimetric procedure requires a longer analysis time because of a slow rate of exchange of NTA ligand with BPT, leading to the slow rate of formation of the colored complex.

  20. In-situ measurements of low-level mercury vapor exposure from dental amalgam with zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Stefan; Welzl, Gerhard

    2004-01-01

    Alongside food, emissions from amalgam fillings are an essential contribution to man's mercury burden. Previous methods for the determination of intraoral mercury vapor (Hg degrees ) release used principally some form of preconcentration of Hg on gold (film or wool), allowing relatively few measurements with unknown precision and sensitivity at selected times. Recently available computer-controlled Hg detectors operating on Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy (ZAAS) facilitate the direct real-time measurement of Hg degrees concentrations. It was the aim to adapt this method for a comparative investigation of emission processes from fillings in situ and from amalgam specimens in vitro. In addition to the ZAAS instrument, the apparatus consisted of a pump, magnetic valves, an electronic flow controller and a handle with a disposable mouth piece for aspiration of oral air. A programmable timer integrated the computer-controlled instrument operation and the data collection into a standard sampling protocol. A fast exponential decay of the emission was found after stimulation of amalgam specimens and of fillings in situ (halftimes 8.6 and 10.7 min). Precision was evaluated by a series of measurements on a single patient which indicated a consistently low coefficient of variation between 18% and 25%. After insertion of a few new fillings, sensitivity was high enough to detect a significant increase in emission against the background emission from the majority of old fillings. Zeeman-AAS in connection with a semi-automated sampling protocol and data storage provides precise in-situ measurements of Hg degrees emission from dental amalgam with real-time resolution. This facilitates the detailed exploration of the Hg degrees release kinetics and the applicability to large-scale studies.