WorldWideScience

Sample records for cold work level

  1. COLD-WORKED HARDWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Strizhak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The different types of cold-worked accessory are examined in the article. The necessity of development of such type of accessory in the Republic of Belarus due to requirements of market is shown. High emphasis is placed on the methods of increase of plasticity of cold-worked accessory from usual mill of RUP and CIS countries.

  2. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-08

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.  Created: 2/8/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 2/8/2016.

  3. Working smarter on cold cases: identifying factors associated with successful cold case investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert C; Jensen, Carl J; Burgette, Lane; Burnett, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Cold case squads have garnered much attention; however, they have yet to undergo significant empirical scrutiny. In the present study, the authors interviewed investigators and reviewed 189 solved and unsolved cold cases in Washington, D.C., to determine whether there are factors that can predict cold case solvability. In the interviews, new information from witnesses or information from new witnesses was cited as the most prevalent reason for case clearance. The case reviews determined that there were factors in each of the following domains that predicted whether cases would be solved during cold case investigations: Crime Context, Initial Investigation Results, Basis for Opening Cold Case, and Cold Case Investigator Actions. The results suggest that it is possible to prioritize cold case work based on the likelihood of investigations leading to clearances. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Cold Spring Brook Site Investigation Work Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    floodplain is a forested swamp habitat dominated by red maples (Acer rubrum). Various oak species ( Quercus spp.), grey birch (Betula populifolia...Vaccinium corymbosum), and speckled alder (Alnus rugosa ) also occur in the floodplain of Cold Spring Brook. Typical floodplain herbaceous components

  5. Thermal Recovery from Cold-Working in Type K Bare-Wire Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenen, A. D.; Webster, E. S.

    2017-12-01

    Cold-working of most thermocouples has a significant, direct impact on the Seebeck coefficient which can lead to regions of thermoelectric inhomogeneity and accelerated drift. Cold-working can occur during the wire swaging process, when winding the wire onto a bobbin, or during handling by the end user—either accidentally or deliberately. Swaging-induced cold-work in thermocouples, if uniformly applied, may result in a high level of homogeneity. However, on exposure to elevated temperatures, the subsequent recovery process from the cold-working can then result in significant drift, and this can in turn lead to erroneous temperature measurements, often in excess of the specified manufacturer tolerances. Several studies have investigated the effects of cold-work in Type K thermocouples usually by bending, or swaging. However, the amount of cold-work applied to the thermocouple is often difficult to quantify, as the mechanisms for applying the strains are typically nonlinear when applied in this fashion. A repeatable level of cold-working is applied to the different wires using a tensional loading apparatus to apply a known yield displacement to the thermoelements. The effects of thermal recovery from cold-working can then be accurately quantified as a function of temperature, using a linear gradient furnace and a high-resolution homogeneity scanner. Variation in these effects due to differing alloy compositions in Type K wire is also explored, which is obtained by sourcing wire from a selection of manufacturers. The information gathered in this way will inform users of Type K thermocouples about the potential consequences of varying levels of cold-working and its impact on the Seebeck coefficient at a range of temperatures between ˜ 70°C and 600° C. This study will also guide users on the temperatures required to rapidly alleviate the effects of cold-working using thermal annealing treatments.

  6. The Effect of Cold Work on Properties of Alloy 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Alloy 617 is approved for non-nuclear construction in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section I and Section VIII, but is not currently qualified for nuclear use in ASME Code Section III. A draft Code Case was submitted in 1992 to qualify the alloy for nuclear service but efforts were stopped before the approval process was completed.1 Renewed interest in high temperature nuclear reactors has resulted in a new effort to qualify Alloy 617 for use in nuclear pressure vessels. The mechanical and physical properties of Alloy 617 were extensively characterized for the VHTR programs in the 1980’s and incorporated into the 1992 draft Code Case. Recently, the properties of modern heats of the alloy that incorporate an additional processing step, electro-slag re-melting, have been characterized both to confirm that the properties of contemporary material are consistent with those in the historical record and to increase the available database. A number of potential issues that were identified as requiring further consideration prior to the withdrawal of the 1992 Code Case are also being re-examined in the current R&D program. Code Cases are again being developed to allow use of Alloy 617 for nuclear design within the rules of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. In general the Code defines two temperature ranges for nuclear design with austenitic and nickel based alloys. Below 427°C (800°F) time dependent behavior is not considered, while above this temperature creep and creep-fatigue are considered to be the dominant life-limiting deformation modes. There is a corresponding differentiation in the treatment of the potential for effects associated with cold work. Below 427°C the principal issue is the relationship between the level of cold work and the propensity for stress corrosion cracking and above that temperature the primary concern is the impact of cold work on creep-rupture behavior.

  7. A prospective study of work stressors and the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S-G; Kim, H-C; Min, J-Y; Hwang, S H; Park, Y-S; Min, K-B

    2011-01-01

    Psychological stress is a risk factor for infectious diseases. Although psychological stress at work is considered an important problem for many workers, there is little evidence for the effect of work-related stress on infectious diseases. To investigate whether work-related stress affected the occurrence of the common cold in South Korean workers in small- to medium-sized manufacturing companies. We conducted a prospective study, involving 1241 workers. At the outset, we collected information regarding sociodemographic and work characteristics. At follow-up after 6 months, we asked subjects whether they had experienced common cold symptoms during the preceding 4 months. Male subjects experiencing stress at the outset were more likely to report having experienced the common cold at follow-up (odds ratios: high job demand group 1.74; 95% CI: 1.28-2.36; insufficient job control 1.42; 95% CI: 1.05-1.93; inadequate social support 1.40; 95% CI: 1.03-1.91). For females, no significant association between work stress and occurrence of the common cold was detected. Males experiencing work stress in job demand, job control and social support reported an increased occurrence of the common cold at follow-up but this association was not seen in females.

  8. Similar cold stress induces sex-specific neuroendocrine and working memory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solianik, Rima; Skurvydas, Albertas; Urboniene, Daiva; Eimantas, Nerijus; Daniuseviciute, Laura; Brazaitis, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Men have higher cold-induced neuroendocrine response than women; nevertheless, it is not known whether a different stress hormone rise elicits different effects on cognition during whole body cooling. The objective was to compare the effect of cold-induced neuroendocrine responses on the performance of working memory sensitive tasks between men and women. The cold stress continued until rectal temperature reached 35.5 degree C or for a maximum of 170 min. Working memory performance and stress hormone concentrations were monitored. During cold stress, body temperature variables dropped in all subjects (P stress raised plasma epinephrine and serum cortisol levels only in men (P stress adversely affected memory performance in men but not in women (P stress in men and women induces sex-specific neuroendocrine and working memory responses.

  9. Structural relaxation in a heavily cold-worked metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mear, F.O. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: alg13@cam.ac.uk; Lenk, B.; Zhang, Y.; Greer, A.L. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Differential scanning calorimetry heating runs on as-cast and shot-peened bulk metallic glass Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} show a broad temperature range of heat release (relaxation spectrum) with two peaks. The higher-temperature peak is reduced by shot-peening, suggesting uniform deformation and partial relaxation of the glassy structure. Peening of pre-annealed samples shows the stored energy of cold work to be a few per cent of the work done. Peening increases atomic mobility, revealed by a downward temperature shift of the relaxation spectrum.

  10. Muscular activity and thermal responses in men and women during repetitive work in cold environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormunen, Erja; Rissanen, Sirkka; Oksa, Juha; Pienimaki, Tuomo; Remes, Jouko; Rintamaki, Hannu

    2009-08-01

    Thermal responses and muscular activity in repetitive work were studied in eight women and eight men at 19 degrees C (thermoneutral) and at 4 degrees C (cold). Furthermore, effect of a heating vest was studied at 4 degrees C. Women had lower (p work in women. However, compared with thermoneutral, working in cold increased (p work load reduction in repetitive work in cold environments. Present results indicate that in identical work, sex affects thermal responses and muscular activity during repetitive work in conditions comparable with cooled departments in the food-processing industry. Sex differences should be considered when evaluating cold protection and preventive measures for work load reduction.

  11. Thermal creep and stress-affected precipitation of 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigh, R. J.; Lovell, A. J.; Garner, F. A.

    1984-05-01

    Measurements of the thermal creep of 20% cold-worked 316 stainless stpel have been performed for temperatures from 593 to 760°C, stress levels as high as 138 MPa and exposure times as long as 15,000 hours. The creep strains exhibit a complex behavior arising from the combined action of true creep and stress-affected precipitation of intermetallic phases. The latter process is suspected to be altered by neutron irradiation.

  12. Cold work effects: a compilation of data for types 304 and 316 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moen, R A; Duncan, D R

    1976-03-01

    Effects of cold working on the mechanical properties of Types 304 and 316 stainless steel are tabulated, illustrated, and summarized. The properties covered are those that affect the setting of Code allowable stresses. Effects on other properties that indirectly affect the utilization of cold worked materials are also discussed. The report provides in summary the basis for formulating guidelines or rules to govern the use of cold worked materials in various types of components and construction.

  13. Effect of cold work and aging on mechanical properties of a copper ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Investigations have been carried out on the effect of cold work and subsequent aging on mechanical properties of a Cu-bearing HSLA-100 steel microalloyed with Nb and Ti. Aging at 400°C after various degrees of cold work (25–70 pct) exhibits multiple hardness peaks. The treatments cause significant improvement in ...

  14. The mechanical properties of austenite stainless steel 304 after structural deformation through cold work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubarok, Naila; Manaf, Azwar, E-mail: azwar@ui.ac.id [PPS Materials Science, FMIPA-Universitas Indonesia, Depok 16424 (Indonesia); Notonegoro, Hamdan Akbar [Mechanical Engineering Dept., FT-Universitas Sultan Ageng Tirtayasa,Cilegon 42435 (Indonesia); Thosin, Kemas Ahmad Zaini [Pusat Penelitian Fisika,LIPI, Serpong (Indonesia)

    2016-06-17

    The 304 stainless steel (SS) type is widely used in oil and gas operations due to its excellent corrosion resistance. However, the presence of the fine sand particles and H{sub 2}S gas contained in crude oil could lead the erosion and abrasion in steel. In this study, cold rolled treatments were conducted to the 304 SS in order to increase the wear resistance of the steel. The cold work has resulted in thickness reduction to 20%, 40% and 60% of the original. Various microstructural characterizations were used to analyze the effect of deformation. The hardness characterization showed that the initial hardness value increased from 145 HVC to 395 HVC as the level of deformation increase. Further, the wear resistance increased with the deformation rate from 0% to 40% and subsequently decreased from 40% to 60% deformation rate. Microstructural characterization shows that the boundary change to coincide by 56 µm, 49 µm, 45 µm, and 43 µm width and the grain go to flatten and being folded like needles. The effect of deformation on the grain morphology and structure was also studied by optical metallography and X-Ray Diffraction. It is shown that the deformation by means of a cold rolled process has transformed the austenite structure into martensitic structure.

  15. Cold working room temperature increased moderate/severe qualitative work stressor risk in Air Traffic Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Astuti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Latar belakang: Pemandu lalu lintas udara (PLLU kemungkinan lebih besar terkena stresor kerja kualitatif. Tujuan penelitian untuk mengidentifikasi beberapa faktor yang berkaitan dengan stresor kerja kualitatif moderat (SBKL sedang di antara PLLU di Bandar Udara Internasional Soekarno-Hatta.Metode:  Studi  potong  lintang  dilakukan  pada  bulan  November 2008  dengan  subjek  PLLU  aktif  bekerja minimal  6  bulan. Penelitian  menggunakan  kuesioner  standar  survei  diagnostik stres  dan  kuesioner  stresor rumah tangga. Kuesioner diisi oleh subjek.Hasil: Subjek berumur 27-55 tahun terdiri dari 122 PLLU dengan SBKL sedang/berat dan serta 13 (9,6% PLLU dengan SBKL rendah. Model menunjukkan bahwa mereka yang merasa dibandingkan dengan yang tidak merasa suhu ruangan terlalu dingin mempunyai 11-lipat risiko SBKL sedang/berat [rasio odds suaian (ORa = 10,63: 95% interval kepercayaan (CI = 1,79-65,59]. Dibandingkan dengan subjek tanpa stresor ketaksaan peran, mereka yang mempunyai stresor ketaksaan peran sedang/berat berisiko 8,2-lipat SBKL sedang/berat (ORa = 8,23: 95% CI = 1,13-59,90. Di samping itu, mereka yang mempunyai stresor tanggung jawab sedang/berat mendapatkan dibandingkan dengan tanpa stesor ini 6,6-kali berisiko SBKL sedang/berat (ORa = 6,64: 95% CI = 1.13-38.85, Selanjutntya mereka yang mempunyai dibandingkan dengan yang tanpa stresor pengembangan karir sedang/berat mempunyai 3,7-kali risiko SBKL sedang/berat  (ORa = 3,67: 95% CI = 0.88-15.35; P = 0,075.Kesimpulan: Subjek LLU yang merasa suhu ruangan terlalu dingin, stresor ketaksaan peran, tanggung jawab personal dan pengembangan karir sedang/berat mengalami peningkatan risiko SBKL sedang/berat. (Health Science Indones 2011;2:58-65.AbstractBack ground: Air traffic controllers (ATCs have a high level of responsibility which may lead to qualitative work load stressor (QLWS. This study identified several risk factors related to moderate qualitative

  16. Cold urticaria patients exhibit normal skin levels of functional mast cells and histamine after tolerance induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kring Tannert, Line; Stahl Skov, Per; Bjerremann Jensen, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Cold urticaria is a skin condition characterized by rapid appearance of itchy wheals and occasionally angioedema in response to cold stimulation. Antihistamines do not sufficiently protect all patients from symptoms, even when used in higher than standard doses. In these patients, desensitization...... to cold can be beneficial. The aim was to investigate whether desensitization can lower temperature thresholds and reduce release of histamine in the skin. Cold urticaria patients were subjected to desensitization and assessed for skin responses to cold stimulation and codeine before and after. Histamine...... levels mediated by cold and codeine were determined by cutaneous microdialysis before and after desensitization in patients and healthy controls. Desensitization to cold resulted in protection from cold-induced symptoms and lower temperature thresholds in six out of nine patients. Desensitization also...

  17. Effect of Prior Cold Work on Grain Refinement in ST 44-2 Mild Steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A steel grade, ST 44-2 (0.14-0.20%C, 0.18-0.28%Si, 0.40-0.60%Mn), was cold worked to various degrees of deformation and subjected to various isothermal heat treatments, keeping the holding time constant while the peak temperature was varied and vice-versa for a number of cycles. The higher the degree of cold work ...

  18. Corrosion behavior of cold-worked austenitic stainless steels in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Yuji

    2014-05-01

    The effect of cold working on the corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) was studied to develop accelerator-driven systems for the transmutation of long-lived radioactive wastes and lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors. Corrosion tests on solution-treated, 20% cold-worked and 50% cold-worked 316SS and JPCA (15Cr-15Ni-Ti) were conducted in oxygen-controlled LBE. Slight ferritization caused by Ni dissolution and Pb-Bi penetration were observed for all specimens in the corrosion test conducted at 500 °C for 1000 h in liquid LBE with an intermediate oxygen concentration (1.4 × 10-7 wt.%). In the corrosion test performed at 550 °C for 1000 h in liquid LBE with a low oxygen concentration (4.2 × 10-9 wt.%), the depth of the ferritization of 316SS and JPCA increased with the extent of cold working. Only oxidation was observed in the corrosion test that was performed at 550 °C for 1000 h in liquid LBE with a high oxygen concentration (approximately 10-5 wt.%). Cold working accelerated the formation of the double layer oxide and increased the thickness of the oxide layer slightly. In contrast, the ferritization accompanied by Pb-Bi penetration was widely observed with oxidation for all specimens corrosion tested at 550 °C for 3000 h under the high-oxygen condition. Cold working increased the depth of the ferritization of 316SS and JPCA. It is considered that cold working accelerated the ferritization and Pb-Bi penetration through the enhanced dissolution of Ni into LBE due to an increase in the dislocation density under conditions in which the protective oxide layer was not formed in liquid LBE.

  19. Use of the Larson-Miller parameter to study the influence of ageing on the hardness of cold-worked austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, M. (Materials Development Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)); Venkadesan, S. (Materials Development Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)); Sivaprasad, P.V. (Materials Development Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)); Mannan, S.L. (Materials Development Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India))

    1994-08-01

    The Larson-Miller parameter (L-M parameter) was used for studying the influence of thermal ageing on hardness of cold-worked titanium-modified 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo austenitic stainless steel, which is commonly referred to as alloy D-9. The samples were given 15-22.5% prior cold work and aged in the temperature range 873-1223 K for durations ranging from 0.25-4800 h. Using a non-linear regression analysis of hardness data as a function of cold-work level and ageing conditions, the optimum cold-work level for alloy D-9 has been determined to be 20%. ((orig.)). Letter-to-the-editor

  20. The Effect of Cold Showering on Health and Work: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierevelt, Inger N.; van der Heijden, Bas C. J. M.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to determine the cumulative effect of a routine (hot-to-) cold shower on sickness, quality of life and work productivity. Methods Between January and March 2015, 3018 participants between 18 and 65 years without severe comorbidity and no routine experience of cold showering were randomized (1:1:1:1) to a (hot-to-) cold shower for 30, 60, 90 seconds or a control group during 30 consecutive days followed by 60 days of showering cold at their own discretion for the intervention groups. The primary outcome was illness days and related sickness absence from work. Secondary outcomes were quality of life, work productivity, anxiety, thermal sensation and adverse reactions. Results 79% of participants in the interventions groups completed the 30 consecutive days protocol. A negative binomial regression model showed a 29% reduction in sickness absence for (hot-to-) cold shower regimen compared to the control group (incident rate ratio: 0.71, P = 0.003). For illness days there was no significant group effect. No related serious advents events were reported. Conclusion A routine (hot-to-) cold shower resulted in a statistical reduction of self-reported sickness absence but not illness days in adults without severe comorbidity. Trial Registration Netherlands National Trial Register NTR5183 PMID:27631616

  1. Behavior of cold-worked AISI-304 steel in stress-corrosion cracking process: Microstructural aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, A.; Novotny, R.; Uca, O.; Krsjak, V.; Macak, J.; Debarberis, L.

    2008-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steel is one of the key structural materials for a wide-range of components for present nuclear power plants. Moreover, this type of steel is also foreseen as a key structural material in future reactor systems, the so-called Generation IV. However, for the successful application of these materials in new environmental conditions an integrated Research and Development program needs to be successfully completed. This work is focused to the evaluation of cold-worked AISI-304 stainless steel from 20 to 45% of cold-worked deformation by different spectroscopic techniques within the aim to study the microstructural characteristics. In particular, positron annihilation spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering have been used for characterization of phase transformation and microstructural behavior. Furthermore, outcomes of corrosion properties of cold-worked AISI-304 stainless steel exposed for 100 and 500 h in super-critical water reactor conditions are correlated with the obtained results.

  2. A comprehensive review on cold work of AISI D2 tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Mohd Aidil Shah bin; Minhat, Mohamad bin; Hussein, Nur Izan Syahriah Binti; Salleh, Mohd Shukor bin

    2017-11-01

    As a common material in mould and die application, AISI D2 cold work tool steel has proven to be a promising chosen material in the industries. However, challenges remain in using AISI D2 through a modified version with a considerable progress having been made in recent years. This paper provides a critical review of the original as-cast AISI D2 cold work tool steel up to the modified version. The main purpose is to develop an understanding of current modified tool steel trend; the machinability of AISI D2 (drilling, milling, turning, grinding and EDM/WEDM; and the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of these cold work tool steels due to the presence of alloy materials in the steel matrix. The doping of rare earth alloy element, new steel fabrication processes, significant process parameter in machinability and surface treatment shows that there have been few empirical investigations into these cold work tool steel alloys. This study has discovered that cold work tool steel will remain to be explored in order to survive in the steel industries.

  3. Working memory performance after acute exposure to the cold pressor stress in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncko, Roman; Johnson, Linda; Merikangas, Kathleen; Grillon, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Effects of acute stress exposure on learning and memory have been frequently studied in both animals and humans. However, only a few studies have focused specifically on working memory performance and the available data are equivocal. The present study examined working memory performance during the Sternberg item recognition task after exposure to a predominantly adrenergic stressor. Twenty four healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a stress group or a control group. The stress group was exposed to the cold pressor stress test (CPS; i.e. insertion of the dominant hand into ice water for 60s),while 37 degrees C warm water was used with the control group. Twenty minutes after the stress exposure, working memory performance was tested with the Sternberg item recognition task with three levels of cognitive load. Sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axis activation during CPS, were assessed by measuring heart rate and salivary cortisol before and during (heart rate) or 30 min after (cortisol) the stress procedure. Exposure to the CPS test was associated with a significant increase in heart rate but no increase in salivary cortisol. Participants exposed to the stress procedure showed significantly shorter reaction times during trials with higher cognitive load but tended to show higher false alarm rates than control subjects. The present results indicate that exposure to CPS can be associated with signs of both enhanced and impaired working memory performance. The observed behavioral pattern might represent a form of streamlined information processing advantageous in a threatening situation.

  4. Characterization of SCC Initiation Precursors in Cold-Worked Alloy 690

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruska, Karen; Zhai, Ziqing; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2017-03-27

    Due to its superior resistance to corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC), high Cr, Ni-base Alloy 690 is now commonly used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Even though highly cold-worked (CW) Alloy 690 has been shown to be susceptible to SCC crack growth in PWR primary water environments, an open question remains whether SCC initiation was possible for these materials under constant load test conditions. Testing has been performed on a series of CW alloy 690 CRDM tubing specimens at constant load for up to 9,220 hours in 360°C simulated PWR primary water. A companion paper will discuss the overall testing approach and describe results on different alloy 690 heats and cold work levels. The focus of the current paper is to illustrate the use of focused ion beam (FIB), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the high-resolution investigation of precursor damage and intergranular (IG) crack nucleation in these specimens. Three-dimensional (3D) FIB/SEM imaging has been conducted on a series of grain boundary (GB) damage precursors, such as IG small cavities, local corrosion and even shallow cracks observed at the specimen surface. Contrast variations and EDS mapping were used to distinguish oxides, carbides and cavities from the matrix material. Nanometer-sized cavities were observed associated with GB carbides in the highly CW specimens. Shallow IG cracks were present in the 30%CW specimens and exhibited oxidized crack flanks and a higher density of cavities ahead of the oxide front in all cases. The shape and distribution of carbides and cavities in the plane of the cracked GBs was analyzed in 3D to gain a mechanistic understanding of the processes that may be leading to crack initiation in highly CW alloy 690.

  5. Effect of prior cold work on the degree of sensitisation of welded joints of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel studied by using an electrochemical minicell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Tiedra, Pilar [Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento CMeIM/EGI/ICGF/IM/IPF, Universidad de Valladolid, Escuela de Ingenierias Industriales, Paseo del Cauce 59, Valladolid 47011 (Spain); Martin, Oscar, E-mail: oml@eis.uva.es [Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento CMeIM/EGI/ICGF/IM/IPF, Universidad de Valladolid, Escuela de Ingenierias Industriales, Paseo del Cauce 59, Valladolid 47011 (Spain); Garcia, Cristina; Martin, Fernando; Lopez, Manuel [Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Departamento CMeIM/EGI/ICGF/IM/IPF, Universidad de Valladolid, Escuela de Ingenierias Industriales, Paseo del Cauce 59, Valladolid 47011 (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double loop shows greater sensitivity to interdendritic corrosion than single loop. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fusion line sensitisation is lower than that of weld metal for all prior cold works. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat affected zone sensitisation is maximum at a prior cold work of 10%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat affected zone sensitisation Much-Less-Than base material sensitisation for a prior cold work of 20%. - Abstract: This work aims to assess the effect of prior cold work on the degree of sensitisation of each of the four welding zones of welded joints of AISI 316L subjected to post-welding sensitisation. Electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation and double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation tests are performed on each of the four zones by using a small-scale electrochemical cell (minicell). The results show that the degree of sensitisation of heat affected zone, which achieves its maximum at a prior cold work level of 10%, is significantly lower than that of base material for a prior cold work of 20%.

  6. Cold induced changes in lipid, protein and carbohydrate levels in the tropical insect Gromphadorhina coquereliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Lubawy, Jan; Spochacz, Marta; Ewelina, Paluch; Grzegorz, Smykalla; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Slocinska, Malgorzata

    2015-05-01

    Insects cope with thermal stressors using mechanisms such as rapid cold hardening and acclimation. These mechanisms have been studied in temperate insects, but little is known about their use by tropical insects in response to cold stress. Here, we investigated whether cold stress (1×8 h and 3×8 h at 4°C) triggers a metabolic response in the Madagascar cockroach Gromphadorhina coquereliana. We examined the effects of cold on the levels of selected metabolites in the fat body tissue of G. coquereliana. After cold exposure, we found that the quantity of total protein increased significantly in the insect fat body, whereas glycogen decreased slightly. Using antibodies, we observed upregulation of AQP-like proteins and changes in the HSP70 levels in the fat body of G. coquereliana when exposed to cold. We also examined the content and nature of the free sugars in the G. coquereliana hemolymph and discovered an increase in the levels of polyols and glucose in response to cold stress. These results suggest an important role of the fat body tissue of tropical insects upon cold exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Political Evolution at NATO Level in Post Cold War Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomescu Cătălin Tomiţă

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the post Cold era sounds like that: „The world has changed dramatically. The Alliance has made an essential contribution. The peoples of North America and the whole of Europe can now join in a community of shared values based on freedom, democracy, human rights and the rule of law. As an agent of change, a source of stability and the indispensable guarantor of its members' security, our Alliance will continue to play a key role in building a new, lasting order of peace in Europe: a Europe of cooperation and prosperity”[1].

  8. Verification of Cold Working and Interference Levels at Fastener Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Program Conference, San Antonio, Texas, December 1998. Brooks Craig L., Mills, Thomas B., Prost-Domasky, Scott A., Honeycutt, Kyle, and Young...Model. AFRL-VA-WP-TR-2006-3080, Final Report for 01 May 2003 – 30 April 2006, SBIR Phase II Report, May 2006. 150 pages. Brot, Abraham and Matias

  9. Work Hardening Behavior of 1020 Steel During Cold-Beating Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    CUI, Fengkui; LING, Yuanfei; XUE, Jinxue; LIU, Jia; LIU, Yuhui; LI, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The present research of cold-beating formation mainly focused on roller design and manufacture, kinematics, constitutive relation, metal flow law, thermo-mechanical coupling, surface micro-topography and microstructure evolution. However, the research on surface quality and performance of workpieces in the process of cold-beating is rare. Cold-beating simulation experiment of 1020 steel is conducted at room temperature and strain rates ranging from 2000 to 4000 s-1 base on the law of plastic forming. According to the experimental data, the model of strain hardening of 1020 steel is established, Scanning Electron Microscopy(SEM) is conducted, the mechanism of the work hardening of 1020 steel is clarified by analyzing microstructure variation of 1020 steel. It is found that the strain rate hardening effect of 1020 steel is stronger than the softening effect induced by increasing temperatures, the process of simulation cold-beating cause the grain shape of 1020 steel significant change and microstructure elongate significantly to form a fibrous tissue parallel to the direction of deformation, the higher strain rate, the more obvious grain refinement and the more hardening effect. Additionally, the change law of the work hardening rate is investigated, the relationship between dislocation density and strain, the relationship between work hardening rate and dislocation density is obtained. Results show that the change trend of the work hardening rate of 1020 steel is divided into two stages, the work hardening rate decreases dramatically in the first stage and slowly decreases in the second stage, finally tending toward zero. Dislocation density increases with increasing strain and strain rate, work hardening rate decreases with increasing dislocation density. The research results provide the basis for solving the problem of improving the surface quality and performance of workpieces under cold-beating formation of 1020 steel.

  10. Psychological job demands as a risk factor for common cold in a Dutch working population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohren, D.C.; Swaen, G.M.H.; Borm, P.J.; Bast, A.J.J.; Galama, J.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effect of Psychological Job Demands (PJD) on the occurrence of the clinical symptoms of common cold. METHODS: Subjects, participating in a large prospective cohort study on psychological determinants of fatigue at work, were asked to fill in a questionnaire on the

  11. Effect of cold work and aging on mechanical properties of a copper ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Investigations have been carried out on the effect of cold work and subsequent aging on mechani- cal properties of a Cu-bearing HSLA-100 steel ... in ductility, which again improves on subsequent aging. The C70A treatment involving 70 pct ..... Hence, the strong pinning effects of dislocations and (Nb, Ti)C carbides ...

  12. A Finite Element Procedure for Interference - Fit and Cold - Working Problems with Limited Yielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation Australian Airlines, Library Qantas Airways Limited Ansett Airlines of Australia, Library...AERONAUTICAL RESEARCH LABORATORIES Structures Report 425 A FINITE ELEMENT PROCEDURE FOR INTERFERENCE - FIT AND COLD - WORKING PROBLEMS WITH LIMITED ...changing loading. An 18 degree sector angle was dictated by a shape limitation for the innermost pin element whilst the division into generally four

  13. Colds and influenza-like illnesses in university students: impact on health, academic and work performance, and health care use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, Kristin L; D'Heilly, Sarah; Ehlinger, Edward

    2005-05-01

    Upper respiratory tract illnesses (URIs) are a major cause of morbidity among adults, with substantial direct and indirect costs to society, but their impact among university students has not been well described. We sought to assess the impact of URIs (colds and influenza-like illnesses [ILIs]) on the health, academic and work performance, and health care use of university students. This was a cohort study of college students at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities campus (Minneapolis-St. Paul), who were recruited during October 2002 and followed up from November 2002 through April 2003. All 42,000 registered students were invited via e-mail to participate. Baseline information was obtained in October 2002. Monthly follow-up information about colds or ILIs was obtained for the period of November 2002 through April 2003. Data were collected by use of Internet-based questionnaires. Of 4919 volunteers, 3249 completed all follow-up surveys. The mean age was 22.7 years; 68% of the volunteers were female. Ninety-one percent had > or = 1 URI (83% had > or = 1 cold, and 36.7% had > or = 1 ILI). These URIs caused 6023 bed-days, 4263 missed school days, 3175 missed work days, and 45,219 days of illness. Of the cohort, 22.2% had > or = 1 health care visit, and 15.8% used antibiotics to treat a URI; 27.8% did poorly on a test and 46.3% did poorly on a class assignment. ILIs versus colds had a much greater impact on all parameters (e.g., general health level was 55%-60% lower with ILI vs. no URI and 33%-39% lower for colds vs. no URI; P students. Enhanced efforts to prevent and control URIs, especially influenza vaccination, could improve the health and well-being of the 17 million college and university students in this country.

  14. SCC crack growth rate of cold worked 316L stainless steel in PWR environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Donghai; Chen, Kai; Yu, Lun; lu, Hui; Zhang, Lefu; Shi, Xiuqiang; Xu, Xuelian

    2015-01-01

    Many component failures in nuclear power plants were found to be caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cold worked austenitic steels. Some of the pressure boundary component materials are even cold worked up to 35% plastic deformation, leaving high residual stress and inducing high growth rate of corrosion crack. Controlling water chemistry is one of the best counter measure to mitigate this problem. In this work, the effects of temperature (200 up to 325 °C) and dissolved oxygen (0 up to 2000 μg/L) on SCC crack growth rates of cold worked austenitic stainless steel type 316L have been tested by using direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. The results showed that temperature affected SCC crack growth rates more significantly in oxygenated water than in deaerated water. In argon deaerated water, the crack growth rate exhibited a peak at about 250 °C, which needs further verification. At 325 °C, the SCC crack growth rate increased rapidly with the increase of dissolved oxygen concentration within the range from 0 up to 200 μg/L, while when dissolved oxygen was above 200 μg/L, the crack growth rate followed a shallower dependence on dissolved oxygen concentration.

  15. Characterisation of an Advanced Nickel Based Superalloy Post Cold Work by Swaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R. Bache

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical bars of the advanced nickel based superalloy RR1000 were subjected to swaging to induce approximately 30% cold work. Grain size analysis demonstrated a distinct modification to the microstructure whilst electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD measurements confirmed the evolution of a relatively strong <111> texture parallel with the longitudinal bar axis. Intragranular strain damage was identified. The effects of the swaging on bulk mechanical properties are illustrated across a range of test temperatures.

  16. Rapid nickel diffusion in cold-worked type 316 austenitic steel at 360-500 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arioka, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety Systems, Inc., Mihama (Japan); Iijima, Yoshiaki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science; Miyamoto, Tomoki [Kobe Material Testing Laboratory Co. Ltd., Harima (Japan)

    2017-10-15

    The diffusion coefficient of nickel in cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel was determined by the diffusion couple method in the temperature range between 360 and 500 C. A diffusion couple was prepared by electroless nickel plating on the surface of a 20 % cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel specimen. The growth in width of the interdiffusion zone was proportional to the square root of diffusion time until 14 055 h. The diffusion coefficient of nickel (D{sub Ni}) in cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel was determined by extrapolating the concentration-dependent interdiffusion coefficient to 11 at.% of nickel. The value of D{sub Ni} at 360 C was about 5 000 times higher than the lattice diffusion coefficient of nickel in Type 316 austenitic steel. The determined activation energy 117 kJ mol{sup -1} was 46.6 % of the activation energy 251 kJ mol{sup -1} for the lattice diffusion of nickel in Type 316 austenitic steel.

  17. True stress–strain curves of cold worked stainless steel over a large range of strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamaya, Masayuki, E-mail: kamaya@inss.co.jp; Kawakubo, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    True stress–strain curves for cold worked stainless steel were obtained over a range of strains that included a large strain exceeding the strain for the tensile strength (post-necking strain). A specified testing method was used to obtain the stress–strain curves in air at room temperature. The testing method employed the digital image correlation (DIC) technique and iterative finite element analyses (FEA) and was referred to as IFD (Iteration FEA procedure based on DIC measurement) method. Although hourglass type specimens have been previously used for the IFD method, in this study, plate specimens with a parallel gage section were used to obtain accurate yield and tensile strengths together with the stress–strain curves. The stress–strain curves including the post-necking strain were successfully obtained by the IFD method, and it was shown that the stress–strain curves for different degrees of cold work collapsed onto a single curve when the offset strain was considered. It was also shown that the Swift type constitutive equation gave good regression for the true stress–strain curves including the post-necking strain regardless of the degree of cold work, although the Ramberg–Osgood type constitutive equation showed poor fit. In the regression for the Swift type constitutive equation, the constant for power law could be assumed to be n{sub S} = 0.5.

  18. True stress-strain curves of cold worked stainless steel over a large range of strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Kawakubo, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    True stress-strain curves for cold worked stainless steel were obtained over a range of strains that included a large strain exceeding the strain for the tensile strength (post-necking strain). A specified testing method was used to obtain the stress-strain curves in air at room temperature. The testing method employed the digital image correlation (DIC) technique and iterative finite element analyses (FEA) and was referred to as IFD (Iteration FEA procedure based on DIC measurement) method. Although hourglass type specimens have been previously used for the IFD method, in this study, plate specimens with a parallel gage section were used to obtain accurate yield and tensile strengths together with the stress-strain curves. The stress-strain curves including the post-necking strain were successfully obtained by the IFD method, and it was shown that the stress-strain curves for different degrees of cold work collapsed onto a single curve when the offset strain was considered. It was also shown that the Swift type constitutive equation gave good regression for the true stress-strain curves including the post-necking strain regardless of the degree of cold work, although the Ramberg-Osgood type constitutive equation showed poor fit. In the regression for the Swift type constitutive equation, the constant for power law could be assumed to be nS = 0.5.

  19. Plasma thrombopoietin level after liver transplantation: relationship to cold ischemia time and coagulation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobado-Berrios, P M; López-Pedrera, C; Soriano, F; de la Mata, M; Guerrero, R; Torres, A; Velasco, F

    2000-06-01

    To determine the relation between thrombopoietin (Tpo) levels following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), cold ischemia time and postoperative peripheral blood platelet count and prothrombin activity. Prospective clinical study. Intensive care unit. Fourteen patients with uncomplicated postoperative course after OLT. Plasma Tpo, as quantified by enzyme immunoassay, rose significantly from 194.9 +/- 45.7 pg/ml on day 1 after OLT to a peak value of 500.7 +/- 94.1 pg/ml on day 5 while platelet count was below normal values. Then the platelet count increased and reached normal values while Tpo decreased to normal. The rise of Tpo levels was associated with normalization of prothrombin time but peak Tpo concentrations were in inverse correlation with cold ischemia times. The extent of production of Tpo in the liver graft following OLT is affected by cold ischemia time. This observation may be applicable in the prevention of bleeding complications associated with postoperative thrombocytopenia.

  20. Influence of prior cold working on the tribological behavior of Cu-0.65 wt.%Cr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouhanjani, Saeed Asadi [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-553, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: saeed.asadi@gmail.com; Zare-Bidaki, Arman; Abedini, Morteza [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395-553, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, Nader [Minning and Metallurgy Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-07-08

    The influence of prior cold working on the friction and wear behavior of Cu-0.65 wt.%Cr alloy under dry sliding against a steel disk was investigated on a pin-on-disk wear tester. The worn surfaces and debrises of Cu-Cr alloy were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrum. The results indicated that prior cold working and aging had an effect on the hardness and wear resistance of Cu-Cr alloy; in other words hardness and wear rate increased with the amount of cold working. At constant aging temperature, the wear rate of Cu-Cr alloys increase with cold working and reached maximum at 50% cold working. At constant amount of cold working aged specimens at 500 deg. C shows higher wear resistance than 450 deg. C. Crack initiation and propagation in the tribolayer and at the interface of subsurface and tribolayer was the dominant mechanism during the sliding process.

  1. How geomorphology and groundwater level affect the spatio-temporal variability of riverine cold water patches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Vincent; Piégay, Hervé; Allemand, Pascal; Vaudor, Lise; Goma, Régis; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Temperature is a key factor for river ecosystems. In summer, patches of cold water are formed in the river by groundwater seepage. These patches have strong ecological significance and extend to the surface water in a well-mixed riverine system. These patches can serve as thermal refuges for some fish species during summer. In this study, the temporal variability and spatial distribution of cold water patches were explored along a 50 km river reach (the lower Ain River, France) using thermal infrared airborne remote sensing. This study examines a new range of processes acting on cold water patches at different scales that have not previously been touched upon in the literature. Three airborne campaigns were conducted during the summers of 2010, 2011 and 2014. Based on these images, a large number of cold water patches were identified using an automated method. Four types of patches were observed: tributary plumes, cold side channels (former channels or point-bar backwater channels), side seeps (located directly in the river channel) and gravel bar seeps (occurring at the downstream end of gravel bars). Logistic regression was used to analyse the longitudinal distribution of cold water patches according to geomorphologic indicators reflecting current or past fluvial process. Side seeps were found to be related to the local geology. Cold side channels were correlated to contemporary and past lateral river mobility. Gravel bar seeps were related to the current development of bars and are more prevalent in wandering reaches than in single-bed incised and paved reaches. The logistic model was subsequently used to evaluate gravel bar seep variability in the past. The model suggests larger numbers of seeps in the mid-20th century when bar surface area was higher. Interannual variability in the occurrence and spatial extent of side seeps and gravel bar seeps appear to be related to groundwater level fluctuations. Cold side channels exhibited greater interannual stability

  2. Nitriding Process Characterization of Cold Worked AISI 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Alfredo Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitriding behavior of austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and 316 was studied by different cold work degree (0% (after heat treated, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% before nitride processing. The microstructure, layer thickness, hardness, and chemical microcomposition were evaluated employing optical microscopy, Vickers hardness, and scanning electron microscopy techniques (WDS microanalysis. The initial cold work (previous plastic deformations in both AISI 304 and 306 austenitic stainless steels does not show special influence in all applied nitriding kinetics (in layer thicknesses. The nitriding processes have formed two layers, one external layer formed by expanded austenite with high nitrogen content, followed by another thinner layer just below formed by expanded austenite with a high presence of carbon (back diffusion. An enhanced diffusion can be observed on AISI 304 steel comparing with AISI 316 steel (a nitrided layer thicker can be noticed in the AISI 304 steel. The mechanical strength of both steels after nitriding processes reveals significant hardness values, almost 1100 HV, on the nitrided layers.

  3. Cavity Optomechanics with synthetic Landau levels of ultra cold Fermi gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sankalpa; Padhi, Bikash

    2014-03-01

    Ultra cold fermionic atoms placed in a synthetic magnetic field arrange themselves in Landau levels. We theoretically study the optomechanical interaction between the light field and collective excitations of such fermionic atoms in synthetic magnetic field by placing them in side a Fabry Perot cavity. We derive the effective hamiltonian for particle hole excitations from a filled Landau level using a bosonization technique and obtain an expression for the cavity transmission spectrum. Using this we show that the cavity transmission spectrum demonstrates cold atom analogue of Subnikov de Hass oscillation in electronic condensed matter systems. We discuss the experimental consequences for this oscillation for such system and the related optical bistability. Ref. Bikash Padhi and Sankalpa Ghosh, Physical Review Letters, Vol 111, 043603 (2013) PDA Grant, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi.

  4. Working in cold environment and risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Swedish EIRA case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Pingling; Bengtsson, Camilla; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    To investigate (1) whether working in cold environment (WCE) is associated with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (overall), anticitrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive RA and ACPA-negative RA and (2) whether WCE interacts with occupational physical workload in conferring RA risk. Data from the Swedish population-based case-control study Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis involving 3659 incident cases and 5925 controls were analysed. Study participants were asked whether they had ever worked in cold/outdoor environment along with their exposure duration and frequency. Occurrence of RA among exposed and unexposed subjects were compared by calculating ORs with 95% CI using logistic regression. Additive interactions between WCE and six types of physical workload were assessed using the principle of departure from additivity by calculating attributable proportion due to interaction (AP). The OR associated with having ever worked in cold environment was 1.5 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.7) for RA (overall), 1.6 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.8) for ACPA-positive RA and 1.4 (95% CI 1.2 to 1.6) for ACPA-negative RA. The risk of developing RA increased with increasing cumulative dose of working in cold indoor environment (p value working in cold outdoor environment. Positive additive interaction was observed between WCE and repetitive hand/finger movements (AP 0.3 (95% CI 0.1 to 0.5)). WCE is associated with increased risk of developing both ACPA-positive and ACPA-negative RA. A dose-response relationship was found between working in cold indoor environment and risk of developing RA. Moderate additive interaction was observed between exposure to cold environment and exposure to repetitive hand/finger movements.

  5. Working in cold environment and risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Swedish EIRA case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Camilla; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate (1) whether working in cold environment (WCE) is associated with an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (overall), anticitrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive RA and ACPA-negative RA and (2) whether WCE interacts with occupational physical workload in conferring RA risk. Methods Data from the Swedish population-based case-control study Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis involving 3659 incident cases and 5925 controls were analysed. Study participants were asked whether they had ever worked in cold/outdoor environment along with their exposure duration and frequency. Occurrence of RA among exposed and unexposed subjects were compared by calculating ORs with 95% CI using logistic regression. Additive interactions between WCE and six types of physical workload were assessed using the principle of departure from additivity by calculating attributable proportion due to interaction (AP). Results The OR associated with having ever worked in cold environment was 1.5 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.7) for RA (overall), 1.6 (95% CI 1.4 to 1.8) for ACPA-positive RA and 1.4 (95% CI 1.2 to 1.6) for ACPA-negative RA. The risk of developing RA increased with increasing cumulative dose of working in cold indoor environment (p value working in cold outdoor environment. Positive additive interaction was observed between WCE and repetitive hand/finger movements (AP 0.3 (95% CI 0.1 to 0.5)). Conclusions WCE is associated with increased risk of developing both ACPA-positive and ACPA-negative RA. A dose–response relationship was found between working in cold indoor environment and risk of developing RA. Moderate additive interaction was observed between exposure to cold environment and exposure to repetitive hand/finger movements. PMID:28879055

  6. Fatigue damage in 20% cold-worked type 316L stainless steel under deuteron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, R. (CEC, Joint Research Centre, 21020, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Type 316L stainless steel samples in 20% cold-worked conditions were exposed to fully reversed fatigue cycling in torsion at 400 C during an irradiation with 19 MeV deuterons. Fatigue tests were performed in the high cycle fatigue (HCF) range under continuous cycling and in the low cycle fatigue (LCF) range by imposing a hold-time at the minimum strain value. In comparison with tests under thermal conditions, an increase in the number of cycles to failure N[sub f] by a factor of 6 is observed for the HCF tests and a decrease in N[sub f], by more than an order of magnitude, for the LCF tests. The data are analyzed using a fatigue damage model: a fatigue damage parameter is defined and the change in this parameter caused by the different irradiation or loading conditions shows directly the effect of changed experimental conditions on the fatigue life. ((orig.))

  7. Microstructural evolution of a cold work tool steel after pulsed laser remelting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kosec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the investigation of micro-structural behaviour of a Mat. No. 1.2379 (EN-X160CrMoV121; AISI D2 cold work tool steel after remelting with a precise pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The investigated steel is one of the most hard to weld tool steels, due to large amount of alloying elements. The analysis was done on single spots remelted with specific laser pulse shape and parameters, assuring crack-less solidification. Re-solidifi ed areas were investigated with microscopy, hardness measurements, X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction method. Laser treatment causes rapid solidifi cation leading into a formation of a fine dendritic microstructures containing high amount of retained austenite causing a significant decrease of hardness.

  8. Effect of cold working on the aging and corrosion behavior of Fe-Mn-Al stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghayad, I.M.; Girgis, N.N.; Ghanem, W. [Central Metallurgical Research and Development Institute, CMRDI, P.O. Box 87, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); Hamada, A.S. [Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Eng., Faculty of Petrol. and Min. Eng., Suez Canal University, el-Shikg Zayed, 41522 Ismailia (Egypt)

    2004-07-01

    The cold working; aging process; and corrosion behavior of the Fe-Mn-Al stainless steel having a composition of Fe-29wt%Mn-3.5wt%Al-0.5wt%C were investigated. Three different groups of specimens of the alloy were subjected to different procedures of cold working and aging. The first group were cold worked then solution treated at 1100 deg. C for 24 hr, coded as CW+ST. The second group were cold worked, solution treated at 1100 deg. C for 24 hr then cold worked again, coded as CW+ST+CW. The third group were solution treated at 1100 deg. C for 24 hr then cold worked, coded as ST+CW. Subsequent aging treatments of the controlled-worked alloy showed age hardening similar to that reported for the solution-treated alloys. The strengthening of the experimental alloy due to the controlled-working and aging is discussed on the basis of microstructural observations and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior of the different groups of the alloy, CW+ST; CW+ST+CW; ST+CW, with their peak aged and over aged conditions has been examined in 3.5% NaCl solution. The electrochemical techniques, potentiodynamic polarization and Tafel plots were employed. All the alloy groups did not passivate in 3.5% NaCl solution and the major corrosion type observed was general corrosion. The peak aged and over aged of the CW+ST+CW exhibited higher corrosion rates due to the formation of ferrite phase that formed a galvanic couple with the austenitic matrix. (authors)

  9. Nitrogen effect on precipitation and sensitization in cold-worked Type 316L(N) stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yong Jun; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2000-02-01

    The precipitation behavior and sensitization resistance of Type 316L(N) stainless steels containing different concentrations of nitrogen have been investigated at the aging condition of 700°C for cold work (CW) levels ranging from 0% (as solution annealed) to 40% reduction in thickness. The precipitation of M 23C 6 carbide and intermetallic compounds ( χ, Laves and σ phase) was accelerated by increasing the CW level. Nitrogen in the deformed alloys retarded the inter- and intra-granular precipitation of the carbides at low and high CW levels respectively, whereas it increased the relative amount of the χ phase. Quantitative assessment of the degree of sensitization (DOS) using the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) tests indicated that CW levels up to 20% enhanced sensitization while 40% CW suppressed sensitization for all aging times. The increase in nitrogen content accelerated the sensitization at CW levels below 20%. This might be associated with the homogeneous distribution of dislocations and the lower tendency toward recrystallization exhibited in the alloys having higher nitrogen content.

  10. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Cold Work Embrittlement of Interstitial Free Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John T Bowker; Pierre Martin

    2002-10-31

    This work addresses the issues of measurement of secondary cold work embrittlement (SCWE) of an IF steel in deep-drawn parts using laboratory tests, and its correlation with real part fracture. It aimed at evaluating the influence of the steel chemistry and processing condition, microstructure, and test conditions, on SCWE as well as the effect of SCWE on fatigue properties. Size 6-in. cups produced with various draw ratios or trimmed at different heights were tested to determine the ductile-to-brittle-transition temperature (DBTT) as a function of strain. The 2-in. cup/expansion test, bend test and fracture of notched specimens were also used to generate information complementary to that provided by the 6-inch cup/expansion test. The relationship between laboratory tests and fracture in real parts was established by testing large-scale parts. The fatigue behavior was investigated in the as-rolled and deep drawn (high stain) conditions, using prestrained specimens taken from the wall of a formed part.

  11. Cold laboratory test on nuclide removal from Low-Level Radioactive Liquid Waste by lanthanum phosphate reduction coprecipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igarashi, T. [Nuclear Technology and Engineering Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Fukumoto, Masahiro; Murata, E.; Kobayashi, T.; Ikeda, Satoshi

    1999-02-01

    Low Level Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility (LWTF) for the removal of radionuclides contained in Low Level Radioactive Liquid Waste (LLLW) from reprocessing plant in JNC Tokai Works is now under construction. The primary process has now been designed to be complex processes: removal of iodine, of carbonic acid in solution, of lanthanides coprecipitated with ferric hydroxide and of remaining radionuclides such as strontium can cesium. However, the study on the behavior of ruthenium in the coprecipitation process revealed that it is insufficient for removal of ruthenium. As an alternative process, coprecipitation with lanthanum phosphate method substituting for ferric hydroxide was studied. As the result of test, it was confirmed that the method is practical to remove ruthenium with other lanthanides from LLLW except strontium. In this report, the preliminary cold test was described briefly. (H. Itami)

  12. COLD-PCR enriches low-level variant DNA sequences and increases the sensitivity of genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Milbury, Coren A; Guha, Minakshi; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2014-01-01

    Detection of low-level mutations is important for cancer biomarker and therapy targets discovery, but reliable detection remains a technical challenge. The newly developed method of CO-amplification at Lower Denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) helps to circumvent this issue. This PCR-based technology preferentially enriches minor known or unknown variants present in samples with a high background of wild type DNA which often hampers the accurate identification of these minority alleles. This is a simple process that consists of lowering the temperature at the denaturation step during the PCR-cycling protocol (critical denaturation temperature, T c) and inducing DNA heteroduplexing during an intermediate step. COLD-PCR in its simplest forms does not need additional reagents or specific instrumentation and thus, can easily replace conventional PCR and at the same time improve the mutation detection sensitivity limit of downstream technologies. COLD-PCR can be applied in two basic formats: fast-COLD-PCR that can enrich T m-reducing mutations and full-COLD-PCR that can enrich all mutations, though it requires an intermediate cross-hybridization step that lengthens the thermocycling program. An improved version of full-COLD-PCR (improved and complete enrichment, ice-COLD-PCR) has also been described. Finally, most recently, we developed yet another form of COLD-PCR, temperature-tolerant-COLD-PCR, which gradually increases the denaturation temperature during the COLD-PCR reaction, enriching diverse targets using a single cycling program. This report describes practical considerations for application of fast-, full-, ice-, and temperature-tolerant-COLD-PCR for enrichment of mutations prior to downstream screening.

  13. Preparation Femtosecond Laser Prevention for the Cold-Worked Stress Corrosion Crackings on Reactor Grade Low Carbon Stainless Steel

    CERN Document Server

    John Minehara, Eisuke

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the femtosecond lasers like low average power Ti:Sapphire lasers, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser and others could peel off and remove two stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked and the cracking susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in hardened and stretched surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the third origin of corrosive environment. Because a 143 °C and 43% MgCl2 hot solution SCC test was performed for the samples to simulate the cold-worked SCC phenomena of the internals to show no crack at the laser-peered off strip on the cold-worked side and ten-thousands of cracks at the non-peeled off on the same side, it has been successfully demonstrated that the femtosecond lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins and could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC.

  14. Precursor evolution and SCC initiation of cold-worked alloy 690 in simulated PWR primary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing; Kruska, Karen; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2017-03-27

    Stress corrosion crack initiation of two thermally-treated, cold-worked (CW) alloy 690 materials was investigated in 360oC simulated PWR primary water using constant load tensile (CLT) tests and blunt notch compact tension (BNCT) tests equipped with direct current potential drop (DCPD) for in-situ detection of cracking. SCC initiation was not detected by DCPD for the 21% and 31%CW CLT specimens loaded at their yield stress after ~9,220 h, however intergranular (IG) precursor damage and isolated surface cracks were observed on the specimens. The two 31%CW BNCT specimens loaded at moderate stress intensity after several cyclic loading ramps showed DCPD-indicated crack initiation after 10,400h exposure at constant stress intensity, which resulted from significant growth of IG cracks. The 21%CW BNCT specimens only exhibited isolated small IG surface cracks and showed no apparent DCPD change throughout the test. Interestingly, post-test cross-section examinations revealed many grain boundary (GB) nano-cavities in the bulk of all the CLT and BNCT specimens particularly for the 31%CW materials. Cavities were also found along GBs extending to the surface suggesting an important role in crack nucleation. This paper provides an overview of the evolution of GB cavities and will discuss their effects on crack initiation in CW alloy 690.

  15. Infrared low-level wind shear work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Pat

    1988-01-01

    Results of field experiments for the detection of clear air disturbance and low level wind shear utilizing an infrared airborne system are given in vugraph form. The hits, misses and nuisance alarms scores are given. Information is given on the infrared spatial resolution technique. The popular index of aircraft hazard (F= WX over g - VN over AS) is developed for a remote temperature sensor.

  16. Influence of sublingual captopril on plasma catecholamine levels during hypertensive emergencies and cold immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonia, J J; Monteiro, A; Esteves, A; Cunha, M E; Santos, M L; Coutinho, J; Coelho, J L; Brandao, F A; Cerqueira-Gomes, M

    1988-03-11

    Experimental evidence of captopril-induced inhibition of sympathetic activity, mediated by decrease in angiotensin II production, is presented. The blood pressure, plasma catecholamine, plasma renin activity, and plasma aldosterone responses to a single dose of sublingual captopril in 23 patients with hypertensive emergencies were evaluated. The major correlation found was between the captopril-induced decrease in blood pressure and the decrease in plasma norepinephrine levels (r = 0.57, p less than 0.01). In another 11 hypertensive patients with normal or high renin levels, captopril lowered by 65 percent the increase in plasma norepinephrine induced by cold immersion of the forearm. In both circumstances, plasma renin and aldosterone levels changed in accordance with the expected inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme activity. These data suggest that, in selected circumstances in hypertensive patients, captopril exhibits a depressive influence on sympathetic activity along with the inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system.

  17. Investigation of Catalase, Proxidase and Total Protein Level in Some Cold Treated Grapevine Cultivars Cold Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karimi Alavijeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilling is an important environmental stress that influences the yield and quality of many agricultural crops. Different plants use different systems to endure this stress and minimize its effects. One of these systems is enzymatic reaction. To find out more about responses of different grapevine species and cultivars to the low temperature conditions, their enzymatic changes were evaluated in a factorial experiment based on randomized complete design with 3 replication during different periods after chilling stress. Leaf samples of plants under cold stress had been taken and maintained in -80 °C until enzyme extraction. Low temperature around 4 °C is sufficient to induce genes that produce chilling acclimatization proteins. In the present study, leaf samples were collected from the plants that were kept at 4 °C during different time intervals, and then total proteins as well as two main antioxidant enzymes (catalase and guaiacolperoxidase activities were measured. Results showed that as temperature decreased, enzymatic activities were increased in six Iranian grapevine cultivars (‘Atabaki’, ‘Khalili-Danedar’, ‘Shahroodi’, ‘Rajabi-Siah’, ‘Askari’ and ‘Bidane-Sefid’ as well as ‘Riparia’, an American species. The highest enzymatic activities of catalase and ceroxidase were recorded in ‘Khalili-Danedar’ and ‘Riparia’. However,the lowest activities were recorded in ‘Rajabi-Siah’, ‘Bidane-Sefid’ and ‘Shahroodi’. For all studied cultivars, peroxidase showed its highest activity at 12 h after chilling stress, then remained constant, while, the highest activity of catalase were recorded at 8 h. In addition, cold stress increased the total protein content for all studied cultivars, in which ‘Khalili-Danedar’ had the highest protein content amongstudied cultivars. Also, the highest proteins content were recorded at 12 h after exposing plants to cold.

  18. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of annealed and cold worked 316L stainless steel in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The alloy 316L is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water. • The susceptibility of alloy 316L increases with temperature and plastic deformation. • Dynamic strain ageing processes may be active in the material. - Abstract: The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the more promising designs considered by the Generation IV International Forum due to its high thermal efficiency and improving security. To build this reactor, standardized structural materials used in light water reactors (LWR), like austenitic stainless steels, have been proposed. These kind of materials have shown an optimum behavior to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under LWR conditions except when they are cold worked. It is known that physicochemical properties of water change sharply with pressure and temperature inside of the supercritical region. Owing to this situation, there are several doubts about the behavior of candidate materials like austenitic stainless steel 316L to SCC in the SCWR conditions. In this work, alloy 316L was studied in deaerated SCW at two different temperatures (400 °C and 500 °C) and at 25 MPa in order to determine how changes in this variable influence the resistance of this material to SCC. The influence of plastic deformation in the behavior of alloy 316L to SCC in SCW was also studied at both temperatures. Results obtained from these tests have shown that alloy 316L is susceptible to SCC in supercritical water reactor conditions where the susceptibility of this alloy increases with temperature. Moreover, prior plastic deformation of 316L SS increased its susceptibility to environmental cracking in SCW.

  19. Level of Work Related Stress among Teachers in Elementary Schools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agai-Demjaha, Teuta; Bislimovska, Jovanka Karadzinska; Mijakoski, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    .... To identify the level of self-perceived work-related stress among teachers in elementary schools and its relationship to gender, age, position in the workplace, the level of education and working experience...

  20. Cold Remedies: What Works, What Doesn't, What Can't Hurt

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stay hydrated. Water, juice, clear broth or warm lemon water with honey helps loosen congestion and prevents ... the duration of symptoms. Vitamin C may provide benefit for people at high risk of colds due ...

  1. High level liquid waste solidification using a ''Cold' crucible induction melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demine, A.V.; Krylova, N.V.; Polyektov, P.P.; Shestoperov, I.N.; Smelova, T.V. [SSC RF VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gorn, V.F.; Medvedev, G.M. [IA ' ' MAYAK' ' , Ozersk (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    At the present time the primary problem in a closed nuclear fuel cycle is the management of high level liquid waste (HLLW) generated by the recovery of uranium and plutonium from the spent nuclear fuel. Long-term storage of the HLLW, even in special storage facilities, poses a real threat of ecological accidents. This problem can be solved by incorporating the radioactive waste into solid fixed forms that minimize the potential for biosphere pollution by long-lived radionuclides and ensure ecologically acceptable safe storage, transportation, and disposal. In the present report, the advantages of a two-stage HLLW solidification process using a 'cold' crucible induction melter (CCIM) are considered in comparison with a one-stage vitrification process in a ceramic melter. This paper describes the features of a process and equipment for two-stage HLLW solidification technology using a 'cold' crucible induction melter (CCIM) and its advantages compared to a one stage ceramic melter. A two-stage pilot facility and the technical characteristics of the equipment are described using a once-through evaporated and induction cold-crucible melter currently operational at the IA 'Mayak' facility in Ozersk, Russia. The results of pilot-plant tests with simulated HLLW to produce a phosphate glass are described. Features of the new mineral-like waste form matrices synthesized by the CCIM method are also described. Subject to further development, the CCIM technology is planned to be used to solidify all accumulated HLLW at Mayak - first to produce borosilicate glass waste forms then mineral-like waste forms. (authors)

  2. The Cold-Inducible RNA-Binding Protein (CIRP Level in Peripheral Blood Predicts Sepsis Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Zhou

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a lethal and complex clinical syndrome caused by infection or suspected infection. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP is a widely distributed cold-shock protein that plays a proinflammatory role in sepsis and that may induce organ damage. However, clinical studies regarding the use of CIRP for the prognostic evaluation of sepsis are lacking. The purpose of this research was to investigate the prognostic significance of peripheral blood concentrations of CIRP in sepsis. Sepsis was assessed using several common measures, including the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score; the Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score; the lactate, serum creatinine, and procalcitonin (PCT levels; the white blood cell (WBC count; and the neutrophil ratio (N%.Sixty-nine adult patients with sepsis were enrolled in this study. According to the mortality data from the hospital, 38 patients were survivors, and 31 were nonsurvivors. The plasma levels of the biomarkers were measured and the APACHE II and SOFA scores were calculated within 24 hours of patient enrollment into our study. The CIRP level was measured via ELISA.The plasma level of CIRP was significantly higher in the nonsurvivors than in the survivors (median (IQR 4.99 (2.37-30.17 ng/mL and 1.68 (1.41-13.90 ng/mL, respectively; p = 0.013. The correlations of the CIRP level with the APACHE II score (r = 0.248, p = 0.040, n = 69, the SOFA score (r = 0.323, p = 0.007, n = 69, the serum creatinine level (r = 0.316, p = 0.008, n = 69, and the PCT level (r = 0.282, p = 0.019, n = 69 were significant. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed that the area under the ROC curve (AUC for the CIRP level was 0.674 (p = 0.013. According to Cox proportional hazards models, the CIRP level independently predicts sepsis mortality. When the CIRP level in the peripheral blood increased by 10 ng/mL, the mortality risk increased by 1.05-fold (p = 0.012. Thus

  3. Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    2006-08-01

    The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

  4. Retained Austenite Transformation during Heat Treatment of a 5 Wt Pct Cr Cold Work Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, M. Arbab; Medvedeva, Anna; Svensson, Lars-Erik; Karlsson, Leif

    2017-11-01

    Retained austenite transformation was studied for a 5 wt pct Cr cold work tool steel tempered at 798 K and 873 K (525 °C and 600 °C) followed by cooling to room temperature. Tempering cycles with variations in holding times were conducted to observe the mechanisms involved. Phase transformations were studied with dilatometry, and the resulting microstructures were characterized with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Tempering treatments at 798 K (525 °C) resulted in retained austenite transformation to martensite on cooling. The martensite start ( M s ) and martensite finish ( M f ) temperatures increased with longer holding times at tempering temperature. At the same time, the lattice parameter of retained austenite decreased. Calculations from the M s temperatures and lattice parameters suggested that there was a decrease in carbon content of retained austenite as a result of precipitation of carbides prior to transformation. This was in agreement with the resulting microstructure and the contraction of the specimen during tempering, as observed by dilatometry. Tempering at 873 K (600 °C) resulted in precipitation of carbides in retained austenite followed by transformation to ferrite and carbides. This was further supported by the initial contraction and later expansion of the dilatometry specimen, the resulting microstructure, and the absence of any phase transformation on cooling from the tempering treatment. It was concluded that there are two mechanisms of retained austenite transformation occurring depending on tempering temperature and time. This was found useful in understanding the standard tempering treatment, and suggestions regarding alternative tempering treatments are discussed.

  5. A Proposal of a Constitutive Description for Aluminium Alloys in Both Cold and Hot Working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier León

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most important difficulties when the behaviour of a part that is subjected to external mechanical forces is simulated deal with the determination of both the material thermo-mechanical properties and its boundary conditions. The accuracy of the results obtained from the simulation is directly related to the knowledge of the flow stress curve. Therefore, the determination of a material flow rule which is valid for both a wide temperature range and different initial deformation conditions in the starting material presents a great deal of interest when simulation results close to the experimental values are required to be obtained. In this present study, a novel flow stress curve is proposed that is able to accurately predict the behaviour of both materials with no previous accumulated strain and materials that have been previously subjected to severe plastic deformation processes. Moreover, it is possible to use it both for hot and cold working. The results are analysed in a wide test temperature range, which varies from room temperature to 300 °C, and from material previously processed by angular channel extrusion or with no previous strain accumulated. It is shown that the flow rule proposed is effective to model the material behaviour in a wide temperature range and it makes it possible to take the recrystallization phenomena that appear in previously deformed materials into account. In addition, the results obtained are compared with those predicted by other flow rules that exist in the prior literature. Furthermore, the study is complemented with finite element simulations and with a comparison between simulation and experimental results.

  6. Characterization on carbide of a novel steel for cold work roll during solidification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J.; Liu, L.G.; Li, Q.; Sun, Y.L. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Gao, Y.K. [Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Ren, X.J. [School of Engineering, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Yang, Q.X., E-mail: qxyang@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2013-05-15

    A novel steel for cold work roll was developed in this work. Its phase structures were determined by X-ray diffraction, and phase transformation temperatures during the cooling process were measured by Differential Scanning Calorimeter. The Fe–C isopleths of the steel were calculated by Thermo-Calc to preliminarily determine the characteristic temperatures of the different phases. Then the specimens were quenched at these characteristic temperatures. The typical microstructures were observed by Optical Microscopy and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Disperse Spectroscopy. The results show that α-Fe, MC, M{sub 2}C and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} precipitate when the specimen is cooled slowly to room temperature. According to the DSC curve and the Fe–C isopleths, the characteristic temperatures of the phase transformation and carbide precipitation are chosen as 1380 °C, 1240 °C, 1200 °C and 1150 °C respectively. Primary austenite precipitates at 1380 °C, then eutectic reaction occurs in residual liquid after quenching and the eutectic microstructures distribute along the crystal grain boundary. The eutectic MC is leaf-like and eutectic M{sub 2}C is fibrous-like. Both of them precipitate in ternary eutectic reaction simultaneously at 1240 °C, grow together in the form of dendrite along the crystal grain boundary. Secondary MC precipitates from the austenitic matrix at 1200 °C and nucleates at the position where eutectic MC located accompanied by the dissolving of eutectic carbides. The mixed secondary M{sub 2}C and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} precipitate at 1150 °C. The secondary M{sub 2}C is strip-like and honeycomb-like, while the M{sub 7}C{sub 3} is chrysanthemum-like and maze-like. - Highlights: • The solidification process was analyzed by Thermo-Calc, DSC, XRD and SEM observation. • Primary and secondary carbides precipitated during solidification were determined. • The three dimensional morphologies of all carbides was observed. • The

  7. Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talha, Mohd [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India); Kumar, Sanjay [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India); Behera, C.K. [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India); Sinha, O.P., E-mail: opsinha.met@itbhu.ac.in [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2014-02-01

    The aims of the present work are to explore the effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized low cost Ni-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) and to compare it with conventionally used biomedical grade, i.e. AISI 316L and 316LVM, using Dalton's Lymphoma (DL) cell line. The MTT assay [3-(4,5-dimethythiazol 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] was performed on DL cell line for cytotoxicity evaluation and cell adhesion test. As a result, it was observed that the HNS had higher cell proliferation and cell growth and it increases by increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working. The surface wettability of the alloys was also investigated by water contact angle measurements. The value of contact angles was found to decrease with increase in nitrogen content and degree of cold working. This indicates that the hydrophilic character increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working which further attributed to enhance the surface free energy (SFE) which would be conducive to cell adhesion which in turn increases the cell proliferation. - Graphical abstract: Effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized Ni-free nitrogen bearing austenitic stainless steels was explored using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line. Cell proliferation and cell adhesion increase by increasing the degree of cold working and nitrogen content in steel indicating that indigenized material is more biocompatible and no negative effect of cold working on these steels. - Highlights: • Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free austenitic stainless steels • Cell proliferation and adhesion increase with nitrogen and degree of cold working. • Contact angle values decrease with nitrogen and degree of cold working.

  8. Level of Work Related Stress among Teachers in Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuta Agai–Demjaha

    2015-07-01

    CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm that the majority of interviewed teachers perceived their work-related stress as high or very high. In terms of the relationship between the level of teachers’ stress and certain demographic and job characteristics, according to our results, the level of work-related stress has shown significantly high relation to gender, age, levels of grades taught as well as working experience, and significant relation to the level of education.

  9. Ghrelin levels after a cold pressor stress test in obese women with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Marci E; Yahav, Eric; Hashim, Sami A; Geliebter, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone secreted mainly by the stomach, increases appetite and food intake. Surprisingly, ghrelin levels are lower in obese individuals with binge eating disorder (BED) than in obese non-BED individuals. Acute psychological stress has been shown to raise ghrelin levels in animals and humans. Our aim was to assess ghrelin levels after a cold pressor test (CPT) in women with BED. We also examined the relationship between the cortisol stress response and changes in ghrelin levels. Twenty-one obese (mean [standard deviation] body mass index = 34.9 [5.8] kg/m(2)) women (10 non-BED, 11 BED) underwent the CPT, hand submerged in ice water for 2 minutes. Blood samples were drawn for 70 minutes and assayed for ghrelin and cortisol. There were no differences between the groups in ghrelin levels at baseline (-10 minutes). Ghrelin rose significantly after the CPT (F = 2.4, p = .024) peaking at 19 minutes before declining (F = 17.9, p stress, hunger, or desire to eat after CPT. In addition, there were no observed relationships between the area under the curves for ghrelin or cortisol after stress. Although there were no differences between BED groups, there was a significant rise in ghrelin in obese humans after a stressor, consistent with other recent reports suggesting a stress-related role for ghrelin.

  10. Gene expression associated with changes in cold tolerance levels of the Antarctic springtail, Cryptopygus antarcticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G; Thorne, M A S; Hillyard, G; Clark, M S; Convey, P; Worland, M R

    2010-02-01

    The ability of the Antarctic microarthropod Cryptopygus antarcticus (Collembola, Isotomidae) to survive low temperatures has been well studied at the physiological level, with recent investigations indicating the importance of the moulting process in conferring this ability. This study investigated gene expression in groups of C. antarcticus that have distinct differences in their ability to survive low temperatures. A microarray containing c. 5400 C. antarcticus expressed sequence tags was used to investigate gene expression differences between groups of animals with different supercooling points (SCP), and to low temperatures close to their SCP. By demonstrating the involvement of moult-related genes in the differential survival of two groups of C. antarcticus with distinct SCP profiles, the results of this investigation add support to the suggestion that moulting plays a role in conferring cold tolerance in C. antarcticus.

  11. Quenching and Cold-Work Residual Stresses in Aluminum Hand Forgings : Contour Method Measurement and FEM Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prime, M. B. (Michael B.); Newborn, M. A. (Mark A.); Balog, J. A. (John A.)

    2003-01-01

    The cold-compression stress relief process used to reduce the quench-induced stresses in high-strength aerospace aluminum alloy forgings does not fully relieve the stresses. This study measured and predicted the residual stress in 7050-T74 (solution heat treated, quenched, and artificially overaged) and 7050-T7452 (cold compressed prior to aging) hand forgings. The manufacturing process was simulated by finite element analysis. First, a thermal analysis simulated the quench using appropriate thermal boundary conditions and temperature dependent material properties. Second, a structural analysis used the thermal history and a temperature and strain-rate dependent constitutive model to predict the stresses after quenching. Third, the structural analysis was continued to simulate the multiple cold compressions of the stress relief process. Experimentally, the residual stresses in the forgings were mapped using the contour method, which involved cutting the forgings using wire EDM and then measuring the contour of the cut surface using a CMM. Multiple cuts were used to map different stress components. The results show a spatially periodic variation of stresses that results from the periodic nature of the cold work stress relief process. The results compare favorably with the finite element prediction of the stresses.

  12. Working of Ideology in the TV Commercials of Cold Drinks in Pakistani Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Madiha; Ahmad, Sofia; Ijaz, Nida; Batool, Sumera; Abid, Maratab

    2015-01-01

    The article aims at the analysis of the TV commercials of three carbonated cold drinks from Pakistani media. The analysis will be carried out using the three dimensional framework presented by Fairclough. Through the analysis, the ideological framing of the commercials will be brought to light. To achieve this purpose different techniques used by…

  13. Metabolite profiling reveals novel multi-level cold responses in the diploid model Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohloff, Jens; Kopka, Joachim; Erban, Alexander; Winge, Per; Wilson, Robert C; Bones, Atle M; Davik, Jahn; Randall, Stephen K; Alsheikh, Muath K

    2012-05-01

    Winter freezing damage is a crucial factor in overwintering crops such as the octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) when grown in a perennial cultivation system. Our study aimed at assessing metabolic processes and regulatory mechanisms in the close-related diploid model woodland strawberry (Fragaria vescaL.) during a 10-days cold acclimation experiment. Based on gas chromatography/time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (GC/TOF-MS) metabolite profiling of three F. vesca genotypes, clear distinctions could be made between leaves and non-photosynthesizing roots, underscoring the evolvement of organ-dependent cold acclimation strategies. Carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, photosynthetic acclimation, and antioxidant and detoxification systems (ascorbate pathway) were strongly affected. Metabolic changes in F. vesca included the strong modulation of central metabolism, and induction of osmotically-active sugars (fructose, glucose), amino acids (aspartic acid), and amines (putrescine). In contrast, a distinct impact on the amino acid proline, known to be cold-induced in other plant systems, was conspicuously absent. Levels of galactinol and raffinose, key metabolites of the cold-inducible raffinose pathway, were drastically enhanced in both leaves and roots throughout the cold acclimation period of 10 days. Furthermore, initial freezing tests and multifaceted GC/TOF-MS data processing (Venn diagrams, independent component analysis, hierarchical clustering) showed that changes in metabolite pools of cold-acclimated F. vesca were clearly influenced by genotype. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Working of Ideology in the TV Commercials of Cold Drinks in Pakistani Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiha Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article aims at the analysis of the TV commercials of three carbonated cold drinks from Pakistani media. The analysis will be carried out using the three dimensional framework presented by Fairclough.  Through the analysis, the ideological framing of the commercials will be brought to light. To achieve this purpose different techniques used by the ad- makers will be described, interpreted and explained in the light of critical discourse analysis. Keywords: Advertisements, Power, Ideology, CDA, Fairclough

  15. Development of Nanocrystalline 304L Stainless Steel by Large Strain Cold Working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Odnobokova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The microstructural changes leading to nanocrystalline structure development and the respective tensile properties were studied in a 304L stainless steel subjected to large strain cold rolling at ambient temperature. The cold rolling was accompanied by the development of deformation twinning and martensitic transformation. The latter readily occurred at deformation microshear bands, leading the martensite fraction to approach 0.75 at a total strain of 3. The deformation twinning followed by microshear banding and martensitic transformation promoted the development of nanocrystalline structure consisting of a uniform mixture of austenite and martensite grains with their transverse sizes of 120–150 nm. The developed nanocrystallites were characterized by high dislocation density in their interiors of about 3 × 1015 m−2 and 2 × 1015 m−2 in austenite and martensite, respectively. The development of nanocrystalline structures with high internal stresses led to significant strengthening. The yield strength increased from 220 MPa in the original hot forged state to 1600 MPa after cold rolling to a strain of 3.

  16. Public-Interest and Level-of-Evidence Considerations in Cold Fusion Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinshaw, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Cold fusion (CF) protagonists and antagonists would no doubt agree that scientific processes have been challenged in the CF case. The public interest in CF turns on two questions: What are the potential benefits? What is the probability that CF is ``real''? Potential benefits have been agreed on since CF announcement in 1989. The probability of CF reality may be assessed based on level of evidence (LoE): preponderance of evidence (PoE); clear and convincing evidence (CCE); and beyond a reasonable doubt (BRD). PoE, from civil law, indicates a probability of 50% or higher. BRD, from criminal law, has a probability approaching 90%. CCE, in between, thus has a 70-75% probability. CF experimental evidence, based on: 1) initial affirmations, 2) the large number of corroborations since marginalization, and 3) particularly demonstrative experiments, reasonably indicates at least a PoE level of evidence for excess heat. A case can also be made for a CCE (but probably not for a BRD) LoE. In either the PoE or CCE scenario a clear need is demonstrated for change in policy toward CR, given its potential benefits to humanity.

  17. Level of Work Related Stress among Teachers in Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agai-Demjaha, Teuta; Bislimovska, Jovanka Karadzinska; Mijakoski, Dragan

    2015-09-15

    Teaching is considered a highly stressful occupation, with work-related stress levels among teachers being among the highest compared to other professions. Unfortunately there are very few studies regarding the levels of work-related stress among teachers in the Republic of Macedonia. To identify the level of self-perceived work-related stress among teachers in elementary schools and its relationship to gender, age, position in the workplace, the level of education and working experience. We performed a descriptive-analytical model of a cross-sectional study that involved 300 teachers employed in nine elementary schools. Evaluation of examined subjects included completion of a specially designed questionnaire. We found that the majority of interviewed teachers perceive their work-related stress as moderate. The level of work-related stress was significantly high related to the gender, age, position in workplace, as well as working experience (p related to level of education (p grade teachers perceives the workplace as extremely stressful as compared to the upper-grade teachers (18.5% vs. 5.45%), while the same is true for female respondents as compared to the male ones (15.38% vs. 3.8%). In addition, our results show that teachers with university education significantly more often associate their workplace with stronger stress than their colleagues with high education (13.48% vs. 9.4%). We also found that there is no significant difference of stress levels between new and more experienced teachers. Our findings confirm that the majority of interviewed teachers perceived their work-related stress as high or very high. In terms of the relationship between the level of teachers' stress and certain demographic and job characteristics, according to our results, the level of work-related stress has shown significantly high relation to gender, age, levels of grades taught as well as working experience, and significant relation to the level of education.

  18. Variations in leptin and insulin levels within one swimming season in non-obese female cold water swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibas-Dorna, Magdalena; Checinska, Zuzanna; Korek, Emilia; Kupsz, Justyna; Sowinska, Anna; Wojciechowska, Malgorzata; Krauss, Hanna; Piątek, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether cold water swimming for seven consecutive months changes basal leptin and insulin concentrations and insulin sensitivity in healthy non-obese women. Fourteen recreational female swimmers aged 45 ± 8.7 years, regularly swimming outdoors during winter months were exposed to cold water at least twice a week. Fasting blood samples were collected in October, January and April. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose concentrations were tested and insulin sensitivity was calculated using updated model HOMA2. Repeated cold water baths significantly increased insulin sensitivity and decreased insulin and leptin concentrations (p = 0.006, p = 0.032, p = 0.042, respectively). Leptin concentration positively correlated with body-mass index (BMI) and insulin level (r = 0.412, r = 0.868, respectively). Insulin level inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity and positively with glucose (r = -0.893, r = 0.166, respectively). No associations between leptin and insulin sensitivity were found. Regular cold water swimming may stimulate metabolic changes suggesting that leptin and insulin participate in adaptive metabolic mechanisms triggered by repeated cold exposure accompanied by mild exercise in healthy non-obese women.

  19. Retrofitting a 1960s Split-Level, Cold-Climate Home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puttagunta, Srikanth [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2015-07-01

    National programs such as Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® and numerous other utility air sealing programs have brought awareness to homeowners of the benefits of energy efficiency retrofits. Yet, these programs tend to focus on the low-hanging fruit: air-sealing the thermal envelope and ductwork where accessible, switch to efficient lighting, and low-flow fixtures. At the other end of the spectrum, deep-energy retrofit programs are also being encouraged by various utilities across the country. While deep energy retrofits typically seek 50% energy savings, they are often quite costly and most applicable to gut-rehab projects. A significant potential for lowering energy usage in existing homes lies between the low hanging fruit and deep energy retrofit approaches - retrofits that save approximately 30% in energy over the existing conditions. A key is to be non-intrusive with the efficiency measures so the retrofit projects can be accomplished in occupied homes. This cold climate retrofit project involved the design and optimization of a home in Connecticut that sought to improve energy savings by at least 30% (excluding solar PV) over the existing home's performance. This report documents the successful implementation of a cost-effective solution package that achieved performance greater than 30% over the pre-retrofit - what worked, what did not, and what improvements could be made.

  20. Deep sequencing of Brachypodium small RNAs at the global genome level identifies microRNAs involved in cold stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Kang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small RNAs having large-scale regulatory effects on plant development and stress responses. Extensive studies of miRNAs have only been performed in a few model plants. Although miRNAs are proved to be involved in plant cold stress responses, little is known for winter-habit monocots. Brachypodium distachyon, with close evolutionary relationship to cool-season cereals, has recently emerged as a novel model plant. There are few reports of Brachypodium miRNAs. Results High-throughput sequencing and whole-genome-wide data mining led to the identification of 27 conserved miRNAs, as well as 129 predicted miRNAs in Brachypodium. For multiple-member conserved miRNA families, their sizes in Brachypodium were much smaller than those in rice and Populus. The genome organization of miR395 family in Brachypodium was quite different from that in rice. The expression of 3 conserved miRNAs and 25 predicted miRNAs showed significant changes in response to cold stress. Among these miRNAs, some were cold-induced and some were cold-suppressed, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated under cold stress condition. Conclusion Our results suggest that Brachypodium miRNAs are composed of a set of conserved miRNAs and a large proportion of non-conserved miRNAs with low expression levels. Both kinds of miRNAs were involved in cold stress response, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated, implying an important role for cold-induced miRNAs. The different size and genome organization of miRNA families in Brachypodium and rice suggest that the frequency of duplication events or the selection pressure on duplicated miRNAs are different between these two closely related plant species.

  1. Activation of the cold-receptor TRPM8 by low levels of menthol in tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Meike; Tkachenko, Anna; Ackermann, Katja; Hutzler, Christoph; Henkler, Frank; Luch, Andreas

    2017-04-05

    Activation of the cold-receptor TRPM8 by menthol or other tobacco additives can suppress natural defense reactions such as coughing that usually would become effective as involuntary resistance against the inhalation of fumes. In Europe menthol is only regulated as flavor, but can be used as additive as long as no characteristic mint-like aroma will become noticeable in the end-product tobacco. The question needs to be addressed of whether such comparatively minor contents would be sufficient to trigger a measurable activation of TRPM8. In this study, we have analyzed both the contents of menthol and other natural TRPM8 agonists in tobacco products and developed a bioassay to determine the minimum concentrations of selected agonists to activate the TRPM8 receptor in cultured cells. The data confirm menthol as strongest natural agonist investigated. Based on these experiments and previously published data, we have estimated both the minimum menthol concentrations in cigarette smoke and in tobacco that are expected to trigger measurable physiological effects. According to our assessments, TRPM8 activation is likely to occur when cigarettes contain more than 50 micrograms of menthol. Importantly, menthol contents in cigarettes far below the typical levels that require declaration as "mentholated" would be sufficient to activate sensory receptors. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A survey of work engagement and psychological capital levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Lynda

    2016-08-11

    To evaluate the relationship between work engagement and psychological capital (PsyCap) levels reported by registered nurses. PsyCap is a developable human resource. Research on PsyCap as an antecedent to work engagement in nurses is needed. A convenience sample of 137 registered nurses participated in this quantitative cross-sectional survey. Questionnaires measured self-reported levels of work engagement and psychological capital. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used for data analysis. There was a statistically significant correlation between work engagement and PsyCap scores (r=0.633, p<0.01). Nurses working at band 5 level reported statistically significantly lower PsyCap scores compared with nurses working at band 6 and 7 levels. Nurses reporting high levels of work engagement also reported high levels of PsyCap. Band 5 nurses might benefit most from interventions to increase their PsyCap. This study supports PsyCap as an antecedent to work engagement.

  3. Identification of endogenously S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis plantlets: effect of cold stress on cysteine nitrosylation level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyaubert, Juliette; Fares, Abasse; Rézé, Nathalie; Peltier, Jean-Benoît; Baudouin, Emmanuel

    2014-02-01

    S-nitrosylation is a nitric oxide (NO)-based post-translational modification regulating protein function and signalling. We used a combination between the biotin switch method and labelling with isotope-coded affinity tag to identify endogenously S-nitrosylated peptides in Arabidopsis thaliana proteins extracted from plantlets. The relative level of S-nitrosylation in the identified peptides was compared between unstressed and cold-stress seedlings. We thereby detected 62 endogenously nitrosylated peptides out of which 20 are over-nitrosylated following cold exposure. Taken together these data provide a new repertoire of endogenously S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis with cysteine S-nitrosylation site. Furthermore they highlight the quantitative modification of the S-nitrosylation status of specific cysteine following cold stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Variation in Hsp70 levels after cold shock: signs of evolutionary responses to thermal selection among Leptinotarsa decemlineata populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Lyytinen

    Full Text Available Individuals of widely spread species are expected to show local adaption in temperature tolerance as they encounter a range of thermal conditions. We tracked thermal adaptations of the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata that invaded Europe within the last 100 years. It has occupied various conditions although, like the majority of invasive species, it lost a measurable amount of neutral genetic variation due to bottleneck effect when it invaded Europe. We exposed diapausing beetles originated from three different latitudes (54°N, 59°N, 60°N to cold shock (-5°C, 1.5 hrs in order to test if beetles from the northern populations express differential levels of cold-induced and constitutive Hsp70 compared to the beetles from milder temperature regime. The level of cold-induced Hsp70 was lowest in the northernmost beetle populations while the level of constitutive Hsp70 did not differ with the population. Moreover, the southernmost beetles were more plastic in their response to cold shock than the northernmost beetles. These results suggest that physiological adaptation, like the synthesis of Hsp70, can evolve very quickly.

  5. [A survey of knowledge on common cold and its treatment situation among physicians from various levels of hospitals in mainland China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Nan; Lin, Jiang-tao; Liu, Guan-jian; Lin, Yan-ping; Yin, Kai-sheng; Bai, Chun-xue; Ma, Li-jun; Qiu, Chen; Liu, Chun-tao; Chen, Ming-wei; Liu, Hua; Chen, Ping

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the cognition of the common cold and current situation of the treatment among physicians from various levels of hospitals in Chinese mainland, so as to provide evidence for future continuing medical education and rational medication. A questionnaire designed for this survey was used to learn about the general information, cognitive degree of the common cold and prescription habits of physician who prescribed for cold within last three months, from various levels hospitals. A total of 1001 physicians were interviewed. Among them, 749 physicians chose right options that the cold was the common cold and the influenza with 79.84% in resident physicians and 56.76% in chief physicians. A total of 745 physicians chose options that the course of common cold will be lasting 4 to 7 days; 895 physicians chose options that old people are the most susceptible for complication; 669 physicians thought the common cold was the most common infection in winter; 841 physicians used clinical methods to diagnose the common cold; 736 physicians thought although the cold was a kind of self-limited disease and symptomatic treatment could alleviate symptoms and improve life quality, patients should see doctor in time if it turns to severer; and 745 physicians held the opinion that treatment of the common cold should focus on relieving symptoms first. In addition, 61.60% physicians had made prescription based on clinical symptoms; 505 (54.24%) of them thought compound drugs were priority in treating the common cold. However, there were still 43 physicians prescribed antibiotics for common cold. There is misunderstanding and discrepancy in cognition towards common cold and treatment among physicians from various levels of hospitals in mainland China. Physicians should standardize diagnosis and treatment for the common cold according to the domestic and foreign guidelines.

  6. Doing what works literacy strategies for the next level

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, Judy Tilton

    2013-01-01

    Doing What Works: Literacy Strategies for the Next Level will assist educators as they support students in the mastery of vocabulary, comprehension, and study skills required by the Common Core State Standards.

  7. GABA level, gamma oscillation, and working memory performance in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming A. Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between working memory impairment, disordered neuronal oscillations, and abnormal prefrontal GABA function has been hypothesized in schizophrenia; however, in vivo GABA measurements and gamma band neural synchrony have not yet been compared in schizophrenia. This case–control pilot study (N = 24 compared baseline and working memory task-induced neuronal oscillations acquired with high-density electroencephalograms (EEGs to GABA levels measured in vivo with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Working memory performance, baseline GABA level in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, and measures of gamma oscillations from EEGs at baseline and during a working memory task were obtained. A major limitation of this study is a relatively small sample size for several analyses due to the integration of diverse methodologies and participant compliance. Working memory performance was significantly lower for patients than for controls. During the working memory task, patients (n = 7 had significantly lower amplitudes in gamma oscillations than controls (n = 9. However, both at rest and across working memory stages, there were significant correlations between gamma oscillation amplitude and left DLPFC GABA level. Peak gamma frequency during the encoding stage of the working memory task (n = 16 significantly correlated with GABA level and working memory performance. Despite gamma band amplitude deficits in patients across working memory stages, both baseline and working memory-induced gamma oscillations showed strong dependence on baseline GABA levels in patients and controls. These findings suggest a critical role for GABA function in gamma band oscillations, even under conditions of system and cognitive impairments as seen in schizophrenia.

  8. "All in the Day's Work": Cold War Doctoring and Its Discontents in William Burroughs's Naked Lunch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Michael

    In Naked Lunch, the institutions and practices of science and medicine, specifically with regard to psychiatry/psychology, are symptoms of a bureaucratic system of control that shapes, constructs, defines, and makes procrustean alterations to both the mind and body of human subjects. Using sickness and junk (or heroin) as convenient metaphors for both a Cold War binary mentality and the mandatory consumption of twentieth-century capitalism, Burroughs presents modern man as fundamentally alienated from any sense of a personal self. Through policing the health of citizens, the doctors are some of the novel's most overt "Senders," or agents of capital-C Control, commodifying and exploiting the individual's humanity (mind and body) as a raw material in the generation of a knowledge that functions only in the legitimation and reinforcement of itself as authoritative.

  9. Stress Level and Adversity Quotient among Single Working Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Bautista Solis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study identified the profile of the single working mothers in terms of number of children, number of years as a single parent and reason for being a single parent; assessed the single mothers’ stress level and adversity quotient; determined the significant difference of stress level and adversity quotient of single mothers when grouped according to profile variables; determined the best predictor of stress level and adversity quotient. Moreover this research endeavoured to test significant relationship between the adversity quotient and stress level of single working mothers. Lastly, it proposed a stress management program for single working mothers for them to cope with their stress and adversities in life. The researcher employed quantitative method using standardized questionnaires namely Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS and Adversity Response Profile (ARP. The respondents were twenty five (25 single working mothers of the students of Batangas State University. From the results, majority of the respondents have 3 children, widow and in early years as single parent; with a normal level of stress and an average adversity quotient.. There are no significant differences on the stress level and adversity quotient of the respondents when grouped according to profile variables. Finally, stress level has no significant effect on adversity quotient of single working mothers. From the findings, the researcher further recommends that the Office of Guidance and Counseling should update the student information database to determine students with a single working mother. The Parent-Teacher Association may form a single-parent subgroup for the single working mothers to be able to identify to other mothers with same situation. Moreover, the proposed stress management program may be reviewed and implemented by the Office of Guidance and Counseling in coordination with the Parent-Teacher Association of Batangas State University. Future researchers

  10. Evaluation of an enumeration method for Listeria monocytogenes at low contamination levels in cold-smoked salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanou Besse, Nathalie; Beaufort, Annie; Rudelle, Sylvie; Denis, Catherine; Lombard, Bertrand

    2008-06-10

    For the enumeration of Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked salmon, a sensitive enumeration method, based on membrane filtration followed by transfer of the filter on a selective medium has been recently developed (Gnanou Besse et al., 2004, A contribution to the improvement of L. monocytogenes enumeration in cold-smoked salmon. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 91, 119-127). The aim of the study was to assess the performance of this enumeration method through an inter-laboratory study, using cold-smoked salmon artificially contaminated at 2 different levels (approximately 0.6 and 1.6 log10 CFU g(-1)). A reproducibility standard deviation of 0.23 log10 CFU g(-1)and 0.15 log10 CFU g(-1) was obtained for the method respectively at the lower level and the higher level. Under certain conditions, the uncertainty of measurement can be derived from the method reproducibility standard deviation and was calculated to be 0.46 log10 CFU g(-1) for the lower contamination level and 0.30 log10 CFU g(-1) for the higher contamination level. These values can be considered as satisfactory for such low contamination levels.

  11. End of the century pCO₂ levels do not impact calcification in Mediterranean cold-water corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Maier

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification caused by anthropogenic uptake of CO₂ is perceived to be a major threat to calcifying organisms. Cold-water corals were thought to be strongly affected by a decrease in ocean pH due to their abundance in deep and cold waters which, in contrast to tropical coral reef waters, will soon become corrosive to calcium carbonate. Calcification rates of two Mediterranean cold-water coral species, Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, were measured under variable partial pressure of CO₂ (pCO₂ that ranged between 380 µatm for present-day conditions and 930 µatm for the end of the century. The present study addressed both short- and long-term responses by repeatedly determining calcification rates on the same specimens over a period of 9 months. Besides studying the direct, short-term response to elevated pCO₂ levels, the study aimed to elucidate the potential for acclimation of calcification of cold-water corals to ocean acidification. Net calcification of both species was unaffected by the levels of pCO₂ investigated and revealed no short-term shock and, therefore, no long-term acclimation in calcification to changes in the carbonate chemistry. There was an effect of time during repeated experiments with increasing net calcification rates for both species, however, as this pattern was found in all treatments, there is no indication that acclimation of calcification to ocean acidification occurred. The use of controls (initial and ambient net calcification rates indicated that this increase was not caused by acclimation in calcification response to higher pCO₂. An extrapolation of these data suggests that calcification of these two cold-water corals will not be affected by the pCO₂ level projected at the end of the century.

  12. Electrochemical investigation of cold worked copper in alkaline solution with the presence of potassium ethyl xanthate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Svetlana Lj.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the investigation results of the electrochemical behavior of copper in 1 M Na2CO3 solution in the presence of potassium ethyl xanthate (KEtX with different concentrations. Tests were conducted on copper samples obtained without deformation and with deformation of 83, 91 and 99 %. Samples were obtained by cold drawing of wire, which was previously obtained by dip-forming procedure. Corrosion behavior of cold deformed copper wire is characterized by its open circuit potential and behavior during anodic polarization. Experiments were carried out in aqueous solution 1 M Na2CO3 with added various amounts of KEtX between 0.008 g/l and 0.15 g/l. It was experimentally proved that the degree of deformation between 83 and 99 % does not have a large effect on the open circuit potential, as well as on the behavior of copper during anodic polarization in 1 M Na2CO3. Voltammograms show no significant differences between peak heights obtained for different electrodes. The first peak which occurs at potential of around -0.06 V vs. SCE corresponds to the formation of copper oxide Cu2O. The second wide peak is at potential of around 0.15 V vs. SCE and corresponds to the formation of CuO. Addition of potassium ethyl xanthate in alkaline 1 M Na2CO3 solution changes the mechanism of the process in anodic part, which is reflected in the change of shape of voltammograms. In presence of KEtX in concentration between 0.008 g/l and 0.15 g/l on voltammograms a sharp peak appears at potential of about -0.2 V vs. SCE and corresponds to the oxidation of xanthate. Current density, which determines the rate of the process which takes place at the electrode surface, yet in the presence of smallest amounts of KEtX (<0,08 g/l is higher than in the absence of KEtX. It allows one to conclude that the processes of oxidation of copper accelerate in presence of potassium ethyl xanthate.

  13. Stress Level and Adversity Quotient among Single Working Mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Dianne Bautista Solis; Elna R. Lopez

    2015-01-01

    The study identified the profile of the single working mothers in terms of number of children, number of years as a single parent and reason for being a single parent; assessed the single mothers’ stress level and adversity quotient; determined the significant difference of stress level and adversity quotient of single mothers when grouped according to profile variables; determined the best predictor of stress level and adversity quotient. Moreover this research endeavoured to tes...

  14. [Respiratory work and pattern with different proportional assist ventilation levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ferrón, Francisco; Machado, Juan; Morante, Antonia; Galindo, Silvia; Castillo, Ana; Rucabado, Luis

    2009-01-01

    To study the minimum assistance level during proportional assist ventilation (PAV) to decrease the work of breathing to physiological limits (0.6 j/l) and the relationship between breathing pattern changes and respiratory effort at different PAV levels. Prospective cohort study. Polyvalent intensive care unit of a teaching hospital of Jaen, Spain. Twelve long-term mechanical ventilated patients who met criteria to initiate weaning from the ventilator. We used the Puritan-Bennett 840 ventilator in proportional assist ventilation. The percentage of support was randomly modified between 5% and 80%, in intervals of 10%. Prior to the change in the PAV level, the patients were ventilated in assist-volume control followed by pressure support ventilation. Before PAV, we measured the respiratory mechanics and the breathing pattern and work of breathing during this mode. The decrease in respiratory assist in PAV was related to significantly higher work of breathing, this going from 0.2+/-0,07 (0.1-0.3) j/l with PAV80 to 0.9+/-0.2 (0.4-1.5) j/l with PAV5 (p=0.002). The coefficient correlation between PAV level and work of breathing (measured as j/l and j/min) was r=-0.8 and -0.6, respectively. Minimum PAV level related with physiological work of breathing was 30% (0.63+/-0.13 j/l). Except for the tidal volume that increased significantly (PAV80 vs PAV5=0.4+/-0.1 vs 0.3+/-0.1; p=0.02), the remaining variables defining the breathing pattern did not changed with the increase in PAV. In the group of patients studied, the increase in the PAV levels decreases work of breathing, without significantly changing the breathing pattern. Levels lower than 30% of PAV are associated to excessive work of breathing.

  15. The effect of time of day on cold water ingestion by high-level swimmers in a tropical climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, Olivier; Monjo, Roland; Lazzaro, Marc; Baillot, Michelle; Hellard, Philippe; Marlin, Laurent; Jean-Etienne, A

    2013-07-01

    The authors tested the effect of cold water ingestion during high-intensity training in the morning vs the evening on both core temperature (TC) and thermal perceptions of internationally ranked long-distance swimmers during a training period in a tropical climate. Nine internationally ranked long-distance swimmers (5 men and 4 women) performed 4 randomized training sessions (2 in the evening and 2 in the morning) with 2 randomized beverages with different temperatures for 3 consecutive days. After a standardized warm-up of 1000 m, the subjects performed a standardized training session that consisted of 10 x 100 m (start every 1'20″) at a fixed velocity. The swimmers were then followed for the next 3000 m of the training schedule. Heart rate (HR) was continuously monitored during the 10 x 100 m, whereas TC, thermal comfort, and thermal sensation (TS) were measured before and after each 1000-m session. Before and after each 1000 m, the swimmers were asked to drink 190 mL of neutral (26.5 ± 2.5°C) or cold (1.3 ± 0.3°C) water packaged in standardized bottles. Results demonstrated that cold water ingestion induced a significant effect on TC, with a pronounced decrease in the evening, resulting in significantly lower mean TC and lower mean delta TC in evening cold (EC) than in evening neutral (EN), concomitant with significantly lower TS in EC than in EN and a significant effect on exercise HR. Moreover, although TC increased significantly with time in MN, MC, and EN, TC was stabilized during exercise in EC. To conclude, we demonstrate that a cold beverage had a significant effect on TC, TS, and HR during training in high-level swimmers in a tropical climate, especially during evening training.

  16. Psychological Peculiarities of Teachers with Different Work Capacity Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Dorogina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the issue of teacher’s work capacity optimization. The research is aimed at defining teachers’ psychological peculiarities relating to their work capacity level and creating the assistance program for its optimization. In the course of the program implementation, its effectiveness has being proved, the low work capacity being optimized by developing self-control, emotional stability and decreasing the aggressive reactions in frustrating situations. The research findings can be applied while creating programs for teachers’ further training as well as for students training courses. 

  17. The Level of Quality of Work Life to Predict Work Alienation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The current research aims to determine the level of elementary school teachers' quality of work life (QWL) to predict work alienation. The study was designed using the relational survey model. The research population consisted of 1096 teachers employed at 25 elementary schools within the city of Van in the academic year 2010- 2011, and 346…

  18. INDUSTRIAL CARBON DIOXIDE HEAT PUMP STATION WITH EVAPORATORS WORKING AT VARIOUS TEMPERATURE LEVELS AND AT VARIABLE LOAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sit M.L.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The block diagram of an industrial carbon dioxide heat pump working in a supercritical cycle, with two evaporators included in parallel working at different temperature levels (mainly for wine-making factories is developed. Heat pump is intended for simultaneous production of heat and cold and works at variable thermal loading. It is shown, how an ejector inclusion in the heat pump scheme provides growth of its thermal efficiency. The way of construction of the hydraulic scheme and a control system provides full controllability of the thermal pump.

  19. Changes in free amino acid levels in sour orange leaves in response to cold stress and during recovery from cold stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a previous study, we reported that potted sour orange trees recovering from cold stress attracted more Asian citrus psyllid than the control plants continuously kept under warm condition. In parallel studies, cold treated plants were shown to have relatively increased amounts of ninhydrin positi...

  20. Multi-level cascaded electromagnetically induced transparency in cold atoms using an optical nanofibre interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ravi; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    Ultrathin optical fibres integrated into cold atom setups are proving to be ideal building blocks for atom-photon hybrid quantum networks. Such optical nanofibres (ONF) can be used for the demonstration of nonlinear optics and quantum interference phenomena in atomic media. Here, we report on the observation of multilevel cascaded electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using an optical nanofibre to interface cold $^{87}$Rb atoms through the intense evanescent fields that can be achieved at ultralow probe and coupling powers. Both the probe (at 780 nm) and the coupling (at 776 nm) beams propagate through the nanofibre. The observed multipeak transparency spectra of the probe beam could offer a method for simultaneously slowing down multiple wavelengths in an optical nanofibre or for generating ONF-guided entangled beams, showing the potential of such an atom-nanofibre system for quantum information. We also demonstrate all-optical-switching in the all fibred system using the obtained EIT effect.

  1. Characterizing the effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking of cold worked Alloy 690 in supercritical water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lefu; Chen, Kai; Du, Donghai; Gao, Wenhua; Andresen, Peter L.; Guo, Xianglong

    2017-08-01

    The effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied by measuring crack growth rates (CGRs) of 30% cold worked (CW) Alloy 690 in supercritical water (SCW) and inert gas environments at temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 550 °C. The SCC crack growth rate under SCW environments can be regarded as the cracking induced by the combined effect of corrosion and creep, while the CGR in inert gas environment can be taken as the portion of creep induced cracking. Results showed that the CW Alloy 690 sustained high susceptibility to intergranular (IG) cracking, and creep played a dominant role in the SCC crack growth behavior, contributing more than 80% of the total crack growth rate at each testing temperature. The temperature dependence of creep induced CGRs follows an Arrhenius dependency, with an apparent activation energy (QE) of about 225 kJ/mol.

  2. Levels of burnout among registrars and medical officers working at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Burnout is prevalent among medical personnel and affects their work environment. This study investigated the level of burnout among registrars and medical officers at public healthcare facilities in Bloemfontein. Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study included registrars and medical officers at four public ...

  3. ICE1 of Pyrus ussuriensis functions in cold tolerance by enhancing PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with PuHHP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaosan; Li, Kongqing; Jin, Cong; Zhang, Shaoling

    2015-12-01

    ICE1 transcription factor plays an important role in plant cold stress via regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. In this study, a PuICE1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. The expression levels of the PuICE1 were induced by cold, dehydration and salt, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PuICE1 was localized in the nucleus and could bind specifically to the MYC element in the PuDREBa promoter. The PuICE1 fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain to have transcriptional activation activity. Ectopic expression of the PuICE1 in tomato conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress at cold temperatures, less electrolyte leakage, less MDA content, higher chlorophyll content, higher survival rate, higher proline content, higher activities of enzymes. In additon, steady-state mRNA levels of six stress-responsive genes coding for either functional or regulatory genes were induced to higher levels in the transgenic lines by cold stress. Yeast two-hybrid, transient assay, split luciferase complementation and BiFC assays all revealed that PuHHP1 protein can physically interact with PuICE1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PuICE1 plays a positive role in cold tolerance, which may be due to enhancement of PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with the PuHHP1.

  4. Training and work characteristics of mid-level nursing teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia Marli Schubert Backes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify teacher training and professional performance of teachers in mid-level nursing training schools. A quantitative study performed in 2012 through questionnaires with 41 teachers from eleven mid-level nursing training schools in the states of Rio Grande do Norte and Santa Catarina. General characteristics of the teacher, initial and continued education and work characteristics are presented. It is concluded that it is necessary to point out guidelines for the training/graduation of mid-level professionals and educators, and it is also necessary to globally value teachers, not only those acting in the federal network.

  5. Conducting Organizational-level occupational health interventions: What works?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina; Randall, Raymond; Holten, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in how organizational-level occupational health interventions aimed at improving psychosocial working conditions and employee health and well-being may be planned, implemented and evaluated. It has been claimed that such interventions have...... the best chance of achieving a significant impact if they follow an intervention process that is structured and also includes the participation of employees. This paper provides an overview of prominent European methods that describe systematic approaches to improving employee health and well-being through...... the alteration of the way in which work is designed, organized and managed. The methods identified are the Risk Management approach and the Management Standards from Great Britain, the German Health Circles approach, Work Positive from Ireland and Prevenlab from Spain. Comparative analyses reveal...

  6. WORK STRESS LEVEL AND CARING BEHAVIOUR OF NURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Lestari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A nurse who experience burnout feelings will influence their motivation, and quality performance. This situation is probably affecting a decline in work quality towards the caring behaviour demonstrated by nurses to their patiens, particularly for a nurse who are working in the long-stay installation room facing directly to patient's problems. The purpose of this research is to identify the work stress level of nurse towards the nurse's caring behaviour in the long-stay installation room (IRNA in general hospital in Malang. Method: This research used descriptive – correlational, the sampling was Non Probability Purposive Sampling with 93 nurses as the corresponds. The data was analyzed by operating Correlation Pearson, with a significance of p < 0.05. Result: The result found that there was a substantial correlation between the work stress level and the nurse's caring behaviour with p = 0.008 and r = -0.274, and it was a negative correlation. Discussion: It means that when the stress level of nurses will declined, the nurse's caring behavior automatically will beamplified. Conversely, if the stess level of nurses intensively increased, the nurse's caring behaviour become decreased. Thus, this research is needed to be analyzed further in order to asses the quality of caring behaviour by expanding the connected indicator and variable. It is aimed to improve the professionalism and quality of nurses in giving the best service to patients this research need to be continued further in order to asses the quality of nurse's caring behavior by expanding the variable, which is related to internal factors, such as knowledge, perception, emotion, ect and also connected to external factors, such as environment, both physically and non physically like: climate, human being, social economic, culture and ect.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION AND PERFORMANCE OF DUPLEX-COATINGS ON Cr-V COLD WORK TOOL STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jurči

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Specimens made of Vanadis 6 steel were heat treated, plasma nitrided and coated with Cr2N. The microstructure, phase constitution and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided areas and duplex-coatings have been investigated using the light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microhardness measurements. The adhesion of the coatings and the wear performance were studied using the scratch test and ring-on-plate tribological testing. Worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Nitrided areas formed at lower temperature were free of compound “white” layer while hose developed at higher temperatures contained as the white layer so the nitrided network. Significant increase in substrate hardness was detected due to the nitriding. Beneficial effect of the nitriding on the adhesion of Cr2N coatings was clearly determined whereas the extent in improvement of the adhesion depends on the presence/no presence of “white” layer on the surface. The extent of beneficial effect of plasma nitriding on the wear performance follows the impact of the constitution of nitrided areas on the adhesion. The amelioration of wear performance of Cr2N coatings can be attributed to the supporting effect of hard nitrided intermediate region, which provides excellent resistance of the substrate against plastic deformation, under heavy loading in particular. Practical testing demonstrated many times prolonged service-time of duplex-treated tools for sheet metal working.

  8. Assessment of Cold Stress and Its Effects on Workers in a Cold-Storage Warehouse

    OpenAIRE

    Farhang Akbar-Khanzadeh; Mohammad–Hossein Sajadi; Keramat Nouri Jelyani; Farideh Golbabaei

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to cold work environment is an occupational health hazard and poses adverse effect on workers health, performance and productivity. This study was performed in a cold food-storage warehouse complex in Tehran-Iran in order to evaluate the workers' exposure to cold stress. Twenty nine exposed workers and 33 non-exposed workers as control subject were included in this study. Climatic factors were measured based on ISO 7996 at the three levels of workers height. Physiological factor...

  9. Civil engineering work to raise the level of Route Goward

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Civil engineering work to raise the level of Route Goward will take place during Long Shutdown 1. The work will begin on 18 March 2013 and is expected to last around 5 months.   Route Goward runs over the top of the PS tunnel and is the only access route to the inside of the ring. The layer of shielding backfill beneath this road is the thinnest anywhere on the PS ring. As the purpose of this shielding is to protect against the ionising radiation emitted by the accelerator when in operation, this road has been classified as a “supervised radiation area” according to radiation protection regulations. This classification was merely a temporary solution and, on the recommendation of the PS Radiation Working Group (PSRWG), the decision has been taken to raise the surface level permanently by around 2 m in order to increase the thickness of the shielding and thus lower the dose rate to that of a non-designated area. As the PS tunnel itself is unable to withstand the weight of t...

  10. Assessment of soy aeroallergen levels in different work environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ollés, S; Cruz, M J; Bogdanovic, J; Wouters, I M; Doekes, G; Sander, I; Morell, F; Rodrigo, M J

    2007-12-01

    Airborne soybean hull proteins are known causes of asthma epidemics around harbours and soy processing plants. Soy flour dust proteins may cause occupational allergy in food and feed industries. To compare enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) for soy hull and soy flour aeroallergens, exposure assessment in various work environments. Airborne dust samples (n=324) from soy unloading and/or processing plants, the animal feed industry and pig stables were analysed by two soy flour assays: one assay for measuring complete soy hull proteins and two assays for measuring the purified low-molecular-weight (LMW) soy hull allergens. Immunoblotting confirmed strong differences between antibody specificities and soy preparations. The results of the two soy flour assays and the assay for measuring complete soy hull proteins were highly correlated (r>0.85). The two LMW soy hull assays also showed a strong mutual correlation (r=0.91), but much less correlation with assays for measuring soy flour and complete soy hull. The levels of LMW soy hull proteins were the highest at sites of soybean unloading or processing, while soy flour levels were particularly high in the soy and animal feed industry. The optimal EIA procedure for soy aeroallergen exposure assessment depends on the type of work environment and the local soy dust composition. Thus, the type of work environment should always be taken into account in future soy allergy studies in order to prevent a possible underestimation of the workers' actual risk of developing soy allergy.

  11. Putrescine Is Involved in Arabidopsis Freezing Tolerance and Cold Acclimation by Regulating Abscisic Acid Levels in Response to Low Temperature1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Juan C.; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Alcázar, Rubén; Zarza, Xavier; Koncz, Csaba; Altabella, Teresa; Salinas, Julio; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Ferrando, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The levels of endogenous polyamines have been shown to increase in plant cells challenged with low temperature; however, the functions of polyamines in the regulation of cold stress responses are unknown. Here, we show that the accumulation of putrescine under cold stress is essential for proper cold acclimation and survival at freezing temperatures because Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants defective in putrescine biosynthesis (adc1, adc2) display reduced freezing tolerance compared to wild-type plants. Genes ADC1 and ADC2 show different transcriptional profiles upon cold treatment; however, they show similar and redundant contributions to cold responses in terms of putrescine accumulation kinetics and freezing sensitivity. Our data also demonstrate that detrimental consequences of putrescine depletion during cold stress are due, at least in part, to alterations in the levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Reduced expression of NCED3, a key gene involved in ABA biosynthesis, and down-regulation of ABA-regulated genes are detected in both adc1 and adc2 mutant plants under cold stress. Complementation analysis of adc mutants with ABA and reciprocal complementation tests of the aba2-3 mutant with putrescine support the conclusion that putrescine controls the levels of ABA in response to low temperature by modulating ABA biosynthesis and gene expression. PMID:18701673

  12. Study of tensile test behavior of austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes in cold worked condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terui, Clarice, E-mail: clarice.terui@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CINA/CTMSP), Iperó, SP (Brazil). Centro Industrial Nuclear da Marinha; Lima, Nelson B. de, E-mail: nblima@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    These austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes are potential candidates to be used in fuel elements of nuclear power plants (as PWR - Pressurized Water Reactor). So, their metallurgical condition and mechanical properties, as the tensile strength and yield strength, normally are very restrict in demanding project and design requirements. Several full size tensile tests at room temperature and high temperature (315 deg C) were performed in these seamless tubes in cold-worked condition. The results of specified tensile and yield strengths were achieved but the elongation of the tube, in the geometry of the component, could not be measured at high temperature due to unconventional mode of rupture (helical mode without separation of parts). The average value of elongation was obtained from stress-strain curves of hot tensile tests and was around 5%. The results obtained in this research show that this behavior of the full size tensile test samples of thin-walled tube (wall thickness less than 0.5 mm) in high temperature (315°C) is due to the combination of the manufacturing process, the material (crystallographic structure and chemical composition) and the final geometry of the component. In other words, the strong crystallographic texture of material induced by tube drawing process in addition with the geometry of the component are responsible for the behavior in hot uniaxial tensile tests. (author)

  13. Effect of parameters on picosecond laser ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Baoye; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun; Wang, Xizhao; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2018-01-01

    Cr12MoV cold work mold steel, which is a difficult-to-machining material, is widely used in the mold and dye industry. A picosecond pulse Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm was used to conduct the study. Effects of operation parameters (i.e., laser fluence, scanning speed, hatched space and number of scans) were studied on ablation depth and quality of Cr12MoV at the repetition rate of 20 MHz. The experimental results reveal that all the four parameters affect the ablation depth significantly. While the surface roughness depends mainly on laser fluence or scanning speed and secondarily on hatched space or number of scans. For laser fluence and scanning speed, three distinct surface morphologies were observed experiencing transition from flat (Ra 2.40 μm). However, for hatched space and number of scan, there is a small bumpy and rough zone or even no rough zone. Mechanisms including heat accumulation, plasma shielding and combustion reaction effects are proposed based on the ablation depth and processing morphology. By appropriate management of the laser fluence and scanning speed, high ablation depth with low surface roughness can be obtained at small hatched space and high number of scans.

  14. Effects of picosecond laser repetition rate on ablation of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Baoye; Deng, Leimin; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Fei; Duan, Jun, E-mail: duans@hust.edu.cn; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effects of pulse repetition rate on ablation efficiency and quality of Cr12MoV cold work mold steel have been studied using a picosecond (ps) pulse Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser system at λ= 1064 nm. The experimental results of area ablation on target surface reveal that laser repetition rate plays a significant role in controlling ablation efficiency and quality. Increasing the laser repetition rate, while keeping a constant mean power improves the ablation efficiency and quality. For each laser mean power, there is an optimal repetition rate to achieve a higher laser ablation efficiency with low surface roughness. A high ablation efficiency of 42.29, 44.11 and 47.52 μm{sup 3}/mJ, with surface roughness of 0.476, 0.463 and 0.706 μm could be achieved at laser repetition rate of 10 MHz, for laser mean power of 15, 17 and 19 W, respectively. Scanning electron microcopy images revels that the surface morphology evolves from rough with numerous craters, to flat without pores when we increased the laser repetition rate. The effects of laser repetition rate on the heat accumulation, plasma shield and ablation threshold were analyzed by numerical simulation, spectral analysis and multi-laser shot, respectively. The synergetic effects of laser repetition rate on laser ablation rate and machining quality were analyzed and discussed systemically in this paper.

  15. High temperature corrosion of cold worked YUS409D bellows of bellow-sealed valve in LBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustari1, A. P. A.; Irwanto1, D.; Takahashi, M.

    2017-01-01

    Lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) loop test is highly contributes to the lead-alloy-cooled fast breeder reactor (LFR) and accelerator driven system (ADS) research and development by providing comprehensive results of both corrosion and erosion phenomenon. Bellows-sealed valve is a crucial part in the LBE loop test apparatus, due to its capability of preventing corrosion on valve spring, thus improves the operation time of the system. LBE is very corrosive to stainless steel by formation of oxide layer or elemental dissolution, e.g. Ni. Thus, new type of bellows for bellows-sealed valve made of nickel free material, i.e. YUS409D, is proposed to be used in the LBE. Bellows material undergo heat treatments for mechanical improvement including cold working and annealing. The thickness reduction by the heat treatments is about 90% of initial condition. Corrosion behavior of the bellows has been studied in stagnant LBE at 500 and 600 °C for 500 hours. The oxygen concentration was controlled at about 10-7 wt%. Typical oxide layers were developed on the surface. Oxidation rate was sharply increased at 600°C.

  16. Seebeck Changes Due to Residual Cold-Work and Reversible Effects in Type K Bare-Wire Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, E. S.

    2017-09-01

    Type K thermocouples are the most commonly used thermocouple for industrial measurements because of their low cost, wide temperature range, and durability. As with all base-metal thermocouples, Type K is made to match a mathematical temperature-to-emf relationship and not a prescribed alloy formulation. Because different manufacturers use varying alloy formulations and manufacturing techniques, different Type K thermocouples exhibit a range of drift and hysteresis characteristics, largely due to ordering effects in the positive (K+) thermoelement. In this study, these effects are assessed in detail for temperatures below 700°C in the Type K wires from nine manufacturers. A linear gradient furnace and a high-resolution homogeneity scanner combined with the judicious use of annealing processes allow measurements that separately identify the effects of cold-work, ordering, and oxidation to be made. The results show most K+ alloys develop significant errors, but the magnitudes of the contributions of each process vary substantially between the different K+ wires. In practical applications, the measurement uncertainties achievable with Type K therefore depend not only on the wire formulation but also on the temperature, period of exposure, and, most importantly, the thermal treatments prior to use.

  17. Precursor Evolution and Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Cold-Worked Alloy 690 in Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Toloczko, Mychailo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Kruska, Karen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Bruemmer, Stephen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.

    2017-05-22

    Stress corrosion crack initiation of two thermally-treated, cold-worked (CW) alloy 690 (UNS N06690) materials was investigated in 360oC simulated PWR primary water using constant load tensile (CLT) tests and blunt notch compact tension (BNCT) tests equipped with direct current potential drop (DCPD) for in-situ detection of cracking. SCC initiation was not detected by DCPD for either the 21% or 31%CW CLT specimens loaded at their yield stress after ~9,220 hours, however intergranular (IG) precursor damage and isolated surface cracks were observed on the specimens. The two 31%CW BNCT specimens loaded at moderate stress intensity after several cyclic loading ramps showed DCPD-indicated crack initiation after 10,400 hours of exposure at constant stress intensity, which was resulted from significant growth of IG cracks. The 21%CW BNCT specimens only exhibited isolated small IG surface cracks and showed no apparent DCPD change throughout the test. Post-test cross-section examinations revealed many grain boundary (GB) nano-cavities in the bulk of all the CLT and BNCT specimens particularly for the 31%CW materials. Cavities were also found along GBs extending to the surface suggesting an important role in crack nucleation. This paper provides an overview of the evolution of GB cavities and discusses their effects on crack initiation in CW alloy 690.

  18. Effects of redecoration of a hospital isolation room with natural materials on stress levels of denizens in cold season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hiromi; Maruyama, Megumi; Tanabe, Yoko; Hara, Toshiko; Nishino, Yoshihiko; Tsujino, Yoshio; Morita, Eishin; Kobayashi, Shotai; Shido, Osamu

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the effects of redecoration of a hospital isolation room with natural materials on thermoregulatory, cardiovascular and hormonal parameters of healthy subjects staying in the room. Two isolation rooms with almost bilaterally-symmetrical arrangements were used. One room (RD) was redecorated with wood paneling and Japanese paper, while the other (CN) was unchanged (with concrete walls). Seven healthy male subjects stayed in each room for over 24 h in the cold season. Their rectal temperature (Tre) and heart rate, and the room temperature (Ta) and relative humidity were continuously measured. Arterial blood pressures, arterial vascular compliance, thermal sensation and thermal comfort were measured every 4 h except during sleeping. Blood was sampled after the stay in the rooms. In RD, Ta was significantly higher by about 0.4°C and relative humidity was lower by about 5% than in CN. Diurnal Tre levels of subjects in RD significantly differed from those in CN, i.e., Tres were significantly higher in RD than in CN especially in the evening. In RD, the subjects felt more thermally-comfortable than in CN. Redecoration had minimal effects on cardiovascular parameters. Plasma levels of catecholamines and antidiuretic hormone did not differ, while plasma cortisol level was significantly lower after staying in RD than in CN by nearly 20%. The results indicate that, in the cold season, redecoration with natural materials improves the thermal environment of the room and contributes to maintaining core temperature of denizens at preferable levels. It also seems that redecoration of room could attenuate stress levels of isolated subjects.

  19. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  20. [Na+, K+-ATPase activity of the kidneys and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine levels in rat plasma during adaptation to cold].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamaĭ, T N; Medvedev, L N

    1985-01-01

    No correlation between Na, K-ATPase activity increase in rat kidney and the level of T3 in blood plasma was revealed in course of the rats adaptation to cold. Spironolactone prevented the enzyme activation caused by cold. Actinomycin D, administered to the acclimated rats two days before the experiment, decreased the enzyme activity. Addition of actinomycin D to membrane preparation did not change the enzyme activity. The increase in Na, K-ATPase activity in kidney during adaptation of rats to cold appears to be related to DNA-dependent synthesis of RNA. The enzyme activation was apparently regulated by aldosterone but it was not the T3-dependent process.

  1. Influence of cold work in the elastic modulus of the Ti-16.2Hf-24.8Nb-1Zr alloy characterized by instrumented nanoindentation

    OpenAIRE

    González Colominas, Marta; Peña Andrés, Francisco Javier; Manero Planella, José María; Gil Mur, Francisco Javier

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, β type Ti-based alloys have been developed for load transfer clinical applications due to their superelasticity, shape memory effect, low elastic modulus and high damping capacity [1]. These properties promote bone regeneration and make them promising candidates for being used in load transfer implantology. The objective of the present work is to achieve a material with shape memory properties and/or low elastic modulus. The influence of cold work on the thermoelastic...

  2. The X-like shaped spatiotemporal structure of the biphoton entangled state in a cold two-level atomic ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dasen; Zhang, Zhiming

    2017-02-01

    We study the spatiotemporal structure of the biphoton entangled state generated by the four-wave mixing (FWM) process in a cold two-level atomic ensemble. We analyze, for the first time, the X-like shaped structure of the biphoton entangled state and the geometry of the biphoton correlation for different lengths and densities of the cold atomic ensemble. The propagation equations of the photon pairs generated from FWM process are derived in a spatiotemporal framework. By means of the input-output relations of the propagation equations, the biphoton amplitude function is obtained in a spatiotemporal domain. In the given frequency range, the biphoton amplitude displays an X-like shaped geometry, nonfactorizable in the space-time domain. Such an X-like shaped spatiotemporal structure is caused by the phase matching and the FWM gain. The former leads to the X-like shaped envelope of the biphoton correlation, while the latter gives rise to the oscillations around the X-like shaped envelope.

  3. Anxiety mediates the effect of acute stress on working memory performance when cortisol levels are high: a moderated mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Anna; Pulvers, Kim; Spady, Thomas J; Kliebenstein, Alexa; Bachand, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety is an aversive emotional state characterized by perceived uncontrollability and hypervigilance to threat that can frequently cause disruptions in higher-order cognitive processes like working memory. The attentional control theory (ACT) predicts that anxiety negatively affects the working memory system. This study tested the association between anxiety and working memory after the addition of stress and measured the glucocorticoid, cortisol. To better understand this relationship, we utilized a moderated mediation model. Undergraduate students from a public university (N = 103) self-reported their anxiety levels. Participants first completed a short-term memory test. During and after a forehead cold pressor task (stress vs. control procedure) participants completed a working memory test. Salivary cortisol was taken at baseline and after the last working memory test. Overall, acute stress had no effect on working memory. However, we found that anxiety levels mediated the influence of condition (stressed vs. control) on working memory, but only among those individuals who had high cortisol levels after exposure to acute stress, supporting a moderated mediation model. These results imply that activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis was necessary for working memory impairment in anxious individuals. These results provide support for the ACT.

  4. Dormancy removal of apple seeds by cold stratification is associated with fluctuation in H2O2, NO production and protein carbonylation level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dębska, Karolina; Krasuska, Urszula; Budnicka, Katarzyna; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2013-03-15

    Reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species play a signaling role in seed dormancy alleviation and germination. Their action may be described by the oxidative/nitrosative "window/door". ROS accumulation in embryos could lead to oxidative modification of protein through carbonylation. Mature apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) seeds are dormant and do not germinate. Their dormancy may be overcome by 70-90 days long cold stratification. The aim of this work was to analyze the relationship between germinability of embryos isolated from cold (5°C) or warm (25°C) stratified apple seeds and ROS or nitric oxide (NO) production and accumulation of protein carbonyl groups. A biphasic pattern of variation in H2O2 concentration in the embryos during cold stratification was detected. H2O2 content increased markedly after 7 days of seeds imbibition at 5°C. After an additional two months of cold stratification, the H2O2 concentration in embryos reached the maximum. NO production by the embryos was low during entire period of stratification, but increased significantly in germination sensu stricto (i.e. phase II of the germination process). The highest content of protein carbonyl groups was detected after 6 weeks of cold stratification treatment. Fluctuation of H2O2 and protein carbonylation seems to play a pivotal role in seed dormancy alleviation by cold stratification, while NO appears to be necessary for seed germination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of cold stratification pretreatment and pH level on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-02-28

    , strong anthropogenic ... An increase in pH level had negative effects on seed germination, the lowest germination (27.22 ± 4.18. %) was determined at pH 8.5. ... ment seems to be the principal cause of the loss of biodiversity ...

  6. Metabolic, Thermal and Cardiovascular Adjustments to Cold Exposure with Special Reference to Physical Work and Body Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    performance data in response to cold stress. The present study was designed to systematically 2 study in the sam unacclimatized young adult men and women...percent body fat and surface area-to-sas in young adult (on and women. Included in this figure are the data of Kolliss and to-workers (15). For a given...comitioms of cold exposure and body is. vomn would cool at a faster rate tem man. This Is borne out in the pr .. risons of mem clasifed es higb for body

  7. Stress Level and Adversity Quotient among Single Working Mothers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dianne Bautista Solis; Elna R. Lopez

    2015-01-01

    ...; assessed the single mothers’ stress level and adversity quotient; determined the significant difference of stress level and adversity quotient of single mothers when grouped according to profile variables...

  8. Boundary-Layer Development and Low-level Baroclinicity during High-Latitude Cold-Air Outbreaks: A Simple Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechin, Dmitry G.; Lüpkes, Christof

    2017-01-01

    A new quasi-analytical mixed-layer model is formulated describing the evolution of the convective atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) during cold-air outbreaks (CAO) over polar oceans downstream of the marginal sea-ice zones. The new model is superior to previous ones since it predicts not only temperature and mixed-layer height but also the height-averaged horizontal wind components. Results of the mixed-layer model are compared with dropsonde and aircraft observations carried out during several CAOs over the Fram Strait and also with results of a 3D non-hydrostatic (NH3D) model. It is shown that the mixed-layer model reproduces well the observed ABL height, temperature, low-level baroclinicity and its influence on the ABL wind speed. The mixed-layer model underestimates the observed ABL temperature only by about 10 %, most likely due to the neglect of condensation and subsidence. The comparison of the mixed-layer and NH3D model results shows good agreement with respect to wind speed including the formation of wind-speed maxima close to the ice edge. It is concluded that baroclinicity within the ABL governs the structure of the wind field while the baroclinicity above the ABL is important in reproducing the wind speed. It is shown that the baroclinicity in the ABL is strongest close to the ice edge and slowly decays further downwind. Analytical solutions demonstrate that the e-folding distance of this decay is the same as for the decay of the difference between the surface temperature of open water and of the mixed-layer temperature. This distance characterizing cold-air mass transformation ranges from 450 to 850 km for high-latitude CAOs.

  9. Combining COLD-PCR and high-resolution melt analysis for rapid detection of low-level, rifampin-resistant mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu; Liu, Guan; Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Suhua; Zhao, Yan-Lin

    2013-04-01

    Multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) remains a serious threat to public health. Mutational analysis of the gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) is an established and widely used surrogate marker for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The rpoB-based drug-resistant assay requires relatively less time to detect drug resistance in M. tuberculosis, yet it fails to detect low-level mutations in wild-type DNA. Here, we describe a low-level mutation detection method that combines co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) with high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis, aimed at detecting low-level, rifampin-resistant mutations in M. tuberculosis. Compared to conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), dilution experiments demonstrated a four- to eightfold improvement in selectivity using COLD-PCR/HRM to detect low-level, rifampin-resistant mutations. The mutation detection limit of conventional PCR/HRM was approximately 20%, whereas COLD-PCR/HRM had a mutation detection limit of 2.5%. Using traditional PCR/HRM and DNA sequencing, we found rpoB mutation in 110 rifampin-resistant isolates. The use of COLD-PCR/HRM allowed us to detect 10 low-level, rifampin-resistant mutations in 16 additional drug-resistant isolates. The sensitivity of COLD-PCR/HRM (95.2%) is significantly higher than that of PCR/HRM (87.3%). Our findings demonstrate that combined use of COLD-PCR with HRM can provide a sensitivity of at least 5% in detecting rpoB-mutated populations in a wild-type background, decreasing the delay in drug-resistant TB diagnosis and leading to faster, cheaper, more efficient, and more personalized antibiotic treatment, especially for low-level drug resistance mutations among the excess wild-type DNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  11. Effects of Cold Hardening on the Regulation of Polyamine Levels in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Paul; Delaney, Sandra; Chouinard, Lucette

    1987-01-01

    When leaves of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are exposed to a cold hardening temperature, a major accumulation of putrescine (6-9 times) takes place. Spermidine accumulates to a lesser extent and, conversely, spermine decreases slightly. These variations are completely reversible when plants are returned to initial growing conditions. A similar response is obtained with crowns. During cold hardening, arginine decarboxylase activity remains near its initial level while a considerable loss of activity is observed in control plants. Ornithine decarboxylase and diamine oxidase activity levels are not substantially modified by the treatment. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) also accumulates putrescine under low temperature stress, indicating that this phenomenon is not typical of cereals. The physiological significance of this accumulation of putrescine is still unexplained but the results obtained suggest the involvement of polyamines in the biochemical processes of cold hardening. PMID:16665409

  12. Does Multi-Level Intervention Enhance Work Process Knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppanen, Anneli; Hopsu, Leila; Klemola, Soili; Kuosma, Eeva

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to find out the impacts of participation in formal training and development of work on the work process knowledge of school kitchen workers. Design/methodology/approach: The article describes a follow-up study on the consequences of intervention. In total, 108 subjects participated both in the interventions and in…

  13. Levels of burnout among registrars and medical officers working at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    U Sirsawy

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... demand on work/life balance, dealing with emergencies and patient expectations and ... gender, younger age, long working hours, low job satisfaction ... Junior doctors at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in. Cape Town .... correlate at all with personal accomplishment (r = – 0.01; p = 0.88).

  14. Determining the Optimum Level of Working Capital in the Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The issue of working capital is very important to the operations of the Cameroon Development Corporation (CDC) Net working capital (i.e. the excess of liquid current assets over current liabilities) is an indispensable component of any business organization's capital structure. For any company to make profit in order to ...

  15. Power enhancement of heat engines via correlated thermalization in a three-levelworking fluid”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David; Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Brumer, Paul; Kurizki, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    We explore means of maximizing the power output of a heat engine based on a periodically-driven quantum system that is constantly coupled to hot and cold baths. It is shown that the maximal power output of such a heat engine whose “working fluid” is a degenerate V-type three-level system is that generated by two independent two-level systems. Hence, level degeneracy is a thermodynamic resource that may effectively double the power output. The efficiency, however, is not affected. We find that coherence is not an essential asset in such multilevel-based heat engines. The existence of two thermalization pathways sharing a common ground state suffices for power enhancement. PMID:26394838

  16. Parametric Optimization of Wire Electrical Discharge Machining of Powder Metallurgical Cold Worked Tool Steel using Taguchi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakara, Dara; Prasanthi, Guvvala

    2017-04-01

    Wire Cut EDM is an unconventional machining process used to build components of complex shape. The current work mainly deals with optimization of surface roughness while machining P/M CW TOOL STEEL by Wire cut EDM using Taguchi method. The process parameters of the Wire Cut EDM is ON, OFF, IP, SV, WT, and WP. L27 OA is used for to design of the experiments for conducting experimentation. In order to find out the effecting parameters on the surface roughness, ANOVA analysis is engaged. The optimum levels for getting minimum surface roughness is ON = 108 µs, OFF = 63 µs, IP = 11 A, SV = 68 V and WT = 8 g.

  17. Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratory‘s Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vince Maio

    2011-08-01

    This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine

  18. An improved red blood cell additive solution maintains 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and adenosine triphosphate levels by an enhancing effect on phosphofructokinase activity during cold storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, Patrick; Korsten, Herbert; de Korte, Dirk; Rombout, Eva; van Bruggen, Robin; Verhoeven, Arthur J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current additive solutions (ASs) for red blood cells (RBCs) do not maintain constant 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels during cold storage We have previously shown that with a new AS called phosphate-adenine-glucose-guanosine-gluconate-mannitol

  19. Antioxidant activities of cold-nature Tibetan herbs are signifcantly greater than hot-nature ones and are associated with their levels of total phenolic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yan-Fang; Li, Ji-Yu; Zheng, Li-Fang; Li, Hong-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Tibetan medicinal plants have been used for more than 2 000 years. In order to find their differences in antioxidant activity, total phenolics and total flavonoids between "hot-nature" and "cold-nature" herbs, we investigated the antioxidant activities of 40 Tibetan herbs from Qinghai plateau, with 20 herbs in cold-nature and 20 herbs in hot-nature. Antioxidant capacities were evaluated by the following methods: scavenging ABTS•(+) (2, 2'azinobis-(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), scavenging O2•(-), and Ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). The effects on inhibition of mitochondrion lipid peroxidation were determined by measuring the formation of TBARS (Thiobarbituric acid reactive substrates). Total phenolics and flavonoids were estimated by Folin-Ciocalteu and NaNO2-Al(NO3)3-NaOH colorimetric methods. Interestingly, the cold-nature herbs displayed higher antioxidant activities than the hot-nature ones, corresponding to nearly three-fold higher total phenolic contents in the cold-nature herbs. Moreover, the antioxidant activities correlated linearly with the levels of total phenolics for both cold-nature and hot-nature herbs, but only with the levels of total flavonoids for the hot-nature herbs. The results suggested that the phenolic compounds, but not the flavonoids, play the major role in antioxidant capacities of the cold-nature herbs. These findings could shed new lights on the study the theory of Tibetan medicine. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Individual- and Organization-Level Work-to-Family Spillover Are Uniquely Associated with Hotel Managers' Work Exhaustion and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomi; Davis, Kelly D; Neuendorf, Claudia; Grandey, Alicia; Lam, Chun Bun; Almeida, David M

    2016-01-01

    Building on the Conservation of Resources theory, this paper examined the unique and interactive associations of negative and positive work-to-family spillover (NWFS and PWFS, respectively) at the individual and organizational level with hotel managers' work exhaustion and satisfaction, beyond job demands and supervisors' leadership style. Guided by the levels of analysis framework, we first tested the unique associations of NWFS and PWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction at the individual level (571 hotel managers), beyond job demands supervisors' leadership style. Second, using multilevel modeling, we tested the climate effects of NWFS and PWFS on emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction aggregated at the organizational level (41 hotels). Third, we examined the role of the organizational climate of PWFS in the associations of individual-level NWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. Beyond the effects of psychological job demands and supervisor's transformational leadership, at the individual level, hotel managers who experienced higher NWFS than other managers reported more exhaustion and lower job satisfaction, whereas those with higher PWFS reported less exhaustion and higher satisfaction. At the organizational level, working in hotels where the average level of NWFS was higher than other hotels was associated with feeling more exhaustion of the individual members; working in hotels with higher PWFS was associated with feeling less exhaustion. The negative link between individual-level NWFS and job satisfaction was buffered when organization-level PWFS was higher, compared to when it was lower. This study moves beyond a focus on traditional job characteristics, toward considering individual and organizational experiences in the work-family interface as unique predictors of work exhaustion and satisfaction. Strengths of the study include illuminating organizational work-family climate effects such that coworkers' shared experiences of

  1. Dehydrin, alcohol dehydrogenase, and central metabolite levels are associated with cold tolerance in diploid strawberry (Fragaria spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davik, Jahn; Koehler, Gage; From, Britta; Torp, Torfinn; Rohloff, Jens; Eidem, Petter; Wilson, Robert C; Sønsteby, Anita; Randall, Stephen K; Alsheikh, Muath

    2013-01-01

    The use of artificial freezing tests, identification of biomarkers linked to or directly involved in the low-temperature tolerance processes, could prove useful in applied strawberry breeding. This study was conducted to identify genotypes of diploid strawberry that differ in their tolerance to low-temperature stress and to investigate whether a set of candidate proteins and metabolites correlate with the level of tolerance. 17 Fragaria vesca, 2 F. nilgerrensis, 2 F. nubicola, and 1 F. pentaphylla genotypes were evaluated for low-temperature tolerance. Estimates of temperatures where 50 % of the plants survived (LT₅₀) ranged from -4.7 to -12.0 °C between the genotypes. Among the F. vesca genotypes, the LT₅₀ varied from -7.7 °C to -12.0 °C. Among the most tolerant were three F. vesca ssp. bracteata genotypes (FDP821, NCGR424, and NCGR502), while a F. vesca ssp. californica genotype (FDP817) was the least tolerant (LT₅₀) -7.7 °C). Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), total dehydrin expression, and content of central metabolism constituents were assayed in select plants acclimated at 2 °C. The LT₅₀ estimates and the expression of ADH and total dehydrins were highly correlated (r(adh) = -0.87, r (dehyd) = -0.82). Compounds related to the citric acid cycle were quantified in the leaves during acclimation. While several sugars and acids were significantly correlated to the LT₅₀ estimates early in the acclimation period, only galactinol proved to be a good LT₅₀ predictor after 28 days of acclimation (r(galact) = 0.79). It is concluded that ADH, dehydrins, and galactinol show great potential to serve as biomarkers for cold tolerance in diploid strawberry.

  2. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.; David Baxter, G.

    2010-05-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  3. Population-level thermal performance of a cold-water ectotherm is linked to ontogeny and local environmental heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, Blake R.; Corn, P. Stephen; , Winsor H. Lowe; , Molly A. H. Webb; , Mariah J. Talbott; , Kevin M. Kappenman

    2013-01-01

    1. Negative effects of global warming are predicted to be most severe for species that occupy a narrow range of temperatures, have limited dispersal abilities or have long generation times. These are characteristics typical of many species that occupy small, cold streams.

  4. Effect of the Leveling Conditions on Residual Stress Evolution of Hot Rolled High Strength Steels for Cold Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Keecheol; Oh, Kyungsuk

    2017-09-01

    In order to investigate the effect of leveling conditions on residual stress evolution during the leveling process of hot rolled high strength steels, the in-plane residual stresses of sheet processed under controlled conditions at skin-pass mill and levelers were measured by cutting method. The residual stress was localized near the edge of sheet. As the thickness of sheet was increased, the residual stress occurred region was expanded. The magnitude of residual stress within the sheet was reduced as increasing the deformation occurred during the leveling process. But the residual stress itself was not removed completely. The magnitude of camber occurred at cut plate was able to be predicted by the residual stress distribution. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysing the effect of leveling conditions on residual stress. It was able to implement the effect of plastic deformation in leveling, tension, work roll bending, and initial state of sheet (residual stress and curl distribution). The validity of simulated results was verified from comparison with the experimentally measured residual stress and curl in a sheet.

  5. Experimental Investigation Of Segregation Of Carbon Atoms Due To Sub-Zero Cryogenic Treatment In Cold Work Tool Steel By Mechanical Spectroscopy And Atom Probe Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present mechanical spectroscopy of cold work tool steel subjected to sub-zero cryogenic soaking treatment to reveal the carbon segregation and the subsequent carbides refinement. The maximum of Snoek-Köster (SK peak height was obtained in the sample subjected to soaking 1h at −130°C cryogenic treatment. The SK peak height is reduced with prolonging the soaking time. The results indicate that an increase in the height of SK peak is connected with an increase in dislocation density and the number of segregated carbon atoms in the vicinity of dislocations or twin planes after martensite transformation at −130°C which is confirmed by corresponding TEM and atom probe tomography measurement. Hence, it is suggested that the isothermal martensite, formed during the cryogenic soaking treatment decreases (APT the height of SK peak.

  6. Theoretical and experimental performance analysis for cold trap design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemanath, M.G., E-mail: hemanath@igcar.gov.i [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Meikandamurthy, C.; Kumar, A. Ashok; Chandramouli, S.; Rajan, K.K.; Rajan, M.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Padmakumar, G.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Raj, Baldev [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2010-10-15

    Cold trap is a purification unit used in sodium system of FBR's for maintaining the oxygen/hydrogen level in sodium within acceptable limits. It works on the principle of crystallization and precipitation of oxides/hydrides of sodium in a wire mesh, when the temperature of sodium is reduced below the saturation temperature. The cold traps presently used have lower effectiveness and get plugged prematurely. The plugged cold traps are cleaned and then put back into service. Frequent cleaning of cold trap results in the long down time of the sodium system. New design of cold trap has been conceived to overcome the above problems. The mathematical modeling for the new design was carried out and validated with experimentally tested results for its effectiveness. This paper shares the experience gained on the new design of cold trap for FBR's.

  7. Individual- and Organization-Level Work-to-Family Spillover Are Uniquely Associated with Hotel Managers' Work Exhaustion and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomi; Davis, Kelly D.; Neuendorf, Claudia; Grandey, Alicia; Lam, Chun Bun; Almeida, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Building on the Conservation of Resources theory, this paper examined the unique and interactive associations of negative and positive work-to-family spillover (NWFS and PWFS, respectively) at the individual and organizational level with hotel managers' work exhaustion and satisfaction, beyond job demands and supervisors' leadership style. Design/Methodology/Approach: Guided by the levels of analysis framework, we first tested the unique associations of NWFS and PWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction at the individual level (571 hotel managers), beyond job demands supervisors' leadership style. Second, using multilevel modeling, we tested the climate effects of NWFS and PWFS on emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction aggregated at the organizational level (41 hotels). Third, we examined the role of the organizational climate of PWFS in the associations of individual-level NWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. Findings: Beyond the effects of psychological job demands and supervisor's transformational leadership, at the individual level, hotel managers who experienced higher NWFS than other managers reported more exhaustion and lower job satisfaction, whereas those with higher PWFS reported less exhaustion and higher satisfaction. At the organizational level, working in hotels where the average level of NWFS was higher than other hotels was associated with feeling more exhaustion of the individual members; working in hotels with higher PWFS was associated with feeling less exhaustion. The negative link between individual-level NWFS and job satisfaction was buffered when organization-level PWFS was higher, compared to when it was lower. Originality/Value: This study moves beyond a focus on traditional job characteristics, toward considering individual and organizational experiences in the work-family interface as unique predictors of work exhaustion and satisfaction. Strengths of the study include illuminating organizational work

  8. Individual- and Organization-level Work-to-Family Spillover are Uniquely Associated with Hotel Managers' Work Exhaustion and Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soomi Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Building on the Conservation of Resources theory, this paper examined the unique and interactive associations of negative and positive work-to-family spillover (NWFS and PWFS, respectively at the individual and organizational level with hotel managers’ wok exhaustion and satisfaction, beyond job demands and supervisors’ leadership style. Design/methodology/approach: Guided by the levels of analysis framework, we first tested the unique associations of NWFS and PWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction at the individual level (571 hotel managers, beyond job demands supervisors’ leadership style. Second, using multilevel modeling, we tested the climate effects of NWFS and PWFS on emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction aggregated at the organizational level (41 hotels. Third, we examined the role of the organizational climate of PWFS in the associations of individual-level NWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. Findings: Beyond the effects of psychological job demands and supervisor’s transformational leadership, at the individual level, hotel managers who experienced higher NWFS than other managers reported more exhaustion and lower job satisfaction, whereas those with higher PWFS reported less exhaustion and higher satisfaction. At the organizational level, working in hotels where the average level of NWFS was higher than other hotels was associated with feeling more exhaustion of the individual members; working in hotels with higher PWFS was associated with feeling less exhaustion. The negative link between individual-level NWFS and job satisfaction was buffered when organization-level PWFS was higher, compared to when it was lower. Originality/value: This study moves beyond a focus on traditional job characteristics, toward considering individual and organizational experiences in the work-family interface as unique predictors of work exhaustion and satisfaction. Strengths of the study include

  9. Flow behaviour of autoclaved, 20% cold worked, Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube material in the temperature range of room temperature to 800 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dureja, A. K.; Sinha, S. K.; Srivastava, Ankit; Sinha, R. K.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Seshu, P.; Pawaskar, D. N.

    2011-05-01

    Pressure tube material of Indian Heavy Water Reactors is 20% cold-worked and stress relieved Zr-2.5Nb alloy. Inherent variability in the process parameters during the fabrication stages of pressure tube and also along the length of component have their effect on micro-structural and texture properties of the material, which in turn affect its strength parameters (yield strength and ultimate tensile strength) and flow characteristics. Data of tensile tests carried out in the temperature range from room temperature to 800 °C using the samples taken out from a single pressure tube have been used to develop correlations for characterizing the strength parameters' variation as a function of axial location along length of the tube and the test temperature. Applicability of Ramberg-Osgood, Holloman and Voce's correlations for defining the post yield behaviour of the material has been investigated. Effect of strain rate change on the deformation behaviour has also been studied.

  10. The relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression level in psychiatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu Mi; Lai, Chien Yu; Chang, Yong-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yu; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Yu, Ching-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Psychiatric nurses are exposed to highly stressful work environments that can lead to depression over time. This study aimed to explore the relationships among work stress, resourcefulness, and depression levels of psychiatric nurses. A cross-sectional design with randomized sampling was used; 154 psychiatric nurses were recruited from six medical centers in Taiwan. Psychiatric nurses' work stress was found positively correlated with their depression level, and negatively related to resourcefulness. Work stress significantly predicted depression level. These results suggest that the hospital administrative units may develop training courses about resourcefulness skills to reduce psychiatric nurses' work stress, and improve their mental health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Review of Cold war social science: Knowledge production, liberal democracy, and human nature, and Working knowledge: Making the human sciences from Parsons to Kuhn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Reviews the books, Cold War Social Science: Knowledge Production, Liberal Democracy, and Human Nature by Mark Solovey and Hamilton Cravens (2012) and Working Knowledge: Making the Human Sciences From Parsons to Kuhn by Joel Isaac (see record 2012-13212-000). Taken together, these two important books make intriguing statements about the way to write the histories of fields like psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics in the Anglo American world during the 20th century. To date, histories of these fields have drawn on a number of fairly well-established punctuation marks to assist in periodization: the shift from interwar institutionalism in economics to postwar neoclassicism, with its physics-like emphasis on mathematical theory-building; the transition from the regnant prewar behaviorism through a postwar "cognitive revolution" in American psychology; and the move in fields like sociology and anthropology away from positivism and the pursuit of what has sometimes been called "grand theory" in the early postwar era toward a period defined by intellectual and political fragmentation, the reemergence of interpretive approaches and a reaction to the scientistic pretensions of the earlier period. These books, by contrast, provide perspectives orthogonal to such existing narrative frameworks by adopting cross-cutting lenses like the "Cold War" and the working practices of researchers in the social and behavioral sciences. As a result, they do much to indicate the value of casting a historiographical net beyond individual disciplines, or even beyond the "social sciences" or the "human sciences" sensu stricto, in the search for deeper patterns of historical development in these fields. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  13. Beyond the cold hit: measuring the impact of the national DNA data bank on public safety at the city and county level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Matthew; Boland, Cherisse; Holt, Cydne

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) has increased solvability of violent crimes by linking evidence DNA profiles to known offenders. At present, an in-depth analysis of the United States National DNA Data Bank effort has not assessed the success of this national public safety endeavor. Critics of this effort often focus on laboratory and police investigators unable to provide timely investigative support as a root cause(s) of CODIS' failure to increase public safety. By studying a group of nearly 200 DNA cold hits obtained in SFPD criminal investigations from 2001-2006, three key performance metrics (Significance of Cold Hits, Case Progression & Judicial Resolution, and Potential Reduction of Future Criminal Activity) provide a proper context in which to define the impact of CODIS at the City and County level. Further, the analysis of a recidivist group of cold hit offenders and their past interaction with law enforcement established five noteworthy criminal case resolution trends; these trends signify challenges to CODIS in achieving meaningful case resolutions. CODIS' effectiveness and critical activities to support case resolutions are the responsibility of all criminal justice partners in order to achieve long-lasting public safety within the United States.

  14. Development of library preparation method able to correct gene expression levels in rice anther and isolate a trace expression gene mediated in cold-resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Koike, Setsuo [Tohoku National Agricultural Experiment Station, Morioka (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    When cDNA library is prepared by a previously developed method, genes of which expression level is high are apt to be cloned at a high frequency, whereas genes of which expression level are low, are difficult to be cloned. A low-expression gene has been cloned at very low frequency. Therefore, the gene encoding the key enzyme that is involved in growth disturbance of rice pollen has not been identified. In this study, development of a library preparing method able to correct the expression level was attempted using highly sensitive detection method with radioisotope and some genes related to cold-resistance of rice were isolated. Double strand DNAs were synthesized using mRNA extract from rice anthers and annealed following heat-denaturation. It has been known that single strand DNA molecules abundantly existing in DNA solution can easily aggregate to form double strand DNA, but single stranded DNA molecules poor in the solution are apt to still remain as single strand after annealing. Thus, the amount of single strand DNA would be balanced in the solution between abundant DNA and poor DNA species. The authors succeeded to prepare a gene library including low and high expression genes at similar proportions. Moreover, spin trap method that allows RI labeling of DNA bound to latex particle, was developed to detect with high sensitivity, especially for genes that are expressed at low level. The present method could be used for recovery, detection and quantitative analysis of radiolabeled single strand DNA. Thus, it was demonstrated that the stage from tetrad sperm to small sperm might be easily affected by cold stress. The present results suggest that the expressions of {beta}-1 and {beta}-3 glucanase, which are involved in the release of small sperms following meiosis in the pollen formation, might be easily affected by cold stress. (M.N.)

  15. Cold-air investigation of a 4 1/2 stage turbine with stage-loading factor of 4.66 and high specific work output. 2: Stage group performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, W. J.; Behning, F. P.; Moffitt, T. P.; Hotz, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    The stage group performance of a 4 1/2 stage turbine with an average stage loading factor of 4.66 and high specific work output was determined in cold air at design equivalent speed. The four stage turbine configuration produced design equivalent work output with an efficiency of 0.856; a barely discernible difference from the 0.855 obtained for the complete 4 1/2 stage turbine in a previous investigation. The turbine was designed and the procedure embodied the following design features: (1) controlled vortex flow, (2) tailored radial work distribution, and (3) control of the location of the boundary-layer transition point on the airfoil suction surface. The efficiency forecast for the 4 1/2 stage turbine was 0.886, and the value predicted using a reference method was 0.862. The stage group performance results were used to determine the individual stage efficiencies for the condition at which design 4 1/2 stage work output was obtained. The efficiencies of stages one and four were about 0.020 lower than the predicted value, that of stage two was 0.014 lower, and that of stage three was about equal to the predicted value. Thus all the stages operated reasonably close to their expected performance levels, and the overall (4 1/2 stage) performance was not degraded by any particularly inefficient component.

  16. Effects of Managers’ Work Motivation and Networking Activity on Their Reported Levels of External Red Tape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torenvlied, R.; Akkerman, A.

    2012-01-01

    This study brings together two perspectives on managers’ reported levels of red tape. The work motivation perspective explains how managers’ characteristics, such as work engagement (alienation) or commitment, affect their reported levels of red tape. The external control perspective explains how

  17. Work Values Contrasts at the Associate and Baccalaureate Student Levels in the Medical Laboratory Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Marie C.; Doran, Rodney L.

    1978-01-01

    The work values patterns of female and male students at the two- and four-year levels of allied health professions are investigated. Results indicate that a student's educational level or sex has an impact on his/her work orientation. (Author/JKS)

  18. Investigation of the Motivation Level of Teachers Working at State Schools in Relation to Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Süleyman

    2015-01-01

    In order to give the best and accurate orientation to teachers working in school organizations, it seems to be necessary to determine their motivation level. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to determine the motivation level of teachers working in state elementary and secondary schools. Moreover, the study also looks at the relationships…

  19. Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.…

  20. A STUDY ON THE DETERMINATION OF WORK ENGAGEMENT LEVELS OF HEALTH EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Özer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine work engagement levels of health employees and to reveal whether the individual and demographic features of the employees have an effect on the level of work engagement or not. The population of study included all employees in Aydin Atatürk State Hospital. The sample is selected in the study, tried to reach the whole universe and a total of 414 usable responses were obtained. According to result of this study, there are statistically significant differences between employees’ evaluations related to work engagement level by level of education, occupational status and gender whereas total work years, age and marital status do not create a difference in terms of work engagement levels of employees.

  1. DETERMINATION OF ORGANIZATIONAL STRESS AND ORGANIZATIONAL BURNOUT LEVELS OF MID LEVEL MANAGERS WORKING IN FOUR AND FIVE STAR HOTEL BUSINESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevket Yirik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study emphasizes the concepts of stress and organizational stress which are the main concepts constituting theoretical foundation of the research; evaluates influences of stress on organization; discusses the concept of organizational burnout as well as its sub-dimensions; and analyses organizational stress and burnout levels of mid level managers working in four and five star hotels. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between organizational stress and organizational burnout levels of mid level managers of four and five star hotel businesses. Survey has been conducted on 318 employees of four and five star hotels operating in Alanya, Turkey. According to the analysis of data, it has been observed that ages of mid level managers have an influence on their organizational stress and burnout levels. Genders of mid level managers are influential on their organizational stress levels while they have no influence on their burnout levels. Education levels of managers influence their organizational stress levels while they have no influence on their burnout levels. The departments of managers are influential both on organizational stress and burnout. Positions of managers influence their burnout levels while they have no influence on their organizational stress levels.

  2. The effect of clove bud powder at a spice level on antioxidant and quality properties of emulsified pork sausage during cold storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang-Keun; Choi, Jung-Seok; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Kim, Gap-Don

    2016-09-01

    Clove bud is a widely used spice in meat and meat products, and it contains high level of phenolic compounds. The effectiveness of the clove as a spice has not been fully studied at a general level of addition in the meat products. Therefore, in the present study, the antioxidant, antimicrobial, and nitrite scavenging abilities of clove bud powder (CBP) was assessed at spice level (0.1% and 0.2%) in emulsified pork sausage, during 6 weeks of cold storage. CBP had DPPH radical scavenging ability, but CBP addition at 0.1% and 0.2% did not decrease the TBARS value. An antimicrobial effect of CBP was also not observed during the cold storage. However, residual nitrite at storage weeks 4 and 6 was shown to be lower (P 0.05). The positive effect on nitrite scavenging could be expected by the addition of 0.2% CBP as a spice. However, antioxidant and antimicrobial abilities were not observed, as well as improvement in the quality of characteristics, in emulsified pork sausage. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Post-cold war United Nations peacekeeping operations: a review of the case for a hybrid level 2+ medical treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ralph Jay

    2015-01-01

    Post-Cold War, UN peacekeeping operations (UN PKOs) have become larger, more mobile, multi-faceted and conducted over vast areas of remote, rugged, and harsh geography. They have been increasingly involved in dangerous areas with ill-defined boundaries, simmering internecine armed conflict, and disregard on the part of some local parties for peacekeepers' security and role. Yet progressively there have been expectations of financial restraint and austerity. Additionally, UN PKOs have become more "robust," that is, engaged in preemptive, assertive operations. A statistically positive and significant relationship exists between missions' size, complexity, remoteness, and aggressive tenor and a higher probability of trauma or death, especially as a result of hostile actions or disease. Therefore, in the interest of "force protection" and optimizing operations, a key component of UN PKOs is health care and medical treatment. The expectation is that UN PKO medical support must conform to the general intent and structure of current UN PKOs to become more streamlined, portable, mobile, compartmentalized, and specialized, but also more varied and complex to address the medical aspects of these missions cost-efficiently. This article contends that establishing a hybrid level 2-a level 2 with level 3 modules and components (i.e., level 2+)-is a viable course of action when considering trends in the medical aspects of Post-Cold War UN PKOs. A level 2 medical treatment facility has the potential to provide needed forward mobile medical treatment, especially trauma care, for extended, complex, large-scale, and comprehensive UN PKOs. This is particularly the case for missions that include humanitarian outreach, preventive medicine, and psychiatry. The level 2 treatment facility is flexible enough to expand into a hybrid level 2+ with augmentation of modules based on changes in mission requirements and variation in medical aspects.

  4. Generational differences on work engagement levels of government healthcare institution employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Hlongwane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to explore generational differences on work engagement levels of employees in a South African government healthcare institution. The Ultrech Work Engagement Scale measured the participants’ levels of work engagement and it was administered to a random sample size of government healthcare institution employees (n=289. Statistical analyses of the data were conducted and the results of ANOVA indicated that the levels of work engagement significantly differ depending on the employees’ generational cohort or group for the dimensions vigour, dedication and absorption. In terms of contributions and practical implications, recommendations are made regarding proposed organisational development interventions to enhance employees’ work engagement levels in a healthcare institution context as well as to conduct future research.

  5. The effects of menthol on cold allodynia and wind-up-like pain in upper limb amputees with different levels of phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vase, Lene; Svensson, Peter; Nikolajsen, Lone; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2013-02-08

    The mechanisms underlying phantom limb pain are not fully known, but hypersensitivity appears to be a central element. Menthol has previously been suggested as a model for hypersensitivity, but it has not yet been investigated if different levels of neuropathic pain may influence the effects of menthol or if topical application of menthol may act as a model for hypersensitivity in patients with phantom limb pain. In the present study, menthol (l-menthol 40%) was applied to the affected and non-affected sides in 24 upper-limb amputees with different levels of phantom limb pain to test if menthol could induce cold allodynia and exacerbate wind-up-like pain. The average level of phantom limb pain was significantly related to cold allodynia (P=0.044). Prior to application of menthol, the level of phantom limb pain was significantly related to the level of wind-up-like pain following both brush (P=0.040) and pinprick (P=0.033) stimulation. After application of menthol, the level of phantom limb pain was only related to wind-up-like pain following brush (P=0.011) but not pinprick stimulation (P=0.233). This study indicates that menthol does influence hypersensitivity in phantom limb pain patients, and it is the first study to show that menthol may exacerbate wind-up-like pain in this group of neuropathic pain patients. The findings suggest that menthol may act as a model for studying sensitization in phantom limb patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Night shift work and levels of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and cortisol in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, Dana K; Bhatti, Parveen; Chen, Chu; Nordt, Frank; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Davis, Scott

    2013-06-01

    Night shift work is associated with cancer among men, but the biologic mechanism is unclear. We investigated whether male night shift workers showed changes in levels of melatonin and cortisol, potential biomarkers of cancer risk. Urine was collected from 185 night shift and 158 day shift-working male healthcare providers, aged 22 to 55 years, throughout work and sleep periods, and assayed for 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and cortisol. Morning serum was collected within 90 minutes of completing the night and assayed for cortisol. Night shift workers had significantly lower 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels during daytime sleep, nighttime work, and nighttime sleep on off-nights (57%, 62%, and 40% lower, respectively), relative to the day shift workers during nighttime sleep (P cortisol in night shift workers was 16% higher during daytime sleep and 13% lower during nighttime sleep on off-nights (P cortisol post-work and post-sleep in night shift workers were 24% and 43% lower, respectively, than post-sleep levels among day shift workers (P melatonin levels and significantly higher urinary cortisol levels during daytime sleep and nighttime work, relative to nighttime sleep (P cortisol levels post-work were lower than those post-sleep. Night shift workers have substantially lower 6-sulfatoxymelatonin during night work and daytime sleep, and levels remain low when night shift workers sleep at night. Chronic reduction in melatonin among night shift workers may be an important carcinogenic mechanism. Cortisol secretion patterns may be impacted by night shift work, which could affect cancer risk. Shift work could be an important risk factor for many types of cancer.

  7. Work engagement, moral distress, education level, and critical reflective practice in intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Lisa A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how nurses' moral distress, education level, and critical reflective practice (CRP) related to their work engagement. The study is relevant to nursing, given registered nurse (RN) documented experiences of job-related distress and work dissatisfaction, and the nursing shortage crisis. A better understanding of factors that may enhance RN work engagement is needed. A non-experimental, descriptive, correlational design was used to examine the relationships among four variables: moral distress, education level, CRP, and work engagement. The sample included 28 intensive care unit RNs from three separate ICUs in a 355-bed Southwest magnet-designated hospital. There was a positive direct relationship between CRP and work engagement, a negative direct relationship between moral distress and work engagement, and CRP and moral distress, together, explained 47% of the variance in work engagement. Additionally, in the neonatal intensive care unit, a positive direct relationship between increased educational level and CRP was identified, with a suggested negative relationship between increased education level and moral distress. Strategies to promote CRP and reduce moral distress are recommended, to promote RN work engagement. Additionally, further study on the role of education in nurses' work engagement is recommended. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Factors predicting quality of work life among nurses in tertiary-level hospitals, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, N; Akkadechanunt, T; Chontawan, R; Klunklin, A

    2017-11-03

    This study examined the level of quality of work life and predictability of years of education, monthly income, years of experience, job stress, organizational commitment and work environment on quality of work life among nurses in tertiary-level hospitals in the People's Republic of Bangladesh. There is an acute shortage of nurses worldwide including Bangladesh. Quality of work life is important for quality of patient care and nurse retention. Nurses in Bangladesh are fighting to provide quality care for emerging health problems for the achievement of sustainable development goals. We collected data from 288 randomly selected registered nurses, from six tertiary-level hospitals. All nurses were requested to fill questionnaire consisted of Demographic Data Sheet, Quality of Nursing Work Life Survey, Expanded Nursing Stress Scale, Questionnaire of Organizational Commitment and Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics and multiple regression. The quality of work life as perceived by nurses in Bangladesh was at moderate level. Monthly income was found as the best predictor followed by work environment, organizational commitment and job stress. A higher monthly income helps nurses to fulfil their personal needs; positive work environment helps to provide quality care to the patients. Quality of work life and predictors measured by self-report only may not reflect the original picture of the quality of work life among nurses. Findings provide information for nursing and health policymakers to develop policies to improve quality of work life among nurses that can contribute to quality of nursing care. This includes the working environment, commitment to the organization and measures to reduce job stress. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Cold Sore

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain Headache Cold sore Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  10. Cold Urticaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management of physical urticaria. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2013;111:235. Nov. 21, 2014 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cold-urticaria/basics/definition/CON-20034524 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  11. Identifying meaning and perceived level of satisfaction within the context of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angie; Kitchell, Molly; O'Neill, Tiffany; Lockliear, Jennifer; Vosler, Alyson; Kubek, Dayna; Dale, Lucinda

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The primary objectives of this study were to identify sources of meaning for individuals within the context of a work environment, and to compare varied sources of meaning for individuals with high and low work satisfaction levels. METHOD: Participants were chosen based on satisfaction levels in employment, full-time employment status within an organization for at least one year, and diversity in the work setting. Data were gathered through a series of interviews and observations of the participants' workplaces. A comparative analysis of transcribed interviews was conducted by the researchers and with an expert occupational therapy faculty panel. From these analyses, the researchers developed work narratives for a mechanical engineer, a high school teacher, an employee of mechanical services, and a career service counselor. RESULTS: Emerging themes from the work narratives indicated that the various meanings employees found in work had an effect on their perceived levels of job satisfaction. Participants conveyed that organization identification, financial benefits, independent decision-making, reciprocal respect, opportunities for creativity, and maintaining significant relationships outside of work enhanced meaning and satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: The worker role is a significant source of an individual's identity, meaning, and satisfaction in life. Professionals in various fields can work with employers to develop meaningful work environments for increased job satisfaction, greater motivation for work, increased productivity, and decreased employee turnover.

  12. The relationships of working conditions, recent stressors and childhood trauma with salivary cortisol levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleman, Michiel; Vreeburg, Sophie A.; Dekker, Jack J. M.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    Background: An etiological model has been suggested where stress leads to high cortisol levels and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, resulting in somatic diseases and psychopathology. To evaluate this model we examined the association of different stressors (working

  13. Flow behaviour of autoclaved, 20% cold worked, Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube material in the temperature range of room temperature to 800 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dureja, A.K., E-mail: akdureja@barc.gov.in [Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Sinha, S.K.; Srivastava, Ankit; Sinha, R.K. [Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Materials' Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 85 (India); Seshu, P.; Pawaskar, D.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 76 (India)

    2011-05-01

    Pressure tube material of Indian Heavy Water Reactors is 20% cold-worked and stress relieved Zr-2.5Nb alloy. Inherent variability in the process parameters during the fabrication stages of pressure tube and also along the length of component have their effect on micro-structural and texture properties of the material, which in turn affect its strength parameters (yield strength and ultimate tensile strength) and flow characteristics. Data of tensile tests carried out in the temperature range from room temperature to 800 deg. C using the samples taken out from a single pressure tube have been used to develop correlations for characterizing the strength parameters' variation as a function of axial location along length of the tube and the test temperature. Applicability of Ramberg-Osgood, Holloman and Voce's correlations for defining the post yield behaviour of the material has been investigated. Effect of strain rate change on the deformation behaviour has also been studied.

  14. Improvement in microstructure and superconducting properties of single-filament powder-in-tube MgB2 wires by cold working with a swaging machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yusuke; Murakami, Masato; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the influence of the mechanical deformation method of wire fabrication on the microstructure and superconducting properties of single-filament in situ powder-in-tube (PIT) MgB2 wires. We employed three deformation methods to fabricate the wires: only swaging, groove rolling + roller drawing, and groove rolling + conventional drawing. We found that cold working by swaging has three advantages over the groove rolling + drawing method: (1) improved uniformity of the MgB2 core along the longitudinal direction; (2) higher mass density of the Mg + B (MgB2) core before (after) heat treatment (HT); and (3) well-developed fiber structures of Mg (MgB2) before (after) HT. These three factors greatly enhanced the critical current density (J c) values of PIT MgB2 wires. The highest J c values were obtained through mechanical deformation by swaging for both pure and carbon-doped wires. A J c value of 3.5 × 104 A cm-2 and an engineering critical current density (J e) of 1.1 × 104 A cm-2 were recorded at 4.2 K and 10 T for a swaged wire of 4.5%-carbon-coated boron powder heat-treated at 600 °C for 1 h.

  15. Relationship between Job Statisfaction Levels and Work-Family Conflicts of Physical Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulucan, Hakki

    2017-01-01

    Study aims to examine the relationship between perceived job satisfaction levels and work-family conflicts of the physical education teachers. Research group consists of 154 volunteer physical education teachers that work full time in governmental institutions in Kirsehir city and its counties. To acquire the job satisfaction datum; the Minnesota…

  16. Team-level flexibility, work-home spillover, and health behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L

    2013-05-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE--results only work environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large U.S. corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees' health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Cold energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  18. Job crafting at the team and individual level: Implications for work engagement and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tims, M.; Bakker, A.B.; Derks, D.; Rhenen, van W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that employee job crafting is positively related to job performance through employee work engagement. The present study expands this individual-level perspective to the team level by hypothesizing that team job crafting relates positively to team performance through team

  19. Policy-level interventions and work-related psychosocial risk management in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leka, S.; Jain, A.; Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Cox, T.

    2010-01-01

    There exists a substantial degree of diversity across strategies to prevent and manage work- related psychosocial risks and their associated health effects. Whereas it is common to distinguish between organizational and individual interventions, the important level of policy- level interventions has

  20. Waterford Early Reading Level One[TM]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Waterford Early Reading Level One"[TM] is an emergent literacy curriculum that uses computer-based technology to prepare children for reading. It begins with a tutorial to familiarize the child with the computer and mouse and a reading placement evaluation to assess and determine whether a child should work on "Level One"…

  1. Individual and group-level job resources and their relationships with individual work engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllemann, Désirée; Brauchli, Rebecca; Jenny, Gregor J; Bauer, Georg F

    2016-06-16

    This study adds a multilevel perspective to the well-researched individual-level relationship between job resources and work engagement. In addition, we explored whether individual job resources cluster within work groups because of a shared psychosocial environment and investigated whether a resource-rich psychosocial work group environment is beneficial for employee engagement over and above the beneficial effect of individual job resources and independent of their variability within groups. Data of 1,219 employees nested in 103 work groups were obtained from a baseline employee survey of a large stress management intervention project implemented in six medium and large-sized organizations in diverse sectors. A variety of important job resources were assessed and grouped to an overall job resource factor with three subfactors (manager behavior, peer behavior, and task-related resources). Data were analyzed using multilevel random coefficient modeling. The results indicated that job resources cluster within work groups and can be aggregated to a group-level job resources construct. However, a resource-rich environment, indicated by high group-level job resources, did not additionally benefit employee work engagement but on the contrary, was negatively related to it. On the basis of this unexpected result, replication studies are encouraged and suggestions for future studies on possible underlying within-group processes are discussed. The study supports the presumed value of integrating work group as a relevant psychosocial environment into the motivational process and indicates a need to further investigate emergent processes involved in aggregation procedures across levels.

  2. A study on the level of awareness of school principles on professional social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a study to determine the level of awareness of school principles on professional social work in the city of Esfehan, Iran. The proposed study of this paper distributes questionnaire among eighty principle managers who work for different schools in this city. The first part of the questionnaire is devoted to people's personal characteristics such as gender, age, etc. and the second part is associated with the some questions about their awareness on professional social work. The study, for instance, finds that there is a meaningful relationship between job experience and gender and awareness when the statistical significance level is less than five percent but there is no relationship between the level of education and the awareness on professional social work.

  3. Levels of occupational stress and stressful activities for nurses working in emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Ferreira da Fonseca

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to identify stress levels, areas and their activities identified as stressful by nurses working in the emergence in Manaus, AM, Brazil. It is an epidemiological, cross-sectional design, with 36 emergency nurses from December 2010 to January 2011. The Bianchi Stress Scale with 57 questions was used. The nurses were at risk for high levels of stress. The most stressful areas were the operation of the unit, conditions of work and personnel administration, and the most stressful activity was the request for equipment review and repair. The difference by Friedman test between the areas was significant (p <0.05, Dunn post-test significant (p <0.05 when compared by peers. The accumulation of management activities with the assistance activities can generate higher levels of stress, it is necessary to invest in improving the work environment and management support to minimize the stress experienced at work.

  4. Combining predictive microbiology with cold-enrichment in minced pork for quantifying low levels of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, C. O. A.; Aabo, Søren; Hansen, Tina Beck

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE For determination of Salmonella concentration in meat various methods can be used depending on the expected level. When higher levels (102 to 103 bacteria or more per g) are anticipated, plate count techniques using selective agars, i.e. XLD, are appropriate whereas for low numbers (3 t...

  5. Perceived stress at work is associated with lower levels of DHEA-S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartsson, Anna-Karin; Theorell, Töres; Rockwood, Alan L; Kushnir, Mark M; Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H

    2013-01-01

    It is known that long-term psychosocial stress may cause or contribute to different diseases and symptoms and accelerate aging. One of the consequences of prolonged psychosocial stress may be a negative effect on the levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphated metabolite dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S). The aim of this study is to investigate whether levels of DHEA and DHEA-S differ in individuals who report perceived stress at work compared to individuals who report no perceived stress at work. Morning fasting DHEA-S and DHEA levels were measured in serum in a non-stressed group (n = 40) and a stressed group (n = 41). DHEA and DHEA-S levels were compared between the groups using ANCOVA, controlling for age. The mean DHEA-S levels were 23% lower in the subjects who reported stress at work compared to the non-stressed group. Statistical analysis (ANCOVA) showed a significant difference in DHEA-S levels between the groups (p = 0.010). There was no difference in DHEA level between the groups. This study indicates that stressed individual have markedly lower levels of DHEA-S. Given the important and beneficial functions of DHEA and DHEA-S, lower levels of DHEA-S may constitute one link between psychosocial stress, ill health and accelerated ageing.

  6. [Level of job satisfaction among employees working at healthcare facilities in Nisava and Toplica district].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Roberta Teofilo; Ilić, Marina Deljanin; Milosević, Zoran; Vasić, Milena; Bogdanović, Dragan; Sagrić, Cedomir

    2013-01-01

    The product of health system and its employees is health service whose quality is related to the satisfaction and motivation of people working in health system. The objective of this study was to assess and compare satisfaction with different aspects of work among different categories of employees in healthcare facilities on primary, secondary and tertiary level of health care in Nisava and Toplica districts. The study was conducted as a one-day study in 15 healthcare facilities on primary level, in two public hospitals and 27 clinics of Clinical Centre of Nis, using anonymous questionnaire. Out of 3,892 employees, who took part in this study, 2,227 were from primary and 1,665 were from secondary and tertiary level. All employees on primary level are more satisfied with the majority of aspects of job comparing with employees on secondary and tertiary level of health care. Administrative staff is in general more satisfied with all aspects of job comparing with other categories of employees. All employees on secondary and tertiary level are more physically and psychically exhausted than employees on primary level of health care. Health workers on secondary and tertiary level are most psychically exhausted. There is a difference in satisfaction with different aspects ofjob in different categories of employees, and on different levels of health, in healthcare facilities in Nisava and Toplica districts. Employees of healthcare facilities on primary level of health care are in general more satisfied than employees on se-condary and tertiary level of health care.

  7. Levels of Phonological Awareness, Working Memory, and Lexical Knowledge in Elementary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Helena Motta Bandini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between oral language, phonological awareness, and working memory have been empirically demonstrated, however, phonological awareness encompasses different abilities, assessed at different levels. The present study investigated the possible associations between specific phonological awareness abilities and phonological working memory in first-grade students. In the initial phase ( n = 254, the study evaluated the abilities of phonological awareness and phonological working memory and found a high positive correlation between these abilities, thus confirming the findings of previous studies. The second phase ( n = 12 evaluated the vocabulary of individuals who, in the initial phase, showed low or high working memory and phonological awareness scores. Students with low working memory and low phonological awareness capacities had low scores in expressive language abilities, suggesting that phonological working memory may have direct effects on lexical knowledge. These results contribute to the understanding of the relationships investigated in this study and have important implications for planning teaching strategies.

  8. Night Shift Work and Levels of 6-Sulfatoxymelatonin and Cortisol in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, Dana K.; Bhatti, Parveen; Chen, Chu; Nordt, Frank; Stanczyk, Frank Z.; Davis, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background Nightshift work is associated with cancer among men, but the biological mechanism is unclear. We investigated whether male nightshift workers demonstrated changes in levels of melatonin and cortisol, potential biomarkers of cancer risk. Methods Urine was collected from 185 nightshift and 158 dayshift-working male healthcare providers, aged 22-55, throughout work and sleep periods and assayed for 6-sulfatoxymelatonin and cortisol. Morning serum was collected within 90 minutes of completing the night and assayed for cortisol. Results Nightshift workers had significantly lower 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels during daytime sleep, nighttime work, and nighttime sleep on off-nights (57%, 62% and 40% lower, respectively), relative to the dayshift workers during nighttime sleep (pwork and post-sleep in nightshift workers were 24% and 43% lower, respectively, than post-sleep levels among dayshift workers (pwork, relative to nighttime sleep (pwork were lower than those post-sleep. Conclusions Nightshift workers have substantially lower 6-sulfatoxymelatonin during night work and daytime sleep, and levels remain low when nightshift workers sleep at night. Chronic reduction in melatonin among nightshift workers may be an important carcinogenic mechanism. Cortisol secretion patterns may be impacted by night shift work, which could affect cancer risk. Impact Shiftwork could be an important risk factor for many types of cancer. PMID:23563887

  9. COMBINATION OF COLD PACK, WATER SPRAY, AND FAN COOLING ON BODY TEMPERATURE REDUCTION AND LEVEL OF SUCCESS TO REACH NORMAL TEMPERATURE IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS WITH HYPERTHERMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Eka Dzulfaijah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the effect of the combination of cold pack, water spray, and fan cooling on body temperature reduction and level of success to reach normal temperature in critically ill patients with hyperthermia. Methods: This was a randomized control trial (RCT with pretest postest control group design and repeated measurement, conducted on December 2016 – January 2017. There were 32 respondents selected using total sampling, with 16 respondents randomly assigned in the experiment and control group. A digital thermometer was used to measure hyperthermia. Paired t-test, Repeated Anova with post hoc, and Mann Whitney were used for data analysis. Results: Findings showed that the mean of body temperature in the experiment group in pretest was 38.762oC and decreased to 37.3oC after given intervention for 60 minutes. The mean difference of body temperature was 1.4625, with p-value 0.000 (<0.05. In control group, the mean of body temperature in pretest was 38.669oC and decreased to 38.188oC given intervention for 60 minutes. The mean difference of body temperature was 0.4812, with p-value 0.000 (<0.05. Conclusion: There was a significant effect of the combination of cold pack, water spray, and fan cooling on body temperature reduction and level of success to reach normal temperature in critically ill patients with hyperthermia. This combination is more effective than water compress alone.

  10. The Work Softening by Deformation-Induced Disordering and Cold Rolling of 6.5 wt pct Si Steel Thin Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianglong; Li, Haoze; Zhang, Weina; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Guodong; Luo, Zhonghan; Zhang, Fengquan

    2016-09-01

    As-cast strip of 6.5 wt pct Si steel was fabricated by twin-roll strip casting. After hot rolling at 1323 K (1050 °C), thin sheets with the thickness of 0.35 mm were produced by warm rolling at 373 K (100 °C) with rolling reductions of 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 pct. Influence of warm rolling reduction on ductility was investigated by room temperature bending test. The measurement of macro-hardness showed that "work softening" could begin when the warm rolling reduction exceeded 35 pct. The room temperature ductility of the thin sheets gradually increased with the increase of warm rolling reductions, and the plastic deformation during bending began to form when the warm rolling reduction was greater than 45 pct, the 65 pct rolled thin sheet exhibited the maximum plastic deformation of about 0.6 pct during bending at room temperature, with a few small dimples having been observed on the fracture surfaces. B2-ordered domains were formed in the 15, 25, 35, 45, and 55 pct rolled specimens, and their average size decreased with the increase of warm rolling reductions. By contrast, no B2-ordered domain could be found in the 65 pct rolled specimen. It had been observed that large-ordered domains could be split into several small parts by the slip of partial super-dislocations during warm rolling, which led to significant decrease of the order degree to cause the phenomenon of deformation-induced disordering. On the basis of these results, cold rolling schedule was developed to successfully fabricate 0.25-mm-thick sheets with good surface qualities and magnetic properties from warm rolled sheets.

  11. Efficiency at maximum power of a heat engine working with a two-level atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Jianhui; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli

    2013-04-01

    We consider the finite-time operation of a quantum heat engine whose working substance is composed of a two-level atomic system. The engine cycle, consisting of two quantum adiabatic and two quantum isochoric (constant-frequency) processes and working between two heat reservoirs at temperatures T(h) and T(c)(engine model based on a mesoscopic or macroscopic system. If the internal friction is included, we find that the EMP decreases as the friction coefficient increases.

  12. Draft Level 1 Remedial Investigation Work Plan: 316-3 waste disposal trenches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    This work plan describes the work to be performed for the initial level of site characterization for the 316.3 Trenches at the Hanford Site. This initial site characterization effort will include a review of existing environmental contamination data for the 300 Area as well as collection and analysis of environmental samples to better characterize subsurface contamination at the site. 7 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Suk Yong; You, Jae Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    Nearly every technical information is chased in the world. All of them are reviewed and analyzed. Some of them are chosen to study further more to review every related documents. And a probable suggestion about the excitonic process in deuteron absorbed condensed matter is proposed a way to cold fusion. 8 refs. (Author).

  14. Common cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many health problems, including colds. DO NOT use antibiotics if they are not needed. Breastfeed infants if possible. Breast milk is known to protect against respiratory tract infections in children, even years after you stop breastfeeding. Drink plenty of fluids to help your immune ...

  15. Performance analysis of quantum Diesel heat engines with a two-level atom as working substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X. L.; Shang, Y. F.; Guo, D. Y.; Yu, Qian; Sun, Qi

    2017-07-01

    A quantum Diesel cycle, which consists of one quantum isobaric process, one quantum isochoric process and two quantum adiabatic processes, is established with a two-level atom as working substance. The parameter R in this model is defined as the ratio of the time in quantum isochoric process to the timescale for the potential width movement. The positive work condition, power output and efficiency are obtained, and the optimal performance is analyzed with different R. The effects of dissipation, the mixed state in the cycle and the results of other working substances are also discussed at the end of this analysis.

  16. Stress among nurses: an examination of salivary cortisol levels on work and day off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cecilia Pires da Rocha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the use of salivary cortisol concentration as a physiological index of the stress level among nurses on their work day and day off and correlates it with the questionnaire used to measure occupational stress in nurses (Inventário de Estresse em Enfermeiros - IEE. This is a comparative, cross-sectional descriptive study in which sociodemographic data, IEE results and salivary cortisol levels were used. Fifty-seven nurses participated in the study (80.7% females and a mean age of 37.1 years old. The IEE average score was 124.5. The average cortisol level was 564.1 ng/m on work day and 354.1 ng/mL on day off. Nurses who had double workdays presented high values of salivary cortisol during the work day (638.1 ng/mL. In conclusion, salivary cortisol identified the nurses’ stress level, and differences were found between a work day and day off. On the nurses’ day off, their salivary cortisol levels and stress scores were lower.

  17. Exploring the relationships between high involvement work system practices, work demands and emotional exhaustion : A multi-level study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppenauer, V.; van de Voorde, F.C.

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the impact of enacted high involvement work systems (HIWS) practices on employee emotional exhaustion. This study hypothesized that work overload and job responsibility mediate the relationship between HIWS practices (ability, motivation, opportunity and work design HIWS

  18. Exploring the relationships between high involvement work system practices, work demands and emotional exhaustion : A multi-level study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppenauer, V.; van de Voorde, F.C.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the impact of enacted high involvement work systems (HIWS) practices on employee emotional exhaustion. This study hypothesized that work overload and job responsibility mediate the relationship between HIWS practices (ability, motivation, opportunity and work design HIWS

  19. Effect of exhaust emissions on carbon monoxide levels in employees working at indoor car wash facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topacoglu, H; Katsakoglou, S; Ipekci, A

    2014-01-01

    Exhaust emissions from motor vehicles threaten the environment and human health. Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, especially the use of exhaust gas CO in suicidal attempts is well known in the literature. Recently, indoor car wash facilities established in large shopping malls with closed parking, lots is a new risk area that exposes car wash employees to prolonged periods of high level CO emissions from cars. The aim of this study was to investigate how carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) blood levels of employees get affected in confined areas with relatively poor air circulation. Twenty male volunteers working in indoor parking car wash facilities were included in the study. Participants were informed about the aim of this study and their consent was obtained. Their pulse COHb levels were measured twice, at the beginning and at the end of the working day using Rad-57 pulse CO-oximeter device, allowing non-invasive measurement of COHb blood levels to compare the changes in their COHb levels before and after work. The mean age of the male volunteers was 29.8 ± 11.9 (range 18-55). While the mean COHb levels measured at the start of the working day was 2.1 ± 2.0 (range 0-9), it was increased to 5.2 ± 3.3 (range 1-15) at the end of work shift (Wilcoxon test, p car wash facility employees is directly impacted and gets elevated by motor vechile exhaust emissions. For the health of the employees at indoor parking car wash facilities, stricter precautions are needed and the government should not give permit to such operations.

  20. Correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with musculoskeletal complaints among dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiory Dioptis Putriwijaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal complaints have been common for dentists since their body is unknowingly often in inappropriate positions when caring for patients. For example, they bend towards patients, suddenly move, and then rotate from one side to another. The repetitive movements are done in long term. High activities and sufficient recovery time can cause a buildup of lactic acid in their blood leading to obstruction of the energy intake from the aerobic system in their muscle cells, resulting in fatigue. As a result, such conditions trigger decreased muscle performances. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with the risk of musculoskeletal disorders among dentists at Public Health Centers in Surabaya. Method: This research was an analytical observational research using cross sectional approach. Sampling technique used in this research was cluster random sampling with nineteen samples. To evaluate the working positions of those samples, a rapid entire body assessment (REBA method was used. Meanwhile, to observe the musculoskeletal disorders of those samples, a Nordic body map was used. Data obtained then were analyzed using Pearson correlation test with a significance level (p<0.05. Result: Results of data analysis using the Pearson correlation test showed that the significance value obtained was 0.036. It indicates that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels with the musculoskeletal disorders in those dentists. The results of the Pearson correlation test also revealed that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels among those dentists with a significance value of 0.025. Conclusion: It may be concluded that the wrong body positions during working can increase lactic acid level in the body of dentists. The increased level of lactic acid then can affect their muscles, leading to the high risk of

  1. Socioeconomic Status, Higher-Level Mathematics Courses, Absenteeism, and Student Mobility as Indicators of Work Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folds, Lea D.; Tanner, C. Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relations among socioeconomic status, highest-level mathematics course, absenteeism, student mobility and measures of work readiness of high school seniors in Georgia. Study participants were 476 high school seniors in one Georgia county. The full regression model explained 27.5% of the variance in…

  2. Night Moves: A Qualitative Investigation of Street-Level Sex Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla, Rochelle L.

    2002-01-01

    The subculture of street-level sex work including the social environment, drug use and abuse, and violence was examined. Personal interviews were conducted with 43 women involved in streetwalking prostitution. Data were analyzed using Phenomenological Descriptive Analysis (Colaizzi, 1978). Several participants reported developing emotional…

  3. The relationships of working conditions, recent stressors and childhood trauma with salivary cortisol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Michiel; Vreeburg, Sophie A; Dekker, Jack J M; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2012-06-01

    An etiological model has been suggested where stress leads to high cortisol levels and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, resulting in somatic diseases and psychopathology. To evaluate this model we examined the association of different stressors (working conditions, recent life events and childhood trauma) with various cortisol indicators in a large cohort study. Data are from 1995 participants of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Most of the selected participants had a current or remitted anxiety and/or depressive disorder. Working conditions were assessed with self-report questionnaires, life-events and childhood trauma were assessed with interview questionnaires. Cortisol levels were measured in seven saliva samples, determining the 1-h cortisol awakening response (CAR), evening cortisol levels and cortisol suppression after a 0.5mg dexamethasone suppression test (DST). Regression analyses--adjusted for covariates--showed two significant associations: low social support at work and high job strain were associated with more cortisol suppression after the DST. No other associations were found with any of the cortisol variables. Working conditions, recent stressors and childhood trauma were not convincingly associated with cortisol levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reviewing the Role of Cognitive Load, Expertise Level, Motivation, and Unconscious Processing in Working Memory Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuldas, Seffetullah; Hashim, Shahabuddin; Ismail, Hairul Nizam; Abu Bakar, Zainudin

    2015-01-01

    Human cognitive capacity is unavailable for conscious processing of every amount of instructional messages. Aligning an instructional design with learner expertise level would allow better use of available working memory capacity in a cognitive learning task. Motivating students to learn consciously is also an essential determinant of the capacity…

  5. The effect of training administered to working mothers on maternal anxiety levels and breastfeeding habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiftçi, Esra K; Arikan, Duygu

    2012-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of training administered to working mothers and its duration on maternal anxiety levels and breastfeeding habits. Within the scope of Health for All in the 21st Century project, a goal was set to increase the rate of infants fed exclusively by breastfeeding during the first six months of life to 80% by the year 2015. A randomised design with repeated measures. During collection of pretest data, a Personal Information Form, a Questionnaire Form and a State Trait Anxiety Inventory were administered to the mothers in the experimental and control groups. Five home visits were conducted starting two weeks before the date when mothers returned to work and ending when the infants became six months old. Breastfeeding techniques were taught to these mothers. Data were subjected to Proc MEAN, FREQ, anova and GENMOD procedures. The rate of natural feeding (breastfeeding exclusively) among trained mothers was greater than untrained mothers. The frequency of breastfeeding affects maternal anxiety levels; the anxiety level of mothers decreased with increasing frequency of breastfeeding. Educating working mothers about breastfeeding reduces their anxiety levels and influences positively their breastfeeding habits. With the support of health-care staff to increase awareness and knowledge on the value and sufficiency of breast milk, the rate and period of natural feeding increased significantly among working mothers. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. The Influence of Levels of Processing on Recall from Working Memory and Delayed Recall Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza, Vanessa M.; McCabe, David P.; Youngblood, Jessie L.; Rose, Nathan S.; Myerson, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Recent research in working memory has highlighted the similarities involved in retrieval from complex span tasks and episodic memory tasks, suggesting that these tasks are influenced by similar memory processes. In the present article, the authors manipulated the level of processing engaged when studying to-be-remembered words during a reading…

  7. Employee voice and work engagement : Macro, meso, and micro-level drivers of convergence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwon, Bora; Farndale, E.; Park, Jong Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Direct forms of individual employee voice are potentially important yet underexplored antecedents of work engagement. Based largely in job demands-resources theorizing, we develop a conceptual multi-level framework that explores how individual employee perceptions of voice practices affect their

  8. The Variation of Work Productivity and Muscle Activities at Different Levels of Production Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Nurhayati Mohd; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Dahari, Mahidzal; Zuhairah Mahmud Zuhudi, Nurul

    2017-10-01

    This paper aims to investigate the variation of work productivity and muscle activities among workers performing industrial repetitive tasks at four different levels of production target. The work productivity and muscle activities data were recorded from twenty workers at four levels of production target corresponding to “participative (PS1)”, “normal (PS2)”, “high (PS3)” and “very high (PS4)”. The results showed that worker productivity was found to increase at higher production target and there was a significant change (p muscle activities were found to increase at higher production target and correspond to more discomfort and a higher rate of muscle fatigue. The results indicated that working with a higher production target results in higher worker productivity, but could lead to higher risk of WMSDs.

  9. The Working Conditions of Elite Politicians and Administrators at the National and Local Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmar, Ulf; Holm Pedersen, Lene; Bhatti, Yosef

    and mayors as well as their top-administrators. This allows us to make a comparative analysis between top-politicians and top-administrators at the national as well as the local level. The survey asked respondents questions related to their overall time consume, work related pressure, the relationship......This paper compares the working conditions of elite politicians and administrators. These groups allegedly have overlapping roles, which sometimes is characterized by politicians dominating managers, and in other cases as bureaucrats dominating the powerless politicians. But how do the working...... between family and work, exposure to the media, and harassment/threats against the politicians or their families. More than 70% of the ministers and mayors answered the survey. The surveys were supplemented by in-depth interviews with 3 ministers, 4 mayors and 5 top-administrators concerning the same...

  10. Industry growth, work role characteristics, and job satisfaction: a cross-level mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Michael T; Wooldridge, Jessica D

    2012-10-01

    The associations between industry revenue growth, individual work role characteristics, and job satisfaction were examined in this cross-level mediation analysis. Work roles were expected to be more autonomous, involve greater skill variety, and offer more opportunities for growth and development for workers in growing industries than for workers in declining industries. Supervisor support was also hypothesized to be stronger for workers in high-growth industries. Results from a nationally representative (U.S.) sample of service industry workers, using multilevel modeling, supported these propositions and suggest that job enrichment mediates relations between industry growth and job satisfaction. Associations between industry growth and autonomy were also stronger among workers in occupations that are less normatively autonomous, suggesting that industry growth fosters a weakening, and industry decline a strengthening, of traditional differences in autonomy across work roles. These results contribute to a multilevel perspective on organizational environments, individual work roles, and worker attitudes and well-being.

  11. Coping with Cold Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skating Living With Stepparents Be a Green Kid Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Cold Sores Print A ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  12. Factors influencing the levels of work engagement in physicians from Poland, Serbia and Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyński, Krzysztof Maria; Swamad, Mohammed Abdul; Subotic, Vanja; Wizner, Dominika; Mazgaj, Elżbieta; Wajda, Weronika

    2015-09-01

    Lowered work engagement and burnout are a growing problem in recent years, especially among physicians. Cynicism, lack of energy and decreased efficacy may lead to the occurrence of severe depression. These phenomena influence almost every aspect of affected person's life, both professional and extraprofessional, and decrease its quality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of family life and other factors on levels of work engagement and risk of depression. Our study was conducted on a group of 417 physicians from Poland, Serbia and Bulgaria using a paper questionnaire. The collected data was subjected to statistical analyses using Statsoft Statistica v. 10.0 software. There was no significant correlation between work engagement and sex or age. The highest score on work engagement was in Serbia (m=4.41; Mann-Whitney's U test with p<0.05). The highest score of BDI was in Bulgaria (m=14.73; Mann-Whitney's U test with p<0.05). There was no significant correlation exceeding r=0.5 between UWES and SWING scales. WHI+/WHI- ratio correlates significantly with a BDI scale (Spearman's r=-0.49; p<0.05). Family life of physicians seem to have minor or even no influence on their work engagement and risk of burnout. The negative influence of work on family life may increase the risk of depression, and that effect is not susceptible to either positive or negative interactions of family life with work. The country with the lowest expenditure on a healthcare have also the lowest levels of work engagement.

  13. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  14. Burnout Levels and Affecting Factors in Nurses Working in a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Özsoylu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It was aimed to determine the burnout level and associated factors in nurses working in a university hospital. Methods: The study was designed as a cross-sectional study. The Maslach Burnout Inventory, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey were used to assess the level of burnout in nurses working in Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine between April 2017 and May 2017. Results: A total of 44 nurses with the mean age of 30.5 years (range: 22-46 participated in the study. Fourteen (31.8% were working in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU and the remaining 30 (68.2% were working in other departments. 31.8% were in the age group 25-29, 31.8% in the age group 30-34, and 13.6% in the age group 35-39 and, 22.8% of participants were ≥40 years of age. Nurses working in the other departments had higher scores on SF-36 role limitations due to emotional problems scale than PICU nurses (p=0.039. At the same time, PICU nurses were also better in terms of social functioning than nurses working in other departments (p=0.049. It was observed that working in intensive care unit decreased personal goal achievement [odds ratio (OR 2.13,95%, confidence interval (CI 1.21-3.84] 2.13 times and increased depersonalization (OR 1.8, 95%, CI 1.07-3.34 1.8 times. In multiple regression analysis, it was found that working in intensive care unit decreased personal goal achievement (OR 2.07, 95%, CI 1.17-3.74 2.07 times and increased depersonalization (OR 1.76, 95%, CI 1.12-3.21 1.76 times. Conclusion: Nurses working in intensive care units constitute one of the highest risk groups for burnout syndrome due to stressful working conditions as well as intense work environment. For this reason, assessment of burnout in PICU nurses at certain intervals and based on the results obtained, improving working conditions besides providing coping skills training may be suggested.

  15. Temperature Distribution within a Cold Cap during Nuclear Waste Vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Derek R; Schweiger, Michael J; Riley, Brian J; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel

    2015-07-21

    The kinetics of the feed-to-glass conversion affects the waste vitrification rate in an electric glass melter. The primary area of interest in this conversion process is the cold cap, a layer of reacting feed on top of the molten glass. The work presented here provides an experimental determination of the temperature distribution within the cold cap. Because direct measurement of the temperature field within the cold cap is impracticable, an indirect method was developed in which the textural features in a laboratory-made cold cap with a simulated high-level waste feed were mapped as a function of position using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The temperature distribution within the cold cap was established by correlating microstructures of cold-cap regions with heat-treated feed samples of nearly identical structures at known temperatures. This temperature profile was compared with a mathematically simulated profile generated by a cold-cap model that has been developed to assess the rate of glass production in a melter.

  16. Correlation between work concentration level and background music: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Yi-Nuo; Huang, Rong-Hwa; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2009-01-01

    It is a common phenomenon for office workers {to listen to music} while executing daily routines at their desks. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between work concentration level and background music. This research would first follow examples in previous researches, and then explore the influence of background music on participants' scores on attention tests. We hope to gain a preliminary understanding of the possible influence of background music on people's focus and concentration when doing work. Thirty-two college students were separated into three controlled groups; all were given the attention test. Group [a] listened to background music while being tested for 10 minutes; group [b] had no background music at all; and group [c] listened to the music for 10 minutes prior to the attention test. The test was conducted in a "noise free" environment. The means and error rates for each group were then calculated. The findings showed that, in comparison with "no music at all", those who listened to music prior to testing obtained higher scores in attentiveness (most probably a supplemental effect of the music), whereas those who listened to music during attention test showed extremely high level of variation in attention test scoring. Background music does affect people's job-site behavior. In fact, all three test conditions - no background music at all, background music before the work shift, and background music during work - have affected worker performance on different levels.

  17. Methodology for Assessing the Work of Small Business at the Municipal Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Evgen’evich Kremin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to promote sustainable socio-economic development in a municipality, its local authorities face the task of establishing an industrial and financial base on their territory, it will help increase its level of economic independence. On the basis of foreign experience and domestic research on territorial development it can be concluded that one of the most effective ways to enhance the level of socio-economic development of the municipality is to boost its small business. Effective management of this economic sector requires adequate assessment of its functioning at the municipal level. The analysis of existing methodologies for assessing the functioning of small business at the municipal level shows that none of them meets the criteria that the author of the present paper has selected and that are necessary for efficient research into the small business sector. In this regard, a methodology for estimating the work of small business at the municipal level was elaborated, and tested on the statistic data of municipal formations of the Vologda Oblast. The study reveals municipalities with the highest and lowest levels of small business development. In addition, municipalities were grouped in three blocks that represent different characteristics of their functioning. Taking into account the problems of business subjects, the study has developed measures to increase the level of development for each group of municipalities. Implementing these activities will help intensify the work of the sector of the economy under consideration, and increase the economic independence of territorial formations in the region. The paper can be used to assess the effectiveness of activities aimed to support small business in the region and to help regional and municipal authorities to work out a strategy for further development of this economic sector

  18. Running wheel training does not change neurogenesis levels or alter working memory tasks in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar A. Acevedo-Triana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Exercise can change cellular structure and connectivity (neurogenesis or synaptogenesis, causing alterations in both behavior and working memory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exercise on working memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in adult male Wistar rats using a T-maze test. Methods An experimental design with two groups was developed: the experimental group (n = 12 was subject to a forced exercise program for five days, whereas the control group (n = 9 stayed in the home cage. Six to eight weeks after training, the rats’ working memory was evaluated in a T-maze test and four choice days were analyzed, taking into account alternation as a working memory indicator. Hippocampal neurogenesis was evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry of BrdU positive cells. Results No differences between groups were found in the behavioral variables (alternation, preference index, time of response, time of trial or feeding, or in the levels of BrdU positive cells. Discussion Results suggest that although exercise may have effects on brain structure, a construct such as working memory may require more complex changes in networks or connections to demonstrate a change at behavioral level.

  19. Running wheel training does not change neurogenesis levels or alter working memory tasks in adult rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Manuel J.; Cardenas P., Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background Exercise can change cellular structure and connectivity (neurogenesis or synaptogenesis), causing alterations in both behavior and working memory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exercise on working memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in adult male Wistar rats using a T-maze test. Methods An experimental design with two groups was developed: the experimental group (n = 12) was subject to a forced exercise program for five days, whereas the control group (n = 9) stayed in the home cage. Six to eight weeks after training, the rats’ working memory was evaluated in a T-maze test and four choice days were analyzed, taking into account alternation as a working memory indicator. Hippocampal neurogenesis was evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry of BrdU positive cells. Results No differences between groups were found in the behavioral variables (alternation, preference index, time of response, time of trial or feeding), or in the levels of BrdU positive cells. Discussion Results suggest that although exercise may have effects on brain structure, a construct such as working memory may require more complex changes in networks or connections to demonstrate a change at behavioral level. PMID:28503368

  20. Identification of Organizational Commitment Level of Instructors Working at Foundation Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şebnem GÜZELBAYRAM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried on to reveal the organizational commitment levels and how these levels change with the factors such as age, sex, length of service, salary, having postgraduate education and additional work of the instructors working at foundation universities. Study group of the resarch consists of 118 instructors who volunteered to fill in the questionnaire after obtaining permission from the administratives of the foundation universities in Ankara, İstanbul and İzmir. To obtain the data, Literature search was initially conducted and similar studies were examined. ‘Organizational Commitment Questionnaire' developed by Balay was used adaptating to this study. At the end of the study it was seen that the instructors were pleased to be present at their schools and they obeyed the rules stipulated by the administration because they believed in the necessity of them. Similarly, they were happy with the implementations and activities the management applies to make them more committed. However, if the instructors find a chance to work in a different organization, they will use the opportuniy without considering their experience. Instructors think that, beside their obligations they work with extra effort and devotion but although they are provided with the suitable educational environment, they still think that they are offered insufficent career development possibilities. Therefore, they believe that they always have the optimum performance at school and the structure of their school is not in the best possible way and they may feel indifferent to matters such as value, priorities and criticism against their institution. When all these judgments are taken into consideration, it can be said that instructors are concerned about the future and success of their institution and they think they endeavour more than they are expected. The organizational commitment levels of instructors do not differ meaningfully with age, length of service

  1. Association between depression and work stress in nursing professionals with technical education level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi-Donato, Edilaine Cristina da Silva; Cardoso, Lucilene; Teixeira, Carla Araújo Bastos; Pereira, Sandra de Souza; Reisdorfer, Emilene

    2015-01-01

    to analize the relationship between depression and work stress in nursing professionals with technical education level of a teaching hospital in a city of the state of São Paulo. a cross-sectional study was carried out with 310 nursing technicians and nursing assistants, randomly selected. The outcome analyzed was the report of depression and its relationship with high levels of work stress, measured using the Job Stress Scale. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were performed. the prevalence of depression in this study was 20%, and it was more expressive in females, aged over 40 years, living without a partner and in smokers. The chance of depression was twice as high among professionals showing high levels of work stress, even after multiple regression adjusting. depressive symptoms were strongly associated with high stress levels among nursing assistants and nursing technicians, evidencing a problem to be considered along with the planning of specific intervention programs for this population, as well as the need for better cases management by the supervisors.

  2. Sickness absence and workplace levels of satisfaction with psychosocial work conditions at public service workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Hansen, Torsten; Wieclaw, Joanna; Agerbo, Esben

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to examine the impact of psychosocial work conditions on sickness absence while addressing methodological weaknesses in earlier studies. METHODS: The participants were 13,437 employees from 698 public service workplace units in Aarhus County, Denmark....... Satisfaction with psychosocial work conditions was rated on a scale from 0 (low) to 10 (high). Individual ratings were aggregated to workplace scores. Analysis of variance was used to compare the average number of days of yearly sickness absence in three groups with different levels of satisfaction...

  3. Physiological responses to four hours of low-level repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, A Helene; Hansen, Åse Marie; Jensen, Bente R

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The study investigated physiological responses to 4 hours of standardized low-level repetitive work. It was hypothesized that accumulative effects not observed after 1 hour could be found after 4 hours of repetitive work. METHODS: Ten healthy women performed intermittent (5 seconds + 5...... the 4 hours. In accordance, the RPE recorded for the hand, forearm, and shoulder regions increased progressively. For the remaining physiological measures, no accumulative changes were found. Forearm muscle activity was higher during a mental reference task with lower exerted force than during...

  4. Being engaged at work and detached at home: A week-level study on work engagement, psychological detachment, and affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonnentag, S.E.; Mojza, E.J.; Binnewies, C.; Scholl, A.

    2008-01-01

    Although earlier research has shown that work engagement is associated with positive outcomes for the employee and the organization, this paper suggests that employees also need time periods for temporarily disengaging (i.e., psychological detaching) from work. We hypothesized that work engagement

  5. Cross talk between arsenic and cold on the regulation of inorganic phosphate level in peripheral tissues of fresh water fishes (Channa punctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shahidul Haque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold acclimation shows the increased Pi in skeletal muscle of Channa punctata variety of fishes after 1 h and 2 h while reduces at prolonged exposure (4 h. Similar stimulatory effects were observed in heart, however, reduced at 30 min and 4 h and in liver it causes prevention of Pi release after 30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 4 h respectively. In gastrointestinal tract, the effects were pronounced whenever the fishes were exposed to cold for 1 h and 2 h, while reduced activity was demonstrated after 4 h of the treatment. To clarify the role of arsenic on cold-induced Pi release, fishes were exposed to Na2HAsO4 which reduced the effect in skeletal muscle, gastrointestinal tract and heart effectively and significantly. Whenever the fishes were exposed to cold with arsenic, the amount of Pi was also reduced than the control. In liver of arsenic treated fishes, the increased results were found while in cold, the values were reduced again in presence of arsenic compared to control and cold exposed fishes. Our findings give a new insight for the regulation of adaptive response tissue specifically and differentially and arsenic might be involved in cross talk through impairment of the cold-induced effect.

  6. Transcending Landscapes: Working Across Scales and Levels in Pastoralist Rangeland Governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lance W; Ontiri, Enoch; Alemu, Tsegaye; Moiko, Stephen S

    2017-08-01

    Landscape approaches can be subjected to mistakenly targeting a single "best" level of governance, and paying too little attention to the role that cross-scale and cross-level interactions play in governance. In rangeland settings, resources, patterns of use of those resources, and the institutions for managing the resources exist at multiple levels and scales. While the scholarship on commons offers some guidance on how to conceptualize governance in rangeland landscapes, some elements of commons scholarship-notably the "design principles" for effective governance of commons-do not seem to apply neatly to governance in pastoralist rangeland settings. This paper examines three cases where attempts have been made to foster effective landscape governance in such settings to consider how the materiality of commons influences the nature of cross-scale and cross-level interactions, and how these interactions affect governance. In all three cases, although external actors seemed to work appropriately and effectively at community and landscape levels, landscape governance mechanisms have been facing great challenges arising from relationships beyond the landscape, both vertically to higher levels of decision-making and horizontally to communities normally residing in other landscapes. The cases demonstrate that fostering effective landscape-level governance cannot be accomplished only through action at the landscape level; it is a task that must be pursued at multiple levels and in relation to the connections across scales and levels. The paper suggests elements of a conceptual framework for understanding cross-level and cross-scale elements of landscape governance, and offers suggestions for governance design in pastoralist rangeland settings.

  7. Transcending Landscapes: Working Across Scales and Levels in Pastoralist Rangeland Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lance W.; Ontiri, Enoch; Alemu, Tsegaye; Moiko, Stephen S.

    2017-08-01

    Landscape approaches can be subjected to mistakenly targeting a single "best" level of governance, and paying too little attention to the role that cross-scale and cross-level interactions play in governance. In rangeland settings, resources, patterns of use of those resources, and the institutions for managing the resources exist at multiple levels and scales. While the scholarship on commons offers some guidance on how to conceptualize governance in rangeland landscapes, some elements of commons scholarship—notably the "design principles" for effective governance of commons—do not seem to apply neatly to governance in pastoralist rangeland settings. This paper examines three cases where attempts have been made to foster effective landscape governance in such settings to consider how the materiality of commons influences the nature of cross-scale and cross-level interactions, and how these interactions affect governance. In all three cases, although external actors seemed to work appropriately and effectively at community and landscape levels, landscape governance mechanisms have been facing great challenges arising from relationships beyond the landscape, both vertically to higher levels of decision-making and horizontally to communities normally residing in other landscapes. The cases demonstrate that fostering effective landscape-level governance cannot be accomplished only through action at the landscape level; it is a task that must be pursued at multiple levels and in relation to the connections across scales and levels. The paper suggests elements of a conceptual framework for understanding cross-level and cross-scale elements of landscape governance, and offers suggestions for governance design in pastoralist rangeland settings.

  8. Application of the Generalized Work Relation for an N-level Quantum System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Ishikawa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An efficient periodic operation to obtain the maximum work from a nonequilibrium initial state in an N–level quantum system is shown. Each cycle consists of a stabilization process followed by an isentropic restoration process. The instantaneous time limit can be taken in the stabilization process from the nonequilibrium initial state to a stable passive state. In the restoration process that preserves the passive state a minimum period is needed to satisfy the uncertainty relation between energy and time. An efficient quantum feedback control in a symmetric two–level quantum system connected to an energy source is proposed.

  9. Work in process level definition: a method based on computer simulation and electre tri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Pergher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method for defining the levels of work in progress (WIP in productive environments managed by constant work in process (CONWIP policies. The proposed method combines the approaches of Computer Simulation and Electre TRI to support estimation of the adequate level of WIP and is presented in eighteen steps. The paper also presents an application example, performed on a metalworking company. The research method is based on Computer Simulation, supported by quantitative data analysis. The main contribution of the paper is its provision of a structured way to define inventories according to demand. With this method, the authors hope to contribute to the establishment of better capacity plans in production environments.

  10. Cold and trapped metastable noble gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vassen, W.; Cohen-Tannoudji, C.; Leduc, M.; Boiron, D.; Westbrook, C.I.; Truscott, A.; Baldwin, K.; Birkl, G.; Cancio, P.; Trippenbach, M.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental work on cold, trapped metastable noble gases is reviewed. The aspects which distinguish work with these atoms from the large body of work on cold, trapped atoms in general is emphasized. These aspects include detection techniques and collision processes unique to metastable atoms.

  11. Coherent generation and dynamic manipulation of double stationary light pulses in a five-level double-tripod system of cold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Qianqian; Zhang Xiaohang; Gao Junyan; Zhang Yan; Cui Cuili; Wu Jinhui [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2011-12-15

    We study a five-level double-tripod system of cold atoms for efficiently manipulating the dynamic propagation and evolution of a quantum probe field by modulating four classical control fields. Our numerical results show that it is viable to transform the quantum probe field into a pair of two-color stationary light pulses mutually coupled through two wave packets of atomic spin coherence. The pair of stationary light pulses can be released either from the sample entrance and exit synchronously or just from the sample exit with a controlled time delay. In addition, the two-color stationary light pulses are immune to the fast decay originating from the higher-order Fourier components of atomic spin and optical coherence, and may exhibit the quantum limited beating signals with their characteristic frequency determined by detunings of the four classical control fields. These results could be explored to design novel photonic devices, such as optical routing, beam splitter, and beat generator, for manipulating a quantum light field.

  12. Plasma cortisol levels in response to a cold pressor test did not predict appetite or ad libitum test meal intake in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geliebter, Allan; Gibson, Charlisa D; Hernandez, Dominica B; Atalayer, Deniz; Kwon, Anne; Lee, Michelle I; Mehta, Nandini; Phair, Donna; Gluck, Marci E

    2012-12-01

    Heightened cortisol response to stress due to hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may stimulate appetite and food intake. In this study, we assessed cortisol responsivity to a cold pressor test (CPT) as well as appetite ratings and subsequent test meal intake (TMI) in obese women. Following an overnight fast on two counterbalanced days, 20 obese women immersed their non-dominant hand for 2min in ice water (CPT) or warm water (WW) as a control. Plasma cortisol (ng/ml), heart rate, and blood pressure, as well as ratings of stress, pain, and appetite, were serially acquired. An ad libitum liquid meal was offered at 45min and intake measured covertly. Fasting cortisol was higher at 15min (mean peak cortisol) following the CPT compared to WW. Higher stress was reported at 2 and 15min for the CPT compared to WW. Pain, an indirect marker of the acute stress, systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased following the CPT at 2min compared to WW. Hunger decreased after the CPT at 2 and 15min, and desire to eat ratings were lower following CPT compared to WW. Subjects did not have greater test meal intake (TMI) following CPT compared to WW. There was also no significant relationship between cortisol levels following stress and TMI, indicating that cortisol did not predict subsequent intake in obese women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of the common cold on mood, psychomotor performance, the encoding of new information, speed of working memory and semantic processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew P

    2012-10-01

    Previous research has shown that people with the common cold report a more negative mood and psychomotor slowing. Recent research suggests that memory speed may also be impaired. This was examined in the study reported here. A prospective design was used and all participants (N=200; half male, half female; mean age 21 years, range 18-30 years) carried out a baseline session when healthy. The test battery involved mood rating, simple and choice reaction time, verbal reasoning and semantic processing. Volunteers returned when they developed an upper respiratory tract illness (URTI) and repeated the test battery. If they remained healthy they were recalled as a control. One hundred and eighty-nine participants completed the study and 48 developed URTIs and 141 were in the healthy control group. Symptoms and signs suggested that those who were ill had colds rather than influenza. The results showed that those with colds reported lower alertness, a more negative mood, and psychomotor slowing. They were also slower at encoding new information and slower on the verbal reasoning and semantic processing tasks. The magnitude of the mood changes associated with being ill were correlated with symptom severity. The performance changes were not correlated with symptom severity, sleep duration or mood changes. Further research is now needed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the behavioral malaise associated with URTIs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Work-engaged nurses for a better clinical learning environment: a ward-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomietto, Marco; Comparcini, Dania; Simonetti, Valentina; Pelusi, Gilda; Troiani, Silvano; Saarikoski, Mikko; Cicolini, Giancarlo

    2016-05-01

    To correlate workgroup engagement in nursing teams and the clinical learning experience of nursing students. Work engagement plays a pivotal role in explaining motivational dynamics. Nursing education is workplace-based and, through their clinical placements, nursing students develop both their clinical competences and their professional identity. However, there is currently a lack of evidence on the role of work engagement related to students' learning experiences. A total of 519 nurses and 519 nursing students were enrolled in hospital settings. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) was used to assess work engagement, and the Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision plus nurse Teacher (CLES+T) scale was used to assess students' learning experience. A multilevel linear regression analysis was performed. Group-level work engagement of nurses correlated with students' clinical learning experience (β = 0.11, P clinical learning (respectively, β = 0.37, P analysis to understand the most effective strategies of intervention for both organisations and nursing education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Work, sleep, and cholesterol levels of U.S. long-haul truck drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Michael K; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Hege, Adam; Wideman, Laurie; Sönmez, Sevil

    2017-04-07

    Long-haul truck drivers in the United States experience elevated cardiovascular health risks, possibly due to hypercholesterolemia. The current study has two objectives: 1) to generate a cholesterol profile for U.S. long-haul truck drivers; and 2) to determine the influence of work organization characteristics and sleep quality and duration on cholesterol levels of long-haul truck drivers. Survey and biometric data were collected from 262 long-haul truck drivers. Descriptive analyses were performed for demographic, work organization, sleep, and cholesterol measures. Linear regression and ordinal logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine for possible predictive relationships between demographic, work organization, and sleep variables, and cholesterol outcomes. The majority (66.4%) of drivers had a low HDL (Sleep quality was associated with HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol, and daily work hours were associated with LDL cholesterol. Workday sleep duration was associated with non-HDL cholesterol, and driving experience and sleep quality were associated with cholesterol ratio. Long-haul truck drivers have a high risk cholesterol profile, and sleep quality and work organization factors may induce these cholesterol outcomes. Targeted worksite health promotion programs are needed to curb these atherosclerotic risks.

  16. Authentic leadership and psychological well-being at work of nurses: The mediating role of work climate at the individual level of analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Nelson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Authentic leadership has been purported to influence psychological well-being through its impact on work climate. Using a sample of 406 nurses, a time-lagged study design was employed to determine the mediational role of work climate in explaining the impact of authentic leadership. Two self-reported questionnaires were completed to ascertain: (1 authentic leadership; and (2 work climate at baseline. In addition, nurses completed a measure to determine their level of psychological well-being at work at the 6 month time period. A mediation analysis with the use of a bootstrapping technique reveals that work climate mediates the relationship between authentic leadership and psychological well-being at work. These findings indicate that authentic leadership impacts the work climate in a positive manner; thereby, increasing levels of psychological well-being at work. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings for future research as well as outline some limitations.

  17. Quality of life and independent living and working levels of farmers and ranchers with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Danielle M; Fetsch, Robert J; Collins, Christina L

    2016-04-01

    The status of farmers and ranchers with disabilities has been understudied. Understanding this population's quality of life (QOL) and independent living and working (ILW) levels have the potential to be informative for changes in public policy and service provision. To assess QOL levels among farmers and ranchers with disabilities as well as explore a conceptual model of ILW accounting for variance in QOL levels. Participants (N = 398) included farmers and ranchers with varying disabilities. Descriptive information was gathered using the McGill Quality of Life (MQOL) and ILW measures. The MQOL measure produces an objective and comprehensive profile of one's QOL across several domains. ILW was used to account for variance in QOL scores. We also examined whether there were any differences in QOL and or ILW based on type of disability. There were no differences in type of disability and QOL levels. The mean QOL level was 5.50 (SD = 1.67; N = 398). The sample rated support and existential well-being the highest among the QOL subscales, which confounds previous research. Further, age group and ILW accounted for 16.2% of the variance in QOL levels, P disabilities, age group and ILW account for significant variance in QOL. Health professionals can use these findings to support and assess improvements in clients' ILW, self-determination, and QOL. Future research is needed to explore further the effects of QOL and ILW in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Evaluation of the level of stress and his indicators in physicians working in operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Vincent; Watrelot, Antoine; Cuche, Henri

    2012-12-01

    A questionnaire (146 questions) devised by ASSPRO Scientifique (Association de prévention du risque opératoire - Association for the prevention of surgical risk) and covering the professional and personal indicators likely to be involved in stress was used to assess the level of satisfaction or dissatisfaction of physicians and the level of stress. The collected data were analysed using frequency distribution tables and cross tabulations. Of the completed questionnaires returned by 1272 physicians (21.9% of the sampled physicians), 1204 questionnaires could be used. Of the total sample, 85.5% was male, between 35 and 64 years old (92.8%); they were anaesthetists (29.6%), orthopaedists (29.4%) or obstetrician gynaecologists (12.8%) attending a single workplace (67.9%) in sector 2 (64%). More than one quarter of these physicians reported feelings of exhaustion after work and one quarter of them had a fear of the workload ahead. Overall, the mean level of happiness (on a scale from 0 to 10) was quite high (6.7) and the mean stress level (graded from 0 to 10) was 5.9 (above or equal to 8 in 29.8%). The links between the stress level and the behaviour or the frame of mind at work were especially clear and significant for the following factors (stress level on a scale from 0 to 10): fear of the workload ahead (8.3), feeling of exhaustion (7.6), inability to 'switch off' (7.5) or to distance oneself from the difficult times of the day (7.3), sleeping disturbances (7.3), back pain (6.9) and headaches (6.9), which factors seem to be strong indicators of an advanced state of stress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Cold-formed steel design

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wei-Wen

    2010-01-01

    The definitive text in the field, thoroughly updated and expanded Hailed by professionals around the world as the definitive text on the subject, Cold-Formed Steel Design is an indispensable resource for all who design for and work with cold-formed steel. No other book provides such exhaustive coverage of both the theory and practice of cold-formed steel construction. Updated and expanded to reflect all the important developments that have occurred in the field over the past decade, this Fourth Edition of the classic text provides you with more of the detailed, up-to-the-minute techni

  20. Modelling flow and work hardening behaviour of cold worked Zr–2.5Nb pressure tube material in the temperature range of 30–600 {sup o}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dureja, A.K., E-mail: akdureja@barc.gov.in [Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Sinha, S.K. [Reactor Design and Development Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Pawaskar, D.N.; Seshu, P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Sinha, R.K. [Department of Atomic Energy, Anushakti-Bhavan, Near Gateway of India, Mumbai (India)

    2014-04-01

    Under a postulated accident scenario of loss of cooling medium in an Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR), temperature of the pressure tubes can rise and lead to large deformations. In order to investigate the modes of deformation of pressure tube – calandria tube assembly, material property data defining the flow behaviour over a temperature range from room temperature (RT) to 800 {sup o}C are needed. It is of practical importance to formulate mathematical equations to describe the stress–strain relationships of a material for a variety of reasons, such as the analysis of forming operations and the assessment of component's performance in service. A number of constitutive relations of empirical nature have been proposed and they have been found very suitable to describe the behaviour of a material. Although these relations are of empirical nature, various metallurgical factors appear to decide applicability of each of these relations. For example, grain size influences mainly the friction stress while the strain hardening is governed by dislocation density. In a recent work, tensile deformation behaviour of pressure tube material of IPHWR has been carried out over a range of temperature and strain rates (Dureja et al., 2011). It has been found that the strength parameters (yield and ultimate tensile strength) vary along the length of the tube with higher strength at the trailing end as compared to the leading end. This stems from cooling of the billet during the extrusion process which results in the variation of microstructure, texture and dislocation density from the leading to the trailing end. In addition, the variation in metallurgical parameters is also expected to influence the work hardening behaviour, which is known to control the plastic instability (related to uniform strain). In the present investigation, the tensile flow and work-hardening behaviour of a cold worked Zr–2.5Nb pressure tube material of IPHWRs has been studied over

  1. Blast neurotrauma impairs working memory and disrupts prefrontal myo-inositol levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Perrine, Shane A; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Hall, Christina S; Galloway, Matthew P; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2014-03-01

    Working memory, which is dependent on higher-order executive function in the prefrontal cortex, is often disrupted in patients exposed to blast overpressure. In this study, we evaluated working memory and medial prefrontal neurochemical status in a rat model of blast neurotrauma. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized with 3% isoflurane and exposed to calibrated blast overpressure (17 psi, 117 kPa) while sham animals received only anesthesia. Early neurochemical effects in the prefrontal cortex included a significant decrease in betaine (trimethylglycine) and an increase in GABA at 24 h, and significant increases in glycerophosphorylcholine, phosphorylethanolamine, as well as glutamate/creatine and lactate/creatine ratios at 48 h. Seven days after blast, only myo-inositol levels were altered showing a 15% increase. Compared to controls, short-term memory in the novel object recognition task was significantly impaired in animals exposed to blast overpressure. Working memory in control animals was negatively correlated with myo-inositol levels (r=-.759, p<0.05), an association that was absent in blast exposed animals. Increased myo-inositol may represent tardive glial scarring in the prefrontal cortex, a notion supported by GFAP changes in this region after blast overexposure as well as clinical reports of increased myo-inositol in disorders of memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploring the Unique Features of a First Nations Graduate-Level Social Work Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph C. Bodor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a one-time cohort of graduate-level social work students completed a unique MSW program. The program was delivered in partnership between the Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary and Blue Quills First Nations College and, of the twenty four graduates; twenty-one were of First Nations or Me´tis ancestry. The program honored traditional knowledge and ways of learning combined with a critical analysis of Western perspectives of social work knowledge. Strong fiscal resources enabled the program to establish a formal support network for the students and to support the development of Indigenous curriculum and programming that encouraged success for the students. The program was fundamentally different than urban on-campus programs while still maintaining graduate level accreditation requirements. This analysis of the program required the use of Indigenous Research Methodology to collect and create an understanding of the program. Instructors commented on the centered, empowered, balanced, and congruent students. The formal and informal, concrete and invisible supports to the students ensured the success of this program and this cohort of students. As one student commented, the program started in ceremony, ended in ceremony, and could not fail within the context ceremony.

  3. Work disabilities and unmet needs for health care and rehabilitation among jobseekers: a community-level investigation using multidimensional work ability assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerätär, Raija; Taanila, Anja; Jokelainen, Jari; Soukainen, Jouko; Ala-Mursula, Leena

    2016-12-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the prevalence and quality of work disabilities and unmet needs for health care and rehabilitation to support return to work (RTW) among jobseekers. Community-level, cross-sectional analysis with multidimensional clinical work ability assessments. Paltamo, Finland. Unemployed citizens either participating in the Full-Employment Project or long-term unemployed (n = 230, 81%). Based on data from theme interviews, patient records, supervisors' observations of work performance and clinical examinations, a physician concluded the individual's work ability, categorised into four groups: good work ability, good work ability expected after RTW support, able to transitional work only or unable to work. These groups were cross tabulated with primary diagnoses, types of plans to support RTW, as well as categories of social functioning and motivation, for which sensitivity and specificity scores in detecting work disability were calculated. Only about half of the jobseekers had good work ability, 27% were found unable to work in the open labour market and 15% even eligible for a disability pension. For 20%, care or rehabilitation was seen necessary to enable RTW. Poor supervisor- and self-rated performance at work or poor social functioning appeared as sensitive measures in detecting work disability. Work disabilities and unmet needs for health care and rehabilitation are highly prevalent among jobseekers, as depicted using a multidimensional work ability assessment procedure inspired by the International Classification of Functioning (ICF). Further development of work ability assessment practices is clearly needed. KEY POINTS Although the association of unemployment with poor health is well known, evidence on the work ability of the unemployed remains scarce. Work disabilities are common among the unemployed. Multidimensional work ability assessment among the unemployed reveals unmet needs for care and rehabilitation to support return to

  4. IERS Working group on Combination of Space Geodetic Techniques at the Observation Level (COL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, J.-Y.; Biancale, R.; Bizouard, C.; Deleflie, F.; Gambis, G.; Koenig, R.; Loyer, S.; Sciaretta, C.; Seitz, M.; Spicakova, H.; Springer, T.; Thaller, D.

    2012-04-01

    The different space geodetic techniques have different strengths and weaknesses for recovering geodetic parameters. This makes their combination useful. However they may have some systematic behaviour which can be detected and removed at the observation level. In order to review the interest in combining techniques at this level, a Working Group at the Combination Level (WG COL) was set up in the course of 2009 in the frame of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS). A major task of the WG COL is to study methods and advantages of combining space geodetic techniques (DORIS, GNSS, SLR, VLBI), searching for an optimal strategy to solve for geodetic parameters. The first action of the Working Group was to organize an inter-comparison benchmark campaign to serve as a test. The period chosen is from August 10 to August 30, 2008. It includes the intensive CONT08 VLBI period. The combination analyses are based on weekly or daily combined SINEX files which contain normal equations of station coordinates, Earth Orientation Parameters from all space geodetic techniques, tropospheric parameters for GNSS, DORIS and VLBI techniques and quasar coordinates for the VLBI technique. We will present the objectives and strategy of multi-technique combination, establishing conventions and some results already achieved.

  5. Stress-responsive gene RsICE1 from Raphanus sativus increases cold tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Lili; Xiang, Dianjun; Wang, Lina; Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Xiaodong; Qi, Guochao

    2017-03-01

    The ICE1 transcription factor plays a critical role in plant cold tolerance via triggering CBF/DREB1 cold-regulated signal networks. In this work, a novel MYC-type ICE1-like gene, RsICE1, was isolated from radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and its function in cold tolerance was characterized in rice. The RsICE1 gene was expressed constitutively with higher transcriptional levels in the roots and stems of radish seedlings. The NaCl, cold, and ABA treatments could significantly upregulate RsICE1 expression levels, but dehydration stress had a weak effect on its expression. Ectopic expression of the RsICE1 gene in rice conferred enhanced tolerance to low-temperature stress grounded on a higher survival rate, higher accumulation of soluble sugars and free proline content, a decline in electrolyte leakage and MDA levels, and higher chlorophyll levels relative to control plants. OsDREBL and OsTPP1, downstream cold-regulated genes, were remarkably upregulated at transcription levels in rice overexpressing RsICE1 under low-temperature stress, which indicated that RsICE1 was involved in CBF/DREB1 cold-regulated signal networks. Overall, the above data showed that RsICE1 played an active role in improving rice cold tolerance, most likely resulting from the upregulation of OsDREBL and OsTPP1 expression levels by interacting with the RsICE1 gene under low-temperature stress.

  6. Transparent Conducting Oxides for Photovoltaics: Manipulation of Fermi Level, Work Function and Energy Band Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E. Proffit

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Doping limits, band gaps, work functions and energy band alignments of undoped and donor-doped transparent conducting oxides Zn0, In2O3, and SnO2 as accessed by X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS/UPS are summarized and compared. The presented collection provides an extensive data set of technologically relevant electronic properties of photovoltaic transparent electrode materials and illustrates how these relate to the underlying defect chemistry, the dependence of surface dipoles on crystallographic orientation and/or surface termination, and Fermi level pinning.

  7. Knowledge levels of the health care employees working at the primary health institutions about patient rights

    OpenAIRE

    Handan Zincir; Zeliha Kaya

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to examine the knowledge levels of the health care personnel working at the first step health institutions about patient rights. It was a descriptive research which was carried out in Melikgazi and Kocasinan Health Group Directorate of Kayseri Province between 1st. of October 2006 and 30th. of May 2007. 406 of 610 health care personnel participated in the study (% 66.5 participation rate). A questionnaire form of 39 questions was utilized. Kruskal-wallis test was ...

  8. EFL Speech Production: Exploring the relationship between working memory capacity and proficiency level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gicele Vergine Vieira Prebianca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available : The present study explores the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC and proficiency level in EFL1 speech production. Forty-one participants performed two WMC tests – the Speaking Span Test in L1 and in L2. The statistical analysis indicated both a variation on WMC scores in L2 as a function of proficiency as well as a difference between WMC scores in L1 and in L2. Findings are explained mainly in respect to the interplay between automatic and controlled processes on memory retrieval and on the development of L2 proficiency

  9. EFL Speech Production: Exploring the relationship between working memory capacity and proficiency level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gicele Vergine Vieira PREBIANCA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores the relationship between working memory capacity (WMC and proficiency level in EFL1 speech production. Forty-one participants performed two WMC tests – the Speaking Span Test in L1 and in L2. The statistical analysis indicated both a variation on WMC scores in L2 as a function of proficiency as well as a difference between WMC scores in L1 and in L2. Findings are explained mainly in respect to the interplay between automatic and controlled processes on memory retrieval and on the development of L2 proficiency.

  10. Associations of demographics, living conditions, work and lifestyle, with levels of satisfaction of nursing personnel in Grahamstown, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hodgskiss, J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available of shifts worked. Although obesity was highly prevalent in this sample, it was not significantly associated with levels of satisfaction. Relatively few associations with work-related variables were found. However, as expected, those with lower job...

  11. Progress with cold antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Johnson, I; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A G; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; Van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2006-01-01

    The creation of cold antihydrogen by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations, working at CERN's unique Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility, has ushered in a new era in atomic physics. This contribution will briefly review recent results from the ATHENA experiment. These include discussions of antiproton slowing down in a cold positron gas during antihydrogen formation, information derived on the dependence of the antihydrogen formation rate upon the temperature of the stored positron plasma and, finally, upon the spatial distribution of the emitted anti-atoms. We will discuss the implications of these studies for the major outstanding goal of trapping samples of antihydrogen for precise spectroscopic comparisons with hydrogen. The physics motivations for undertaking these challenging experiments will be briefly recalled.

  12. State-Level Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Fatal Injuries - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feijun; Florence, Curtis

    2017-01-13

    Injury-associated deaths have substantial economic consequences in the United States. The total estimated lifetime medical and work-loss costs associated with fatal injuries in 2013 were $214 billion (1). In 2014, unintentional injury, suicide, and homicide (the fourth, tenth, and seventeenth leading causes of death, respectively) accounted for 194,635 deaths in the United States (2). In 2014, a total of 199,756 fatal injuries occurred in the United States, and the associated lifetime medical and work-loss costs were $227 billion (3). This report examines the state-level economic burdens of fatal injuries by extending a previous national-level study (1). Numbers and rates of fatal injuries, lifetime costs, and lifetime costs per capita were calculated for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) and for four injury intent categories (all intents, unintentional, suicide, and homicide). During 2014, injury mortality rates and economic burdens varied widely among the states and DC. Among fatal injuries of all intents, the mortality rate and lifetime costs per capita ranged from 101.9 per 100,000 and $1,233, respectively (New Mexico) to 40.2 per 100,000 and $491 (New York). States can engage more effectively and efficiently in injury prevention if they are aware of the economic burden of injuries, identify areas for immediate improvement, and devote necessary resources to those areas.

  13. National Service Frameworks and UK general practitioners: street-level bureaucrats at work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checkland, Kath

    2004-11-01

    This paper argues that the past decade has seen significant changes in the nature of medical work in general practice in the UK. Increasing pressure to use normative clinical guidelines and the move towards explicit quantitative measures of performance together have the potential to alter the way in which health care is delivered to patients. Whilst it is possible to view these developments from the well-established sociological perspectives of deprofessionalisation and proletarianisation, this paper takes a view of general practice as work, and uses the ideas of Lipsky to analyse practice-level responses to some of these changes. In addition to evidence-based clinical guidelines, National Service Frameworks, introduced by the UK government in 1997, also specify detailed models of service provision that health care providers are expected to follow. As part of a larger study examining the impact of National Service Frameworks in general practice, the response of three practices to the first four NSFs were explored. The failure of NSFs to make a significant impact is compared to the practices' positive responses to purely clinical guidelines such as those developed by the British Hypertension Society. Lipsky's concept of public service workers as 'street-level bureaucrats' is discussed and used as a framework within which to view these findings.

  14. Cold symptoms (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  15. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Your Parents - or Other Adults Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... resfriado Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  16. Cold antihydrogen and CPT

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielse, G; Bowden, N S; Oxley, P; Storry, C H; Wessels, M; Speck, A K; Estrada, J; Yesley, P S; Grzonka, D; Oelert, Walter; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Walz, J

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the quest for cold antihydrogen includes the first substantial accumulation of cold positrons and the first demonstration of positron cooling. Stacking of cold antiprotons is key to using the new antiproton decelerator facility at CERN. (22 refs).

  17. Vitamin C Supplementation Slightly Improves Physical Activity Levels and Reduces Cold Incidence in Men with Marginal Vitamin C Status: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Carol S.; Gillean M. Barkyoumb; Schumacher, Sara S.

    2014-01-01

    The early indications of vitamin C deficiency are unremarkable (fatigue, malaise, depression) and may manifest as a reduced desire to be physically active; moreover, hypovitaminosis C may be associated with increased cold duration and severity. This study examined the impact of vitamin C on physical activity and respiratory tract infections during the peak of the cold season. Healthy non-smoking adult men (18–35 years; BMI < 34 kg/m2; plasma vitamin C < 45 µmol/L) received either 1000 m...

  18. Cross talk between arsenic and cold on the regulation of inorganic phosphate level in peripheral tissues of fresh water fishes (Channa punctata)

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, Md. Shahidul; Roy, Swapan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Cold acclimation shows the increased Pi in skeletal muscle of Channa punctata variety of fishes after 1 h and 2 h while reduces at prolonged exposure (4 h). Similar stimulatory effects were observed in heart, however, reduced at 30 min and 4 h and in liver it causes prevention of Pi release after 30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 4 h respectively. In gastrointestinal tract, the effects were pronounced whenever the fishes were exposed to cold for 1 h and 2 h, while reduced activity was demonstrated after 4...

  19. Managerial work behavior and hierarchical level: implications for the managerial training of first-line supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodela, E S

    1991-04-01

    Mintzberg proposed that managers at all levels enact ten roles. There is, however, a relative importance ascribed to the various roles given the manager's location in the hierarchy. Like Mintzberg's ideas on the utility of ten roles, we found that managers at all levels, to varying degrees, need the three skills proposed by Katz. We have argued that a variety of roles and skills describe what managers do. At the same time, the predominance of one role or skill over another may be influenced by the location of the manager in the hierarchy. The question is not whether roles would be enacted at different levels or whether skills will be required, but whether one role or skill or a set of roles and skills will be predominant for the first-line supervisor. The first-line supervisor's work requires that he or she be predominantly proficient in the areas of human and technical skills in order to fulfill supervisory responsibilities. Current empirical research supports this assertion; however, the continuing study of managerial roles and skills and other variables such as functional specialty will offer other opportunities for the study of first-line supervisors. For example, will the predominance of the roles and skills that we have discussed vary if the supervisor is a line or staff manager or if the supervisor works in a production or service related organization? Organizations adapt to change to meet the expectations of those within and outside the organization with something at stake. Organizations need managers to facilitate the realization of organizational goals, so organizations need to continuously train managers, targeting appropriate roles and skills given each manager's location in the hierarchy. The preceding pages should provide resource materials to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating and designing the training and development of first-line supervisors. This roles-and-skills information can be productively utilized to assist the

  20. Designing automation for complex work environments under different levels of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Juergen; Nickel, Peter; Wastell, David

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of different forms of static and adaptable automation under low- and high-stress conditions. Forty participants were randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions, comparing three levels of static automation (low, medium and high) and one level of adaptable automation, with the environmental stressor (noise) being varied as a within-subjects variable. Participants were trained for 4 h on a simulation of a process control environment, called AutoCAMS, followed by a 2.5-h testing session. Measures of performance, psychophysiology and subjective reactions were taken. The results showed that operators preferred higher levels of automation under noise than under quiet conditions. A number of parameters indicated negative effects of noise exposure, such as performance impairments, physiological stress reactions and higher mental workload. It also emerged that adaptable automation provided advantages over low and intermediate static automation, with regard to mental workload, effort expenditure and diagnostic performance. The article concludes that for the design of automation a wider range of operational scenarios reflecting adverse as well as ideal working conditions needs to be considered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of work-related stress among nurses working in primary and secondary health care levels in Dammam, Eastern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda M. Al-Makhaita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Work-related stress (WRS is an insidious and persistent part of everyday life related to the response of people to work environment. Nursing is a strenuous job and WRS is prevalent among nurses. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of WRS among nurses working in primary and secondary health care levels in Dammam, Eastern Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in 17 primary health care centers (PHCCs representing the primary level of health care and  Medical Tower Complex (MTC representing the secondary health care level in Dammam city. The total number of nurses included in the study was 637 nurses (144 in PHCCs and (493 MTC. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, which was developed based on the pertinent literature. It included two main parts: Sociodemographic and job characteristics of nurses and 31 WRS questions. Results: The overall prevalence of WRS among all studied nurses was 45.5%; 43.1% and 46.2% in primary and secondary levels, respectively. In the primary level, there was a statistical significant association between WRS and being married (85.5%, and having living three children and more (53.2%. Moreover, younger age group 20-<30 years (79.4%, Saudi nationality (86.8%, being married (74.6%, having nonbachelor degree (83.3%, work shifts (89.5%, and working in surgical department (46.5% were the significant associating factors with the occurrence of WRS among nurses in secondary levels. Young age was the only predicting factor for WRS in primary care level. While being female, Saudi, married, with work shifts, and working in surgical department were found to predict WRS in the secondary level. Recommendations: Appropriate strategy in health care organization to investigate stress in health care settings is recommended. Moreover, interventional programs to identify, and relieve sources and effects of stress should be developed.

  2. Vitamin C supplementation slightly improves physical activity levels and reduces cold incidence in men with marginal vitamin C status: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Carol S; Barkyoumb, Gillean M; Schumacher, Sara S

    2014-07-09

    The early indications of vitamin C deficiency are unremarkable (fatigue, malaise, depression) and may manifest as a reduced desire to be physically active; moreover, hypovitaminosis C may be associated with increased cold duration and severity. This study examined the impact of vitamin C on physical activity and respiratory tract infections during the peak of the cold season. Healthy non-smoking adult men (18-35 years; BMI vitamin C vitamin C daily (n = 15) or placebo (n = 13) in a randomized, double-blind, eight-week trial. All participants completed the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 daily and the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire weekly. In the final two weeks of the trial, the physical activity score rose modestly for the vitamin C group vs. placebo after adjusting for baseline values: +39.6% (95% CI [-4.5,83.7]; p = 0.10). The number of participants reporting cold episodes was 7 and 11 for the vitamin C and placebo groups respectively during the eight-week trial (RR = 0.55; 95% CI [0.33,0.94]; p = 0.04) and cold duration was reduced 59% in the vitamin C versus placebo groups (-3.2 days; 95% CI [-7.0,0.6]; p = 0.06). These data suggest measurable health advantages associated with vitamin C supplementation in a population with adequate-to-low vitamin C status.

  3. Perception of intellectual stimulation, creativity and innovation among health managers working in tertiary level hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Saadia; Zareen, Humaira

    2011-01-01

    Management in health sector is becoming focus of attention world over being an important subject due to resource crunch particularly in developing countries. Beside sociodemographic factors, poor management in health sector is also an important factor responsible for poor health in developing countries. Moreover, there is gross lack of effective leadership in our national setup. It is necessary for health managers to be well versed with the knowledge about emerging theories, concepts and new philosophies of management/administration and leadership. This anthropological study was done to assess the perception and knowledge of Intellectual stimulation, creativity and innovation among the health managers working in the tertiary level hospitals of Lahore. This qualitative study was conducted in two public sector tertiary care hospitals of Lahore. Observation and in-depth interviews were conducted for data collection. Open ended questionnaire, developed on the lines of Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire was used. One main domain of Intellectual stimulation and its variables were developed and emergence of different themes was noted. In the domain of Intellectual stimulation all the participants of the study showed positive themes for the variable of creativity. Seven of the health managers showed positive themes for the variable of innovation, where as three health managers showed negative responses. Health managers with management/administration qualification had better concept about the key ideas of Intellectual stimulation, creativity and innovation; as compared to those who were working at these managerial posts on the basis of their long term experience only. Female health managers were stronger in building their team members on a broader horizon as a wholesome personality and not just taking the daily routine work.

  4. Level of occupational exposure during daily work in a Nuclear Medicine Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarcke, Marcelo, E-mail: mschwarcke@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica e Matematica; Ferreira, Nadya [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Cardoso, Domingos [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Workers of the Nuclear Medicine Department have a very complex geometric exposition. The source of irradiation is not collimated and irradiated for all direction, the interaction with many structural tissue is inside the body before could be detected outside. The professional who works in a Nuclear Medicine Department is exposed to this condition and different energies. This work proposes a good approach to estimate the mensal dose level according to the dose rate during their daily routine. To measure the dose rate, a Babyline 81 ionization chamber was used, and the most frequent exams using {sup 99m}Tc were chosen. A previous study was conducted to determine the most frequent exams made in the Nuclear Medicine Department at the Central Army Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, and previous environment monitoring determine the places with higher exposure that could interfere in the measurement of this paper. The Renal scintigraphy with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) had an average dose rate of (2.50{+-}0.25) {mu}Sv/h; for the Renal scintigraphy with dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), it was of (1.20{+-}0.25) {mu}Sv/h; for Bone scintigraphy using two different protocols, it was (2.63{+-}0.30) {mu}Sv/h and (3.09{+-}0.30) {mu}Sv/h. Exposition during elution, dose preparing and clinical procedure was considered a critical moment in the daily routine of the employee. The dose rate obtained in this study demonstrated that the professional cannot exceed the public dose limit in one day of his work routine. Therefore, for the Radioprotection Department, this is a good approach to make a radioprotection plan in the Nuclear Medicine Department. (author)

  5. Electronic structures of 1-ML C84/Ag(111): Energy level alignment and work function variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhao, Li-Li; Zhang, Jin-Juan; Li, Wen-Jie; Liu, Wei-Hui; Chen, Da; Sheng, Chun-Qi; Wang, Jia-Ou; Qian, Hai-Jie; Ibrahim, Kurash; Li, Hong-Nian

    2017-12-01

    The electronic structures of fullerene/metal interface are critical to the performance of devices based on fullerene in molecular electronics and organic electronics. Herein, we investigate the electronic structures at the interface between C84 and Ag(111) by photoelectron spectroscopy and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques. It is observed that C84 monolayer on Ag(111) surface (1-ML C84/Ag(111)) has metallic nature. A charge transfer from substrate to the unoccupied states of C84 is determined to be 1.3 electrons per molecule. However, the work function of 1-ML C84 (4.72 eV) is observed slightly larger than that of the clean Ag(111) substrate (4.50 eV). A bidirectional charge transfer model is introduced to understand the work function variation of the fullerene/metal system. In addition to the charge transfer from substrate to the adsorbate's unoccupied states, there exists non-negligible back charge transfer from fullerene occupied molecular orbital to the metal substrate through interfacial hybridization. The Fermi level will be pinned at ∼4.72 eV for C84 monolayer on coinage metal substrate.

  6. MOTIVATION AT WORK - STUDY ON THE SATISFACTION LEVEL OF WORKERS IN A CLOTHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Vieira Pires

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Motivation is a relevant fact because they come from intimate human, what motivates you, in case the company should offer tools to facilitate the work of its employees, continuous improvement employee requires changes in organizational environment by requiring mainly that is proposed, means for the employee can show that he can be considered excellent, leading him to stimuli increasing its capacity, dedication, persistence, responsibility and commitment, this paper aims to conduct a study on the level of motivation employees of a confection, as a theoretical foundation was based on: motivation, motivation at work and in some theories on the subject, so much has been used as a method applying a questionnaire with sample equivalent to 50% of the company's employees through the data analysis it is perceived that they are not motivated, the befitting for her not using motivational policies, and that the relationship with the boss imposes a psychological pressure to the desktop repressing contributor to efficiently perform its function.

  7. Relationship of Word- and Sentence-Level Working Memory to Reading and Writing in Second, Fourth, and Sixth Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berninger, Virginia W.; Abbott, Robert D.; Swanson, H. Lee; Lovitt, Dan; Trivedi, Pam; Lin, Shin-Ju; Gould, Laura; Youngstrom, Marci; Shimada, Shirley; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of working memory at the word and sentence levels of language to reading and writing outcomes. Method: Measures of working memory at the word and sentence levels, reading and writing, were administered to 2nd (N = 122), 4th (N = 222), and 6th (N = 105) graders. Structural equation…

  8. Relationship of word- and sentence-level working memory to reading and writing in second, fourth, and sixth grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berninger, Virginia W; Abbott, Robert D; Swanson, H Lee; Lovitt, Dan; Trivedi, Pam; Lin, Shin-Ju Cindy; Gould, Laura; Youngstrom, Marci; Shimada, Shirley; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contribution of working memory at the word and sentence levels of language to reading and writing outcomes. Measures of working memory at the word and sentence levels, reading and writing, were administered to 2nd (N = 122), 4th (N = 222), and 6th (N = 105) graders. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate whether the 2 predictor working memory factors contributed unique variance beyond their shared covariance to each of 5 outcome factors: handwriting, spelling, composing, word reading, and reading comprehension. At each grade level, except for handwriting and composing in 6th grade, the word-level working memory factor contributed unique variance to each reading and writing outcome. The text-level working memory factor contributed unique variance to reading comprehension in 4th and 6th grade. The clinical significance of these findings for assessment and intervention is discussed.

  9. Psychosocial stress impairs working memory at high loads: an association with cortisol levels and memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, N Y L; Everaerd, W T A M; Elzinga, B M; van Well, S; Bermond, B

    2006-09-01

    Stress and cortisol are known to impair memory retrieval of well-consolidated declarative material. The effects of cortisol on memory retrieval may in particular be due to glucocorticoid (GC) receptors in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Therefore, effects of stress and cortisol should be observable on both hippocampal-dependent declarative memory retrieval and PFC-dependent working memory (WM). In the present study, it was tested whether psychosocial stress would impair both WM and memory retrieval in 20 young healthy men. In addition, the association between cortisol levels and cognitive performance was assessed. It was found that stress impaired WM at high loads, but not at low loads in a Sternberg paradigm. High cortisol levels at the time of testing were associated with slow WM performance at high loads, and with impaired recall of moderately emotional, but not of highly emotional paragraphs. Furthermore, performance at high WM loads was associated with memory retrieval. These data extend previous results of pharmacological studies in finding WM impairments after acute stress at high workloads and cortisol-related retrieval impairments.

  10. Coherence across consciousness levels: Symmetric visual displays spare working memory resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, Magda L

    2015-12-15

    Two studies demonstrate that the need for coherence could nudge individuals to use structural similarities between binary visual displays and two concurrent cognitive tasks to unduly solve the latter in similar fashion. In an overt truth-judgement task, participants decided whether symmetric colourful displays matched conjunction or disjunction descriptions (e.g., "the black and/or the orange"). In the simultaneous covert categorisation task, they decided whether a colour name (e.g., "black") described a two-colour object or half of a single-colour object. Two response patterns emerged as follows. Participants either acknowledged or rejected matches between disjunction descriptions and two visual stimuli and, similarly, either acknowledged or rejected matches between single colour names and two-colour objects or between single colour names and half of single-colour objects. These findings confirm the coherence hypothesis, highlight the role of coherence in preserving working-memory resources, and demonstrate an interaction between high-level and low-level consciousness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connection...

  12. PERFORMANCE SIMULATION OF COLD STORAGE USING ENERGYPLUS

    OpenAIRE

    ASHISH S. UTAGE; K. V. MALI; A. D. KADAM

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with the study of cold storage refrigeration plant and simulation of refrigeration system to evaluate the cooling load and annual energy consumption for cold storage applications. The specific temperature and humidity range is required for properly storing any particular food and thus facilitates its preservation for a longer duration of time. The present cold storage capacity in India is grossly inadequate and with a positive future outlook for the agro, food processin...

  13. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Sharon E.; Melendez, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aid researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials to maintain temperature. Details of these current technologies are provided along with operational experience gained to date. This paper discusses the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  14. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Provides Novel Insights into Cold Stress Responses in Petunia Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Huilin; Ning, Luyun; Li, Bei; Bao, Manzhu

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature is a major adverse environmental factor that impairs petunia growth and development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of cold stress adaptation of petunia plants, a quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology was performed to detect the effects of cold stress on protein expression profiles in petunia seedlings which had been subjected to 2°C for 5 days. Of the 2430 proteins whose levels were quantitated, a total of 117 proteins were discovered to be differentially expressed under low temperature stress in comparison to unstressed controls. As an initial study, 44 proteins including well known and novel cold-responsive proteins were successfully annotated. By integrating the results of two independent Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses, seven common GO terms were found of which "oxidation-reduction process" was the most notable for the cold-responsive proteins. By using the subcellular localization tool Plant-mPLoc predictor, as much as 40.2% of the cold-responsive protein group was found to be located within chloroplasts, suggesting that the chloroplast proteome is particularly affected by cold stress. Gene expression analyses of 11 cold-responsive proteins by real time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not strongly correlated with the respective protein levels. Further activity assay of anti-oxidative enzymes showed different alterations in cold treated petunia seedlings. Our investigation has highlighted the role of antioxidation mechanisms and also epigenetic factors in the regulation of cold stress responses. Our work has provided novel insights into the plant response to cold stress and should facilitate further studies regarding the molecular mechanisms which determine how plant cells cope with environmental perturbation. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002189.

  15. Dynamics of cold acclimation and complex phytohormone responses in Triticum monococcum lines G3116 and DV92 differing in vernalization and frost tolerance level

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaňková, Radomíra; Kosová, K.; Dobrev, Petre; Vítámvás, P.; Trávníčková, Alena; Cvikrová, Milena; Pešek, Bedřich; Gaudinová, Alena; Přerostová, Sylva; Musilová, J.; Galiba, G.; Prášil, I.T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 101, MAY 2014 (2014), s. 12-25 ISSN 0098-8472 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/09/2058 Grant - others:GA ČR GPP501/11/P637 Program:GP Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Cold stress * Dehydrin * Einkorn wheat Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.359, year: 2014

  16. Vitamin C Supplementation Slightly Improves Physical Activity Levels and Reduces Cold Incidence in Men with Marginal Vitamin C Status: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol S. Johnston

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The early indications of vitamin C deficiency are unremarkable (fatigue, malaise, depression and may manifest as a reduced desire to be physically active; moreover, hypovitaminosis C may be associated with increased cold duration and severity. This study examined the impact of vitamin C on physical activity and respiratory tract infections during the peak of the cold season. Healthy non-smoking adult men (18–35 years; BMI < 34 kg/m2; plasma vitamin C < 45 µmol/L received either 1000 mg of vitamin C daily (n = 15 or placebo (n = 13 in a randomized, double-blind, eight-week trial. All participants completed the Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 daily and the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire weekly. In the final two weeks of the trial, the physical activity score rose modestly for the vitamin C group vs. placebo after adjusting for baseline values: +39.6% (95% CI [−4.5,83.7]; p = 0.10. The number of participants reporting cold episodes was 7 and 11 for the vitamin C and placebo groups respectively during the eight-week trial (RR = 0.55; 95% CI [0.33,0.94]; p = 0.04 and cold duration was reduced 59% in the vitamin C versus placebo groups (−3.2 days; 95% CI [−7.0,0.6]; p = 0.06. These data suggest measurable health advantages associated with vitamin C supplementation in a population with adequate-to-low vitamin C status.

  17. Acute cold exposure and rewarming enhanced spatial memory and activated the MAPK cascades in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Chen, Yaoming; Zhang, Xueping; Cai, Tongjian; Liu, Mingchao; Zhao, Fang; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2008-11-06

    Cold is a common stressor that is likely to occur in everyday occupational or leisure time activities. Although there is substantial literature on the effects of stress on memory from behavioral and pharmacologic perspectives, the effects of cold stress on learning and memory were little addressed. The aims of the present work were to investigate the effects of acute cold exposure on Y-maze learning and the activation of cerebral MAPK cascades of rats. We found that the 2-hour cold exposure (-15 degrees C) and a subsequent 30-min rewarming significantly increased the performance of the rats in the Y-maze test. Serum corticosterone (CORT) level was increased after the cold exposure. After a transient reduction following the cold exposure, the P-ERK levels in the hippocampus and PFC drastically increased 30 min later. The levels of P-JNK increased gradually after the cold exposure in all the three brain regions we investigated, but the level of P-p38 only increased in the PFC. The levels of GABAA receptor alpha1 subunit remained unchanged after the cold exposure. Furthermore, the performance of rats treated with cold plus muscimol or bicuculline in the Y-maze test was similar to that of the rats treated with those GABAergic agents alone. These results demonstrated that acute cold exposure and the subsequent rewarming could result in enhanced performance of spatial learning and memory, and the activation of MAPKs in the brain. However, GABAA receptor may not be involved in the acute cold exposure-induced enhancement of memory.

  18. Seed Germination Ecology of the Cold Desert Annual Isatis violascens (Brassicaceae): Two Levels of Physiological Dormancy and Role of the Pericarp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan M; Lu, Juan J; Tan, Dun Y; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of various species of Brassicaceae with indehiscent fruits in the cold deserts of NW China suggests that there are adaptive advantages of this trait. We hypothesized that the pericarp of the single-seeded silicles of Isatis violascens restricts embryo expansion and thus prevents germination for 1 or more years. Thus, our aim was to investigate the role of the pericarp in seed dormancy and germination of this species. The effects of afterripening, treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3) and cold stratification on seed dormancy-break were tested using intact silicles and isolated seeds, and germination phenology was monitored in an experimental garden. The pericarp has a role in mechanically inhibiting germination of fresh seeds and promotes germination of nondormant seeds, but it does not facilitate formation of a persistent seed bank. Seeds in silicles in watered soil began to germinate earlier in autumn and germinated to higher percentages than isolated seeds. Sixty-two percent of seeds in the buried silicles germinated by the end of the first spring, and only 3% remained nongerminated and viable. Twenty to twenty-five percent of the seeds have nondeep physiological dormancy (PD) and 75-80% intermediate PD. Seeds with nondeep PD afterripen in summer and germinate inside the silicles in autumn if the soil is moist. Afterripening during summer significantly decreased the amount of cold stratification required to break intermediate PD. The presence of both nondeep and intermediate PD in the seed cohort may be a bet-hedging strategy.

  19. Seed Germination Ecology of the Cold Desert Annual Isatis violascens (Brassicaceae: Two Levels of Physiological Dormancy and Role of the Pericarp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan M Zhou

    Full Text Available The occurrence of various species of Brassicaceae with indehiscent fruits in the cold deserts of NW China suggests that there are adaptive advantages of this trait. We hypothesized that the pericarp of the single-seeded silicles of Isatis violascens restricts embryo expansion and thus prevents germination for 1 or more years. Thus, our aim was to investigate the role of the pericarp in seed dormancy and germination of this species. The effects of afterripening, treatment with gibberellic acid (GA3 and cold stratification on seed dormancy-break were tested using intact silicles and isolated seeds, and germination phenology was monitored in an experimental garden. The pericarp has a role in mechanically inhibiting germination of fresh seeds and promotes germination of nondormant seeds, but it does not facilitate formation of a persistent seed bank. Seeds in silicles in watered soil began to germinate earlier in autumn and germinated to higher percentages than isolated seeds. Sixty-two percent of seeds in the buried silicles germinated by the end of the first spring, and only 3% remained nongerminated and viable. Twenty to twenty-five percent of the seeds have nondeep physiological dormancy (PD and 75-80% intermediate PD. Seeds with nondeep PD afterripen in summer and germinate inside the silicles in autumn if the soil is moist. Afterripening during summer significantly decreased the amount of cold stratification required to break intermediate PD. The presence of both nondeep and intermediate PD in the seed cohort may be a bet-hedging strategy.

  20. Acute effects of low-level sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide exposures on the respiratory tract of susceptible subjects in cold environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salonen, R.O.; Randell, J.T.; Haelinen, A.I.; Pennanen, A.S. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Div. of Environmental Health; Kosma, V.M. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Pathology; Pekkarinen, H. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physiology; Ruuskanen, J. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Tukiainen, H. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Pulmonary Diseases

    1995-12-31

    Several recent epidemiological studies from Finland have suggested that sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) cause adverse health effects in susceptible population groups, such as children and asthmatic patients, at much smaller concentrations than the present guideline values of the World Health Organization. One possible explanation of these findings is that the relatively long winter-time increases the sensitivity of the respiratory tract to irritant pollutants. This hypothesis is supported by experimental human and animal studies, which have shown obstruction and inflammatory changes in the conducting airways after ventilation of cold and dry air. Asthmatic patients are much more sensitive than healthy subjects to the irritating effects of cold and dry air and of air pollutants. The airways of many non-asthmatic a topic subjects are also sensitive to cold air, but these subjects are poorly defined as a potential susceptible population group to air pollutants. The aims of this project are: (1) to construct experimental human and animal facilities and protocols for short-term studies on SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} exposures at subfreezing temperatures, (2) to apply advanced lung function methodologies and symptom assessment for characterisation of short-term respiratory responses of asthmatic and a topic subjects to these exposures, (3) to apply well-established pulmonary physiological, cytological and morphological methods for characterisation of short-term responses to and mechanisms of these exposures in the guinea-pig lower airways. (author)

  1. Perception of leadership among health managers working in tertiary level hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Saadia; Zareen, Humaira

    2012-01-01

    Rapid growth of medical knowledge has created major changes in technology which in turn has created greater demand of the client for better health services, and health sector is constantly under pressure of great internal and external demands. Quality of services, largely depend on to what extent managers are well versed with the concept of evidence based management, team and group approach in achieving organizational objectives. Making an effective health system, addressing the double burden of diseases coupled with resource crunch in developing countries is a big challenge for policy makers and health managers. Comprehensive concepts and application knowledge of leadership is very important for health managers in the present day in order to get best output that satisfies all the stake holders. Present anthropological study was done to assess the perception and knowledge of leadership among the health managers working in tertiary level hospitals. This qualitative study was conducted in two public sector tertiary level hospitals of Lahore chosen randomly out of a total of seven such hospitals in the same city. Convenient sampling technique was used. Observation and in- depth interviews were conducted for data collection. Open ended questionnaire on the lines of MLQ was used. One main domain of leadership was developed and categorisation of the themes was done in the two evolved categories of transformational and transactional leadership. In the domain of leadership 10 of the health managers showed positive themes for transactional leadership, 6 showed positive themes for transformational leadership, and still 1 health manager showed overall negative response for the concept of leadership; he was totally in favour of dictatorship. Health managers with degrees in management/administration had better concept about the key idea of leadership and its variables. Female health managers were more inclined towards transformational leadership behaviour.

  2. Effect of underground working on vitamin D levels and bone mineral densities in coal miners: a controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya, S.; Ozdolap, S.; Mungan, A.G.; Gumustas, S.; Koc, U.; Guven, B.; Begendik, F. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2006-07-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of underground working on 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels and bone mineral density (BMD) values in coal miners. Fifty coal miners working underground and 50 surface workers as controls, matched for age and body mass index, from Zonguldak, Turkey, were recruited to the study. Levels of 25-OHD, biochemical bone markers, and lumbar spine and femur BMD values were measured in all study participants. Lumbar spine and femur BMD values were significantly higher in underground workers compared with surface workers, but there was no significant difference in 25-OHD levels between the two groups. Duration of underground working, age, 25-OHD levels, cigarette consumption and dietary calcium intake were not correlated with BMD values. Underground physical working does not seem to be a significant risk factor for low 25-OHD levels or low BMD values.

  3. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abele, Hartmut; Jenke, Tobias; Konrad, Gertrud

    2015-05-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10-4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  4. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    OpenAIRE

    Abele Hartmut; Jenke Tobias; Konrad Gertrud

    2014-01-01

    We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the \\RB drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron $\\beta$-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10$^{-4}$ level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS) allows to test Newton's gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gr...

  5. Spectroscopy with cold and ultra-cold neutrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abele Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two new types of spectroscopy methods for cold and ultra-cold neutrons. The first method, which uses the R×B drift effect to disperse charged particles in a uniformly curved magnetic field, allows to study neutron β-decay. We aim for a precision on the 10−4 level. The second method that we refer to as gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS allows to test Newton’s gravity law at short distances. At the level of precision we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravity-like interaction. In particular, limits on dark energy chameleon fields are improved by several orders of magnitude.

  6. Understanding the Relative Contributions of Lower-Level Word Processes, Higher-Level Processes, and Working Memory to Reading Comprehension Performance in Proficient Adult Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Although a considerable amount of evidence has been amassed regarding the contributions of lower-level word processes, higher-level processes, and working memory to reading comprehension, little is known about the relationships among these sources of individual differences or their relative contributions to reading comprehension performance. This…

  7. The association between team-level social capital and individual-level work engagement: Differences between subtypes of social capital and the impact of intra-team agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Annette; Clausen, Thomas; Borg, Vilhelm

    2018-02-19

    The study explored the association between team-level social capital and individual-level work engagement. Questionnaire data were collected from six companies in the dairy industry. Seven hundred seventy-two participants divided into 65 teams were included. In confirmatory factor analyses, we found a superior model fit to a four dimensional model of social capital: bonding social capital, bridging social capital and two types of linking social capital. The results showed a positive association between all subtypes of social capital at the team level and work engagement at the individual level. However, this association only remained significant for linking social capital in relation the workplace as a whole when we adjusted for psychosocial working conditions. The level of intra-team agreement in social capital score did not moderate the association between social capital and work engagement. In conclusion, the results provide further support for previous findings suggesting a positive association between social capital and work engagement. They add to the existing knowledge by suggesting that linking social capital in relation to the workplace is the most important explanatory variable for work engagement, thus emphasizing the need to distinguish between subtypes of social capital in research and practice. © 2018 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology published by Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A systematic review and meta-analysis of cold in situ perfusion and preservation of the hepatic allograft: Working toward a unified approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Ahmer M; Laurence, Jerome M; Lam, Vincent W T; Pleass, Henry C; Hawthorne, Wayne J

    2017-12-01

    The efficacy of cold in situ perfusion and static storage of the liver is a possible determinant of transplantation outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence to substantiate a preference for a particular perfusion route (aortic or dual) or perfusion/preservation solution in donation after brain death (DBD) liver transplantation. The Embase, MEDLINE, and Cochrane databases were used (1980-2017). Random effects modeling was used to estimate effects on transplantation outcomes based on (1) aortic or dual in situ perfusion and (2) the use of University of Wisconsin (UW), histidine tryptophan ketoglutarate (HTK), Celsior, and/or Institut Georges Lopez-1 (IGL-1) solutions for perfusion/preservation. A total of 22 articles were included (2294 liver transplants). The quality of evidence ranged from very low to moderate Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations score. Meta-analyses were conducted for 14 eligible studies. Although there was no difference in the primary nonfunction (PNF) rate, a higher peak alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was recorded in dual compared with aortic-only UW-perfused livers (standardized mean difference, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.47); a back-table portal venous flush was undertaken in the majority of aortic-only perfused livers. There were no relevant differences in peak enzymes, PNF, thrombotic graft loss, biliary complications, or 1-year graft survival in comparisons between dual-perfused livers using UW, HTK, Celsior, or IGL-1. In conclusion, there is no significant evidence that aortic-only perfusion of the DBD liver compromises transplantation outcomes, and it may be favored because of its simplicity. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate for the use of any particular perfusion/preservation fluid over the others. Liver Transplantation 23 1615-1627 2017 AASLD. © 2017 The Authors. Liver Transplantation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf

  9. SATISFACTION LEVEL OF MEDICAL EDUCATORS WORKING IN TEACHING INSTITUTIONS : A QUESTIONNAIRE BASED CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudeshna Chatterjee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In a resource-limited and high-burden disease setting, satisfied health professional is an asset in terms of maximized productivity, efficiency and quality health care. Job Satisfaction Index is a validated measure to identify the components that influence those issues. A multi-faceted structured questionnaire study was conducted upon a cross-section of medical educators (n=160 serving two tertiary care teaching institutions under different management set-up. Multiple demographic features were independent variables whereas three (3 critical areas of satisfaction index (SI were outcome variables. All participants were interviewed using 15 item Likert response-based, modified job satisfaction scale. It was observed that total SI scores among doctors representing the private group remained marginally higher (P<0.05 while compared to the other group. The comparative analysis of SI scores in critical areas like availability of academic supports and job security remained higher among the private doctors than that of the government ones though not significant. However the private doctors remained marginally satisfied in terms of working environment. The study outcome necessitates appropriate intervention measures at the organizational levels.

  10. Levels of agreement between parents' and children's reports of near work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rah, Marjorie J; Mitchell, G Lynn; Mutti, Donald O; Zadnik, Karla

    2002-07-01

    To assess whether parents and children report the same information regarding children's near vision activities when given similar questionnaires. Data from questionnaires administered to 406 children and their parents were analyzed to evaluate the agreement between parent and child reports. The questionnaires were completed during the 1994 testing of the Orinda Longitudinal Study of Myopia. Each child and parent was asked to categorize how often the child reads for pleasure. In addition, each subject was asked to estimate how many hours per week were spent in each of five visual activities. The weighted kappa statistic, paired t-tests, and polytomous logistic regression were used for analyses. A weighted kappa = 0.42 (moderate agreement) was found in the comparison of child-reported vs. parent-reported classification of reading. Agreement between parent- and child-reported number of hours spent doing homework (0.21), reading for pleasure (0.31), watching television (0.31), playing video games (0.31), and engaging in sports/outdoor activities (0.26) was fair for each activity. Although the results indicate fair to moderate levels of agreement, better methods of reporting near-work activities are needed for future myopia research.

  11. Preparing PhD-Level Clinical Social Work Practitioners for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzoff, Joan; Drisko, James

    2015-01-01

    Social work doctoral programs are not adequately preparing students to educate future clinical practitioners. Social work is predominantly a practice profession. Social work's PhD programs must continue the education of excellent researchers while also educating for excellence in practice, teaching, field liaison, and the supervision of practice.…

  12. The effects of energy expenditure rate on work productivity performance at different levels of production standard time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Nurhayati Mohd; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md; Dahari, Mahidzal; Sanusi, Junedah

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of energy expenditure rate on work productivity performance at different levels of production standard time. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty industrial workers performed repetitive tasks at three different levels of production standard time, normal, hard, and very hard. Work productivity and energy expenditure rate were recorded during the experimental tasks. [Results] The work productivity target was not attainable for the hard and very hard production standard times. This was attributed to the energy expenditure rate, which increased as the level of production standard time became harder. The percentage change in energy expenditure rate for the very hard level (32.5%) relative to the normal level was twice that of the hard level (15.5%), indicating a higher risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders for the harder production standard time. The energy expenditure rate for the very hard production standard time (1.36 kcal/min) was found to exceed the maximum energy expenditure rate recommended for light repetitive tasks involving both arms (1.2 kcal/min). [Conclusion] The present study shows that working with an energy expenditure rate that is either equal to or above the maximum energy expenditure rate of the tasks results in decreased work productivity performance due to the onset of physical fatigue and a higher risks of work-related musculoskeletal disorders.

  13. Cold Signaling and Cold Response in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Kenji Miura; Tsuyoshi Furumoto

    2013-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental stresses. Freezing or extremely low temperature constitutes a key factor influencing plant growth, development and crop productivity. Plants have evolved a mechanism to enhance tolerance to freezing during exposure to periods of low, but non-freezing temperatures. This phenomenon is called cold acclimation. During cold acclimation, plants develop several mechanisms to minimize potential damages caused by low temperature. Cold respons...

  14. Trends in Work-Family Context among U.S. Women by Education Level, 1976 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montez, Jennifer Karas; Sabbath, Erika; Glymour, M Maria; Berkman, Lisa F

    2014-10-01

    This study compares trends in work-family context by education level from 1976 to 2011 among U.S. women. The major aim is to assess whether differences in work-family context by education level widened, narrowed, or persisted. We used data from the 1976-2011 March Current Population Surveys on women aged 25-64 (n=1,597,914). We compare trends in four work-family forms by education level within three race/ethnic groups. The work-family forms reflect combinations of marital and employment status among women with children at home. Trends in the four work-family forms exhibited substantial heterogeneity by education and race/ethnicity. Educational differences in the work-family forms widened mainly among white women. Compared with more-educated peers, white women without a high school credential became increasingly less likely to be married, to be employed, to have children at home, and to combine these roles. In contrast, educational differences in the work-family forms generally narrowed among black women and were directionally mixed among Hispanic women. Only one form-unmarried and employed with children at home-became more strongly linked to a woman's education level within all three race/ethnic groups. This form carries an elevated risk of work-family conflict and its prevalence increased moderately during the 35-year period. Taken together, the trends underscore recent calls to elevate work-family policy on the national agenda.

  15. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  16. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed.

  17. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Huei Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed.

  18. Solvability & risk factors: a cold case investigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keglovits, Sally; McCrary, Gregg; Ramsland, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    ... cold case investigations, investigators must use best practices. COLD CASE IN FLORIDA On December 19, 1959, someone killed Christine and Cliff Walker in their modest home in Osprey, FL, along with their two children, Jimmy, 3, and Debbie, 2. Cliff worked the land, while Christine was a homemaker. She had several male admirers and was rumo...

  19. Prevalence and consequences of positive blood alcohol levels among patients injured at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin A Foster

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to characterize positive blood alcohol among patients injured at work, and to compare the severity of injury and outcome of blood alcohol concentration (BAC positive and negative patients. Settings and Design: A retrospective cohort study was performed at a Level 1 academic trauma center. Patients injured at work between 01/01/07 and 01/01/12 and admitted with positive (BAC+ vs negative (BAC- blood alcohol were compared using bivariate analysis. Results: Out of 823, 319 subjects were tested for BAC (38.8%, of whom 37 were BAC+ (mean 0.151 g/dL, range 0.015-0.371 g/dL. Age (41 years, sex (97.2% men, race, intensive care unit (ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS, and mortality were similar between groups. Nearly half of BAC+ cases were farming injuries (18, 48.6%: Eight involved livestock, five involved all-terrain vehicles (ATVs, three involved heavy equipment, one fell, and one had a firearm injury. Eight (21.6% were construction site injuries involving falls from a roof or scaffolding, five (13.5% were semi-truck collisions, four (10.8% involved falls from a vehicle in various settings, and two (5.4% were crush injuries at an oilfield. BAC+ subjects were less likely to be injured in construction sites and oilfields, including vehicle-related falls (2.3 vs 33.9%, P < 0.0001. Over half of BAC+ (n = 20, 54% subjects were alcohol dependent; three (8.1% also tested positive for cocaine on admission. No BAC+ subjects were admitted to rehabilitation compared to 33 (11.7% of BAC- subjects. Workers′ compensation covered a significantly smaller proportion of BAC+ patients (16.2 vs 61.0%, P < 0.0001. Conclusions: Alcohol use in the workplace is more prevalent than commonly suspected, especially in farming and other less regulated industries. BAC+ is associated with less insurance coverage, which probably affects resources available for post-discharge rehabilitation and hospital reimbursement.

  20. SSA DISABILITY. SGA Levels Appear to Affect the Work Behavior of Relatively Few Beneficiaries, but More Data Needed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baucus, Max

    2002-01-01

    ... physical or mental impairment has earnings that exceed the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level, which represents SSA's principal standard for determining whether a disabled individual is able to work...

  1. Levels of processing in working memory: differential involvement of frontotemporal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nathan S; Craik, Fergus I M; Buchsbaum, Bradley R

    2015-03-01

    How does the brain maintain to-be-remembered information in working memory (WM), particularly when the focus of attention is drawn to processing other information? Cognitive models of WM propose that when items are displaced from focal attention recall involves retrieval from long-term memory (LTM). In this fMRI study, we tried to clarify the role of LTM in performance on a WM task and the type of representation that is used to maintain an item in WM during rehearsal-filled versus distractor-filled delays. Participants made a deep or shallow levels-of-processing (LOP) decision about a single word at encoding and tried to recall the word after a delay filled with either rehearsal of the word or a distracting math task. Recalling one word after 10 sec of distraction demonstrated behavioral and neural indices of retrieval from LTM (i.e., LOP effects and medial-temporal lobe activity). In contrast, recall after rehearsal activated cortical areas that reflected reporting the word from focal attention. In addition, areas that showed an LOP effect at encoding (e.g., left ventrolateral VLPFC and the anterior temporal lobes [ATLs]) were reactivated at recall, especially when recall followed distraction. Moreover, activity in left VLPFC during encoding, left ATL during the delay, and left hippocampus during retrieval predicted recall success after distraction. Whereas shallow LOP and rehearsal-related areas supported active maintenance of one item in focal attention, the behavioral processes and neural substrates that support LTM supported recall of one item after it was displaced from focal attention.

  2. Programs for the work with ENSDF format files: Evaluator's editor EVE, Viewer for the nuclear level schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Shulyak, G I

    2010-01-01

    Tools for the regular work of the nuclear data evaluator are presented: the context-dependent editor EVE and the viewer for the level schemes of nuclei from ENSDF datasets. These programs may be used by everybody who works with the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File and for the educational purposed.

  3. Work stress, occupational burnout and depression levels: a clinical study of paediatric intensive care unit nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ching; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Cheng, Su-Fen; Wu, Li-Min; Ou-Yang, Mei-Chen

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between work stress and depression; and investigate the mediating effect of occupational burnout among nurses in paediatric intensive care units. The relationships among work stress, occupational burnout and depression level have been explored, neither regarding occupational burnout as the mediating role that causes work stress to induce depression nor considering the paediatric intensive care unit context. A cross-sectional correlational design was conducted. One hundred and forty-four female paediatric intensive care unit nurses from seven teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan were recruited as the participants. Data were collected by structured questionnaires including individual demographics, the Nurse Stress Checklist, the Occupational Burnout Inventory and the Taiwan Depression Questionnaire. The results indicated that after controlling for individual demographic variables, the correlations of work stress with occupational burnout, as well as work stress and occupational burnout with depression level were all positive. Furthermore, occupational burnout may exert a partial mediating effect on the relationship between work stress and depression level. This study provides information about work stress, occupational burnout and depression level, and their correlations, as well as the mediating role of occupational burnout among paediatric intensive care unit nurses. It suggests government departments and hospital administrators when formulating interventions to prevent work stress and occupational burnout. These interventions can subsequently prevent episodes of depression in paediatric intensive care unit nurses, thereby providing patients with a safe and high-quality nursing environment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Does Domain Knowledge Moderate Involvement of Working Memory Capacity in Higher-Level Cognition? A Test of Three Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambrick, D.Z.; Oswald, F.L.

    2005-01-01

    Research suggests that both working memory capacity and domain knowledge contribute to individual differences in higher-level cognition. This study evaluated three hypotheses concerning the interplay between these factors. The compensation hypothesis predicts that domain knowledge attenuates the influence of working memory capacity on higher-level…

  5. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalotte Mörelius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU (n=33 and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP (n=14 using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person. Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  6. Neonatal intensive care and child psychiatry inpatient care: do different working conditions influence stress levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörelius, Evalotte; Gustafsson, Per A; Ekberg, Kerstin; Nelson, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (n = 33) and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (n = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  7. The impact of cold spells on mortality and effect modification by cold spell characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Tao; Hu, Mengjue; Zeng, Weilin; Zhang, Yonghui; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Xiao, Jianpeng; Yin, Peng; Liu, Jiangmei; Chu, Cordia; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun; Zhou, Maigeng

    2016-12-06

    In China, the health impact of cold weather has received little attention, which limits our understanding of the health impacts of climate change. We collected daily mortality and meteorological data in 66 communities across China from 2006 to 2011. Within each community, we estimated the effect of cold spell exposure on mortality using a Distributed Lag Nonlinear Model (DLNM). We also examined the modification effect of cold spell characteristics (intensity, duration, and timing) and individual-specific factors (causes of death, age, gender and education). Meta-analysis method was finally used to estimate the overall effects. The overall cumulative excess risk (CER) of non-accidental mortality during cold spell days was 28.2% (95% CI: 21.4%, 35.3%) compared with non-cold spell days. There was a significant increase in mortality when the cold spell duration and intensity increased or occurred earlier in the season. Cold spell effects and effect modification by cold spell characteristics were more pronounced in south China. The elderly, people with low education level and those with respiratory diseases were generally more vulnerable to cold spells. Cold spells statistically significantly increase mortality risk in China, with greater effects in southern China. This effect is modified by cold spell characteristics and individual-level factors.

  8. The impact of cold spells on mortality and effect modification by cold spell characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Tao; Hu, Mengjue; Zeng, Weilin; Zhang, Yonghui; Rutherford, Shannon; Lin, Hualiang; Xiao, Jianpeng; Yin, Peng; Liu, Jiangmei; Chu, Cordia; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun; Zhou, Maigeng

    2016-12-01

    In China, the health impact of cold weather has received little attention, which limits our understanding of the health impacts of climate change. We collected daily mortality and meteorological data in 66 communities across China from 2006 to 2011. Within each community, we estimated the effect of cold spell exposure on mortality using a Distributed Lag Nonlinear Model (DLNM). We also examined the modification effect of cold spell characteristics (intensity, duration, and timing) and individual-specific factors (causes of death, age, gender and education). Meta-analysis method was finally used to estimate the overall effects. The overall cumulative excess risk (CER) of non-accidental mortality during cold spell days was 28.2% (95% CI: 21.4%, 35.3%) compared with non-cold spell days. There was a significant increase in mortality when the cold spell duration and intensity increased or occurred earlier in the season. Cold spell effects and effect modification by cold spell characteristics were more pronounced in south China. The elderly, people with low education level and those with respiratory diseases were generally more vulnerable to cold spells. Cold spells statistically significantly increase mortality risk in China, with greater effects in southern China. This effect is modified by cold spell characteristics and individual-level factors.

  9. Factors predicting work outcome in Japanese patients with schizophrenia: role of multiple functioning levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Sumiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia suggest recovery of cognitive, everyday, and social functioning. Specifically improvement of work status is considered to be most important for their independent living and self-efficacy. The main purposes of the present study were 1 to identify which outcome factors predict occupational functioning, quantified as work hours, and 2 to provide cut-offs on the scales for those factors to attain better work status. Forty-five Japanese patients with schizophrenia and 111 healthy controls entered the study. Cognition, capacity for everyday activities, and social functioning were assessed by the Japanese versions of the MATRICS Cognitive Consensus Battery (MCCB, the UCSD Performance-based Skills Assessment-Brief (UPSA-B, and the Social Functioning Scale Individuals’ version modified for the MATRICS-PASS (Modified SFS for PASS, respectively. Potential factors for work outcome were estimated by multiple linear regression analyses (predicting work hours directly and a multiple logistic regression analyses (predicting dichotomized work status based on work hours. ROC curve analyses were performed to determine cut-off points for differentiating between the better- and poor work status. The results showed that a cognitive component, comprising visual/verbal learning and emotional management, and a social functioning component, comprising independent living and vocational functioning, were potential factors for predicting work hours/status. Cut-off points obtained in ROC analyses indicated that 60–70% achievements on the measures of those factors were expected to maintain the better work status. Our findings suggest that improvement on specific aspects of cognitive and social functioning are important for work outcome in patients with schizophrenia.

  10. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  11. Education Level Explains Participation in Work and Education Later in Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjursell, Cecilia; Nystedt, Paul; Björklund, Anita; Sternäng, Ola

    2017-01-01

    A prolonged working life is crucial for sustaining social welfare and fiscal stability for countries facing ageing populations. The group of older adults is not homogeneous; however, differences within the group may affect the propensity to continue working and to participate in continuing education. The aim of this paper is to explore how…

  12. Do "High-Performance" Work Practices Improve Establishment-Level Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Peter; Neumark, David

    2001-01-01

    Links between organizational performance and high-performance work practices were studied using data from the National Employment Survey, measures of work practices comparable across organizations, and a longitudinal design incorporating data predating use of high-performance practices. Practices raise employee compensation without necessarily…

  13. College Women in the 21st Century: A Closer Look at Academic, Family and Work Demands on Levels of Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valoy, Glenny A.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the contributions of background characteristics, family, academic, and work demands on levels of burnout among undergraduate females in an urban college setting and to what extent informal/formal support is related to levels of burnout. Data were obtained through the use of self-administered questionnaires, which were…

  14. Level of Sedentary Behavior and Its Associated Factors among Saudi Women Working in Office-Based Jobs in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albawardi, Nada M; Jradi, Hoda; Almalki, Abdulla A; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2017-06-19

    Research in Saudi Arabia has revealed a shocking level of insufficiently physically active adults, particularly women. The risk of sedentary behavior will likely increase as the number of women with office-based jobs increases. The aim of this study is to determine the level of sedentary behavior, and its associated factors, among Saudi women working office-based jobs in the city of Riyadh. A cross-sectional study of 420 Saudi female employees at 8 office-based worksites were measured to determine body mass index and were given a self-administered survey to evaluate their level of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Median sitting time on work days was 690 min per day (interquartile range, IQR 541-870), with nearly half accumulated during work hours, and 575 min per day (IQR 360-780) on non-work days. Predictors of work day sitting time were level of education, number of children, and working in the private sector. Number of children, whether they were single, and whether they lived in a small home were found to predict non-work day sitting time. This study identifies Saudi women in office-based jobs as a high-risk group for sedentary behavior. There is a need to promote physical activity at worksites and reduce prolonged sitting.

  15. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  16. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000557.htm Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) is a rare blood disorder in ...

  17. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D.; Daanen, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced metabolism. van Marken Lichtenbelt WD, Daanen HA. Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering

  18. Conceptualizing Cold Disasters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauta, Kristian Cedervall; Dahlberg, Rasmus; Vendelø, Morten Thanning

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we explore in more depth the particular circumstances and characteristics of governing what we call ‘cold disasters’, and thereby, the paper sets out to investigate how disasters in cold contexts distinguish themselves from other disasters, and what the implications hereof...... are for the conceptualization and governance of cold disasters. Hence, the paper can also be viewed as a response to Alexander’s (2012a) recent call for new theory in the field of disaster risk reduction. The article is structured in four overall parts. The first part, Cold Context, provides an overview of the specific...... conditions in a cold context, exemplified by the Arctic, and zooms in on Greenland to provide more specific background for the paper. The second part, Disasters in Cold Contexts, discusses “cold disasters” in relation to disaster theory, in order to, elucidate how cold disasters challenge existing...

  19. Cold knife cone biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  20. Cold air investigation of 4 1/2-stage turbine with stage loading factor of 4.66 and high specific work output. 1: Overall performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, W. J.; Behning, F. P.; Moffitt, T. P.; Hotz, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    The turbine developed design specific work output at design speed at a total pressure ratio of 6.745 with a corresponding efficiency of 0.855. The efficiency (0.855)was 3.1 points lower than the estimated efficiency quoted by the contractor in the design report and 0.7 of a point lower than that determined by a reference prediction method. The performance of the turbine, which was a forced vortex design, agreed with the performance determined by the prediction method to about the same extent as did the performance of three reference high stage loading factor turbines, which were free vortex designs.

  1. Attempting to be active: Self-efficacy and barrier limitation differentiate activity levels of working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierc, Madelaine; Locke, Sean; Jung, Mary; Brawley, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Working mothers are less physically active than working women without children and mothers who do not work. The purpose of this study was to examine concurrent self-regulatory efficacy and barriers to physical activity in a sample of working mothers. Women completed a mixed-methods survey which included measures of physical activity, concurrent self-regulatory efficacy, and barriers. Sufficiently active women experienced significantly greater concurrent self-regulatory efficacy and significantly less barrier limitation and frequency. No significant group differences were found for age, domestic duties performed, and children's extracurricular activities. Thematic analysis of barriers revealed six themes of common and unique factors, including limited time and family activities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Work above shoulder level and degenerative alterations of the rotator cuff tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Gelineck, John; Mathiassen, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine whether work performed with the arms in a highly elevated position is associated with alterations in the rotator cuff tendons as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in a historical cohort of male machinists, car...... work histories obtained by questionnaire and from registry data. Supraspinatus tendinopathy was evidenced by MRI signal intensity changes and morphologic alterations. Infraspinatus and subscapularis tendinopathy were also assessed. Additional outcomes were acromioclavicular joint degeneration.......02–1.60) for a 5-month increase in the total number of full-time working months spent with the arm elevated >90°. Conclusion Work with the arms in a highly elevated position is associated with MRI-diagnosed alterations in the supraspinatus tendon. By demonstrating the first part of a possible biologic pathway...

  3. Job satisfaction and social comparison levels of teachers working for state schools

    OpenAIRE

    Serpil Kılıç; Taşkın Tanrıkulu; Hasan Uğur

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to determine primary and secondary level teachers’ job satisfaction and social comparison levels. In line with this general aim, the relationship between the teachers’ personal data and job satisfaction and social comparison levels were researched. The research sampling was 185 teachers composed of 105 female and 81 male participants. Research data were gathered through Minnesota Job Satisfaction and Social Comparison questionnaires, respectively. According t...

  4. Regeneration qualification of cold trap using modeling validated by radiography and image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyanasundaram, P. [FRTG, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Raj, Baldev [PSG Institutions, Peelamedu, Coimbatore (India); Hemanath, M.G., E-mail: hemanath@igcar.gov.in [FRTG, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chandramouli, S. [FRTG, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Venkatraman, B. [EIRSG, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Cold trap is an online sodium purification unit used in sodium cooled Fast Reactors. ► Regeneration is the process of removal of impurities from saturated cold trap. ► The extent of impurity removal after regeneration is reveled by radiographed image. ► This paper discusses this innovative and comprehensive image processing technique. ► Results obtained from this technique is good agreement with theoretical estimation. -- Abstract: Cold trap is a purification unit used in sodium cooled Fast Spectrum Reactors (FSRs) for maintaining the oxygen and hydrogen level in sodium within acceptable limits. It works on the principle of crystallization and precipitation of oxides and hydrides of sodium in a wire mesh, when the temperature of sodium is reduced below the saturation temperature. The sodium hydride gets accumulated in the secondary cold trap as a consequence of the continuous diffusion of hydrogen in sodium and with time the trap is fully loaded and becomes inoperable. The removal of these impurity deposits at intervals by keeping the cold trap in same location of the loop is known as in situ regeneration. After regeneration cold trap is qualified by gamma radiograph technique to ensure adequate removal of impurities before bringing the cold trap back to service in sodium for purification. The numerical results predict the impurity deposition pattern in the wire mesh region of cold trap. The mathematical model has been validated with experimental data obtained from model cold trap. This paper discusses the methodologies developed for qualification of regeneration of cold trap using radiography and image processing techniques for assessing impurity deposition before and after regeneration.

  5. Dynamic adaptation of the peripheral circulation to cold exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, S.S.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Humans residing or working in cold environments exhibit a stronger cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction in the peripheral microvasculature than those living in warm regions of the world, leading to a general assumption that thermal responses to local cold exposure can be systematically improved

  6. Day-to-day differences in cortisol levels and molar cortisol-to-DHEA ratios among working individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Young-Jin; Ahn, Ryun-Sup

    2010-03-01

    The present study was carried out to determine day-to-day differences in cortisol levels and the molar cortisol-to-dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) ratio (molar C/D ratio) in working subjects. The cortisol and DHEA levels were measured from saliva samples collected 30 minutes after awakening for 7 consecutive days in full-time working subjects that worked Monday through Saturday. To determine the day-to-day differences within subjects, the collected data was analyzed using variance (ANOVA) for a randomized complete block design (RCBD). The cortisol levels from samples collected 30 minutes after awakening on workdays were similar to each other, but were significantly different from the cortisol levels on Sunday. The DHEA levels were not significantly different between the days of week. The DHEA levels on Monday and Tuesday were relatively lower than the levels on the other weekdays. The DHEA levels on Thursday and Friday were relatively higher than the other days. The molar C/D ratios on Sunday were significantly lower than those on workdays. The molar C/D ratios on Monday and Tuesday were significantly higher than those on Wednesday or other workdays. The cortisol levels and the molar C/D ratios demonstrate differences in adrenocortical activities between workdays and non-workdays, but the molar C/D ratio additionally represents differences in adrenocortical status between the first two workdays and other workdays. Thus, it is possible that the day-to-day differences in the cortisol levels and the molar C/D ratio represent the adrenal response to upcoming work-related stress.

  7. Tracking Blood Lead and Zinc Protoporphyrin Levels in Andean Adults Working in a Lead Contaminated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Fernando; Counter, S. Allen; Buchanan, Leo H.; Parra, Angelica Maria Coronel; Collaguaso, Maria Angela; Jacobs, Anthony B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate current blood lead (PbB) and zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) levels in adults presently living in environmentally Pb-contaminated Andean communities, and to compare the findings with the PbB and ZPP levels of Pb-exposed adult cohorts from the same study area tested between 1996 and 2007. Blood samples from 39 adults were measured for PbB and ZPP concentrations. The current mean PbB level (22.7 μg/dl) was significantly lower than the mean (37.9 μg/dl) of the initial 1996 cohort. PbB levels for the 1997, 1998, 2003, and 2006 cohorts were also significantly lower than the levels for the 1996 group. Elevated ZPP/heme ratios of 103.3, 128.4 and 134.2 μmol/mol were not significantly different for the 2006, 2007 and 2012 groups, indicating chronic Pb exposure. While ZPP levels of Andean Ecuadorian Pb-glazing workers have remained elevated, PbB levels declined. Pb exposure of the workers need to be continually monitored. PMID:24274152

  8. Cognitive Egocentrism Differentiates Warm and Cold People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Ryan L; Bresin, Konrad; Ode, Scott; Robinson, Michael D

    2013-02-01

    Warmth-coldness is a fundamental dimension of social behavior. Cold individuals are egocentric in their social relations, whereas warm individuals are not. Previous theorizing suggests that cognitive egocentrism underlies social egocentrism. It was hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal coldness would predict greater cognitive egocentrism. Cognitive egocentrism was assessed in basic terms through tasks wherein priming a lateralized self-state biased subsequent visual perceptions in an assimilation-related manner. Such effects reflect a tendency to assume that the self's incidental state provides meaningful information concerning the external world. Cognitive egocentrism was evident at high, but not low, levels of interpersonal coldness. The findings reveal a basic difference between warm and cold people, encouraging future research linking cognitive egocentrism to variability in relationship functioning.

  9. A Workshop Approach to Reading and Writing: Why Does It Work for Middle Level Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Judy P.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the elements and activities in the workshop approach that motivate middle level students to begin to love to read and write. Examines the basic needs of students--survival, belonging, power, freedom, and fun. (RS)

  10. Do the Effects of Working Memory Training Depend on Baseline Ability Level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jeffrey L.; Harrison, Tyler L.; Hicks, Kenny L.; Draheim, Christopher; Redick, Thomas S.; Engle, Randall W.

    2017-01-01

    There is a debate about the ability to improve cognitive abilities such as fluid intelligence through training on tasks of working memory capacity. The question addressed in the research presented here is who benefits the most from training: people with low cognitive ability or people with high cognitive ability? Subjects with high and low working…

  11. Assessment of Work Zone Noise Levels at a Cement Factory in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjective responses indicated that 47.5% of workers are exposure to noise for more than 5 years whereas, 82.5% of workers indicated that there could be health effects caused by the noise from machines. The study suggests that, though most workers ever use protective gears during working hours, health checkups for ...

  12. The Acquaintance Level of Turkish Prospective Teachers with Qualified Works of Children's Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çer, Erkan; Sahin, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study is investigate to what extent acquainted prospective Turkish teachers are with qualified works of children's literature. A convenience sample of 146 university students studying at the Turkish teaching department at a university in the Central Black Sea Region completed a questionnaire to determine the…

  13. Extending Theorisations of the Global Teacher: Care Work, Gender, and Street-Level Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    This article is concerned with teachers' negotiation of global transitions premised on improving educational opportunity with implications for professionalism. The study blends sociology of gender, work, and organisations and gender policy analysis to theorise teachers' policy negotiations. I explore how 20 Argentine teachers mediate 3 programmes'…

  14. Worsening Work Conditions and Rising Levels of Job Satisfaction? Measuring the Happiness of Academics in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Theresa; Fankhauser, Peter; Goodman, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Working conditions in academia are generally considered to be deteriorating. Data from surveys which look at the job satisfaction of academics, however, do not clearly support this notion. This appears to be especially true for the case of Japan. Much of the recent literature on academics' job satisfaction globally relies on the comparison of two…

  15. Stimulation of Work Integration Social Enterprises (WISES) and Combatting Social Exclusion at the Local Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesveldt, N.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162503199

    2016-01-01

    WISES are social enterprises that work with people marginalized from the regular labour market, including people with severe handicaps, with disabilities and those who suffer addiction and homelessness. WISES offer an alternative to regular social programs: they breach social exclusion and stimulate

  16. Diurnal urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels among healthy Danish nurses during work and leisure time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Helene Garde, Anne; Hansen, Johnni

    2006-01-01

    samples were collected during 24 h from the participants on a work day and on a day off and were analyzed for 6-sulphatoxymelatonin. On the day of urine sampling, participants filled in the Karolinska Sleep Diary. Additional information was collected through a telephone interview. Data were analyzed using...

  17. 77 FR 1778 - U.S.-EU High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... transatlantic trade and investment, the Working Group plans to consult extensively with business, nongovernmental organizations, academia, and other stakeholders. As part of this process, and consistent with the...: ] the short- and medium-term impact on economic growth, job creation, and competitiveness; the...

  18. Exploring Senior Level Athletic Training Students' Perceptions on Burnout and Work-Life Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jessica L.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Eason, Christianne M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: The professional socialization process enables athletic training students (ATSs) to gain insights into behaviors, values, and attitudes that characterize their chosen profession. However, the process often focuses on skill development over professional issues. ATSs may be exposed to burnout and work-life conflict, which may impact their…

  19. Measuring and managing the work environment of the mid-level provider – the neglected human resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAuliffe Eilish

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much has been written in the past decade about the health workforce crisis that is crippling health service delivery in many middle-income and low-income countries. Countries having lost most of their highly qualified health care professionals to migration increasingly rely on mid-level providers as the mainstay for health services delivery. Mid-level providers are health workers who perform tasks conventionally associated with more highly trained and internationally mobile workers. Their training usually has lower entry requirements and is for shorter periods (usually two to four years. Our study aimed to explore a neglected but crucial aspect of human resources for health in Africa: the provision of a work environment that will promote motivation and performance of mid-level providers. This paper explores the work environment of mid-level providers in Malawi, and contributes to the validation of an instrument to measure the work environment of mid-level providers in low-income countries. Methods Three districts were purposively sampled from each of the three geographical regions in Malawi. A total of 34 health facilities from the three districts were included in the study. All staff in each of the facilities were included in the sampling frame. A total of 153 staff members consented to be interviewed. Participants completed measures of perceptions of work environment, burnout and job satisfaction. Findings The Healthcare Provider Work Index, derived through Principal Components Analysis and Rasch Analysis of our modification of an existing questionnaire, constituted four subscales, measuring: (1 levels of staffing and resources; (2 management support; (3 workplace relationships; and (4 control over practice. Multivariate analysis indicated that scores on the Work Index significantly predicted key variables concerning motivation and attrition such as emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction, satisfaction with the profession

  20. Effective Techniques for Working with the Tongue Twister in the Elementary Level of Training Russian as a Foreign Language

    OpenAIRE

    Korolkova, Yana V.; Slabukho, Olesia A.; Vydrina, Vera V.; Zheleznyakova, Anna N.; Zhang, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    The selection of material for teaching phonetics is a topical problem in the practice of teaching Russian as a foreign language. In this article the tongue twister, as the material for the development of phonetic skills at the elementary level of teaching Russian to foreigners, will be discussed. It is proposed to work only with one tongue twister during daily phonetic exercises. It is also important to organize the work with different types of activities. This paper presents a set of tasks (...

  1. Development of a project level performance measurement model for improving collaborative design team work.

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Yuanyuan; Qin, Shengfeng; Holland, Ray

    2008-01-01

    This research explored a new direction of improving collaborative design by performance measurement. More specifically, a novel 3-dimensional performance measurement model is developed and the purpose of this model is to help project managers improve team collaboration by indicating strengths and weaknesses of team members during the project development process. Considering the complexity of collaborative design work, a multiple criteria model is proposed to reflect the design dynamics, which...

  2. Obesity among working age adults: the role of county-level persistent poverty in rural disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kevin J; Probst, Janice C; Pumkam, Chaiporn

    2011-09-01

    Little research has investigated the relationship between county-level poverty and obesity rates. We examined the factors related to obesity among residents of Rural Persistent Poverty counties, finding that these counties had a larger proportion of obese residents (34.5%) than Other Rural (28.4%) or Urban counties (24.9%). In adjusted analysis, the statistically significant association between persistent poverty and obesity was attenuated. Both individual characteristics (race, age) and county-level food availability and access factors were found to be significantly related to obesity. Improved access to quality food may be beneficial to residents of impoverished areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving cold chain systems: Challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Ashvin; Brison, Michael; LeTallec, Yann

    2017-04-19

    While a number of new vaccines have been rolled out across the developing world (with more vaccines in the pipeline), cold chain systems are struggling to efficiently support national immunization programs in ensuring the availability of safe and potent vaccines. This article reflects on the Clinton Health Access Initiative, Inc. (CHAI) experience working since 2010 with national immunization programs and partners to improve vaccines cold chains in 10 countries-Ethiopia, Nigeria, Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Cameroon, Mozambique, Lesotho and India - to identify the root causes and solutions for three common issues limiting cold chain performance. Key recommendations include: Collectively, the solutions detailed in this article chart a path to substantially improving the performance of the cold chain. Combined with an enabling global and in-country environment, it is possible to eliminate cold chain issues as a substantial barrier to effective and full immunization coverage over the next few years. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Social science in the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engerman, David C

    2010-06-01

    This essay examines ways in which American social science in the late twentieth century was--and was not--a creature of the Cold War. It identifies important work by historians that calls into question the assumption that all social science during the Cold War amounts to "Cold War social science." These historians attribute significant agency to social scientists, showing how they were enmeshed in both long-running disciplinary discussions and new institutional environments. Key trends in this scholarship include a broadening historical perspective to see social scientists in the Cold War as responding to the ideas of their scholarly predecessors; identifying the institutional legacies of World War II; and examining in close detail the products of extramural--especially governmental--funding. The result is a view of social science in the Cold War in which national security concerns are relevant, but with varied and often unexpected impacts on intellectual life.

  5. Social ties and susceptibility to the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S; Doyle, W J; Skoner, D P; Rabin, B S; Gwaltney, J M

    1997-06-25

    To examine the hypothesis that diverse ties to friends, family, work, and community are associated with increased host resistance to infection. After reporting the extent of participation in 12 types of social ties (eg, spouse, parent, friend, workmate, member of social group), subjects were given nasal drops containing 1 of 2 rhinoviruses and monitored for the development of a common cold. Quarantine. A total of 276 healthy volunteers, aged 18 to 55 years, neither seropositive for human immunodeficiency virus nor pregnant. Colds (illness in the presence of a verified infection), mucus production, mucociliary clearance function, and amount of viral replication. In response to both viruses, those with more types of social ties were less susceptible to common colds, produced less mucus, were more effective in ciliary clearance of their nasal passages, and shed less virus. These relationships were unaltered by statistical controls for prechallenge virus-specific antibody, virus type, age, sex, season, body mass index, education, and race. Susceptibility to colds decreased in a dose-response manner with increased diversity of the social network. There was an adjusted relative risk of 4.2 comparing persons with fewest (1 to 3) to those with most (6 or more) types of social ties. Although smoking, poor sleep quality, alcohol abstinence, low dietary intake of vitamin C, elevated catecholamine levels, and being introverted were all associated with greater susceptibility to colds, they could only partially account for the relation between social network diversity and incidence of colds. More diverse social networks were associated with greater resistance to upper respiratory illness.

  6. Research status and development of medical science in cold regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-hai SUN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To propose the concept, objects of study,tasks and roles of military medical sciences in cold regions(CM, and provide a theoretical basis and academic reference for its establishment anddevelopment. Methods  Literature concerning medical sciences in cold regions were retrieved with infomatics method to analyze the research status and development of medical sciences in cold regions in the military,domestic and abroad, and venture to propose the strategy and direction of development of medical sciences in cold regions. Results CM is a comprehensive medical science composing of multiple speciaties.A large area of Chinese territory is situated in frigid area, where the garrison servicemen have to take up onerous duties, so that the establishment anddevelopment of CM should be considered as a special subject and an important specialty in military medical support. Conclusion Research work on CM in PLA is in preliminary stage.For developing CM in the future,it is suggested to integrate medical resources of CM, with the aim of gathering and rectifying interrelated medical resources,improving related medical equipment,in order to establish abasic and clinical research platform for improving the health level of garrison forces both at peacetime and during military conflicts, and also in prevention of organic and psychological diseases.Therefore,it is important to emphasize the establishment of such specialty, with an effort to accelerate team construction of science and technology of medicine of cold regions, with an increase in funding for research andimprovement in improve the scientific innovation, with a purpose of safeguarding andimproving the combat effectiveness of troops in cold regions.

  7. Stress Levels of Kuwaiti Mothers of Children with SLD: Does Work and Educational Status Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazemi, Saad S.; Hadadian, Azar; Merbler, John B.; Wang, Cen

    2015-01-01

    Existing research literature indicates that parents of children with disabilities have higher stress. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in stress levels between mothers in relation to their children with specific learning disabilities (SLD). A sub sample of 91 mothers participated in the study. The outcome of the research…

  8. System Level Support for School Effectiveness: A Practitioner Perspective on Work in Progress. Policy and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzina, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Describes an Australian Catholic school district's efforts to pursue school effectiveness by implementing system-level practices embodying Fullan's notions of support and pressure. Key elements included school development processes and appraisal and professional development for principals and teachers. The system has mobilized resources for…

  9. A Study on the Level of the First Aid Knowledge of Educators Working in Preschools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, Caglayan; Atakurt, Yildir; Simsek, Isil

    This questionnaire study examined the level of knowledge of first aid of 138 educators in private and state preschools in Turkey. Questionnaires were completed by educators between May and July 1997. The findings indicated that about 17 percent of the educators thought that they had sufficient first aid knowledge, with 62 percent indicating that…

  10. Lee y trabaja: Libro de lectura 2, nivel 1 (Read and Work: Reader 2, Level 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Emiliano; and Others

    This reading textbook, the second of a series, is an anthology of stories designed to relate to the natural interest of the elementary school child. On this level the number of words to memorize is increased (on the average, four per unit) while at the same time, the study of word variants is introduced to begin analysis exercises based on the…

  11. Mothers as Educational Workers: Mothers' Emotional Work at Their Children's Transfer to Second-Level Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Maeve

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the phenomenon of mothers' emotional labour in relation to children's transfer from first- to second-level schooling: a time that has been shown to pose significant challenges for students and their families. It seeks to break the silence that surrounds the recognition and production of emotional labour in general, and…

  12. To imitate or differentiate: Cross-level identity work in an innovation network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I Fortin (Israël); Oliver, D. (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSurvival in global high-tech industries requires many organizations to participate in specialized innovation networks. However, sustained participation in these networks often proves more challenging than expected for organizations and their representatives, due to complex cross-level

  13. Electromyographical manifestations of muscle fatigue during different levels of simulated light manual assembly work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, T.; Looze, M.P. de; Kingma, I.; Visser, B.; Dieën, J.H. van

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether objective electromyographical manifestations of muscle fatigue develop in the upper trapezius muscle in two assembly tasks involving contractions of different low-intensity levels (8% and 12% MVC) and whether these indications of fatigue are

  14. Group-level impact of work environment dimensions on burnout experiences among nurses: a multivariate multilevel probit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoyue; Bruyneel, Luk; Sermeus, Walter; Van den Heede, Koen; Matawie, Kenan; Aiken, Linda; Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    Nurses' work environments are associated with burnout experiences among nurses. The RN4CAST project provides data on these constructs within a four-level structure (nurse, nursing unit, hospital, and country), implying more complicated multilevel analysis strategies than have been used in previous efforts studying this relationship. First, to explore and investigate the effect of the nursing unit, hospital, and country level variability on the relationship between dimensions of nurses' work environment and dimensions of burnout. Second, to explore the significance of the nursing unit, hospital, and country level variability among the burnout dimensions. Data from the RN4CAST project were available from a cross-sectional survey among 23,446 nurses in 2087 nursing units in 352 hospitals in 11 countries. Nurse-reported information on their work environment (managerial support for nursing, doctor-nurse collegial relations, and promotion of care quality) and burnout experiences (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment) were available. We specified ecological measures of the nurse work environment dimensions at the three organizational levels and combined these with individual-level outcomes within a series of multilevel statistical models. The final model was a multivariate multilevel probit model in which we modeled the work environment and burnout dimensions jointly. Doctor-nurse collegial relations affected all burnout dimensions, but at the unit level only. For the dimension of promotion of care quality, the effect of the ecological exposure on burnout was pronounced at both the nursing unit and the hospital level for all three burnout dimensions. Findings for the dimensions of managerial support for nursing were ambiguous. Nurse work environment dynamics are related to nurses' burnout experiences at both the nursing unit and the hospital level. This implies that both hospital-wide and unit-specific interventions should be considered to

  15. BURNOUT LEVELS OF ASSISTANT PHYSICIANS WORKING AT A TURKISH UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirincci, Edibe; Vicdanli, Safiye Selcen

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine their current levels of burnout and to identify the factors associated with burnout syndrome among assistant physicians who are undergoing further training in medical specialties. The present descriptive study was conducted on assistant physicians at a Turkish university hospital. The participants were subject to a 26-item questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The mean age of the participants was 29.95 ± 3.79 years. Their mean scores in the three sub-scales of the MBI were as follows: 22.33 ± 8.37 in emotional exhaustion (EE), 8.72 ± 4.74 in depersonalization (D), and 18.76 ± 5.87 in personal accomplishment (PA). While there were no significant discrepancies among the respondents in terms of their mean scores in EE, D and PA depending on their gender, age groups and marital status, those who considered their monthly income levels as "poor" differed significantly from those who regarded their monthly income levels as "good" in terms of their mean scores in EE, D, and PA. In addition, there was a significant difference in terms of the mean scores in EE, D, and PA between the participants who were appreciated by their superiors and those who were not. The participants had high, low and average mean scores in EE, PA and D, respectively, suggesting that they had high levels of burnout in reference to EE and PA and average levels of burnout in reference to D.

  16. Relationship between the police and crime victims: An analysis of the process and the level of satisfaction with police work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klisarić Milan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of this study was to investigate the level of satisfaction of various categories of crime victims with various aspects of police work and behavior. The aim of this research was to examine whether the police treat all victims of crime equally responsibly, or whether there is a significant difference in the satisfaction of various categories of crime victims with various aspects of police work and behavior. On an occasional sample of 150 examinees, we analyzed the level of satisfaction of crime victims in relation to the expectations of the police regarding the reported criminal offenses and then the level of satisfaction towards different aspects of work and conduct of the police, such as reporting crime to the police, environmental conditions of interview and human compassion/empathy of police officers. The results indicate a significant difference in the satisfaction of specified aspects of police work among different categories of victims. Most dissatisfaction was expressed by members of the LGBT community and convicted persons when they appear in the role of victims. The research makes recommendations for improving the quality of the work and behavior of the police towards victims of crime.

  17. Statements of work for FY 1996 to 2001 for the Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Performance Assessment Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, F.M.

    1995-06-07

    The statements of work for each activity and task of the Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Performance Assessment project are given for the fiscal years 1996 through 2001. The end product of this program is approval of a final performance assessment by the Department of Energy in the year 2000.

  18. A Framework for Lab Work Management in Mass Courses. Application to Low Level Input/Output without Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Santiago; Zamorano, Juan; Rosales, Francisco; Dopico, Antonio Garcia; Pedraza, Jose Luis

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a complete lab work management framework designed and developed in the authors' department to help teachers to manage the small projects that students are expected to complete as lab assignments during their graduate-level computer engineering studies. The paper focuses on an application example of the framework to a specific…

  19. Reading Comprehension, Working Memory and Higher-Level Language Skills in Children with SLI and/or Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anita M.-Y.; Ho, Connie S.-H.; Au, Terry K.-F.; McBride, Catherine; Ng, Ashley K.-H.; Yip, Lesley P.-W.; Lam, Catherine C.-C.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined (1) whether working memory and higher-level languages skills--inferencing and comprehension monitoring--accounted for individual differences among Chinese children in Chinese reading comprehension, after controlling for age, Chinese word reading and oral language skills, and (2) whether children with specific language…

  20. Computer Use Ethics among University Students and Staffs: The Influence of Gender, Religious Work Value and Organizational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Norshidah; Karim, Nor Shahriza Abdul; Hussein, Ramlah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which individual characteristics, which are gender, religious (Islamic) work value, and organization level (students and staff), are related to attitudes toward computer use ethics. This investigation is conducted in an academic setting in Malaysia, among those subscribing to the…

  1. Similarities and Differences between Working Memory and Long-Term Memory: Evidence from the Levels-of-Processing Span Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Nathan S.; Myerson, Joel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Hale, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments compared the effects of depth of processing on working memory (WM) and long-term memory (LTM) using a levels-of-processing (LOP) span task, a newly developed WM span procedure that involves processing to-be-remembered words based on their visual, phonological, or semantic characteristics. Depth of processing had minimal effect on…

  2. Effect of exhaust emissions on carbon monoxide levels in employees working at indoor car wash facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Topacoglu, H; Katsakoglou, S; Ipekci, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exhaust emissions from motor vehicles threaten the environment and human health. Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning, especially the use of exhaust gas CO in suicidal attempts is well known in the literature. Recently, indoor car wash facilities established in large shopping malls with closed parking, lots is a new risk area that exposes car wash employees to prolonged periods of high level CO emissions from cars. The aim of this study was to investigate how carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) bl...

  3. Assessment of Burnout Levels among Working Undergraduate Nursing Students in Turkey: Being a Full Time Employee and Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Tugutlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burnout originates in social work environment which causes numerous health problems in people.Objective: The purpose of this research was to determine the burnout levels of working undergraduate students who actually work as health care staff at hospitals and attending full time education in School of Health in North West region of Turkey.Results: More than half of the students (56.6 % were satisfied by working and studying at the same time. Majority of the students (84.8 % reported that they like their profession. We found that, years in profession and income levels did not affect emotional exhaustion (p>0.05, whilst having negative feelings about professionincreased emotional exhaustion among working students (p<0.01.Conclusion: Being a student and working at the same time as health care staff is a cause of burnout among students. Adding assertiveness, positive thinking, development of self-control to nursing curricula may help overwhelmed and burnout students to get along with problems they face.

  4. The impact of the work environment of nurses on patient safety outcomes: a multi-level modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Marcia; Matthews, Anne; Scott, P Anne

    2013-02-01

    Patient safety is a priority for health services in all countries. The importance of the nurse's role in patient safety has been established. Effective nurse staffing levels, nurse education levels, and a positive work environment for nurses are factors which are known to impact on patient safety outcomes. This study sought to explore the relationship between the ward environment in which nurses practice and specific patient safety outcomes, using ward level variables as well as nurse level variables. The outcomes were nurse-reported patient safety levels in the wards in which they work, and numbers of formal adverse events reports submitted by nurses in the last year. This cross-sectional quantitative study was carried out within a European FP7 project: Nurse Forecasting: Human Resources Planning in Nursing (RN4CAST) project. 108 general medical and surgical wards in 30 hospitals throughout Ireland. All nurses in direct patient care in the study wards were invited to participate. Data from 1397 of these nurses were used in this analysis. A nurse survey was carried out using a questionnaire incorporating the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI). Ethical approval was obtained from the authors' institution and all ethics committees representing the 30 study hospitals. Multilevel modelling was carried out to examine the impact of ward level factors on patient safety. These included proportions of nurses on the ward educated to degree level, and aggregated ward-level mean for PES-NWI scores. The study results support other research findings indicating that a positive practice environment enhances patient safety outcomes. Specifically at ward level, factors such as the ward practice environment and the proportion of nurses with degrees were found to significantly impact safety outcomes. The models developed for this study predicted 76% and 51% of the between-ward variance of these outcomes. The results can be used to enhance patient safety

  5. Organizational level indicators to address health equity work in local public health agencies: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Katherine; Salvaterra, Rosana; Antonello, Deborah; Cohen, Benita E; Kothari, Anita; LeBer, Marlene Janzen; LeMieux, Suzanne; Moran, Kathy; Rizzi, Katherine; Robson, Jordan; Wai, Caroline

    2017-09-14

    To determine what organizational level indicators exist that could be used by local Ontario public health agencies to monitor and guide their progress in addressing health equity. This scoping review employed Arksey and O'Malley's (2005) six-stage framework. Multiple online databases and grey literature sources were searched using a comprehensive strategy. Studies were included if they described or used indicators to assess an organization's health equity activity. Abstracted indicator descriptions were classified using the roles for public health action identified by the Canadian National Collaborating Centre for Determinants of Health (NCCDH). Health equity experts participated in a consultation phase to examine items extracted from the literature. Eighteen peer-reviewed studies and 30 grey literature reports were included. Abstracted indicators were considered for 1) relevance for organizational assessment, 2) ability to highlight equity-seeking populations, and 3) potential feasibility for application. Twenty-eight items formed the basis for consultation with 13 selected health equity experts. Items considered for retention were all noted to require significant clarification, definition and development. Those eliminated were often redundant or not an organizational level indicator. Few evidence-based, validated indicators to monitor and guide progress to address health inequities at the level of the local public health organization were identified. There is a need for continued development of identified indicator items, including careful operationalization of concepts and establishing clear definitions for key terms.

  6. A large-scale neural network model of the influence of neuromodulatory levels on working memory and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Michael C; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), which is regarded as the primary site for visuospatial working memory in the brain, is significantly modulated by dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE). DA and NE originate in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and locus coeruleus (LC), respectively, and have been shown to have an "inverted-U" dose-response profile in dlPFC, where the level of arousal and decision-making performance is a function of DA and NE concentrations. Moreover, there appears to be a sweet spot, in terms of the level of DA and NE activation, which allows for optimal working memory and behavioral performance. When either DA or NE is too high, input to the PFC is essentially blocked. When either DA or NE is too low, PFC network dynamics become noisy and activity levels diminish. Mechanisms for how this is occurring have been suggested, however, they have not been tested in a large-scale model with neurobiologically plausible network dynamics. Also, DA and NE levels have not been simultaneously manipulated experimentally, which is not realistic in vivo due to strong bi-directional connections between the VTA and LC. To address these issues, we built a spiking neural network model that includes D1, α2A, and α1 receptors. The model was able to match the inverted-U profiles that have been shown experimentally for differing levels of DA and NE. Furthermore, we were able to make predictions about what working memory and behavioral deficits may occur during simultaneous manipulation of DA and NE outside of their optimal levels. Specifically, when DA levels were low and NE levels were high, cues could not be held in working memory due to increased noise. On the other hand, when DA levels were high and NE levels were low, incorrect decisions were made due to weak overall network activity. We also show that lateral inhibition in working memory may play a more important role in increasing signal-to-noise ratio than increasing recurrent excitatory input.

  7. Comparison of the Value of Nursing Work Environments in Hospitals Across Different Levels of Patient Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Jeffrey H; Rosenbaum, Paul R; McHugh, Matthew D; Ludwig, Justin M; Smith, Herbert L; Niknam, Bijan A; Even-Shoshan, Orit; Fleisher, Lee A; Kelz, Rachel R; Aiken, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    The literature suggests that hospitals with better nursing work environments provide better quality of care. Less is known about value (cost vs quality). To test whether hospitals with better nursing work environments displayed better value than those with worse nursing environments and to determine patient risk groups associated with the greatest value. A retrospective matched-cohort design, comparing the outcomes and cost of patients at focal hospitals recognized nationally as having good nurse working environments and nurse-to-bed ratios of 1 or greater with patients at control group hospitals without such recognition and with nurse-to-bed ratios less than 1. This study included 25 752 elderly Medicare general surgery patients treated at focal hospitals and 62 882 patients treated at control hospitals during 2004-2006 in Illinois, New York, and Texas. The study was conducted between January 1, 2004, and November 30, 2006; this analysis was conducted from April to August 2015. Focal vs control hospitals (better vs worse nursing environment). Thirty-day mortality and costs reflecting resource utilization. This study was conducted at 35 focal hospitals (mean nurse-to-bed ratio, 1.51) and 293 control hospitals (mean nurse-to-bed ratio, 0.69). Focal hospitals were larger and more teaching and technology intensive than control hospitals. Thirty-day mortality in focal hospitals was 4.8% vs 5.8% in control hospitals (P value in the focal group. For the focal vs control hospitals, the greatest mortality benefit (17.3% vs 19.9%; P risk quintile, with a nonsignificant cost difference of $941 per patient ($53 701 vs $52 760; P = .25). The greatest difference in value between focal and control hospitals appeared in patients in the second-highest risk quintile, with mortality of 4.2% vs 5.8% (P value (lower mortality with similar costs) compared with hospitals without nursing environment recognition and with below-average staffing, especially for higher

  8. Social Relations at the Collective Level: The Meaning and Measurement of Collective Control in Research on the Psychosocial Work Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Øystein Saksvik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we suggest that organizational-level social relations should be defined and measured as workplace norms. We base this argument on new research on the components of the psychosocial work environment and on the availability of new techniques for measuring and analyzing workplace norms as organizational properties. Workplace norms emerge from interactions and negotiations among organizational actors, through which patterns of behavior, attitudes, and perspectives become defined as legitimate. This is an underestimated dimension of the psychosocial work environment that should be assessed with two types of data: self-reports by employees of their experiences in the workplace (task-level control and self-reports by employees and employers of collective or group-level norms. Hierarchical linear modeling is an especially useful tool for analyzing the relationships between workplace norms and different organizational outcomes because it allows researchers to separate the effects of individual-level variables from group or organizational-level factors. Our approach is anchored in the Nordic perspective of the work environment developed over the past 50 years.

  9. Relative Tolerance of Six Bactrocera (Diptera: Tephritidae) Species to Phytosanitary Cold Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott W; Cancio-Martinez, Elena; Hallman, Guy J; Fontenot, Emily A; Vreysen, Marc J B

    2016-12-01

    To compare relative cold treatment tolerance across the economically important tephritid fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae), Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera correcta (Bezzi), Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett), four populations of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), Bactrocera zonata (Saunders), and Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt), eggs (in vitro), and larvae (in infested fruit or on carrot diet) were cold treated at 2.0 ± 0.2 °C for selected durations. The study was performed to assess whether a single (i.e., generic) cold treatment could be developed that would control the entire group of fruit flies that were tested. Probit regression models showed that the hierarchy of cold resistance was third-instar larvae reared on carrot diet > third-instar larvae reared on orange > eggs test in vitro. Differences in mortality responses of third-instar larvae reared in oranges across populations of B. dorsalis were observed only at subefficacious levels of control. The majority of Bactrocera species responded the same at the high levels of control demanded of phytosanitary treatments, which indicated that cold treatments would be similarly effective across the species and populations tested. B. cucurbitae was found to be the most cold tolerant of all the species tested. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Wood construction under cold climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hagman, Olle; Sundqvist, Bror

    2014-01-01

    As wood constructions increasingly use engineered wood products worldwide, concerns arise about the integrity of the wood and adhesives system. The glueline stability is a crucial issue for engineered wood application, especially under cold climate. In this study, Norway spruce (Picea abies...... specimens need to be tested in further work to more completely present the issue. The EN 301 and EN 302 may need to be specified based on wood species....

  11. Window Performance in Extreme Cold,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Casement windows-windows with sashes hinged on ATID difference between the indoor ambient and the side. indoor dewpoint temperatures ATIo difference...did. Installed casement windows (at 0.23 ft 3/ PREVIOUS WORK IN COLD min ft) were the only type of window with airtight- WEATHER WINDOW PERFORMANCE...to calculate air leakage hung sash unit to a casement or possibly adding another with no wind and with double the mean wind as latch to the casement

  12. The effect of organizational level and practice area on managerial work in hospital dietetic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, J P; Spears, M C; Vaden, A G; Dayton, A D

    1985-07-01

    All areas of practice in hospital dietetic services include a management component; however, the nature of the managerial role in various areas of dietetic practice has not been identified clearly. The definition of dietetic practice in the Conceptual Framework for the Profession of Dietetics supports the importance of managerial skills. The effect of organizational level and practice area on managerial activities and roles of professional staff in hospital dietetic services was examined in this study. The nationwide sample included professionals in hospitals with 300+ beds. A total of 3,280 dietetic professionals participated. Five groups were defined: low administrative, low clinical, middle administrative, middle clinical, and upper administrative. Mintzberg identified 10 managerial roles and categorized them as interpersonal, informational, or decisional. The 10 roles were used as the basis for developing an 80-item instrument on which respondents rated each item for importance and time demand. Perceived importance of managerial activities tended to be greater at higher organizational levels. The managerial aspects of the lower clinical and upper administrative position were the most clearly defined. The lower clinical group tended to rate all of the managerial roles as significantly less important than did those in other positions; however, the middle clinical position included a substantial managerial responsibility.

  13. Electromyographical manifestations of muscle fatigue during different levels of simulated light manual assembly work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, T; de Looze, M P; Kingma, I; Visser, B; van Dieën, J H

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether objective electromyographical manifestations of muscle fatigue develop in the upper trapezius muscle in two assembly tasks involving contractions of different low-intensity levels (8% and 12% MVC) and whether these indications of fatigue are homogeneously distributed across different muscle parts. Ten subjects performed an assembly task for 3 h. EMG was recorded using four pairs of bipolar electrodes over the left and right trapezius muscles during the task itself and during isometric test contractions. Both recordings (during task and test) showed a significant decrease in the mean power frequency (MPF), at both intensity levels while the amplitude remained constant. A regression analysis showed significantly different temporal patterns for the MPF decrease for the two intensities. No differences in manifestations of muscle fatigue development were found between different parts of the muscle. These results indicate that in a highly repetitive low-intensity task, electromyographical manifestations of muscle fatigue can be observed from signals recorded in the task itself. Furthermore, the rate of development of fatigue manifestations was different between the two assembly tasks. This fatigue development appeared to be homogenous across the muscle.

  14. Engine Cold Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED ENGINE COLD START INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 469 by Douglas M. Yost Gregory A. T. Hansen U.S...not return it to the originator. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED ENGINE COLD START INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 469 by Douglas M. Yost...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engine Cold Start 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W56HZV-09-C-0100 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Douglas

  15. Physical Activity, Energy Expenditure, Nutritional Habits, Quality of Sleep and Stress Levels in Shift-Working Health Care Personnel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Charles Roskoden

    Full Text Available Among health care personnel working regular hours or rotating shifts can affect parameters of general health and nutrition. We have investigated physical activity, sleep quality, metabolic activity and stress levels in health care workers from both groups.We prospectively recruited 46 volunteer participants from the workforce of a University Medical Department of which 23 worked in rotating shifts (all nursing and 21 non-shift regular hours (10 nursing, 13 clerical staff. All were investigated over 7 days by multisensory accelerometer (SenseWear Bodymedia® armband and kept a detailed food diary. Physical activity and resting energy expenditure (REE were measured in metabolic equivalents of task (METs. Quality of sleep was assessed as Pittsburgh Sleeping Quality Index and stress load using the Trier Inventory for Chronic Stress questionnaire (TICS.No significant differences were found for overall physical activity, steps per minute, time of exceeding the 3 METs level or sleep quality. A significant difference for physical activity during working hours was found between shift-workers vs. non-shift-workers (p<0.01 and for shift-working nurses (median = 2.1 METs SE = 0.1 vs. non-shift-working clerical personnel (median = 1.5 METs SE = 0.07, p<0.05. Non-shift-working nurses had a significantly lower REE than the other groups (p<0.05. The proportion of fat in the diet was significantly higher (p<0.05 in the office worker group (median = 42% SE = 1.2 whereas shift-working nurses consumed significantly more carbohydrates (median = 46% SE = 1.4 than clerical staff (median = 41% SE = 1.7. Stress assessment by TICS confirmed a significantly higher level of social overload in the shift working group (p<0.05.In this prospective cohort study shift-working had no influence on overall physical activity. Lower physical activity during working hours appears to be compensated for during off-hours. Differences in nutritional habits and stress load warrant larger

  16. Essential Oil of Japanese Cedar (Cryptomeria japonica Wood Increases Salivary Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Levels after Monotonous Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Matsubara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Employee problems arising from mental illnesses have steadily increased and become a serious social problem in recent years. Wood is a widely available plant material, and knowledge of the psychophysiological effects of inhalation of woody volatile compounds has grown considerably. In this study, we established an experimental method to evaluate the effects of Japanese cedar wood essential oil on subjects performing monotonous work. Two experiment conditions, one with and another without diffusion of the essential oil were prepared. Salivary stress markers were determined during and after a calculation task followed by distribution of questionnaires to achieve subjective odor assessment. We found that inhalation of air containing the volatile compounds of Japanese cedar wood essential oil increased the secretion of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-s. Slight differences in the subjective assessment of the odor of the experiment rooms were observed. The results of the present study indicate that the volatile compounds of Japanese cedar wood essential oil affect the endocrine regulatory mechanism to facilitate stress responses. Thus, we suggest that this essential oil can improve employees’ mental health.

  17. The effect of presenteeism-related health conditions on employee work engagement levels: A comparison between groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon T. de Beer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Awareness of presenteeism-related health conditions is important as the prevalence of these conditions unknowingly influences performance and productivity in organisations.Research purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine the differences in work engagement levels based on groups of presenteeism-related conditions in employees.Motivation for the study: Awareness of the impact of presenteeism-related conditions on work engagement levels can aid in the crafting of interventions to assist employees who suffer from these conditions, which in turn can boost work engagement levels.Research design, approach and method: Cross-sectional data was collected from an availability sample of employees in the manufacturing sector (N = 3387.Main findings: The results of the multi-group structural equation modelling revealed significant mean differences in work engagement levels between the groups. Practical significance tests revealed significant differences between all the groups. The largest difference was between the group who suffered from no presenteeism-related conditions and the group who suffered from all three conditions included in this study concurrently.Practical/managerial implications: Organisational stakeholders are encouraged to take note of the effects that presenteeism-related health conditions have on work engagement and to consider relevant strategies and interventions to address and alleviate symptoms in order to tend to employee health and obviate the effect on productivity.Contribution: This study found that there were clear practical differences between employees who suffer from the presenteeism-related conditions and those who suffer from none of the conditions. Furthermore, there was also a clear difference when comparing the ‘no condition’ group to a general random sample in which employees might experience some symptoms but not comorbidity.

  18. Physical Activity, Energy Expenditure, Nutritional Habits, Quality of Sleep and Stress Levels in Shift-Working Health Care Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskoden, Frederick Charles; Krüger, Janine; Vogt, Lena Johanna; Gärtner, Simone; Hannich, Hans Joachim; Steveling, Antje; Lerch, Markus M; Aghdassi, Ali A

    2017-01-01

    Among health care personnel working regular hours or rotating shifts can affect parameters of general health and nutrition. We have investigated physical activity, sleep quality, metabolic activity and stress levels in health care workers from both groups. We prospectively recruited 46 volunteer participants from the workforce of a University Medical Department of which 23 worked in rotating shifts (all nursing) and 21 non-shift regular hours (10 nursing, 13 clerical staff). All were investigated over 7 days by multisensory accelerometer (SenseWear Bodymedia® armband) and kept a detailed food diary. Physical activity and resting energy expenditure (REE) were measured in metabolic equivalents of task (METs). Quality of sleep was assessed as Pittsburgh Sleeping Quality Index and stress load using the Trier Inventory for Chronic Stress questionnaire (TICS). No significant differences were found for overall physical activity, steps per minute, time of exceeding the 3 METs level or sleep quality. A significant difference for physical activity during working hours was found between shift-workers vs. non-shift-workers (pworking nurses (median = 2.1 METs SE = 0.1) vs. non-shift-working clerical personnel (median = 1.5 METs SE = 0.07, pworking nurses had a significantly lower REE than the other groups (pworking nurses consumed significantly more carbohydrates (median = 46% SE = 1.4) than clerical staff (median = 41% SE = 1.7). Stress assessment by TICS confirmed a significantly higher level of social overload in the shift working group (pworking had no influence on overall physical activity. Lower physical activity during working hours appears to be compensated for during off-hours. Differences in nutritional habits and stress load warrant larger scale trials to determine the effect on implicit health-associated conditions.

  19. Relationship of experience and the place of work to the level of competency among public health nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Reiko; Shiomi, Misa; Iwamoto, Saori; Hatono, Yoko; Chiba, Yumi; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Bessyo, Yuko; Nakayama, Kimiko; Inoue, Kiyomi

    2008-06-01

    To examine the actual competencies of public health nurses (PHNs) working in public organizations in Japan in order to clarify the relationship between the level of competency and the number of years of experience and the place of work. The subjects were 1799 full-time PHNs working at 135 prefectural public health centers and 115 municipal health centers, which were randomly selected. Each subject received a questionnaire in the mail, requesting basic personal information and a self-evaluation of six levels of achievement in 11 topics in five categories of competencies. The number of respondents was 1261 (70.1%), with a total of 1184 valid responses (65.8%). In terms of the level of competency, the average score was >3 for all items and the number of PHNs who achieved Ladders 5 and 6 was low, with very few achieving Ladder 6, despite having more years of experience. Furthermore, the level of achievement depended on the workplace, position, and academic background. The tasks regarding the education of PHNs in Japan are to establish achievement goals clearly and incrementally and to develop methods and systems that consistently and systematically increase competencies, not only in basic undergraduate education, but also for employed PHNs, through specialized education. In particular, educational methods that lead to high-quality experiences need to be selected in order to develop competencies.

  20. ENSO's far reaching connection to Indian cold waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, J V; Behera, Swadhin K; Annamalai, H; Ratna, Satyaban B; Rajeevan, M; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-11-23

    During boreal winters, cold waves over India are primarily due to transport of cold air from higher latitudes. However, the processes associated with these cold waves are not yet clearly understood. Here by diagnosing a suite of datasets, we explore the mechanisms leading to the development and maintenance of these cold waves. Two types of cold waves are identified based on observed minimum surface temperature and statistical analysis. The first type (TYPE1), also the dominant one, depicts colder than normal temperatures covering most parts of the country while the second type (TYPE2) is more regional, with significant cold temperatures only noticeable over northwest India. Quite interestingly the first (second) type is associated with La Niña (El Niño) like conditions, suggesting that both phases of ENSO provide a favorable background for the occurrence of cold waves over India. During TYPE1 cold wave events, a low-level cyclonic anomaly generated over the Indian region as an atmospheric response to the equatorial convective anomalies is seen advecting cold temperatures into India and maintaining the cold waves. In TYPE2 cold waves, a cyclonic anomaly generated over west India anomalously brings cold winds to northwest India causing cold waves only in those parts.

  1. ACHIEVEMENT OF THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF SAFETY AND HEALTH AT WORK AND THE SATISFACTION OF EMPLOYEES IN THE TEXTILE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana Urosevic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Safety and health at work involves the exercise of such working conditions that take certain measures and activities in order to protect the life and health of employees. The interest of society, of all stakeholders and every individual is to achieve the highest level of safety and health at work, to unwanted consequences such as injuries, occupational diseases and diseases related to work are reduced to a minimum, and to create the conditions work in which employees have a sense of satisfaction in the performance of their professional duties. Textile industry is a sector with higher risk, because the plants of textile industry prevailing unfavorable microclimate conditions: high air temperature and high humidity, and often insufficient illumination of rooms and increased noise. The whole line of production in the textile industry, there is a risk of injury, the most common with mechanical force, or gaining burns from heat or chemicals. All of these factors are present in the process of production and processing of textiles and the same may affect the incidence of occupational diseases of workers, absenteeism, reduction of their working capacity and productivity. With the progress of the textile industry production increases in the number of hazardous and harmful substances that may pose a potential danger to the employee in this branch of the economy as well as the harmful impact on the environment. Therefore, it is important to give special attention to these problems.

  2. Street-level diplomacy? Communicative and adaptive work at the front line of implementing public health policies in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Nicola; Dowswell, George; Greenfield, Sheila; Marshall, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Public services are increasingly operating through network governance, requiring those at all levels of the system to build collaborations and adapt their practice. Agent-focused implementation theories, such as 'street-level bureaucracy', tend to focus on decision-making and the potential of actors to subvert national policy at a local level. While it is acknowledged that network leaders need to be adaptable and to build trust, much less consideration has been given to the requirement for skills of 'diplomacy' needed by those at the front line of delivering public services. In this article, drawing on theoretical insights from international relations about the principles of 'multi-track diplomacy', we propose the concept of street level diplomacy, offer illustrative empirical evidence to support it in the context of the implementation of public health (preventative) policies within primary care (a traditionally responsive and curative service) in the English NHS and discuss the contribution and potential limitations of the new concept. The article draws on qualitative data from interviews conducted with those implementing case finding programmes for cardiovascular disease in the West Midlands. The importance of communication and adaptation in the everyday work of professionals, health workers and service managers emerged from the data. Using abductive reasoning, the theory of multi-track diplomacy was used to aid interpretation of the 'street-level' work that was being accomplished. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Level of Sedentary Behavior and Its Associated Factors among Saudi Women Working in Office-Based Jobs in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Nada M. Albawardi; Hoda Jradi; Abdulla A. Almalki; Hazzaa M. Al-Hazzaa

    2017-01-01

    Research in Saudi Arabia has revealed a shocking level of insufficiently physically active adults, particularly women. The risk of sedentary behavior will likely increase as the number of women with office-based jobs increases. The aim of this study is to determine the level of sedentary behavior, and its associated factors, among Saudi women working office-based jobs in the city of Riyadh. A cross-sectional study of 420 Saudi female employees at 8 office-based worksites were measured to dete...

  4. Leader-Member Exchange across two hierarchical levels of leadership: concurrent influences on work characteristics and employee psychological health

    OpenAIRE

    Karanika-Murray, Maria; Bartholomew, Kimberley J.; Williams, Glenn A.; Cox, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) theory suggests that the quality of the leader–employee relationship is linked to employee psychological health. Leaders who reside at different hierarchical levels have unique roles and spheres of influence and potentially affect employees' work experiences in different ways. Nevertheless, research on the impact of leadership on employee psychological health has largely viewed leaders as a homogeneous group. Expanding on LMX theory, we argue that (1) LMX sourced ...

  5. Level of Motivation Amongst Health Personnel Working in A Tertiary Care Government Hospital of New Delhi, India

    OpenAIRE

    Poonam Jaiswal; Ashok K. Singhal; Gadpayle, Adesh K.; Sandeep Sachdeva; Rabindra Padaria

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To assess the level and factors of motivation amongst permanent government employees working in a tertiary health care institution. Material and Methods: A sample of 200 health personnel (50 in each category) i.e. doctors, nurses, technician, and support staff were contacted through face to face interview. Motivation was measured as the degree to which an individual possessed various identified motivation domains like Drive, Control, Challenge, Relationship and Rewards. Each domain was ...

  6. Investigation of Level of Nurses’ Burnout and Depression in Terms of Working Conditions andDemographic Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    AKYÜZ, İlknur

    2015-01-01

    Burnout, being formed because of physical and mental problems which caused by working environment, especially appears among employees who are interact with human beings individually. Burnout differs in three ways as, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment and it damages employees and the people who are served. Another negative condition caused by environment is frequency of depression experience. In this study, it aims to investigate burnout and depression level o...

  7. Occupational stress in consultants in accident and emergency medicine: a national survey of levels of stress at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbeck, R; Coomber, S; Robinson, S M; Todd, C

    2002-05-01

    To assess levels of occupational stress in UK accident and emergency (A&E) consultants. Postal survey of complete enumeration of UK consultants. GHQ-12 and SCL-D, and respondents' reported perceptions of stressors. Of 371 valid respondents (78%), 21 declined to participate. Of the remaining 350, 154 (44.4%) had GHQ-12 scores over the threshold for distress, which is much higher than found in other studies of doctors. Levels of depression as measured by the SCL-D at 18% (n=63) were slightly higher than other groups. Thirty four (10%) reported suicidal ideation. Women had significantly higher SCL-D scores than men (U=6604, pGHQ-12 scores) (rho=0.126, pGHQ identified caseness, while "the effect of stress on family life" (OR=1.53), low prestige of specialty (OR=1.20), and "dealing with management" (OR=1.28) predicted SCL-D scores. There are high levels of psychological distress among doctors working in A&E compared with other groups of doctors. There is likely to be an effect on staff morale and career longevity. Interventions to improve the working lives of A&E consultants are required, in particular a reduction in hours worked.

  8. Work engagement supports nurse workforce stability and quality of care: nursing team-level analysis in psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, P; Wouters, K; Willems, R; Mondelaers, M; Clarke, S

    2013-10-01

    Research in healthcare settings reveals important links between work environment factors, burnout and organizational outcomes. Recently, research focuses on work engagement, the opposite (positive) pole from burnout. The current study investigated the relationship of nurse practice environment aspects and work engagement (vigour, dedication and absorption) to job outcomes and nurse-reported quality of care variables within teams using a multilevel design in psychiatric inpatient settings. Validated survey instruments were used in a cross-sectional design. Team-level analyses were performed with staff members (n = 357) from 32 clinical units in two psychiatric hospitals in Belgium. Favourable nurse practice environment aspects were associated with work engagement dimensions, and in turn work engagement was associated with job satisfaction, intention to stay in the profession and favourable nurse-reported quality of care variables. The strongest multivariate models suggested that dedication predicted positive job outcomes whereas nurse management predicted perceptions of quality of care. In addition, reports of quality of care by the interdisciplinary team were predicted by dedication, absorption, nurse-physician relations and nurse management. The study findings suggest that differences in vigour, dedication and absorption across teams associated with practice environment characteristics impact nurse job satisfaction, intention to stay and perceptions of quality of care. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Leader-Member Exchange across two hierarchical levels of leadership: concurrent influences on work characteristics and employee psychological health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanika-Murray, Maria; Bartholomew, Kimberley J; Williams, Glenn A; Cox, Tom

    2015-01-02

    Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) theory suggests that the quality of the leader-employee relationship is linked to employee psychological health. Leaders who reside at different hierarchical levels have unique roles and spheres of influence and potentially affect employees' work experiences in different ways. Nevertheless, research on the impact of leadership on employee psychological health has largely viewed leaders as a homogeneous group. Expanding on LMX theory, we argue that (1) LMX sourced at the levels of the line manager (LM) and senior management (SM) team will be differentially linked to employee psychological health (assessed as worn-out) and that (2) these relationships will be mediated by perceived work characteristics (reward and recognition, workload management, quality of relationships with colleagues and physical environment). Structural equation modelling on data from 337 manual workers partially supported the hypotheses. Perceptions of the physical environment mediated the relationship between LMX at the LM level and employee psychological health, whereas perceptions of workload management mediated the relationship between LMX at the SM level and psychological health. These findings corroborate arguments that leaders are not a uniform group and as such the effects of LMX on employees will depend on leadership hierarchy. Implications for expanding leadership theory are discussed.

  10. Leader-Member Exchange across two hierarchical levels of leadership: concurrent influences on work characteristics and employee psychological health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanika-Murray, Maria; Bartholomew, Kimberley J.; Williams, Glenn A.; Cox, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) theory suggests that the quality of the leader–employee relationship is linked to employee psychological health. Leaders who reside at different hierarchical levels have unique roles and spheres of influence and potentially affect employees' work experiences in different ways. Nevertheless, research on the impact of leadership on employee psychological health has largely viewed leaders as a homogeneous group. Expanding on LMX theory, we argue that (1) LMX sourced at the levels of the line manager (LM) and senior management (SM) team will be differentially linked to employee psychological health (assessed as worn-out) and that (2) these relationships will be mediated by perceived work characteristics (reward and recognition, workload management, quality of relationships with colleagues and physical environment). Structural equation modelling on data from 337 manual workers partially supported the hypotheses. Perceptions of the physical environment mediated the relationship between LMX at the LM level and employee psychological health, whereas perceptions of workload management mediated the relationship between LMX at the SM level and psychological health. These findings corroborate arguments that leaders are not a uniform group and as such the effects of LMX on employees will depend on leadership hierarchy. Implications for expanding leadership theory are discussed. PMID:25999635

  11. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced

  12. Small Cold Temperature Instrument Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Millar, P. S.; Yeh, P. S.; Feng, S.; Brigham, D.; Beaman, B.

    We are developing a small cold temperature instrument package concept that integrates a cold temperature power system with ultra low temperature ultra low power electronics components and power supplies now under development into a 'cold temperature surface operational' version of a planetary surface instrument package. We are already in the process of developing a lower power lower temperature version for an instrument of mutual interest to SMD and ESMD to support the search for volatiles (the mass spectrometer VAPoR, Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith) both as a stand alone instrument and as part of an environmental monitoring package. We build on our previous work to develop strategies for incorporating Ultra Low Temperature/Ultra Low Power (ULT/ULP) electronics, lower voltage power supplies, as well as innovative thermal design concepts for instrument packages. Cryotesting has indicated that our small Si RHBD CMOS chips can deliver >80% of room temperature performance at 40K (nominal minimum lunar surface temperature). We leverage collaborations, past and current, with the JPL battery development program to increase power system efficiency in extreme environments. We harness advances in MOSFET technology that provide lower voltage thresholds for power switching circuits incorporated into our low voltage power supply concept. Conventional power conversion has a lower efficiency. Our low power circuit concept based on 'synchronous rectification' could produce stable voltages as low as 0.6 V with 85% efficiency. Our distributed micro-battery-based power supply concept incorporates cold temperature power supplies operating with a 4 V or 8 V battery. This work will allow us to provide guidelines for applying the low temperature, low power system approaches generically to the widest range of surface instruments.

  13. Assessment of Health Level and Socio-Economic Characteristics of People Working in the Shipbuilding Industry: A Control Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouri, Agoritsa; Roupa, Zoe; Sarafis, Pavlos; Hatzoglou, Chryssi; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The health level of the population and the way people perceive it has been associated with their physical and mental health, as well as with their social and occupational characteristics. Purpose: The comparative assessment of mental and health level in shipbuilding industry workers and general population and its relationship to social and economic parameters. Methods: A group of one hundred men working in the shipbuilding industry aged 51.8±8.2 years old and a control group of one hundred men of the general population aged 51.1±6.4 were studied. All participants completed the General Health Questionnaire – 28 and Fagerstrom test and a form with demographic, occupational and economic status characteristics. The statistical software SPSS 17.0 was used for data analysis. Results: Twenty–six percent of the general population and 47% of men working in the shipbuilding industry assessed their health as moderate/poor. Higher median values of anxiety and depressive symptomatology were observed in individuals characterizing their health as moderate/poor (p<0.001), their work as physically too demanding and in individuals with high dependency on smoking (p<0.05). With regard to the parameter of physical complaints, people working in the shipbuilding industry, non-active employees and those with comorbidities were found more burdened in relation to the general population (p<0.05). Depressive disorders were more common in those stating that their economic situation had been significantly deteriorated and in individuals with chronic diseases, which also showed reduced social functioning (p<0.05). Conclusions: Health level and its individual dimensions are both associated with health self-assessment and occupational and economic status. The coexistence of chronic diseases and smoking dependence affects emotion and social functioning of individuals. PMID:25716381

  14. EDITORIAL: Cold Quantum GasesEditorial: Cold Quantum Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassen, W.; Hemmerich, A.; Arimondo, E.

    2003-04-01

    This Special Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics brings together the contributions of various researchers working on theoretical and experimental aspects of cold quantum gases. Different aspects of atom optics, matter wave interferometry, laser manipulation of atoms and molecules, and production of very cold and degenerate gases are presented. The variety of subjects demonstrates the steadily expanding role associated with this research area. The topics discussed in this issue, extending from basic physics to applications of atom optics and of cold atomic samples, include: bulletBose--Einstein condensation bulletFermi degenerate gases bulletCharacterization and manipulation of quantum gases bulletCoherent and nonlinear cold matter wave optics bulletNew schemes for laser cooling bulletCoherent cold molecular gases bulletUltra-precise atomic clocks bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to metrology and spectroscopy bulletApplications of cold quantum gases to quantum computing bulletNanoprobes and nanolithography. This special issue is published in connection with the 7th International Workshop on Atom Optics and Interferometry, held in Lunteren, The Netherlands, from 28 September to 2 October 2002. This was the last in a series of Workshops organized with the support of the European Community that have greatly contributed to progress in this area. The scientific part of the Workshop was managed by A Hemmerich, W Hogervorst, W Vassen and J T M Walraven, with input from members of the International Programme Committee who are listed below. The practical aspects of the organization were ably handled by Petra de Gijsel from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. The Workshop was funded by the European Science Foundation (programme BEC2000+), the European Networks 'Cold Quantum Gases (CQG)', coordinated by E Arimondo, and 'Cold Atoms and Ultraprecise Atomic Clocks (CAUAC)', coordinated by J Henningsen, by the German Physical Society (DFG), by

  15. Correlation of volumetric flow rate and skin blood flow with cold intolerance in digital replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Mi, Jingyi; Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Xiaoyun; Yao, Qun; Qiu, Yang

    2017-12-01

    Cold intolerance is a common complication of digital replantation. The exact etiology is unclear, but it is considered to be multifactorial, including nonsurgical characteristics, vascular, and neurologic conditions. Blood flow may play a significant role in cold intolerance. This study was designed to evaluate the correlation of digital blood flow, including volumetric flow rate (VFR) and skin blood flow (SkBF), with cold intolerance in replanted fingers.A retrospective study was conducted among patients who underwent digital replantation between 2010 and 2013. Patients were selected into study cohort based on the inclusion criteria. Surgical data was collected on each patient, including age, sex, injury mechanism, amputation level, ischemia time, number of arteries repaired, and whether or not vascular crisis occurred. Patients were included as study cohort with both nerves repaired and without chronic disease. Cold intolerance was defined as a Cold Intolerance Symptom Severity (CISS) score over 30. The arterial flow velocity and caliber were measured by Color Doppler Ultrasound and the digital VFR was calculated. The SkBF was measured by Laser Speckle Imager. Both VFR and SkBF were calculated as a percentage of the contralateral fingers. Comparative study of surgical data and blood flow was performed between the patient with and without cold intolerance. Correlation between VFR and SkBF was also analyzed.A total of 93 patients met inclusion criteria for the study. Approximately, 42 patients were identified as having cold intolerance. Fingers that survived vascular crisis had a higher incidence of cold intolerance with a lower VFR and SkBF. The VFR was higher in 2-artery replantation, but the SkBF and incidence of cold intolerance did not differ significantly. No differences were found in age, sex, injury mechanism, amputation level, or ischemia time. Furthermore, no correlation was found between VFR and SkBF.Cold intolerance of digital replantation is associated

  16. Assessing the Present in Perspective of the Past: Experiences from a Chronicle Workshop on Company-Level Work Disability Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrik Gensby

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Participatory approaches to jointly address development and change processes are increasingly applied in Nordic working life research. One approach, the Chronicle Workshop (CW, aims at facilitating collective history through collaborative exploration and joint analysis of organizational development and change processes to guide forthcoming change. This study presents the CW methodology as an interactive research process. The study examines how the CW can facilitate mutual understanding and explanation of sickness absence and return to work efforts in the healthcare workplace, and discuss the extent to which the CW methodology can inform researchers involved in organizational development and change to address some potential limitations that exist. The CW encouraged the expression of diverse perspectives, incorporating insight from different organizational levels, and identified various kinds of resources and dilemmas in mapping the collective history of company-level sickness absence and return to work efforts. More attention to consensus building and power relations, greater explicitness about theoretical groundings, researcher role, and follow-up action ought to be considered prospectively to develop the method further. Inspiration from action research principles and the combined use of critical realism and interactive research may guide future development of the CW methodology.

  17. Autler-Townes splitting via frequency upconversion at ultra-low power levels in cold $^{87}$Rb atoms using an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ravi; Deasy, Kieran; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    The tight confinement of the evanescent light field around the waist of an optical nanofiber makes it a suitable tool for studying nonlinear optics in atomic media. Here, we use an optical nanofiber embedded in a cloud of laser-cooled 87Rb for near-infrared frequency upconversion via a resonant two-photon process. Sub-nW powers of the two-photon beams, at 780 nm and 776 nm, co-propagate through the optical nanofiber and generation of 420 nm photons is observed. A measurement of the Autler-Townes splitting provides a direct measurement of the Rabi frequency of the 780 nm transition. Through this method, dephasings of the system can be studied. In this work, the optical nanofiber is used as an excitation and detection tool simultaneously, and it highlights some of the advantages of using fully fibered systems for nonlinear optics with atoms.

  18. Shift work at young age is associated with elevated long-term cortisol levels and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, Laura; van Kruysbergen, Rulanda G P M; de Jong, Frank H; Koper, Jan W; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C

    2011-11-01

    The incidence of obesity and other features of the metabolic syndrome is increased in shift workers. This may be due to a misalignment between the internal circadian rhythm and the behavioral rhythm. The stress hormone cortisol could play a role in this phenomenon because it is secreted in a circadian rhythm, and long-term elevated cortisol leads to components of the metabolic syndrome. We compared cortisol levels in scalp hair of shift and day workers to study changes in long-term cortisol due to shift work. Hair samples were collected from 33 shift workers and 89 day workers. Cortisol was extracted from the hair samples with methanol, and cortisol levels were measured using ELISA. Height and weight were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Shift workers had higher hair cortisol levels than day workers: 47.32 pg/mg hair [95% confidence interval (CI) = 38.37-58.21] vs. 29.72 pg/mg hair (95% CI = 26.18-33.73) (P shift workers: 48.53 pg/mg hair (95% CI = 36.56-64.29) vs. 26.42 pg/mg hair (95% CI = 22.91-30.55) (P shift workers as well: 27.2 (95% CI = 25.5-28.8) vs. 23.7 (95% CI = 22.8-24.7) in young day workers (P = 0.001). Hair cortisol and BMI were positively correlated (β = 0.262; P = 0.005). Shift work at a young adult age is associated with elevated long-term cortisol levels and increased BMI. Elevated cortisol levels and BMI may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk found in shift workers.

  19. An Ergonomic Evaluation of the Illumination Level and the Management Plan to Improve the Working Environment of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang Hyeon; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Illumination in the working environment is one of the crucial factors that affect worker's psychological status as well as the physiological condition according to each task. Sometimes it affects the results of worker's cognitive, perceptual work performance. In particular, illumination may become a triggering factor to human errors in visual tasks due to visual fatigue through direct influence of vision in NPPs. Illumination includes several visual conditions such as uniformity factor, light distribution, glare, SPD (Surge Protector Device), flicker, illumination system, daylight and window control, in addition to the simple physical aspects of illumination and luminance. These conditions may affect operators' visibility and disillusion level, cause stress, attention, emotion, etc. and they finally affect workers' performance and errors as a result. From the many illumination conditions mentioned above, current work environment evaluation items on illumination are mainly based only on the intensity of illumination, and there is yet no systematic way with evaluation criteria for other factors such as luminance, flickering, etc. In addition, research and development on illumination emphasizes mainly the physical characteristics of illumination, and it is insufficient for the influence studies on human error or work performance that are caused by these factors

  20. Stacking of cold antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielse, G; Oxley, P; Speck, A K; Storry, C H; Tan, J N; Wessels, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Walz, J; Pittner, H; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A

    2002-01-01

    The stacking of cold antiprotons is currently the only way to accumulate the large numbers of the cold antiprotons that are needed for low energy experiments. Both the largest possible number and the lowest possible temperature are desired, especially for the production and study of cold antihydrogen. The antiprotons accumulated in our particle trap have an energy 10/sup 10/ times lower than the energy of those delivered by CERN's Antiprotons Decelerator (AD). The number accumulated (more than 0.4 million in this demonstration) is linear in the number of accepted high energy antiproton pulses (32 in this demonstration). Accumulation efficiencies and losses are measured and discussed. (12 refs).

  1. Increased endothelin-1 and diminished nitric oxide levels in blister fluids of patients with intermediate cold type complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niehof Sjoerd

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1 pro-inflammatory mediators and vascular changes play an important role in the sustained development and outcome of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of vasoactive substances endothelin-1 (ET-1 and nitric oxide (NO during early chronic CRPS1. Methods Included were 29 patients with CRPS 1 who were diagnosed during the acute stage of their disease and observed during follow-up visits. Disease activity and impairment were determined and artificial suction blisters were made on the CRPS1 and the contralateral extremities for measurements of IL-6, TNF-α, ET-1 and nitrate/nitrite (NOx. Results The levels of IL-6, TNF-α and ET-1 in blister fluid in the CRPS1 extremity versus the contralateral extremity were significantly increased and correlated with each other, whereas NOx levels were decreased. Conclusion The NOx/ET-1 ratio appears to be disturbed in the intermediate stage of CRPS, resulting in vasoconstriction and consequently in a diminished tissue blood distribution.

  2. Level of economic development of the country of origin and work-to-family conflict after migration to Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazer, Shirin; Young, Marisa

    2017-03-01

    Using a sample of employed adults living in Canada, this article examines patterns and antecedents of work-to-family conflict (WFC) among immigrants, relative to the native-born. We test whether the origin-country- or intermediary country of residence- country-level economic development, and length of residence in Canada interact to affect WFC differentially for immigrants. We hypothesize that origin-country economic development impacts the value and transferability of immigrants' capital in the host country. Discrepancies between the two results in underemployment, stressful work experiences, and thus greater WFC for immigrants, relative to the native-born. Results indicate greater WFC among recent and established immigrants from less developed countries and among established immigrants from developed countries. This finding, however, is conditioned by gender and particularly strong among established immigrant men from less developed countries, compared to their female counterparts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Zinc for the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenu; Das, Rashmi R

    2013-06-18

    The common cold is one of the most widespread illnesses and is a leading cause of visits to the doctor and absenteeism from school and work. Trials conducted in high-income countries since 1984 investigating the role of zinc for the common cold symptoms have had mixed results. Inadequate treatment masking and reduced bioavailability of zinc from some formulations have been cited as influencing results. To assess whether zinc (irrespective of the zinc salt or formulation used) is efficacious in reducing the incidence, severity and duration of common cold symptoms. In addition, we aimed to identify potential sources of heterogeneity in results obtained and to assess their clinical significance. In this updated review, we searched CENTRAL (2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 2, 2013), EMBASE (1974 to January 2013), CINAHL (1981 to January 2013), Web of Science (1985 to January 2013), LILACS (1982 to January 2013), WHO ICTRP and clinicaltrials.gov. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials using zinc for at least five consecutive days to treat, or for at least five months to prevent the common cold. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Five trials were identified in the updated searches in January 2013 and two of them did not meet our inclusion criteria. We included 16 therapeutic trials (1387 participants) and two preventive trials (394 participants). Intake of zinc was associated with a significant reduction in the duration (days) (mean difference (MD) -1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.72 to -0.34) (P = 0.003) (I(2) statistic = 89%) but not the severity of common cold symptoms (MD -1.06, 95% CI -2.36 to 0.23) (P = 0.11) (I(2) statistic = 84%). The proportion of participants who were symptomatic after seven days of treatment was significantly smaller (odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% CI 0.20 to 1.00) (P = 0.05) than those in the control, (I(2 )statistic = 75%). The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of developing a

  4. Engineering Cold Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Gulzar S; Wani, Shabir H; Hussain, Wasim; Singh, N.B

    2011-01-01

    Plants respond with changes in their pattern of gene expression and protein products when exposed to low temperatures. Thus ability to adapt has an impact on the distribution and survival of the plant, and on crop yields. Many species of tropical or subtropical origin are injured or killed by non-freezing low temperatures, and exhibit various symptoms of chilling injury such as chlorosis, necrosis, or growth retardation. In contrast, chilling tolerant species are able to grow at such cold temperatures. Conventional breeding methods have met with limited success in improving the cold tolerance of important crop plants involving inter-specific or inter-generic hybridization. Recent studies involving full genome profiling/ sequencing, mutational and transgenic plant analyses, have provided a deep insight of the complex transcriptional mechanism that operates under cold stress. The alterations in expression of genes in response to cold temperatures are followed by increases in the levels of hundreds of metabolites, some of which are known to have protective effects against the damaging effects of cold stress. Various low temperature inducible genes have been isolated from plants. Most appear to be involved in tolerance to cold stress and the expression of some of them is regulated by C-repeat binding factor/ dehydration-responsive element binding (CBF/DREB1) transcription factors. Numerous physiological and molecular changes occur during cold acclimation which reveals that the cold resistance is more complex than perceived and involves more than one pathway. The findings summarized in this review have shown potential practical applications for breeding cold tolerance in crop and horticultural plants suitable to temperate geographical locations. PMID:21886453

  5. Engineering cold stress tolerance in crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Gulzar S; Wani, Shabir H; Hussain, Wasim; Singh, N B

    2011-03-01

    Plants respond with changes in their pattern of gene expression and protein products when exposed to low temperatures. Thus ability to adapt has an impact on the distribution and survival of the plant, and on crop yields. Many species of tropical or subtropical origin are injured or killed by non-freezing low temperatures, and exhibit various symptoms of chilling injury such as chlorosis, necrosis, or growth retardation. In contrast, chilling tolerant species are able to grow at such cold temperatures. Conventional breeding methods have met with limited success in improving the cold tolerance of important crop plants involving inter-specific or inter-generic hybridization. Recent studies involving full genome profiling/ sequencing, mutational and transgenic plant analyses, have provided a deep insight of the complex transcriptional mechanism that operates under cold stress. The alterations in expression of genes in response to cold temperatures are followed by increases in the levels of hundreds of metabolites, some of which are known to have protective effects against the damaging effects of cold stress. Various low temperature inducible genes have been isolated from plants. Most appear to be involved in tolerance to cold stress and the expression of some of them is regulated by C-repeat binding factor/ dehydration-responsive element binding (CBF/DREB1) transcription factors. Numerous physiological and molecular changes occur during cold acclimation which reveals that the cold resistance is more complex than perceived and involves more than one pathway. The findings summarized in this review have shown potential practical applications for breeding cold tolerance in crop and horticultural plants suitable to temperate geographical locations.

  6. Aerodynamic Performance of a Compact, High Work-Factor Centrifugal Compressor at the Stage and Subcomponent Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunscheidel, Edward P.; Welch, Gerard E.; Skoch, Gary J.; Medic, Gorazd; Sharma, Om P.

    2015-01-01

    The measured aerodynamic performance of a compact, high work-factor, single-stage centrifugal compressor, comprising an impeller, diffuser, 90deg-bend, and exit guide vane is reported. Performance levels are based on steady-state total-pressure and total-temperature rake and angularity-probe data acquired at key machine rating planes during recent testing at NASA Glenn Research Center. Aerodynamic performance at the stage level is reported for operation between 70 to 105 percent of design corrected speed, with subcomponent (impeller, diffuser, and exit-guide-vane) flow field measurements presented and discussed at the 100 percent design-speed condition. Individual component losses from measurements are compared with pre-test CFD predictions on a limited basis.

  7. Heating up cold agglutinins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stone, Marvin J

    2010-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Berentsen and coworkers describe a high response rate which is durable in some patients who receive combination fludarabine and rituximab for chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD...

  8. Chilling Out With Colds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a little earlier for a few nights. De-stress. Kids who are stressed out feel worse when they have colds. Relax and use the time to read, listen to music, or watch a movie. In other words, chill ...

  9. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  10. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.; Daanen, Hein A M

    Purpose of review: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic

  11. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic

  12. Dence Cold Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavinskiy Alexey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Possible way to create dense cold baryonic matter in the laboratory is discussed. The density of this matter is comparable or even larger than the density of neutron star core. The properties of this matter can be controlled by trigger conditions. Experimental program for the study of properties of dense cold matter for light and heavy ion collisions at initial energy range √sNN~2-3GeV is proposed..

  13. The Relationship Between Sociodemographic Characteristics, Work Conditions, and Level of "Mobbing" of Health Workers in Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picakciefe, Metin; Acar, Gulcihan; Colak, Zehra; Kilic, Ibrahim

    2015-06-19

    Mobbing is a type of violence which occurs in workplaces and is classified under the community violence subgroup of interpersonal violence. The aim of this study is to examine health care workers who work in primary health care in the city of Mugla and to determine whether there is a relationship between sociodemographic characteristics, work conditions, and their level of mobbing. A cross-sectional analysis has been conducted in which 130 primary health care workers were selected. Of the 130, 119 health workers participated, yielding a response rate of 91.5%; 83.2% of health workers are female, 42.9% are midwives, 27.7% are nurses, and 14.3% are doctors. In all, 31.1% of health workers have faced with "mobbing" in the last 1 year, and the frequency of experiencing "mobbing" of those 48.6% of them is 1 to 3 times per year. A total of 70.3% of those who apply "mobbing" are senior health workers, and 91.9% are female. The frequency of encountering with "mobbing" was found significantly in married health workers, in those 16 years and above according to examined total working time, in those who have psychosocial reactions, and in those who have counterproductive behaviors. It has been discovered that primary health care workers have high prevalence of "mobbing" exposure. To avoid "mobbing" at workplace, authorities and responsibilities of all employees have to be clearly determined. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Home and Work Physical Activity Environments: Associations with Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Physical Activity Level in French Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppert, Jean-Michel; Charles, Marie-Aline; Charreire, Hélène; Menai, Mehdi; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Brage, Soren; de Lauzon-Guillain, Blandine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Balkau, Beverley

    2016-08-15

    The influence of the physical activity environment in the home and at work on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and objectively-measured physical activity has not been extensively studied. We recruited 147 women with a (mean ± SD) age of 54 ± 7 years and without evidence of chronic disease. The physical activity environment was assessed by self-report (Assessing Levels of PHysical Activity or ALPHA questionnaire), CRF using a submaximal step test, usual physical activity using combined heart rate and accelerometry, as well as by a validated questionnaire (Recent Physical Activity Questionnaire). Summary scores of the home environment and the work environment derived from the ALPHA questionnaire were positively correlated with CRF after adjustment for age (r = 0.18, p = 0.03 and r = 0.28, p fitness equipment at work had higher CRF. In conclusion, these results provide new insights into potential environmental influences on physical capacity and physical activity that could inform the design of physical activity promotion strategies.

  15. A descriptive study of the perceptions of workplace violence and safety strategies of nurses working in level I trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlette, Martha

    2005-12-01

    Workplace violence is a significant occupational hazard in health care. As the largest group of employees in health care, nurses are particularly vulnerable to workplace violence, with those who work in emergency departments being especially at risk. The purpose of this research was to study the phenomenon of workplace violence by interviewing emergency nurses who had experienced violence while on duty. A descriptive study approached the issue of workplace violence from the perspective of 8 registered nurses from 2 level I trauma centers who volunteered to be interviewed. Cross-case comparison of the interview responses was used to analyze the data from verbatim transcripts. Emergency nurses identified specific experiences of violence at work. Inadequate safety measures and vulnerability were the 2 themes that were consistently verbalized through out the interviews. The emergency nurses who were interviewed discussed their experiences with patients, family members, and others who exhibited violent and aggressive behavior. They identified safety measures that they believed were inadequate and discussed their feelings of vulnerability because of violent incidents at work. Further research with larger samples could confirm specific safety problems in emergency departments that must be addressed to provide a safer workplace for emergency nurses, their colleagues, and their patients.

  16. Home and Work Physical Activity Environments: Associations with Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Physical Activity Level in French Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Oppert

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the physical activity environment in the home and at work on cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF and objectively-measured physical activity has not been extensively studied. We recruited 147 women with a (mean ± SD age of 54 ± 7 years and without evidence of chronic disease. The physical activity environment was assessed by self-report (Assessing Levels of PHysical Activity or ALPHA questionnaire, CRF using a submaximal step test, usual physical activity using combined heart rate and accelerometry, as well as by a validated questionnaire (Recent Physical Activity Questionnaire. Summary scores of the home environment and the work environment derived from the ALPHA questionnaire were positively correlated with CRF after adjustment for age (r = 0.18, p = 0.03 and r = 0.28, p < 0.01, respectively. Women owning a bicycle or having a garden (which may prompt physical activity had higher CRF; those with a bicycle at home also had a higher physical activity energy expenditure. Similarly, women who had access to fitness equipment at work had higher CRF. In conclusion, these results provide new insights into potential environmental influences on physical capacity and physical activity that could inform the design of physical activity promotion strategies.

  17. Model for the techno-economic analysis of common work of wind power and CCGT power plant to offer constant level of power in the electricity market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Z.; Rajsl, I.; Filipovic, M.

    2017-11-01

    Wind power varies over time, mainly under the influence of meteorological fluctuations. The variations occur on all time scales. Understanding these variations and their predictability is of key importance for the integration and optimal utilization of wind in the power system. There are two major attributes of variable generation that notably impact the participation on power exchanges: Variability (the output of variable generation changes and resulting in fluctuations in the plant output on all time scales) and Uncertainty (the magnitude and timing of variable generation output is less predictable, wind power output has low levels of predictability). Because of these variability and uncertainty wind plants cannot participate to electricity market, especially to power exchanges. For this purpose, the paper presents techno-economic analysis of work of wind plants together with combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant as support for offering continues power to electricity market. A model of wind farms and CCGT plant was developed in program PLEXOS based on real hourly input data and all characteristics of CCGT with especial analysis of techno-economic characteristics of different types of starts and stops of the plant. The Model analyzes the followings: costs of different start-stop characteristics (hot, warm, cold start-ups and shutdowns) and part load performance of CCGT. Besides the costs, the technical restrictions were considered such as start-up time depending on outage duration, minimum operation time, and minimum load or peaking capability. For calculation purposes, the following parameters are necessary to know in order to be able to economically evaluate changes in the start-up process: ramp up and down rate, time of start time reduction, fuel mass flow during start, electricity production during start, variable cost of start-up process, cost and charges for life time consumption for each start and start type, remuneration during start up time regarding

  18. Emotion work within eldercare and depressive symptoms: A cross-sectional multi-level study assessing the association between externally observed emotion work and self-reported depressive symptoms among Danish eldercare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Louise M; Jorgensen, Anette F B; Thomsen, Birthe L; Albertsen, Karen; Greiner, Birgit A; Rugulies, Reiner

    2016-10-01

    Danish professional caregivers have high rates of depressive symptoms. One proposed cause is exposure to emotion work. However, emotion work is usually measured by self-report which may bias results. The objective of this study was to examine the association of emotion work, externally observed at the workplace, with self-reported depressive symptoms of professional caregivers. The study was a cross-sectional observational study. Data was collected by 9 observers who assessed emotion work stressors and emotion work resources in 124 individual professional caregivers working in 56 work units across 10 eldercare homes. Emotion work stressors were defined as i) barriers for empathetic care, ii) taxing aggressive events, and iii) taxing non-aggressive events. Emotion work resources were defined as i) meaningful events, and ii) social interactions between professional caregivers and residents. Depressive symptoms were measured by a questionnaire sent to all professional caregivers at the 10 eldercare homes. We constructed two samples for analysis: a) a sample of 95 directly observed professional caregivers with full information on covariates, and b) a sample of 205 observed and non-observed professional caregivers with full information on covariates working in one of the 56 observed work units. Using multilevel regression models we analysed associations of individual and work unit averaged levels of emotion work with depressive symptoms among professional caregivers. None of the three emotion work stressors were associated with depressive symptoms. Of the two emotion work resources, a high amount of social interactions between professional caregivers and residents were, contrary to expectations, related to higher levels of depressive symptoms at both the individual level and the work unit averaged level. The unexpected association between social interactions and depressive symptoms need to be replicated in future studies. These future studies should also investigate

  19. Assessment of health level and socio-economic characteristics of people working in the shipbuilding industry: a control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouri, Agoritsa; Roupa, Zoe; Sarafis, Pavlos; Hatzoglou, Chryssi; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos

    2014-10-09

    The health level of the population and the way people perceive it has been associated with their physical and mental health, as well as with their social and occupational characteristics. The comparative assessment of mental and health level in shipbuilding industry workers and general population and its relationship to social and economic parameters. A group of one hundred men working in the shipbuilding industry aged 51.8±8.2 years old and a control group of one hundred men of the general population aged 51.1±6.4 were studied. All participants completed the General Health Questionnaire - 28 and Fagerstrom test and a form with demographic, occupational and economic status characteristics. The statistical software SPSS 17.0 was used for data analysis. Twenty-six percent of the general population and 47% of men working in the shipbuilding industry assessed their health as moderate/poor. Higher median values of anxiety and depressive symptomatology were observed in individuals characterizing their health as moderate/poor (pshipbuilding industry, non-active employees and those with comorbidities were found more burdened in relation to the general population (p<0.05). Depressive disorders were more common in those stating that their economic situation had been significantly deteriorated and in individuals with chronic diseases, which also showed reduced social functioning (p<0.05). Health level and its individual dimensions are both associated with health self-assessment and occupational and economic status. The coexistence of chronic diseases and smoking dependence affects emotion and social functioning of individuals.

  20. Preparing master-level mental health nurses to work within a wellness paradigm: Findings from the eMenthe project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Louise; Ellilä, Heikki; Jormfeldt, Henrika; Lahti, Mari; Higgins, Agnes; Keogh, Brian; Meade, Oonagh; Sitvast, Jan; Skärsäter, Ingela; Stickley, Theo; Kilkku, Nina

    2017-08-07

    Mental health promotion remains an important component of mental health nursing practice. Supporting wellness at both the individual and societal levels has been identified as one of the key tenets of mental health promotion. However, the prevailing biomedical paradigm of mental health education and practice has meant that many nurses have not been equipped to incorporate a wellness perspective into their mental health practice. In the present study, we report on an exploratory study which details the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required by master-level mental health nurses to practice within a wellness paradigm from the perspective of three groups of key stakeholders: (i) service users and family members (n = 23); (ii) experienced mental health nurses (n = 49); and (iii) master-level mental health nursing students (n = 37). The findings, which were reported from individual and focus group interviews across five European countries, suggested a need to reorientate mental health nursing education to include a focus on wellness and resilience to equip mental health nurses with the skills to work within a strengths-based, rather than a deficits-based, model of mental health practice. Key challenges to working within a wellness paradigm were identified as the prevailing dominance of the biomedical model of cause and treatment of mental health problems, which focusses on symptoms, rather than the holistic functioning of the individual, and positions the person as passive in the nurse-service user relationship. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  1. The working time – various developments of the meaning of working time at the European Union level from a Romanian labor relations’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminița Dima

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The working time is defined by the European Directive concerning certain aspects of the organisation of working time. The meaning of ‘working time’ and applicability of the Directive’s requirements was further clarified by the Court of Justice of the European Union in its case law, with respect to various situations such as: working time of the employees who perform work on call, working time of the foresters who are provided with tied accommodation within the range of forest within their purview and qualification of the time spent by workers when travelling from home to work. Over the past years such cases have been more often met in the employment relationships in Romania, especially as regards work on call and mobile employees. Since there are no specific legal provisions to clarify the legal regime applicable to such situations, whether and in which circumstances they represent working time and the corresponding rights and obligations of the respective employees, the study aims to analyse such situations from the perspective of the Romanian labour relations by comparing the European legislation and case law with the Romanian national legislation in view of finding some specific answers useful for the interpretation and application of the Romanian legislation in such specific cases.

  2. Platelet cold agglutinins and thrombocytopenia: A diagnostic dilemma in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TV Bharath Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of pseudo-thrombocytopenia due to cold agglutinins against platelets. These cold agglutinins were the cause for diagnostic confusion and resulted in extensive workup and unnecessary therapeutic precautions. A thirty two year old female with Guillain-Barre syndrome was admitted in the ICU and serial work-up showed markedly low levels of platelets. The patient had no symptoms of bleeding and patient was investigated extensively for deciphering the etiology of low platelet count. In-vitro clumping of platelets was suspected and in-vitro studies showed marked clumping of platelets with ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid, citrate and heparinized samples. The manual platelet count was found to be within normal limits. Thrombocytopenia as a result of platelet cold agglutinins is a rare cause of in-vitro low platelet counts. No clinical problems have been reported due to the same.

  3. Cutaneous microvascular response during local cold exposure - the effect of female sex hormones and cold perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankar, Ksenija; Music, Mark; Finderle, Zare

    2016-11-01

    It is generally known that differences exist between males and females with regard to sensitivity to cold. Similar differences even among females in different hormonal balance might influence microvascular response during cold provocation testing. The aim of the present study was to measure sex hormone levels, cold and cold pain perception thresholds and compare them to cutaneous laser-Doppler flux response during local cooling in both the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. In the luteal phase a more pronounced decrease in laser-Doppler flux was observed compared to follicular phase during local cooling at 15°C (significant difference by Dunnett's test, p<0.05). In addition, statistically significant correlations between progesterone level and laser-Doppler flux response to local cooling were observed during the follicular (R=-0.552, p=0.0174) and during the luteal phases (R=0.520, p=0.0271). In contrast, the correlation between estradiol level and laser-Doppler flux response was observed only in the follicular phase (R=-0.506, p=0.0324). Our results show that individual sensitivity to cold influences cutaneous microvascular response to local cooling; that microvascular reactivity is more pronounced during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle; and that reactivity correlates with hormone levels. The effect of specific sex hormone levels is related to the cold-provocation temperature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The Cold man. A clinical case of the cold sensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Settineri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The lack of correlation between available knowledge and the current approach to Somatoform Disorders is highlighted.. Methods: the study, via the analysis of an unusual clinical case of an anomalous sensation of cold, examines various hypotheses on the physiopathology of somatization. Conclusions: a conceptualization would focus attention on the level of patients’ preoccupation with their symptoms, on the anomalies of the variations of perceptions and on patients’ hyperarousal. It could lead to a more harmonious position in psychiatry, between anthropologically-based understanding and interpretation of psychophysical information.

  5. PHYSIOLOGICAL AND LEUKOCYTE SUBSET RESPONSES TO EXERCISE AND COLD EXPOSURE IN COLD-ACCLIMATIZED SKATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated physiological responses and changes in circulating immune cells following exercise in cold and thermoneutral conditions. Participants were short track skaters (n=9 who were acclimatized to cold conditions, and inline skaters (n=10 who were not acclimatized. All skaters were young, and skating at a recreational level three days per week for at least one year. Using a cross-over design, study variables were measured during 60 min of submaximal cycling (65% ·VO2max in cold (ambient temperature: 5±1°C, relative humidity: 41±9% and thermoneutral conditions (ambient temperature: 21±1°C, relative humidity: 35±5%. Heart rate, blood lactate and tympanic temperature were measured at rest, during exercise and recovery. Plasma cortisol, calprotectin and circulating blood cell numbers were measured before and after 60 min of cold or thermoneutral conditions, and during recovery from exercise. Heart rate was lower in both groups during exercise in cold versus thermoneutral conditions (P<0.05. The increase in total leukocytes during recovery was primarily due to an increase in neutrophils in both groups. The cold-acclimatized group activated neutrophils after exercise in cold exposure, whereas the non-acclimatized group activated lymphocyte and cortisol after exercise in cold exposure. Lymphocyte subsets significantly changed in both groups over time during recovery as compared to rest. Immediately after exercise in both groups, CD16+ and CD69+ cells were elevated compared to rest or before exercise in both conditions. Acclimatization to exercise in the cold does not appear to influence exercise-induced immune changes in cold conditions, with the possible exception of neutrophils, lymphocytes and cortisol concentration.

  6. STIR-Physics: Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-02

    STIR-Physics: Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials We worked on a tapered fiber in cold atomic cloud...setup. At the end of this program, we had built the vacuum system, specialized cold atom chamber and were working on the fiber epoxy mount for the...Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Tapered Fibers, Cold atoms , Nonlinear Optics REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR

  7. Level of Motivation Amongst Health Personnel Working in A Tertiary Care Government Hospital of New Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Poonam; Singhal, Ashok K.; Gadpayle, Adesh K.; Sachdeva, Sandeep; Padaria, Rabindra

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To assess the level and factors of motivation amongst permanent government employees working in a tertiary health care institution. Material and Methods: A sample of 200 health personnel (50 in each category) i.e. doctors, nurses, technician, and support staff were contacted through face to face interview. Motivation was measured as the degree to which an individual possessed various identified motivation domains like Drive, Control, Challenge, Relationship and Rewards. Each domain was represented by 4 dimensions- accordingly a closed-ended statement represented each of these dimensions and responses were assessed on a Likert based scale. Data management was done using SPSS, ver. 19. Results: The average age for different health personnel were: Doctors 48.68 (±8.53), nurses 40.72 (±7.76), technician 38.4 (±10.65) and support staff 43.24 (±9.52) years. The average year of work experience was: Doctor 19.09 (±9.77), nurses 17.2 (±8.420), technician 14.84 (±10.45), support staff 18.24 (±10.28). A comparison of overall motivation index (mean score) revealed that nurse had highest level (3.47), followed by support staff (3.46), doctor (3.45) and technician (3.43). Based on their individual mean scores, the healthcare providers were categorised into three different levels of motivation and it was found that majority of the health personnel i.e.70% of support staff, 62% nurse, 56% doctor and technician, had high to very high level of motivation index. The mean scores for all the five factors as well as their respective ranks were also found out and it was deduced that “relationship” assumed first rank for doctors (mean score: 3.71) and technician (mean score: 3.75), whereas “control” assumed greatest significance for nurses (mean score, 3.62) and support staff (mean scores, 3.61). Based upon the mean scores, “reward” assumed third rank among all the four categories. Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to test if the different categories of health

  8. Level of motivation amongst health personnel working in a tertiary care government hospital of new delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Poonam; Singhal, Ashok K; Gadpayle, Adesh K; Sachdeva, Sandeep; Padaria, Rabindra

    2014-10-01

    To assess the level and factors of motivation amongst permanent government employees working in a tertiary health care institution. A sample of 200 health personnel (50 in each category) i.e. doctors, nurses, technician, and support staff were contacted through face to face interview. Motivation was measured as the degree to which an individual possessed various identified motivation domains like Drive, Control, Challenge, Relationship and Rewards. Each domain was represented by 4 dimensions- accordingly a closed-ended statement represented each of these dimensions and responses were assessed on a Likert based scale. Data management was done using SPSS, ver. 19. THE AVERAGE AGE FOR DIFFERENT HEALTH PERSONNEL WERE: Doctors 48.68 (±8.53), nurses 40.72 (±7.76), technician 38.4 (±10.65) and support staff 43.24 (±9.52) years. The average year of work experience was: Doctor 19.09 (±9.77), nurses 17.2 (±8.420), technician 14.84 (±10.45), support staff 18.24 (±10.28). A comparison of overall motivation index (mean score) revealed that nurse had highest level (3.47), followed by support staff (3.46), doctor (3.45) and technician (3.43). Based on their individual mean scores, the healthcare providers were categorised into three different levels of motivation and it was found that majority of the health personnel i.e.70% of support staff, 62% nurse, 56% doctor and technician, had high to very high level of motivation index. The mean scores for all the five factors as well as their respective ranks were also found out and it was deduced that "relationship" assumed first rank for doctors (mean score: 3.71) and technician (mean score: 3.75), whereas "control" assumed greatest significance for nurses (mean score, 3.62) and support staff (mean scores, 3.61). Based upon the mean scores, "reward" assumed third rank among all the four categories. Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to test if the different categories of health personnel varied with respect to five factors of

  9. Level of motivation amongst health personnel working in a Tertiary care Government Hospital of New Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Jaiswal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To assess the level and factors of motivation amongst permanent government employees working in a tertiary health care institution. Material and Methods: A sample of 200 health personnel (50 in each category i.e. doctors, nurses, technician, and support staff were contacted through face to face interview. Motivation was measured as the degree to which an individual possessed various identified motivation domains like Drive, Control, Challenge, Relationship and Rewards. Each domain was represented by 4 dimensions- accordingly a closed-ended statement represented each of these dimensions and responses were assessed on a Likert based scale. Data management was done using SPSS, ver. 19. Results: The average age for different health personnel were: Doctors 48.68 (±8.53, nurses 40.72 (±7.76, technician 38.4 (±10.65 and support staff 43.24 (±9.52 years. The average year of work experience was: Doctor 19.09 (±9.77, nurses 17.2 (±8.420, technician 14.84 (±10.45, support staff 18.24 (±10.28. A comparison of overall motivation index (mean score revealed that nurse had highest level (3.47, followed by support staff (3.46, doctor (3.45 and technician (3.43. Based on their individual mean scores, the healthcare providers were categorised into three different levels of motivation and it was found that majority of the health personnel i.e.70% of support staff, 62% nurse, 56% doctor and technician, had high to very high level of motivation index. The mean scores for all the five factors as well as their respective ranks were also found out and it was deduced that "relationship" assumed first rank for doctors (mean score: 3.71 and technician (mean score: 3.75, whereas "control" assumed greatest significance for nurses (mean score, 3.62 and support staff (mean scores, 3.61. Based upon the mean scores, "reward" assumed third rank among all the four categories. Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to test if the different categories of health personnel

  10. Fast learning of simple perceptual discriminations reduces brain activation in working memory and in high-level auditory regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daikhin, Luba; Ahissar, Merav

    2015-07-01

    Introducing simple stimulus regularities facilitates learning of both simple and complex tasks. This facilitation may reflect an implicit change in the strategies used to solve the task when successful predictions regarding incoming stimuli can be formed. We studied the modifications in brain activity associated with fast perceptual learning based on regularity detection. We administered a two-tone frequency discrimination task and measured brain activation (fMRI) under two conditions: with and without a repeated reference tone. Although participants could not explicitly tell the difference between these two conditions, the introduced regularity affected both performance and the pattern of brain activation. The "No-Reference" condition induced a larger activation in frontoparietal areas known to be part of the working memory network. However, only the condition with a reference showed fast learning, which was accompanied by a reduction of activity in two regions: the left intraparietal area, involved in stimulus retention, and the posterior superior-temporal area, involved in representing auditory regularities. We propose that this joint reduction reflects a reduction in the need for online storage of the compared tones. We further suggest that this change reflects an implicit strategic shift "backwards" from reliance mainly on working memory networks in the "No-Reference" condition to increased reliance on detected regularities stored in high-level auditory networks.

  11. The effects of exercise reminder software program on office workers' perceived pain level, work performance and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmak, A; Bumin, G; Irmak, R

    2012-01-01

    In direct proportion to current technological developments, both the computer usage in the workplaces is increased and requirement of leaving the desk for an office worker in order to photocopy a document, send or receive an e-mail is decreased. Therefore, office workers stay in the same postures accompanied by long periods of keyboard usage. In recent years, with intent to reduce the incidence of work related musculoskeletal disorders several exercise reminder software programs have been developed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the exercise reminder software program on office workers' perceived pain level, work performance and quality of life. 39 healthy office workers accepted to attend the study. Participants were randomly split in to two groups, control group (n = 19) and intervention group (n = 20). Visual Analogue Scale to evaluate the perceived pain was administered all of the participants in the beginning and at the end of the study. The intervention group used the program for 10 weeks. Findings showed that the control group VAS scores remained the same, but the intervention group VAS scores decreased in a statistically significant way (p software programs may help to reduce perceived pain among office workers. Further long term studies with more subjects are needed to describe the effects of these programs and the mechanism under these effects.

  12. A multilevel analysis of the demands-control model: Is stress at work determined by factors at the group level or the individual level?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, N.W.; Snijders, T.A.B.

    2000-01-01

    This study explored the extent to which negative health-related outcomes are associated with differences between work groups and with differences between individuals within work groups using R. A. Karasek's (1979) demands-control model. The sample consisted of 260 employees in 31 working groups of a

  13. EFSPI/PSI working group on data sharing: accessing and working with pharmaceutical clinical trial patient level datasets – a primer for academic researchers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sudlow, Rebecca; Branson, Janice; Friede, Tim; Morgan, David; Whately-Smith, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Access to patient level datasets from clinical trial sponsors continues to be an important topic for the Pharmaceutical Industry as well as academic institutions and researchers...

  14. The effect of repeated measurements and working memory on the most comfortable level in the ANL test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, K Jonas; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Holm, Lucas; Kastberg, Tobias; Ibertsson, Tina

    2014-11-01

    To study the effect of a large number of repetitions on the most comfortable level (MCL) when doing the acceptable noise level (ANL) test, and explore if MCL variability is related to central cognitive processes. Twelve MCL repetitions were measured within the ANL test using interleaved methodology during one session using a non-semantic version. Phonological (PWM) and visuospatial working memory (VSWM) was measured. Thirty-two normal-hearing adults. Repeated measures ANOVA, intraclass correlations, and the coefficient of repeatability (CR) were used to assess the repeatability. Repeated measures ANOVA and CR indicated poor agreement between the two first repetitions. After excluding the first repetition, analyses showed that the MCL in the ANL test is reliable. A negative association was found between PWM and MCL variability indicating that subjects with higher PWM show less variability. The findings suggest that, after excluding the first repetition, the MCL in the ANL test is reliable. A single repetition of the MCL in the ANL test should be avoided. If an interleaved methodology is used, a single ANL repetition should be added prior to the actual testing. The findings also suggest that MCL variability is associated to PWM but not VSWM.

  15. Placement Work Experience May Mitigate Lower Achievement Levels of Black and Asian vs. White Students at University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Elisabeth; Birdi, Gurkiran K; Higson, Helen E

    2017-01-01

    Ethnic minority groups have been shown to obtain poorer final year degree outcomes than their majority group counterparts in countries including the United States, the United Kingdom and The Netherlands. Obtaining a lower degree classification may limit future employment prospects of graduates as well as opportunities for higher level study. To further investigate this achievement gap, we analyzed performance levels across three academic years of study of 3,051 Black, Asian and White students from a United Kingdom University. Analyses of covariance investigated effects of ethnicity and work placement experience (internships) on first, second and final year marks, whilst statistically controlling for a number of factors thought to influence achievement, including prior academic performance. Results demonstrated superior achievement of White students consistently across all years of study. Placement experience reduced, but did not eliminate, the size of the achievement gap exhibited by final year students. Sex, parental education and socioeconomic status had no significant main effects. Female students showed a more complex pattern of results than males, with Black females not showing the same final year uplift in marks as their Asian and White counterparts. Implications and possible explanations are discussed.

  16. Flange Curling in Cold Formed Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Ramonas, Gediminas

    2012-01-01

    The non-linear flange curling phenomenon in cold formed profiles is the tendency of slender flanges to deform towards the neutral axis for increasing flexural curvature. Based on Braziers work, Winter proposed a simple engineering formula for determination of the local flange deformation towards...

  17. Cold regions isotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids. (TFD)

  18. A Review on Cold Start of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmin Wan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Successful and rapid startup of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs at subfreezing temperatures (also called cold start is of great importance for their commercialization in automotive and portable devices. In order to maintain good proton conductivity, the water content in the membrane must be kept at a certain level to ensure that the membrane remains fully hydrated. However, the water in the pores of the catalyst layer (CL, gas diffusion layer (GDL and the membrane may freeze once the cell temperature decreases below the freezing point (Tf. Thus, methods which could enable the fuel cell startup without or with slight performance degradation at subfreezing temperature need to be studied. This paper presents an extensive review on cold start of PEMFCs, including the state and phase changes of water in PEMFCs, impacts of water freezing on PEMFCs, numerical and experimental studies on PEMFCs, and cold start strategies. The impacts on each component of the fuel cell are discussed in detail. Related numerical and experimental work is also discussed. It should be mentioned that the cold start strategies, especially the enumerated patents, are of great reference value on the practical cold start process.

  19. Using Satellite Observations to Infer the Relationship Between Cold Pools and Subsequent Convection Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaesser, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Cold pools are increasingly being recognized as important players in the evolution of both shallow and deep convection; hence, the incorporation of cold pool processes into a number of recently developed convective parameterizations. Unfortunately, observations serving to inform cold pool parameterization development are limited to select field programs and limited radar domains. However, a number of recent studies have noted that cold pools are often associated with arcs-lines of shallow clouds traversing 10 100 km in visible satellite imagery. Boundary layer thermodynamic perturbations are plausible at such scales, coincident with such mesoscale features. Atmospheric signatures of features at these spatial scales are potentially observable from satellites. In this presentation, we discuss recent work that uses multi-sensor, high-resolution satellite products for observing mesoscale wind vector fluctuations and boundary layer temperature depressions attributed to cold pools produced by antecedent convection. The relationship to subsequent convection as well as convective system longevity is discussed. As improvements in satellite technology occur and efforts to reduce noise in high-resolution orbital products progress, satellite pixel level (10 km) thermodynamic and dynamic (e.g. mesoscale convergence) parameters can increasingly serve as useful benchmarks for constraining convective parameterization development, including for regimes where organized convection contributes substantially to the cloud and rainfall climatology.

  20. Commemoration of a cold war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farbøl, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    and heritage sites as case studies, this article sheds new light on the politics of history involved in Cold War commemoration. It suggests that the Cold War is commemorated as a war, yet this war memory is of a particular kind: it is a war memory without victims.......This article brings together the fields of Cold War studies and memory studies. In Denmark, a remarkable institutionalisation of Cold War memory has taken place in the midst of a heated ideological battle over the past and whether to remember the Cold War as a ‘war’. Using Danish Cold War museums...

  1. Low back pain among mineworkers in relation to driving, cold environment and ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skandfer, Morten; Talykova, Ljudmila; Brenn, Tormod; Nilsson, Tohr; Vaktskjold, Arild

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study the association between low back pain (LBP) and exposure to low temperature, wet clothes, heavy lifting and jobs that involve whole body vibration (WBV) in a population of miners. Health and personal data were collected in a population study by a questionnaire. A total of 3530 workers from four mines participated in the study. 51% of the workers reported LBP within the last 12 months. The adjusted odds ratio for LBP was above unity for working with wet clothes (1.82), working in cold conditions (1.52), lifting heavy (1.54), having worked as a driver previously (1.79) and driving Toro400 (2.61) or train (1.69). Wet clothing, cold working conditions, heavy lifting, previous work as a driver and driving certain vehicles were associated with LBP, but vehicles with WBV levels above action value were not. For better prevention of LBP, improved cabin conditions and clothing should be emphasised. To address risk factors for low back pain (LBP) in miners, a population study measured exposures and LBP. Cold work conditions, wet clothes and awkward postures appeared to be more strongly associated with LBP than exposure to whole body vibration from driving heavy vehicles. Prevention strategies must focus more on clothing and ergonomics.

  2. Building America Case Study: Retrofitting a 1960s Split-Level, Cold-Climate Home, Westport, Connecticut; Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-08-01

    ??National programs such as Home Performance with ENERGY STAR(R) and numerous other utility air sealing programs have brought awareness to homeowners of the benefits of energy efficiency retrofits. Yet, these programs tend to focus on the low-hanging fruit: air-sealing the thermal envelope and ductwork where accessible, switch to efficient lighting, and low-flow fixtures. At the other end of the spectrum, deep-energy retrofit programs are also being encouraged by various utilities across the country. While deep energy retrofits typically seek 50% energy savings, they are often quite costly and most applicable to gut-rehab projects. A significant potential for lowering energy usage in existing homes lies between the low hanging fruit and deep energy retrofit approaches - retrofits that save approximately 30% in energy over the existing conditions. A key is to be non-intrusive with the efficiency measures so the retrofit projects can be accomplished in occupied homes. This cold climate retrofit project involved the design and optimization of a home in Connecticut that sought to improve energy savings by at least 30% (excluding solar PV) over the existing home's performance. This report documents the successful implementation of a cost-effective solution package that achieved performance greater than 30% over the pre-retrofit - what worked, what did not, and what improvements could be made. Confirmation of successfully achieving 30% source energy savings over the pre-existing conditions was confirmed through energy modeling and comparison of the utility bills pre- and post- retrofit.

  3. Two cold-season derechoes in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzen, Christoph; Púčik, Tomas; Ryva, David

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we apply for the first time the definition of a derecho (Johns and Hirt, 1987) to European cold-season convective storm systems. These occurred on 18 January 2007 and 1 March 2008, respectively, and they are shown to fulfill the criteria of a derecho. Damaging winds were reported over a distance of 1500 km and locally reached F3 intensity. Synoptic analysis for the events reveal strongly forced situations that have been described for cold-season derechoes in the United States. A comparison of swaths of damaging winds, radar structures, detected lightning, cold pool development, and cloud-top temperatures indicates that both derechoes formed along cold fronts that were affected by strong quasi-geostrophic forcing. It seems that the overlap of the cold front position with the strong differential cyclonic vorticity advection at the cyclonic flank of mid-level jet streaks favoured intense convection and high winds. The movement and path width of the two derechoes seemed to be related to this overlap. The wind gust intensity that was also different for both events is discussed and could be related to the component of the mid-level winds perpendicular to the gust fronts.

  4. Detection of cold pain, cold allodynia and cold hyperalgesia in freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Clifford J

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is elicited by cold, and a major feature of many neuropathic pain states is that normally innocuous cool stimuli begin to produce pain (cold allodynia. To expand our understanding of cold induced pain states we have studied cold pain behaviors over a range of temperatures in several animal models of chronic pain. Results We demonstrate that a Peltier-cooled cold plate with ± 1°C sensitivity enables quantitative measurement of a detection withdrawal response to cold stimuli in unrestrained rats. In naïve rats the threshold for eliciting cold pain behavior is 5°C. The withdrawal threshold for cold allodynia is 15°C in both the spared nerve injury and spinal nerve ligation models of neuropathic pain. Cold hyperalgesia is present in the spared nerve injury model animals, manifesting as a reduced latency of withdrawal response threshold at temperatures that elicit cold pain in naïve rats. We also show that following the peripheral inflammation produced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, a hypersensitivity to cold occurs. Conclusion The peltier-cooled provides an effective means of assaying cold sensitivity in unrestrained rats. Behavioral testing of cold allodynia, hyperalgesia and pain will greatly facilitate the study of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in cold/cool sensations and enable measurement of the efficacy of pharmacological treatments to reduce these symptoms.

  5. Preventing Work-Related Musculoskeletal Illnesses Through Ergonomics: The Air Force PREMIER Program, Volume 4B: Research Report For Level I Ergonomics Methodology Guide For Maintenance/Inspection Work Areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barker, Richard

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the results of a pilot test to assess the reliability, sensitivity, validity, and practicality of the Level I Ergonomics Assessment Methodology Guide for Maintenance/Inspection Work Areas...

  6. Heating up cold agglutinins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Marvin J

    2010-10-28

    In this issue of Blood, Berentsen and coworkers describe a high response rate which is durable in some patients who receive combination fludarabine and rituximab for chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD). If confirmed, this is a significant advance in therapy for a frequently difficult clinical problem.

  7. Recent Cold War Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  8. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D [Stuart, FL; Sanders, Stuart A [Palm Beach Gardens, FL

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  9. Cold Regions Environmental Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-03

    MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Test Business Management Division (TEDT-TMB) US Army Developmental...losses in dry air, decreased thirst, cold-induced diuresis , and conscious under-drinking. 12 TOP 1-1-017 03 February 2009 4.4 Shelter. A

  10. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one…

  11. Cold resistance depends on acclimation and behavioral caste in a temperate ant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modlmeier, Andreas P.; Pamminger, Tobias; Foitzik, Susanne; Scharf, Inon

    2012-10-01

    Adjusting to low temperatures is important for animals living in cold environments. We studied the chill-coma recovery time in temperate ant workers ( Temnothorax nylanderi) from colonies collected in autumn and spring in Germany. We experimentally acclimated these ant colonies to cold temperatures followed by warm temperatures. As expected, cold-acclimated workers recovered faster from freezing temperatures, but subsequent heat acclimation did not change the short recovery times observed after cold acclimation. Hence, either heat acclimation improves cold tolerance, possibly as a general response to stress, or at least it does not negate enhanced cold tolerance following cold acclimation. Colonies collected in spring showed similar cold tolerance levels to cold-acclimated colonies in the laboratory. Next, we compared the chill-coma recovery time of different worker castes and found that exterior workers recovered faster than interior workers. This difference may be related to their more frequent exposure to cold, higher activity level, or distinct physiology. Interior workers were also heavier and showed a higher gaster-to-head ratio and thorax ratio compared to exterior workers. An obvious difference between exterior and interior workers is activity level, but we found no link between activity and cold tolerance. This suggests that physiology rather than behavioral differences could cause the increased cold tolerance of exterior workers. Our study reveals the importance of acclimation for cold tolerance under natural and standardized conditions and demonstrates differences in cold tolerance and body dimensions in monomorphic behavioral castes of an ant.

  12. Physical activity level at work and risk of chronic low back pain: A follow-up in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuch, Ingrid; Heuch, Ivar; Hagen, Knut; Zwart, John-Anker

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity in leisure time seems to reduce the risk of low back pain, but it is not known whether occupational activity, as recorded in a representative working population, produces a higher or lower risk. To study associations between physical activity level at work and risk of chronic low back pain. Associations were examined in a Norwegian prospective study using data from the HUNT2 and HUNT3 surveys carried out in the whole county of Nord-Trøndelag. Participants were 7580 women and 7335 men who supplied information about physical activity level at work. Levels considered were sedentary work, work involving walking but no heavy lifting, work involving walking and heavy lifting, and particularly strenuous physical work. Nobody in the cohort was affected by chronic low back pain at baseline. After 11 years, participants reported whether they suffered from chronic low back pain. Generalized linear modelling with adjustment for potential confounders was applied to assess associations with risk factors. In age-adjusted analyses both women and men showed statistically significant associations between physical activity at work and risk of chronic low back pain, suggesting positive relationships. For particularly strenuous physical work the relative risk of chronic low back pain was 1.30 (95% CI: 1.00-1.71) in women and 1.36 (95% CI 1.17-1.59) in men, compared to sedentary work. Women still showed a general association with activity level after adjustment for education, leisure time physical activity, BMI, smoking and occupational category. In men, the higher risk was only maintained for particularly strenuous work. In this cohort, women had a higher risk of chronic low back pain with work involving walking and heavy lifting or particularly strenuous work, compared to sedentary work. Men participating in particularly strenuous work also experienced a higher risk of chronic low back pain.

  13. Regulatory networks in pollen development under cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Dev Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cold stress modifies anthers’ metabolic pathways to induce pollen sterility. Cold-tolerant plants, unlike the susceptible ones, produce high proportion of viable pollen. Anthers in susceptible plants, when exposed to cold stress, increase abscisic acid (ABA metabolism and reduce ABA catabolism. Increased ABA negatively regulates expression of tapetum cell wall bound invertase and monosaccharide transport genes resulting in distorted carbohydrate pool in anther. Cold-stress also reduces endogenous levels of the bioactive gibberellins (GAs, GA4 and GA7, in susceptible anthers by repression of the GA biosynthesis genes. Here we discuss recent findings on mechanisms of cold susceptibility in anthers which determine pollen sterility. We also discuss differences in regulatory pathways between cold-stressed anthers of susceptible and tolerant plants that decide pollen sterility or viability.

  14. A REVIEW OF THE PRACTICE OF WORK-BASED LEARNING (WBL AT HIGHER EDUCATION LEVEL IN THE UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Talbot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to review the practice of work-based learning (WBL, based on the experience of higher education institutions in the United Kingdom.Methods. The methods of system and comparative analysis, synthesis and generalization are used.Results. The background and development of WBL is given; the importance and value of this form of education in the modern, rapidly changing society is shown. The main characteristics are selected and basic aspects of WBL programs profitable different from traditional university programs are designated: relevance to real production processes; student centricity; flexibility of content which is built proceeding from interests of an employer and a student; high extent of integration of various disciplines and fields of knowledge; recognition of the prior certified and independent training; optimization of time expenditure; possibility of the choice of the place of training, its sequence, schedule of control actions, and other advantages. Options of a program implementation of WBL, complexity of their implementation and methods of their overcoming are described. A few critical remarks concerning WBL programs are also presented.Scientific novelty. For the first time the analytical review of WBL practice at a higher education level, which is widespread in English-speaking countries over the last 25 years, is presented in the Russian scientific literature in education.Practical significance. The materials provided in the article can be useful to heads and teachers of institutions of higher education; methodologists of structures of vocational preparation and advanced training of personnel of high technology productions; the employers heading large-scale industries and interested in upgrading of employees’ educational level.

  15. Short-term sleep deprivation impairs spatial working memory and modulates expression levels of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Meilan; Yan, Jie; He, Chao; Yang, Li; Tan, Gang; Li, Chao; Hu, Zhian; Wang, Jiali

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning memory is sensitive to sleep deprivation (SD). Although the ionotropic glutamate receptors play a vital role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory, however, whether the expression of these receptor subunits is modulated by sleep loss remains unclear. In the present study, western blotting was performed by probing with specific antibodies against the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and against the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B. In hippocampus, down regulation of surface GluA1 and GluN2A surface expression were observed in both SD groups. However, surface expression level of GluA2, GluA3, GluN1 and GluN2B was significantly up-regulated in 8h-SD rats when compared to the 4h-SD rats. In parallel with the complex changes in AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit expressions, we found the 8h-SD impaired rat spatial working memory in 30-s-delay T-maze task, whereas no impairment of spatial learning was observed in 4h-SD rats. These results indicate that sleep loss alters the relative expression levels of the AMPA and NMDA receptors, thus affects the synaptic strength and capacity for plasticity and partially contributes to spatial memory impairment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Physiological and leukocyte subset responses to exercise and cold exposure in cold-acclimatized skaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Suzuki, K; Peake, J; Ahn, N; Ogawa, K; Hong, Ch; Kim, S; Lee, I; Park, J

    2014-03-01

    We investigated physiological responses and changes in circulating immune cells following exercise in cold and thermoneutral conditions. Participants were short track skaters (n=9) who were acclimatized to cold conditions, and inline skaters (n=10) who were not acclimatized. All skaters were young, and skating at a recreational level three days per week for at least one year. Using a cross-over design, study variables were measured during 60 min of submaximal cycling (65% [Formula: see text]O2max) in cold (ambient temperature: 5±1°C, relative humidity: 41±9%) and thermoneutral conditions (ambient temperature: 21±1°C, relative humidity: 35±5%). Heart rate, blood lactate and tympanic temperature were measured at rest, during exercise and recovery. Plasma cortisol, calprotectin and circulating blood cell numbers were measured before and after 60 min of cold or thermoneutral conditions, and during recovery from exercise. Heart rate was lower in both groups during exercise in cold versus thermoneutral conditions (Pcold-acclimatized group activated neutrophils after exercise in cold exposure, whereas the non-acclimatized group activated lymphocyte and cortisol after exercise in cold exposure. Lymphocyte subsets significantly changed in both groups over time during recovery as compared to rest. Immediately after exercise in both groups, CD16+ and CD69+ cells were elevated compared to rest or before exercise in both conditions. Acclimatization to exercise in the cold does not appear to influence exercise-induced immune changes in cold conditions, with the possible exception of neutrophils, lymphocytes and cortisol concentration.

  17. Metallization of Various Polymers by Cold Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hanqing; Chu, Xin; Vo, Phuong; Yue, Stephen

    2017-11-01

    Previous results have shown that metallic coatings can be successfully cold sprayed onto polymeric substrates. This paper studies the cold sprayability of various metal powders on different polymeric substrates. Five different substrates were used, including carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyether ether ketone (PEEK), polyethylenimine (PEI); mild steel was also used as a benchmark substrate. The CFRP used in this work has a thermosetting matrix, and the ABS, PEEK and PEI are all thermoplastic polymers, with different glass transition temperatures as well as a number of distinct mechanical properties. Three metal powders, tin, copper and iron, were cold sprayed with both a low-pressure system and a high-pressure system at various conditions. In general, cold spray on the thermoplastic polymers rendered more positive results than the thermosetting polymers, due to the local thermal softening mechanism in the thermoplastics. Thick copper coatings were successfully deposited on PEEK and PEI. Based on the results, a method is proposed to determine the feasibility and deposition window of cold spraying specific metal powder/polymeric substrate combinations.

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  19. Optical Estimation on Pollution Level of Respirable Dust Based on Infrared Transmitting Behavior in Coalmine Fully Mechanized Working Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Zheng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Respirable coal particle generated during underground mining is the main cause for gas-dust explosions and coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP which needs accurate monitoring especially on its concentration. Focusing on the coal dust pollution in the fully mechanized working face of Huangbaici coalmine, coal particle was sampled for further industrial analysis and FT-IR test to obtain its chemical composition and optical constant. Combined with the simulated spatial distribution of airborne dust, the spectral transmission characteristics of coal dust within wavelengths of 2.5 to 25 μm under different operating conditions were obtained. The simulation results show that the transmittance and aerosol optical depth (AOD of coal dust are closely linked and obviously influenced by the variation of dust generation source (intensity of dust release, position of coal cutting, and the wetting of the coal seam and airflow field (wind speed and direction of ventilation. Furthermore, an optical channel of 1260–1280 cm−1 (7.937–7.813 μm which is almost only sensitive to the variation of dust concentration but dull to the diameter change of coal dust was selected to establish the correlation of dust concentration and infrared transmittance. The fitting curve was then applied to retrieve the equivalent dust concentration based on optical information, and the comparison results demonstrate that the estimated pollution level is consistent with field measurement data in engineering practice.

  20. Attention, working memory, and phenomenal experience of WM content: memory levels determined by different types of top-down modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jane; Jacobs, Christianne; Silvanto, Juha

    2015-01-01

    What is the role of top-down attentional modulation in consciously accessing working memory (WM) content? In influential WM models, information can exist in different states, determined by allocation of attention; placing the original memory representation in the center of focused attention gives rise to conscious access. Here we discuss various lines of evidence indicating that such attentional modulation is not sufficient for memory content to be phenomenally experienced. We propose that, in addition to attentional modulation of the memory representation, another type of top-down modulation is required: suppression of all incoming visual information, via inhibition of early visual cortex. In this view, there are three distinct memory levels, as a function of the top-down control associated with them: (1) Nonattended, nonconscious associated with no attentional modulation; (2) attended, phenomenally nonconscious memory, associated with attentional enhancement of the actual memory trace; (3) attended, phenomenally conscious memory content, associated with enhancement of the memory trace and top-down suppression of all incoming visual input.

  1. Cold chain status at immunisation centres in Ethiopia | Berhane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Child immunisation is among the most cost-effective ways of preventing premature child deaths, and the potency of vaccines, crucial for vaccine efficacy, is dependent on effective management of the cold chain at all levels of vaccine handling. Objective: To assess the status of the cold chain at peripheral ...

  2. Characterization of Medicago populations under cold acclimation by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Medicago populations under cold acclimation by morphological traits and microsatellite (SSR) markers. ... altitude (lower ability to cold acclimation). Tests differentiation between species by fisher pair indicates that all species were different from each other. Results show the highest level of homozygosity ...

  3. Allergic rhinitis and the common cold high cost to society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hellgren, J; Cervin, A; Nordling, S; Bergman, A; Cardell, L. O

    2010-01-01

    ...:  The common cold and allergic rhinitis constitute a global health problem that affects social life, sleep, school and work performance and is likely to impose a substantial economic burden on society...

  4. Trainability of cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Stoop, M.

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral cold injuries are often reported in mountaineers. Not only low ambient temperatures, but also the hypobaric circumstances are known to be major environmental risk factors. When the fingers are exposed to extreme cold for several minutes, cold induced vasodilation (CIVD) occurs, that is

  5. EFSPI/PSI working group on data sharing: accessing and working with pharmaceutical clinical trial patient level datasets - a primer for academic researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudlow, Rebecca; Branson, Janice; Friede, Tim; Morgan, David; Whately-Smith, Caroline

    2016-07-08

    Access to patient level datasets from clinical trial sponsors continues to be an important topic for the Pharmaceutical Industry as well as academic institutions and researchers. How to make access to patient level data actually happen raises many questions from the perspective of the researcher. Patient level data access models of all major pharmaceutical companies were surveyed and recommendations made to guide academic researchers in the most efficient way through the process of requesting and accessing patient level data. The key considerations for researchers covered here are finding information; writing a research proposal to request data access; the review process; how data are shared; and the expectations of the data holder. A lot of clinical trial information is available on public registries and so these are great sources of information. Depending on the research proposal the required information may be available in Clinical Study Reports and therefore patient level data may not need to be requested. Many data sharing systems have an electronic form or template but in cases where these are not available the proposal needs to be created as a stand-alone document outlining the purpose, statistical analysis plan, identifying the studies for which data are required, the research team members involved, any conflicts of interest and the funding for the research. There are three main review processes - namely having an internal review board, external review board selected by the data holder or an external review board selected by a third party. Data can be shared through Open access i.e. on a public website, direct sharing between the data holder and the researcher, controlled access or the data holder identifies a contract organization to access the data and perform the analyses on behalf of the researcher. The data that are shared will have accompanying documentation to assist the researcher in understanding the original clinical trial and data collection

  6. Mapping Anomalous Democracies During the Cold War

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    During the Cold War, a number of countries established stable democracies despite low levels of modernization and a relative lack of democratic neighbour countries—factors otherwise consistently related to the endurance of democracy. Meanwhile, the Cold War superpowers often supported autocracies...... of democratic stability. However, so far no-one has attempted to systematically identify deviant democracies before 1989. This research note does so via a large-N analysis of 125 countries during the first part of the third wave of democratization, i.e., in the period 1975-1988. 11 deviant democracies...

  7. Economic evaluations of ergonomic interventions preventing work-related musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review of organizational-level interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan-Taïeb, Hélène; Parent-Lamarche, Annick; Gaillard, Aurélie; Stock, Susan; Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Hong, Quan Nha; Vezina, Michel; Coulibaly, Youssouph; Vézina, Nicole; Berthelette, Diane

    2017-12-08

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) represent a major public health problem and economic burden to employers, workers and health insurance systems. This systematic review had two objectives: (1) to analyze the cost-benefit results of organizational-level ergonomic workplace-based interventions aimed at preventing WMSD, (2) to explore factors related to the implementation process of these interventions (obstacles and facilitating factors) in order to identify whether economic results may be due to a successful or unsuccessful implementation. Systematic review. Studies were searched in eight electronic databases and in reference lists of included studies. Companion papers were identified through backward and forward citation tracking. A quality assessment tool was developed following guidelines available in the literature. An integration of quantitative economic results and qualitative implementation data was conducted following an explanatory sequential design. Out of 189 records, nine studies met selection criteria and were included in our review. Out of nine included studies, grouped into four types of interventions, seven yielded positive economic results, one produced a negative result and one mixed results (negative cost-effectiveness and positive net benefit). However, the level of evidence was limited for the four types of interventions given the quality and the limited number of studies identified. Our review shows that among the nine included studies, negative and mixed economic results were observed when the dose delivered and received by participants was low, when the support from top and/or middle management was limited either due to limited participation of supervisors in training sessions or a lack of financial resources and when adequacy of intervention to workers' needs was low. In studies where economic results were positive, implementation data showed strong support from supervisors and a high rate of employee participation. Studies

  8. A task-level perspective on work engagement: A new approach that helps to differentiate the concepts of engagement and burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Sonnentag

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical paper differentiates work engagement from the burnout concept by using a task-level perspective. Specifically, I argue that work engagement (i.e., the experience of vigor, dedication and absorption, Schaufeli & Bakker, 2004 emerges during the process of working. It does not only differ between persons and does not only fluctuate from one day to the other (or even within the course of a day, but can vary largely between different work tasks. Burnout (and particularly exhaustion as a chronic state does not differ from one work task to the other. I describe task features derived from the job characteristics model (Hackman & Oldham, 1976 as predictors of task-specific work engagement and discuss interaction effects between task features on the one hand and job-level social and personal resources on the other hand. I outline possible avenues for future research and address practical implications, including task design and employee's energy management throughout the workday.

  9. The need to be cold : cold warriors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, L.

    2008-10-15

    This article discussed the changing climate of Ellesmere Island and the adaptation of the Inuit in response to the climate change, with particular reference to Canada's most northern community of Grise Fiord. Because of the changing climate, the vast northern landscape that the Inuit navigated for centuries by reading its subtle signs is becoming warmer, softer, and unpredictable. The geographic history and demographics of Grise Fiord were described. The community's main water supply comes from a glacier which is sinking. The negative impacts of ice shrinkage on this northern community and on the environment were presented. These included more international shipping through the Arctic, more resource exploration, a greater risk of environmental contamination, and reduced habitat for the polar bears and seals that eat, mate, and reproduce on the ice. Climate change impacts on the sea and sea ice were also discussed. Several photographs illustrating the changing climate were presented. The article noted that climate change could destroy the Inuit culture, making climate change an issue of human rights, notably the right to live connected to the land and the right to be cold. It was concluded that in one generation, Inuit were swept up by both a social and an economic upheaval. In one more generation, they will undergo an environmental shift. 13 figs.

  10. How high level of anxiety in Panic Disorder can interfere in working memory? A computer simulation and electrophysiological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giorgio Silva, Luiza Wanick; Aprigio, Danielle; Di Giacomo, Jesse; Gongora, Mariana; Budde, Henning; Bittencourt, Juliana; Cagy, Mauricio; Teixeira, Silmar; Ribeiro, Pedro; de Carvalho, Marcele Regine; Freire, Rafael; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Basile, Luis Fernando; Velasques, Bruna

    2017-12-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is characterized by repeated and unexpected attacks of intense anxiety, which are not restricted to a determined situation or circumstance. The coherence function has been used to investigate the communication among brain structures through the quantitative EEG (qEEG). The objective of this study is to analyze if there is a difference in frontoparietal gamma coherence (GC) between panic disorder patients (PDP) and healthy controls (HC) during the Visual oddball paradigm; and verify if high levels of anxiety (produced by a computer simulation) affect PDP's working memory. Nine PDP (9 female with average age of 48.8, SD: 11.16) and ten HC (1 male and 9 female with average age of 38.2, SD: 13.69) were enrolled in this study. The subjects performed the visual oddball paradigm simultaneously to the EEG record before and after the presentation of computer simulation (CS). A two-way ANOVA was applied to analyze the factors Group and the Moment for each pair of electrodes separately, and another one to analyze the reaction time variable. We verified a F3-P3 GC increased after the CS movie, demonstrating the left hemisphere participation during the anxiety processing. The greater GC in HC observed in the frontal and parietal areas (P3-Pz, F4-F8 and Fp2-F4) points to the participation of these areas with the expected behavior. The greater GC in PDP for F7-F3 and F4-P4 pairs of electrodes assumes that it produces a prejudicial "noise" during information processing, and can be associated to interference on the communication between frontal and parietal areas. This "noise" during information processing is related to PD symptoms, which should be better known in order to develop effective treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  12. WISPy Cold Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Arias, Paola; Goodsell, Mark; Jaeckel, Joerg; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches -- exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques -- can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future.

  13. The impact of employee level and work stress on mental health and GP service use: an analysis of a sample of Australian government employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strazdins Lyndall

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study sought to identify the extent to which employee level and work stressors were associated with mental health problems experienced by Australian government employees, and with their use of primary care services. Methods 806 government employees aged between 40 and 44 years were surveyed as part of an epidemiological study conducted in Australia. Data collected from participants included sociodemographic attributes, physical health, psychological measures and work stressors relating to job control, job demands, job security and skills discretion at work. For 88% of these participants, information on visits made to general practitioners (GPs for the six months before and after their survey interview was obtained from health insurance records. Results When work stress and personal factors were taken into account, men at more junior levels reported better mental health, more positive affect and used fewer GP services. Women at middle-management levels obtained less GP care than their more senior counterparts. Both men and women who reported higher levels of work stress were found to have poorer mental health and well-being. The impact of such stressors on GP service use, however, differed for men and women. Conclusion Measures of work stress and not employee level affect the mental health and well-being of government employees. For governments with responsibility for funding health care services, reducing work stress experienced by their own employees offers potential benefits by improving the health of their workforce and reducing outlays for such services.

  14. An Investigation of Burn-Out Levels of Teachers Working in Elementary and Secondary Educational Institutions and Their Attitudes to Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the burn-out levels of teachers working in elementary and secondary educational institutions and their attitudes and beliefs regarding classroom management are investigated with respect to gender, job seniority, class size and the types of schools they have been working in. This is a survey method research and quantitative…

  15. Marital and Family Satisfaction as a Function of Work-Family Demands and Community Resources: Individual- and Couple-Level Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Andrew J.; Desrochers, Stephan; Kopko, Kimberly; Moen, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    This study uses individual- and couple-level analyses to examine the influence of work-family demands and community resources on marital and family satisfaction within a sample of dual-earner parents with dependent children (N = 260 couples, 520 individuals). Total couple work hours were strongly negatively associated with marital satisfaction for…

  16. Individualism-collectivism as a moderator of the work demands-strains relationship: A cross-level and cross-national examination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, L.Q.; Spector, P.E.; Sanchez, J.I.; Allen, T.D.; Poelmans, S.; Cooper, G.L.; Lapierre, L.M.; O'Driscoll, M.P.; Abarca, N.; Alexandrova, M.; Antoniou, A.S.; Beham, B.; Brough, P.; Çarikçi, I.; Ferreiro, P.; Fraile, G.; Geurts, S.A.E.; Kinnunen, U.; Lu, C.Q.; Lu, L.; Moreno-Velázquez, I.F.; Pagon, M.; Pitariu, H.; Salamatov, V.; Siu, O.L.; Shima, S.; Schulmeyer, M.K.; Tillemann, K.; Widerszal-Bazyl, M.; Woo, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Surveying 6509 managers from 24 countries/geopolitical entities, we tested the process through which individualism–collectivism at the country level relates to employees’ appraisals of and reactions to three types of work demands (i.e., work hours, workload, and organizational constraints). Our

  17. Effects of Performance-Based Financial Incentives on Work Performance: A Study of Technical-Level Employees in the Private Sector in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Vathsala; Dabere, Sampath

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of performance-based financial incentives on work performance. The study hypothesized that the design features of performance-based financial incentive schemes themselves may influence individuals' work performance. For the study, survey methodology was used and 93 technical-level employees…

  18. Reported Levels of Time-Based and Strain-Based Conflict between Work and Family Roles in Europe: A Multilevel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, Nadia

    2009-01-01

    What are the determinants of the "subjective experience" of conflict between work and family roles among dual-earner couples in Europe? Taking a demands-and-resources approach, this study investigates the individual and macro-level factors that generate perceptions of negative spill-over from work to family. Comparative survey data for…

  19. Cold neutron interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaguchi, Masaaki

    2009-10-01

    Neutron interferometry is a powerful technique for studying fundamental physics. A large dimensional interferometer for long wavelength neutrons is extremely important in order to investigate problems of fundamental physics, including tests of quantum measurement theories and searches for non-Newtonian effects of gravitation, since the sensitivity of interferometer depends on the wavelength and the interaction length. Neutron multilayer mirrors enable us to develop the large scale interferometer for long wavelength neutrons. The multilayer mirror is one of the most useful devices in cold neutron optics. A multilayer of two materials with different potentials is understood as a one-dimensional crystal, which is suitable for Bragg reflection of long wavelength neutrons. Cold and very cold neutrons can be utilized for the interferometer by using the multilayer mirrors with the proper lattice constants. Jamin-type interferometer by using beam splitting etalons (BSEs) has shown the feasibility of the development of large scale interferometer, which enables us to align the four independent mirrors within required precision. The BSE contains two parallel multilayer mirrors. A couple of the BSEs in the Jamin-type interferometer separates and recombines the two paths spatially. Although the path separation was small at the first test, now we have already demonstrated the interferometer with perfectly separated paths. This has confirmed that the multilayer mirrors cause no serious distortion of wave front to compose a interferometer. Arranging such mirrors, we are capable of establishing even a Mach-Zehnder type with much larger size. The interferometer using supermirrors, which reflects the wide range of the wavelength of neutrons, can increase the neutron counts for high precision measurements. We are planning the experiments using the interferometer both for the very cold neutrons and for the pulsed neutrons including J-PARC.

  20. Dense cold matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavinskiy Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to study cold nuclear matter with the density of neutron star core and even larger in the laboratory experiment is discussed. Special rare kinematical trigger for relativistic ion-ion collisions is proposed for such study. Expected properties of the matter in such unusual conditions and experimental program for its study is discussed. Possible experimental setup and R&D results for position sensitive neutron detector are presented.

  1. The CMS COLD BOX

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is built around a large solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 3.8 Tesla: about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. To run, this superconducting magnet needs to be cooled down to very low temperature with liquid helium. Providing this is the job of a compressor station and the so-called “cold box”.

  2. Clumpy cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  3. Enrichment of mutations in multiple DNA sequences using COLD-PCR in emulsion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Castellanos-Rizaldos

    Full Text Available Multiplex detection of low-level mutant alleles in the presence of wild-type DNA would be useful for several fields of medicine including cancer, pre-natal diagnosis and infectious diseases. COLD-PCR is a recently developed method that enriches low-level mutations during PCR cycling, thus enhancing downstream detection without the need for special reagents or equipment. The approach relies on the differential denaturation of DNA strands which contain Tm-lowering mutations or mismatches, versus 'homo-duplex' wild-type DNA. Enabling multiplex-COLD-PCR that can enrich mutations in several amplicons simultaneously is desirable but technically difficult to accomplish. Here we describe the proof of principle of an emulsion-PCR based approach that demonstrates the feasibility of multiplexed-COLD-PCR within a single tube, using commercially available mutated cell lines. This method works best with short amplicons; therefore, it could potentially be used on highly fragmented samples obtained from biological material or FFPE specimens.Following a multiplex pre-amplification of TP53 exons from genomic DNA, emulsions which incorporate the multiplex product, PCR reagents and primers specific for a given TP53 exon are prepared. Emulsions with different TP53 targets are then combined in a single tube and a fast-COLD-PCR program that gradually ramps up the denaturation temperature over several PCR cycles is applied (temperature-tolerant, TT-fast-eCOLD-PCR. The range of denaturation temperatures applied encompasses the critical denaturation temperature (T(c corresponding to all the amplicons included in the reaction, resulting to a gradual enrichment of mutations within all amplicons encompassed by emulsion.Validation for TT-fast-eCOLD-PCR is provided for TP53 exons 6-9. Using dilutions of mutated cell-line into wild-type DNA, we demonstrate simultaneous mutation enrichment between 7 to 15-fold in all amplicons examined.TT-fast-eCOLD-PCR expands the versatility

  4. Enrichment of mutations in multiple DNA sequences using COLD-PCR in emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Milbury, Coren Audrey; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2012-01-01

    Multiplex detection of low-level mutant alleles in the presence of wild-type DNA would be useful for several fields of medicine including cancer, pre-natal diagnosis and infectious diseases. COLD-PCR is a recently developed method that enriches low-level mutations during PCR cycling, thus enhancing downstream detection without the need for special reagents or equipment. The approach relies on the differential denaturation of DNA strands which contain Tm-lowering mutations or mismatches, versus 'homo-duplex' wild-type DNA. Enabling multiplex-COLD-PCR that can enrich mutations in several amplicons simultaneously is desirable but technically difficult to accomplish. Here we describe the proof of principle of an emulsion-PCR based approach that demonstrates the feasibility of multiplexed-COLD-PCR within a single tube, using commercially available mutated cell lines. This method works best with short amplicons; therefore, it could potentially be used on highly fragmented samples obtained from biological material or FFPE specimens. Following a multiplex pre-amplification of TP53 exons from genomic DNA, emulsions which incorporate the multiplex product, PCR reagents and primers specific for a given TP53 exon are prepared. Emulsions with different TP53 targets are then combined in a single tube and a fast-COLD-PCR program that gradually ramps up the denaturation temperature over several PCR cycles is applied (temperature-tolerant, TT-fast-eCOLD-PCR). The range of denaturation temperatures applied encompasses the critical denaturation temperature (T(c)) corresponding to all the amplicons included in the reaction, resulting to a gradual enrichment of mutations within all amplicons encompassed by emulsion. Validation for TT-fast-eCOLD-PCR is provided for TP53 exons 6-9. Using dilutions of mutated cell-line into wild-type DNA, we demonstrate simultaneous mutation enrichment between 7 to 15-fold in all amplicons examined. TT-fast-eCOLD-PCR expands the versatility of COLD

  5. Work related Changes And New Understandings Of Prevention: Results Of Multi-Level Participatory Interventions In Four SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ipsen, Christine; Poulsen, Signe; Gish, Liv

    2014-01-01

    to explicate tacit knowledge about what creates enthusiasms and stress at the work place, Multi-voting which decided two work-related changes to be initiated, a KickOff session to mark the start-up of the actual changes, continuous interviews of colleagues by the in-house facilitators, and ongoing status...... it clear that the PoWRS model provides a collective learning process about the work place which supports new insights among both managers and employees. They state that having collective reflections about work, issues and potential solutions and changes is an eye-opener to how change processes can...

  6. Innovative Work Behavior: To What Extent and How Can HRM Practices Contribute to Higher Levels of Innovation Within SMEs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bücker, J.J.L.E.; Horst, E. van der; Mura, L.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, the influence of HR practices and more specifically the Ned Herrmanns development tool HBDI on the development of innovative work behavior (IWB) is described. Innovative work behavior today is important for organizations to stay in a competitive position. Also for small and

  7. Education Pays Off! On Transition to Work for 25 Year Olds in Norway with Upper Secondary Education or Lower as Their Highest Educational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markussen, Eifred

    2017-01-01

    In this article we examine the relationship between educational level and position in the labour market at age 25 for those who have completed upper secondary education or lower as their highest educational level. Whilst completion of upper secondary education is widely regarded as being important, we find that early and lasting work experience…

  8. Exploring the Alignment of the Intended and Implemented Curriculum through Teachers' Interpretation: A Case Study of A-Level Biology Practical Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaeton, Mukaro Joe; Stears, Michèle

    2017-01-01

    The research reported on here is part of a larger study exploring the alignment of the intended, implemented and attained curriculum with regard to practical work in the Zimbabwean A-level Biology curriculum. In this paper we focus on the alignment between the intended and implemented A-Level Biology curriculum through the lens of teachers'…

  9. An empirical model for friction in cold forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Eriksen, Morten; Tan, Xincai

    2002-01-01

    With a system of simulative tribology tests for cold forging the friction stress for aluminum, steel and stainless steel provided with typical lubricants for cold forging has been determined for varying normal pressure, surface expansion, sliding length and tool/work piece interface temperature....... The results show, that friction is strongly influenced by normal pressure and tool/work piece interface temperature, whereas the other process parameters investigated show minor influence on friction. Based on the experimental results a mathematical model has been established for friction as a function...... of normal pressure and tool/work piece interface temperature. The model is verified by process testing measuring friction at varying reductions in cold forward rod extrusion. KEY WORDS: empirical friction model, cold forging, simulative friction tests....

  10. Prefoldins Negatively Regulate Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana by Promoting Nuclear Proteasome-Mediated HY5 Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea-Resa, Carlos; Rodríguez-Milla, Miguel A; Iniesto, Elisa; Rubio, Vicente; Salinas, Julio

    2017-06-05

    The process of cold acclimation is an important adaptive response whereby many plants from temperate regions increase their freezing tolerance after being exposed to low non-freezing temperatures. The correct development of this response relies on proper accumulation of a number of transcription factors that regulate expression patterns of cold-responsive genes. Multiple studies have revealed a variety of molecular mechanisms involved in promoting the accumulation of these transcription factors. Interestingly, however, the mechanisms implicated in controlling such accumulation to ensure their adequate levels remain largely unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that prefoldins (PFDs) control the levels of HY5, an Arabidopsis transcription factor with a key role in cold acclimation by activating anthocyanin biosynthesis, in response to low temperature. Our results show that, under cold conditions, PFDs accumulate into the nucleus through a DELLA-dependent mechanism, where they interact with HY5, triggering its ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. The degradation of HY5 would result, in turn, in anthocyanin biosynthesis attenuation, ensuring the accurate development of cold acclimation. These findings uncover an unanticipated nuclear function for PFDs in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Letter report: Cold crucible melter assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, M.L.

    1996-03-01

    One of the activities of the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project is to assist the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Program in determining which melter systems should be performance tested for potential implementation in the high-level waste (HLW) vitrification plant. The Richland Operations Office (RL) has recommended that the Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) be evaluated as a candidate ``next generation`` melter. As a result, the CCM System Evaluation cost account was established under the PVTD Project so that the CCM could be initially assessed on a high-priority basis. This letter report summarizes a brief initial review and assessment of the CCM. Using the recommendations made in this document, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and RL will make a decision regarding the urgency of performance testing the CCM. If the decision is favorable, a subcontract will be negotiated for performance testing of a CCM using Hanford HLW simulants in a pilot-scale facility. Because of the aggressive nature of the schedule, the CCM evaluation was not rigorous. The evaluation consisted of a literature review and interviews with proponents of the technology during a recent trip to France. This letter report summarizes the evaluation and makes recommendations regarding further work in this area.

  12. Time-Dependent Effects of Acute Exercise on University Students’ Cognitive Performance in Temperate and Cold Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yu Ji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have examined the acute exercise-induced changes in cognitive performance in different thermal environments and the time course effects.Objective: Investigate the time-dependent effects of acute exercise on university students’ processing speed, working memory and cognitive flexibility in temperate and cold environments.Method: Twenty male university students (age 23.5 ± 2.0 years with moderate physical activity level participated in a repeated-measures within-subjects design. Processing speed, working memory and cognitive flexibility were assessed using CogState test battery at baseline (BASE, followed by a 45-min rest (REST, immediately after (EX and 30 min after (POST-EX 30-min moderate-intensity treadmill running in both temperate (TEMP; 25°C and cold (COLD; 10°C environments. Mean skin temperature (MST and thermal sensation (TS were also recorded. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA was performed to analyze each variable. Spearman’s rho was used to identify the correlations between MST, TS and cognitive performance.Results: Reaction time (RT of processing speed and working memory decreased immediately after exercise in both conditions (processing speed: p = 0.003; working memory: p = 0.007. The facilitating effects on processing speed disappeared within 30 min after exercise in TEMP (p = 0.163 and COLD (p = 0.667, while improvements on working memory remained 30 min after exercise in TEMP (p = 0.047, but not in COLD (p = 0.663. Though RT of cognitive flexibility reduced in both conditions (p = 0.003, no significance was found between EX and REST (p = 0.135. Increased MST and TS were significantly associated with reductions in processing speed RT (MST: r = -0.341, p < 0.001; TS: r = -0.262, p = 0.001 and working memory RT (MST: r = -0.282, p < 0.001; TS: r = -0.2229, p = 0.005, and improvements in working memory accuracy (MST: r = 0.249, p = 0.002; TS: r = 0.255, p = 0.001.Conclusion: The results demonstrate

  13. Dehydrin expression as a potential diagnostic tool for cold stress in white clover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseva, Irina Ivanova; Anders, Iwona; Yuperlieva-Mateeva, Bistra; Nenkova, Rosa; Kostadinova, Anelia; Feller, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Cold acclimation is important for crop survival in environments undergoing seasonal low temperatures. It involves the induction of defensive mechanisms including the accumulation of different cryoprotective molecules among which are dehydrins (DHN). Recently several sequences coding for dehydrins were identified in white clover (Trifolium repens). This work aimed to select the most responsive to cold stress DHN analogues in search for cold stress diagnostic markers. The assessment of dehydrin transcript accumulation via RT-PCR and immunodetection performed with three antibodies against the conserved K-, Y-, and S-segment allowed to outline different dehydrin types presented in the tested samples. Both analyses confirmed that YnKn dehydrins were underrepresented in the controls but exposure to low temperature specifically induced their accumulation. Strong immunosignals corresponding to 37-40 kDa with antibodies against Y- and K-segment were revealed in cold-stressed leaves. Another 'cold-specific' band at position 52-55 kDa was documented on membranes probed with antibodies against K-segment. Real time RT-qPCR confirmed that low temperatures induced the accumulation of SKn and YnSKn transcripts in leaves and reduced their expression in roots. Results suggest that a YnKn dehydrin transcript with GenBank ID: KC247805 and the immunosignal at 37-40 kDa, obtained with antibodies against Y- and K-segment are reliable markers for cold stress in white clover. The assessment of SKn (GenBank ID: EU846208) and YnSKn (GenBank ID: KC247804) transcript levels in leaves could serve as additional diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Temperature limit values for cold touchable surfaces ' ColdSurf ' : final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmer, I.; Havenith, G.; Hartog, E.A. den; Rintamaki, H.; Malchaire, J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the project was to find and compile information on human responses to contact with cold surfaces. The work has covered 1) literature search and field survey; 2) experimental studies with human subjects; 3) simulation by modeling; 4) instrumentation (artificial finger), 5) establishment of

  15. Antivirals for the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, T O; Tyrrell, D

    2001-01-01

    The common cold is a ubiquitous short and usually mild illness for which preventive and treatment interventions have been under development since the mid-40s. As our understanding of the disease has increased, more experimental antivirals have been developed. This review attempts to draw together experimental evidence of the effects of these compounds. To identify, assemble, evaluate and (if possible) synthesise the results of published and unpublished randomised controlled trials of the effects of antivirals to prevent or minimise the impact of the common cold. We searched electronic databases, corresponded with researchers and handsearched the archives of the MRC's Common Cold Unit (CCU). We included original reports of randomised and quasi-randomised trials assessing the effects of antivirals on volunteers artificially infected and in individuals exposed to colds in the community. We included 241 studies assessing the effects of Interferons, interferon-inducers and other antivirals on experimental and naturally occurring common colds, contained in 230 reports. We structured our comparisons by experimental or community setting. Although intranasal interferons have high preventive efficacy against experimental colds (protective efficacy 46%, 37% to 54%) and to a lesser extent against natural colds (protective efficacy 24%, 21% to 27%) and are also significantly more effective than placebo in attenuating the course of experimental colds (WMD 15.90, 13.42 to 18.38), their safety profile makes compliance with their use difficult. For example, prolonged prevention of community colds with interferons causes blood-tinged nasal discharge (OR 4.52, 3.78 to 5.41). Dipyridamole (protective efficacy against natural colds 49%, 30% to 62%), ICI 130, 685 (protective efficacy against experimental colds 58%, 35% to 74% ), Impulsin (palmitate) (protective efficacy against natural colds 44%, CI 35% to 52% ) and Pleconaril (protective efficacy against experimental colds 71%, 15% to

  16. Integrating diversity into graduate social work education: a 30-year retrospective view by MSW-level African American social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Stan L; Hall, J Camille; Johnson, Oliver J

    2011-01-01

    The study surveyed a national sample of 100 African American master of social work graduates to retroactively assess perceived diversity content in Human Behavior courses before and after the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) established accreditation standards on diversity. Seventy-one percent of the respondents were females, the mean age was 45.8 years, and their graduation years ranged from 1958 to 2002. Most graduated from northeastern schools (34%), followed by midwestern (28%), southeastern (22%), northwestern (11%), and southwestern (5%) schools. Investigators used the Preparation for Graduate Education Social Work Education Scale and the Human Behavior Survey Addendum (alpha = .97). There were no statistically significant differences on diversity content scores for participants enrolled before and after CSWE diversity standards were established, but graduates of historically Black colleges gave higher diversity content scores in every area. Study includes discussion and implications for Afrocentric theory and the need to prepare practitioners for future social work careers in multicultural communities.

  17. Cold water immersion: kill or cure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M J; Collier, N; Massey, H; Corbett, J; Harper, M

    2017-11-01

    What is the topic of this review? This is the first review to look across the broad field of 'cold water immersion' and to determine the threats and benefits associated with it as both a hazard and a treatment. What advances does it highlight? The level of evidence supporting each of the areas reviewed is assessed. Like other environmental constituents, such as pressure, heat and oxygen, cold water can be either good or bad, threat or treatment, depending on circumstance. Given the current increase in the popularly of open cold water swimming, it is timely to review the various human responses to cold water immersion (CWI) and consider the strength of the claims made for the effects of CWI. As a consequence, in this review we look at the history of CWI and examine CWI as a precursor to drowning, cardiac arrest and hypothermia. We also assess its role in prolonged survival underwater, extending exercise time in the heat and treating hyperthermic casualties. More recent uses, such as in the prevention of inflammation and treatment of inflammation-related conditions, are also considered. It is concluded that the evidence base for the different claims made for CWI are varied, and although in most instances there seems to be a credible rationale for the benefits or otherwise of CWI, in some instances the supporting data remain at the level of anecdotal speculation. Clear directions and requirements for future research are indicated by this review. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  18. Carburettor with cold start aid. Vergaser mit Kaltstarthilfe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauer, W.

    1991-07-18

    This is a cold start aid on carburettors for internal combustion engines for driving cars, motorcycles, stationary units etc as a replacement for the ''spot'' for lifting the fuel level in float housings.

  19. The politics of agenda setting at the global level: key informant interviews regarding the International Labour Organization Decent Work Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ruggiero, Erica; Cohen, Joanna E; Cole, Donald C

    2014-07-01

    Global labour markets continue to undergo significant transformations resulting from socio-political instability combined with rises in structural inequality, employment insecurity, and poor working conditions. Confronted by these challenges, global institutions are providing policy guidance to protect and promote the health and well-being of workers. This article provides an account of how the International Labour Organization's Decent Work Agenda contributes to the work policy agendas of the World Health Organization and the World Bank. This qualitative study involved semi-structured interviews with representatives from three global institutions--the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization and the World Bank. Of the 25 key informants invited to participate, 16 took part in the study. Analysis for key themes was followed by interpretation using selected agenda setting theories. Interviews indicated that through the Decent Work Agenda, the International Labour Organization is shaping the global policy narrative about work among UN agencies, and that the pursuit of decent work and the Agenda were perceived as important goals with the potential to promote just policies. The Agenda was closely linked to the World Health Organization's conception of health as a human right. However, decent work was consistently identified by World Bank informants as ILO terminology in contrast to terms such as job creation and job access. The limited evidence base and its conceptual nature were offered as partial explanations for why the Agenda has yet to fully influence other global institutions. Catalytic events such as the economic crisis were identified as creating the enabling conditions to influence global work policy agendas. Our evidence aids our understanding of how an issue like decent work enters and stays on the policy agendas of global institutions, using the Decent Work Agenda as an illustrative example. Catalytic events and policy

  20. Effect of short-term cold stress on oxidative damage and transcript accumulation of defense-related genes in chickpea seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi-Shahandashti, Seyyedeh-Sanam; Maali-Amiri, Reza; Zeinali, Hassan; Khazaei, Mona; Talei, Alireza; Ramezanpour, Seyyedeh-Sanaz

    2014-08-15

    Cold stress affects many plant physiological and biochemical components and induces cascades of alterations in metabolic pathways, amongst them the membrane fatty acid compositions, the activity of antioxidative enzymes and the regulation of gene expression. The present work aimed to characterize the changes of some of these factors in both cold acclimated (CA) and non-acclimated (NA) plants of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) to identify the role of the acclimation process in adjusting plant responses to severe cold stress. The results showed an increase in the unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) ratio compared to saturated fatty acids, which was more obvious in CA plants. Defense enzymes had an important role in CA plants to create greater cold tolerance compared to NA ones in the cases of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) activities. During cold stress, a high transcription level of CaCAT and CaSOD genes was detected in CA plants, but a low transcription of CaLOX gene was observed in CA plants compared to NA plants, which might have prevented the decline of UFAs (confirmed by double bond index (DBI) data). Moreover, the transcription level of the Carubisco gene, as an energy producing agent, was higher in CA plants than in NA plants and the transcription of the Catubulin gene, as a crucial substance of cell cytoskeleton, showed a decreasing trend in both CA and NA plants, but this decline was greater in NA plants. These responses showed the possible targets of cold stress as chloroplast and signal transduction to balance stress programs. The above results indicate the crucial role of FA compositions in creating cold tolerance in susceptible chickpea plants with possible responsive components and the possible interactions in protein and transcript levels even in facing extreme cold stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.