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Sample records for cold stress signaling

  1. Signal transduction during cold stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanke, Amolkumar U; Sharma, Arun K

    2008-04-01

    Cold stress signal transduction is a complex process. Many physiological changes like tissue break down and senescence occur due to cold stress. Low temperature is initially perceived by plasma membrane either due to change in membrane fluidity or with the help of sensors like Ca(2+) permeable channels, histidine kinases, receptor kinases and phospholipases. Subsequently, cytoskeleton reorganization and cytosolic Ca(2+) influx takes place. Increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) is sensed by CDPKs, phosphatase and MAPKs, which transduce the signals to switch on transcriptional cascades. Photosynthetic apparatus have also been thought to be responsible for low temperature perception and signal transduction. Many cold induced pathways are activated to protect plants from deleterious effects of cold stress, but till date, most studied pathway is ICE-CBF-COR signaling pathway. However, the importance of CBF independent pathways in cold acclimation is supported by few Arabidopsis mutants' studies. Cold stress signaling has certain pathways common with other abiotic and biotic stress signaling which suggest cross-talks among these. Most of the economically important crops are sensitive to low temperature, but very few studies are available on cold susceptible crop plants. Therefore, it is necessary to understand signal transducing components from model plants and utilize that knowledge to improve survival of cold sensitive crop plants at low temperature.

  2. Signal transduction during cold stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Solanke, Amolkumar U.; Sharma, Arun K.

    2008-01-01

    Cold stress signal transduction is a complex process. Many physiological changes like tissue break down and senescence occur due to cold stress. Low temperature is initially perceived by plasma membrane either due to change in membrane fluidity or with the help of sensors like Ca2+ permeable channels, histidine kinases, receptor kinases and phospholipases. Subsequently, cytoskeleton reorganization and cytosolic Ca2+ influx takes place. Increase in cytosolic Ca2+ is sensed by CDPKs, phosphatas...

  3. Signal transduction during cold, salt, and drought stresses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guo-Tao; Ma, Shi-Liang; Bai, Li-Ping; Zhang, Li; Ma, Hui; Jia, Ping; Liu, Jun; Zhong, Ming; Guo, Zhi-Fu

    2012-02-01

    Abiotic stresses, especially cold, salinity and drought, are the primary causes of crop loss worldwide. Plant adaptation to environmental stresses is dependent upon the activation of cascades of molecular networks involved in stress perception, signal transduction, and the expression of specific stress-related genes and metabolites. Plants have stress-specific adaptive responses as well as responses which protect the plants from more than one environmental stress. There are multiple stress perception and signaling pathways, some of which are specific, but others may cross-talk at various steps. In this review article, we first expound the general stress signal transduction pathways, and then highlight various aspects of biotic stresses signal transduction networks. On the genetic analysis, many cold induced pathways are activated to protect plants from deleterious effects of cold stress, but till date, most studied pathway is ICE-CBF-COR signaling pathway. The Salt-Overly-Sensitive (SOS) pathway, identified through isolation and study of the sos1, sos2, and sos3 mutants, is essential for maintaining favorable ion ratios in the cytoplasm and for tolerance of salt stress. Both ABA-dependent and -independent signaling pathways appear to be involved in osmotic stress tolerance. ROS play a dual role in the response of plants to abiotic stresses functioning as toxic by-products of stress metabolism, as well as important signal transduction molecules and the ROS signaling networks can control growth, development, and stress response. Finally, we talk about the common regulatory system and cross-talk among biotic stresses, with particular emphasis on the MAPK cascades and the cross-talk between ABA signaling and biotic signaling.

  4. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  5. Mg-protoporphyrin IX signals enhance plant’s tolerance to cold stress

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong-Wei Zhang; Zi-Li Wu; Ling-Yang Feng; Li-Hua Dong; An-Jun Song; Ming Yuan; Yang-Er Chen; Jian Zeng; Guang-Deng Chen; Shu Yuan

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between Mg-protoporphyrin IX (Mg-Proto IX) signals and plant’s tolerance to cold stress is investigated. Arabidopsis seedlings grown for 3 weeks were pretreated with 2 mM glutamate and 2 mM MgCl2 for 48 h at room temperature to induce Mg-Proto IX accumulation. Then cold stress was performed at 4 °C for additional 72 h. Glutamate + MgCl2 pre-treatments alleviated the subsequent cold stress significantly by rising the leaf temperature through inducing Mg-Proto IX signals. The p...

  6. A Subset of Cytokinin Two-component Signaling System Plays a Role in Cold Temperature Stress Response in Arabidopsis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin; Kim, Nan Young; Kim, Sunmi; Kang, Na Young; Novák, Ondrej; Ku, Su-Jin; Cho, Chuloh; Lee, Dong Ju; Lee, Eun-Jung; Strnad, Miroslav; Kim, Jungmook

    2010-01-01

    A multistep two-component signaling system is established as a key element of cytokinin signaling in Arabidopsis. Here, we provide evidence for a function of the two-component signaling system in cold stress response in Arabidopsis. Cold significantly induced the expression of a subset of A-type ARR genes and of GUS in ProARR7:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis. AHK2 and AHK3 were found to be primarily involved in mediating cold to express A-type ARRs despite cytokinin deficiency. Cold neither significantly induced AHK2 and AHK3 expression nor altered the cytokinin contents of wild type within the 4 h during which the A-type ARR genes exhibited peak expression in response to cold, indicating that cold might induce ARR expression via the AHK2 and AHK3 proteins without alterations in cytokinin levels. The ahk2 ahk3 and ahk3 ahk4 mutants exhibited enhanced freezing tolerance compared with wild type. These ahk double mutants acclimated as efficiently to cold as did wild type. The overexpression of the cold-inducible ARR7 in Arabidopsis resulted in a hypersensitivity response to freezing temperatures under cold-acclimated conditions. The expression of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element target genes was not affected by ARR7 overexpression as well as in ahk double mutants. By contrast, the arr7 mutants showed increased freezing tolerance. The ahk2 ahk3 and arr7 mutants showed hypersensitive response to abscisic acid (ABA) for germination, whereas ARR7 overexpression lines exhibited insensitive response to ABA. These results suggest that AHK2 and AHK3 and the cold-inducible A-type ARRs play a negative regulatory role in cold stress signaling via inhibition of ABA response, occurring independently of the cold acclimation pathway. PMID:20463025

  7. Differential Modulation of Photosynthesis, Signaling, and Transcriptional Regulation between Tolerant and Sensitive Tomato Genotypes under Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Taotao; Li, Hanxia; Zhang, Yuyang; Yu, Chuying; Ye, Zhibiao

    2012-01-01

    The wild species Solanum habrochaites is more cold tolerant than the cultivated tomato (S. lycopersicum). To explore the mechanisms underlying cold tolerance of S. habrochaites, seedlings of S. habrochaites LA1777 introgression lines (ILs), as well as the two parents, were evaluated under low temperature (4°C). The IL LA3969 and its donor parent LA1777 were found to be more cold tolerant than the recurrent parent S. lycopersicum LA4024. The differences in physiology and global gene expression between cold-tolerant (LA1777 and LA3969) and -sensitive (LA4024) genotypes under cold stress were further investigated. Comparative transcriptome analysis identified 1613, 1456, and 1523 cold-responsive genes in LA1777, LA3969, and LA4024, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis revealed that more GO biological process terms were significantly enriched among the up-regulated genes in the two tolerant genotypes, whereas more biological processes were significantly repressed by cold stress in the sensitive one. A total of 92 genes with significant differential expression between tolerant and sensitive genotypes under cold stress were identified. Among these, many stress-related GO terms were significantly enriched, such as ‘response to stimulus’ and ‘response to stress’. Moreover, GO terms ‘response to hormone stimulus’, ‘response to reactive oxygen species (ROS)’, and ‘calcium-mediated signaling’ were also overrepresented. Several transcripts involved in hormone or ROS homeostasis were also differentially expressed. ROS, hormones, and calcium as signaling molecules may play important roles in regulating gene expression in response to cold stress. Moreover, the expression of various transcription factors, post-translational proteins, metabolic enzymes, and photosynthesis-related genes was also specifically modulated. These specific modifications may play pivotal roles in conferring cold tolerance in tomato. These results not only provide

  8. Cold Signaling and Cold Response in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Kenji Miura; Tsuyoshi Furumoto

    2013-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental stresses. Freezing or extremely low temperature constitutes a key factor influencing plant growth, development and crop productivity. Plants have evolved a mechanism to enhance tolerance to freezing during exposure to periods of low, but non-freezing temperatures. This phenomenon is called cold acclimation. During cold acclimation, plants develop several mechanisms to minimize potential damages caused by low temperature. Cold respons...

  9. Disruption of Arabidopsis CHY1 Reveals an Important Role of Metabolic Status in Plant Cold Stress Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Zolman, Bethany K.; Bartel, Bonnie; Lee, Byeong-ha; Stevenson, Becky; Agarwal, Manu; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    To study cold signaling, we screened for Arabidopsis mutants with altered cold-induced transcription of a firefly luciferase reporter gene driven by the CBF3 promoter (CBF3-LUC). One mutant, chy1-10, displayed reduced cold-induction of CBF3-LUC luminescence. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that expression of endogenous CBFs also was reduced in the chy1 mutant. chy1-10 mutant plants are more sensitive to freezing treatment than wild-type after cold acclimation. Both the wild-type and chy1 mutan...

  10. Effect of Poly(γ-glutamic acid) on the Physiological Responses and Calcium Signaling of Rape Seedlings (Brassica napus L.) under Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Peng; Xu, Zongqi; Ding, Yan; Tang, Bao; Zhang, Yunxia; Li, Huashan; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Hong

    2015-12-09

    Cold stress adversely affects plant growth and development. Poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) is a potential plant growth regulator that may be an effective cryoprotectant that prevents crops from damage during cold weather. In this study, the effects of γ-PGA on the physiological responses of rape seedlings subject to cold stress were investigated using hydroponic experiments. We determined that the malondialdehyde content was decreased by 33.4% and the proline content was increased by 62.5% by γ-PGA after 144 h under cold stress. Antioxidant enzymes activities were also evidently enhanced after treatment with γ-PGA. These responses counteracted increases in the fresh weight and chlorophyll content of rape seedlings, which increased by 24.5 and 50.9%, respectively, after 144 h, which meant that growth inhibition caused by cold was mitigated by γ-PGA. Our results also showed that γ-PGA also regulated Ca(2+) concentrations in the cytoplasm and calcium-dependent protein kinases, which are associated with cold resistance. In conclusion, we suggest that the Ca(2+)/CPKs signal pathway is involved in the γ-PGA-mediated enhancement of cold resistance in rape seedlings.

  11. Cold, salinity and drought stresses: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Shilpi; Tuteja, Narendra

    2005-12-15

    World population is increasing at an alarming rate and is expected to reach about six billion by the end of year 2050. On the other hand food productivity is decreasing due to the effect of various abiotic stresses; therefore minimizing these losses is a major area of concern for all nations to cope with the increasing food requirements. Cold, salinity and drought are among the major stresses, which adversely affect plants growth and productivity; hence it is important to develop stress tolerant crops. In general, low temperature mainly results in mechanical constraint, whereas salinity and drought exerts its malicious effect mainly by disrupting the ionic and osmotic equilibrium of the cell. It is now well known that the stress signal is first perceived at the membrane level by the receptors and then transduced in the cell to switch on the stress responsive genes for mediating stress tolerance. Understanding the mechanism of stress tolerance along with a plethora of genes involved in stress signaling network is important for crop improvement. Recently, some genes of calcium-signaling and nucleic acid pathways have been reported to be up-regulated in response to both cold and salinity stresses indicating the presence of cross talk between these pathways. In this review we have emphasized on various aspects of cold, salinity and drought stresses. Various factors pertaining to cold acclimation, promoter elements, and role of transcription factors in stress signaling pathway have been described. The role of calcium as an important signaling molecule in response to various stress signals has also been covered. In each of these stresses we have tried to address the issues, which significantly affect the gene expression in relation to plant physiology.

  12. Global transcriptional profiling of a cold-tolerant rice variety under moderate cold stress reveals different cold stress response mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junliang; Zhang, Shaohong; Yang, Tifeng; Zeng, Zichong; Huang, Zhanghui; Liu, Qing; Wang, Xiaofei; Leach, Jan; Leung, Hei; Liu, Bin

    2015-07-01

    Gene expression profiling under severe cold stress (4°C) has been conducted in plants including rice. However, rice seedlings are frequently exposed to milder cold stresses under natural environments. To understand the responses of rice to milder cold stress, a moderately low temperature (8°C) was used for cold treatment prior to genome-wide profiling of gene expression in a cold-tolerant japonica variety, Lijiangxintuanheigu (LTH). A total of 5557 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found at four time points during moderate cold stress. Both the DEGs and differentially expressed transcription factor genes were clustered into two groups based on their expression, suggesting a two-phase response to cold stress and a determinative role of transcription factors in the regulation of stress response. The induction of OsDREB2A under cold stress is reported for the first time in this study. Among the anti-oxidant enzyme genes, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were upregulated, suggesting that the glutathione system may serve as the main reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger in LTH. Changes in expression of genes in signal transduction pathways for auxin, abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA) imply their involvement in cold stress responses. The induction of ABA response genes and detection of enriched cis-elements in DEGs suggest that ABA signaling pathway plays a dominant role in the cold stress response. Our results suggest that rice responses to cold stress vary with the specific temperature imposed and the rice genotype. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  13. ZmCPK1, a calcium-independent kinase member of the Zea mays CDPK gene family, functions as a negative regulator in cold stress signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weckwerth, Philipp; Ehlert, Britta; Romeis, Tina

    2015-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have been shown to play important roles in plant environmental stress signal transduction. We report on the identification of ZmCPK1 as a member of the maize (Zea mays) CDPK gene family involved in the regulation of the maize cold stress response. Based upon in silico analysis of the Z. mays cv. B73 genome, we identified that the maize CDPK gene family consists of 39 members. Two CDPK members were selected whose gene expression was either increased (Zmcpk1) or decreased (Zmcpk25) in response to cold exposure. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that ZmCPK1 displays calcium-independent protein kinase activity. The C-terminal calcium-binding domain of ZmCPK1 was sufficient to mediate calcium independency of a previously calcium-dependent enzyme in chimeric ZmCPK25-CPK1 proteins. Furthermore, co-transfection of maize mesophyll protoplasts with active full-length ZmCPK1 suppressed the expression of a cold-induced marker gene, Zmerf3 (ZmCOI6.21). In accordance, heterologous overexpression of ZmCPK1 in Arabidopsis thaliana yielded plants with altered acclimation-induced frost tolerance. Our results identify ZmCPK1 as a negative regulator of cold stress signalling in maize. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Systemic Cold Stress Adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valledor, Luis; Furuhashi, Takeshi; Hanak, Anne-Mette; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is one of the most important model organisms nowadays phylogenetically situated between higher plants and animals (Merchant et al. 2007). Stress adaptation of this unicellular model algae is in the focus because of its relevance to biomass and biofuel production. Here, we have studied cold stress adaptation of C. reinhardtii hitherto not described for this algae whereas intensively studied in higher plants. Toward this goal, high throughput mass spectrometry was employed to integrate proteome, metabolome, physiological and cell-morphological changes during a time-course from 0 to 120 h. These data were complemented with RT-qPCR for target genes involved in central metabolism, signaling, and lipid biosynthesis. Using this approach dynamics in central metabolism were linked to cold-stress dependent sugar and autophagy pathways as well as novel genes in C. reinhardtii such as CKIN1, CKIN2 and a hitherto functionally not annotated protein named CKIN3. Cold stress affected extensively the physiology and the organization of the cell. Gluconeogenesis and starch biosynthesis pathways are activated leading to a pronounced starch and sugar accumulation. Quantitative lipid profiles indicate a sharp decrease in the lipophilic fraction and an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids suggesting this as a mechanism of maintaining membrane fluidity. The proteome is completely remodeled during cold stress: specific candidates of the ribosome and the spliceosome indicate altered biosynthesis and degradation of proteins important for adaptation to low temperatures. Specific proteasome degradation may be mediated by the observed cold-specific changes in the ubiquitinylation system. Sparse partial least squares regression analysis was applied for protein correlation network analysis using proteins as predictors and Fv/Fm, FW, total lipids, and starch as responses. We applied also Granger causality analysis and revealed correlations between proteins and

  15. Systemic cold stress adaptation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valledor, Luis; Furuhashi, Takeshi; Hanak, Anne-Mette; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2013-08-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is one of the most important model organisms nowadays phylogenetically situated between higher plants and animals (Merchant et al. 2007). Stress adaptation of this unicellular model algae is in the focus because of its relevance to biomass and biofuel production. Here, we have studied cold stress adaptation of C. reinhardtii hitherto not described for this algae whereas intensively studied in higher plants. Toward this goal, high throughput mass spectrometry was employed to integrate proteome, metabolome, physiological and cell-morphological changes during a time-course from 0 to 120 h. These data were complemented with RT-qPCR for target genes involved in central metabolism, signaling, and lipid biosynthesis. Using this approach dynamics in central metabolism were linked to cold-stress dependent sugar and autophagy pathways as well as novel genes in C. reinhardtii such as CKIN1, CKIN2 and a hitherto functionally not annotated protein named CKIN3. Cold stress affected extensively the physiology and the organization of the cell. Gluconeogenesis and starch biosynthesis pathways are activated leading to a pronounced starch and sugar accumulation. Quantitative lipid profiles indicate a sharp decrease in the lipophilic fraction and an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids suggesting this as a mechanism of maintaining membrane fluidity. The proteome is completely remodeled during cold stress: specific candidates of the ribosome and the spliceosome indicate altered biosynthesis and degradation of proteins important for adaptation to low temperatures. Specific proteasome degradation may be mediated by the observed cold-specific changes in the ubiquitinylation system. Sparse partial least squares regression analysis was applied for protein correlation network analysis using proteins as predictors and Fv/Fm, FW, total lipids, and starch as responses. We applied also Granger causality analysis and revealed correlations between proteins and

  16. Plant resistance to cold stress: Mechanisms and environmental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2004-10-28

    Oct 28, 2004 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 29; Issue 4. Plant resistance to cold stress: Mechanisms and environmental signals triggering frost hardening and dehardening ... Keywords. Cold acclimation of plants; environmental signals; frost hardening; photoperiod; phytochrome; Scots pine ...

  17. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  18. Role of melatonin in alleviating cold stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Vikramjit S; Shukla, Mukund R; Sherif, Sherif M; Murch, Susan J; Saxena, Praveen K

    2014-04-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has been implicated in abiotic and biotic stress tolerance in plants. However, information on the effects of melatonin in cold-stress tolerance in vivo is limited. In this study, the effect of melatonin was investigated in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana challenged with a cold stress at 4⁰C for 72 and 120 hr. Melatonin-treated plants (10 and 30 μm) had significantly higher fresh weight, primary root length, and shoot height compared with the nontreated plants. To aid in the understanding of the role of melatonin in alleviating cold stress, we investigated the effects of melatonin treatment on the expression of cold-related genes. Melatonin up-regulated the expression of C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought Response Element Binding factors (DREBs), a cold-responsive gene, COR15a, a transcription factor involved in freezing and drought-stress tolerance CAMTA1 and transcription activators of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related antioxidant genes, ZAT10 and ZAT12, following cold stress. The up-regulation of cold signaling genes by melatonin may stimulate the biosynthesis of cold-protecting compounds and contribute to the increased growth of plants treated with exogenous melatonin under cold stress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Gene regulation during cold stress acclimation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Sunkar, Ramanjulu

    2010-01-01

    Cold stress adversely affects plant growth and development and thus limits crop productivity. Diverse plant species tolerate cold stress to a varying degree, which depends on reprogramming gene expression to modify their physiology, metabolism, and growth. Cold signal in plants is transmitted to activate CBF-dependent (C-repeat/drought-responsive element binding factor-dependent) and CBF-independent transcriptional pathway, of which CBF-dependent pathway activates CBF regulon. CBF transcription factor genes are induced by the constitutively expressed ICE1 (inducer of CBF expression 1) by binding to the CBF promoter. ICE1-CBF cold response pathway is conserved in diverse plant species. Transgenic analysis in different plant species revealed that cold tolerance can be significantly enhanced by genetic engineering CBF pathway. Posttranscriptional regulation at pre-mRNA processing and export from nucleus plays a role in cold acclimation. Small noncoding RNAs, namely micro-RNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are emerging as key players of posttranscriptional gene silencing. Cold stress-regulated miRNAs have been identified in Arabidopsis and rice. In this chapter, recent advances on cold stress signaling and tolerance are highlighted.

  20. Acute Cold / Restraint Stress in Castrated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to determine whether castration altered osmotically stimulated vasopressin (VP release and urinary volume and what is the role of endocrine-stress axis in this process.Materials and methods: Totally 108 mice were studied in two main groups of castrated (n=78 and control (n=30. Each group was extracted by acute cold stress (4◦C for 2h/day, restraint stress (by syringes 60cc 2h/day and cold/restraint stress. The castrated group was treated in sub groups of testosterone, control (sesame oil as vehicle of testosterone. Propranolol as blocker of sympathetic nervous system was given to both groups of castrated mice and main control.Results: Our results showed that, there is interactions between testosterone and sympathetic nervous system on vasopressin, because urine volume was decreased only in testoctomized mice with cold/restraint and cold stress (P<0.001; propranolol as the antagonist of sympathetic nervous system could block and increase urine volume in castrated mice. This increased volume of urine was due to acute cold stress, not restraint stress (p<0.001. The role of testosterone, noradrenalin (NA and Vasopressin (VP in the acute cold stress is confirmed, because testosterone could return the effect of decreased urine volume in control group (P<0.001. Conclusion: Considering the effect of cold/restraint stress on urinary volume in castrated mice shows that there is interaction between sex hormone (testosterone, vasopressin and adrenergic systems.

  1. Engineering Cold Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Gulzar S; Wani, Shabir H; Hussain, Wasim; Singh, N.B

    2011-01-01

    Plants respond with changes in their pattern of gene expression and protein products when exposed to low temperatures. Thus ability to adapt has an impact on the distribution and survival of the plant, and on crop yields. Many species of tropical or subtropical origin are injured or killed by non-freezing low temperatures, and exhibit various symptoms of chilling injury such as chlorosis, necrosis, or growth retardation. In contrast, chilling tolerant species are able to grow at such cold temperatures. Conventional breeding methods have met with limited success in improving the cold tolerance of important crop plants involving inter-specific or inter-generic hybridization. Recent studies involving full genome profiling/ sequencing, mutational and transgenic plant analyses, have provided a deep insight of the complex transcriptional mechanism that operates under cold stress. The alterations in expression of genes in response to cold temperatures are followed by increases in the levels of hundreds of metabolites, some of which are known to have protective effects against the damaging effects of cold stress. Various low temperature inducible genes have been isolated from plants. Most appear to be involved in tolerance to cold stress and the expression of some of them is regulated by C-repeat binding factor/ dehydration-responsive element binding (CBF/DREB1) transcription factors. Numerous physiological and molecular changes occur during cold acclimation which reveals that the cold resistance is more complex than perceived and involves more than one pathway. The findings summarized in this review have shown potential practical applications for breeding cold tolerance in crop and horticultural plants suitable to temperate geographical locations. PMID:21886453

  2. Engineering cold stress tolerance in crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Gulzar S; Wani, Shabir H; Hussain, Wasim; Singh, N B

    2011-03-01

    Plants respond with changes in their pattern of gene expression and protein products when exposed to low temperatures. Thus ability to adapt has an impact on the distribution and survival of the plant, and on crop yields. Many species of tropical or subtropical origin are injured or killed by non-freezing low temperatures, and exhibit various symptoms of chilling injury such as chlorosis, necrosis, or growth retardation. In contrast, chilling tolerant species are able to grow at such cold temperatures. Conventional breeding methods have met with limited success in improving the cold tolerance of important crop plants involving inter-specific or inter-generic hybridization. Recent studies involving full genome profiling/ sequencing, mutational and transgenic plant analyses, have provided a deep insight of the complex transcriptional mechanism that operates under cold stress. The alterations in expression of genes in response to cold temperatures are followed by increases in the levels of hundreds of metabolites, some of which are known to have protective effects against the damaging effects of cold stress. Various low temperature inducible genes have been isolated from plants. Most appear to be involved in tolerance to cold stress and the expression of some of them is regulated by C-repeat binding factor/ dehydration-responsive element binding (CBF/DREB1) transcription factors. Numerous physiological and molecular changes occur during cold acclimation which reveals that the cold resistance is more complex than perceived and involves more than one pathway. The findings summarized in this review have shown potential practical applications for breeding cold tolerance in crop and horticultural plants suitable to temperate geographical locations.

  3. Transcriptomic Response of Chinese Yew (Taxus chinensis to Cold Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianghua Yu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Taxus chinensis is a rare and endangered shrub, highly sensitive to temperature changes and widely known for its potential in cancer treatment. How gene expression of T. chinensis responds to low temperature is still unknown. To investigate cold response of the genus Taxus, we obtained the transcriptome profiles of T. chinensis grown under normal and low temperature (cold stress, 0°C conditions using Illumina Miseq sequencing. A transcriptome including 83,963 transcripts and 62,654 genes were assembled from 4.16 Gb of reads data. Comparative transcriptomic analysis identified 2,025 differently expressed (DE isoforms at p < 0.05, of which 1,437 were up-regulated by cold stress and 588 were down-regulated. Annotation of DE isoforms indicated that transcription factors (TFs in the MAPK signaling pathway and TF families of NAC, WRKY, bZIP, MYB, and ERF were transcriptionally activated. This might have been caused by the accumulation of secondary messengers, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS and Ca2+. While accumulation of ROS will have caused damages to cells, our results indicated that to adapt to low temperatures T. chinensis employed a series of mechanisms to minimize these damages. The mechanisms included: (i cold-enhanced expression of ROS deoxidant systems, such as peroxidase and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, to remove ROS. This was further confirmed by analyses showing increased activity of POD, SOD, and CAT under cold stress. (ii Activation of starch and sucrose metabolism, thiamine metabolism, and purine metabolism by cold-stress to produce metabolites which either protect cell organelles or lower the ROS content in cells. These processes are regulated by ROS signaling, as the “feedback” toward ROS accumulation.

  4. Transcriptome profiling of low temperature-treated cassava apical shoots showed dynamic responses of tropical plant to cold stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    An, Dong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    .... Nevertheless, it is an extremely cold-sensitive tropical species. Thus far, there is limited information about gene regulation and signalling pathways related to the cold stress response in cassava...

  5. Comparative Phosphoproteomics Reveals an Important Role of MKK2 in Banana (Musa spp.) Cold Signal Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Zhang, Sheng; He, Wei-Di; Shao, Xiu-Hong; Li, Chun-Yu; Wei, Yue-Rong; Deng, Gui-Ming; Kuang, Rui-Bin; Hu, Chun-Hua; Yi, Gan-Jun; Yang, Qiao-Song

    2017-01-01

    Low temperature is one of the key environmental stresses, which greatly affects global banana production. However, little is known about the global phosphoproteomes in Musa spp. and their regulatory roles in response to cold stress. In this study, we conducted a comparative phosphoproteomic profiling of cold-sensitive Cavendish Banana and relatively cold tolerant Dajiao under cold stress. Phosphopeptide abundances of five phosphoproteins involved in MKK2 interaction network, including MKK2, HY5, CaSR, STN7 and kinesin-like protein, show a remarkable difference between Cavendish Banana and Dajiao in response to cold stress. Western blotting of MKK2 protein and its T31 phosphorylated peptide verified the phosphoproteomic results of increased T31 phosphopeptide abundance with decreased MKK2 abundance in Daojiao for a time course of cold stress. Meanwhile increased expression of MKK2 with no detectable T31 phosphorylation was found in Cavendish Banana. These results suggest that the MKK2 pathway in Dajiao, along with other cold-specific phosphoproteins, appears to be associated with the molecular mechanisms of high tolerance to cold stress in Dajiao. The results also provide new evidence that the signaling pathway of cellular MKK2 phosphorylation plays an important role in abiotic stress tolerance that likely serves as a universal plant cold tolerance mechanism. PMID:28106078

  6. Comparative Phosphoproteomics Reveals an Important Role of MKK2 in Banana (Musa spp.) Cold Signal Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Zhang, Sheng; He, Wei-Di; Shao, Xiu-Hong; Li, Chun-Yu; Wei, Yue-Rong; Deng, Gui-Ming; Kuang, Rui-Bin; Hu, Chun-Hua; Yi, Gan-Jun; Yang, Qiao-Song

    2017-01-20

    Low temperature is one of the key environmental stresses, which greatly affects global banana production. However, little is known about the global phosphoproteomes in Musa spp. and their regulatory roles in response to cold stress. In this study, we conducted a comparative phosphoproteomic profiling of cold-sensitive Cavendish Banana and relatively cold tolerant Dajiao under cold stress. Phosphopeptide abundances of five phosphoproteins involved in MKK2 interaction network, including MKK2, HY5, CaSR, STN7 and kinesin-like protein, show a remarkable difference between Cavendish Banana and Dajiao in response to cold stress. Western blotting of MKK2 protein and its T31 phosphorylated peptide verified the phosphoproteomic results of increased T31 phosphopeptide abundance with decreased MKK2 abundance in Daojiao for a time course of cold stress. Meanwhile increased expression of MKK2 with no detectable T31 phosphorylation was found in Cavendish Banana. These results suggest that the MKK2 pathway in Dajiao, along with other cold-specific phosphoproteins, appears to be associated with the molecular mechanisms of high tolerance to cold stress in Dajiao. The results also provide new evidence that the signaling pathway of cellular MKK2 phosphorylation plays an important role in abiotic stress tolerance that likely serves as a universal plant cold tolerance mechanism.

  7. Analysis of Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Cultivated and Weedy Rice Differing in Cold Stress Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Caroline Borges; Basu, Supratim; Pereira, Andy; Tseng, Te-Ming; Zimmer, Paulo Dejalma; Burgos, Nilda Roma

    2015-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars show impairment of growth in response to environmental stresses such as cold at the early seedling stage. Locally adapted weedy rice is able to survive under adverse environmental conditions, and can emerge in fields from greater soil depth. Cold-tolerant weedy rice can be a good genetic source for developing cold-tolerant, weed-competitive rice cultivars. An in-depth analysis is presented here of diverse indica and japonica rice genotypes, mostly weedy rice, for cold stress response to provide an understanding of different stress adaptive mechanisms towards improvement of the rice crop performance in the field. We have tested a collection of weedy rice genotypes to: 1) classify the subspecies (ssp.) grouping (japonica or indica) of 21 accessions; 2) evaluate their sensitivity to cold stress; and 3) analyze the expression of stress-responsive genes under cold stress and a combination of cold and depth stress. Seeds were germinated at 25°C at 1.5- and 10-cm sowing depth for 10d. Seedlings were then exposed to cold stress at 10°C for 6, 24 and 96h, and the expression of cold-, anoxia-, and submergence-inducible genes was analyzed. Control plants were seeded at 1.5cm depth and kept at 25°C. The analysis revealed that cold stress signaling in indica genotypes is more complex than that of japonica as it operates via both the CBF-dependent and CBF-independent pathways, implicated through induction of transcription factors including OsNAC2, OsMYB46 and OsF-BOX28. When plants were exposed to cold + sowing depth stress, a complex signaling network was induced that involved cross talk between stresses mediated by CBF-dependent and CBF-independent pathways to circumvent the detrimental effects of stresses. The experiments revealed the importance of the CBF regulon for tolerance to both stresses in japonica and indica ssp. The mechanisms for cold tolerance differed among weedy indica genotypes and also between weedy indica and cultivated

  8. Analysis of Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Cultivated and Weedy Rice Differing in Cold Stress Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Borges Bevilacqua

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. cultivars show impairment of growth in response to environmental stresses such as cold at the early seedling stage. Locally adapted weedy rice is able to survive under adverse environmental conditions, and can emerge in fields from greater soil depth. Cold-tolerant weedy rice can be a good genetic source for developing cold-tolerant, weed-competitive rice cultivars. An in-depth analysis is presented here of diverse indica and japonica rice genotypes, mostly weedy rice, for cold stress response to provide an understanding of different stress adaptive mechanisms towards improvement of the rice crop performance in the field. We have tested a collection of weedy rice genotypes to: 1 classify the subspecies (ssp. grouping (japonica or indica of 21 accessions; 2 evaluate their sensitivity to cold stress; and 3 analyze the expression of stress-responsive genes under cold stress and a combination of cold and depth stress. Seeds were germinated at 25°C at 1.5- and 10-cm sowing depth for 10d. Seedlings were then exposed to cold stress at 10°C for 6, 24 and 96h, and the expression of cold-, anoxia-, and submergence-inducible genes was analyzed. Control plants were seeded at 1.5cm depth and kept at 25°C. The analysis revealed that cold stress signaling in indica genotypes is more complex than that of japonica as it operates via both the CBF-dependent and CBF-independent pathways, implicated through induction of transcription factors including OsNAC2, OsMYB46 and OsF-BOX28. When plants were exposed to cold + sowing depth stress, a complex signaling network was induced that involved cross talk between stresses mediated by CBF-dependent and CBF-independent pathways to circumvent the detrimental effects of stresses. The experiments revealed the importance of the CBF regulon for tolerance to both stresses in japonica and indica ssp. The mechanisms for cold tolerance differed among weedy indica genotypes and also between weedy indica and

  9. Regulatory Networks in Pollen Development under Cold Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Kamal Dev Sharma; Harsh eNayyar

    2016-01-01

    Cold stress modifies anthers’ metabolic pathways to induce pollen sterility. Cold-tolerant plants, unlike the susceptible ones, produce high proportion of viable pollen. Anthers in susceptible plants, when exposed to cold stress, increase abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and reduce ABA catabolism. Increased ABA negatively regulates expression of tapetum cell wall bound invertase and monosaccharide transport genes resulting in distorted carbohydrate pool in anther. Cold-stress also reduces endog...

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of barley plant responses to cold stress

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Previous molecular and genomic studies have shown that several group genes in Arabidopsis with various functions are induced by cold stresses, and that various transcription factors are involved in the regulation of stress-inducible genes which contribute to an increase in cold tolerance. Here, we present the results of transcriptome analysis indicating the existence of genes of potential importance to cold stress and multiple low-temperature regulatory pathways in addition to the cold respon...

  11. Proteomic analysis of cold stress responses in tobacco seedlings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cold stress is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting the productivity and the geographical distribution of many important crops. To gain a better understanding of cold stress responses in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we carried out a comparative proteomic analysis. Five-week-old tobacco seedlings were treated at 4°C ...

  12. Cold stress tolerance mechanisms in plants. A review

    OpenAIRE

    Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The human population is increasing at an alarming rate, whereas at the same time agricultural productivity is decreasing due to the effect of various environmental problems. In particular, cold stress is a serious threat to the sustainability of crop yields. Indeed, cold stress can lead to major crop losses. Various phenotypic symptoms in response to cold stress include poor germination, stunted seedlings, yellowing of leaves (chlorosis), reduced leaf expansion and wil...

  13. Neural models on temperature regulation for cold-stressed animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The present review evaluates several assumptions common to a variety of current models for thermoregulation in cold-stressed animals. Three areas covered by the models are discussed: signals to and from the central nervous system (CNS), portions of the CNS involved, and the arrangement of neurons within networks. Assumptions in each of these categories are considered. The evaluation of the models is based on the experimental foundations of the assumptions. Regions of the nervous system concerned here include the hypothalamus, the skin, the spinal cord, the hippocampus, and the septal area of the brain.

  14. Regulatory networks in pollen development under cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Dev Sharma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cold stress modifies anthers’ metabolic pathways to induce pollen sterility. Cold-tolerant plants, unlike the susceptible ones, produce high proportion of viable pollen. Anthers in susceptible plants, when exposed to cold stress, increase abscisic acid (ABA metabolism and reduce ABA catabolism. Increased ABA negatively regulates expression of tapetum cell wall bound invertase and monosaccharide transport genes resulting in distorted carbohydrate pool in anther. Cold-stress also reduces endogenous levels of the bioactive gibberellins (GAs, GA4 and GA7, in susceptible anthers by repression of the GA biosynthesis genes. Here we discuss recent findings on mechanisms of cold susceptibility in anthers which determine pollen sterility. We also discuss differences in regulatory pathways between cold-stressed anthers of susceptible and tolerant plants that decide pollen sterility or viability.

  15. Evidence for ACD5 ceramide kinase activity involvement in Arabidopsis response to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutilleul, Christelle; Chavarria, Heidy; Rézé, Nathalie; Sotta, Bruno; Baudouin, Emmanuel; Guillas, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Although sphingolipids emerged as important signals for plant response to low temperature, investigations have been limited so far to the function of long-chain base intermediates. The formation and function of ceramide phosphates (Cer-Ps) in chilled Arabidopsis were explored. Cer-Ps were analysed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) following in vivo metabolic radiolabelling. Ceramide kinase activity, gene expression and growth phenotype were determined in unstressed and cold-stressed wild type (WT) and Arabidopsis ceramide kinase mutant acd5. A rapid and transient formation of Cer-P occurs in cold-stressed WT Arabidopsis plantlets and cultured cells, which is strongly impaired in acd5 mutant. Although concomitant, Cer-P formation is independent of long-chain base phosphate (LCB-P) formation. No variation of ceramide kinase activity was measured in vitro in WT plantlets upon cold stress but the activity in acd5 mutant was further reduced by cold stress. At the seedling stage, acd5 response to cold was similar to that of WT. Nevertheless, acd5 seed germination was hypersensitive to cold and abscisic acid (ABA), and ABA-dependent gene expression was modified in acd5 seeds when germinated at low temperature. Our data involve for the first time Cer-P and ACD5 in low temperature response and further underline the complexity of sphingolipid signalling operating during cold stress. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Towards a synthetic view of potato cold and salt stress response by transcriptomic and proteomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, D; Legay, S; Lamoureux, D; Hausman, J F; Hoffmann, L; Renaut, J

    2012-03-01

    Potato can suffer from several abiotic stresses such as cold temperature, high soil salinity, lack of water or heavy metal exposure, to name a few. They are known to affect plant growth as well as productivity, with differential regulations at several levels. Potato response to cold and salt exposure was investigated at both transcriptomic and proteomic levels in a growth chamber experiment. Cold exposure in potato resulted in a higher number of significantly differentially regulated genes compared to salt exposure, whereas there were nearly three times more differentially regulated proteins after salt exposure when compared to cold exposure. The allocation of up and down-regulated genes at the functional category level also differed between salt and cold exposure although common trends, previously described in various abiotic stresses, were observed. In both stresses, the majority of photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated whereas cell rescue and transcription factor-related genes were mostly up-regulated. In the other functional categories no common trend was observed; salt exposure results displayed a strong down-regulation of genes implicated in primary metabolism, detoxication apparatus and signal transduction, whereas upon cold exposure, up and down-regulated genes were similar in number. At the proteomic level, the abundance of the majority of identified proteins was increased except for the photosynthesis-related proteins, which were mostly less abundant after both salt and cold exposure. Common responses between salt and cold stress and specific responses inherent to these abiotic stresses are described.

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Rice Seedlings Under Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li; Zhou, Ping; Zhu, Ya; Liu, Fang; Li, Rongbai; Qiu, Yongfu

    2017-08-01

    Low temperature can greatly restrict the growth and development of rice. The rice seedlings show growth retardation, lamina wrap, and part of blade even died under the condition of low temperature. In order to get more information about cold stress responses in rice, two dimensional electrophoresis and bioinformatics analysis of mass spectrometry were used to preliminary survey the cold tolerance of cold sensitive line 9311 and cold resistance variety Fujisaka 5 under cold stress. Two dimensional electrophoresis maps of 9311 and Fujisaka 5 were established under cold treatment. With analysis of bioinformation, the proteins were found involve in many aspects of rice development. The largest category of proteins is functioning on metabolism. By comparing the proteins from the two varieties, it can be found that most proteins from 9311 were down-regulated and were up-regulated in Fujisaka 5. The results showed that the membrane composition and structure were damaged, metabolism changed dramatically and rice defense system was activated under the cold stimulation. Fifty-nine proteins related to the resistance of cold stress were identified in our study, and we have investigated and classified all of their biological functions. The importance of our study are providing some conduct for the research of rice resistant to cold stress, supporting auxiliary technique for rice varieties and widening the search field of cold tolerance in plants.

  18. Stress-responsive gene RsICE1 from Raphanus sativus increases cold tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Lili; Xiang, Dianjun; Wang, Lina; Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Xiaodong; Qi, Guochao

    2017-03-01

    The ICE1 transcription factor plays a critical role in plant cold tolerance via triggering CBF/DREB1 cold-regulated signal networks. In this work, a novel MYC-type ICE1-like gene, RsICE1, was isolated from radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and its function in cold tolerance was characterized in rice. The RsICE1 gene was expressed constitutively with higher transcriptional levels in the roots and stems of radish seedlings. The NaCl, cold, and ABA treatments could significantly upregulate RsICE1 expression levels, but dehydration stress had a weak effect on its expression. Ectopic expression of the RsICE1 gene in rice conferred enhanced tolerance to low-temperature stress grounded on a higher survival rate, higher accumulation of soluble sugars and free proline content, a decline in electrolyte leakage and MDA levels, and higher chlorophyll levels relative to control plants. OsDREBL and OsTPP1, downstream cold-regulated genes, were remarkably upregulated at transcription levels in rice overexpressing RsICE1 under low-temperature stress, which indicated that RsICE1 was involved in CBF/DREB1 cold-regulated signal networks. Overall, the above data showed that RsICE1 played an active role in improving rice cold tolerance, most likely resulting from the upregulation of OsDREBL and OsTPP1 expression levels by interacting with the RsICE1 gene under low-temperature stress.

  19. Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino acid homeostasis in Lactococcus lactis NZ9000. ... Compared to exposure to acid stress only, pre-adaptation to cold stress decreased the redox balance ratio and the formation of hydroxyl radicals, indicating a change in aerobic respiration and oxidative ...

  20. Integration of photoperiod and cold temperature signals into flowering genetic pathways in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hyung; Park, Chung-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate timing of flowering is critical for propagation and reproductive success in plants. Therefore, flowering time is coordinately regulated by endogenous developmental programs and external signals, such as changes in photoperiod and temperature. Flowering is delayed by a transient shift to cold temperatures that frequently occurs during early spring in the temperate zones. It is known that the delayed flowering by short-term cold stress is mediated primarily by the floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). However, how the FLC-mediated cold signals are integrated into flowering genetic pathways is not fully understood. We have recently reported that the INDUCER OF CBF EXPRESSION 1 (ICE1), which is a master regulator of cold responses, FLC, and the floral integrator SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) constitute an elaborated feedforward-feedback loop that integrates photoperiod and cold temperature signals to regulate seasonal flowering in Arabidopsis. Cold temperatures promote the binding of ICE1 to FLC promoter to induce its expression, resulting in delayed flowering. However, under floral inductive conditions, SOC1 induces flowering by blocking the ICE1 activity. We propose that the ICE1-FLC-SOC1 signaling network fine-tunes the timing of photoperiodic flowering during changing seasons.

  1. Assessment of Cold Stress and Its Effects on Workers in a Cold-Storage Warehouse

    OpenAIRE

    Farhang Akbar-Khanzadeh; Mohammad–Hossein Sajadi; Keramat Nouri Jelyani; Farideh Golbabaei

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to cold work environment is an occupational health hazard and poses adverse effect on workers health, performance and productivity. This study was performed in a cold food-storage warehouse complex in Tehran-Iran in order to evaluate the workers' exposure to cold stress. Twenty nine exposed workers and 33 non-exposed workers as control subject were included in this study. Climatic factors were measured based on ISO 7996 at the three levels of workers height. Physiological factor...

  2. Salicylic acid alleviates cold-induced photosynthesis inhibition and oxidative stress in Jasminum sambac

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Han; He, Mengying; Ma, Kun; HUANG, YONGGAO; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a signal molecule that mediates many biotic and abiotic stress-induced physiological responses in plants. In the current study the protective effects of SA on cold stress-caused oxidative damage and photosynthesis inhibition in jasmine plants (Jasminum sambac) were examined. Jasmine seedlings were pretreated with 100 µM SA for 3 days and then subjected to cold stress (4 °C) for 15 days. The amounts of superoxide radicals (O_2^{-}) and hydrogen peroxide (H_{2}O_{2}) sign...

  3. Rice NAC transcription factor ONAC095 plays opposite roles in drought and cold stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-09-20

    The NAC (NAM, ATAF and CUC) transcriptional factors constitute a large family with more than 150 members in rice and some of them have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in plant abiotic stress response. Here, we report the characterization of a rice stress-responsive NAC gene, ONAC095, and the exploration of its function in drought and cold stress tolerance. Expression of ONAC095 was up-regulated by drought stress and abscisic acid (ABA) but down-regulated by cold stress. ONAC095 protein had transactivation activity and the C2 domain in C-terminal was found to be critical for transactivation activity. Transgenic rice lines with overexpression of ONAC095 (ONAC095-OE) and dominant chimeric repressor-mediated suppression of ONAC095 (ONAC095-SRDX) were generated. The ONAC095-OE plants showed comparable phenotype to wild type under drought and cold stress conditions. However, the ONAC095-SRDX plants displayed an improved drought tolerance but exhibited an attenuated cold tolerance. The ONAC095-SRDX plants had decreased water loss rate, increased proline and soluble sugar contents, and up-regulated expression of drought-responsive genes under drought condition, whereas the ONAC095-SRDX plants accumulated excess reactive oxygen species, increased malondialdehyde content and down-regulated expression of cold-responsive genes under cold condition. Furthermore, ONAC095-SRDX plants showed an increased ABA sensitivity, contained an elevated ABA level, and displayed altered expression of ABA biosynthetic and metabolic genes as well as some ABA signaling-related genes. Functional analyses through dominant chimeric repressor-mediated suppression of ONAC095 demonstrate that ONAC095 plays opposite roles in drought and cold stress tolerance, acting as a negative regulator of drought response but as a positive regulator of cold response in rice.

  4. Cold compression residual stress reduction in aluminium alloy 7010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, D.A. [Limerick Univ. (Ireland). Materials Research Centre; Robinson, J.S. [Dept. of Materials Science and Technology, Univ. of Limerick (Ireland); Cudd, R.L. [HDA Forgings Ltd., Redditch, Worchestershire (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    7010 is one of the high strength aluminium alloys used mainly as plate and forgings in the aerospace industry. Its high strength is achieved through a quenching operation where the material is rapidly cooled from the solution heat treatment temperature (475 C) to room temperature. As with all rapid quenching operations, residual stresses develop, leaving the material unsuitable for further machining operations and for service. Regular shaped forgings are generally cold compressed after quenching to relieve residual stresses. The effect of friction, increasing/decreasing the amount of cold compression and applying cold compression in 'bites' on residual stress magnitudes is unknown. This paper aims to study the effect that these variables have on final residual stress patterns through use of a finite element model. (orig.)

  5. Global analysis of transcriptome responses and gene expression profiles to cold stress of Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Zou, Zhurong; Wang, Shasha; Gong, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L., also called the Physic nut, is an oil-rich shrub with multiple uses, including biodiesel production, and is currently exploited as a renewable energy resource in many countries. Nevertheless, because of its origin from the tropical MidAmerican zone, J. curcas confers an inherent but undesirable characteristic (low cold resistance) that may seriously restrict its large-scale popularization. This adaptive flaw can be genetically improved by elucidating the mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to cold temperatures. The newly developed Illumina Hiseq™ 2000 RNA-seq and Digital Gene Expression (DGE) are deep high-throughput approaches for gene expression analysis at the transcriptome level, using which we carefully investigated the gene expression profiles in response to cold stress to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of cold response in J. curcas. In total, 45,251 unigenes were obtained by assembly of clean data generated by RNA-seq analysis of the J. curcas transcriptome. A total of 33,363 and 912 complete or partial coding sequences (CDSs) were determined by protein database alignments and ESTScan prediction, respectively. Among these unigenes, more than 41.52% were involved in approximately 128 known metabolic or signaling pathways, and 4,185 were possibly associated with cold resistance. DGE analysis was used to assess the changes in gene expression when exposed to cold condition (12°C) for 12, 24, and 48 h. The results showed that 3,178 genes were significantly upregulated and 1,244 were downregulated under cold stress. These genes were then functionally annotated based on the transcriptome data from RNA-seq analysis. This study provides a global view of transcriptome response and gene expression profiling of J. curcas in response to cold stress. The results can help improve our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant cold resistance and favor the screening of crucial genes for genetically enhancing cold resistance

  6. Global analysis of transcriptome responses and gene expression profiles to cold stress of Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Jatropha curcas L., also called the Physic nut, is an oil-rich shrub with multiple uses, including biodiesel production, and is currently exploited as a renewable energy resource in many countries. Nevertheless, because of its origin from the tropical MidAmerican zone, J. curcas confers an inherent but undesirable characteristic (low cold resistance that may seriously restrict its large-scale popularization. This adaptive flaw can be genetically improved by elucidating the mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to cold temperatures. The newly developed Illumina Hiseq™ 2000 RNA-seq and Digital Gene Expression (DGE are deep high-throughput approaches for gene expression analysis at the transcriptome level, using which we carefully investigated the gene expression profiles in response to cold stress to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of cold response in J. curcas. RESULTS: In total, 45,251 unigenes were obtained by assembly of clean data generated by RNA-seq analysis of the J. curcas transcriptome. A total of 33,363 and 912 complete or partial coding sequences (CDSs were determined by protein database alignments and ESTScan prediction, respectively. Among these unigenes, more than 41.52% were involved in approximately 128 known metabolic or signaling pathways, and 4,185 were possibly associated with cold resistance. DGE analysis was used to assess the changes in gene expression when exposed to cold condition (12°C for 12, 24, and 48 h. The results showed that 3,178 genes were significantly upregulated and 1,244 were downregulated under cold stress. These genes were then functionally annotated based on the transcriptome data from RNA-seq analysis. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a global view of transcriptome response and gene expression profiling of J. curcas in response to cold stress. The results can help improve our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying plant cold resistance and favor the screening of

  7. Genome wide transcriptional profile analysis of Vitis amurensis and Vitis vinifera in response to cold stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiping Xin

    Full Text Available Grape is one of the most important fruit crops worldwide. The suitable geographical locations and productivity of grapes are largely limited by temperature. Vitis amurensis is a wild grapevine species with remarkable cold-tolerance, exceeding that of Vitis vinifera, the dominant cultivated species of grapevine. However, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the enhanced freezing tolerance of V. amurensis remain unknown. Here we used deep sequencing data from restriction endonuclease-generated cDNA fragments to evaluate the whole genome wide modification of transcriptome of V. amurensis under cold treatment. Vitis vinifera cv. Muscat of Hamburg was used as control to help investigate the distinctive features of V. amruensis in responding to cold stress. Approximately 9 million tags were sequenced from non-cold treatment (NCT and cold treatment (CT cDNA libraries in each species of grapevine sampled from shoot apices. Alignment of tags into V. vinifera cv. Pinot noir (PN40024 annotated genome identified over 15,000 transcripts in each library in V. amruensis and more than 16,000 in Muscat of Hamburg. Comparative analysis between NCT and CT libraries indicate that V. amurensis has fewer differential expressed genes (DEGs, 1314 transcripts than Muscat of Hamburg (2307 transcripts when exposed to cold stress. Common DEGs (408 transcripts suggest that some genes provide fundamental roles during cold stress in grapes. The most robust DEGs (more than 20-fold change also demonstrated significant differences between two kinds of grapevine, indicating that cold stress may trigger species specific pathways in V. amurensis. Functional categories of DEGs indicated that the proportion of up-regulated transcripts related to metabolism, transport, signal transduction and transcription were more abundant in V. amurensis. Several highly expressed transcripts that were found uniquely accumulated in V. amurensis are discussed in detail. This subset of unique

  8. Genome Wide Transcriptional Profile Analysis of Vitis amurensis and Vitis vinifera in Response to Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Haiping; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Lina; Xiang, Yue; Fang, Linchuan; Li, Jitao; Sun, Xiaoming; Wang, Nian; Londo, Jason P.; Li, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Grape is one of the most important fruit crops worldwide. The suitable geographical locations and productivity of grapes are largely limited by temperature. Vitis amurensis is a wild grapevine species with remarkable cold-tolerance, exceeding that of Vitis vinifera, the dominant cultivated species of grapevine. However, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the enhanced freezing tolerance of V. amurensis remain unknown. Here we used deep sequencing data from restriction endonuclease-generated cDNA fragments to evaluate the whole genome wide modification of transcriptome of V. amurensis under cold treatment. Vitis vinifera cv. Muscat of Hamburg was used as control to help investigate the distinctive features of V. amruensis in responding to cold stress. Approximately 9 million tags were sequenced from non-cold treatment (NCT) and cold treatment (CT) cDNA libraries in each species of grapevine sampled from shoot apices. Alignment of tags into V. vinifera cv. Pinot noir (PN40024) annotated genome identified over 15,000 transcripts in each library in V. amruensis and more than 16,000 in Muscat of Hamburg. Comparative analysis between NCT and CT libraries indicate that V. amurensis has fewer differential expressed genes (DEGs, 1314 transcripts) than Muscat of Hamburg (2307 transcripts) when exposed to cold stress. Common DEGs (408 transcripts) suggest that some genes provide fundamental roles during cold stress in grapes. The most robust DEGs (more than 20-fold change) also demonstrated significant differences between two kinds of grapevine, indicating that cold stress may trigger species specific pathways in V. amurensis. Functional categories of DEGs indicated that the proportion of up-regulated transcripts related to metabolism, transport, signal transduction and transcription were more abundant in V. amurensis. Several highly expressed transcripts that were found uniquely accumulated in V. amurensis are discussed in detail. This subset of unique candidate

  9. Comparative transcriptomics analysis reveals difference of key gene expression between banana and plantain in response to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiao-Song; Gao, Jie; He, Wei-Di; Dou, Tong-Xin; Ding, Li-Jie; Wu, Jun-Hua; Li, Chun-Yu; Peng, Xin-Xiang; Zhang, Sheng; Yi, Gan-Jun

    2015-06-10

    Banana and plantain (Musa spp.) comprise an important part of diets for millions of people around the globe. Low temperature is one of the key environmental stresses which greatly affects the global banana production. To understand the molecular mechanism of the cold-tolerance in plantain we used RNA-Seq based comparative transcriptomics analyses for both cold-sensitive banana and cold-tolerant plantain subjected to the cold stress for 0, 3 and 6 h. The cold-response genes at early stage are identified and grouped in both species by GO analysis. The results show that 10 and 68 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) are identified for 3 and 6 h of cold stress respectively in plantain, while 40 and 238 DEGs are identified respectively in banana. GO classification analyses show that the majority of DEGs identified in both banana and plantain belong to 11 categories including regulation of transcription, response to stress signal transduction, etc. A similar profile for 28 DEGs was found in both banana and plantain for 6 h of cold stress, suggesting both share some common adaptation processes in response to cold stress. There are 17 DEGs found uniquely in cold-tolerance plantain, which were involved in signal transduction, abiotic stress, copper ion equilibrium, photosynthesis and photorespiration, sugar stimulation, protein modifications etc. Twelve early responsive genes including ICE1 and MYBS3 were selected and further assessed and confirmed by qPCR in the extended time course experiments (0, 3, 6, 24 and 48 h), which revealed significant expression difference of key genes in response to cold stress, especially ICE1 and MYBS3 between cold-sensitive banana and cold-tolerant plantain. We found that the cold-tolerance pathway appears selectively activated by regulation of ICE1 and MYBS3 expression in plantain under different stages of cold stress. We conclude that the rapid activation and selective induction of ICE1 and MYBS3 cold tolerance pathways in plantain, along

  10. Transcriptome response mediated by cold stress in Lotus japonicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Ignacio Calzadilla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Lotus genus are important as agricultural forage sources under marginal environmental conditions given their high nutritional value and tolerance of various abiotic stresses. However, their dry matter production is drastically reduced in cooler seasons, while their response to such conditions is not well studied. This paper analyzes cold acclimation of the genus by studying Lotus japonicus over a stress period of 24 h. High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to identify and classify 1077 differentially expressed genes, of which 713 were up-regulated and 364 were down-regulated. Up-regulated genes were principally related to lipid, cell wall, phenylpropanoid, sugar, and proline regulation, while down-regulated genes affected the photosynthetic process and chloroplast development. Together, a total of 41 cold-inducible transcription factors were identified, including members of the AP2/ERF, NAC, MYB, and WRKY families; two of them were described as putative novel transcription factors. Finally, DREB1/CBFs were described with respect to their cold stress expression profiles. This is the first transcriptome profiling of the model legume L. japonicus under cold stress. Data obtained may be useful in identifying candidate genes for breeding modified species of forage legumes that more readily acclimate to low temperatures

  11. Global Gene Expression Analysis Reveals Crosstalk between Response Mechanisms to Cold and Drought Stresses in Cassava Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxia Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress negatively impacts cassava (Manihot esculenta growth and yield. Several molecular mechanisms of plant response to cold and drought have been identified and described in the literature, however, little is known about the crosstalk of the responses of cassava to these two stresses. To elucidate this question, transcriptome analysis of cassava seedlings under cold or PEG-simulated drought stress treatment was performed. Our results showed that 6103 and 7462 transcripts were significantly regulated by cold and drought stress, respectively. Gene Ontology annotation revealed that the abscisic and jasmonic acid signaling pathways shared between the two stresses responses. We further identified 2434 common differentially expressed genes (DEGs, including 1130 up-regulated and 841 down-regulated DEGs by the two stresses. These co-induced or co-suppressed genes are grouped as stress signal perception and transduction, transcription factors (TFs, metabolism as well as transport facilitation according to the function annotation. Furthermore, a large proportion of well characterized protein kinases, TF families and ubiquitin proteasome system related genes, such as RLKs, MAPKs, AP2/ERFBPs, WRKYs, MYBs, E2 enzymes and E3 ligases, including three complexes of interacting proteins were shown as key points of crosstalk between cold and drought stress signaling transduction pathways in a hierarchical manner. Our research provides valuable information and new insights for genetically improving the tolerance of crops to multiple abiotic stresses.

  12. Global Gene Expression Analysis Reveals Crosstalk between Response Mechanisms to Cold and Drought Stresses in Cassava Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuxia; Yu, Xiang; Cheng, Zhihao; Yu, Xiaoling; Ruan, Mengbin; Li, Wenbin; Peng, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic stress negatively impacts cassava (Manihot esculenta) growth and yield. Several molecular mechanisms of plant response to cold and drought have been identified and described in the literature, however, little is known about the crosstalk of the responses of cassava to these two stresses. To elucidate this question, transcriptome analysis of cassava seedlings under cold or PEG-simulated drought stress treatment was performed. Our results showed that 6103 and 7462 transcripts were significantly regulated by cold and drought stress, respectively. Gene Ontology annotation revealed that the abscisic and jasmonic acid signaling pathways shared between the two stresses responses. We further identified 2434 common differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including 1130 up-regulated and 841 down-regulated DEGs by the two stresses. These co-induced or co-suppressed genes are grouped as stress signal perception and transduction, transcription factors (TFs), metabolism as well as transport facilitation according to the function annotation. Furthermore, a large proportion of well characterized protein kinases, TF families and ubiquitin proteasome system related genes, such as RLKs, MAPKs, AP2/ERFBPs, WRKYs, MYBs, E2 enzymes and E3 ligases, including three complexes of interacting proteins were shown as key points of crosstalk between cold and drought stress signaling transduction pathways in a hierarchical manner. Our research provides valuable information and new insights for genetically improving the tolerance of crops to multiple abiotic stresses.

  13. Phytochrome A and B Function Antagonistically to Regulate Cold Tolerance via Abscisic Acid-Dependent Jasmonate Signaling1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhixin; Li, Huizi; Wang, Mengmeng; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    Light signaling and phytohormones both influence plant growth, development, and stress responses; however, cross talk between these two signaling pathways in response to cold remains underexplored. Here, we report that far-red light (FR) and red light (R) perceived by phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB positively and negatively regulated cold tolerance, respectively, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), which were associated with the regulation of levels of phytohormones such as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) and transcript levels of ABA- and JA-related genes and the C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR (CBF) stress signaling pathway genes. A reduction in the R/FR ratio did not alter cold tolerance, ABA and JA accumulation, and transcript levels of ABA- and JA-related genes and the CBF pathway genes in phyA mutant plants; however, those were significantly increased in wild-type and phyB plants with the reduction in the R/FR ratio. Even though low R/FR treatments did not confer cold tolerance in ABA-deficient (notabilis [not]) and JA-deficient (prosystemin-mediated responses2 [spr2]) mutants, it up-regulated ABA accumulation and signaling in the spr2 mutant, with no effect on JA levels and signaling in the not mutant. Foliar application of ABA and JA further confirmed that JA functioned downstream of ABA to activate the CBF pathway in light quality-mediated cold tolerance. It is concluded that phyA and phyB function antagonistically to regulate cold tolerance that essentially involves FR light-induced activation of phyA to induce ABA signaling and, subsequently, JA signaling, leading to an activation of the CBF pathway and a cold response in tomato plants. PMID:26527654

  14. Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Bacterial strains were grown at 4 °C for 2 h pre-adaptation, and then subjected to various stresses including exposure to ... Keywords: Pre-cold stress, Acis stress resistance, Lactococcus lactis, Redox balance, Amino acid homeostasis. Tropical ... differs in metabolism and production [4] and viability and metabolic ...

  15. Cold exposure increases exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martarelli, D; Cocchioni, M; Scuri, S; Spataro, A; Pompei, P

    2011-06-01

    We determined the combined effects of cold and exercise on oxidative stress during submaximal exercise. Sixteen amateur male cyclists pedaled at a constant speed corresponding to 85% of maximal HR as determined in normal conditions. Eight athletes pedaled indoors at 23 °C while 8 athletes pedaled outdoors at a temperature of 4-6 °C. We then evaluated the levels of reactive oxygen metabolites and plasma levels of antioxidants after exercise. Performing a physical task in cold conditions increased the free radical production, as demonstrated by the augmented levels of reactive oxygen metabolites and the concomitant decrease of plasma levels of antioxidants in outdoors cyclists as compared to indoors cyclists. The overall ANOVA and the post-hoc comparisons revealed a significant exercise and temperature effect. The mean level of reactive oxygen metabolites in athletes who exercised indoors was significantly lower than that of the outdoor athletes. Moreover, the outdoors group presented plasma levels of antioxidants significantly lower than those of the indoors group. Since several sports are performed outdoors during the winter season, the increased risk of oxidative stress in cold conditions must be considered in these disciplines. Cyclists, football and rugby players, and runners are all affected by the elevation in oxygen radicals induced by cold and should take appropriate precautions, such as specific antioxidant integration.

  16. Transcriptome profiling of low temperature-treated cassava apical shoots showed dynamic responses of tropical plant to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Dong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Peng

    2012-02-10

    Cassava is an important tropical root crop adapted to a wide range of environmental stimuli such as drought and acid soils. Nevertheless, it is an extremely cold-sensitive tropical species. Thus far, there is limited information about gene regulation and signalling pathways related to the cold stress response in cassava. The development of microarray technology has accelerated the study of global transcription profiling under certain conditions. A 60-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing 20,840 genes was used to perform transcriptome profiling in apical shoots of cassava subjected to cold at 7°C for 0, 4 and 9 h. A total of 508 transcripts were identified as early cold-responsive genes in which 319 sequences had functional descriptions when aligned with Arabidopsis proteins. Gene ontology annotation analysis identified many cold-relevant categories, including 'Response to abiotic and biotic stimulus', 'Response to stress', 'Transcription factor activity', and 'Chloroplast'. Various stress-associated genes with a wide range of biological functions were found, such as signal transduction components (e.g., MAP kinase 4), transcription factors (TFs, e.g., RAP2.11), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes (e.g., catalase 2), as well as photosynthesis-related genes (e.g., PsaL). Seventeen major TF families including many well-studied members (e.g., AP2-EREBP) were also involved in the early response to cold stress. Meanwhile, KEGG pathway analysis uncovered many important pathways, such as 'Plant hormone signal transduction' and 'Starch and sucrose metabolism'. Furthermore, the expression changes of 32 genes under cold and other abiotic stress conditions were validated by real-time RT-PCR. Importantly, most of the tested stress-responsive genes were primarily expressed in mature leaves, stem cambia, and fibrous roots rather than apical buds and young leaves. As a response to cold stress in cassava, an increase in transcripts and enzyme activities of

  17. Transcriptome profiling of low temperature-treated cassava apical shoots showed dynamic responses of tropical plant to cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Dong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cassava is an important tropical root crop adapted to a wide range of environmental stimuli such as drought and acid soils. Nevertheless, it is an extremely cold-sensitive tropical species. Thus far, there is limited information about gene regulation and signalling pathways related to the cold stress response in cassava. The development of microarray technology has accelerated the study of global transcription profiling under certain conditions. Results A 60-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing 20,840 genes was used to perform transcriptome profiling in apical shoots of cassava subjected to cold at 7°C for 0, 4 and 9 h. A total of 508 transcripts were identified as early cold-responsive genes in which 319 sequences had functional descriptions when aligned with Arabidopsis proteins. Gene ontology annotation analysis identified many cold-relevant categories, including 'Response to abiotic and biotic stimulus', 'Response to stress', 'Transcription factor activity', and 'Chloroplast'. Various stress-associated genes with a wide range of biological functions were found, such as signal transduction components (e.g., MAP kinase 4, transcription factors (TFs, e.g., RAP2.11, and reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging enzymes (e.g., catalase 2, as well as photosynthesis-related genes (e.g., PsaL. Seventeen major TF families including many well-studied members (e.g., AP2-EREBP were also involved in the early response to cold stress. Meanwhile, KEGG pathway analysis uncovered many important pathways, such as 'Plant hormone signal transduction' and 'Starch and sucrose metabolism'. Furthermore, the expression changes of 32 genes under cold and other abiotic stress conditions were validated by real-time RT-PCR. Importantly, most of the tested stress-responsive genes were primarily expressed in mature leaves, stem cambia, and fibrous roots rather than apical buds and young leaves. As a response to cold stress in cassava, an increase

  18. The Effects of Cold Stress on Photosynthesis in Hibiscus Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Miriam; Quiles, María José

    2015-01-01

    The present work studies the effects of cold on photosynthesis, as well as the involvement in the chilling stress of chlororespiratory enzymes and ferredoxin-mediated cyclic electron flow, in illuminated plants of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis. Plants were sensitive to cold stress, as indicated by a reduction in the photochemistry efficiency of PSII and in the capacity for electron transport. However, the susceptibility of leaves to cold may be modified by root temperature. When the stem, but not roots, was chilled, the quantum yield of PSII and the relative electron transport rates were much lower than when the whole plant, root and stem, was chilled at 10°C. Additionally, when the whole plant was cooled, both the activity of electron donation by NADPH and ferredoxin to plastoquinone and the amount of PGR5 polypeptide, an essential component of the cyclic electron flow around PSI, increased, suggesting that in these conditions cyclic electron flow helps protect photosystems. However, when the stem, but not the root, was cooled cyclic electron flow did not increase and PSII was damaged as a result of insufficient dissipation of the excess light energy. In contrast, the chlororespiratory enzymes (NDH complex and PTOX) remained similar to control when the whole plant was cooled, but increased when only the stem was cooled, suggesting the involvement of chlororespiration in the response to chilling stress when other pathways, such as cyclic electron flow around PSI, are insufficient to protect PSII.

  19. Psychological stress and susceptibility to the common cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S; Tyrrell, D A; Smith, A P

    1991-08-29

    It is not known whether psychological stress suppresses host resistance to infection. To investigate this issue, we prospectively studied the relation between psychological stress and the frequency of documented clinical colds among subjects intentionally exposed to respiratory viruses. After completing questionnaires assessing degrees of psychological stress, 394 healthy subjects were given nasal drops containing one of five respiratory viruses (rhinovirus type 2, 9, or 14, respiratory syncytial virus, or coronavirus type 229E), and an additional 26 were given saline nasal drops. The subjects were then quarantined and monitored for the development of evidence of infection and symptoms. Clinical colds were defined as clinical symptoms in the presence of an infection verified by the isolation of virus or by an increase in the virus-specific antibody titer. The rates of both respiratory infection (P less than 0.005) and clinical colds (P less than 0.02) increased in a dose-response manner with increases in the degree of psychological stress. Infection rates ranged from approximately 74 percent to approximately 90 percent, according to levels of psychological stress, and the incidence of clinical colds ranged from approximately 27 percent to 47 percent. These effects were not altered when we controlled for age, sex, education, allergic status, weight, the season, the number of subjects housed together, the infectious status of subjects sharing the same housing, and virus-specific antibody status at base line (before challenge). Moreover, the associations observed were similar for all five challenge viruses. Several potential stress-illness mediators, including smoking, alcohol consumption, exercise, diet, quality of sleep, white-cell counts, and total immunoglobulin levels, did not explain the association between stress and illness. Similarly, controls for personality variables (self-esteem, personal control, and introversion-extraversion) failed to alter our findings

  20. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Low Temperature-Treated Phlox subulata and Analysis of the Genes Involved in Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yanting; Zhou, Aimin; Zhang, Xing; Tang, Huanwei; Liang, Ming; Han, Hui; Zuo, Yuhu

    2015-04-29

    Phlox subulata, a perennial herbaceous flower, can survive during the winter of northeast China, where the temperature can drop to -30 °C, suggesting that P. subulata is an ideal model for studying the molecular mechanisms of cold acclimation in plants. However, little is known about the gene expression profile of P. subulata under cold stress. Here, we examined changes in cold stress-related genes in P. subulata. We sequenced three cold-treated (CT) and control (CK) samples of P. subulata. After de novo assembly and quantitative assessment of the obtained reads, 99,174 unigenes were generated. Based on similarity searches with known proteins in public protein databases, 59,994 unigenes were functionally annotated. Among all differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 8302, 10,638 and 11,021 up-regulated genes and 9898, 17,876, and 12,358 down-regulated genes were identified after treatment at 4, 0, and -10 °C, respectively. Furthermore, 3417 up-regulated unigenes were expressed only in CT samples. Twenty major cold-related genes, including transcription factors, antioxidant enzymes, osmoregulation proteins, and Ca²⁺ and ABA signaling components, were identified, and their expression levels were estimated. Overall, this is the first transcriptome sequencing of this plant species under cold stress. Studies of DEGs involved in cold-related metabolic pathways may facilitate the discovery of cold-resistance genes.

  1. Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pre-cold stress increases acid stress resistance and induces amino acid homeostasis in Lactococcus lactis. NZ9000. Taher Khakpour Moghaddam1,2, Juan Zhang1,2, Guocheng Du1,2*. 1Key Laboratory of Industrial Biotechnology, Ministry of Education, 2School of Biotechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi,. Jiangsu ...

  2. Comparative Analysis of Anther Transcriptome Profiles of Two Different Rice Male Sterile Lines Genotypes under Cold Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Bai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice is highly sensitive to cold stress during reproductive developmental stages, and little is known about the mechanisms of cold responses in rice anther. Using the HiSeq™ 2000 sequencing platform, the anther transcriptome of photo thermo sensitive genic male sterile lines (PTGMS rice Y58S and P64S (Pei’ai64S were analyzed at the fertility sensitive stage under cold stress. Approximately 243 million clean reads were obtained from four libraries and aligned against the oryza indica genome and 1497 and 5652 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified in P64S and Y58S, respectively. Both gene ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG analyses were conducted for these DEGs. Functional classification of DEGs was also carried out. The DEGs common to both genotypes were mainly involved in signal transduction, metabolism, transport, and transcriptional regulation. Most of the DEGs were unique for each comparison group. We observed that there were more differentially expressed MYB (Myeloblastosis and zinc finger family transcription factors and signal transduction components such as calmodulin/calcium dependent protein kinases in the Y58S comparison group. It was also found that ribosome-related DEGs may play key roles in cold stress signal transduction. These results presented here would be particularly useful for further studies on investigating the molecular mechanisms of rice responses to cold stress.

  3. Stressful Presentations: Mild Chronic Cold Stress in Mice Influences Baseline Properties of Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Marie Kokolus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability of dendritic cells to stimulate and regulate T cells is critical to effective anti-tumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to fully recognize any inherent factors which may influence DC function under experimental conditions, especially in laboratory mice since they are used so heavily to study immune responses. Physiological stress is well recognized to impair several arms of immune protection. The goals of this report are to briefly summarize previous work revealing how DCs respond to various forms of physiologically relevant stress and to present new data highlighting the potential for chronic mild cold stress inherent in mice housed at standard ambient temperatures required for laboratory mice to influence baseline DCs properties. Since recent data from our group shows that CD8+ T cell function is altered by mild chronic cold stress and since DC function is crucial for CD8+ T cell activation, we wondered whether mild cold stress may also be influencing DC properties. We found increased numbers of splenic DCs (CD11c+ in cold stressed mice compared to mice housed at a thermoneutral temperature, which significantly reduces cold stress. However, many of the DCs which are expanded in cold stressed mice express an immature phenotype. We also found that antigen presentation and ability of splenocytes to activate T cells were impaired compared to that seen in DCs isolated from mice at thermoneutrality. The new data presented here strongly suggest that the housing temperature of mice can affect fundamental properties of DC function which in turn could be influencing the response of DCs to added experimental stressors or other treatments.

  4. Down-regulation of OsSPX1 causes high sensitivity to cold and oxidative stresses in rice seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunchao Wang

    Full Text Available Rice SPX domain gene, OsSPX1, plays an important role in the phosphate (Pi signaling network. Our previous work showed that constitutive overexpression of OsSPX1 in tobacco and Arabidopsis plants improved cold tolerance while also decreasing total leaf Pi. In the present study, we generated rice antisense and sense transgenic lines of OsSPX1 and found that down-regulation of OsSPX1 caused high sensitivity to cold and oxidative stresses in rice seedlings. Compared to wild-type and OsSPX1-sense transgenic lines, more hydrogen peroxide accumulated in seedling leaves of OsSPX1-antisense transgenic lines for controls, cold and methyl viologen (MV treatments. Glutathione as a ROS scavenger could protect the antisense transgenic lines from cold and MV stress. Rice whole genome GeneChip analysis showed that some oxidative-stress marker genes (e.g. glutathione S-transferase and P450s and Pi-signaling pathway related genes (e.g. OsPHO2 were significantly down-regulated by the antisense of OsSPX1. The microarray results were validated by real-time RT-PCR. Our study indicated that OsSPX1 may be involved in cross-talks between oxidative stress, cold stress and phosphate homeostasis in rice seedling leaves.

  5. Estimation of cold stress effect on dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouček, J.; Letkovičová, M.; Kovalčuj, K.

    1991-03-01

    Twelve crossbred heifers (Slovak Spotted x Holstein-Friesian) were housed in an open, uninsulated barn with straw bedding and a concrete-floored yard. Minimum temperatures inside the barn were as low as -19°C. The average milk yield decreased as the temperatures approached these minima. Compared with the temperate conditions, the feed intake and blood levels of glucose and free fatty acids increased. The level of sodium declined significantly during the second cold period. Correlations and regressions between milk yield and biochemical parameters were calculated, and the results indicate that the concentrations of free fatty acids, cholesterol, and triiodothyronine and the haematocrit values may serve to predict milk production during periods of cold stress, or in lactations of 305 days.

  6. Molecular genetic perspectives on cross-talk and specificity in abiotic stress signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Schumaker, Karen; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2004-01-01

    The perception of abiotic stresses and signal transduction to switch on adaptive responses are critical steps in determining the survival and reproduction of plants exposed to adverse environments. Plants have stress-specific adaptive responses as well as responses which protect the plants from more than one environmental stress. There are multiple stress perception and signalling pathways, some of which are specific, but others may cross-talk at various steps. Recently, progress has been made in identifying components of signalling pathways involved in salt, drought and cold stresses. Genetic analysis has defined the Salt-Overly-Sensitive (SOS) pathway, in which a salt stress-induced calcium signal is probably sensed by the calcium-binding protein SOS3 which then activates the protein kinase SOS2. The SOS3-SOS2 kinase complex regulates the expression and activity of ion transporters such as SOS1 to re-establish cellular ionic homeostasis under salinity. The ICE1 (Inducer of CBF Expression 1)-CBF (C-Repeat Binding Protein) pathway is critical for the regulation of the cold-responsive transcriptome and acquired freezing tolerance, although at present the signalling events that activate the ICE1 transcription factor during cold stress are not known. Both ABA-dependent and -independent signalling pathways appear to be involved in osmotic stress tolerance. Components of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades may act as converging points of multiple abiotic as well as biotic stress signalling pathways. Forward and reverse genetic analysis in combination with expression profiling will continue to uncover many signalling components, and biochemical characterization of the signalling complexes will be required to determine specificity and cross-talk in abiotic stress signalling pathways.

  7. Heat or cold priming-induced cross-tolerance to abiotic stresses in plants: key regulators and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Anwar; Li, Zhong-Guang; Hoque, Tahsina Sharmin; Burritt, David J; Fujita, Masayuki; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2018-01-01

    Plants growing under field conditions are constantly exposed, either simultaneously or sequentially, to more than one abiotic stress factor. Plants have evolved sophisticated sensory systems to perceive a number of stress signals that allow them to activate the most adequate response to grow and survive in a given environment. Recently, cross-stress tolerance (i.e. tolerance to a second, strong stress after a different type of mild primary stress) has gained attention as a potential means of producing stress-resistant crops to aid with global food security. Heat or cold priming-induced cross-tolerance is very common in plants and often results from the synergistic co-activation of multiple stress signalling pathways, which involve reactive nitrogen species (RNS), reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive carbonyl species (RCS), plant hormones and transcription factors. Recent studies have shown that the signalling functions of ROS, RNS and RCS, most particularly hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide (NO) and methylglyoxal (MG), provide resistance to abiotic stresses and underpin cross-stress tolerance in plants by modulating the expression of genes as well as the post-translational modification of proteins. The current review highlights the key regulators and mechanisms underlying heat or cold priming-induced cross-stress tolerance in plants, with a focus on ROS, MG and NO signalling, as well as on the role of antioxidant and glyoxalase systems, osmolytes, heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and hormones. Our aim is also to provide a comprehensive idea on the topic for researchers using heat or cold priming-induced cross-tolerance as a mechanism to improve crop yields under multiple abiotic stresses.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of the paper mulberry under cold stress as revealed by a comprehensive analysis of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xianjun; Wu, Qingqing; Teng, Linhong; Tang, Feng; Pi, Zhi; Shen, Shihua

    2015-04-19

    Several studies have focused on cold tolerance in multiple regulated levels. However, a genome-scale molecular analysis of the regulated network under the control of transcription factors (TFs) is still lacking, especially for trees. To comprehensively identify the TFs that regulate cold stress response in the paper mulberry and understand their regulatory interactions, transcriptomic data was used to assess changes in gene expression induced by exposure to cold. Results indicated that 794 TFs, belonging to 47 families and comprising more than 59% of the total TFs of this plant, were involved in the cold stress response. They were clustered into three groups, namely early, intermediate and late responsive groups which contained 95, 550 and 149 TFs, respectively. Among of these differentially expressed TFs, one bHLH, two ERFs and three CAMTAs were considered to be the key TFs functioning in the primary signal transduction. After that, at the intermediate stage of cold stress, there were mainly two biological processes that were regulated by TFs, namely cold stress resistance (including 5 bHLH, 14 ERFs, one HSF, 4 MYBs, 3 NACs, 11 WRKYs and so on) and growth and development of lateral organ or apical meristem (including ARR-B, B3, 5 bHLHs, 2 C2H2, 4 CO-like, 2 ERF, 3 HD-ZIP, 3 YABBYs, G2-like, GATA, GRAS and TCP). In late responsive group, 3 ARR-B, C3H, 6 CO-like, 2 G2-like, 2 HSFs, 2 NACs and TCP. Most of them presented the up-regulated expression at 12 or 24 hours after cold stress implied their important roles for the new growth homeostasis under cold stress. Our study identified the key TFs that function in the regulatory cascades mediating the activation of downstream genes during cold tress tolerance in the paper mulberry. Based on the analysis, we found that the AP2/ERF, bHLH, MYB, NAC and WRKY families might play the central and significant roles during cold stress response in the paper mulberry just as in other species. Meanwhile, many other TF families

  9. Thermoregulatory disorders and illness related to heat and cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheshire, William P

    2016-04-01

    Thermoregulation is a vital function of the autonomic nervous system in response to cold and heat stress. Thermoregulatory physiology sustains health by keeping body core temperature within a degree or two of 37°C, which enables normal cellular function. Heat production and dissipation are dependent on a coordinated set of autonomic responses. The clinical detection of thermoregulatory impairment provides important diagnostic and localizing information in the evaluation of disorders that impair thermoregulatory pathways, including autonomic neuropathies and ganglionopathies. Failure of neural thermoregulatory mechanisms or exposure to extreme or sustained temperatures that overwhelm the body's thermoregulatory capacity can also result in potentially life-threatening departures from normothermia. Hypothermia, defined as a core temperature of 40.5°C, may present with sweating, flushing, tachycardia, fatigue, lightheadedness, headache, and paresthesia, progressing to weakness, muscle cramps, oliguria, nausea, agitation, hypotension, syncope, confusion, delirium, seizures, and coma. Mental status changes and core temperature distinguish potentially fatal heat stroke from heat exhaustion. Management requires the immediate reduction of core temperature. Ice water immersion has been shown to be superior to alternative cooling measures. Avoidance of thermal risk and early recognition of cold or heat stress are the cornerstones of preventive therapy. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli

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    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and adenosine triphosphate (ATP significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, glutathione S-transferase (GST, super oxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and

  11. Transcriptome analysis reveals genes commonly induced by Botrytis cinerea infection, cold, drought and oxidative stresses in Arabidopsis.

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    Arjun Sham

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact synergistically or antagonistically. To identify the similarities and differences among responses to diverse stresses, we analyzed previously published microarray data on the transcriptomic responses of Arabidopsis to infection with Botrytis cinerea (a biotic stress, and to cold, drought, and oxidative stresses (abiotic stresses. Our analyses showed that at early stages after B. cinerea inoculation, 1498 genes were up-regulated (B. cinerea up-regulated genes; BUGs and 1138 genes were down-regulated (B. cinerea down-regulated genes; BDGs. We showed a unique program of gene expression was activated in response each biotic and abiotic stress, but that some genes were similarly induced or repressed by all of the tested stresses. Of the identified BUGs, 25%, 6% and 12% were also induced by cold, drought and oxidative stress, respectively; whereas 33%, 7% and 5.5% of the BDGs were also down-regulated by the same abiotic stresses. Coexpression and protein-protein interaction network analyses revealed a dynamic range in the expression levels of genes encoding regulatory proteins. Analysis of gene expression in response to electrophilic oxylipins suggested that these compounds are involved in mediating responses to B. cinerea infection and abiotic stress through TGA transcription factors. Our results suggest an overlap among genes involved in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding components of the cyclopentenone signaling pathway in response to biotic and abiotic stresses suggest that the oxylipin signal transduction pathway plays a role in plant defense. Identifying genes that are commonly expressed in response to environmental stresses, and further analyzing the functions of their encoded products, will increase our understanding of the plant stress response. This information could identify targets

  12. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Genes Commonly Induced by Botrytis cinerea Infection, Cold, Drought and Oxidative Stresses in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ameri, Salma; Al-Mahmoud, Bassam; Awwad, Falah; Al-Rawashdeh, Ahmed; Iratni, Rabah; AbuQamar, Synan

    2014-01-01

    Signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact synergistically or antagonistically. To identify the similarities and differences among responses to diverse stresses, we analyzed previously published microarray data on the transcriptomic responses of Arabidopsis to infection with Botrytis cinerea (a biotic stress), and to cold, drought, and oxidative stresses (abiotic stresses). Our analyses showed that at early stages after B. cinerea inoculation, 1498 genes were up-regulated (B. cinerea up-regulated genes; BUGs) and 1138 genes were down-regulated (B. cinerea down-regulated genes; BDGs). We showed a unique program of gene expression was activated in response each biotic and abiotic stress, but that some genes were similarly induced or repressed by all of the tested stresses. Of the identified BUGs, 25%, 6% and 12% were also induced by cold, drought and oxidative stress, respectively; whereas 33%, 7% and 5.5% of the BDGs were also down-regulated by the same abiotic stresses. Coexpression and protein-protein interaction network analyses revealed a dynamic range in the expression levels of genes encoding regulatory proteins. Analysis of gene expression in response to electrophilic oxylipins suggested that these compounds are involved in mediating responses to B. cinerea infection and abiotic stress through TGA transcription factors. Our results suggest an overlap among genes involved in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding components of the cyclopentenone signaling pathway in response to biotic and abiotic stresses suggest that the oxylipin signal transduction pathway plays a role in plant defense. Identifying genes that are commonly expressed in response to environmental stresses, and further analyzing the functions of their encoded products, will increase our understanding of the plant stress response. This information could identify targets for genetic

  13. The wheat aquaporin gene TaAQP7 confers tolerance to cold stress in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Zhou, Shiyi; Hu, Wei; Deng, Xiaomin; Wei, Shuya; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporin proteins (AQPs) have been shown to be involved in abiotic stress responses. However, the precise role of AQPs, especially in response to cold stress, is not understood in wheat (Triticum aestivum). In the present study, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that TaAQP7 expression increased in leaves, but decreased in roots after cold treatment. Expression of TaAQP7 in tobacco plants resulted in increased root elongation and better growth compared with wild-type (WT) plants under cold stress. Moreover, after cold treatment, the transgenic tobacco lines exhibited higher chlorophyll contents, lower levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), and less ion leakage (IL) than WT plants. Thus, expression of TaAQP7 enhanced cold stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco. Taken together, our results suggest that TaAQP7 confers cold stress tolerance by relieving membrane damage in the transgenic plants.

  14. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing in Passiflora edulis Sims to Identify Genes and Signaling Pathways Involved in Cold Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims, also known as the purple granadilla, is widely cultivated as the new darling of the fruit market throughout southern China. This exotic and perennial climber is adapted to warm and humid climates, and thus is generally intolerant of cold. There is limited information about gene regulation and signaling pathways related to the cold stress response in this species. In this study, two transcriptome libraries (KEDU_AP vs. GX_AP were constructed from the aerial parts of cold-tolerant and cold-susceptible varieties of P. edulis, respectively. Overall, 126,284,018 clean reads were obtained, and 86,880 unigenes with a mean size of 1449 bp were assembled. Of these, there were 64,067 (73.74% unigenes with significant similarity to publicly available plant protein sequences. Expression profiles were generated, and 3045 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed between the KEDU_AP and GX_AP libraries, including 1075 (35.3% up-regulated and 1970 (64.7% down-regulated. These included 36 genes in enriched pathways of plant hormone signal transduction, and 56 genes encoding putative transcription factors. Six genes involved in the ICE1–CBF–COR pathway were induced in the cold-tolerant variety, and their expression levels were further verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This report is the first to identify genes and signaling pathways involved in cold tolerance using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing in P. edulis. These findings may provide useful insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating cold tolerance and genetic breeding in Passiflora spp.

  15. Genome-wide identification of WRKY family genes and their response to cold stress in Vitis vinifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants. WRKY genes are not only found to play significant roles in biotic and abiotic stress response, but also regulate growth and development. Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) production is largely limited by stressful climate conditions such as cold stress and the role of WRKY genes in the survival of grapevine under these conditions remains unknown. Results We identified a total of 59 VvWRKYs from the V. vinifera genome, belonging to four subgroups according to conserved WRKY domains and zinc-finger structure. The majority of VvWRKYs were expressed in more than one tissue among the 7 tissues examined which included young leaves, mature leaves, tendril, stem apex, root, young fruits and ripe fruits. Publicly available microarray data suggested that a subset of VvWRKYs was activated in response to diverse stresses. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) results demonstrated that the expression levels of 36 VvWRKYs are changed following cold exposure. Comparative analysis was performed on data from publicly available microarray experiments, previous global transcriptome analysis studies, and qRT-PCR. We identified 15 VvWRKYs in at least two of these databases which may relate to cold stress. Among them, the transcription of three genes can be induced by exogenous ABA application, suggesting that they can be involved in an ABA-dependent signaling pathway in response to cold stress. Conclusions We identified 59 VvWRKYs from the V. vinifera genome and 15 of them showed cold stress-induced expression patterns. These genes represented candidate genes for future functional analysis of VvWRKYs involved in the low temperature-related signal pathways in grape. PMID:24755338

  16. Brahma Rasayana enhances in vivo antioxidant status in cold-stressed chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnath, V; Rekha, P S

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the antioxidant status of chicken during cold stress and to investigate if there are any beneficial effects of Brahma Rasayana supplementation in cold stressed chicken. Activities of enzymatic and levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants in blood / serum and liver tissue were evaluated in chicken exposed to cold (4 +/- 10C and relative humidity of 40 +/- 5%, for six consecutive hours daily, for 5 or 10 days). The antioxidant properties of Brahma Rasayana (BR) supplementation (2 g/kg daily, orally) during cold stress was also studied. There was a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in antioxidant enzyme in the blood, such as, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), and serum reduced glutathione (GSH) in cold stressed chicken. Serum and liver lipid peroxidation levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in cold stressed untreated chickens when compared to the treated and unstressed groups. There was also a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the antioxidant enzymes in the blood, such as, catalase (CAT) and SOD, in the liver CAT and SOD, and in GPX and GR in BR-treated cold stressed chicken, when compared to the untreated controls. Results of the present study conclude that in chicken, BR supplementation during cold stress brings about enhanced actions of the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, which nullify the undesired side effects of free radicals generated during cold stress.

  17. The transcriptional regulatory network in the drought response and its crosstalk in abiotic stress responses including drought, cold and heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo eNakashima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Drought negatively impacts plant growth and the productivity of crops around the world. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in the drought response is important for improvement of drought tolerance using molecular techniques. In plants, abscisic acid (ABA is accumulated under osmotic stress conditions caused by drought, and has a key role in stress responses and tolerance. Comprehensive molecular analyses have shown that ABA regulates the expression of many genes under osmotic stress conditions, and the ABA-responsive element (ABRE is the major cis-element for ABA-responsive gene expression. Transcription factors (TFs are master regulators of gene expression. ABRE-binding protein (AREB and ABRE-binding factor (ABF TFs control gene expression in an ABA-dependent manner. SNF1-related protein kinases 2, group A 2C-type protein phosphatases, and ABA receptors were shown to control the ABA signaling pathway. ABA-independent signaling pathways such as dehydration-responsive element-binding protein (DREB TFs and NAC TFs are also involved in stress responses including drought, heat and cold. Recent studies have suggested that there are interactions between the major ABA signaling pathway and other signaling factors in stress responses. The important roles of these transcription factors in crosstalk among abiotic stress responses will be discussed. Control of ABA or stress signaling factor expression can improve tolerance to environmental stresses. Recent studies using crops have shown that stress-specific overexpression of TFs improves drought tolerance and grain yield compared with controls in the field.

  18. The effect of cold and haemorrhagic stress on reticulocytes in male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In this study, the effect of cold and haemorrhagic stressors in male albino Wistar rats will be investigated. Methods: Cold stress was induced by placing the animals in thermostatic chamber containing ice cold water (0-10oC) and well aerated. Rats were allowed to stay for 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes before they ...

  19. Changes in free amino acid levels in sour orange leaves in response to cold stress and during recovery from cold stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a previous study, we reported that potted sour orange trees recovering from cold stress attracted more Asian citrus psyllid than the control plants continuously kept under warm condition. In parallel studies, cold treated plants were shown to have relatively increased amounts of ninhydrin positi...

  20. Identification and expression analysis of cold and freezing stress responsive genes of Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Cho, Yong-Gu; Hur, Yoonkang; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-10

    Cold and freezing stress is a major environmental constraint to the production of Brassica crops. Enhancement of tolerance by exploiting cold and freezing tolerance related genes offers the most efficient approach to address this problem. Cold-induced transcriptional profiling is a promising approach to the identification of potential genes related to cold and freezing stress tolerance. In this study, 99 highly expressed genes were identified from a whole genome microarray dataset of Brassica rapa. Blast search analysis of the Brassica oleracea database revealed the corresponding homologous genes. To validate their expression, pre-selected cold tolerant and susceptible cabbage lines were analyzed. Out of 99 BoCRGs, 43 were differentially expressed in response to varying degrees of cold and freezing stress in the contrasting cabbage lines. Among the differentially expressed genes, 18 were highly up-regulated in the tolerant lines, which is consistent with their microarray expression. Additionally, 12 BoCRGs were expressed differentially after cold stress treatment in two contrasting cabbage lines, and BoCRG54, 56, 59, 62, 70, 72 and 99 were predicted to be involved in cold regulatory pathways. Taken together, the cold-responsive genes identified in this study provide additional direction for elucidating the regulatory network of low temperature stress tolerance and developing cold and freezing stress resistant Brassica crops. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of chronic cold stress on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Susmita; Kaur, Jyotdeep

    2005-09-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of chronic cold stress on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and inflammation. Male Wistar rats were subjected to cold exposure for three weeks. At the end of the cold exposure, intestinal cell proliferation, luminal nitrite and protein levels, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity and mast cell numbers were evaluated. Severely compromised proliferation rate of the crypt-base cells was observed under chronic stress conditions. Cells isolated from stressed rats showed a decreased DNA content in villus and lower villus cell fractions and an increased DNA content in the crypt cells, as compared to controls. Chronic cold stress resulted in increased luminal nitrite, luminal protein levels, and intestinal myeloperoxidase activity. The number of mast cells was significantly elevated under chronic stress conditions. Chronic cold stress resulted in a compromised intestinal epithelial cell proliferation rate and induced inflammation in the rat small intestine, through the combined action of nitric oxide, neutrophils and mast cells.

  2. Identification of endogenously S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis plantlets: effect of cold stress on cysteine nitrosylation level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyaubert, Juliette; Fares, Abasse; Rézé, Nathalie; Peltier, Jean-Benoît; Baudouin, Emmanuel

    2014-02-01

    S-nitrosylation is a nitric oxide (NO)-based post-translational modification regulating protein function and signalling. We used a combination between the biotin switch method and labelling with isotope-coded affinity tag to identify endogenously S-nitrosylated peptides in Arabidopsis thaliana proteins extracted from plantlets. The relative level of S-nitrosylation in the identified peptides was compared between unstressed and cold-stress seedlings. We thereby detected 62 endogenously nitrosylated peptides out of which 20 are over-nitrosylated following cold exposure. Taken together these data provide a new repertoire of endogenously S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis with cysteine S-nitrosylation site. Furthermore they highlight the quantitative modification of the S-nitrosylation status of specific cysteine following cold stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Similar cold stress induces sex-specific neuroendocrine and working memory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solianik, Rima; Skurvydas, Albertas; Urboniene, Daiva; Eimantas, Nerijus; Daniuseviciute, Laura; Brazaitis, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Men have higher cold-induced neuroendocrine response than women; nevertheless, it is not known whether a different stress hormone rise elicits different effects on cognition during whole body cooling. The objective was to compare the effect of cold-induced neuroendocrine responses on the performance of working memory sensitive tasks between men and women. The cold stress continued until rectal temperature reached 35.5 degree C or for a maximum of 170 min. Working memory performance and stress hormone concentrations were monitored. During cold stress, body temperature variables dropped in all subjects (P stress raised plasma epinephrine and serum cortisol levels only in men (P stress adversely affected memory performance in men but not in women (P stress in men and women induces sex-specific neuroendocrine and working memory responses.

  4. Specific and unspecific responses of plants to cold and drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Erwin H; Fettig, Sebastian; Knake, Claudia; Hartig, Katja; Bhattarai, Tribikram

    2007-04-01

    Different environmental stresses to a plant may result in similar responses at the cellular and molecular level. This is due to the fact that the impacts of the stressors trigger similar strains and downstream signal transduction chains. A good example for an unspecific response is the reaction to stressors which induce water deficiency e.g.drought, salinity and cold, especially frost. The stabilizing effect of liquid water on the membrane bilayer can be supported by compatible solutes and special proteins. At the metabolic level, osmotic adjustment by synthesis of low-molecular osmolytes (carbohydrates, betains, proline) can counteract cellular dehydration and turgor loss. Taking the example of Pinus sylvestris, changes at the level of membrane composition, and concomitantly of photosynthetic capacity during frost hardening is shown. Additionally the effect of photoperiod as measured via the phytochrome system and the effect of subfreezing temperatures on the incidence of frost hardening is discussed. Extremely hydrophilic proteins such as dehydrins are common products protecting not only the biomembranes in ripening seeds (late embryogenesis abundant proteins)but accumulate also in the shoots and roots during cold adaptation, especially in drought tolerant plants. Dehydrins are characterized by conserved amino acid motifs, called the K-,Y-or S-segments. Accumulation of dehydrins can be induced not only by drought, but also by cold,salinity,treatment with abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate. Positive effects of the overexpression of a wild chickpea (Cicer pinnatifidum) dehydrin in tobacco plants on the dehydration tolerance is shown. The presentation discusses the perception of cold and drought,the subsequent signal transduction and expression of genes and their products. Differences and similarities between the plant responses to both stressors are also discussed.

  5. Dynamic transcriptome analysis reveals AP2/ERF transcription factors responsible for cold stress in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chunfang; Hu, Kaining; Xian, Shuanshi; Liu, Chunqing; Fan, Jianchun; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2016-06-01

    The APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor (TF) superfamily plays an important regulatory role in signal transduction of the plant responses to various stresses including low temperature. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of cold resistance in Brassica napus, an important oilseed crop. However, comprehensive studies on the induction and activity of these TFs under low temperature have been lacking. In this study, 132 AP2/ERF genes were identified by transcriptome sequencing of rapeseed leaves exposed to 0, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of low (4 °C) temperature stress. The genes were classified into 4 subfamilies (AP2, DREB, ERF, and RAV) and 13 subgroups, among which the DREB subfamily and ERF subfamily contained 114 genes, no genes were assigned to soloist or DREB A3 subgroups. One hundred and eighteen genes were located on chromosomes A1 to C9. GO functional analysis and promoter sequence analysis revealed that these genes are involved in many molecular pathways that may enhance cold resistance in plants, such as the low-temperature responsiveness, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, and ethylene-responsiveness pathways. Their expression patterns revealed dynamic control at different times following initiation of cold stress; the RAV and DREB subfamilies were expressed at the early stage of cold stress, whereas the AP2 subfamily was expressed later. Quantitative PCR analyses of 13 cold-induced AP2/ERF TFs confirmed the accuracy of above results. This study is the first dynamic analysis of the AP2/ERF TFs responsible for cold stress in rapeseed. These findings will serve as a reference for future functional research on transcription in rapeseed.

  6. Genetic Control of Germination Ability under Cold Stress in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou-fei WANG

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available An F9 recombinant inbred lines (RIL population, derived from a cross between IR28 (Oryza sativa L. spp. indica and Daguandao (O. sativa L. spp. japonica, was used to construct a molecular linkage map and to identify germination ability including the traits of imbibition rate, germination rate, germination index, root length, shoot length and seed vigor at 14°C for 23 d. A composite interval mapping approach was applied to conduct genetic analysis for germination ability. The frequency distributions of the germination ability traits under the cold stress in the RIL population showed continuous segregation, suggesting they were quantitative traits controlled by several genes. A total of seven QTLs were identified on chromosomes 4, 6 and 9, including two for imbibition rate (qIR-6, qIR-9, one for germination rate (qGR-4, two for germination index (qGI-4-1, qGI-4-2 and two for root length (qRL-4-1, qRL-4-2. There were no detected QTLs controlling shoot length and seed vigor. The phenotypic variance explained by a single QTL ranged from 9.1% to 37.0%, and two major QTLs, qIR-6 and qGI-4-2, accounted for over 30% of the phenotypic variance. The expressions of QTLs were developmentally regulated and growth stage-specific. Most of the QTLs observed here were located in the regions similar to the QTLs for rice cold tolerance reported previously, indicating that these QTLs were reliable. However, qRL-4-2 is not reported before.

  7. Mitochondrial Stress Signaling Promotes Cellular Adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne Alexandra Barbour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the aetiology of many complex diseases, as well as the ageing process. Much of the research on mitochondrial dysfunction has focused on how mitochondrial damage may potentiate pathological phenotypes. The purpose of this review is to draw attention to the less well-studied mechanisms by which the cell adapts to mitochondrial perturbations. This involves communication of stress to the cell and successful induction of quality control responses, which include mitophagy, unfolded protein response, upregulation of antioxidant and DNA repair enzymes, morphological changes, and if all else fails apoptosis. The mitochondrion is an inherently stressful environment and we speculate that dysregulation of stress signaling or an inability to switch on these adaptations during times of mitochondrial stress may underpin mitochondrial dysfunction and hence amount to pathological states over time.

  8. Membrane fluidity controls redox-regulated cold stress responses in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Eugene G; Mironov, Kirill S; Trofimova, Marina S; Nechaeva, Natalya L; Todorenko, Daria A; Klementiev, Konstantin E; Tsoraev, Georgy V; Tyutyaev, Eugene V; Zorina, Anna A; Feduraev, Pavel V; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Paschenko, Vladimir Z; Los, Dmitry A

    2017-09-01

    Membrane fluidity is the important regulator of cellular responses to changing ambient temperature. Bacteria perceive cold by the transmembrane histidine kinases that sense changes in thickness of the cytoplasmic membrane due to its rigidification. In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis, about a half of cold-responsive genes is controlled by the light-dependent transmembrane histidine kinase Hik33, which also partially controls the responses to osmotic, salt, and oxidative stress. This implies the existence of some universal, but yet unknown signal that triggers adaptive gene expression in response to various stressors. Here we selectively probed the components of photosynthetic machinery and functionally characterized the thermodynamics of cyanobacterial photosynthetic membranes with genetically altered fluidity. We show that the rate of oxidation of the quinone pool (PQ), which interacts with both photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chains, depends on membrane fluidity. Inhibitor-induced stimulation of redox changes in PQ triggers cold-induced gene expression. Thus, the fluidity-dependent changes in the redox state of PQ may universally trigger cellular responses to stressors that affect membrane properties.

  9. DNA methylation and physio-biochemical analysis of chickpea in response to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakei, Aida; Maali-Amiri, Reza; Zeinali, Hassan; Ranjbar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Cold stress (CS) signals are translated into physiological changes as products of direct and/or indirect of gene expression regulated by different factors like DNA methylation. In this study, some of these factors were comparatively studied in two chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes (Sel96Th11439, cold-tolerant genotype, and ILC533, cold susceptible one) under control (23 °C) and days 1, 3, and 6 after exposing the seedlings to CS (4 °C). Under CS, tolerant genotype prevented H2O2 accumulation which led to a decrease in damage indices (malondialdehyde and electrolyte leakage index) compared to susceptible one. The significant activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase) along with a significant proportion of change in DNA methylation/demethylation patterns were often effective factors in preserving cell against cold-induced oxidative stress. Chickpea cells in response to CS changed access to their genome as the number of bands without change from day 1 to day 6 of exposure to CS particularly in tolerant genotype was decreased. During CS, the methylation level was higher compared to demethylation (29.05 vs 19.79 %) in tolerant genotype and (27.92 vs 22.09 %) in susceptible one. However, for prolonged periods of CS, changes in demethylated bands in tolerant genotype were higher than that of in susceptible one (9.24 vs 4.13 %), indicating higher potential for activation of CS responsive genes. Such a status along with higher activity of antioxidants and less damage indices could be related to cold tolerance (CT) mechanisms in chickpea. Sequencing analysis confirmed the important role of some specific DNA sequences in creating CT with possible responsive components involved in CS. Thus, dynamic assessment using multi-dimensional approaches allows us to progressively fill in the gaps between physio-biochemical and molecular events in creating CT, to comprehend better the

  10. Plasma Membrane CRPK1-Mediated Phosphorylation of 14-3-3 Proteins Induces Their Nuclear Import to Fine-Tune CBF Signaling during Cold Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyan; Jia, Yuxin; Ding, Yanglin; Shi, Yiting; Li, Zhen; Guo, Yan; Gong, Zhizhong; Yang, Shuhua

    2017-04-06

    In plant cells, changes in fluidity of the plasma membrane may serve as the primary sensor of cold stress; however, the precise mechanism and how the cell transduces and fine-tunes cold signals remain elusive. Here we show that the cold-activated plasma membrane protein cold-responsive protein kinase 1 (CRPK1) phosphorylates 14-3-3 proteins. The phosphorylated 14-3-3 proteins shuttle from the cytosol to the nucleus, where they interact with and destabilize the key cold-responsive C-repeat-binding factor (CBF) proteins. Consistent with this, the crpk1 and 14-3-3κλ mutants show enhanced freezing tolerance, and transgenic plants overexpressing 14-3-3λ show reduced freezing tolerance. Further study shows that CRPK1 is essential for the nuclear translocation of 14-3-3 proteins and for 14-3-3 function in freezing tolerance. Thus, our study reveals that the CRPK1-14-3-3 module transduces the cold signal from the plasma membrane to the nucleus to modulate CBF stability, which ensures a faithfully adjusted response to cold stress of plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Model of Surface Residual Stress Distribution of Cold Rolling Spline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress is an important parameter in the evaluation of the performance of a cold rolling spline surface. However, research on cold rolling spline is rare. To improve the surface property of a spline, an involute spline is selected as the object of this study. The contour method for determining cold roll-beating residual stress involves measuring the force spatial distribution, performing a statistical analysis of the experimental results, establishing the parameters for the tooth profile for different positions (dedendum, pitch, and addendum of residual stress, and determining the effect of pressure on the relationship between stress and the depth of the cold roll-beating. A response surface method is used to establish the spline tooth profile of the dedendum, pitch, and addendum of the residual stress and different depths of the stress layer to obtain the parameters of a multiple regression model and perform a comparative analysis of the experimental and prediction results. Research indicates that the prediction results have high reliability. The establishment of this model has important guiding significance to control the residual stress in the cold roll-beating forming process, optimize the cold roll-beating processing parameters, and improve the surface properties of cold rolling spline.

  12. ABA signal in rice under stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Ever since its discovery, abscisic acid (ABA) has been intensively studied due to its versatile functions in plant developmental and physiological processes. Many signaling details of ABA have been well elucidated and reviewed. The identification of ABA receptors is a great breakthrough in the field of ABA study, whereas the discovery of ABA transporter has changed our concept that ABA is delivered solely by passive transport. The intensity of ABA signaling pathway is well known to be controlled by multi-regulators. Nonetheless, the interaction and coordination among ABA biosynthesis, catabolism, conjugation and transportation are seldom discussed. Here, we summarize the biological functions of ABA in response to different stresses, especially the roles of ABA in plant defense to pathogen attack, and discuss the possible relationships of these determinants in controlling the specificity and intensity of ABA signaling pathway in the rice. PMID:24764501

  13. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Provides Novel Insights into Cold Stress Responses in Petunia Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Huilin; Ning, Luyun; Li, Bei; Bao, Manzhu

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature is a major adverse environmental factor that impairs petunia growth and development. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of cold stress adaptation of petunia plants, a quantitative proteomic analysis using iTRAQ technology was performed to detect the effects of cold stress on protein expression profiles in petunia seedlings which had been subjected to 2°C for 5 days. Of the 2430 proteins whose levels were quantitated, a total of 117 proteins were discovered to be differentially expressed under low temperature stress in comparison to unstressed controls. As an initial study, 44 proteins including well known and novel cold-responsive proteins were successfully annotated. By integrating the results of two independent Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analyses, seven common GO terms were found of which "oxidation-reduction process" was the most notable for the cold-responsive proteins. By using the subcellular localization tool Plant-mPLoc predictor, as much as 40.2% of the cold-responsive protein group was found to be located within chloroplasts, suggesting that the chloroplast proteome is particularly affected by cold stress. Gene expression analyses of 11 cold-responsive proteins by real time PCR demonstrated that the mRNA levels were not strongly correlated with the respective protein levels. Further activity assay of anti-oxidative enzymes showed different alterations in cold treated petunia seedlings. Our investigation has highlighted the role of antioxidation mechanisms and also epigenetic factors in the regulation of cold stress responses. Our work has provided novel insights into the plant response to cold stress and should facilitate further studies regarding the molecular mechanisms which determine how plant cells cope with environmental perturbation. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002189.

  14. Supplemental fat for dairy calves during mild cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litherland, N B; Da Silva, D N L; LaBerge, R J; Schefers, J; Kertz, A

    2014-05-01

    Eighty-one Holstein and Holstein-cross dairy calves fed calf milk replacer (CMR) were used to determine response to increasing amounts of supplemental fat during mild cold stress. Calves (n=27) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: (1) low fat [LF; 28% crude protein:15% fat milk replacer (28:15 MR)]; (2) medium fat [MF; 28:15 MR+113 g/d of commercial fat supplement (FS)]; (3) high fat (HF; 28:15 MR+227 g/d of FS). The MF and HF calves received FS from d 2 to 21, and all calves were fed LF from d 22 to 49. The CMR was fed at 1.4% of birth body weight (BBW) from d 1 to 10, at 1.8% of BBW from d 11 to 42, and at 0.9% of BBW from d 43 to 49. Calves were weaned on d 49 and remained in hutches until d 56. The CMR was reconstituted to 13% solids. Calves were fed a commercial starter grain (19.2% crude protein on a dry matter basis) ad libitum and offered warm water after CMR feeding. Calves were fed CMR twice daily at 0630 and 1730 h in hutches bedded with straw. Starter intake, CMR intake, and ambient temperature were measured daily, and body weight (BW), hip height, and body length were measured weekly. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED in SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) as a randomized design with linear and quadratic contrasts. Calf BBW averaged 42.0 ± 1.0 kg, total serum protein averaged 5.8 ± 0.1mg/dL, and birth ambient temperature averaged 5.0 ± 1.1°C. Feeding FS increased metabolizable energy intake (MEI) over maintenance but decreased efficiency of conversion of BW gain:MEI. Starter intake by LF calves was greatest until the beginning of weaning, after which starter intake was similar among treatments. Because of higher starter intake, total MEI was similar among treatments. Feed efficiency through d 49 was greater for calves fed MF and HF. Average daily gain during fat supplementation was greater for MF and HF than for LF. Lack of increase in BW gain and feed efficiency between MF and HF treatments indicated that HF did not result in advantages

  15. Signaling pathways of replication stress in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Benjamin; Crabbé, Laure; Pasero, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells activate the S-phase checkpoint in response to a variety of events affecting the progression of replication forks, collectively referred to as replication stress. This signaling pathway is divided in two branches: the DNA damage checkpoint (DDC) and the DNA replication checkpoint (DRC). Both pathways are activated by the sensor kinase Mec1 and converge on the effector kinase Rad53. However, the DDC operates throughout the cell cycle and depends on the checkpoint mediator Rad9 to activate Rad53, whereas the DRC is specific to S phase and is mediated by Mrc1 and other fork components to signal replication impediments. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on these two pathways, with a focus on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which many important aspects of the replication stress response were discovered. We also discuss the differences and similarities between DDC and DRC and speculate on how these pathways cooperate to ensure the complete and faithful duplication of the yeast genome under various replication stress conditions. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Combined Cytological and Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals a Nitric Oxide Signaling Pathway Involved in Cold-Inhibited Camellia sinensis Pollen Tube Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weidong; Sheng, Xianyong; Shu, Zaifa; Li, Dongqin; Pan, Junting; Ye, Xiaoli; Chang, Pinpin; Li, Xinghui; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a signaling molecule plays crucial roles in many abiotic stresses in plant development processes, including pollen tube growth. Here, the signaling networks dominated by NO during cold stress that inhibited Camellia sinensis pollen tube growth are investigated in vitro. Cytological analysis show that cold-induced NO is involved in the inhibition of pollen tube growth along with disruption of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ gradient, increase in ROS content, acidification of cytoplasmic pH and abnormalities in organelle ultrastructure and cell wall component distribution in the pollen tube tip. Furthermore, differentially expressed genes (DEGs)-related to signaling pathway, such as NO synthesis, cGMP, Ca2+, ROS, pH, actin, cell wall, and MAPK cascade signal pathways, are identified and quantified using transcriptomic analyses and qRT-PCR, which indicate a potential molecular mechanism for the above cytological results. Taken together, these findings suggest that a complex signaling network dominated by NO, including Ca2+, ROS, pH, RACs signaling and the crosstalk among them, is stimulated in the C. sinensis pollen tube in response to cold stress, which further causes secondary and tertiary alterations, such as ultrastructural abnormalities in organelles and cell wall construction, ultimately resulting in perturbed pollen tube extension. PMID:27148289

  17. Rat Lung Response to PM2.5 Exposure under Different Cold Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Luo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ambient particulate matters and temperature were reported to have additive effects over the respiratory disease hospital admissions and deaths. The purpose of this study is to discuss the interactive pulmonary toxicities of cold stress and fine particulate matter (PM2.5 exposure by estimating inflammation and oxidative stress responses. 48 Wistar male rats, matched by weight and age, were randomly assigned to six groups, which were treated with cold stress alone (0 °C, 10 °C, and 20 °C (Normal control and cold stresses plus PM2.5 exposures respectively. Cold stress alone groups were intratracheal instillation of 0.25 mL normal saline, while cold stress plus PM2.5 exposure groups were intratracheal instillation of 8 mg/0.25 mL PM2.5. These procedures were carried out for three times with an interval of 48 hours for each treatment. All rats were sacrificed after 48 hours of the third treatment. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was collected for analyzing inflammatory cells and cytokines, and lung homogenate MDA was determined for oxidative stress estimation. Results showed higher level of total cell and neutrophil in the BALF of PM2.5 exposed groups (p < 0.05. Negative relationships between cold stress intensity and the level of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a, C-reactive protein (CRP interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 in BALF were indicated in PM2.5 exposure groups. Exposure to cold stress alone caused significant increase of inflammatory cytokines and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA and decline of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px activity only in 0 °C exposure group (p < 0.05. The two-way ANOVA found significant interactive effects between PM2.5 exposure and cold stress in the level of neutrophil, IL-6 and IL-8 and SOD activity (p < 0.05. These data demonstrated that inflammation and oxidative stress involved in the additive effect of PM2.5 exposure and cold stress on pulmonary toxicity

  18. Endothelial cell oxidative stress and signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCIO FONCEA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction (ED is an early event in atherosclerotic disease, preceding clinical manifestations and complications. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated as important mechanisms that contribute to ED, and ROS’s may function as intracellular messengers that modulate signaling pathways. Several intracellular signal events stimulated by ROS have been defined, including the identification of two members of the mitogen activated protein kinase family (ERK1/2 and big MAP kinase, BMK1, tyrosine kinases (Src and Syk and different isoenzymes of PKC as redox-sensitive kinases. ROS regulation of signal transduction components include the modification in the activity of transcriptional factors such as NFkB and others that result in changes in gene expression and modifications in cellular responses. In order to understand the intracellular mechanisms induced by ROS in endothelial cells (EC, we are studying the response of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells to increased ROS generation by different pro-atherogenic stimuli. Our results show that Homocysteine (Hcy and oxidized LDL (oxLDL enhance the activity and expression of oxidative stress markers, such as NFkB and heme oxygenase 1. These results suggest that these pro-atherogenic stimuli increase oxidative stress in EC, and thus explain the loss of endothelial function associated with the atherogenic process

  19. Thermographic registration of thermal effects in plants exposed to cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovchavtcev A.P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In present paper the possibility of continuous measurement of thermal effects of plants by thermography was investigated. The problems of measurement precision decreasing and thermograph calibration to cold-restraint stress process temperature region was discussed. The possibility of fast temperature measurement of plants in cold-restraint stress process was investigated. The dead temperature region of winter wheat was find out.

  20. Lipocalin 2 regulation by thermal stresses: Protective role of Lcn2/NGAL against cold and heat stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi, E-mail: roudkenar@ibto.ir [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Halabian, Raheleh [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roushandeh, Amaneh Mohammadi [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nourani, Mohammad Reza [Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masroori, Nasser [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Majid [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chemical Injury Research Center, Baqiyatallah Medical Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikogoftar, Mahin; Rouhbakhsh, Mehdi; Bahmani, Parisa [Research Center, Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafabadi, Ali Jahanian [Department of Molecular Biology, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-01

    Environmental temperature variations are the most common stresses experienced by a wide range of organisms. Lipocalin 2 (Lcn2/NGAL) is expressed in various normal and pathologic conditions. However, its precise functions have not been fully determined. Here we report the induction of Lcn2 by thermal stresses in vivo, and its role following exposure to cold and heat stresses in vitro. Induction of Lcn2 in liver, heart and kidney was detected by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry following exposure of mice to heat and cold stresses. When CHO and HEK293T cells overexpressing NGAL were exposed to cold stress, cell proliferation was higher compared to controls. Down-regulatrion of NGAL by siRNA in A549 cells resulted in less proliferation when exposed to cold stress compared to control cells. The number of apoptotic cells and expression of pro-apoptotic proteins were lower in the NGAL overexpressing CHO and HEK293T cells, but were higher in the siRNA-transfected A549 cells compared to controls, indicating that NGAL protects cells against cold stress. Following exposure of the cells to heat stress, ectopic expression of NGAL protected cells while addition of exogenous recombinant NGAL to the cell culture medium exacerbated the toxicity of heat stress specially when there was low or no endogenous expression of NGAL. It had a dual effect on apoptosis following heat stress. NGAL also increased the expression of HO-1. Lcn2/NGAL may have the potential to improve cell proliferation and preservation particularly to prevent cold ischemia injury of transplanted organs or for treatment of some cancers by hyperthermia.

  1. Female plants of Hippophae salicifolia D. Don are more responsive to cold stress than male plants

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Sanjay Mohan; Grover, Atul; Pandey, Pankaj; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2012-01-01

    Hippophae salicifolia D. Don (Seabuckthorn) grows in stressful environment of high altitude under conditions of low temperature and low availability of water. We have studied gender based differences in physiochemical response to cold stress in male and female plants of Seabuckthorn. After 24 h of cold stress about 32 and 66 % higher electrolyte leakage (EL) was recorded in male and female plants respectively. Relative water content (RWC) at the end of 24 h stress was higher in male plants (~...

  2. Proteomics of early and late cold shock stress on thermophilic bacterium, Thermus sp. GH5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi-Nejad, Masoumeh; Manesh, Hossein Naderi-; Khajeh, Khosro

    2011-09-06

    Thermus sp. GH5 is an aerobic thermophilic bacterium with optimal growth at 70-75°C isolated from a hot spring in Ardabil, North West province of Iran. Due to industrial and biotechnological applications of thermophils, it is very important to know more about their proteomes and metabolomes. Since thermophils live in stressful environments it will be very useful to study their survival mechanisms. There are many reports on stress induced proteins, particularly the well characterized heat shock proteins, but little is known about the functions of proteins induced after a decrease in temperature. In this study, the proteomes of the thermophilic bacterium after a temperature down shift from 75°C to 45°C for 2h and 5h were investigated. We also compared protein profiles of early and late cold shock processes to that of cells grown at 75°C and identified a set of proteins, some of which are involved in metabolic processes such as fatty acid synthesis, pentose phosphate pathway, aromatic component degradation and signal transduction. Our data showed this organism could be tolerating the stress conditions by changing its metabolism and physiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Individually ventilated cages impose cold stress on laboratory mice: a source of systemic experimental variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, John M; Knowles, Scott; Lamkin, Donald M; Stout, David B

    2013-11-01

    Individual ventilated cages (IVC) are increasing in popularity. Although mice avoid IVC in preference testing, they show no aversion when provided additional nesting material or the cage is not ventilated. Given the high ventilation rate in IVC, we developed 3 hypotheses: that mice housed in IVC experience more cold stress than do mice housed in static cages; that IVC-induced cold stress affects the results of experiments using mice; and that, when provided shelters, mice behaviorally thermoregulate and thereby rescue the cold-stress effects of IVC. To test these hypotheses, we housed mice in IVC, IVC with shelters, and static cages maintained at 20 to 21 °C. We quantified the cold stress of each housing system on mice by assessing nonshivering thermogenesis and brown adipose vacuolation. To test housing effects in a common, murine model of human disease, we implanted mice with subcutaneous epidermoid carcinoma cells and quantified tumor growth, tumor metabolism, and adrenal weight. Mice housed in IVC had histologic signs of cold stress and significantly higher nonshivering thermogenesis, smaller subcutaneous tumors, lower tumor metabolism, and larger adrenal weights than did mice in static cages. Shelters rescued IVC-induced nonshivering thermogenesis, adrenal enlargement, and phenotype-dependent cold-mediated histologic changes in brown adipose tissue and tumor size. IVC impose chronic cold stress on mice, alter experimental results, and are a source of systemic confounders throughout rodent-dependent research. Allowing mice to exhibit behavioral thermoregulation through seeking shelter markedly rescues the experiment-altering effects of housing-imposed cold stress, improves physiologic uniformity, and increases experimental reproducibility across housing systems.

  4. Investigation of Catalase, Proxidase and Total Protein Level in Some Cold Treated Grapevine Cultivars Cold Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Karimi Alavijeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chilling is an important environmental stress that influences the yield and quality of many agricultural crops. Different plants use different systems to endure this stress and minimize its effects. One of these systems is enzymatic reaction. To find out more about responses of different grapevine species and cultivars to the low temperature conditions, their enzymatic changes were evaluated in a factorial experiment based on randomized complete design with 3 replication during different periods after chilling stress. Leaf samples of plants under cold stress had been taken and maintained in -80 °C until enzyme extraction. Low temperature around 4 °C is sufficient to induce genes that produce chilling acclimatization proteins. In the present study, leaf samples were collected from the plants that were kept at 4 °C during different time intervals, and then total proteins as well as two main antioxidant enzymes (catalase and guaiacolperoxidase activities were measured. Results showed that as temperature decreased, enzymatic activities were increased in six Iranian grapevine cultivars (‘Atabaki’, ‘Khalili-Danedar’, ‘Shahroodi’, ‘Rajabi-Siah’, ‘Askari’ and ‘Bidane-Sefid’ as well as ‘Riparia’, an American species. The highest enzymatic activities of catalase and ceroxidase were recorded in ‘Khalili-Danedar’ and ‘Riparia’. However,the lowest activities were recorded in ‘Rajabi-Siah’, ‘Bidane-Sefid’ and ‘Shahroodi’. For all studied cultivars, peroxidase showed its highest activity at 12 h after chilling stress, then remained constant, while, the highest activity of catalase were recorded at 8 h. In addition, cold stress increased the total protein content for all studied cultivars, in which ‘Khalili-Danedar’ had the highest protein content amongstudied cultivars. Also, the highest proteins content were recorded at 12 h after exposing plants to cold.

  5. ABA Is Involved in Regulation of Cold Stress Response in Bermudagrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebing Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As a representative warm-season grass, Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers.] is widely used in turf systems. However, low temperature remarkably limits its growth and distribution. ABA is a crucial phytohormone that has been reported to regulate much important physiological and biochemical processes in plants under abiotic stress. Therefore, the objective of this study was to figure out the effects of ABA on the cold-sensitive (S and cold-resistant (R Bermudagrass genotypes response to cold stress. In this study, the plants were treated with 100 μM ABA solution and exposed to 4°C temperature. After 7 days of cold treatment, the electrolyte leakage (EL, malonaldehyde (MDA and H2O2 content were significantly increased in both genotypes compared with control condition, and these values were higher in R genotype than those of S genotype, respectively. By contrast, exogenous ABA application decreased the electrolyte leakage (EL, MDA and H2O2 content in both genotypes compared with those plants without ABA treatment under cold treatment condition. In addition, exogenous ABA application increased the levels of chlorophyll a fluorescence transient curve for both genotypes, and it was higher in R genotype than that of S genotype. Analysis of photosynthetic fluorescence parameters revealed that ABA treatment improved the performance of photosystem II under cold condition, particularly for the R genotype. Moreover, cold stress significantly increased δ13C values for both genotypes, while it was alleviated by exogenous ABA. Additionally, exogenous ABA application altered the expression of ABA- or cold related genes, including ABF1, CBF1, and LEA. In summary, exogenous ABA application enhanced cold resistance of both genotypes by maintaining cell membrane stability, improving the process of photosystem II, increasing carbon isotopic fractionation under cold stress, and more prominently in R genotype compared with S genotype.

  6. Effect of short-term cold stress on oxidative damage and transcript accumulation of defense-related genes in chickpea seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi-Shahandashti, Seyyedeh-Sanam; Maali-Amiri, Reza; Zeinali, Hassan; Khazaei, Mona; Talei, Alireza; Ramezanpour, Seyyedeh-Sanaz

    2014-08-15

    Cold stress affects many plant physiological and biochemical components and induces cascades of alterations in metabolic pathways, amongst them the membrane fatty acid compositions, the activity of antioxidative enzymes and the regulation of gene expression. The present work aimed to characterize the changes of some of these factors in both cold acclimated (CA) and non-acclimated (NA) plants of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) to identify the role of the acclimation process in adjusting plant responses to severe cold stress. The results showed an increase in the unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) ratio compared to saturated fatty acids, which was more obvious in CA plants. Defense enzymes had an important role in CA plants to create greater cold tolerance compared to NA ones in the cases of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) activities. During cold stress, a high transcription level of CaCAT and CaSOD genes was detected in CA plants, but a low transcription of CaLOX gene was observed in CA plants compared to NA plants, which might have prevented the decline of UFAs (confirmed by double bond index (DBI) data). Moreover, the transcription level of the Carubisco gene, as an energy producing agent, was higher in CA plants than in NA plants and the transcription of the Catubulin gene, as a crucial substance of cell cytoskeleton, showed a decreasing trend in both CA and NA plants, but this decline was greater in NA plants. These responses showed the possible targets of cold stress as chloroplast and signal transduction to balance stress programs. The above results indicate the crucial role of FA compositions in creating cold tolerance in susceptible chickpea plants with possible responsive components and the possible interactions in protein and transcript levels even in facing extreme cold stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative transcriptomics of rice plants under cold, iron, and salt stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Amaral, Marcelo Nogueira; Arge, Luis Willian Pacheco; Benitez, Letícia Carvalho; Danielowski, Rodrigo; Silveira, Solange Ferreira da Silveira; Farias, Daniel da Rosa; de Oliveira, Antonio Costa; da Maia, Luciano Carlos; Braga, Eugenia Jacira Bolacel

    2016-09-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity, iron toxicity, and low temperatures are the main limiting factors of rice (Oryza sativa L.) yield. The elucidation of the genes involved in responses to these stresses is extremely important to understand the mechanisms that confer tolerance, as well as for the development of cultivars adapted to these conditions. In this study, the RNA-seq technique was used to compare the transcriptional profile of rice leaves (cv. BRS Querência) in stage V3, exposed to cold, iron, and salt stresses for 24 h. A range of 41 to 51 million reads was aligned, in which a total range of 88.47 to 89.21 % was mapped in the reference genome. For cold stress, 7905 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were observed, 2092 for salt and 681 for iron stress; 370 of these were common to the three DEG stresses. Functional annotation by software MapMan demonstrated that cold stress usually promoted the greatest changes in the overall metabolism, and an enrichment analysis of overrepresented gene ontology (GO) terms showed that most of them are contained in plastids, ribosome, and chloroplasts. Saline stress induced a more complex interaction network of upregulated overrepresented GO terms with a relatively low number of genes compared with cold stress. Our study demonstrated a high number of differentially expressed genes under cold stress and a greater relationship between salt and iron stress levels. The physiological process most affected at the molecular level by the three stresses seems to be photosynthesis.

  8. Cold stress and immunity: Do chickens adapt to cold by trading-off immunity for thermoregulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.

    2006-01-01

    Future animal husbandry aims at enhanced animal welfare, with minimal use of preventive medical treatments. These husbandry conditions will resemble more natural or ecological conditions. Under such farming systems, animals will experience various kinds of stressors such as environmental (e.g. cold,

  9. Generating a synthetic axion signal for cold cark matter axion searches using microwave cavities

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108502; Miceli, Lino

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrated that an axion signal in a RF resonator can be synthesized and controlled with commercially available instrumentation. Although this signal needs refinements, it can be customized to the needs of a specific cold dark matter axion search experiment. Since the modulator in the setup has arbitrary function generator capabilities, this apparatus is already capable to produce the necessary refinements, for instance a maxwellian line shape.

  10. Cold stress increases salt tolerance of the extremophytes Eutrema salsugineum (Thellungiella salsuginea) and Eutrema (Thellungiella) botschantzevii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamustakimova, A O; Leonova, Т G; Taranov, V V; de Boer, A H; Babakov, A V

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study was performed to analyze the effect of cold acclimation on improving the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana, Eutrema salsugineum and Eutrema botschantzevii plants to salt stress. Shoot FW, sodium and potassium accumulation, metabolite content, expression of proton pump genes VAB1, VAB2,VAB3, VP2, HA3 and genes encoding ion transporters SOS1, HKT1, NHX1, NHX2, NHX5 located in the plasma membrane or tonoplast were determined just after the cold treatment and the onset of the salt stress. In the same cold-acclimated E. botschantzevii plants, the Na(+) concentration after salt treatment was around 80% lower than in non-acclimated plants, whereas the K(+) concentration was higher. As a result of cold acclimation, the expression of, VAB3, NHX2, NHX5 genes and of SOS1, VP2, HA3 genes was strongly enhanced in E. botschantzevii and in E. salsugineum plants correspondently. None of the 10 genes analyzed showed any expression change in A. thaliana plants after cold acclimation. Altogether, the results indicate that cold-induced adaptation to subsequent salt stress exists in the extremophytes E. botschantzevii and to a lesser extend in E. salsugineum and is absent in Arabidopsis. This phenomenon may be attributed to the increased expression of ion transporter genes during cold acclimation in the Eutrema species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Cold plasma treatment enhances oilseed rape seed germination under drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Li; Jiangang, Li; Minchong, Shen; Chunlei, Zhang; Yuanhua, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Effects of cold plasma treatment on seed germination, seedling growth, antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation levels and osmotic-adjustment products of oilseed rape under drought stress were investigated in a drought-sensitive (Zhongshuang 7) and drought-tolerant cultivar (Zhongshuang 11). Results showed that, under drought stress, cold plasma treatment significantly improved the germination rate by 6.25% in Zhongshuang 7, and 4.44% in Zhongshuang 11. Seedling growth characteristics, including shoot and root dry weights, shoot and root lengths, and lateral root number, significantly increased after cold plasma treatment. The apparent contact angle was reduced by 30.38% in Zhongshuang 7 and 16.91% in Zhongshuang 11. Cold plasma treatment markedly raised superoxide dismutase and catalase activities by 17.71% and 16.52% in Zhongshuang 7, and by 13.00% and 13.21% in Zhongshuang 11. Moreover, cold plasma treatment significantly increased the soluble sugar and protein contents, but reduced the malondialdehyde content in seedlings. Our results suggested that cold plasma treatment improved oilseed rape drought tolerance by improving antioxidant enzyme activities, increasing osmotic-adjustment products, and reducing lipid peroxidation, especially in the drought-sensitive cultivar (Zhongshuang 7). Thus, cold plasma treatment can be used in an ameliorative way to improve germination and protect oilseed rape seedlings against damage caused by drought stress. PMID:26264651

  12. MM99.70 - MODELS FOR FRICTION AND MATERIAL STRESS STRAIN HARDENING IN COLD FORMING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Morten

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present documentation is to provide the necessary information for numerical simulation of cold forging operations applying the new friction model based on simulative testing as described in /1/..The documentation describes how the friction stress depends on the surface pressure...... into three main groups: friction modelling, stress/strain curves and other input data for numerical simulation....

  13. Transcriptome Profiling of Two Asparagus Bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis Cultivars Differing in Chilling Tolerance under Cold Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaqiang Tan

    Full Text Available Cowpea (V. unguiculata L. Walp. is an important tropical grain legume. Asparagus bean (V. unguiculata ssp. sesquipedialis is a distinctive subspecies of cowpea, which is considered one of the top ten Asian vegetables. It can be adapted to a wide range of environmental stimuli such as drought and heat. Nevertheless, it is an extremely cold-sensitive tropical species. Improvement of chilling tolerance in asparagus bean may significantly increase its production and prolong its supply. However, gene regulation and signaling pathways related to cold response in this crop remain unknown. Using Illumina sequencing technology, modification of global gene expression in response to chilling stress in two asparagus bean cultivars-"Dubai bean" and "Ningjiang-3", which are tolerant and sensitive to chilling, respectively-were investigated. More than 1.8 million clean reads were obtained from each sample. After de novo assembly, 88,869 unigenes were finally generated with a mean length of 635 bp. Of these unigenes, 41,925 (47.18% had functional annotations when aligned to public protein databases. Further, we identified 3,510 differentially expressed genes (DEGs in Dubai bean, including 2,103 up-regulated genes and 1,407 down-regulated genes. While in Ningjiang-3, we found 2,868 DEGs, 1,786 of which were increasing and the others were decreasing. 1,744 DEGs were commonly regulated in two cultivars, suggesting that some genes play fundamental roles in asparagus bean during cold stress. Functional classification of the DEGs in two cultivars using Mercator pipeline indicated that RNA, protein, signaling, stress and hormone metabolism were five major groups. In RNA group, analysis of TFs in DREB subfamily showed that ICE1-CBF3-COR cold responsive cascade may also exist in asparagus bean. Our study is the first to provide the transcriptome sequence resource for asparagus bean, which will accelerate breeding cold resistant asparagus bean varieties through genetic

  14. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking. Results In this study, we report genome-scale transcript response diversity of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes originating from different geographical locations to non-freezing cold stress (10°C). To analyze the transcriptional response diversity, we initially compared transcriptome changes in all 10 ecotypes using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. In total 6061 transcripts were significantly cold regulated (p cold stress regulon genes. Significant numbers of non-synonymous amino acid changes were observed in the coding region of the CBF regulon genes. Considering the limited knowledge about regulatory interactions between transcription factors and their target genes in the model plant A. thaliana, we have adopted a powerful systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA) to construct an in-silico transcriptional regulatory network model during response to cold stress. The resulting regulatory network contained 1,275 nodes and 7,720 connections, with 178 transcription factors and 1,331 target genes. Conclusions A. thaliana ecotypes exhibit considerable variation in transcriptome level responses to non-freezing cold stress treatment. Ecotype specific transcripts and related gene ontology (GO) categories were identified to delineate natural variation of cold stress regulated differential gene expression in the model plant A. thaliana. The predicted regulatory network model was able to identify new ecotype specific transcription factors and their regulatory interactions, which might be crucial for their local geographic adaptation to cold temperature. Additionally, since the approach presented here is general, it could be adapted to study networks regulating

  15. Plant resistance to cold stress: Mechanisms and environmental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The syndrome is even more complex because the various tissues of a plant are differently frost resistant, whereby meristematic cells are in general less frosthardy than mature tissues (Sakai and Larcher 1987). Another phenomenon that complicates the investigation of cold as a plant stressor is the seasonal change of frost.

  16. A novel cold-regulated gene, COR25, of Brassica napus is involved in plant response and tolerance to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Zhong, Hui; Ren, Feng; Guo, Qian-Qian; Hu, Xu-Peng; Li, Xue-Bao

    2011-04-01

    Cold stress, which causes dehydration damage to the plant cell, is one of the most common abiotic stresses that adversely affect plant growth and crop productivity. To improve its cold-tolerance, plants often enhance expression of some cold-related genes. In this study, a cold-regulated gene encoding 25 KDa of protein was isolated from Brassica napus cDNA library using a macroarray analysis, and is consequently designated as BnCOR25. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that BnCOR25 was expressed at high levels in hypocotyls, cotyledons, stems, and flowers, but its mRNA was found at low levels in roots and leaves. Northern blot analysis revealed that BnCOR25 transcripts were significantly induced by cold and osmotic stress treatment. The data also showed that BnCOR25 gene expression is mediated by ABA-dependent pathway. Overexpression of BnCOR25 in yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) significantly enhanced the cell survival probability under cold stress, and overexpression of BnCOR25 in Arabidopsis enhances plant tolerance to cold stress. These results suggested that the BnCOR25 gene may play an important role in conferring freezing/cold tolerance in plants.

  17. A Coupled Phase-Temperature Model for Dynamics of Transient Neuronal Signal in Mammals Cold Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firman Ahmad Kirana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a theoretical model consisting of coupled differential equation of membrane potential phase and temperature for describing the neuronal signal in mammals cold receptor. Based on the results from previous work by Roper et al., we modified a nonstochastic phase model for cold receptor neuronal signaling dynamics in mammals. We introduce a new set of temperature adjusted functional parameters which allow saturation characteristic at high and low steady temperatures. The modified model also accommodates the transient neuronal signaling process from high to low temperature by introducing a nonlinear differential equation for the “effective temperature” changes which is coupled to the phase differential equation. This simple model can be considered as a candidate for describing qualitatively the physical mechanism of the corresponding transient process.

  18. The Comparatively Proteomic Analysis in Response to Cold Stress in Cassava Plantlets

    OpenAIRE

    An, Feifei; Li, Genghu; Li, Qing X.; Li, Kaimian; Carvalho, Luiz J. C. B.; Ou, Wenjun; Chen, Songbi

    2016-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a tropical root crop and sensitive to low temperature. However, it is poorly to know how cassava can modify its metabolism and growth to adapt to cold stress. An investigation aimed at a better understanding of cold-tolerant mechanism of cassava plantlets was carried out with the approaches of physiology and proteomics in the present study. The principal component analysis of seven physiological characteristics showed that electrolyte leakage (EL), chloro...

  19. Towards continuous mental stress level estimation from physiological signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, J.L.P; Grundlehner, B.; Liu, H.; Penders, J.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    It is well known that chronic mental stress can cause health problems. Early stress detection can help prevent these problems. We propose and compare two approaches to estimate stress level from physiology. We have measured physiological signals in three different artificial stressful conditions

  20. Cold stress decreases the capacity for respiratory NADH oxidation in potato leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Å.S.; Johansson, F.I.; Møller, I.M.

    2002-01-01

    Cold stress effects on the expression of genes for respiratory chain enzymes were investigated in potato (Solarium tuberosum L., cv. Desiree) leaves. The nda1 and ndb1 genes, homologues to genes encoding the non-proton-pumping respiratory chain NADH dehydrogenases of Escherichia coli and yeast...... is 10% of the original level. This decrease is accompanied by specific decreases of immunodetected NDA protein and internal rotenone-insensitive NADH oxidation in mitochondria isolated from cold-treated plants. The alternative oxidase is not cold-induced neither at the protein nor at the activity level...

  1. Global Transcriptome Profiles of 'Meyer' Zoysiagrass in Response to Cold Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanjun Wei

    Full Text Available A long green period is essential for a turfgrass species with high ornamental value and a wide area of use. Zoysiagrasses (Zoysia spp. Willd. are perennial turfgrass species popular in tropical, subtropical and temperate zones, possessing many properties necessary to be economically useful turfgrass. They do not have a long green period because of cold sensitivity. A main focus in zoysiagrass research is to develop cold tolerant cultivars. Understanding the cold response in zoysiagrass is a fundamental area of research. In the present study, 'Meyer' zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica, a widely cultivated variety in the genus, is used. We employed RNA-Seq to investigate genome-wide gene expression profiles in leaves under cold stress (4°C. Using the Illumina sequencing platform, we obtained approximately 206 million high-quality paired-end reads from three libraries (0 h, 2 h, and 72 h cold treatment at 4°C. After de novo assembly and quantitative assessment, 46,412 unigenes were generated with an average length of 998 bp and an N50 of 1,522 bp. A total of 25,644 (55.2% unigenes were annotated by alignment with public protein databases including NR, SwissProt, KEGG and KOG. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs were investigated using the RPKM method. A total of 756 DEGs were identified between 0 h and 2 h-cold treatment, with 522 up-regulated and 234 down-regulated; and 5327 DEGs were identified between 0 h and 72 h-cold treatment, with 2453 up-regulated and 2874 down-regulated. The expression profile of 15 DEGs selected randomly was confirmed with qRT-PCR. The results suggest that cold stress can induce desiccation and oxidative stress, inhibit photosynthesis and substance transport. In response to the stress, genes involved in proline synthesis, in starch hydrolysis, in methionine and ascorbic acid metabolism, in SOD activity, and in DREBs response pathway were up-regulated. GA metabolism, ABA and JA stimulus response were affected under cold

  2. Overexpression of pigeonpea stress-induced cold and drought regulatory gene (CcCDR) confers drought, salt, and cold tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-09-01

    A potent cold and drought regulatory protein-encoding gene (CcCDR) was isolated from the subtractive cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. CcCDR was induced by different abiotic stress conditions in pigeonpea. Overexpression of CcCDR in Arabidopsis thaliana imparted enhanced tolerance against major abiotic stresses, namely drought, salinity, and low temperature, as evidenced by increased biomass, root length, and chlorophyll content. Transgenic plants also showed increased levels of antioxidant enzymes, proline, and reducing sugars under stress conditions. Furthermore, CcCDR-transgenic plants showed enhanced relative water content, osmotic potential, and cell membrane stability, as well as hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) as compared with control plants. Localization studies confirmed that CcCDR could enter the nucleus, as revealed by intense fluorescence, indicating its possible interaction with various nuclear proteins. Microarray analysis revealed that 1780 genes were up-regulated in CcCDR-transgenics compared with wild-type plants. Real-time PCR analysis on selected stress-responsive genes, involved in ABA-dependent and -independent signalling networks, revealed higher expression levels in transgenic plants, suggesting that CcCDR acts upstream of these genes. The overall results demonstrate the explicit role of CcCDR in conferring multiple abiotic stress tolerance at the whole-plant level. The multifunctional CcCDR seems promising as a prime candidate gene for enhancing abiotic stress tolerance in diverse plants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. Cross-talk between Phosphate Starvation and Other Environmental Stress Signaling Pathways in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Dongwon; Chun, Hyun Jin; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Min Chul

    2017-10-01

    The maintenance of inorganic phosphate (Pi) homeostasis is essential for plant growth and yield. Plants have evolved strategies to cope with Pi starvation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational levels, which maximizes its availability. Many transcription factors, miRNAs, and transporters participate in the Pi starvation signaling pathway where their activities are modulated by sugar and phytohormone signaling. Environmental stresses significantly affect the uptake and utilization of nutrients by plants, but their effects on the Pi starvation response remain unclear. Recently, we reported that Pi starvation signaling is affected by abiotic stresses such as salt, abscisic acid, and drought. In this review, we identified transcription factors, such as MYB, WRKY, and zinc finger transcription factors with functions in Pi starvation and other environmental stress signaling. In silico analysis of the promoter regions of Pi starvation-responsive genes, including phosphate transporters, microRNAs, and phosphate starvation-induced genes, suggest that their expression may be regulated by other environmental stresses, such as hormones, drought, cold, heat, and pathogens as well as by Pi starvation. Thus, we suggest the possibility of cross-talk between Pi starvation signaling and other environmental stress signaling pathways.

  4. Context-dependent effects of cold stress on behavioral, physiological, and life-history traits of the red flour beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Inon; Wertheimer, Keren-Or; Xin, Joy Lim; Gilad, Tomer; Goldenberg, Inna; Subach, Aziz

    2017-06-20

    Animals are exposed in nature to a variety of stressors. While stress is generally harmful, mild stress can also be beneficial and contribute to reproduction and survival. We studied the effect of five cold shock events versus a single cold shock and a control group, representing three levels of stress (harsh, mild, and no stress), on behavioral, physiological, and life-history traits of the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum, Herbst 1797). Beetles exposed to harsh cold stress were less active than a control group: they moved less and failed more frequently to detect a food patch. Their probability to mate was also lower. Beetle pairs exposed to harsh cold stress frequently failed to reproduce at all, and if reproducing, females laid fewer eggs, which were, as larvae in mid-development, smaller than those in the control group. However, harsh cold stress led to improved female starvation tolerance, probably due to enhanced lipid accumulation. Harsh cold shock also improved tolerance to an additional cold shock compared to the control. Finally, a single cold shock event negatively affected fewer measured response variables than the harsh cold stress, but also enhanced neither starvation tolerance nor tolerance to an additional cold shock. The consequences of a harsher cold stress are thus not solely detrimental but might even enhance survival under stressful conditions. Under benign conditions, nevertheless, harsh stress impedes beetle performance. The harsh stress probably shifted the balance point of the survival-reproduction trade-off, a shift that did not take place following exposure to mild stress. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Exhaled Nitric Oxide and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor as Predictors of Cold Symptoms After Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Thomas; Trueba, Ana F; Vogel, Pia D; Auchus, Richard J; Rosenfield, David

    2017-11-18

    Prior research has demonstrated that psychosocial stress is associated with respiratory infections. Immunologic, endocrine, and cardiovascular predictors of such infections have been explored with varying success. We therefore sought to study the unexplored role of airway mucosal immunity factors, nitric oxide (NO) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). NO is secreted by airway epithelial cells as part of the first line of defense against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. VEGF is expressed by mast cells in respiratory infections and recruits immune cells to infected sites, but in excess lead to vulnerability of the airway epithelium. In this proof-of-concept study we measured exhaled NO, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) VEGF, salivary VEGF, and salivary cortisol in 36 students undergoing final academic examinations at three occasions: a low-stress baseline during the term, an early phase of finals, and a late phase of finals. Participants also reported on cold symptoms at these time points and approximately 5 and 10days after their last academic examination. Higher baseline NO was associated with fewer cold symptoms after stress, whereas higher baseline VEGF in EBC and saliva were associated with more cold symptoms after stress. Perceived stress at baseline as well as salivary VEGF and cortisol late in the finals also contributed to the prediction of later cold symptoms. Basal levels of NO and VEGF may inform about mucosal immunocompetence and add to preventative treatments against airway infections from periods of stress in daily life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. [The effect of cold stress on DNA oxidative damage of lung in chicken].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hai-yan; Li, Jin-min; Yu, Qian; Wang, Jun-jie; Li, Shu

    2009-08-01

    To explore the influence of cold strss on DNA oxidative damage of lung in chicken. Took 15-day-old healthy chicks as the experimental object, carried on the cold stress (12 +/- 1 degrees C) to process. Detected the change of the MDA content, SOD and GSH-Px activity of the lung, and performed KCl-SDS precipitation method and fluorescence detection method to identify the influence of cold strss on DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) and DNA-DNA crosslinks (DDC) of lung cell in different time. The results were as follow: with the time lapsing during acute cold stress, MDA content gradually increased, the SOD and GSH-Px activity of the lung increased compared with their control group at each stress time point, and the lung cell DPC and DDC coefficient were all gradually increased with the time lapsing. Cold stress could bring about destruction in the lung tissue oxidation-antioxidant balance, and causes the oxidation damage of DNA.

  7. Adaptation of grapevine flowers to cold involves different mechanisms depending on stress intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélodie Sawicki

    Full Text Available Grapevine flower development and fruit set are influenced by cold nights in the vineyard. To investigate the impact of cold stress on carbon metabolism in the inflorescence, we exposed the inflorescences of fruiting cuttings to chilling and freezing temperatures overnight and measured fluctuations in photosynthesis and sugar content. Whatever the temperature, after the stress treatment photosynthesis was modified in the inflorescence, but the nature of the alteration depended on the intensity of the cold stress. At 4°C, photosynthesis in the inflorescence was impaired through non-stomatal limitations, whereas at 0°C it was affected through stomatal limitations. A freezing night (-3°C severely deregulated photosynthesis in the inflorescence, acting primarily on photosystem II. Cold nights also induced accumulation of sugars. Soluble carbohydrates increased in inflorescences exposed to -3°C, 0°C and 4°C, but starch accumulated only in inflorescences of plants treated at 0 and -3°C. These results suggest that inflorescences are able to cope with cold temperatures by adapting their carbohydrate metabolism using mechanisms that are differentially induced according to stress intensity.

  8. Phylogenetic diversity of stress signalling pathways in fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stansfield Ian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbes must sense environmental stresses, transduce these signals and mount protective responses to survive in hostile environments. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that fungal stress signalling pathways have evolved rapidly in a niche-specific fashion that is independent of phylogeny. To test this hypothesis we have compared the conservation of stress signalling molecules in diverse fungal species with their stress resistance. These fungi, which include ascomycetes, basidiomycetes and microsporidia, occupy highly divergent niches from saline environments to plant or mammalian hosts. Results The fungi displayed significant variation in their resistance to osmotic (NaCl and sorbitol, oxidative (H2O2 and menadione and cell wall stresses (Calcofluor White and Congo Red. There was no strict correlation between fungal phylogeny and stress resistance. Rather, the human pathogens tended to be more resistant to all three types of stress, an exception being the sensitivity of Candida albicans to the cell wall stress, Calcofluor White. In contrast, the plant pathogens were relatively sensitive to oxidative stress. The degree of conservation of osmotic, oxidative and cell wall stress signalling pathways amongst the eighteen fungal species was examined. Putative orthologues of functionally defined signalling components in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were identified by performing reciprocal BLASTP searches, and the percent amino acid identities of these orthologues recorded. This revealed that in general, central components of the osmotic, oxidative and cell wall stress signalling pathways are relatively well conserved, whereas the sensors lying upstream and transcriptional regulators lying downstream of these modules have diverged significantly. There was no obvious correlation between the degree of conservation of stress signalling pathways and the resistance of a particular fungus to the corresponding stress. Conclusion Our

  9. Exogenous 5-Aminolevulenic Acid Promotes Antioxidative Defence System, Photosynthesis and Growth in Soybean against Cold Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe MANAFI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the possibility of enhancing cold stress tolerance of young soybean plants (Glycine max [L.] Merr by exogenous application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA was investigated. ALA was applied at various concentrations (0, 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 mM by seed priming and foliar application method. After ALA treatment, the plants were subjected to cold stress at 10 ± 0.5 °C for 72 h. Cold stress significantly decreased plant growth, relative water content, chlorophyll, photosynthesis and stomatal conductivity, while it increased electrolyte leakage and proline accumulation. ALA at low concentrations (0.3 mM protected plants against cold stress, enhancing plant height, shoot fresh and dry weight, chlorophyll content, photosynthesis, stomatal conductivity as well as relative water content. Increase of electrolyte leakage was also prevented by 0.6 mM ALA. ALA also enhanced superoxide dismutase and catalase activities at 0.6 mM concentration especially under cold stress conditions. Proline increased with increasing in ALA concentration under both temperature conditions. In most cases, application of ALA by spraying method was better than seed priming method. Results showed that ALA, which is considered as an endogenous plant growth regulator, can be used effectively to protect soybean plants from the damaging effects of cold stress, by enhancing the activity of antioxidative enzymes, protecting cell membrane against reactive oxygen species and finally by promoting chlorophyll synthesis, leading to more intense photosynthesis and more carbon fixation, without any adverse effect on the plant growth.

  10. Cold pulse and rotation reversals with turbulence spreading and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, F.; Naulin, Volker; Rasmussen, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    Transport modeling based on inclusion of turbulence spreading and residual stresses shows internal rotation reversals and polarity reversal of cold pulses, with a clear indication of nonlocal transport effects due to fast spreading in the turbulence intensity field. The effects of turbulence....... As an additional and new effect, the model predicts a perturbation of the velocity profile following a cold pulse from the edge. This allows direct experimental confirmation of both the existence of residual stress caused by turbulence intensity profiles and fundamental ideas of transport modeling presented here...

  11. Modulation of alternative oxidase to enhance tolerance against cold stress of chickpea by chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Serkan; Genisel, Mucip; Turk, Hulya; Dumlupinar, Rahmi; Demir, Yavuz

    2015-03-01

    The alternative oxidase (AOX) is the enzyme responsible for the alternative respiratory pathway. This experiment was conducted to examine the influence on cold tolerance ability of chickpea (Cicer aurentium cv. Müfitbey) seedlings of AOX activator (pyruvate), AOX inhibitor (salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM)) and an inhibitor of the cytochrome pathway of respiration (antimycin A) treatments. 5mM pyruvate, 2μM antimycin A and 4mM SHAM solutions were exogenously applied to thirteen-day-old chickpea leaves and then the seedlings were transferred to a different plant growth chamber arranged to 10/5°C (day/night) for 48h. Cold stress markedly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to controls. Pyruvate and antimycin A significantly increased the cold-induced increase in antioxidant activity but SHAM decreased it. Cold-induced increases in superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and lipid peroxidation levels were significantly reduced by pyruvate and antimycin A, but increased by SHAM treatment. Pyruvate and antimycin A application increased both the activity and protein expression of AOX in comparison to cold stress alone. However, SHAM significantly decreased activity of AOX but did not affect its expression. Total cellular respiration values (TCRV) supported the changes in activity and expression of AOX. While TCRV were increased by cold and pyruvate, they were significantly reduced by SHAM and especially antimycin A. These results indicate that pyruvate and antimycin A applications were effective in reducing oxidative stress by activating the alternative respiratory pathway as well as antioxidant activity. Furthermore, direct activation of AOX, rather than inhibition of the cytochrome pathway, was the most effective way to mitigate cold stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Cold stress affects H(+)-ATPase and phospholipase D activity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Carlo; Camoni, Lorenzo; Visconti, Sabina; Aducci, Patrizia

    2016-11-01

    Low temperature is an environmental stress that greatly influences plant performance and distribution. Plants exposed to cold stress exhibit modifications of plasma membrane physical properties that can affect their functionality. Here it is reported the effect of low temperature exposure of Arabidopsis plants on the activity of phospholipase D and H(+)-ATPase, the master enzyme located at the plasma membrane. The H(+)-ATPase activity was differently affected, depending on the length of cold stress imposed. In particular, an exposure to 4 °C for 6 h determined the strong inhibition of the H(+)-ATPase activity, that correlates with a reduced association with the regulatory 14-3-3 proteins. A longer exposure first caused the full recovery of the enzymatic activity followed by a significant activation, in accordance with both the increased association with 14-3-3 proteins and induction of H(+)-ATPase gene transcription. Different time lengths of cold stress treatment were also shown to strongly stimulate the phospholipase D activity and affect the phosphatidic acid levels of the plasma membranes. Our results suggest a functional correlation between the activity of phospholipase D and H(+)-ATPase mediated by phosphatidic acid release during the cold stress response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Estrous cycle and cold stress in iron-deficient rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.M.; Bucher, D.R.; Lukaski, H.C. (USDA/ARS, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Female iron-deficient (ID) rats have plasma triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) concentrations similar to iron sufficient controls (CN) at 24C. Whether the apparently euthyroid ID female can thermoregulate when exposed to cold was studied to assess the interactive effects of iron deficiency and the female reproductive cycle. Rats were assigned to either ID (n = 60) or CN (n = 60) diets for a period of five weeks. The two groups were then subdivided into five groups, four based on stage of the estrous cycle and the fifth group was ovariectomized one week prior to sacrifice. Animals were exposed to 4C for 6 h. Following sacrifice, tissues were collected for analysis of thyroid hormone and iron status indices. There was an interactive effect of iron status and the estrous cycle on core temperature response to the cold. Plasma thyrozine (T{sup 4}) concentrations were unaffected by iron status or the estrous cycle, and plasma T{sub 3} concentrations were significantly lower in ID than CN rats. Thyroxine 5{prime} - deiodinase activity in the liver was significantly lower in ID animals than CN; this conforms with the plasma T{sub 3} findings. Brown adipose tissue deiodinase was not affected by either iron status or the estrous cycle. In conclusion, iron deficiency impairs thermoregulation in rats, and this effect is related to the ovarian cycle. However, brown adipose tissue does not appear specifically involved in this defect.

  14. RDM4 modulates cold stress resistance in Arabidopsis partially through the CBF-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zhulong; Wang, Yanping; Cao, Minjie; Gong, Yuehua; Mu, Zixin; Wang, Haiqing; Hu, Yuanlei; Deng, Xin; He, Xin-Jian; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-03-01

    The C-REPEAT-BINDING FACTOR (CBF) pathway has important roles in plant responses to cold stress. How the CBF genes themselves are activated after cold acclimation remains poorly understood. In this study, we characterized cold tolerance of null mutant of RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 4 (RDM4), which encodes a protein that associates with RNA polymerases Pol V and Pol II, and is required for RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) in Arabidopsis. The results showed that dysfunction of RDM4 reduced cold tolerance, as evidenced by decreased survival and increased electrolyte leakage. Mutation of RDM4 resulted in extensive transcriptomic reprogramming. CBFs and CBF regulon genes were down-regulated in rdm4 but not nrpe1 (the largest subunit of PolV) mutants, suggesting that the role of RDM4 in cold stress responses is independent of the RdDM pathway. Overexpression of RDM4 constitutively increased the expression of CBFs and regulon genes and decreased cold-induced membrane injury. A great proportion of genes affected by rdm4 overlapped with those affected by CBFs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation results suggested that RDM4 is important for Pol II occupancy at the promoters of CBF2 and CBF3. We present evidence of a considerable role for RDM4 in regulating gene expression at low temperature, including the CBF pathway in Arabidopsis. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Anthocyanin biosynthesis for cold and freezing stress tolerance and desirable color in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Hur, Yoonkang; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-07-01

    Flavonoids are divided into several structural classes, including anthocyanins, which provide flower and leaf colors and other derivatives that play diverse roles in plant development and interactions with the environment. This study characterized four anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) genes of Brassica rapa, a structural gene of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, and investigated their association with pigment formation, cold and freezing tolerance in B. rapa. Sequences of these genes were analyzed and compared with similar gene sequences from other species, and a high degree of homology with their respective functions was found. Organ-specific expression analysis revealed that these genes were only expressed in the colored portion of leaves of different lines of B. rapa. Conversely, B. rapa anthocyanidin synthase (BrANS) genes also showed responses to cold and freezing stress treatment in B. rapa. BrANSs were also shown to be regulated by two transcription factors, BrMYB2-2 and BrTT8, contrasting with anthocyanin accumulation and cold stress. Thus, the above results suggest the association of these genes with anthocyanin biosynthesis and cold and freezing stress tolerance and might be useful resources for development of cold-resistant Brassica crops with desirable colors as well.

  16. Transcriptome profiling and validation of gene based single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in sorghum genotypes with contrasting responses to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Ratan; Burow, Gloria; Hayes, Chad; Emendack, Yves; Xin, Zhanguo; Burke, John

    2015-12-09

    Sorghum is a versatile cereal crop, with excellent heat and drought tolerance. However, it is susceptible to early-season cold stress (12-15 °C) which limits stand-establishment and seedling growth. To gain further insights on the molecular mechanism of cold tolerance in sorghum we performed transcriptome profiling between known cold sensitive and tolerant sorghum lines using RNA sequencing technology under control and cold stress treatments. Here we report on the identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between contrasting sorghum genotypes, HongkeZi (cold tolerant) and BTx623 (cold sensitive) under cool and control temperatures using RNAseq approach to elucidate the molecular basis of sorghum response to cold stress. Furthermore, we validated bi-allelic variants in the form of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) between the cold susceptible and tolerant lines of sorghum. An analysis of transcriptome profile showed that in response to cold, a total of 1910 DEGs were detected under cold and control temperatures in both genotypes. We identified a subset of genes under cold stress for downstream analysis, including transcription factors that exhibit differential abundance between the sensitive and tolerant genotypes. We identified transcription factors including Dehydration-responsive element-binding factors, C-repeat binding factors, and Ethylene responsive transcription factors as significantly upregulated during cold stress in cold tolerant HKZ. Additionally, specific genes such as plant cytochromes, glutathione s-transferases, and heat shock proteins were found differentially regulated under cold stress between cold tolerant and susceptible genotype of sorghum. A total of 41,603 SNP were identified between the cold sensitive and tolerant genotypes with minimum read of four. Approximately 89 % of the 114 SNP sites selected for evaluation were validated using endpoint genotyping technology. A new strategy which involved an integrated analysis of

  17. Thermal creep and stress-affected precipitation of 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puigh, R. J.; Lovell, A. J.; Garner, F. A.

    1984-05-01

    Measurements of the thermal creep of 20% cold-worked 316 stainless stpel have been performed for temperatures from 593 to 760°C, stress levels as high as 138 MPa and exposure times as long as 15,000 hours. The creep strains exhibit a complex behavior arising from the combined action of true creep and stress-affected precipitation of intermetallic phases. The latter process is suspected to be altered by neutron irradiation.

  18. Cold stress equally enhances in vivo pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in chicken lines divergently selected for antibody responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.; Kaiser, M.G.; Poel, van der J.J.; Parmentier, H.K.; Lamont, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of cold stress, immunization and genetic selection on the expression of mRNA for cytokine genes in poultry have not been completely elucidated. Therefore, in the present experiment, using real-time quantitative RT-PCR, we evaluated the effect of cold stress and immunization with complete

  19. Abiotic stress signalling pathways: specificity and cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, H; Knight, M R

    2001-06-01

    Plants exhibit a variety of responses to abiotic stresses that enable them to tolerate and survive adverse conditions. As we learn more about the signalling pathways leading to these responses, it is becoming clear that they constitute a network that is interconnected at many levels. In this article, we discuss the 'cross-talk' between different signalling pathways and question whether there are any truly specific abiotic stress signalling responses.

  20. Chromatin changes in response to drought, salinity, heat, and cold stresses in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Myong eKim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin regulation is essential to regulate genes and genome activities. In plants, the alteration of histone modification and DNA methylation are coordinated with changes in the expression of stress-responsive genes to adapt to environmental changes. Several chromatin regulators have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stress-responsive gene networks under abiotic stress conditions. Specific histone modification sites and the histone modifiers that regulate key stress-responsive genes have been identified by genetic and biochemical approaches, revealing the importance of chromatin regulation in plant stress responses. Recent studies have also suggested that histone modification plays an important role in plant stress memory. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the regulation and alteration of histone modification (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, and SUMOylation in response to the abiotic stresses, drought, high-salinity, heat, and cold in plants.

  1. Detection of cold stressed maize seedlings for high throughput phenotyping using hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuanqi; Yang, Ce; Moghimi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging can provide hundreds of images at different wave bands covering the visible and near infrared regions, which is superior to traditional spectral and RGB techniques. Minnesota produced a lot of maize every year, while the temperature in Minnesota can change abruptly during spring. This study was carried out to use hyperspectral imaging technique to identify maize seedlings with cold stress prior to having visible phenotypes. A total of 60 samples were scanned by the hyperspectral camera at the wave range of 395-885 nm. The spectral reflectance information was extracted from the corrected hyperspectral images. By spectral reflectance information, support vector machine (SVM) classification models were established to identify the cold stressed samples. Then, the wavelengths which could play significant roles for the detection were selected using two-wavelength combination method. The classifiers were built again using the selected wavelengths. From the results, it can be found the selected wavelengths can even perform better than full wave range. The overall results indicated that hyperspectral imaging has the potential to classify cold stress symptoms in maize seedlings and thus help in selecting the corn genome lines with cold stress resistance.

  2. Dehydrin expression as a potential diagnostic tool for cold stress in white clover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseva, Irina Ivanova; Anders, Iwona; Yuperlieva-Mateeva, Bistra; Nenkova, Rosa; Kostadinova, Anelia; Feller, Urs

    2014-05-01

    Cold acclimation is important for crop survival in environments undergoing seasonal low temperatures. It involves the induction of defensive mechanisms including the accumulation of different cryoprotective molecules among which are dehydrins (DHN). Recently several sequences coding for dehydrins were identified in white clover (Trifolium repens). This work aimed to select the most responsive to cold stress DHN analogues in search for cold stress diagnostic markers. The assessment of dehydrin transcript accumulation via RT-PCR and immunodetection performed with three antibodies against the conserved K-, Y-, and S-segment allowed to outline different dehydrin types presented in the tested samples. Both analyses confirmed that YnKn dehydrins were underrepresented in the controls but exposure to low temperature specifically induced their accumulation. Strong immunosignals corresponding to 37-40 kDa with antibodies against Y- and K-segment were revealed in cold-stressed leaves. Another 'cold-specific' band at position 52-55 kDa was documented on membranes probed with antibodies against K-segment. Real time RT-qPCR confirmed that low temperatures induced the accumulation of SKn and YnSKn transcripts in leaves and reduced their expression in roots. Results suggest that a YnKn dehydrin transcript with GenBank ID: KC247805 and the immunosignal at 37-40 kDa, obtained with antibodies against Y- and K-segment are reliable markers for cold stress in white clover. The assessment of SKn (GenBank ID: EU846208) and YnSKn (GenBank ID: KC247804) transcript levels in leaves could serve as additional diagnostic tools. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional evolution of leptin of Ochotona curzoniae in adaptive thermogenesis driven by cold environmental stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental stress can accelerate the directional selection and evolutionary rate of specific stress-response proteins to bring about new or altered functions, enhancing an organism's fitness to challenging environments. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae, an endemic and keystone species on Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, is a high hypoxia and low temperature tolerant mammal with high resting metabolic rate and non-shivering thermogenesis to cope in this harsh plateau environment. Leptin is a key hormone related to how these animals regulate energy homeostasis. Previous molecular evolutionary analysis helped to generate the hypothesis that adaptive evolution of plateau pika leptin may be driven by cold stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis, recombinant pika leptin was first purified. The thermogenic characteristics of C57BL/6J mice injected with pika leptin under warm (23±1°C and cold (5±1°C acclimation is investigated. Expression levels of genes regulating adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue and the hypothalamus are compared between pika leptin and human leptin treatment, suggesting that pika leptin has adaptively and functionally evolved. Our results show that pika leptin regulates energy homeostasis via reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure under both warm and cold conditions. Compared with human leptin, pika leptin demonstrates a superior induced capacity for adaptive thermogenesis, which is reflected in a more enhanced β-oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis and heat production. Moreover, leptin treatment combined with cold stimulation has a significant synergistic effect on adaptive thermogenesis, more so than is observed with a single cold exposure or single leptin treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support the hypothesis that cold stress has driven the functional evolution of plateau pika leptin as an ecological adaptation to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  4. Indirect calorimetry: assessing animal response to heat and cold stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaughan, J.B.; Heetkamp, M.J.W.; Hendriks, P.

    2015-01-01

    Calorimetric thermal stress studies where indirect calorimetry is used as a tool to estimate energy expenditure have been undertaken since this technique was developed. Some examples of these studies are presented in this chapter. The measurement of gas exchange by means of an open-circuit

  5. True stress-strain curves of cold worked stainless steel over a large range of strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Kawakubo, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    True stress-strain curves for cold worked stainless steel were obtained over a range of strains that included a large strain exceeding the strain for the tensile strength (post-necking strain). A specified testing method was used to obtain the stress-strain curves in air at room temperature. The testing method employed the digital image correlation (DIC) technique and iterative finite element analyses (FEA) and was referred to as IFD (Iteration FEA procedure based on DIC measurement) method. Although hourglass type specimens have been previously used for the IFD method, in this study, plate specimens with a parallel gage section were used to obtain accurate yield and tensile strengths together with the stress-strain curves. The stress-strain curves including the post-necking strain were successfully obtained by the IFD method, and it was shown that the stress-strain curves for different degrees of cold work collapsed onto a single curve when the offset strain was considered. It was also shown that the Swift type constitutive equation gave good regression for the true stress-strain curves including the post-necking strain regardless of the degree of cold work, although the Ramberg-Osgood type constitutive equation showed poor fit. In the regression for the Swift type constitutive equation, the constant for power law could be assumed to be nS = 0.5.

  6. Finite element analysis of residual stress in cold expanded plate with different thickness and expansion ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin Shariffudin, Kamarul; Karuppanan, Saravanan; Patil, Santosh S.

    2017-10-01

    Cold expansion of fastener/rivet holes is a common way to generate beneficial compressive residual stress around the fastener hole. In this study, cold expansion process was simulated by finite-element method in order to determine the residual stress field around two cold expanded holes by varying the plate thickness and expansion ratio of the hole. The model was developed in ANSYS and assigned to aluminium alloy 7475-T61 material model. The results showed that the residual stress become more compressive as the plate thickness is increased up to t/d = 2.6 and decreased for further level of thickness. In addition, the residual stress at the edge of the hole become more compressive as the expansion ratio is increased up to 4.5% and decreased for further level of expansion. This study also found that the residual stresses near the entrance and the exit face of the plate are less compressive than the residual stresses on the mid-thickness of the plate.

  7. Screening for Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Rice: Salt, Cold, and Drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Diego M; Almadanim, M Cecília; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A; Saibo, Nelson J M; Oliveira, M Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the primary source of food for more than half of the world population. Most rice varieties are severely injured by abiotic stresses, with strong social and economic impact. Understanding rice responses to stress may help breeding for more tolerant varieties. However, papers dealing with stress experiments often describe very different experimental designs, thus making comparisons difficult. The use of identical setups is the only way to generate comparable data. This chapter is organized into three sections, describing the experimental conditions established at the Genomics of Plant Stress (GPlantS) unit of ITQB to assess the response of rice plants to three different abiotic stresses--high salinity, cold stress, and drought. All sections include a detailed description of the materials and methodology, as well as useful notes gathered from the GPlantS team's experience. We use rice seedlings as plants at this stage show high sensitivity to abiotic stresses. For the salt and cold stress assays we use hydroponic cultures, while for the drought assay plants are grown in soil and subjected to water withholding. All setups enable visual score determination and are suitable for sample collection along the imposition of stress. The proposed methodologies are simple and affordable to implement in most labs, allowing the discrimination of several rice genotypes at the molecular and phenotypic level.

  8. Study of exposure to cold stress and body physiological responses in auto mechanic employees in Hamadan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Saedpanah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuous exposure to cold air is considered to be a hazardous agent in the workplace in cold seasons. This study aimed to determine the level of cold stress and relation with physiological responses in auto mechanic employees. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the winter of 1395 on auto mechanic employees in Hamadan city. Physiological responses during daily activity were measured in accordance with ISO 9886 standard method. Environmental air measures like air temperature and air velocity were measured simultaneously and cold stress indexes were also determined. Data was analyzed using SPSS 21 software. Result: The result showed that mean wind chill index, equivalent chill temperature and required clothing insulation were 489.97±47.679 kcal/m2.h, 13.78± 1.869 0c and 2.04 ± 0.246 clo, respectively. According to the results of cold stress indexes, the studied employees are exposed to cold stress. Pearson correlation test showed that there are significant relationship between cold stress indexes with physiological responses (p<0.05, however, IREQ min showed more correlation than the others.  There is also a significant relationship between body fat percentage and deep temperature (p<0.05, r=0.314. Conclusion: The result confirmed that IREQ min index has high validity for estimation of cold stress among auto mechanic employees. Moreover, the increase of body fat percentage leads to an increase of cold tolerance power of employees.

  9. cDNA-AFLP analysis of transcripts induced in chickpea plants by TiO2 nanoparticles during cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Saeed; Maali-Amiri, Reza; Mohammadi, Rahmat; Kazemi-Shahandashti, Seyyedeh-Sanam

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on cold tolerance (CT) development in two chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes (Sel96Th11439, cold tolerant, and ILC533, cold susceptible) by using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique during the first and sixth days of cold stress (CS) at 4 °C. Selective amplification by primer combinations generated 4200 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) while 100 of them (2.62%) were differentially expressed. During CS, 60 differentially expressed TDFs of TiO2 NPs-treated plants were cloned and 10 of them produced successfully readable sequences. These data represented different groups of genes involved in metabolism pathways, cellular defense, cell connections and signaling, transcriptional regulation and chromatin architecture. Two out of 10 TDFs were unknown genes with uncharacterized functions or sequences without homology to known ones. The network-based analysis showed a gene-gene relationship in response to CS. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) confirmed differential expression of identified genes (six out of 10 TDFs) with potential functions in CT and showed similar patterns with cDNA-AFLP results. An increase in transcription level of these TDFs, particularly on the first day of CS, was crucial for developing CT through decreasing electrolyte leakage index (ELI) content in tolerant plants compared to susceptible ones, as well as in TiO2 NPs-treated plants compared to control ones. It could also indicate probable role of TiO2 NPs against CS-induced oxidative stress. Therefore, a new application of TiO2 NPs in CT development is suggested for preventing or controlling the damages in field conditions and increasing crop productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Possible stimulation of anti-tumor immunity using repeated cold stress: a hypothesis

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    Radoja Sasa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phenomenon of hormesis, whereby small amounts of seemingly harmful or stressful agents can be beneficial for the health and lifespan of laboratory animals has been reported in literature. In particular, there is accumulating evidence that daily brief cold stress can increase both numbers and activity of peripheral cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells, the major effectors of adaptive and innate tumor immunity, respectively. This type of regimen (for 8 days has been shown to improve survival of mice infected with intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which would also be consistent with enhanced cell-mediated immunity. Presentation of the hypothesis This paper hypothesizes that brief cold-water stress repeated daily over many months could enhance anti-tumor immunity and improve survival rate of a non-lymphoid cancer. The possible mechanism of the non-specific stimulation of cellular immunity by repeated cold stress appears to involve transient activation of the sympathetic nervous system, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axes, as described in more detail in the text. Daily moderate cold hydrotherapy is known to reduce pain and does not appear to have noticeable adverse effects on normal test subjects, although some studies have shown that it can cause transient arrhythmias in patients with heart problems and can also inhibit humoral immunity. Sudden immersion in ice-cold water can cause transient pulmonary edema and increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thereby increasing mortality of neurovirulent infections. Testing the hypothesis The proposed procedure is an adapted cold swim (5–7 minutes at 20 degrees Celsius, includes gradual adaptation to be tested on a mouse tumor model. Mortality, tumor size, and measurements of cellular immunity (numbers and activity of peripheral CD8+ T lymphocytes and natural killer cells of the cold-exposed group would be compared to

  11. Dynamics of mechanical signal transmission through prestressed stress fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyun Hwang

    Full Text Available Transmission of mechanical stimuli through the actin cytoskeleton has been proposed as a mechanism for rapid long-distance mechanotransduction in cells; however, a quantitative understanding of the dynamics of this transmission and the physical factors governing it remains lacking. Two key features of the actin cytoskeleton are its viscoelastic nature and the presence of prestress due to actomyosin motor activity. We develop a model of mechanical signal transmission through prestressed viscoelastic actin stress fibers that directly connect the cell surface to the nucleus. The analysis considers both temporally stationary and oscillatory mechanical signals and accounts for cytosolic drag on the stress fibers. To elucidate the physical parameters that govern mechanical signal transmission, we initially focus on the highly simplified case of a single stress fiber. The results demonstrate that the dynamics of mechanical signal transmission depend on whether the applied force leads to transverse or axial motion of the stress fiber. For transverse motion, mechanical signal transmission is dominated by prestress while fiber elasticity has a negligible effect. Conversely, signal transmission for axial motion is mediated uniquely by elasticity due to the absence of a prestress restoring force. Mechanical signal transmission is significantly delayed by stress fiber material viscosity, while cytosolic damping becomes important only for longer stress fibers. Only transverse motion yields the rapid and long-distance mechanical signal transmission dynamics observed experimentally. For simple networks of stress fibers, mechanical signals are transmitted rapidly to the nucleus when the fibers are oriented largely orthogonal to the applied force, whereas the presence of fibers parallel to the applied force slows down mechanical signal transmission significantly. The present results suggest that cytoskeletal prestress mediates rapid mechanical signal transmission

  12. Increased Adhesion of Listeria monocytogenes Strains to Abiotic Surfaces under Cold Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Hyung Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Food contamination by Listeria monocytogenes remains a major concern for some food processing chains, particularly for ready-to-eat foods, including processed foods. Bacterial adhesion on both biotic and abiotic surfaces is a source of contamination by pathogens that have become more tolerant or even persistent in food processing environments, including in the presence of adverse conditions such as cold and dehydration. The most distinct challenge that bacteria confront upon entry into food processing environments is the sudden downshift in temperature, and the resulting phenotypic effects are of interest. Crystal violet staining and the BioFilm Ring Test® were applied to assess the adhesion and biofilm formation of 22 listerial strains from different serogroups and origins under cold-stressed and cold-adapted conditions. The physicochemical properties of the bacterial surface were studied using the microbial adhesion to solvent technique. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to visualize cell morphology and biofilm structure. The results showed that adhesion to stainless-steel and polystyrene was increased by cold stress, whereas cold-adapted cells remained primarily in planktonic form. Bacterial cell surfaces exhibited electron-donating properties regardless of incubation temperature and became more hydrophilic as temperature decreased from 37 to 4°C. Moreover, the adhesion of cells grown at 4°C correlated with affinity for ethyl acetate, indicating the role of cell surface properties in adhesion.

  13. De novo assembly and analysis of the transcriptome of Ocimum americanum var. pilosum under cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiangqiang; Yang, Lan; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Jian Kang; Lang, Zhaobo

    2016-03-09

    Ocimum americanum var. pilosum is a chilling-sensitive, widely distributed plant that is consumed as a vegetable in central and southern China. To increase our understanding of cold stress responses in this species, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly for O. americanum var. pilosum and compared the transcriptomes of plants grown under normal and low temperatures. A total of 115,022,842 high quality, clean reads were obtained from four libraries (two replicates of control samples and two replicates of chilling-treated samples) and were used to perform de novo transcriptome assembly. After isoforms were considered, 42,816 unigenes were generated, 30,748 of which were similar to known proteins as determined by a BLASTx search (E-value stress, respectively. Expression of the 10 most up-regulated and the five most down-regulated unigenes was validated by qRT-PCR. To increase our understanding of these differentially expressed unigenes, we performed Gene ontology and KEGG pathway enrichment analyses. The CBF-mediated transcriptional cascade, a well-known cold tolerance pathway, was reconstructed using our de novo assembled transcriptome. Our study has generated a genome-wide transcript profile of O. americanum var. pilosum and a de novo assembled transcriptome, which can be used to characterize genes related to diverse biological processes. This is the first study to assess the cold-responsive transcriptome in an Ocimum species. Our results suggest that cold temperature significantly affects genes related to protein translation and cellular metabolism in this chilling sensitive species. Although most of the CBF pathway genes have orthologs in O. americanum var. pilosum, none of the identified cold responsive (COR) gene orthologs was induced by cold, which is consistent with the lack of cold tolerance in this plant.

  14. Metabolic acclimation of tetraploid and hexaploid wheats by cold stress-induced carbohydrate accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahryar, Negin; Maali-Amiri, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Metabolic acclimation of plants to cold stress may be of great importance for their growth, survival and crop productivity. The accumulation carbohydrates associated with cold tolerance (CT), transcript levels for genes encoding related enzymes along with damage indices were comparatively studied in three genotypes of bread and durum wheats differing in sensitivity. Two (Norstar, bread wheat and Gerdish, durum wheat) were tolerant and the other, SRN (durum wheat), was susceptible to cold stress. During cold stress (-5°C for 24h), the contents of electrolyte leakage index (ELI) in Norstar and then Gerdish plants were lower than that of SRN plants, particularly in cold acclimated (CA) plants (4°C for 14days), confirming lethal temperature 50 (LT50) under field conditions. Increased carbohydrate abundances in the cases of sucrose, glucose, fructose, hexose phosphates, fructan, raffinose, arabinose resulted in different intensities of oxidative stress in bread (Norstar) plants compared to durum plants (SRN and Gerdish) plants as well as in CA plants compared to non-acclimated (NA) ones under cold, indicating metabolic/regulatory capacity along with a decrease in ELI content and enhanced defense activities. A significant decrease in these carbohydrates, particularly sucrose, under cold in NA plants showed an elevated level of cell damage (confirmed by ELI) compared to CA plants. On the other hand, an increase in hexose phosphates, particularly in NA plants, indicated sucrose degradation along with greater production of glucose and fructose compared to CA plants. Under such conditions, a significant increase in transcript levels of sucrose synthase and acidic invertase confirmed these results. Under cold, the high ABA-containing genotypes like Norstar and then Gerdish, which were obvious in CA plants, partly induced relative acclimation of cells for acquisition of CT compared to SRN. These results reveal an important role of carbohydrate metabolism in creating CT in

  15. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    KAUST Repository

    Almadanim, M. Cecília

    2017-01-19

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that OsCPK17 plays a role in rice cold stress response by analyzing OsCPK17 knockout, silencing, and overexpressing rice lines under low temperature. Altered OsCPK17 gene expression compromises cold tolerance performance, without affecting the expression of key cold stress-inducible genes. A comparative phosphoproteomic approach led to the identification of six potential in vivo OsCPK17 targets, which are associated with sugar and nitrogen metabolism, and with osmotic regulation. To test direct interaction, in vitro kinase assays were performed, showing that the sucrose phosphate synthase OsSPS4, and the aquaporin OsPIP2;1/OsPIP2;6 are phosphorylated by OsCPK17 in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether, our data indicates that OsCPK17 is required for a proper cold stress response in rice, likely affecting the activity of membrane channels and sugar metabolism.

  16. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2016-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: -6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: -6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  17. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2017-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: −6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: −6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  18. GsLRPK, a novel cold-activated leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase from Glycine soja, is a positive regulator to cold stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Wu, Kangcheng; Gao, Peng; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Guangpu; Wu, Zujian

    2014-02-01

    Plant LRR-RLKs serve as protein interaction platforms, and as regulatory modules of protein activation. Here, we report the isolation of a novel plant-specific LRR-RLK from Glycine soja (termed GsLRPK) by differential screening. GsLRPK expression was cold-inducible and shows Ser/Thr protein kinase activity. Subcellular localization studies using GFP fusion protein indicated that GsLRPK is localized in the plasma membrane. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that temperature, salt, drought, and ABA treatment can alter GsLRPK gene transcription in G. soja. However, just protein induced by cold stress not by salinity and ABA treatment in tobacco was found to possess kinase activity. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of GsLRPK in yeast and Arabidopsis can enhance resistance to cold stress and increase the expression of a number of cold responsive gene markers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Interactions between cytokinin signalling and abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwack, Paul J; Rashotte, Aaron M

    2015-08-01

    Plants have evolved elaborate mechanisms for sensing and responding to sub-optimal environmental conditions. Abiotic stresses caused by these conditions trigger a wide range of local and long-distance signals which must be co-ordinated and integrated into whole-plant processes, such as development, in order for the plant to respond properly and survive. Several hormones function as key regulators of stress tolerance, connecting local stimuli to systemic responses. Cytokinin is a hormone well known for its role in numerous aspects of growth and development, although abundant evidence also indicates that cytokinin functions in stress responses as well. At present, a full understanding of the effects of cytokinin on plant resistance to stress is lacking, possibly as a result of the complex interactions between cytokinin and stress signalling. Current knowledge of the physiological relationship between cytokinin and abiotic stress, based on measurements of cytokinin levels under stress conditions and the effects of cytokinin treatment on stress tolerance, has been examined here. A pattern of transcriptional regulation of stress-related genes by cytokinin in different plant species has also been identified. In addition, research regarding the role of specific cytokinin signalling components in a variety of stress responses is presented. We discuss what this body of research collectively implies with regard to cross-talk between cytokinin and abiotic stress tolerance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Global Gene Expression Analysis Reveals Crosstalk between Response Mechanisms to Cold and Drought Stresses in Cassava Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shuxia; Yu, Xiang; Cheng, Zhihao; Yu, Xiaoling; Ruan, Mengbin; Li, Wenbin; Peng, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Abiotic stress negatively impacts cassava (Manihot esculenta) growth and yield. Several molecular mechanisms of plant response to cold and drought have been identified and described in the literature, however, little is known about the crosstalk of the responses of cassava to these two stresses. To elucidate this question, transcriptome analysis of cassava seedlings under cold or PEG-simulated drought stress treatment was performed. Our results showed that 6103 and 7462 transcripts were signi...

  1. GhCAX3 gene, a novel Ca(2+/H(+ exchanger from cotton, confers regulation of cold response and ABA induced signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Xu

    Full Text Available As a second messenger, Ca(2+ plays a major role in cold induced transduction via stimulus-specific increases in [Ca(2+]cyt, which is called calcium signature. During this process, CAXs (Ca(2+/H(+ exchangers play critical role. For the first time, a putative Ca(2+/H(+ exchanger GhCAX3 gene from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. 'YZ-1' was isolated and characterized. It was highly expressed in all tissues of cotton except roots and fibers. This gene may act as a regulator in cotton's response to abiotic stresses as it could be up-regulated by Ca(2+, NaCl, ABA and cold stress. Similar to other CAXs, it was proved that GhCAX3 also had Ca(2+ transport activity and the N-terminal regulatory region (NRR through yeast complementation assay. Over-expression of GhCAX3 in tobacco showed less sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling stages, and the phenotypic difference between wild type (WT and transgenic plants was more significant when the NRR was truncated. Furthermore, GhCAX3 conferred cold tolerance in yeast as well as in tobacco seedlings based on physiological and molecular studies. However, transgenic plant seeds showed more sensitivity to cold stress compared to WT during seed germination, especially when expressed in N-terminal truncated version. Finally, the extent of sensitivity in transgenic lines was more severe than that in WT line under sodium tungstate treatment (an ABA repressor, indicating that ABA could alleviate cold sensitivity of GhCAX3 seeds, especially in short of its NRR. Meanwhile, we also found that overexpression of GhCAX3 could enhance some cold and ABA responsive marker genes. Taken together, these results suggested that GhCAX3 plays important roles in the cross-talk of ABA and cold signal transduction, and compared to full-length of GhCAX3, the absence of NRR could enhance the tolerance or sensitivity to cold stress, depending on seedling's developmental stages.

  2. GhCAX3 gene, a novel Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger from cotton, confers regulation of cold response and ABA induced signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lian; Zahid, Kashif Rafiq; He, Liangrong; Zhang, Wenwen; He, Xin; Zhang, Xianlong; Yang, Xiyan; Zhu, Longfu

    2013-01-01

    As a second messenger, Ca(2+) plays a major role in cold induced transduction via stimulus-specific increases in [Ca(2+)]cyt, which is called calcium signature. During this process, CAXs (Ca(2+)/H(+) exchangers) play critical role. For the first time, a putative Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger GhCAX3 gene from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. 'YZ-1') was isolated and characterized. It was highly expressed in all tissues of cotton except roots and fibers. This gene may act as a regulator in cotton's response to abiotic stresses as it could be up-regulated by Ca(2+), NaCl, ABA and cold stress. Similar to other CAXs, it was proved that GhCAX3 also had Ca(2+) transport activity and the N-terminal regulatory region (NRR) through yeast complementation assay. Over-expression of GhCAX3 in tobacco showed less sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling stages, and the phenotypic difference between wild type (WT) and transgenic plants was more significant when the NRR was truncated. Furthermore, GhCAX3 conferred cold tolerance in yeast as well as in tobacco seedlings based on physiological and molecular studies. However, transgenic plant seeds showed more sensitivity to cold stress compared to WT during seed germination, especially when expressed in N-terminal truncated version. Finally, the extent of sensitivity in transgenic lines was more severe than that in WT line under sodium tungstate treatment (an ABA repressor), indicating that ABA could alleviate cold sensitivity of GhCAX3 seeds, especially in short of its NRR. Meanwhile, we also found that overexpression of GhCAX3 could enhance some cold and ABA responsive marker genes. Taken together, these results suggested that GhCAX3 plays important roles in the cross-talk of ABA and cold signal transduction, and compared to full-length of GhCAX3, the absence of NRR could enhance the tolerance or sensitivity to cold stress, depending on seedling's developmental stages.

  3. Alleviation of cold stress in inoculated wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings with psychrotolerant Pseudomonads from NW Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Bisht, Shekhar Chandra; Ruwari, Pooja; Selvakumar, Govindan; Joshi, Gopal Krishna; Bisht, Jaideep Kumar; Bhatt, Jagdish Chandra; Gupta, Hari Shankar

    2011-07-01

    Twelve psychrotolerant Pseudomonad strains were selected on the basis of various plant growth-promoting (PGP) activities at cold temperature (4°C). The effect of inoculation with Pseudomonad strains on cold alleviation and growth of wheat seedling at cold temperature (8°C) was investigated under greenhouse condition. Inoculation with Pseudomonad strains significantly enhanced root/shoot biomass and nutrients uptake as compared to non-bacterized control at 60 days of plant growth. Bacterization significantly improved the level of cellular metabolites like chlorophyll, anthocyanin, free proline, total phenolics, starch content, physiologically available iron, proteins, and amino acids that are sign of alleviation of cold stress in wheat plants. Increased relative water content, reduced membrane injury (electrolyte leakage), and Na(+)/K(+) ratio were also recorded in bacterized wheat plants. Electrolyte leakage and Na(+)/K(+) were found inversely proportional to plant growth at cold temperature. Statistical analysis of twenty-three measured parameters revealed that uninoculated control was under cold stress while eight bacterial strains were positively alleviating cold stress in wheat plants. Thus, the psychrotrophic Pseudomonad strains could effectively provide a promising solution to overcome cold stress, which is major factor hindering wheat productivity under cold climatic condition.

  4. Repeated Cold Stress Reduces Cyclophosphamide-Induced Cystitis/Bladder Pain and Macrophage Activity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubota, Maho; Miyamoto, Tomoyoshi; Hiruma, Saki; Saeki, Haruka; Miyazaki, Takaya; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Funakami, Yoshinori; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effect of repeated cold (RC) stress on cyclophosphamide (CPA)-induced cystitis/bladder pain in mice, in relation to macrophage activity. CPA, given i.p. at 400 mg/kg, caused bladder pain symptoms accompanying cystitis in both unstressed and RC-stressed mice, which were prevented by the macrophage inhibitor minocycline. A low dose, that is, 200 mg/kg, of CPA still produced bladder pain symptoms in unstressed but not RC-stressed mice. Lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production in peritoneal macrophages from RC-stressed mice was less than that from unstressed mice. Thus, RC stress appears to reduce CPA-induced bladder pain in mice, which may be associated with the decreased macrophage activity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The Role of Ubiquitin and the 26S Proteasome in Plant Abiotic Stress Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone L Sophia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin is a small, highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed eukaryotic protein with immensely important and diverse regulatory functions. A well-studied function of ubiquitin is its role in selective proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS. The UPS has emerged as an integral player in plant response and adaptation to environmental stresses such as drought, salinity, cold and nutrient deprivation. The UPS has also been shown to influence the production and signal transduction of stress-related hormones such as abscisic acid. Understanding UPS function has centered mainly on defining the role of E3 ubiquitin ligases, which are the substrate-recruiting component of the ubiquitination pathway. The recent identification of stress signaling/regulatory proteins that are the subject of ubiquitin-dependent degradation has increased our knowledge of how the UPS facilitate responses to adverse environmental conditions. A brief overview is provided on role of the UPS in modulating protein stability during abiotic stress signaling. E3 ubiquitin ligases for which stress-related substrate proteins have been identified are discussed.

  6. ABA signal in rice under stress conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Nenghui; Jia, Liguo; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Ever since its discovery, abscisic acid (ABA) has been intensively studied due to its versatile functions in plant developmental and physiological processes. Many signaling details of ABA have been well elucidated and reviewed. The identification of ABA receptors is a great breakthrough in the field of ABA study, whereas the discovery of ABA transporter has changed our concept that ABA is delivered solely by passive transport. The intensity of ABA signaling pathway is well known to be control...

  7. Gene-expression analysis of cold-stress response in the sexually transmitted protist Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi-Kai; Huang, Kuo-Yang; Huang, Po-Jung; Lin, Rose; Chao, Mei; Tang, Petrus

    2015-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease in the world. This infection affects millions of individuals worldwide annually. Although direct sexual contact is the most common mode of transmission, increasing evidence indicates that T. vaginalis can survive in the external environment and can be transmitted by contaminated utensils. We found that the growth of T. vaginalis under cold conditions is greatly inhibited, but recovers after placing these stressed cells at the normal cultivation temperature of 37 °C. However, the mechanisms by which T. vaginalis regulates this adaptive process are unclear. An expressed sequence tag (EST) database generated from a complementary DNA library of T. vaginalis messenger RNAs expressed under cold-culture conditions (4 °C, TvC) was compared with a previously published normal-cultured EST library (37 °C, TvE) to assess the cold-stress responses of T. vaginalis. A total of 9780 clones were sequenced from the TvC library and were mapped to 2934 genes in the T. vaginalis genome. A total of 1254 genes were expressed in both the TvE and TvC libraries, and 1680 genes were only found in the TvC library. A functional analysis showed that cold temperature has effects on many cellular mechanisms, including increased H2O2 tolerance, activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, induction of iron-sulfur cluster assembly, and reduced energy metabolism and enzyme expression. The current study is the first large-scale transcriptomic analysis in cold-stressed T. vaginalis and the results enhance our understanding of this important protist. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Intermittent whole-body cold immersion induces similar thermal stress but different motor and cognitive responses between males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solianik, Rima; Skurvydas, Albertas; Mickevičienė, Dalia; Brazaitis, Marius

    2014-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the thermal responses and the responses of cognitive and motor functions to intermittent cold stress between males and females. The intermittent cold stress continued until rectal temperature (TRE) reached 35.5°C or for a maximum of 170 min. Thermal response and motor and cognitive performance were monitored. During intermittent cold stress, body temperature variables decreased in all subjects (P differ between sexes. The presence of fast and slow cooling types for participants with similar effect on physiological variables were observed; thus the different rate coolers were grouped together and were attributed only sex specific responses. Overall, TRE cooling rate and cold strain index did not differ between sexes. Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) decreased after intermittent cold exposure only in males (P differ between sexes. The effects of intermittent cold stress on electrically evoked muscle properties, spinal (H-reflex), and supraspinal (V-waves) reflexes did not differ between sexes. Intermittent cold-induced cognitive perturbation of attention and memory task performance was greater in males (P males and females experience similar thermal stress induced by intermittent whole-body cold immersion. Although no sex-specific differences were observed in muscle EMG activity, involuntary muscle properties, spinal and supraspinal reflexes, some of the sex differences observed (e.g., lower isometric MVC and greater cognitive perturbation in males) support the view of sex-specific physiological responses to core temperature decrease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Absorption, translocation and metabolism of bispyribac-sodium on rice seedlings under cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Luiz Fernando D; Burgos, Nilda R; Noldin, José Alberto; de Avila, Luis Antonio; Salas, Reiofeli A

    2015-07-01

    Rice production is highly affected by weed competition. The efficacy of chemical weed control and crop safety is a function of absorption, translocation and metabolism of herbicides. This study investigates the effect of cold stress 22/16 °C (day/night) on absorption, translocation and metabolism of (14)C-bispyribac-sodium on rice seedlings. Maximum (14)C-bispyribac-sodium absorption occurred at 24 h after herbicide treatment and was stimulated by the warm 30/22 °C (day/night) temperature. A large amount of total absorbed herbicide was retained in the treated leaf, indicating that bispyribac-sodium had minimal translocation to other plant parts. Piperonyl-butoxide (a P450 inhibitor) plus herbicide caused greater injury than the herbicide alone. In addition, injury on rice plants was enhanced by exposure to cold, emphasizing the negative effect on herbicide metabolism. In the thin-layer chromatography metabolism experiment, cold-grown plants had higher injury and retained more of the parent herbicide than plants grown at a warm temperature. Cold stress reduces bispyribac-sodium absorption and metabolism in rice, but has no effect on translocation. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Lipid signalling in plant responses to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Quancan; Ufer, Guido; Bartels, Dorothea

    2016-05-01

    Lipids are one of the major components of biological membranes including the plasma membrane, which is the interface between the cell and the environment. It has become clear that membrane lipids also serve as substrates for the generation of numerous signalling lipids such as phosphatidic acid, phosphoinositides, sphingolipids, lysophospholipids, oxylipins, N-acylethanolamines, free fatty acids and others. The enzymatic production and metabolism of these signalling molecules are tightly regulated and can rapidly be activated upon abiotic stress signals. Abiotic stress like water deficit and temperature stress triggers lipid-dependent signalling cascades, which control the expression of gene clusters and activate plant adaptation processes. Signalling lipids are able to recruit protein targets transiently to the membrane and thus affect conformation and activity of intracellular proteins and metabolites. In plants, knowledge is still scarce of lipid signalling targets and their physiological consequences. This review focuses on the generation of signalling lipids and their involvement in response to abiotic stress. We describe lipid-binding proteins in the context of changing environmental conditions and compare different approaches to determine lipid-protein interactions, crucial for deciphering the signalling cascades. © 2016 JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Responses of Early Lactating Ewes to Cold Stress Exposure Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Gavojdian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure cold stress of ewes during post lambing period. The trial was undertaken at theExperimental Farm of Banat’s University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Timisoara, duringFebruary 2012. Six secundiparous Turcana breed ewes were housed in two collective pens of 3.5 m x 2 m each, withdeep straw bedding, in shed where the average temperature was of -1.2°C. Cortisol levels from milk samples weredetermined as indicators of cold stress. Samples were collected at 14 hours after lambing, and at 7, 14 and 21 daysfollowing parturition. At 14 hours after lambing, mean cortisol levels were 7.78±0.47 μg/dl, and decreased asfollows: 5.08±0.72 μg/dl in the 7th of the trial, 2.75±0.50 μg/dl in day 14 and 1.61±0.43 μg/dl in day 21 of theobservations. Differences were significant between the 7 day sampling intervals (p≤0.01 during the first 14 daysafter lambing, while non-significant differences (p≥0.05 have been found between the 14 and 21 days samplings. Ithas been concluded that cortisol levels in milk samples could prove an indicator of sheep adrenal-cortex activity thatmay be applied to measure cold stress in lactating ewes.

  12. The physiological role of fat body and muscle tissues in response to cold stress in the tropical cockroach Gromphadorhina coquereliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowański, Szymon; Lubawy, Jan; Paluch-Lubawa, Ewelina; Spochacz, Marta; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Słocińska, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Protective mechanisms against cold stress are well studied in terrestrial and polar insects; however, little is known about these mechanisms in tropical insects. In our study, we tested if a tropical cockroach Gromphadorhina coquereliana, possesses any protective mechanisms against cold stress. Based on the results of earlier studies, we examined how short-term (3 h) cold (4°C) influences biochemical parameters, mitochondrial respiration activity, and the level of HSPs and aquaporins expression in the fat body and leg muscles of G. coquereliana. Following cold exposure, we found that the level of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins did not change significantly. Nevertheless, we observed significant changes in mitochondrial respiration activity. The oxygen consumption of resting (state 4) and phosphorylating (state 3) mitochondria was altered following cold exposure. The increase in respiratory rate in state 4 respiration was observed in both tissues. In state 3, oxygen consumption by mitochondria in fat body was significantly lower compared to control insects, whereas there were no changes observed for mitochondria in muscle tissue. Moreover, there were cold-induced changes in UCP protein activity, but the changes in activity differed in fat body and in muscles. Additionally, we detected changes in the level of HSP70 and aquaporins expression. Insects treated with cold had significantly higher levels of HSP70 in fat body and muscles. On the other hand, there were lower levels of aquaporins in both tissues following exposure to cold. These results suggest that fat body play an important role in protecting tropical insects from cold stress.

  13. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion through a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism under cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Yang; Haiqiao, Wu; Xie, Wenyao; Huaping, Huang; Zhong, Han; Xiangdong, Zhou; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2016-09-01

    Acute or chronic cold exposure exacerbates chronic inflammatory airway diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a cold-shock protein and is induced by various environmental stressors, such as hypothermia and hypoxia. In this study, we showed that CIRP gene and protein levels were significantly increased in patients with COPD and in rats with chronic airway inflammation compared with healthy subjects. Similarly, inflammatory cytokine production and MUC5AC secretion were up-regulated in rats following cigarette smoke inhalation. Cold temperature-induced CIRP overexpression and translocation were shown to be dependent on arginine methylation in vitro. CIRP overexpression promoted stress granule (SG) assembly. In the cytoplasm, the stability of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs was increased through specific interactions between CIRP and mediator mRNA 3'-UTRs; these interactions increased the mRNA translation, resulting in MUC5AC overproduction in response to cold stress. Conversely, CIRP silencing and a methyltransferase inhibitor (adenosine dialdehyde) promoted cytokine mRNA degradation and inhibited the inflammatory response and mucus hypersecretion. These findings indicate that cold temperature can induce an airway inflammatory response and excess mucus production via a CIRP-mediated increase in mRNA stability and protein translation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Local Strain Distribution of Cold-Rolled Alloy 690 on Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S.-W.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the stress corrosion crack growth behavior of cold-rolled Alloy 690 in the primary water of a pressurized water reactor. Compared with Alloy 600, which shows typical intergranular cracking along high angle grain boundaries, the cold-rolled Alloy 690, with its heterogeneous microstructure, revealed an abnormal crack growth behavior in mixed mode, that is, in transgranular cracking near a banded region, and in intergranular cracking in a matrix region. From local strain distribution analysis based on local mis-orientation, measured along the crack path using the electron back scattered diffraction method, it was suggested that the abnormal behavior was attributable to a heterogeneity of local strain distribution. In the cold-rolled Alloy 690, the stress corrosion crack grew through a highly strained area formed by a prior cold-rolling process in a direction perpendicular to the maximum principal stress applied during a subsequent stress corrosion cracking test.

  15. Reactive oxygen species signaling in plants under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Panda, Piyalee; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Abiotic stresses like heavy metals, drought, salt, low temperature, etc. are the major factors that limit crop productivity and yield. These stresses are associated with production of certain deleterious chemical entities called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), superoxide radical (O₂(-)), hydroxyl radical (OH(-)), etc. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by degradation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene and interfere in various pathways of metabolic importance. Our understanding on ROS in response to abiotic stress is revolutionized with the advancements in plant molecular biology, where the basic understanding on chemical behavior of ROS is better understood. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in ROS generation and its potential role during abiotic stress is important to identify means by which plant growth and metabolism can be regulated under acute stress conditions. ROS mediated oxidative stress, which is the key to understand stress related toxicity have been widely studied in many plants and the results in those studies clearly revealed that oxidative stress is the main symptom of toxicity. Plants have their own antioxidant defense mechanisms to encounter ROS that is of enzymic and non-enzymic nature . Coordinated activities of these antioxidants regulate ROS detoxification and reduces oxidative load in plants. Though ROS are always regarded to impart negative impact on plants, some reports consider them to be important in regulating key cellular functions; however, such reports in plant are limited. Molecular approaches to understand ROS metabolism and signaling have opened new avenues to comprehend its critical role in abiotic stress. ROS also acts as secondary messenger that signals key cellular functions like cell proliferation, apoptosis and necrosis. In higher eukaryotes, ROS signaling is not fully understood. In this review we summarize our understanding on ROS

  16. Quenching and Cold-Work Residual Stresses in Aluminum Hand Forgings : Contour Method Measurement and FEM Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prime, M. B. (Michael B.); Newborn, M. A. (Mark A.); Balog, J. A. (John A.)

    2003-01-01

    The cold-compression stress relief process used to reduce the quench-induced stresses in high-strength aerospace aluminum alloy forgings does not fully relieve the stresses. This study measured and predicted the residual stress in 7050-T74 (solution heat treated, quenched, and artificially overaged) and 7050-T7452 (cold compressed prior to aging) hand forgings. The manufacturing process was simulated by finite element analysis. First, a thermal analysis simulated the quench using appropriate thermal boundary conditions and temperature dependent material properties. Second, a structural analysis used the thermal history and a temperature and strain-rate dependent constitutive model to predict the stresses after quenching. Third, the structural analysis was continued to simulate the multiple cold compressions of the stress relief process. Experimentally, the residual stresses in the forgings were mapped using the contour method, which involved cutting the forgings using wire EDM and then measuring the contour of the cut surface using a CMM. Multiple cuts were used to map different stress components. The results show a spatially periodic variation of stresses that results from the periodic nature of the cold work stress relief process. The results compare favorably with the finite element prediction of the stresses.

  17. Cold pulse and rotation reversals with turbulence spreading and residual stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariri, F. [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Swiss Plasma Center (SPC), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Naulin, V.; Juul Rasmussen, J. [Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Department of Physics, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Xu, G. S.; Yan, N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ASIPP, Hefei (China)

    2016-05-15

    Transport modeling based on inclusion of turbulence spreading and residual stresses shows internal rotation reversals and polarity reversal of cold pulses, with a clear indication of nonlocal transport effects due to fast spreading in the turbulence intensity field. The effects of turbulence spreading and residual stress are calculated from the gradient of the turbulence intensity. In the model presented in this paper, the flux is carried by the turbulence intensity field, which in itself is subject to radial transport effects. The pulse polarity inversion and the rotation profile reversal positions are close to the radial location of the stable/unstable transition. Both effects have no direct explanation within the framework of classical transport modeling, where the fluxes are related directly to the linear growth rates, the turbulence intensity profile is not considered and the corresponding residual stress is absent. Our simulations are in qualitative agreement with measurements from ohmically heated plasmas. Rotation reversal at a finite radius is found in situations not displaying saturated confinement, which we identify as situations where the plasma is nearly everywhere unstable. As an additional and new effect, the model predicts a perturbation of the velocity profile following a cold pulse from the edge. This allows direct experimental confirmation of both the existence of residual stress caused by turbulence intensity profiles and fundamental ideas of transport modeling presented here.

  18. Effect of Fluoxetine on the Hippocampus of Wistar Albino Rats in Cold Restraint Stress Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Saikarthik; Raghunath, Gunapriya; Ilango, Saraswathi; Vijayakumar, J; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2017-06-01

    Stress has been known to be a potential modulator of learning and memory. Long term stress can lead to depression. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor group of drug used in the treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of Fluoxetine on cold restraint induced stress in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. A total of 18 male wistar albino rats were divided randomly into three groups (n=6). Group 1 was the control group which were kept in normal laboratory conditions. Group 2 was the negative control group which were given cold restraint stress for period of four weeks. Group 3 was the experimental group, where the animals were pretreated with fluoxetine 10 mg/kg for a period of one week followed by cold restraint stress for 30 minutes and cotreated with fluoxetine 10 mg/kg for a period of four weeks. The whole study was done for a period of five weeks followed by behavioural studies and subsequently sacrificed with removal of brain for various histological, Immunohistochemical (IHC), neurochemical and antioxidant analysis. The values were expressed as Mean±SEM. One-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's multiple comparisons test was used for the comparison of means. A probability of 0.05 and less was taken as statistically significant using Prism Graphpad software version 6.01. The results show there was significant improvement in the Morris water maze test after treatment with fluoxetine in Group 2. Similar results were also noted in the levels of neurotransmitters and antioxidant levels in brain and also in the number of cells counted in IHC and histological studies by H&E when Group 3 was compared with Group 2. The treatment reversed the damage in Group 2 which was comparable with the control group. The results revealed that administration of fluoxetine 10 mg/kg given orally has a potential antistressor effect by improving the neurogenic and neuroprotective effect on the cold restraint stress induced

  19. Vitamin C and common cold incidence: a review of studies with subjects under heavy physical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemilä, H

    1996-07-01

    Several studies have observed an increased risk of respiratory infections in subjects doing heavy physical exercise. Vitamin C has been shown to affect some parts of the immune system, and accordingly it seems biologically conceivable that it could have effects on the increased incidence of respiratory infections caused by heavy physical stress. In this report the results of three placebo-controlled studies that have examined the effect of vitamin C supplementation on common cold incidence in subjects under acute physical stress are analyzed. In one study the subjects were school-children at a skiing camp in the Swiss Alps, in another they were military troops training in Northern Canada, and in the third they were participants in a 90 km running race. In each of the three studies a considerable reduction in common cold incidence in the group supplemented with vitamin C(0.6-1.0 g/day) was found. The pooled rate ratio (RR) of common cold infections in the studies was 0.50 (95% CI: 0.35-0.69) in favour of vitamin C groups. Accordingly, the results of the three studies suggest that vitamin C supplementation may be beneficial for some of the subjects doing heavy exercise who have problems with frequent upper respiratory infections.

  20. The HSP70 chaperone machines of Chlamydomonas are induced by cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maikova, Anna; Zalutskaya, Zhanneta; Lapina, Tatiana; Ermilova, Elena

    2016-10-01

    The responses of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to low temperatures have not been extensively studied compared with other stresses. Like other organisms, this green alga has heat shock protein 70s (HSP70s) that are located in chloroplast, mitochondrion and cytosol. To test whether temperature downshifts affected HSP70s synthesis, we used real-time PCR and protein gel blot analysis. C. reinhardtii cells exposed to cold stress show increased HSP70s mRNA levels. Genes encoding other components of HSP70 chaperone machines (e.g. CGE1, CDJ1, HSP90C and HSP90A) are also up-regulated in response to decreased temperature. We demonstrated that the accumulation of all analyzed mRNA occur more slowly and with reduced amplitude in cells exposed to cold than in cells treated with heat. Furthermore, C. reinhardtii cells display the splicing of the CGE1 transcript that was dependent on low temperature. Finally, the transcription regulator of C. reinhardtii HSF1 is also cold-responsive, suggesting its role in the transcriptional regulation of HSP genes at low temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Global metabolomic responses of Nitrosomonas europaea 19718 to cold stress and altered ammonia feeding patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Huijie

    2015-11-05

    © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg The model ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea represents one of the environmentally and biotechnologically significant microorganisms. Genome-based studies over the last decade have led to many intriguing discoveries about its cellular biochemistry and physiology. However, knowledge regarding the regulation of overall metabolic routes in response to various environmental stresses is limited due to a lack of comprehensive, time-resolved metabolomic analyses. In this study, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolic profiling was performed to characterize the temporal variations of N. europaea 19718 intercellular metabolites in response to varied temperature (23 and 10 °C) and ammonia feeding patterns (shock loading and continuous feeding of 20 mg N/L). Approximately 87 metabolites were successfully identified and mapped to the existing pathways of N. europaea 19718, allowing interpretation of the influence of temperature and feeding pattern on metabolite levels. In general, varied temperature had a more profound influence on the overall metabolism than varied feeding patterns. Total extracellular metabolite concentrations (relative to internal standards and normalized to biomass weight) were lower under cold stress and shock loading conditions compared with the control (continuous feeding at 23 °C). Cold stress caused the widespread downregulation of metabolites involved in central carbon metabolism, amino acid, and lipid synthesis (e.g., malonic acid, succinic acid, putrescine, and phosphonolpyruvate). Metabolites that showed differences under varied feeding patterns were mainly involved in nucleotide acid, amino acid, and lipid metabolism (e.g., adenine, uracil, and spermidine). This study highlighted the roles of central carbon and nitrogen metabolism in countering cold stress and altered ammonia availability. In addition, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic data from three

  2. Working memory performance after acute exposure to the cold pressor stress in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncko, Roman; Johnson, Linda; Merikangas, Kathleen; Grillon, Christian

    2009-05-01

    Effects of acute stress exposure on learning and memory have been frequently studied in both animals and humans. However, only a few studies have focused specifically on working memory performance and the available data are equivocal. The present study examined working memory performance during the Sternberg item recognition task after exposure to a predominantly adrenergic stressor. Twenty four healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a stress group or a control group. The stress group was exposed to the cold pressor stress test (CPS; i.e. insertion of the dominant hand into ice water for 60s),while 37 degrees C warm water was used with the control group. Twenty minutes after the stress exposure, working memory performance was tested with the Sternberg item recognition task with three levels of cognitive load. Sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical (HPA) axis activation during CPS, were assessed by measuring heart rate and salivary cortisol before and during (heart rate) or 30 min after (cortisol) the stress procedure. Exposure to the CPS test was associated with a significant increase in heart rate but no increase in salivary cortisol. Participants exposed to the stress procedure showed significantly shorter reaction times during trials with higher cognitive load but tended to show higher false alarm rates than control subjects. The present results indicate that exposure to CPS can be associated with signs of both enhanced and impaired working memory performance. The observed behavioral pattern might represent a form of streamlined information processing advantageous in a threatening situation.

  3. Infrared thermography based studies on the effect of age on localized cold stress induced thermoregulation in human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Nishanthi, K.; Mohanalakshmi, K.; Veni, L.; Saumya; Yacin, S. M.; Philip, John

    2016-05-01

    Thermoregulatory control of blood flow plays an important role in maintaining the human body temperature and it provides physiological resistance against extreme environmental thermal stresses. To understand the role of age on thermal signals from veins and the thermoregulatory mechanism, the dynamic variation of the vein temperature on the hands of 17 human subjects, under a localized cold stress, was studied using infrared thermography. It was observed that the vein temperature of the stimulated hand initially decreased with time up to a time interval (called 'inversion time'), which was attributed to the localized cutaneous vasoconstriction. Beyond inversion time, a rise in the vein temperature of the stimulated hand was observed. A shift in the inversion time to higher values was observed for the older subjects, which was attributed to the reduced efficiency and responsiveness of the cutaneous vasoconstriction mechanism in these subjects. Our studies indicated that the inversion time increased linearly with subject age with strong positive Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.94. It was also observed that the contralateral symmetry in vasoconstriction was much lower in older subjects than the younger subjects. The absolute difference between the left and right inversion time varied between 11-118 s and 5-28 s for the older and younger subjects, respectively. Our study clearly demonstrated that infrared thermography is one of the most effective experimental tool for studying dynamic variation in vein pixel temperature under localized thermal stresses.

  4. Exogenous 5-aminolevulenic acid promotes seed germination in Elymus nutans against oxidative damage induced by cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Juanjuan; Sun, Yongfang; Chu, Xitong; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    The protective effects of 5-aminolevulenic acid (ALA) on germination of Elymus nutans Griseb. seeds under cold stress were investigated. Seeds of E. nutans (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD) were pre-soaked with various concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 and 25 mg l(-1)) of ALA for 24 h before germination under cold stress (5°C). Seeds of ZD were more susceptible to cold stress than DX seeds. Both seeds treated with ALA at low concentrations (0.1-1 mg l(-1)) had higher final germination percentage (FGP) and dry weight at 5°C than non-ALA-treated seeds, whereas exposure to higher ALA concentrations (5-25 mg l(-1)) brought about a dose dependent decrease. The highest FGP and dry weight of germinating seeds were obtained from seeds pre-soaked with 1 mg l(-1) ALA. After 5 d of cold stress, pretreatment with ALA provided significant protection against cold stress in the germinating seeds, significantly enhancing seed respiration rate and ATP synthesis. ALA pre-treatment also increased reduced glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (AsA), total glutathione, and total ascorbate concentrations, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR), whereas decreased the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and superoxide radical (O2•-) release in both germinating seeds under cold stress. In addition, application of ALA increased H+-ATPase activity and endogenous ALA concentration compared with cold stress alone. Results indicate that ALA considered as an endogenous plant growth regulator could effectively protect E. nutans seeds from cold-induced oxidative damage during germination without any adverse effect.

  5. Exogenous 5-aminolevulenic acid promotes seed germination in Elymus nutans against oxidative damage induced by cold stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Fu

    Full Text Available The protective effects of 5-aminolevulenic acid (ALA on germination of Elymus nutans Griseb. seeds under cold stress were investigated. Seeds of E. nutans (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD were pre-soaked with various concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 and 25 mg l(-1 of ALA for 24 h before germination under cold stress (5°C. Seeds of ZD were more susceptible to cold stress than DX seeds. Both seeds treated with ALA at low concentrations (0.1-1 mg l(-1 had higher final germination percentage (FGP and dry weight at 5°C than non-ALA-treated seeds, whereas exposure to higher ALA concentrations (5-25 mg l(-1 brought about a dose dependent decrease. The highest FGP and dry weight of germinating seeds were obtained from seeds pre-soaked with 1 mg l(-1 ALA. After 5 d of cold stress, pretreatment with ALA provided significant protection against cold stress in the germinating seeds, significantly enhancing seed respiration rate and ATP synthesis. ALA pre-treatment also increased reduced glutathione (GSH, ascorbic acid (AsA, total glutathione, and total ascorbate concentrations, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX and glutathione reductase (GR, whereas decreased the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and superoxide radical (O2•- release in both germinating seeds under cold stress. In addition, application of ALA increased H+-ATPase activity and endogenous ALA concentration compared with cold stress alone. Results indicate that ALA considered as an endogenous plant growth regulator could effectively protect E. nutans seeds from cold-induced oxidative damage during germination without any adverse effect.

  6. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of bZIP Transcription Factors in Brassica oleracea under Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Indeok; Manoharan, Ranjith Kumar; Kang, Jong-Goo; Chung, Mi-Young; Kim, Young-Wook; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Cabbages (Brassica oleracea L.) are an important vegetable crop around world, and cold temperature is among the most significant abiotic stresses causing agricultural losses, especially in cabbage crops. Plant bZIP transcription factors play diverse roles in biotic/abiotic stress responses. In this study, 119 putative BolbZIP transcription factors were identified using amino acid sequences from several bZIP domain consensus sequences. The BolbZIP members were classified into 63 categories based on amino acid sequence similarity and were also compared with BrbZIP and AtbZIP transcription factors. Based on this BolbZIP identification and classification, cold stress-responsive BolbZIP genes were screened in inbred lines, BN106 and BN107, using RNA sequencing data and qRT-PCR. The expression level of the 3 genes, Bol008071, Bol033132, and Bol042729, was significantly increased in BN107 under cold conditions and was unchanged in BN106. The upregulation of these genes in BN107, a cold-susceptible inbred line, suggests that they might be significant components in the cold response. Among three identified genes, Bol033132 has 97% sequence similarity to Bra020735, which was identified in a screen for cold-related genes in B. rapa and a protein containing N-rich regions in LCRs. The results obtained in this study provide valuable information for understanding the potential function of BolbZIP transcription factors in cold stress responses.

  7. CaPUB1, a Hot Pepper U-box E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Confers Enhanced Cold Stress Tolerance and Decreased Drought Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hye Jo; Jung, Ye Jin; Kang, Bin Goo; Kim, Woo Taek

    2016-03-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought and low temperature critically restrict plant growth, reproduction, and productivity. Higher plants have developed various defense strategies against these unfavorable conditions. CaPUB1 (Capsicum annuum Putative U-box protein 1) is a hot pepper U-box E3 Ub ligase. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants that constitutively expressed CaPUB1 exhibited drought-sensitive phenotypes, suggesting that it functions as a negative regulator of the drought stress response. In this study, CaPUB1 was over-expressed in rice (Oryza sativa L.), and the phenotypic properties of transgenic rice plants were examined in terms of their drought and cold stress tolerance. Ubi:CaPUB1 T3 transgenic rice plants displayed phenotypes hypersensitive to dehydration, suggesting that its role in the negative regulation of drought stress response is conserved in dicot Arabidopsis and monocot rice plants. In contrast, Ubi:CaPUB1 progeny exhibited phenotypes markedly tolerant to prolonged low temperature (4°C) treatment, compared to those of wild-type plants, as determined by survival rates, electrolyte leakage, and total chlorophyll content. Cold stress-induced marker genes, including DREB1A, DREB1B, DREB1C, and Cytochrome P450, were more up-regulated by cold treatment in Ubi:CaPUB1 plants than in wild-type plants. These results suggest that CaPUB1 serves as both a negative regulator of the drought stress response and a positive regulator of the cold stress response in transgenic rice plants. This raises the possibility that CaPUB1 participates in the cross-talk between drought and low-temperature signaling pathways.

  8. Signalling crosstalk in light stress and immune reactions in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Andrea; Rahikainen, Moona; Konert, Grzegorz; Finazzi, Giovanni; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa

    2014-04-19

    The evolutionary history of plants is tightly connected with the evolution of microbial pathogens and herbivores, which use photosynthetic end products as a source of life. In these interactions, plants, as the stationary party, have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense, signal and respond to the presence of external stress agents. Chloroplasts are metabolically versatile organelles that carry out fundamental functions in determining appropriate immune reactions in plants. Besides photosynthesis, chloroplasts host key steps in the biosynthesis of amino acids, stress hormones and secondary metabolites, which have a great impact on resistance against pathogens and insect herbivores. Changes in chloroplast redox signalling pathways and reactive oxygen species metabolism also mediate local and systemic signals, which modulate plant resistance to light stress and disease. Moreover, interplay among chloroplastic signalling networks and plasma membrane receptor kinases is emerging as a key mechanism that modulates stress responses in plants. This review highlights the central role of chloroplasts in the signalling crosstalk that essentially determines the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions in plants.

  9. The Heat Stress Factor HSFA6b Connects ABA Signaling and ABA-Mediated Heat Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Chen; Niu, Chung-Yen; Yang, Chen-Ru; Jinn, Tsung-Luo

    2016-10-01

    Heat stress response (HSR) is a conserved mechanism developed to increase the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) via a heat shock factor (HSF)-dependent mechanism. Signaling by the stress phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in acquired thermotolerance as well. Analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) microarray databases revealed that the expression of HSFA6b, a class A HSF, extensively increased with salinity, osmotic, and cold stresses, but not heat. Here, we show that HSFA6b plays a pivotal role in the response to ABA and in thermotolerance. Salt-inducible HSFA6b expression was down-regulated in ABA-insensitive and -deficient mutants; however, exogenous ABA application restored expression in ABA-deficient, but not -insensitive plants. Thus, ABA signaling is required for proper HSFA6b expression. A transcriptional activation assay of protoplasts revealed that ABA treatment and coexpression of an ABA signaling master effector, ABA-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN1, could activate the HSFA6b promoter. In addition, HSFA6b directly bound to the promoter of DEHYDRATION-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN2A and enhanced its expression. Analysis of ABA responses in seed germination, cotyledon greening, and root growth as well as salt and drought tolerance in HSFA6b-null, overexpression, and dominant negative mutants revealed that HSFA6b is a positive regulator participating in ABA-mediated salt and drought resistance. Thermoprotection tests showed that HSFA6b was required for thermotolerance acquisition. Our study reveals a network in which HSFA6b operates as a downstream regulator of the ABA-mediated stress response and is required for heat stress resistance. This new ABA-signaling pathway is integrated into the complex HSR network in planta. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Syndecan-1 is required to maintain intradermal fat and prevent cold stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko Kasza

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic temperature regulation is fundamental to mammalian physiology and is controlled by acute and chronic responses of local, endocrine and nervous regulators. Here, we report that loss of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-1, causes a profoundly depleted intradermal fat layer, which provides crucial thermogenic insulation for mammals. Mice without syndecan-1 enter torpor upon fasting and show multiple indicators of cold stress, including activation of the stress checkpoint p38α in brown adipose tissue, liver and lung. The metabolic phenotype in mutant mice, including reduced liver glycogen, is rescued by housing at thermoneutrality, suggesting that reduced insulation in cool temperatures underlies the observed phenotypes. We find that syndecan-1, which functions as a facultative lipoprotein uptake receptor, is required for adipocyte differentiation in vitro. Intradermal fat shows highly dynamic differentiation, continuously expanding and involuting in response to hair cycle and ambient temperature. This physiology probably confers a unique role for Sdc1 in this adipocyte sub-type. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone rescues Sdc1-/- intradermal adipose tissue, placing PPARγ downstream of Sdc1 in triggering adipocyte differentiation. Our study indicates that disruption of intradermal adipose tissue development results in cold stress and complex metabolic pathology.

  11. Rapid growth reduces cold resistance: evidence from latitudinal variation in growth rate, cold resistance and stress proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoks, Robby; De Block, Marjan

    2011-02-24

    Physiological costs of rapid growth may contribute to the observation that organisms typically grow at submaximal rates. Although, it has been hypothesized that faster growing individuals would do worse in dealing with suboptimal temperatures, this type of cost has never been explored empirically. Furthermore, the mechanistic basis of the physiological costs of rapid growth is largely unexplored. Larvae of the damselfly Ischnura elegans from two univoltine northern and two multivoltine southern populations were reared at three temperatures and after emergence given a cold shock. Cold resistance, measured by chill coma recovery times in the adult stage, was lower in the southern populations. The faster larval growth rates in the southern populations contributed to this latitudinal pattern in cold resistance. In accordance with their assumed role in cold resistance, Hsp70 levels were lower in the southern populations, and faster growing larvae had lower Hsp70 levels. Yet, individual variation in Hsp70 levels did not explain variation in cold resistance. WE PROVIDE EVIDENCE FOR A NOVEL COST OF RAPID GROWTH: reduced cold resistance. Our results indicate that the reduced cold resistance in southern populations of animals that change voltinism along the latitudinal gradient may not entirely be explained by thermal selection per se but also by the costs of time constraint-induced higher growth rates. This also illustrates that stressors imposed in the larval stage may carry over and shape fitness in the adult stage and highlights the importance of physiological costs in the evolution of life-histories at macro-scales.

  12. Heat- and cold-stress effects on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity among urban and rural populations in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Aleš; Davídkovová, Hana; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have examined the relationship of high and low air temperatures to cardiovascular mortality in the Czech Republic. Much less is understood about heat-/cold-related cardiovascular morbidity and possible regional differences. This paper compares the effects of warm and cold days on excess mortality and morbidity for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in the city of Prague and a rural region of southern Bohemia during 1994-2009. Population size and age structure are similar in the two regions. The results are evaluated for selected population groups (men and women). Excess mortality (number of deaths) and morbidity (number of hospital admissions) were determined as differences between observed and expected daily values, the latter being adjusted for long-term changes, annual and weekly cycles, and epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. Generally higher relative excess CVD mortality on warm days than on cold days was identified in both regions. In contrast to mortality, weak excess CVD morbidity was observed for both warm and cold days. Different responses of individual CVDs to heat versus cold stress may be caused by the different nature of each CVD and different physiological processes induced by heat or cold stress. The slight differences between Prague and southern Bohemia in response to heat versus cold stress suggest the possible influence of environmental and socioeconomic factors such as the effects of urban heat island and exposure to air pollution, lifestyle differences, and divergence in population structure, which may result in differing vulnerability of urban versus rural population to temperature extremes.

  13. Measuring stress variation with depth using Barkhausen signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypris, O., E-mail: orfeas.kypris@cs.ox.ac.uk [Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX13QD (United Kingdom); Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis (BNA) is an established technique for the characterization of stress in ferromagnetic materials. An important application is the evaluation of residual stress in aerospace components, where shot-peening is used to strengthen the part by inducing compressive residual stresses on its surface. However, the evaluation of the resulting stress-depth gradients cannot be achieved by conventional BNA methods, where signals are interpreted in the time domain. The immediate alternative of using x-ray diffraction stress analysis is less than ideal, as the use of electropolishing to remove surface layers renders the part useless after inspection. Thus, a need for advancing the current BNA techniques prevails. In this work, it is shown how a parametric model for the frequency spectrum of Barkhausen emissions can be used to detect variations of stress along depth in ferromagnetic materials. Proof of concept is demonstrated by inducing linear stress-depth gradients using four-point bending, and fitting the model to the frequency spectra of measured Barkhausen signals, using a simulated annealing algorithm to extract the model parameters. Validation of our model suggests that in bulk samples the Barkhausen frequency spectrum can be expressed by a multi-exponential function with a dependence on stress and depth. One practical application of this spectroscopy method is the non-destructive evaluation of residual stress-depth profiles in aerospace components, thus helping to prevent catastrophic failures. - Highlights: • The frequency spectrum of Barkhausen noise is modelled as a function of bending moment. • Experimental results demonstrate the sensitivity of the slope parameter to a bending moment. • This allows extraction of the stress-depth characteristic in ferromagnetic specimens.

  14. Phospholipid signaling responses in salt-stressed rice leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darwish, E.; Testerink, C.; Khalil, M.; El-Shihy, O.; Munnik, T.

    2009-01-01

    Salinity is one of the major environmental factors limiting growth and productivity of rice plants. In this study, the effect of salt stress on phospholipid signaling responses in rice leaves was investigated. Leaf cuts were radiolabeled with 32 P-orthophosphate and the lipids extracted and analyzed

  15. Yeast signaling pathways in the oxidative stress response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikner, Aminah [Section of Microbiology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Shiozaki, Kazuhiro [Section of Microbiology, Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)]. E-mail: kshiozaki@ucdavis.edu

    2005-01-06

    Oxidative stress that generates the reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the major causes of DNA damage and mutations. The 'DNA damage checkpoint' that arrests cell cycle and repairs damaged DNA has been a focus of recent studies, and the genetically amenable model systems provided by yeasts have been playing a leading role in the eukaryotic checkpoint research. However, means to eliminate ROS are likely to be as important as the DNA repair mechanisms in order to suppress mutations in the chromosomal DNA, and yeasts also serve as excellent models to understand how eukaryotes combat oxidative stress. In this article, we present an overview of the signaling pathways that sense oxidative stress and induce expression of various anti-oxidant genes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Three conserved signaling modules have been identified in the oxidative stress response of these diverse yeast species: the stress-responsive MAP kinase cascade, the multistep phosphorelay and the AP-1-like transcription factor. The structure and function of these signaling modules are discussed.

  16. Physiological response of the cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus to thermal stress and ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gori

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures and ocean acidification driven by anthropogenic carbon emissions threaten both tropical and temperate corals. However, the synergistic effect of these stressors on coral physiology is still poorly understood, in particular for cold-water corals. This study assessed changes in key physiological parameters (calcification, respiration and ammonium excretion of the widespread cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus maintained for ∼8 months at two temperatures (ambient 12 °C and elevated 15 °C and two pCO2 conditions (ambient 390 ppm and elevated 750 ppm. At ambient temperatures no change in instantaneous calcification, respiration or ammonium excretion rates was observed at either pCO2 levels. Conversely, elevated temperature (15 °C significantly reduced calcification rates, and combined elevated temperature and pCO2 significantly reduced respiration rates. Changes in the ratio of respired oxygen to excreted nitrogen (O:N, which provides information on the main sources of energy being metabolized, indicated a shift from mixed use of protein and carbohydrate/lipid as metabolic substrates under control conditions, to less efficient protein-dominated catabolism under both stressors. Overall, this study shows that the physiology of D. dianthus is more sensitive to thermal than pCO2 stress, and that the predicted combination of rising temperatures and ocean acidification in the coming decades may severely impact this cold-water coral species.

  17. Physiological response of the cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus to thermal stress and ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Andrea; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Hennige, Sebastian J; Murray, Fiona; Rottier, Cécile; Wicks, Laura C; Roberts, J Murray

    2016-01-01

    Rising temperatures and ocean acidification driven by anthropogenic carbon emissions threaten both tropical and temperate corals. However, the synergistic effect of these stressors on coral physiology is still poorly understood, in particular for cold-water corals. This study assessed changes in key physiological parameters (calcification, respiration and ammonium excretion) of the widespread cold-water coral Desmophyllum dianthus maintained for ∼8 months at two temperatures (ambient 12 °C and elevated 15 °C) and two pCO2 conditions (ambient 390 ppm and elevated 750 ppm). At ambient temperatures no change in instantaneous calcification, respiration or ammonium excretion rates was observed at either pCO2 levels. Conversely, elevated temperature (15 °C) significantly reduced calcification rates, and combined elevated temperature and pCO2 significantly reduced respiration rates. Changes in the ratio of respired oxygen to excreted nitrogen (O:N), which provides information on the main sources of energy being metabolized, indicated a shift from mixed use of protein and carbohydrate/lipid as metabolic substrates under control conditions, to less efficient protein-dominated catabolism under both stressors. Overall, this study shows that the physiology of D. dianthus is more sensitive to thermal than pCO2 stress, and that the predicted combination of rising temperatures and ocean acidification in the coming decades may severely impact this cold-water coral species.

  18. Immune and physiological responses of pufferfish (Takifugu obscurus) under cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chang-Hong; Ye, Chao-Xia; Guo, Zhi-Xun; Wang, An-Li

    2017-05-01

    Low temperature is an important environmental factor in aquaculture farming that affects the survival and growth of organisms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of low temperature on biochemical parameters, oxidative stress and apoptosis in pufferfish. In the stress group, water temperature decreased from 25 °C to 13 °C at a rate of 1 °C/1 h. Fish blood and liver were collected to assay biochemical parameters, oxidative stress and expression of genes at 25 °C, 21 °C, 17 °C, 13 °C and 13 °C for 24 h. The results showed that low temperature could decrease total blood cell count, inhibit cell viability, and subsequently lead to DNA damage. Biochemical parameters such as plasma protein and ALP significantly declined in fish under low temperature, while a significant increase in AST, ALT, LDH and glucose was observed. The gene expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT), HSP90 and C3 were induced by low temperature stress. Furthermore, the gene expression of apoptotic related genes including P53, caspase-9 and caspase-3 were up-regulated, suggesting that caspase-dependent pathway could play important roles in low temperature-induced apoptosis in fish. This study may provide baseline information about how cold stress affects the physiological responses and apoptosis in fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ghrelin levels after a cold pressor stress test in obese women with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Marci E; Yahav, Eric; Hashim, Sami A; Geliebter, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin, a peptide hormone secreted mainly by the stomach, increases appetite and food intake. Surprisingly, ghrelin levels are lower in obese individuals with binge eating disorder (BED) than in obese non-BED individuals. Acute psychological stress has been shown to raise ghrelin levels in animals and humans. Our aim was to assess ghrelin levels after a cold pressor test (CPT) in women with BED. We also examined the relationship between the cortisol stress response and changes in ghrelin levels. Twenty-one obese (mean [standard deviation] body mass index = 34.9 [5.8] kg/m(2)) women (10 non-BED, 11 BED) underwent the CPT, hand submerged in ice water for 2 minutes. Blood samples were drawn for 70 minutes and assayed for ghrelin and cortisol. There were no differences between the groups in ghrelin levels at baseline (-10 minutes). Ghrelin rose significantly after the CPT (F = 2.4, p = .024) peaking at 19 minutes before declining (F = 17.9, p stress, hunger, or desire to eat after CPT. In addition, there were no observed relationships between the area under the curves for ghrelin or cortisol after stress. Although there were no differences between BED groups, there was a significant rise in ghrelin in obese humans after a stressor, consistent with other recent reports suggesting a stress-related role for ghrelin.

  20. Stress affects dopaminergic signaling pathways in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckameyer, Wendi S; Weinstein, Joshua S

    2005-06-01

    Behaviors modulated by dopamine appear to be conserved across species. In the model system Drosophila melanogaster, as in mammals, dopamine modulates female sexual receptivity, a simple form of learning and responses to drugs of abuse. Synthesis, reuptake and binding of dopamine are also evolutionarily conserved. Since stress has been shown to affect dopaminergic signaling pathways in mammals, we investigated the consequences of exposure to diverse stressors on dopaminergic physiology in the fruit fly, D. melanogaster. Animals were exposed to a metabolic stress (starvation), an oxidative stress (via the superoxide anion generator paraquat) or a mechanical stress (gentle vortexing). Sexual maturity, reproductive status, gender and type of stress differentially affected survival. The stress paradigms also resulted in alterations in the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine biosynthesis. Exposure to these stressors perturbed female sexual receptivity and ovarian development, which are modulated by dopamine, suggesting that dopaminergic physiology is affected as a consequence of stress. Transgenic Drosophila with reduced levels of neuronal dopamine displayed an altered response to these stressors, suggesting that, as in mammals, dopamine is a key element in the stress response.

  1. Rapid growth reduces cold resistance: evidence from latitudinal variation in growth rate, cold resistance and stress proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby Stoks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physiological costs of rapid growth may contribute to the observation that organisms typically grow at submaximal rates. Although, it has been hypothesized that faster growing individuals would do worse in dealing with suboptimal temperatures, this type of cost has never been explored empirically. Furthermore, the mechanistic basis of the physiological costs of rapid growth is largely unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Larvae of the damselfly Ischnura elegans from two univoltine northern and two multivoltine southern populations were reared at three temperatures and after emergence given a cold shock. Cold resistance, measured by chill coma recovery times in the adult stage, was lower in the southern populations. The faster larval growth rates in the southern populations contributed to this latitudinal pattern in cold resistance. In accordance with their assumed role in cold resistance, Hsp70 levels were lower in the southern populations, and faster growing larvae had lower Hsp70 levels. Yet, individual variation in Hsp70 levels did not explain variation in cold resistance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: WE PROVIDE EVIDENCE FOR A NOVEL COST OF RAPID GROWTH: reduced cold resistance. Our results indicate that the reduced cold resistance in southern populations of animals that change voltinism along the latitudinal gradient may not entirely be explained by thermal selection per se but also by the costs of time constraint-induced higher growth rates. This also illustrates that stressors imposed in the larval stage may carry over and shape fitness in the adult stage and highlights the importance of physiological costs in the evolution of life-histories at macro-scales.

  2. Methods of Evaluating Protective Clothing Relative to Heat and Cold Stress: Thermal Manikin, Biomedical Modeling, and Human Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    1996. pp. 419–438. 47. O’Brien, C., A.J. Young, and M.N. Sawka: Hypohydration and thermoregulation in cold air. J. Appl. Physiol. 84:185–189 (1998...code) 2011 Journal Article-Journal of Occup and Env Hygiene Methods of Evaluating Protective Clothing Relative to Heat and cold Stress: Thermal...hazard assessment, thermal strain, thermoregulation Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified 12 Catherine O’Brien 508-233-5973 Reset Journal

  3. Characterization of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) genes and their association with cold and freezing stress in Brassica rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Yang, Tae-Jin; Hur, Yoonkang; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2014-10-15

    Flavonoids including anthocyanins provide flower and leaf colors, as well as other derivatives that play diverse roles in plant development and interactions with the environment. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) is part of an important step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanins. This study characterized 12 DFR genes of Brassica rapa and investigated their association with anthocyanin coloration, as well as cold and freezing stress in several genotypes of B. rapa. Comparison of sequences of these genes with DFR gene sequences from other species revealed a high degree of homology. Constitutive expression of the genes in several pigmented and non-pigmented lines of B. rapa demonstrated correlation with anthocyanin accumulation for BrDFR8 and 9. Conversely, BrDFR2, 4, 8 and 9 only showed very high responses to cold stress in pigmented B. rapa samples. BrDFR1, 3, 5, 6 and 10 responded to cold and freezing stress treatments, regardless of pigmentation. BrDFRs were also shown to be regulated by two transcription factors, BrMYB2-2 and BrTT8, contrasting with anthocyanin accumulation and cold and freezing stress. Thus, the above results suggest that these genes are associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis and cold and freezing stress tolerance and might be useful resources for development of cold and/or freezing stress resistant Brassica crops with desirable colors as well. These findings may also facilitate exploration of the molecular mechanism that regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis and its response to abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Steve

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin (SM), a natural product, is touted as a liver protectant and preventer of both chronic inflammation and diseases. To define how SM elicits these effects at a systems level, we performed transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies in human liver and T cell lines. Multiple pathways associated with cellular stress and metabolism were modulated by SM treatment within 0.5 to four hours: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed suppression of glycolytic, TCA cycle, and amino acid metabolism by SM treatment. Antiinflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 hours) SM exposure, with suppression of multiple proinflammatory mRNAs and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling. Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that SM inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while SM inhibition of the mTOR pathway in part required DDIT4. Thus, SM activates stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Therefore, natural products like SM may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation.

  5. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin, a characterized extract of the seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum), suppresses cellular inflammation. To define how this occurs, transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies were performed in human liver and T cell lines. Cellular stress and metabolic pathways were modulated within 4 h of silymarin treatment: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed silymarin suppression of glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and amino acid metabolism. Anti-inflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 h) silymarin exposure, with suppression of multiple pro-inflammatory mRNAs and signaling pathways including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO). Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that silymarin inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while silymarin inhibition of mTOR required DDIT4. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Thus, natural products activate stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory cellular phenotype. Natural products like silymarin may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation. PMID:26186142

  6. Stress response signaling and virulence: insights from entomopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2015-08-01

    The Ascomycete fungal insect pathogens, Beauveria and Metarhizium spp. have emerged as model systems with which to probe diverse aspects of fungal growth, stress response, and pathogenesis. Due to the availability of genomic resources and the development of robust methods for genetic manipulation, the last 5 years have witnessed a rapid increase in the molecular characterization of genes and their pathways involved in stress response and signal transduction in these fungi. These studies have been performed mainly via characterization of gene deletion/knockout mutants and have included the targeting of general proteins involved in stress response and/or virulence, e.g. catalases, superoxide dismutases, and osmolyte balance maintenance enzymes, membrane proteins and signaling pathways including GPI anchored proteins and G-protein coupled membrane receptors, MAPK pathways, e.g. (i) the pheromone/nutrient sensing, Fus3/Kss1, (ii) the cell wall integrity, Mpk1, and (iii) the high osmolarity, Hog1, the PKA/adenyl cyclase pathway, and various downstream transcription factors, e.g. Msn2, CreA and Pac1. Here, we will discuss current research that strongly suggests extensive underlying contributions of these biochemical and signaling pathways to both abiotic stress response and virulence.

  7. Signal Traits and Oxidative Stress: A Comparative Study Across Populations with Divergent Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren N Vitousek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diverging populations often shift patterns of signal use – a process that can contribute to reproductive isolation and speciation. Yet it is not clear why most traits gain or lose signal value during divergence. One reason this could occur is because changes in the relationship between signals and relevant physiological parameters degrade the reliability of a signal, or even change its underlying information content. Here we test the hypothesis that the relationship between signal trait elaboration and a central component of organismal health – oxidative stress – differs across closely related populations that have diverged in signal use and preferences. In the recently diverged barn swallow subspecies complex (Hirundo rustica, Family: Hirundinidae, different populations use different traits as sexual signals. Two of these traits, ventral breast plumage color and tail streamer length, differ markedly between North American H. r. erythrogaster and European H. r. rustica. Despite this divergence, variation in ventral plumage color was similarly associated with measures of oxidative damage across both populations. However, the directionality of these relationships differed between the sexes: darker male barn swallows had higher levels of plasma oxidative damage than their lighter counterparts, while the opposite relationship was seen in females. In contrast, relationships between tail streamer length and measures of oxidative stress were not consistent across populations. Some analyses indicated that in European H. r. rustica, where males bearing elongated streamers are preferred as mates, longer-streamered males were more oxidatively stressed; however, the opposite pattern was suggested in North American H. r. erythrogaster. Tail streamer length was not associated with measures of oxidative stress in females of either population. Differences in the physiological state of stronger signalers across populations and between the sexes may be

  8. Phosphatidic acid, a versatile water-stress signal in roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fionn eMcLoughlin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate water supply is of utmost importance for growth and reproduction of plants. In order to cope with water deprivation, plants have to adapt their development and metabolism to ensure survival. To maximize water use efficiency, plants use a large array of signaling mediators such as hormones, protein kinases and phosphatases, Ca2+, reactive oxygen species and low abundant phospholipids that together form complex signaling cascades. Phosphatidic acid (PA is a signaling lipid that rapidly accumulates in response to a wide array of abiotic stress stimuli. PA formation provides the cell with spatial and transient information about the external environment by acting as a protein-docking site in cellular membranes. PA reportedly binds to a number of proteins that play a role during water limiting conditions, such as drought and salinity and has been shown to play an important role in maintaining root system architecture. Members of two osmotic stress-activated protein kinase families, sucrose non-fermenting 1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2 and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs were recently shown bind PA and are also involved in the maintenance of root system architecture and salinity stress tolerance. In addition, PA regulates several proteins involved in abscisic acid (ABA-signaling. PA-dependent recruitment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH under water limiting conditions indicates a role in regulating metabolic processes. Finally, a recent study also shows the PA recruits the clathrin heavy chain and a potassium channel subunit, hinting towards additional roles in cellular trafficking and potassium homeostasis. Taken together, the rapidly increasing number of proteins reported to interact with PA implies a broad role for this versatile signaling phospholipid in mediating salt and water stress responses.

  9. Deep sequencing of Brachypodium small RNAs at the global genome level identifies microRNAs involved in cold stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Kang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small RNAs having large-scale regulatory effects on plant development and stress responses. Extensive studies of miRNAs have only been performed in a few model plants. Although miRNAs are proved to be involved in plant cold stress responses, little is known for winter-habit monocots. Brachypodium distachyon, with close evolutionary relationship to cool-season cereals, has recently emerged as a novel model plant. There are few reports of Brachypodium miRNAs. Results High-throughput sequencing and whole-genome-wide data mining led to the identification of 27 conserved miRNAs, as well as 129 predicted miRNAs in Brachypodium. For multiple-member conserved miRNA families, their sizes in Brachypodium were much smaller than those in rice and Populus. The genome organization of miR395 family in Brachypodium was quite different from that in rice. The expression of 3 conserved miRNAs and 25 predicted miRNAs showed significant changes in response to cold stress. Among these miRNAs, some were cold-induced and some were cold-suppressed, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated under cold stress condition. Conclusion Our results suggest that Brachypodium miRNAs are composed of a set of conserved miRNAs and a large proportion of non-conserved miRNAs with low expression levels. Both kinds of miRNAs were involved in cold stress response, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated, implying an important role for cold-induced miRNAs. The different size and genome organization of miRNA families in Brachypodium and rice suggest that the frequency of duplication events or the selection pressure on duplicated miRNAs are different between these two closely related plant species.

  10. Galactooligosaccharide supplementation reduces stress-induced gastrointestinal dysfunction and days of cold or flu: a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial in healthy university students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hughes, Christine; Davoodi-Semiromi, Yalda; Colee, James C; Culpepper, Tyler; Dahl, Wendy J; Mai, Volker; Christman, Mary C; Langkamp-Henken, Bobbi

    2011-01-01

    .... We examined whether supplementation with galactooligosaccharides reduced gastrointestinal dysfunction and the percentage of days with cold or flu in academically stressed undergraduate students...

  11. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Ermakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA. Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2 that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments.

  12. Effects of cold plasma treatment on alfalfa seed growth under simulated drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinkui, FENG; Decheng, WANG; Changyong, SHAO; Lili, ZHANG; Xin, TANG

    2018-03-01

    The effect of different cold plasma treatments on the germination and seedling growth of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) seeds under simulated drought stress conditions was investigated. Polyethyleneglycol-6000 (PEG 6000)with the mass fraction of 0% (purified water), 5%, 10%, and 15% were applied to simulate the drought environment. The alfalfa seeds were treated with 15 different power levels ranged between 0–280 W for 15 s. The germination potential, germination rate, germination index, seedling root length, seedling height, and vigor index were investigated. Results indicated significant differences between treated with proper power and untreated alfalfa seeds. With the increase of treatment power, these indexes mentioned above almost presented bimodal curves. Under the different mass fractions of PEG 6000, results showed that the lower power led to increased germination, and the seedlings presented good adaptability to different drought conditions. Meanwhile, higher power levels resulted in a decreased germination rate. Seeds treated with 40 W resulted in higher germination potential, germination rate, seedling height, root length, and vigor index. Vigor indexes of the treated seeds under different PEG 6000 stresses increased by 38.68%, 43.91%, 74.34%, and 39.20% respectively compared to CK0-0, CK5-0, CK10-0, and CK15-0 (the control sample under 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% PEG 6000). Therefore, 40 W was regarded as the best treatment in this research. Although the trend indexes of alfalfa seeds treated with the same power were statistically the same under different PEG 6000 stresses, the cold plasma treatment had a significant effect on the adaptability of alfalfa seeds in different drought environments. Thus, this kind of treatment is worth implementing to promote seed growth under drought situations.

  13. CsWRKY46, a WRKY transcription factor from cucumber, confers cold resistance in transgenic-plant by regulating a set of cold-stress responsive genes in an ABA-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Yu, Hongjun; Yang, Xueyong; Li, Qiang; Ling, Jian; Wang, Hong; Gu, Xingfang; Huang, Sanwen; Jiang, Weijie

    2016-11-01

    Plant WRKY transcription factors are trans-regulatory proteins that are involved in plant immune responses, development and senescence; however, their roles in abiotic stress are still not well understood, especially in the horticultural crop cucumber. In this study, a novel cucumber WRKY gene, CsWRKY46 was cloned and identified, which was up-regulated in response to cold stress and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. CsWRKY46 is belonging to group II of the WRKY family, CsWRKY46 was found exclusively in the nucleus, as indicated by a transient expression assay. Yeast one-hybrid assay shown that CsWRKY46 interact with the W-box in the promoter of ABI5. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines over-expressing CsWRKY46, WRK46-OE1 and WRK46-OE5 had higher seedling survival rates upon freezing treatment compared with that of the wild-type. The above over-expression lines also showed much a higher proline accumulation, less electrolyte leakage and lower malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Furthermore, the CsWRKY46 overexpression lines were hypersensitive to ABA during seed germination, but the seedlings were not. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression levels of the ABA-responsive transcription factor ABI5 were higher in the WRKY46-OE lines than in wild-type and that the overexpression of CsWRKY46 increased the expression of stress-inducible genes, including RD29A and COR47. Taken together, our results demonstrated that CsWRKY46 from cucumber conferred cold tolerance to transgenic plants and positively regulated the cold signaling pathway in an ABA-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Turning and Ball Burnishing on the Microstructure and Residual Stress Distribution in Stainless Steel Cold Spray Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sova, A.; Courbon, C.; Valiorgue, F.; Rech, J.; Bertrand, Ph.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, an experimental study of influence of machining by turning and ball burnishing on the surface morphology, structure and residual stress distribution of cold spray 17-4 PH stainless steel deposits is provided. It is shown that cold spray deposits could be machined by turning under parameters closed to turning of bulk 17-4 PH stainless steel. Ball burnishing process permits to decrease surface roughness. Cross-sectional observation revealed that the turning and ball burnishing process allowed microstructure changes in the coating near-surface zone. In particular, significant particle deformation and particle boundary fragmentation is observed. Measurements of residual stresses showed that residual stresses in the as-spray deposit are compressive. After machining by turning, tensile residual stresses in the near-surface zone were induced. Further surface finishing of turned coating by ball burnishing allowed the establishment of the compressive residual stresses in the coating.

  15. Effect of Turning and Ball Burnishing on the Microstructure and Residual Stress Distribution in Stainless Steel Cold Spray Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sova, A.; Courbon, C.; Valiorgue, F.; Rech, J.; Bertrand, Ph.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, an experimental study of influence of machining by turning and ball burnishing on the surface morphology, structure and residual stress distribution of cold spray 17-4 PH stainless steel deposits is provided. It is shown that cold spray deposits could be machined by turning under parameters closed to turning of bulk 17-4 PH stainless steel. Ball burnishing process permits to decrease surface roughness. Cross-sectional observation revealed that the turning and ball burnishing process allowed microstructure changes in the coating near-surface zone. In particular, significant particle deformation and particle boundary fragmentation is observed. Measurements of residual stresses showed that residual stresses in the as-spray deposit are compressive. After machining by turning, tensile residual stresses in the near-surface zone were induced. Further surface finishing of turned coating by ball burnishing allowed the establishment of the compressive residual stresses in the coating.

  16. Oligo-microarray analysis and identification of stress-immune response genes from manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) exposure to heat and cold stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menike, Udeni; Lee, Youngdeuk; Oh, Chulhong; Wickramaarachchi, W D N; Premachandra, H K A; Park, Se Chang; Lee, Jehee; De Zoysa, Mahanama

    2014-10-01

    Thermal stress regulates the complex system of gene expression and downstream biochemical and physiological responses in aquatic species. To identify genes involved in heat stress responses in manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum), microarray analysis was conducted using clam transcriptome generated by pyrosequencing of cDNA library. Manila clams were exposed to heat (30 ± 1 °C) and cold (4 ± 1 °C) stresses and compared with control animals (18 ± 1 °C). Heat stressed animals have changed greater number of transcripts (8,306) than cold stress (7,573). Results of both heat and cold exposure has shown that over 2-fold up-regulated or down regulated (>2-or <2-fold) transcripts were higher at 24 h than at 6 h. It suggests that silent and constitutive express genes can activate at critical stage of thermal stress which could be between 6 and 24 h post stresses. We identified wide range of stress-immune response genes such as transcription factors, heat shock proteins, antioxidant and detoxification enzymes, inflammatory and apoptosis related genes, cell adhesion molecules, cytokines, and IFN regulatory proteins. Histological results revealed that non-specific cellular alterations such as lesions, hypertrophy, and necrosis in stressed gills could be due to decrease of gas exchange rate which may cause hypoxia.

  17. Effect of prolonged nicotine infusion on response of rat catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes to restraint and cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu-Yuan; Glazkova, Dina; Serova, Lidia; Sabban, Esther L

    2005-11-01

    There is a paradoxical relationship between nicotine and stress. To help elucidate their relationship on catecholamine biosynthesis, rats were infused with nicotine for 7-14 days before exposure to cold or restraint stress. Nicotine (5 mg/kg/day, 14 days) did not alter basal plasma corticosterone or its elevation with 24 h cold stress, but prevented corticosterone elevation following 2 h restraint stress. In adrenal medulla (AM), response of dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), but not tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA, to both stressors was attenuated in nicotine-infused rats. In locus coeruleus (LC), restraint stress elevated TH and DBH mRNA in saline-, but not in nicotine-infused rats. Cold stress triggered a similar response of TH and DBH mRNAs in LC with and without nicotine infusion. With shorter nicotine infusion (8 mg/kg/day, 7 days), TH mRNA in AM was not induced by restraint stress on one (1x) or two (2x) consecutive days nor was DBH mRNA in AM or LC by 2x. The findings demonstrate that constant release of nicotine can modulate, or even prevent, some stress responses at the level of the HPA axis and gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in LC and AM.

  18. AIP1-mediated stress signaling in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiqin; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2015-05-01

    AIP1 (ASK1-interacting protein-1; encoded by the DAB2IP gene), a signaling scaffolding protein, is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (EC). While it was initially discovered as an apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-interacting protein, AIP1 broadly suppresses inflammatory responses triggered by cytokines and stresses such as TNF, LPS, VEGF, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in EC (therefore, AIP1 is an anti-inflammatory protein). Human genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified DAB2IP gene variants conferring susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. Consistently, a global or vascular EC-specific deletion of DAB2IP in mice strongly enhances inflammatory responses and exacerbates atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis progression in mouse models. Mechanisms for AIP1 function and regulation associated with human cardiovascular diseases need further investigations.

  19. Characterization and Expression Analysis of Common Bean Histone Deacetylase 6 during Development and Cold Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Kusi-Appiah Hayford

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs are important regulators of gene transcription thus controlling multiple cellular processes. Despite its essential role in plants, HDA6 is yet to be validated in common bean. In this study, we show that HDA6 is involved in plant development and stress response. Differential expression of HDA6 was determined in various tissues and the expression was seen to be upregulated with plant age (seedling < flowering < maturity. Higher expression was observed in flowers and pods than in stem, leaf, and root. Upregulation of HDA6 gene during cold stress implies its prominent role in abiotic stress. Furthermore, the HDA6 gene was isolated from three common bean genotypes and sequence analyses revealed homology with functionally characterized homologs in model species. The 53 kDa translated product was detected using an HDA6 specific antibody and recombinant protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli showed HDAC activity in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the agriculturally important crop common bean describing the functional characterization and biological role of HDA6.

  20. FLOW STRESS MODEL FOR COLD-FORMED 40HM CONSTRUCTIONAL STEEL

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    Anna Dziubińska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research undertaken to investigate cold forming process for 40HM constructional steel suitable for heat treatment. In the first part of the paper, mechanical properties of this steel and its industrial applications are described. The second part of the paper presents the results of the analysis of flow curves for two kinds of steel specimens: those that were subjected to annealing and those that did not undergo any heat treatment. It was found that the application of heat treatment had a significant effect on improving the forming conditions for this steel at room temperature. The experimental flow curves obtained in a compression test were described by constitutive equations illustrating the dependence between flow stresses and strain value. In order to determine the equation coefficients, the Generalized Reduced Gradient method implemented in Microsoft Excel was used. Based on the obtained equations, a material model will be developed to perform numerical simulations of cold forming for 40HM steel, using FEM-based software that aids the design of metal forming technologies.

  1. Identifying leaf traits that signal stress in TIR spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago Acevedo, Maria F.; Groen, Thomas A.; Hecker, Christoph A.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2017-03-01

    Plants under constant water and temperature stress experience a chain of reactions that in the long term alter their leaf traits (morphology, anatomy and chemistry). The use of these traits as proxies for assessing plant stress was so far mainly based on conventional laboratory methods, which are expensive and time-consuming. Remote sensing methods based on spectral changes can detect changes in pigments and productivity using the visible and near infrared. However, the use of infrared spectra, where changes in the spectra are associated with physical changes of the leaf, is still incipient. In this study plants of Rhododendron cf. catawbiense, were exposed to low temperatures and low soil water content during a six months experiment. The spectral response in the infrared region 1.4-16 μm, microstructural variables, leaf water content, leaf area and leaf molecules such as lignin and cellulose concentrations were measured in individual leaves after the period of stress. This study revealed that under cold conditions plants have most changes in leaf water content, lignin and cellulose concentrations and leaf area, while under drought conditions the most striking change is water loss. These leaf trait modifications are also correlated with changes in thermal infrared spectra, showing their potential as proxies for detecting plant stress in this species. A multinomial model allows the estimation of the stress treatments imposed on these plants from their infrared spectra. This model reveals a group of 15 bands in the SWIR and MWIR between 2.23 and 7.77 μm, which show relatively large changes, and had an overall accuracy of 87%. Finally, individual partial least squares regression models show that lignin, cellulose, leaf water content and leaf area are the leaf traits reacting significantly to long-term stress and that are also generating measurable changes in the infrared spectra. Although these models are based on laboratory data, the congruence of the identified

  2. Negative CD4 + TIM-3 signaling confers resistance against cold preservation damage in mouse liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanxing; Ji, Haofeng; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiu-da; Gao, Feng; Nguyen, Terry T; Shang, Xuanming; Lee, Nayun; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2015-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), an innate immunity-driven local inflammation, remains the major problem in clinical organ transplantation. T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM-3)-Galectin-9 (Gal-9) signaling regulates CD4+ Th1 immune responses. Here, we explored TIM-3-Gal-9 function in a clinically relevant murine model of hepatic cold storage and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). C57BL/6 livers, preserved for 20 h at 4°C in UW solution, were transplanted to syngeneic mouse recipients. Up-regulation of TIM-3 on OLT-infiltrating activated CD4+ T cells was observed in the early IRI phase (1 h). By 6 h of reperfusion, OLTs in recipients treated with a blocking anti-TIM-3 Ab were characterized by: (1) enhanced hepatocellular damage (sALT levels, liver Suzuki's histological score); (2) polarized cell infiltrate towards Th1/Th17-type phenotype; (3) depressed T cell exhaustion markers (PD-1, LAG3); and (4) elevated neutrophil and macrophage infiltration/activation. In parallel studies, adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells from naïve WT, but not from TIM-3 Tg donors, readily recreated OLT damage in otherwise IR-resistant RAG(-/-) test recipients. Furthermore, pre-treatment of mice with rGal-9 promoted hepatoprotection against preservation-association liver damage, accompanied by enhanced TIM-3 expression in OLTs. Thus, CD4+ T cell-dependent "negative" TIM-3 costimulation is essential for hepatic homeostasis and resistance against IR stress in OLTs. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  3. Identifying coagulopathies in the pathophysiology of cold stress syndrome in the Florida manatee Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratclough, Ashley; Conner, Bobbi J; Brooks, Marjory B; Pontes Stablein, Alyssa; Gerlach, Trevor J; Reep, Roger L; Ball, Ray L; Floyd, Ruth Francis

    2017-08-09

    Cold stress syndrome (CSS) in the Florida manatee Trichechus manatus latirostris has been defined as morbidity and mortality resulting from prolonged exposure to water temperatures cases were included in the analyses. There were numerous differences between mean values of TEG and coagulation parameters for healthy manatees and those for CSS cases. Among TEG parameters, reaction time (R), clot formation time (K) and percentage of clot lysed after 30 min (LY30) values were significantly different (p cases also had significantly higher mean D-dimer concentration and coagulation factor XI activity, prolonged mean activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and significantly decreased mean antithrombin activity. These combined abnormalities include clinicopathologic criteria of disseminated intravascular coagulation, indicating an increased risk of thromboembolic disease associated with manatee CSS.

  4. Effect of infrared lamps to ameliorate cold stress in Vrindavani calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Showkat A; Bhushan, Bharat; Sheikh, Sajad A; Chandrasekar, T; Godara, Asu Singh; Bharti, Pranay; Japheth, K Puhle

    2015-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of infrared lamps to ameliorate cold stress in Vrindavani (Holstein Friesian × Brown Swiss × Jersey × Hariana) calves. For the present investigation, ten newborn Vrindavani calves were randomly divided into two groups (G1 and G2) of five each. The experiment was conducted from 2(nd) November to 8(th) February when the environmental temperature was at the lowest. The calves of G1 were provided with no additional protection while the calves of G2 were protected against the cold weather by providing heat using the infrared lamps. The body weight (kg) of the calves was recorded at weekly interval. The blood samples collected within 6 h of birth and then at fortnightly interval were analyzed for packed cell volume (PCV, %), hemoglobin (Hb, g/dl). Besides, the serum biochemical parameters, viz., Total serum protein (TSP, g/l), albumin (g/l), globulin (g/l), albumin globulin ratio (A:G) and important stress parameters, viz., triiodothyronine (T3, ng/ml), thyroxine (T4, ng/ml) and cortisol (ng/ml) were also estimated. The calves of G2 showed higher body weight gain as compared to G1. The differences were found to be highly significant (pcortisol and T4 were observed on 15 and 45(th) day in calves of G1 as compared to G2. The T3 levels were also found higher in calves of G1 than G2 and the differences were significant (p<0.05) on 15 and 30(th) day and highly significant (p<0.01) on 45(th) day of the study. Based on the results, it could be concluded that the infrared lamps are efficient in providing favorable microclimate and hence can be effectively used in calf shed to protect newborn calves from adverse conditions of winter and to improve their body growth performance.

  5. Uncoupling protein-1 is protective of bone mass under mild cold stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Amy D; Lee, Nicola J; Wee, Natalie K Y; Zhang, Lei; Enriquez, Ronaldo F; Khor, Ee Cheng; Nie, Tao; Wu, Donghai; Sainsbury, Amanda; Baldock, Paul A; Herzog, Herbert

    2018-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT), largely controlled by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), has the ability to dissipate energy in the form of heat through the actions of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1), thereby critically influencing energy expenditure. Besides BAT, the SNS also strongly influences bone, and recent studies have demonstrated a positive correlation between BAT activity and bone mass, albeit the interactions between BAT and bone remain unclear. Here we show that UCP-1 is critical for protecting bone mass in mice under conditions of permanent mild cold stress for this species (22°C). UCP-1 -/- mice housed at 22°C showed significantly lower cancellous bone mass, with lower trabecular number and thickness, a lower bone formation rate and mineralising surface, but unaltered osteoclast number, compared to wild type mice housed at the same temperature. UCP-1 -/- mice also displayed shorter femurs than wild types, with smaller cortical periosteal and endocortical perimeters. Importantly, these altered bone phenotypes were not observed when UCP-1 -/- and wild type mice were housed in thermo-neutral conditions (29°C), indicating a UCP-1 dependent support of bone mass and bone formation at the lower temperature. Furthermore, at 22°C UCP-1 -/- mice showed elevated hypothalamic expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) relative to wild type, which is consistent with the lower bone formation and mass of UCP-1 -/- mice at 22°C caused by the catabolic effects of hypothalamic NPY-induced SNS modulation. The results from this study suggest that during mild cold stress, when BAT-dependent thermogenesis is required, UCP-1 activity exerts a protective effect on bone mass possibly through alterations in central NPY pathways known to regulate SNS activity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Memantine prevents cardiomyocytes nuclear size reduction in the left ventricle of rats exposed to cold stress

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    Adriano Meneghini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Memantine is an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist used to treat Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies have suggested that receptor blockers act as neuroprotective agents; however, no study has specifically investigated the impact that these drugs have on the heart. We sought to evaluate the effects of memantine on nuclear size reduction in cardiac cells exposed to cold stress. METHOD: We used male EPM-Wistar rats (n=40 divided into 4 groups: 1 Matched control (CON; 2 Memantine-treated rats (MEM; 3 Rats undergoing induced hypothermia (IH and 4 Rats undergoing induced hypothermia that were also treated with memantine (IHM. Animals in the MEM and IHM groups were treated by oral gavage administration of 20 mg/kg/day memantine over an eight-day period. Animals in the IH and IHM groups were submitted to 4 hours of hypothermia in a controlled environment with a temperature of - 8ºC on the last day of the study. RESULTS: The MEM group had the largest cardiomyocyte nuclear size (151 ± 3.5 μm³ vs. CON: 142 ± 2.3 μm³; p<0.05, while the IH group had the smallest mean value of nuclear size. The nuclear size of the IHM group was preserved (125 ± 2.9 μm³ compared to the IH group (108 ± 1.7 μm³; p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Memantine prevented the nuclear size reduction of cardiomyocytes in rats exposed to cold stress.

  7. Antioxidant capacity of polyphenolic extracts from leaves of Crataegus laevigata and Crataegus monogyna (Hawthorn) subjected to drought and cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirakosyan, Ara; Seymour, Elisabeth; Kaufman, Peter B; Warber, Sara; Bolling, Steven; Chang, Soo Chul

    2003-07-02

    Crataegus laevigata and Crataegus monogyna (hawthorn) were subjected to drought and cold stress treatments, and polyphenolic extracts from control and stress-treated plants were assayed for antioxidant capacities using a modified version of the Total Antioxidant Status Assay (Randox, San Francisco, CA). In addition, these plants were analyzed for levels of flavanol-type substance [(-)-epicatechin] and flavonoid (vitexin 2' '-O-rhamnoside, acetylvitexin 2' '-O-rhamnoside, and hyperoside) constituents that are important metabolites in hawthorn herbal preparations used to treat patients with heart disease. Drought and cold stress treatments caused increases in levels of (-)-epicatechin and hyperoside in both Crataegus species. Such treatments also enhanced the antioxidant capacity of the extracts. The results from this study thus indicate that these kinds of stress treatments can enhance the levels of important secondary metabolites and their total antioxidant capacities in leaves of Crataegus.

  8. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of two contrasting Brassica rapa doubled haploid lines under cold-stresses using Br135K oligomeric chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jeong Jung

    Full Text Available Genome wide transcription analysis in response to stresses is important to provide a basis of effective engineering strategies to improve stress tolerance in crop plants. We assembled a Brassica rapa oligomeric microarray (Br135K microarray using sequence information from 41,173 unigenes and analyzed the transcription profiles of two contrasting doubled haploid (DH lines, Chiifu and Kenshin, under cold-treatments. The two DH lines showed great differences in electrolyte leakage below -4°C, but similar patterns from 4°C to -2°C. Cold-treatments induced 885 and 858 genes in Chiifu and Kenshin, respectively. Overall, 134, and 56 genes showed an intrinsic difference in expression in Chiifu and Kenshin, respectively. Among 5,349 genes that showed no hit found (NHF in public databases, 61 and 24 were specifically expressed in Chiifu and Kenshin, respectively. Many transcription factor genes (TFs also showed various characteristics of expression. BrMYB12, BrMYBL2, BrbHLHs, BrbHLH038, a C2H2, a WRKY, BrDREB19 and a integrase-type TF were induced in a Chiifu-specific fashion, while a bHLH (Bra001826/AT3G21330, bHLH, cycling Dof factor and two Dof type TFs were Kenshin specific. Similar to previous studies, a large number of genes were differently induced or regulated among the two genotypes, but many genes, including NHFs, were specifically or intrinsically expressed with genotype specificity. Expression patterns of known-cold responsive genes in plants resulted in discrepancy to membrane leakage in the two DH lines, indicating that timing of gene expression is more important to conferring freezing tolerance rather than expression levels. Otherwise, the tolerance will be related to the levels of transcripts before cold-treatment or regulated by other mechanisms. Overall, these results indicate common signaling pathways and various transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are working together during cold-treatment of B. rapa. Our newly developed Br135K

  9. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of two contrasting Brassica rapa doubled haploid lines under cold-stresses using Br135K oligomeric chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hee-Jeong; Dong, Xiangshu; Park, Jong-In; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Lee, Sang Sook; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Lim, Yong-Pyo; Nou, Ill-Sup; Hur, Yoonkang

    2014-01-01

    Genome wide transcription analysis in response to stresses is important to provide a basis of effective engineering strategies to improve stress tolerance in crop plants. We assembled a Brassica rapa oligomeric microarray (Br135K microarray) using sequence information from 41,173 unigenes and analyzed the transcription profiles of two contrasting doubled haploid (DH) lines, Chiifu and Kenshin, under cold-treatments. The two DH lines showed great differences in electrolyte leakage below -4°C, but similar patterns from 4°C to -2°C. Cold-treatments induced 885 and 858 genes in Chiifu and Kenshin, respectively. Overall, 134, and 56 genes showed an intrinsic difference in expression in Chiifu and Kenshin, respectively. Among 5,349 genes that showed no hit found (NHF) in public databases, 61 and 24 were specifically expressed in Chiifu and Kenshin, respectively. Many transcription factor genes (TFs) also showed various characteristics of expression. BrMYB12, BrMYBL2, BrbHLHs, BrbHLH038, a C2H2, a WRKY, BrDREB19 and a integrase-type TF were induced in a Chiifu-specific fashion, while a bHLH (Bra001826/AT3G21330), bHLH, cycling Dof factor and two Dof type TFs were Kenshin specific. Similar to previous studies, a large number of genes were differently induced or regulated among the two genotypes, but many genes, including NHFs, were specifically or intrinsically expressed with genotype specificity. Expression patterns of known-cold responsive genes in plants resulted in discrepancy to membrane leakage in the two DH lines, indicating that timing of gene expression is more important to conferring freezing tolerance rather than expression levels. Otherwise, the tolerance will be related to the levels of transcripts before cold-treatment or regulated by other mechanisms. Overall, these results indicate common signaling pathways and various transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are working together during cold-treatment of B. rapa. Our newly developed Br135K oligomeric

  10. Comparative proteomic analysis of the stolon cold stress response between the C4 perennial grass species Zoysia japonica and Zoysia metrella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiping Xuan

    Full Text Available Zoysiagrass, the most cold-tolerant grass among the warm-season turfgrasses, is often used as a model species for isolating cellular components related to cold stress. To understand the proteomic responses to cold stress in zoysiagrass stolons, we extracted stolon proteins from Zoysiajaponica, cv. Meyer (cold-tolerant and Z. metrella, cv. Diamond (cold-sensitive, which were grown with or without cold treatment. Approximately 700 proteins were resolved on 2-DE gels, and 70 protein spots were differentially accumulated. We further observed that 45 of the identified proteins participate in 10 metabolic pathways and cellular processes. A significantly greater number of proteins accumulated in the Meyer than in the Diamond and 15 increased proteins were detected only in the Meyer cultivar under cold stress. Furthermore, we propose a cold stress-responsive protein network composed of several different functional components that exhibits a balance between reactive oxygen species (ROS production and scavenging, accelerated protein biosynthesis and proteolysis, reduced protein folding, enhanced photosynthesis, abundant energy supply and enhanced biosynthesis of carbohydrates and nucleotides. Generally, the cold-tolerant Meyer cultivar showed a greater ROS scavenging ability, more abundant energy supply and increased photosynthesis and protein synthesis than did the cold-sensitive Diamond cultivar, which may partly explain why Meyer is more cold tolerant.

  11. Feasibility of Using Gamma Irradiation for Inactivation of Starvation-, Heat-, and Cold-Stressed Salmonella in Tahini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaili, Tareq M; Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Abubakar, Salisu A; Alaboudi, Akram R; Al-Holy, Murad A

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella continues to be the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis and recently has been involved in infections related to edible seeds and their products, including tahini. This study investigated the (i) effectiveness of using gamma irradiation to inactivate starvation- and heat- or cold-stressed Salmonella in tahini, (ii) effect of storage on the sensitivity of stressed Salmonella to irradiation, and (iii) effect of irradiation on the chemical and physical characteristics of tahini. Tahini samples were inoculated with a cocktail of unstressed or stressed (starvation and heat or cold stress) Salmonella isolates and then exposed after storage at 21°C for 0, 7, and 30 days to gamma irradiation for up to 2.0 kGy. Additionally, the effect of irradiation on the color, peroxide, p-anisidine, and acid values of tahini were assessed. The initial level of unstressed and starvation- and heat-stressed Salmonella in tahini decreased by ca. 4.6 log CFU/g after exposure to 2.0 kGy, while cold-stressed cultures decreased by 4.5 log after exposure to 0.6 kGy. Irradiation doses of 1.0 kGy after 7 days of storage or 0.75 kGy after 30 days of storage decreased the populations of the unstressed and starvation- and heatstressed Salmonella by ca. 3.4 or 2.6 log, respectively. The D10-value of the unstressed Salmonella was 0.43 kGy. Starvation and heat stresses showed no significant effect (P > 0.05) on the calculated D10-value, whereas cold stress significantly (P tahini when compared with nonirradiated samples. Therefore, this study lays the foundation for using irradiation as an effective means for minimizing the risk of Salmonella in tahini without compromising its quality.

  12. PprM, a Cold Shock Domain-Containing Protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, Confers Oxidative Stress Tolerance to Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sun-Ha; Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Jeong, Sunwook; Choi, Yong Jun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Narumi, Issay; Lim, Sangyong

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a representative microorganism that is frequently used for industrial biotechnology; thus its cellular robustness should be enhanced for the widespread application of E. coli in biotechnology. Stress response genes from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans have been used to enhance the stress tolerance of E. coli. In the present study, we introduced the cold shock domain-containing protein PprM from D. radiodurans into E. coli and observed that th...

  13. Vortioxetine restores reversal learning impaired by 5-HT depletion or chronic intermittent cold stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ashley; Pehrson, Alan L; Sánchez, Connie; Morilak, David A

    2014-10-01

    Current treatments for depression, including serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are only partially effective, with a high incidence of residual symptoms, relapse, and treatment resistance. Loss of cognitive flexibility, a component of depression, is associated with dysregulation of the prefrontal cortex. Reversal learning, a form of cognitive flexibility, is impaired by chronic stress, a risk factor for depression, and the stress-induced impairment in reversal learning is sensitive to chronic SSRI treatment, and is mimicked by serotonin (5-HT) depletion. Vortioxetine, a novel, multimodal-acting antidepressant, is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, a 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, and inhibits the 5-HT transporter. Using adult male rats, we first investigated the direct effects of vortioxetine, acting at post-synaptic 5-HT receptors, on reversal learning that was compromised by 5-HT depletion using 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA), effectively eliminating any contribution of 5-HT reuptake blockade. PCPA induced a reversal learning impairment that was alleviated by acute or sub-chronic vortioxetine administration, suggesting that post-synaptic 5-HT receptor activation contributes to the effects of vortioxetine. We then investigated the effects of chronic dietary administration of vortioxetine on reversal learning that had been compromised in intact animals exposed to chronic intermittent cold (CIC) stress, to assess vortioxetine's total pharmacological effect. CIC stress impaired reversal learning, and chronic vortioxetine administration prevented the reversal-learning deficit. Together, these results suggest that the direct effect of vortioxetine at 5-HT receptors may contribute to positive effects on cognitive flexibility deficits, and may enhance the effect of 5-HT reuptake blockade.

  14. Effect of Mahuang Gancao Ganjiang Decoction on Fusion and Fission of Mitochondria and Apoptosis of Lymphocytes in Mice under Cold Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longyun Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mahuang Gancao Ganjiang Decoction (MGGD can effectively alleviate the symptoms of the patients suffering from exogenous cold stress. However, the curative mechanism has not been fully clarified. This study was designed to investigate the effect of MGGD on the apoptosis of lymphocytes induced by cold stress in mice. The model mice were randomly divided into four groups: the normal control group (no handling mice, cold stress group, MGGD + cold stress group, and MGGD group. Lymphocytes of the mice were isolated from the peripheral blood. Electron microscopy analysis revealed cold stress resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation. Accompanied with the change of morphology of mitochondria, ATP production and the activity of respiratory chain complex decreased in these cells. Western blot analysis showed that these cells expressed decreased fusion-related proteins Mitofusin 1 (Mfn1, Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2, and optic atrophy protein-1 (Opa-1 and increased fission-related proteins dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 and fission 1 (Fis-1; our results also show that decreased mitochondrial fusion induces cell apoptosis during cold stress. Meanwhile, we found MGGD can inhibit cell apoptosis induced by cold stress through regulating expression level of Mfn1, Mfn2, Drp1, Fis-1, and Opa-1. These findings are very significant for understanding how MGGD regulates cold-stress-induced cell apoptosis.

  15. Dispositional Affect Moderates the Stress-Buffering Effect of Social Support on Risk for Developing the Common Cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki Deverts, Denise; Cohen, Sheldon; Doyle, William J

    2017-10-01

    The aim was to examine whether trait positive and negative affect (PA, NA) moderate the stress-buffering effect of perceived social support on risk for developing a cold subsequent to being exposed to a virus that causes mild upper respiratory illness. Analyses were based on archival data from 694 healthy adults (Mage  = 31.0 years, SD = 10.7 years; 49.0% female; 64.6% Caucasian). Perceived social support and perceived stress were assessed by self-report questionnaire and trait affect by aggregating responses to daily mood items administered by telephone interview across several days. Subsequently, participants were exposed to a virus that causes the common cold and monitored for 5 days for clinical illness (infection + objective signs of illness). Two 3-way interactions emerged-Support × Stress × PA and Support × Stress × NA. The nature of these effects was such that among persons with high trait PA or low trait NA, greater social support attenuated the risk of developing a cold when under high but not low perceived stress; this stress-buffering effect did not emerge among persons with low trait PA or high trait NA. Dispositional affect might be used to identify individuals who may be most responsive to social support and support-based interventions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Human CDK18 promotes replication stress signaling and genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Giancarlo; Staples, Christopher J; Ganesh, Anil; Patterson, Karl W; Bryne, Dominic P; Myers, Katie N; Patil, Abhijit A; Eyers, Claire E; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Eyers, Patrick A; Collis, Spencer J

    2016-10-14

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) coordinate cell cycle checkpoints with DNA repair mechanisms that together maintain genome stability. However, the myriad mechanisms that can give rise to genome instability are still to be fully elucidated. Here, we identify CDK18 (PCTAIRE 3) as a novel regulator of genome stability, and show that depletion of CDK18 causes an increase in endogenous DNA damage and chromosomal abnormalities. CDK18-depleted cells accumulate in early S-phase, exhibiting retarded replication fork kinetics and reduced ATR kinase signaling in response to replication stress. Mechanistically, CDK18 interacts with RAD9, RAD17 and TOPBP1, and CDK18-deficiency results in a decrease in both RAD17 and RAD9 chromatin retention in response to replication stress. Importantly, we demonstrate that these phenotypes are rescued by exogenous CDK18 in a kinase-dependent manner. Collectively, these data reveal a rate-limiting role for CDK18 in replication stress signalling and establish it as a novel regulator of genome integrity. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. RNA-seq analysis of oil palm under cold stress reveals a different C-repeat binding factor (CBF) mediated gene expression pattern in Elaeis guineensis compared to other species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xintao; Xiao, Yong; Xia, Wei; Mason, Annaliese S; Yang, Yaodong; Ma, Zilong; Peng, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis as a tropical oil-crop is particularly sensitive to low temperature. Improvement of cold-tolerance may significantly increase the total cultivation area of this tropical oil-crop worldwide. We sequenced cold-treated and control (untreated) samples of Elaeis guineensis. De novo assembly generated 51,452 unigenes with an average length of 703 bp. Subsequently, these expressed sequences were functionally annotated. In the K category (transcription factors) of COG (Cluster of Orthologous Group) annotation, the largest proportion of genes induced and repressed at least two-fold under cold stress were from the AP2/ERE family, indicating that C-repeat binding factor, (CBFs, members of the AP2/ERE family) may play a central role in cold tolerance in Elaeis guineensis. Subsequently, the CBF-mediated signal transduction pathway was reconstructed based on transcriptome data and the gene expression profile involving the pathway was examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). CBFs reached maximum transcript level both at medium (4 h) and long period time points (7 days), contrary to the expression pattern of CBFs in Arabidopsis and rice. Moreover, the promoters of downstream Cold Responsive gene (CORs) regulated by CBFs were analyzed. Conservation, mutation and absence of the DRE core motif were detected in the promoters of six CORs. These mutations in DRE motifs suggest that CORs may not be induced via cold stress in Elaeis guineensis.

  18. RNA-seq analysis of oil palm under cold stress reveals a different C-repeat binding factor (CBF mediated gene expression pattern in Elaeis guineensis compared to other species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xintao Lei

    Full Text Available Elaeis guineensis as a tropical oil-crop is particularly sensitive to low temperature. Improvement of cold-tolerance may significantly increase the total cultivation area of this tropical oil-crop worldwide. We sequenced cold-treated and control (untreated samples of Elaeis guineensis. De novo assembly generated 51,452 unigenes with an average length of 703 bp. Subsequently, these expressed sequences were functionally annotated. In the K category (transcription factors of COG (Cluster of Orthologous Group annotation, the largest proportion of genes induced and repressed at least two-fold under cold stress were from the AP2/ERE family, indicating that C-repeat binding factor, (CBFs, members of the AP2/ERE family may play a central role in cold tolerance in Elaeis guineensis. Subsequently, the CBF-mediated signal transduction pathway was reconstructed based on transcriptome data and the gene expression profile involving the pathway was examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR. CBFs reached maximum transcript level both at medium (4 h and long period time points (7 days, contrary to the expression pattern of CBFs in Arabidopsis and rice. Moreover, the promoters of downstream Cold Responsive gene (CORs regulated by CBFs were analyzed. Conservation, mutation and absence of the DRE core motif were detected in the promoters of six CORs. These mutations in DRE motifs suggest that CORs may not be induced via cold stress in Elaeis guineensis.

  19. Oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling in cerulein pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be an important regulator of the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate the activation of inflammatory cascades, the recruitment of inflammatory cells and tissue damage in acute pancreatitis. A hallmark of the inflammatory response in pancreatitis is the induction of cytokine expression, which is regulated by a number of signaling molecules including oxidant-sensitive transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Cross-talk between ROS and pro-inflammatory cytokines is mediated by NF-κB, AP-1, STAT3, and MAPKs; this crosstalk amplifies the inflammatory cascade in acute pancreatitis. Therapeutic studies have shown that antioxidants and natural compounds can have beneficial effects for patients with pancreatitis and can also influence the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Since oxidative stress may activate inflammatory signaling pathways and contribute to the development of pancreatitis, antioxidant therapy may alleviate the symptoms or prevent the development of pancreatitis. Since chronic administration of high doses of antioxidants may have deleterious effects, dosage levels and duration of antioxidant treatment should be carefully determined. PMID:25516643

  20. Avalanche structural rearrangement through cracking-healing in weakly stressed cold dusty plasma liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi; Wang, Wen; I, Lin

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the spatiotemporal dynamical behaviors of the avalanche structural rearrangement through micro-cracking-healing in weakly stressed cold dusty plasma liquids, and the kinetic origins for their different spatial and temporal classifications. The crystalline ordered domains can be cracked or temporarily sustain and transfer the weak stress to remote regions for cracking-healing. It is found that cracking sites form a fractal network with cluster size following power law distribution in the xyt space. The histograms of the persistent times for sustaining regional ordered and disordered structure, the temporal cracking burst width, and quiescent time between two bursts all follow power law decays with fast descending tails. Cracking can be classified into a single temporal burst with simple line like spatial patterns and the successive cracking fluctuation with densely packed cracking clusters. For an ordered region, whether the Burgers vectors of the incoming dislocations from the boundary allow direct dislocation reduction is the key for the above two classifications through cracking a large ordered domain into medium scale corotating ordered domains or small patches. The low regional structural order at the end of a cracking burst can be regarded as an alarm for predicting the short quiescent period before the next cracking burst.

  1. Rubber trees demonstrate a clear retranslocation under seasonal drought and cold stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwu Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Having been introduced to the northern edge of Asian tropics, the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis has become deciduous in this climate with seasonal drought and cold stresses. To determine its internal nutrient strategy during leaf senescence and deciduous periods, we investigated mature leaf and senescent leaf nutrients, water-soluble soil nutrients and characteristics of soil microbiota in nine different ages of monoculture rubber plantations. Rubber trees demonstrate complicated retranslocation of N, P and K during foliar turnover. Approximately 50.26% of leaf nutrients and 21.47% of soil nutrients were redistributed to the rubber tree body during the leaf senescence and withering stages. However, no significant changes in the structure- or function-related properties of soil microbes were detected. These nutrient retranslocation strategy may be important stress responses. In the nutrient retranslocation process, soil plays a dual role as nutrient supplier and nutrient bank. Soil received the nutrients from abscissed leaves, and also supplied nutrients to trees in the non-growth stage. Nutrient absorption and accumulation began before the leaves started to wither and fall.

  2. Rubber Trees Demonstrate a Clear Retranslocation Under Seasonal Drought and Cold Stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwu; Lan, Guoyu; Xia, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Having been introduced to the northern edge of Asian tropics, the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) has become deciduous in this climate with seasonal drought and cold stresses. To determine its internal nutrient strategy during leaf senescence and deciduous periods, we investigated mature leaf and senescent leaf nutrients, water-soluble soil nutrients and characteristics of soil microbiota in nine different ages of monoculture rubber plantations. Rubber trees demonstrate complicated retranslocation of N, P, and K during foliar turnover. Approximately 50.26% of leaf nutrients and 21.47% of soil nutrients were redistributed to the rubber tree body during the leaf senescence and withering stages. However, no significant changes in the structure- or function-related properties of soil microbes were detected. These nutrient retranslocation strategy may be important stress responses. In the nutrient retranslocation process, soil plays a dual role as nutrient supplier and nutrient "bank." Soil received the nutrients from abscised leaves, and also supplied nutrients to trees in the non-growth stage. Nutrient absorption and accumulation began before the leaves started to wither and fall.

  3. Phytoremediation of azoxystrobin and its degradation products in soil by P. major L. under cold and salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeh, Ahmed Ali Ali

    2017-10-01

    Azoxystrobin is a broad-spectrum, systemic and soil-applied fungicide used for crop protection against the four major classes of pathogenic fungi. The use of azoxystrobin use has induced water pollution and ecotoxicological effects upon aquatic organisms, long half-life in soils, as well as heath issues. Such issues may be solved by phytoremediation. Here, we tested the uptake and translocation of azoxystrobin and its degradation products by Plantago major, under cold stress and salt stress. The result demonstrated that azoxystrobin significantly accumulated in P. major roots under salinity conditions more than that in the P. major roots under cold conditions and natural condition within two days of experimental period. In P. major roots and leaves, the chromatograms of HPLC for azoxystrobin and metabolites under natural condition (control) and stressed samples (cold stress and salt stress) show different patterns of metabolism pathways reflecting changes in the degradation products. Azoxystrobin carboxylic acid (AZ-acid) formed by methyl ester hydrolysis was an important route in the roots and the leaves. AZ-pyOH and AZ-benzoic were detected in P. major roots under cold and salt stress, while did not detected in P. major roots under natural condition. In the leaves, AZ-pyOH and AZ-benzoic were detected in all treatments between 4 and 12days of exposure. Shoots of the stressed plants had greater H2O2 and proline contents than was observed in the control plants. The level of 100mM NaCl treatment induced significantly higher peroxidase (POD) activity than the non-treated control group. Leaf Chlorophyll contents in the plants at 80 and 100mM NaCl were significantly reduced than was observed in the control plants. I concluded that P. major had a high potential to contribute to remediation of saline-soil contaminated with azoxystrobin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Endocrine and Metabolic Signaling in Retroperitoneal White Adipose Tissue Remodeling during Cold Acclimation

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Jankovic; Aleksandra Korac; Biljana Buzadzic; Vesna Otasevic; Ana Stancic; Milica Vucetic; Milica Markelic; Ksenija Velickovic; Igor Golic; Bato Korac

    2013-01-01

    The expression profiles of adiponectin, resistin, 5?-AMP-activated protein kinase ? (AMPK ? ), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 ? (HIF-1 ? ), and key enzymes of glucose and fatty acid metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation in rat retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RpWAT) during 45-day cold acclimation were examined. After transient suppression on day 1, adiponectin protein level increased following sustained cold exposure. In parallel, on day 1, the protein level of HIF-1 ? was strongly induce...

  5. Oxidative stress response and Nrf2 signaling in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongqiao; Davies, Kelvin J A; Forman, Henry Jay

    2015-11-01

    Increasing oxidative stress, a major characteristic of aging, has been implicated in a variety of age-related pathologies. In aging, oxidant production from several sources is increased, whereas antioxidant enzymes, the primary lines of defense, are decreased. Repair systems, including the proteasomal degradation of damaged proteins, also decline. Importantly, the adaptive response to oxidative stress declines with aging. Nrf2/EpRE signaling regulates the basal and inducible expression of many antioxidant enzymes and the proteasome. Nrf2/EpRE activity is regulated at several levels, including transcription, posttranslation, and interactions with other proteins. This review summarizes current studies on age-related impairment of Nrf2/EpRE function and discusses the changes in Nrf2 regulatory mechanisms with aging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxidative stress response and Nrf2 signaling in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongqiao; Davies, Kelvin J. A.; Forman, Henry Jay

    2015-01-01

    Increasing oxidative stress, a major characteristic of aging, has been implicated in variety of age-related pathologies. In aging, oxidant production from several sources is increased while antioxidant enzymes, the primary lines of defense, are decreased. Repair systems, including the proteasomal degradation of damaged proteins also declines. Importantly, the adaptive response to oxidative stress declines with aging. Nrf2/EpRE signaling regulates the basal and inducible expression of many antioxidant enzymes and the proteasome. Nrf2/EpRE activity is regulated at several levels including transcription, post-translation, and interaction with other proteins. This review summarizes current studies on age-related impairment of Nrf2/EpRE function and discusses the change of Nrf2 regulatory mechanisms with aging. PMID:26066302

  7. Physiological stress mediates the honesty of social signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary R Bortolotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extravagant ornaments used as social signals evolved to advertise their bearers' quality. The Immunocompetence Handicap Hypothesis proposes that testosterone-dependent ornaments reliably signal health and parasite resistance; however, empirical studies have shown mixed support. Alternatively, immune function and parasite resistance may be indirectly or directly related to glucocorticoid stress hormones. We propose that an understanding of the interplay between the individual and its environment, particularly how they cope with stressors, is crucial for understanding the honesty of social signals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed corticosterone deposited in growing feathers as an integrated measure of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in a wild territorial bird, the red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus. We manipulated two key, interrelated components, parasites and testosterone, which influence both ornamentation and fitness. Birds were initially purged of parasites, and later challenged with parasites or not, while at the same time being given testosterone or control implants, using a factorial experimental design. At the treatment level, testosterone enhanced ornamentation, while parasites reduced it, but only in males not implanted with testosterone. Among individuals, the degree to which both parasites and testosterone had an effect was strongly dependent on the amount of corticosterone in the feather grown during the experiment. The more stressors birds had experienced (i.e., higher corticosterone, the more parasites developed, and the less testosterone enhanced ornamentation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: With this unique focus on the individual, and a novel, integrative, measure of response to stressors, we show that ornamentation is ultimately a product of the cumulative physiological response to environmental challenges. These findings lead toward a more realistic concept of honesty in signaling as well as a

  8. Detection of superoxide radicals in tomato plants exposed to salinity, drought, cold and heavy metal stress using CMC-G-SOD biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabay, Ozge; Emregul, Emel; Aydın, Semra Soydan; Aras, Sumer

    2013-10-01

    A novel highly sensitive electrochemical carboxymethylcellulose-gelatin-superoxide dismutase biosensor was used for the determination of superoxide radicals enhancement in tomato plants exposed to salinity, drought, cold and heavy metal stress. The variations in superoxide radicals depending on abiotic stress was determined using biosensor. The superoxide radical production with regard to control rapidly was increased in tomato plants exposed to salinity, drought, cold and heavy metal stress. The superoxide radical enhancement in tomato plants exposed to salinity, drought, cold and heavy metal stress was successfully determined using carboxymethylcellulose-gelatin-superoxide dismutase biosensor.

  9. [Effects of cold-shock on the growth and flower bud differentiation of tomato seedlings under high temperature stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-li; Xia, Ya-zhen; Sun, Zhi-qiang

    2016-02-01

    In order to explore the effects of cold-shock on the growth and flower bud differentiation of tomato seedlings under high temperature, tomato seedlings were subjected to cold-shock treat- ments every day with 10 °C for 10 minutes in. an artificial climate chamber. Tomato seedlings were treated with cold-shock at the first true leaf stage and the treatment lasted for 15 days. Tomato seed- lings without cold-shock were used as control. At the fourth true leaf period of tomato seedlings, five plants were randomly sampled and the growth characteristics and the ultrastructure changes of meso- phyll cell of tomato seedlings were examined. The flower bud differentiation process of tomato seed- lings was observed at the periods of the second, fourth and sixth true leaves respectively. Flowering and fruiting of tomato seedlings were also investigated after transplanting. The results showed that the stem diameter and health index of tomato seedlings with cold-shock were enhanced by 7.2% and 55.5% compared with seedlings without cold-shock. Mesophyll cells of the seedlings with cold-shock arranged loosely and various organelles such as chloroplasts and mitochondria were morphologically integrated, while chloroplasts and mitochondria of seedlings mesophyll cells without cold-shock swelled up and thylakoids vacuolized apparently. The flower bud differentiation process of seedlings with cold-shock could be advanced significantly at the early seedling stage compared with the control and the advancement was weakened with the seedling growing. Fruit set number and percentage on the first and second inflorescence of tomato plants transplanted by seedlings with cold-shock were enhanced significantly compared with those of the control. These results indicated that the injury of membrane structure of various organelles, especially chloroplast and mitochondria could be allevia- ted by cold-shock treatment under high temperature tress. Cold-shock treatment could not only im- prove the

  10. Attenuated metoclopramide-induced vascular hyperreactivity to cold stress in athletic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, M; Gómez, J; Blanco, G; Negrín, C; Velasco, M

    1998-11-01

    We have previously reported a metoclopramide-induced vascular hyperreactivity to the cold pressor test (CPT) in normotensive and hypertensive subjects. The present study was designed to determine whether the state of physical training influences the cardiovascular responses to the CPT in normotensive subjects under metoclopramide (MTC) treatment. In 20 untrained subjects and 32 athletes (football players and runners), the blood pressure and heart rate responses to the CPT were studied after a 30-minute infusion of MTC (7.5 microg/kg per minute) and two placebo periods, before and after MTC, with 5% glucose solution. Under placebo conditions, the CPT produced significant increases of systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the untrained subjects and the runners, but not in the football players (17.2, 17.8, and 6.5 mm Hg for untrained subjects, runners, and football players, respectively). The runners responded with a lesser increase in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) during the CPT than did the others (15.8, 17.9, and 18.2 mm Hg for runners, untrained subjects, and football players, respectively). In the presence of MTC, the CPT induced a larger increase in blood pressure (SBP/DBP) in the untrained subjects (21.4/24.1 mm Hg) than in the football players (10/18.7 mm Hg) and runners (18.7/13.9 mm Hg). MTC diminished the hyperreactivity responses to the CPT in the trained subjects (41 and 56% for football players and runners, respectively). Our conclusions are as follows: (1) Vascular responses to cold stress are attenuated in athletic subjects compared with untrained subjects. (2) The metoclopramide-induced vascular hyperreactivity, formerly reported for normotensive and hypertensive subjects, seems to be absent in trained subjects. (3) It is suggested that a probable dopaminergic system adaptation occurs during exercise.

  11. Transcriptome Sequencing of Dianthus spiculifolius and Analysis of the Genes Involved in Responses to Combined Cold and Drought Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aimin; Ma, Hongping; Liu, Enhui; Jiang, Tongtong; Feng, Shuang; Gong, Shufang; Wang, Jingang

    2017-04-17

    Dianthus spiculifolius, a perennial herbaceous flower and a member of the Caryophyllaceae family, has strong resistance to cold and drought stresses. To explore the transcriptional responses of D. spiculifolius to individual and combined stresses, we performed transcriptome sequencing of seedlings under normal conditions or subjected to cold treatment (CT), simulated drought treatment (DT), or their combination (CTDT). After de novo assembly of the obtained reads, 112,015 unigenes were generated. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed that 2026, 940, and 2346 genes were up-regulated and 1468, 707, and 1759 were down-regulated in CT, DT, and CTDT samples, respectively. Among all the DEGs, 182 up-regulated and 116 down-regulated genes were identified in all the treatment groups. Analysis of metabolic pathways and regulatory networks associated with the DEGs revealed overlaps and cross-talk between cold and drought stress response pathways. The expression profiles of the selected DEGs in CT, DT, and CTDT samples were characterized and confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. These DEGs and metabolic pathways may play important roles in the response of D. spiculifolius to the combined stress. Functional characterization of these genes and pathways will provide new targets for enhancement of plant stress tolerance through genetic manipulation.

  12. Overexpression of Ran gene from Lepidium latifolium L. (LlaRan) renders transgenic tobacco plants hypersensitive to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Vimlendu Bhushan; Grover, Atul; Singh, Sadhana; Pande, Veena; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2014-09-01

    Ran is a multifunctional small GTPase involved in important cellular activities like nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly, nuclear envelope formation, etc., but is also known to be differentially expressed in response to abiotic stress, particularly low temperature. We have over-expressed Lepidium latifolium (Fam. Brassicaceae) Ran gene in tobacco to study the response of the plants to cold stress (24 h; 4 °C). Transformation of the tobacco plants was verified using PCR targeting Ran gene and co-transformed selectable marker gene nptII. Segregation in Mendelian ratios was validated in five transgenic lines by germination of T1 and T2 seeds on moist filter papers containing 150 mg/l kanamycin. Higher levels of electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation pointed towards hypersensitivity of plants. Similarly, lesser proline accumulation compared to wild types also indicated susceptibility of plants to death under chilling conditions. Specific activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase was also measured under stressed and control conditions. A variation was observed across the different lines, and four out of five lines showed lesser specific activity compared to wild type plants, thus indicating reduced capability of scavenging free radicals. In totality, a strong evidence on induced hypersensitivity to cold stress has been collected which may further be helpful in designing appropriate strategies for engineering crop plants for survival under cold stress conditions.

  13. Effect of Cold Stress on Fruiting Body Production by Medicinal Basidiomycetes in Submerged and Solid-phase Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Vetchinkina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the medicinal xylotrophic basidiomycetes Lentinus edodes, Pleurotus ostreatus, Ganoderma lucidum and Grifola frondosa to produce typical and atypical fruiting bodies with viable basidiospores in submerged and solid-phase culture under stationary conditions in a beer wort-containing medium under cold stress was shown. The examined mushrooms, when not exposed to temperature stress, did not form fruiting bodies. In solid-phase culture in an agarized medium after cold treatment, the basidiome formation period was shortened by 1.5–2 times. Furthermore, the use of a mycelium subjected to temperature stress for inoculation induced and accelerated the formation of fruiting bodies on an industrial wood substrate, which is of great biotechnological importance.

  14. Cortisol and ghrelin concentrations following a cold pressor stress test in overweight individuals with and without night eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geliebter, A; Carnell, S; Gluck, M E

    2013-08-01

    To explore appetite-related hormones following stress in overweight individuals, and their relationship with night eating (NE) status. We measured plasma cortisol and ghrelin concentrations, and recorded ratings of stress and hunger in response to a physiological laboratory stressor (cold pressor test, CPT), in overweight women with (n=11; NE) and without (n=17; non-NE) NE. Following the CPT, cortisol (Pstress and hunger ratings (all Pstress (Pstress. Overweight individuals showed increased cortisol, ghrelin, stress and hunger following a laboratory stressor, and there was some evidence for greater increases in cortisol and subjective stress among NE. The greater AUC cortisol level in NE was due to higher baseline levels, but the group difference in stress was in direct response to the stressor. Our results support a role for cortisol and stress in NE.

  15. Older Thinopyrum intermedium (Poaceae) plants exhibit superior photosynthetic tolerance to cold stress and greater increases in two photosynthetic enzymes under freezing stress compared with young plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaikumar, Nikhil S; Snapp, Sieglinde S; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2016-08-01

    Effects of plant age on resource acquisition and stress tolerance processes is a largely unstudied subject in herbaceous perennials. In a field experiment, we compared rates of photosynthesis (A), ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylation capacity (V Cmax), maximum electron transport rate (J max), and triose phosphate utilization (TPU), as well as concentrations of Rubisco and sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) in 5-year-old and 2-year-old intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium) under both optimal growing conditions and cold stress in early spring and autumn. This species is a relative of wheat undergoing domestication. An additional experiment compared photosynthetic rates in different cohorts at mid-season and under colder conditions. We hypothesized that photosynthetic capacity in older plants would be lower under favorable conditions but higher under cold stress. Our hypothesis was generally supported. Under cold stress, 5-year-old plants exhibited higher A, TPU, and temperature-adjusted V Cmax than younger plants, as well as 50% more SPS and 37% more Rubisco. In contrast, at mid-season, photosynthetic capacities in older plants were lower than in younger plants in one experiment, and similar in the other, independent of differences in water status. Both cohorts increased A, temperature-adjusted TPU and J max, [Rubisco], and [SPS] under cold stress, but changes were greater in older plants. Photosynthetic differences were largest at 1.2 ºC in very early spring, where older plants had 200% higher A and maintained up to 17% of their peak photosynthetic capacity. We find evidence of increased cold tolerance in older cohorts of wheatgrass, consistent with a growing body of research in woody perennials. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. De novo characterization of the Anthurium transcriptome and analysis of its digital gene expression under cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dan-Qing; Pan, Xiao-Yun; Yu, Yong-Ming; Wang, Wei-Yong; Zhang, Fei; Ge, Ya-Ying; Shen, Xiao-Lan; Shen, Fu-Quan; Liu, Xiao-Jing

    2013-11-25

    Anthurium andraeanum is one of the most popular tropical flowers. In temperate and cold zones, a much greater risk of cold stress occurs in the supply of Anthurium plants. Unlike the freeze-tolerant model plants, Anthurium plants are particularly sensitive to low temperatures. Improvement of chilling tolerance in Anthurium may significantly increase its production and extend its shelf-life. To date, no previous genomic information has been reported in Anthurium plants. Using Illumina sequencing technology, we generated over two billion base of high-quality sequence in Anthurium, and demonstrated de novo assembly and annotation of genes without prior genome information. These reads were assembled into 44,382 unigenes (mean length = 560 bp). Based on similarity search with known protein in the non-redundant (nr) protein database, 27396 unigenes (62%) were functionally annotated with a cut-off E-value of 10-5. Further, DGE tags were mapped to the assembled transcriptome for gene expression analysis under cold stress. In total, 4363 differentially expressed genes were identified. Among these genes, 292, 805 and 708 genes were up-regulated after 1-h, 5-h and 24-h cold treatment, respectively. Then we mapped these cold-induced genes to the KEGG database. Specific enrichment was observed in photosynthesis pathway, metabolic pathways and oxidative phosphorylation pathway in 1-h cold-treated plants. After a 5-h cold treatment, the metabolic pathways and oxidative phosphorylation pathway were significantly identified as the top two pathways. After 24-h cold treatment, mRNA surveillance pathway, RNA transport pathway and plant-pathogen interaction pathway were significantly enriched. Together, a total of 39 cold-inducible transcription factors were identified, including subsets of AP2/ERF, Zinc figure, NAC, MYB and bZIP family members. Our study is the first to provide the transcriptome sequence resource for Anthurium plants, and demonstrate its digital gene expression

  17. Eucalyptus urograndis stem proteome is responsive to short-term cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela de Almeida Leonardi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus urograndis is a hybrid eucalyptus of major economic importance to the Brazilian pulp and paper industry. Although widely used in forest nurseries around the country, little is known about the biochemical changes imposed by environmental stress in this species. In this study, we evaluated the changes in the stem proteome after short-term stimulation by exposure to low temperature. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry-based protein identification, 12 proteins were found to be differentially regulated and successfully identified after stringent database searches against a protein database from a closely related species (Eucalyptus grandis. The identification of these proteins indicated that the E. urograndis stem proteome responded quickly to low temperature, mostly by down-regulating specific proteins involved in energy metabolism, protein synthesis and signaling. The results of this study represent the first step in understanding the molecular and biochemical responses of E. urograndis to thermal stress.

  18. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose-phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadanim, M Cecília; Alexandre, Bruno M; Rosa, Margarida T G; Sapeta, Helena; Leitão, António E; Ramalho, José C; Lam, TuKiet T; Negrão, Sónia; Abreu, Isabel A; Oliveira, M Margarida

    2017-07-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that OsCPK17 plays a role in rice cold stress response by analysing OsCPK17 knockout, silencing and overexpressing rice lines under low temperature. Altered OsCPK17 gene expression compromises cold tolerance performance, without affecting the expression of key cold stress-inducible genes. A comparative phosphoproteomic approach led to the identification of six potential in vivo OsCPK17 targets, which are associated with sugar and nitrogen metabolism, and with osmotic regulation. To test direct interaction, in vitro kinase assays were performed, showing that the sucrose-phosphate synthase OsSPS4 and the aquaporin OsPIP2;1/OsPIP2;6 are phosphorylated by OsCPK17 in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether, our data indicates that OsCPK17 is required for a proper cold stress response in rice, likely affecting the activity of membrane channels and sugar metabolism. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Endocrine and metabolic signaling in retroperitoneal white adipose tissue remodeling during cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Aleksandra; Korac, Aleksandra; Buzadzic, Biljana; Otasevic, Vesna; Stancic, Ana; Vucetic, Milica; Markelic, Milica; Velickovic, Ksenija; Golic, Igor; Korac, Bato

    2013-01-01

    The expression profiles of adiponectin, resistin, 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPK α ), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1 α ), and key enzymes of glucose and fatty acid metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation in rat retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RpWAT) during 45-day cold acclimation were examined. After transient suppression on day 1, adiponectin protein level increased following sustained cold exposure. In parallel, on day 1, the protein level of HIF-1 α was strongly induced and AMPK α suppressed, while afterwards the reverse was seen. What is more, after an initial decrease on day 1, a sequential increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP synthase and a decrease in acetyl-CoA carboxylase (from day 3) were observed. Similar to adiponectin, protein level of resistin showed a biphasic profile: it increased after days 1, 3, and 7 and decreased below the control after 21 days of cold-acclimation. In summary, the data suggest that adiponectin and resistin are important integrators of RpWAT metabolic response and roles it plays during cold acclimation. It seems that AMPK α mediate adiponectin effects on metabolic remodeling RpWAT during cold acclimation.

  20. Endocrine and Metabolic Signaling in Retroperitoneal White Adipose Tissue Remodeling during Cold Acclimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Jankovic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression profiles of adiponectin, resistin, 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, and key enzymes of glucose and fatty acid metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation in rat retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (RpWAT during 45-day cold acclimation were examined. After transient suppression on day 1, adiponectin protein level increased following sustained cold exposure. In parallel, on day 1, the protein level of HIF-1α was strongly induced and AMPKα suppressed, while afterwards the reverse was seen. What is more, after an initial decrease on day 1, a sequential increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP synthase and a decrease in acetyl-CoA carboxylase (from day 3 were observed. Similar to adiponectin, protein level of resistin showed a biphasic profile: it increased after days 1, 3, and 7 and decreased below the control after 21 days of cold-acclimation. In summary, the data suggest that adiponectin and resistin are important integrators of RpWAT metabolic response and roles it plays during cold acclimation. It seems that AMPKα mediate adiponectin effects on metabolic remodeling RpWAT during cold acclimation.

  1. Effect of infrared lamps to ameliorate cold stress in Vrindavani calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Showkat A. Bhat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to determine the effect of infrared lamps to ameliorate cold stress in Vrindavani (Holstein Friesian × Brown Swiss × Jersey × Hariana calves. Materials and Methods: For the present investigation, ten newborn Vrindavani calves were randomly divided into two groups (G1 and G2 of five each. The experiment was conducted from 2nd November to 8th February when the environmental temperature was at the lowest. The calves of G1 were provided with no additional protection while the calves of G2 were protected against the cold weather by providing heat using the infrared lamps. The body weight (kg of the calves was recorded at weekly interval. The blood samples collected within 6 h of birth and then at fortnightly interval were analyzed for packed cell volume (PCV, %, hemoglobin (Hb, g/dl. Besides, the serum biochemical parameters, viz., Total serum protein (TSP, g/l, albumin (g/l, globulin (g/l, albumin globulin ratio (A:G and important stress parameters, viz., triiodothyronine (T3, ng/ml, thyroxine (T4, ng/ml and cortisol (ng/ml were also estimated. Results: The calves of G2 showed higher body weight gain as compared to G1. The differences were found to be highly significant (p<0.01. The calves in G1 showed comparatively higher values of PCV and Hb and the differences were found to be significant (p<0.05 on 45th day for PCV and highly significant (p<0.01 on 60th day for PCV and on 45th day for Hb. The values of TSP and albumin were comparatively higher in calves of G1 as compared to G2 and the differences were highly significant (p<0.01 on 45th day for both TSP and albumin and significant (p<0.05 on 60th day for albumin. Significantly (p<0.01 higher values of cortisol and T4 were observed on 15 and 45th day in calves of G1 as compared to G2. The T3 levels were also found higher in calves of G1 than G2 and the differences were significant (p<0.05 on 15 and 30th day and highly significant (p<0.01 on 45th day of the study

  2. Metformin differentially activates ER stress signaling pathways without inducing apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Quentin

    2012-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling (ERSS plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and heart disease. The latter is a common comorbidity of diabetes and worsens patient outcome. Results from clinical studies suggest beneficial effects of metformin – a widely used oral drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes – on the heart of diabetic patients with heart failure. We therefore analyzed the effect of metformin on ERSS in primary rat cardiomyocytes. We found that metformin activates the PERK-ATF4 but not the ATF6 or IRE1-XBP1 branch in ERSS and leads to a strong upregulation of CHOP mRNA and protein. Surprisingly, long-term induction of CHOP by metformin is not accompanied by apoptosis even though CHOP is regarded to be a mediator of ER-stress-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, metformin induces distinct ER stress pathways in cardiomyocytes and our results indicate that CHOP is not necessarily a mediator of apoptosis. Metformin might exert its cardioprotective effect through selective activation of ERSS pathways in the cardiomyocyte.

  3. Metformin differentially activates ER stress signaling pathways without inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentin, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michael; Poppe, Andrea; Thoms, Sven

    2012-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling (ERSS) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and heart disease. The latter is a common comorbidity of diabetes and worsens patient outcome. Results from clinical studies suggest beneficial effects of metformin - a widely used oral drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes - on the heart of diabetic patients with heart failure. We therefore analyzed the effect of metformin on ERSS in primary rat cardiomyocytes. We found that metformin activates the PERK-ATF4 but not the ATF6 or IRE1-XBP1 branch in ERSS and leads to a strong upregulation of CHOP mRNA and protein. Surprisingly, long-term induction of CHOP by metformin is not accompanied by apoptosis even though CHOP is regarded to be a mediator of ER-stress-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, metformin induces distinct ER stress pathways in cardiomyocytes and our results indicate that CHOP is not necessarily a mediator of apoptosis. Metformin might exert its cardioprotective effect through selective activation of ERSS pathways in the cardiomyocyte.

  4. Mechanotransduction Signaling in Podocytes from Fluid Flow Shear Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Tarak; Dai, Hongying; Heruth, Daniel P; Alon, Uri S; Garola, Robert E; Zhou, Jianping; Duncan, R Scott; El-Meanawy, Ashraf; McCarthy, Ellen T; Sharma, Ram; Johnson, Mark L; Savin, Virginia J; Sharma, Mukut

    2017-09-06

    Recently we and others have found that hyperfiltration-associated increase in biomechanical forces, namely tensile stress and fluid flow shear stress (FFSS) can directly and distinctly alter podocyte structure and function. The ultrafiltrate flow over the major processes and cell body generates FFSS to podocyte. Our previous work suggests that COX2-PGE2-EP2 axis plays an important role in mechanoperception of FFSS in podocyte (Srivastava et al. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 307: F1323-F1333, 2014). To address mechanotransduction of the perceived mechanical stimulus through EP2 receptor, cultured podocytes were exposed to FFSS (2 dynes/cm2) for 2hrs. Total RNA from cells at the end of treatment, 2h post-FFSS and 24h post-FFSS was used for whole exon array analysis. The differentially regulated genes (pmechanotransduction as well as exogenous PGE2 activate the Akt-GSK3β-β-catenin (Ser552) and ERK/MAPK but not the cAMP-PKA signal transduction cascades. These pathways are reportedly associated with FFSS-induced and EP2-mediated signaling in other epithelial cells as well. Current regimen for treating hyperfiltration-mediated injury largely depends on targeting the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System. Present study identifies specific transduction mechanisms and provides novel information on the direct effect of FFSS on podocytes. These results suggest that targeting EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways holds therapeutic significance for delaying progression chronic kidney disease secondary to hyperfiltration. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

  5. Calcium signaling alterations, oxidative stress, and autophagy in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ureshino, Rodrigo Portes; Rocha, Katiucha Karolina; Lopes, Guiomar Silva; Bincoletto, Cláudia; Smaili, Soraya Soubhi

    2014-07-01

    Aging is a multi-factorial process that may be associated with several functional and structural deficits which can evolve into degenerative diseases. In this review, we present data that may depict an expanded view of molecular aging theories, beginning with the idea that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major effectors in this process. In addition, we have correlated the importance of autophagy as a neuroprotective mechanism and discussed a link between age-related molecules, Ca(2+) signaling, and oxidative stress. There is evidence suggesting that alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis, including mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and alterations in electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, which increase cell vulnerability, are linked to oxidative stress in aging. As much as Ca(2+) signaling is altered in aged cells, excess ROS can be produced due to an ineffective coupling of mitochondrial respiration. Damaged mitochondria might not be removed by the macroautophagic system, which is hampered in aging by lipofuscin accumulation, boosting ROS generation, damaging DNA, and, ultimately, leading to apoptosis. This process can lead to altered protein expression (such as p53, Sirt1, and IGF-1) and progress to cell death. This cycle can lead to increased cell vulnerability in aging and contribute to an increased susceptibility to degenerative processes. A better understanding of Ca(2+) signaling and molecular aging alterations is important for preventing apoptosis in age-related diseases. In addition, caloric restriction, resveratrol and autophagy modulation appear to be predominantly cytoprotective, and further studies of this process are promising in age-related disease therapeutics.

  6. Heat stress causes oxidative stress but not inflammatory signaling in porcine skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla, Sandra I Rosado; Johnson, Theresa P; Pearce, Sarah C; Gardan-Salmon, Delphine; Gabler, Nicholas K; Ross, Jason W; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H; Lonergan, Steven M; Selsby, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is associated with death and other maladaptions including muscle dysfunction and impaired growth across species. Despite this common observation, the molecular effects leading to these pathologic changes remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which heat stress disrupted redox balance and initiated an inflammatory response in oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscle. Female pigs (5-6/group) were subjected to thermoneutral (20 °C) or heat stress (35 °C) conditions for 1 or 3 days and the semitendinosus removed and dissected into red (STR) and white (STW) portions. After 1 day of heat stress, relative abundance of proteins modified by malondialdehyde, a measure of oxidative damage, was increased 2.5-fold (P < 0.05) compared with thermoneutral in the STR but not the STW, before returning to thermoneutral conditions following 3 days of heat stress. This corresponded with increased catalase and superoxide dismutase-1 gene expression (P < 0.05) and superoxide dismutase-1 protein abundance (P < 0.05) in the STR but not the STW. In the STR catalase and total superoxide dismutase activity were increased by ~30% and ~130%, respectively (P < 0.05), after 1 day of heat stress and returned to thermoneutral levels by day 3. One or 3 days of heat stress did not increase inflammatory signaling through the NF-κB pathway in the STR or STW. These data suggest that oxidative muscle is more susceptible to heat stress-mediated changes in redox balance than glycolytic muscle during chronic heat stress.

  7. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of annealed and cold worked 316L stainless steel in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The alloy 316L is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in supercritical water. • The susceptibility of alloy 316L increases with temperature and plastic deformation. • Dynamic strain ageing processes may be active in the material. - Abstract: The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the more promising designs considered by the Generation IV International Forum due to its high thermal efficiency and improving security. To build this reactor, standardized structural materials used in light water reactors (LWR), like austenitic stainless steels, have been proposed. These kind of materials have shown an optimum behavior to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under LWR conditions except when they are cold worked. It is known that physicochemical properties of water change sharply with pressure and temperature inside of the supercritical region. Owing to this situation, there are several doubts about the behavior of candidate materials like austenitic stainless steel 316L to SCC in the SCWR conditions. In this work, alloy 316L was studied in deaerated SCW at two different temperatures (400 °C and 500 °C) and at 25 MPa in order to determine how changes in this variable influence the resistance of this material to SCC. The influence of plastic deformation in the behavior of alloy 316L to SCC in SCW was also studied at both temperatures. Results obtained from these tests have shown that alloy 316L is susceptible to SCC in supercritical water reactor conditions where the susceptibility of this alloy increases with temperature. Moreover, prior plastic deformation of 316L SS increased its susceptibility to environmental cracking in SCW.

  8. A temperature induced lipocalin gene from Medicago falcata (MfTIL1) confers tolerance to cold and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xueying; Sambe, Mame Abdou Nahr; Zhuo, Chunliu; Tu, Qinghua; Guo, Zhenfei

    2015-04-01

    Temperature-induced lipocalins (TIL) are plasmalemma-localized proteins and responsive to environmental stresses. Physiological functions of MfTIL1 from Medicago sativa subsp. falcata (L.) Arcang. (hereafter falcata), a forage legume with cold and drought tolerance, were investigated in this study. MfTIL1 expression was greatly induced by 4-96 h of cold treatment, while transcript levels of the orthologs in Medicago truncatula, a model legume plant with lower cold tolerance than falcata, were reduced or not altered within 48-96 h. MfTIL1 expression was not responsive to dehydration and salinity. Compared to the wild type, transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing MfTIL1 had lower temperature (LT50) that resulted in 50 % lethal and elevated survival rate in response to freezing, elevated F v/F m and decreased ion leakage after treatments with chilling, high light and methyl viologen (MV). H2O2 and O2 (-) were less accumulated in transgenic plants than in the wild type after treatments with chilling, high light and MV, while antioxidant enzyme activities showed no difference between the two types of plants prior to or following treatments. Higher transcript levels of NtDREB3 and NtDREB4 genes were observed in transgenic plants than in the wild type under non-stressed conditions, but higher transcript levels of NtDREB1, NtDREB2, NtDREB4 and NtCOR15a genes under chilling conditions. It is suggested that MfTIL1 plays an important role in plant tolerance to cold and oxidative stress through promoted scavenging of reactive oxygen species and up-regulating expression of multiple cold responsive genes.

  9. Preparation Femtosecond Laser Prevention for the Cold-Worked Stress Corrosion Crackings on Reactor Grade Low Carbon Stainless Steel

    CERN Document Server

    John Minehara, Eisuke

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the femtosecond lasers like low average power Ti:Sapphire lasers, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser and others could peel off and remove two stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked and the cracking susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in hardened and stretched surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the third origin of corrosive environment. Because a 143 °C and 43% MgCl2 hot solution SCC test was performed for the samples to simulate the cold-worked SCC phenomena of the internals to show no crack at the laser-peered off strip on the cold-worked side and ten-thousands of cracks at the non-peeled off on the same side, it has been successfully demonstrated that the femtosecond lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins and could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC.

  10. Hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography combined with automated functional imaging non-invasively detected vasospastic angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Mizukoshi, Kei; Kou, Seisyou; Takai, Manabu; Izumo, Masaki; Shimozato, Takashi; Hayashi, Akio; Ohtaki, Eiji; Nobuoka, Sachihiko; Miyake, Fumihiko

    2010-01-01

    A 47-year-old male presented with chest discomfort while sleeping. The patient was suspected of having vasospastic angina (VSA) and underwent hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography. No chest pain, ECG changes or decreased wall motion was found. However, automated function imaging (AFI) showed decreased peak systolic strain at the apex and postsystolic shortening at both the apex and inferior wall, which was not found before the test. The provocation test revealed 99% stenosis in the right coronary artery #2 at a dose of 50 μg acetylcholine and 90% stenosis in the left coronary artery #8 at a dose of 100 μg. The patient was thus diagnosed as having VSA. The present case demonstrates the usefulness of AFI combined with hyperventilation and cold-pressor stress echocardiography as a screening examination for VSA. PMID:22798093

  11. The Small-RNA Profiles of Almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.) Reproductive Tissues in Response to Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Marzieh; Ghazanfari, Farahnaz; Fadaei, Adeleh; Ahmadi, Laleh; Shiran, Behrouz; Rabei, Mohammad; Fallahi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Spring frost is an important environmental stress that threatens the production of Prunus trees. However, little information is available regarding molecular response of these plants to the frost stress. Using high throughput sequencing, this study was conducted to identify differentially expressed miRNAs, both the conserved and the non-conserved ones, in the reproductive tissues of almond tolerant H genotype under cold stress. Analysis of 50 to 58 million raw reads led to identification of 174 unique conserved and 59 novel microRNAs (miRNAs). Differential expression pattern analysis showed that 50 miRNA families were expressed differentially in one or both of almond reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Out of these 50 miRNA families, 12 and 15 displayed up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively. The distribution of conserved miRNA families indicated that miR482f harbor the highest number of members. Confirmation of miRNAs expression patterns by quantitative real- time PCR (qPCR) was performed in cold tolerant (H genotype) alongside a sensitive variety (Sh12 genotype). Our analysis revealed differential expression for 9 miRNAs in anther and 3 miRNAs in ovary between these two varieties. Target prediction of miRNAs followed by differential expression analysis resulted in identification of 83 target genes, mostly transcription factors. This study comprehensively catalogued expressed miRNAs under different temperatures in two reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Results of current study and the previous RNA-seq study, which was conducted in the same tissues by our group, provide a unique opportunity to understand the molecular basis of responses of almond to cold stress. The results can also enhance the possibility for gene manipulation to develop cold tolerant plants.

  12. The Small-RNA Profiles of Almond (Prunus dulcis Mill. Reproductive Tissues in Response to Cold Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Karimi

    Full Text Available Spring frost is an important environmental stress that threatens the production of Prunus trees. However, little information is available regarding molecular response of these plants to the frost stress. Using high throughput sequencing, this study was conducted to identify differentially expressed miRNAs, both the conserved and the non-conserved ones, in the reproductive tissues of almond tolerant H genotype under cold stress. Analysis of 50 to 58 million raw reads led to identification of 174 unique conserved and 59 novel microRNAs (miRNAs. Differential expression pattern analysis showed that 50 miRNA families were expressed differentially in one or both of almond reproductive tissues (anther and ovary. Out of these 50 miRNA families, 12 and 15 displayed up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively. The distribution of conserved miRNA families indicated that miR482f harbor the highest number of members. Confirmation of miRNAs expression patterns by quantitative real- time PCR (qPCR was performed in cold tolerant (H genotype alongside a sensitive variety (Sh12 genotype. Our analysis revealed differential expression for 9 miRNAs in anther and 3 miRNAs in ovary between these two varieties. Target prediction of miRNAs followed by differential expression analysis resulted in identification of 83 target genes, mostly transcription factors. This study comprehensively catalogued expressed miRNAs under different temperatures in two reproductive tissues (anther and ovary. Results of current study and the previous RNA-seq study, which was conducted in the same tissues by our group, provide a unique opportunity to understand the molecular basis of responses of almond to cold stress. The results can also enhance the possibility for gene manipulation to develop cold tolerant plants.

  13. Heat- and cold-stress effects on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity among urban and rural populations in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Aleš; Davídkovová, Hana; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2014), s. 1057-1068 ISSN 0020-7128 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/1985 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : heat and cold stress * cardiovascular disease * mortality * morbidity * urban and rural differences * Central Europe Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.246, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00484-013-0693-4#page-1

  14. Strand specific RNA-sequencing and membrane lipid profiling reveals growth phase-dependent cold stress response mechanisms in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hingston, Patricia; Chen, Jessica; Allen, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    -supply-chain. This study utilized strand-specific RNA sequencing and whole cell fatty acid (FA) profiling to characterize the bacterium’s cold stress response. RNA and FAs were extracted from a cold-tolerant strain at five time points between early lag phase and late stationary-phase, both at 4°C and 20°C. Overall, more...... required for branched-chain fatty acid (BCFA) synthesis, the osmolyte transporter genes opuCBCD, and the internalin A and D genes. Genes suppressed at 4°C were largely associated with cobalamin (B12) biosynthesis or the production/export of cell wall components. Antisense transcription accounted for up...... provides new information regarding cold-induced membrane composition changes in L. monocytogenes, the growth-phase dependency of its cold-stress regulon, and the active roles of antisense transcripts in regulating its cold stress response....

  15. Overexpression of FTL1/DDF1, an AP2 transcription factor, enhances tolerance to cold, drought, and heat stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong-Gyu; Kim, Joonki; Kim, Bohwa; Jeong, Hana; Choi, Sun Hee; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Hyo-Yeon; Lim, Pyung Ok

    2011-04-01

    Freezing temperatures control where and when plants can grow, and negatively influence crop quality and productivity. To identify key regulatory genes involved in cold adaptation, we screened activation-tagged Arabidopsis lines for mutants with greater freezing tolerance. One mutant, freezing tolerant line1 (ftl1-1D), manifested enhanced tolerance along with dwarfism and delayed flowering. This was caused by activation of DWARF AND DELAYED FLOWERING 1 (DDF1), a gene previously described as a regulatory component in salinity signaling. The induced gene encoded an AP2 transcription factor of the CBF/DREB1 subfamily. In addition to conferring tolerance to low temperatures and salt stress, ftl1-1D/ddf1 improved tolerance to drought and heat. Real-time PCR indicated that FTL1/DDF1 was up-regulated by those four types of stresses in wild-type Arabidopsis. Its increased expression in the mutant induced various stress-responsive genes under normal growing conditions, resulting in improved tolerances. However, phenotypes shown in the ftl1-1D/ddf1 were restored by treatment with exogenous gibberellin (GA₃), indicating the involvement of a GA pathway in FTL1/DDF1-mediated tolerance. Therefore, we conclude that FTL1/DDF1 plays a role in regulating responses to several abiotic stresses, perhaps via cross-talk in the pathways. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Elevated compartmentalization of Na+ into vacuoles improves salt and cold stress tolerance in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weijuan; Deng, Gaifang; Wang, Hongxia; Zhang, Hongxia; Zhang, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Salinity and low temperature are the main limiting factors for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) growth and agricultural productivity. Various studies have shown that plant NHX-type antiporter plays a crucial role in regulating plant tolerance to salt stress by intracellular Na(+) compartmentalization. The Arabidopsis thaliana AtNHX1 gene that encodes a vacuolar Na(+) /H(+) antiporter was introduced into the sweet potato cultivar Xushu-22 by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation to confer abiotic stress tolerance. Stable insertion of AtNHX1 into the sweet potato genome and its expression was confirmed by Southern blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A remarkably higher Na(+) /H(+) exchange activity of tonoplast membrane from transgenic sweet potato lines (NOE) in comparison with wild-type (WT) plants confirmed the vacuolar antiporter function in mediating Na(+) /H(+) exchange. Under salt stress, NOE plants accumulated higher Na(+) and K(+) levels in their tissues compared with WT plants, maintaining high K(+) /Na(+) ratios. Consequently, NOE plants showed enhanced protection against cell damage due to the increased proline accumulation, preserved cell membrane integrity, enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging (e.g. increased superoxide dismutase activity), and reduced H2 O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) production. Moreover, the transgenic plants showed improved cold tolerance through multiple mechanisms of action, revealing the first molecular evidence for NHX1 function in cold response. The transgenic plants showed better biomass production and root yield under stressful conditions. These findings demonstrate that overexpressing AtNHX1 in sweet potato renders the crop tolerant to both salt and cold stresses, providing a greater capacity for the use of AtNHX1 in improving crop performance under combined abiotic stress conditions. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  17. A novel calcium-dependent protein kinase gene from Populus euphratica, confers both drought and cold stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinhuan; Xue, Bin; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-11-22

    Populus species are the most important timber trees over the Northern hemisphere. Most of them are cold- and drought-sensitive except the Populus euphratica Oliv. Here, a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) gene cloned from P. euphratica, designated as PeCPK10, was rapidly induced by salt, cold, and drought stresses. The protein encoded by PeCPK10 was localized within the nucleus and cytosol, which may be important for its specific regulation in cellular functions. To elucidate the physiological functions of PeCPK10, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PeCPK10. The results showed that PeCPK10-transgenic lines experienced better growth than vector control plants when treated with drought. Stronger abscisic acid-induced promotion of stomatal closing has been showed in transgenic lines. Particularly, overexpression of PeCPK10 showed enhanced freezing tolerance. Constitutive expression of PeCPK10 enhanced the expression of several abscisic acid-responsive genes and multiple abiotic stress-responsive genes such as RD29B and COR15A. Accordingly, a positive regulator responsive to cold and drought stresses in P. euphratica is proposed. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. CHIP Is an Essential Determinant of Neuronal Mitochondrial Stress Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palubinsky, Amy M.; Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Kale, Alixandra C.; Codreanu, Simona G.; Singer, Robert J.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Stanwood, Gregg D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Determine the mechanism by which C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein (CHIP) induction alters neuronal survival under conditions of mitochondrial stress induced by oxygen glucose deprivation. Results: We report that animals deficient in the E3 ubiquitin ligase, CHIP, have high baseline levels of central nervous system protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, reduced antioxidant defenses, and decreased energetic status. Stress-associated molecules typically linked to Parkinson's disease such as the mitochondrial kinase, PTEN-inducible putative kinase 1 (PINK1), and another E3 ligase, Parkin, are upregulated in brains from CHIP knockout (KO) animals. Utilizing a novel biotin–avidin capture technique, we found that the oxidation status of Parkin and the mitochondrial fission protein, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), are altered in a CHIP-dependent manner. We also found that following oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD), the expression of CHIP, PINK1, and the autophagic marker, LC3, increase and there is activation of the redox-sensitive kinase p66shc. Under conditions of OGD, CHIP relocalizes from the cytosol to mitochondria. Mitochondria from CHIP KO mice have profound impairments in stress response induced by calcium overload, resulting in accelerated permeability transition activity. While CHIP-deficient neurons are morphologically intact, they are more susceptible to OGD consistent with a previously unknown neuroprotective role for CHIP in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis. Innovation: CHIP relocalization to the mitochondria is essential for the regulation of mitochondrial integrity and neuronal survival following OGD. Conclusions: CHIP is an essential regulator of neuronal bioenergetics and redox tone. Altering the expression of this protein has profound effects on neuronal survival when cells are exposed to OGD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 535–549. PMID:25602369

  19. Numerical calculation of the stress-strain state of non-rigid pavements, renovated by cold recycling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Михайлівна Талах

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of improving the scientific basis to determine the stress-strain state of non-rigid pavements, renovated by cold recycling technology, is considered. The results of numerical calculation of stress-strain state of non-rigid pavements in the section of road Kyv-Kovel (297 + 700 km - 302 + 400 km are given using automated calculation software complex of thin-walled spatial structures (KARTPK. The real state of the road section through 8.5 years after the renovation is analyzed

  20. Roles of plant soluble sugars and their responses to plant cold stress

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plants can enhance freezing tolerance by gradual exposure to low temperature known as cold acclimation. Soluble sugars have been confirmed to play an important role during the process. This is based on the fact they are most commonly detected in various species of terrestrial plants that have undergone seasonal cold ...

  1. Genotypes Associated with Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Displaying Impaired or Enhanced Tolerances to Cold, Salt, Acid, or Desiccation Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hingston, Patricia A.; Chen, Jessica; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K

    2017-01-01

    -related stress tolerance phenotypes. To accomplish this, 166 L. monocytogenes isolates were sequenced and evaluated for their ability to grow in cold (4°C), salt (6% NaCl, 25°C), and acid (pH 5, 25°C) stress conditions as well as survive desiccation (33% RH, 20°C). The results revealed that the stress tolerance...... tolerate several other food-related stresses with some strains possessing higher levels of tolerances than others. The objective of this study was to use a combination of phenotypic analyses and whole genome sequencing to elucidate potential relationships between L. monocytogenes genotypes and food...... of L. monocytogenes is associated with serotype, clonal complex (CC), full length inlA profiles, and the presence of a plasmid which was identified in 55% of isolates. Isolates with full length inlA exhibited significantly (p tolerance relative to those harboring a premature stop...

  2. Microarray analysis of rice d1 (RGA1 mutant reveals the potential role of G-protein alpha subunit in regulating multiple abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, heat and cold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Prasanna Jangam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome-wide role of heterotrimeric G-proteins in abiotic stress response in rice has not been examined from a functional genomics perspective, despite the availability of mutants and evidences involving individual genes/processes/stresses. Our rice whole transcriptome microarray analysis (GSE 20925 at NCBI GEO using the G-alpha subunit (RGA1 null mutant (Daikoku 1 or d1 and its corresponding wild type (O. sativa Japonica Nipponbare identified 2270 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Out of them, we mined for all the potentially abiotic stress-responsive genes using Gene Ontology terms, STIFDB2.0 and Rice DB. The first two approaches produced smaller subsets of the 1886 genes found at Rice DB. The GO approach revealed similar regulation of several families of stress-responsive genes in RGA1 mutant. The Genevestigator analysis of the stress-responsive subset of the RGA1-regulated genes from STIFDB revealed cold and drought-responsive clusters. Meta data analysis at Rice DB revealed large stress-response categories such as cold (878 up /810 down, drought (882 up /837 down, heat (913 up /777 down, and salt stress (889 up /841 down. 1498 of them are common to all the four abiotic stresses, followed by fewer genes common to smaller groups of stresses. The RGA1-regulated genes that uniquely respond to individual stresses include 111 in heat stress, 8 each in cold only and drought only stresses and 2 genes in salt stress only. The common DEGs (1498 belong to pathways such as the synthesis of polyamine, glycine-betaine, proline and trehalose. Some of the common DEGs belong to abiotic stress signaling pathways such as calcium-dependent pathway, ABA independent and dependent pathway and MAP kinase pathway in the RGA1 mutant. Gene ontology of the common stress responsive DEGs revealed 62 unique molecular functions such as transporters, enzyme regulators, transferases, hydrolases, carbon and protein metabolism, binding to nucleotides

  3. Integrating transcriptomics and metabolomics to characterize the regulation of EPA biosynthesis in response to cold stress in seaweed Bangia fuscopurpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Min; Wang, Dongmei; Mao, Yunxiang; Kong, Fanna; Bi, Guiqi; Xing, Qikun; Weng, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Bangia fuscopurpurea is a traditional mariculture crop having high nutritional value, eicosapntemacnioc acid (EPA) production, and protein content. As an intertidal species, it can tolerate drastic changes in abiotic factors such as temperature, hydration, and light radiation; however, genomic information on the evolutionary aspect and mechanism of EPA enrichment in B. fuscopurpurea and the role of EPA in cold tolerance in this species remain elusive. We conducted transcriptome profile analysis in B. fuscopurpurea to investigate the biological functions of genes associated with resistance to various environment factors. We identified 41,935 unigenes that were assembled and applied to public databases to define their functional annotation (NR, GO, KEGG, KOG, and SwissProt). We further identified genes that encoded key enzymes in EPA biosynthesis; five paralogous genes encoding delta5 desaturase were detected in B. fuscopurpurea. Fatty acid profiling and gene expression analysis of B. fuscopurpurea grown under cold stress were simultaneously performed. The EPA content was increased by 29.8% in the samples grown at 4°C, while the total amount of fatty acids remained unchanged. Moreover, all the EPA biosynthesis-related desaturase and elongase genes were upregulated under cold stress. Thus, we hypothesized that diverse EPA biosynthesis pathways and significant increase in gene copy numbers of fatty acid desaturases, together with the concomitant elevation in the transcriptional level of genes associated with fatty acid metabolism, lead to EPA accumulation and subsequently affect membrane fluidity, contributing to cold stress resistance in B. fuscopurpurea. Our findings not only provide a fundamental genetic background for further research in B. fuscopurpurea, but also have important implications for screening and genetic engineering of algae and plants for EPA production.

  4. Cold stress causes rapid but differential changes in properties of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase of camelina and rapeseed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Sung; Oh, Jung-Min; Luan, Sheng; Carlson, John E; Ahn, Sung-Ju

    2013-06-15

    Camelina (Camelina sativa) and rapeseed (Brassica napus) are well-established oil-seed crops with great promise also for biofuels. Both are cold-tolerant, and camelina is regarded to be especially appropriate for production on marginal lands. We examined physiological and biochemical alterations in both species during cold stress treatment for 3 days and subsequent recovery at the temperature of 25°C for 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 6, and 24h, with particular emphasis on the post-translational regulation of the plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase (EC3.6.3.14). The activity and translation of the PM H(+)-ATPase, as well as 14-3-3 proteins, increased after 3 days of cold stress in both species but recovery under normal conditions proceeded differently. The increase in H(+)-ATPase activity was the most dramatic in camelina roots after recovery for 2h at 25°C, followed by decay to background levels within 24h. In rapeseed, the change in H(+)-ATPase activity during the recovery period was less pronounced. Furthermore, H(+)-pumping increased in both species after 15min recovery, but to twice the level in camelina roots compared to rapeseed. Protein gel blot analysis with phospho-threonine anti-bodies showed that an increase in phosphorylation levels paralleled the increase in H(+)-transport rate. Thus our results suggest that cold stress and recovery in camelina and rapeseed are associated with PM H(+)-fluxes that may be regulated by specific translational and post-translational modifications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Differential effects of two indigenous broilers exposed to cold stress and characters of follicle density and diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y. Geng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous chickens from various part of China, due to different feather characters, always performed differently when countered with cold stress. In this study, the effects of long term hypothermia on serum hormones (triiodothyronine, thyroxine and insulin and activity of plasma enzymes (Alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatine kinase and lactic dehydrogenase were studied in two indigenous broiler breeds, Huainan partridge (H and Wenchang (W chickens. Chickens in 20°C±2°C were compared with those subjected to moderate (15°C±2°C and severe low temperature (10°C±2°C for one week. Long-term hypothermia elevated plasma insulin and reduced T4 in W, decelerated insulin and increased T4 in H, while T3 did not change in the two breeds. Plasma enzymes AST, LDH and CK decreased in the two breeds and ALT only decreased in W exposed to cold stress. A significantly decreased body weight gain of H and no variations in W at low temperature were observed. However, a trend of decreased weight gain in W was observed when bred under low temperature condition. Follicle density and diameter were compared in the two breeds with back density in H significantly higher than W and diameter from back of H significantly smaller than W, while much larger than the latter at latero-abdominal part. We investigated the pattern of serum biological change, follicle diameter and density under cold stress condition in two indigenous broiler breeds from different areas of China to provide informative guidance for broiler production and indications in breeding of cold resistant breed.

  6. Differential effects of two indigenous broilers exposed to cold stress and characters of follicle density and diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Y. Chen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available digenous chickens from various part of China, due to different feather characters, always performed differently when countered with cold stress. In this study, the effects of long term hypothermia on serum hormones (triiodothyronine, thyroxine and insulin and activity of plasma enzymes (Alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, creatine kinase and lactic dehydrogenase were studied in two indigenous broiler breeds, Huainan partridge (H and Wenchang (W chickens. Chickens in 20°C±2°C were compared with those subjected to moderate (15°C±2°C and severe low temperature (10°C±2°C for one week. Long-term hypothermia elevated plasma insulin and reduced T4 in W, decelerated insulin and increased T4 in H, while T3 did not change in the two breeds. Plasma enzymes AST, LDH and CK decreased in the two breeds and ALT only decreased in W exposed to cold stress. A significantly decreased body weight gain of H and no variations in W at low temperature were observed. However, a trend of decreased weight gain in W was observed when bred under low temperature condition. Follicle density and diameter were compared in the two breeds with back density in H significantly higher than W and diameter from back of H significantly smaller than W, while much larger than the latter at latero-abdominal part. We investigated the pattern of serum biological change, follicle diameter and density under cold stress condition in two indigenous broiler breeds from different areas of China to provide informative guidance for broiler production and indications in breeding of cold resistant breed.

  7. Overexpression of a novel cold-responsive transcript factor LcFIN1 from sheepgrass enhances tolerance to low temperature stress in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiong; Li, Xiaoxia; Jia, Junting; Zhao, Pincang; Liu, Panpan; Liu, Zhujiang; Ge, Liangfa; Chen, Shuangyan; Qi, Dongmei; Deng, Bo; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Liu, Gongshe; Cheng, Liqin

    2016-03-01

    As a perennial forage crop broadly distributed in eastern Eurasia, sheepgrass (Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvel) is highly tolerant to low-temperature stress. Previous report indicates that sheepgrass is able to endure as low as -47.5 °C,allowing it to survive through the cold winter season. However, due to the lack of sufficient studies, the underlying mechanism towards the extraordinary low-temperature tolerance is unclear. Although the transcription profiling has provided insight into the transcriptome response to cold stress, more detailed studies are required to dissect the molecular mechanism regarding the excellent abiotic stress tolerance. In this work, we report a novel transcript factor LcFIN1 (L. chinensis freezing-induced 1) from sheepgrass. LcFIN1 showed no homology with other known genes and was rapidly and highly induced by cold stress, suggesting that LcFIN1 participates in the early response to cold stress. Consistently, ectopic expression of LcFIN1 significantly increased cold stress tolerance in the transgenic plants, as indicated by the higher survival rate, fresh weight and other stress-related indexes after a freezing treatment. Transcriptome analysis showed that numerous stress-related genes were differentially expressed in LcFIN1-overexpressing plants, suggesting that LcFIN1 may enhance plant abiotic stress tolerance by transcriptional regulation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and CHIP-qPCR showed that LcCBF1 can bind to the CRT/DRE cis-element located in the promoter region of LcFIN1, suggesting that LcFIN1 is directly regulated by LcCBF1. Taken together, our results suggest that LcFIN1 positively regulates plant adaptation response to cold stress and is a promising candidate gene to improve crop cold tolerance. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. beta3-Adrenergic-dependent and -independent mechanisms participate in cold-induced modulation of insulin signal transduction in brown adipose tissue of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparetti, Alessandra L; Alvarez-Rojas, Fernanda; de Araujo, Eliana P; Hirata, Aparecida E; Saad, Mário J A; Velloso, Lício A

    2005-03-01

    During cold exposure, homeothermic animals mobilize glucose with higher efficiency than at thermoneutrality. An interaction between the insulin signal transduction machinery and high sympathetic tonus is thought to play an important role in this phenomenon. In the present study, rats were exposed to cold during 8 days and treated, or not, with a beta3-adrenergic agonist, BRL37344 sodium 4-2-2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl amino propyl phenoxy-acetic acid sodium (BRL37344), or antagonist, SR59230A 3-(2-ethylphenoxy)-[(1S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphth-1-ylamino]-(2S)-2-propanol oxalate (SR59230A), to evaluate the cross-talk between insulin and beta3-adrenergic intracellular signaling in brown adipose tissue. The drugs did not modify food ingestion, body temperature, and body weight in control and cold-exposed rats. Treatment of control rats with BRL37344 led to higher insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptors, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and ERK, higher insulin-induced IRS-1/PI3-kinase association, and higher [Ser(473)] phosphorylation of Akt. Cold exposure alone promoted higher insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptors, IRS-1, IRS-2, and ERK, and higher insulin-induced IRS-1 and IRS-2/PI3-kinase association. Except for the regulation of ERK, SR59230A abolished all the cold-induced effects upon the insulin signal transduction pathway. However, this antagonist only partially inhibited the cold-induced increase of glucose uptake. Thus, the sympathetic tonus generated during cold-exposure acts, in brown adipose tissue, through the beta3-adrenergic receptor and modulates insulin signal transduction, with the exception of ERK. However, insulin-independent mechanisms other than beta3-adrenergic activation participate in cold-induced glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue of rats.

  9. The influence of short-term cold stress on the metabolism of non-structural carbohydrates in polar grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łopieńska-Biernat Elżbieta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants adapt to extremely low temperatures in polar regions by maximizing their photosynthetic efficiency and accumulating cryoprotective and osmoprotective compounds. Flowering plants of the family Poaceae growing in the Arctic and in the Antarctic were investigated. Their responses to cold stress were analyzed under laboratory conditions. Samples were collected after 24 h and 48 h of cold treatment. Quantitative and qualitative changes of sugars are found among different species, but they can differ within a genus of the family Poaceae. The values of the investigated parameters in Poa annua differed considerably depending to the biogeographic origin of plants. At the beginning of the experiment, Antarctic plants were acclimatized in greenhouse characterized by significantly higher content of sugars, including storage reserves, sucrose and starch, but lower total protein content. After 24 h of exposure to cold stress, much smaller changes in the examined parameters were noted in Antarctic plants than in locally grown specimens. Total sugar content and sucrose, starch and glucose levels were nearly constant in P. annua, but they varied significantly. Those changes are responsible for the high adaptability of P. annua to survive and develop in highly unsupportive environments and colonize new regions.

  10. Energy Metabolism in Cold-Stressed Females: Implications for Predictive Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobs, Ira

    1998-01-01

    This document is a progress report which describes the results from the second of a series of studies carried out to clarify the extent of gender-related differences in physiological responses to cold...

  11. Energy Metabolism in Cold-Stressed Females: Implications for Predictive Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobs, Ira

    1997-01-01

    This document is a progress report which describes the results from the first of a series of studies carried out to clarify the extent 6f gender-related differences in physiological responses to cold...

  12. Natural selection and adaptive evolution of leptin in the ochotona family driven by the cold environmental stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental stress can accelerate the evolutionary rate of specific stress-response proteins and create new functions specialized for different environments, enhancing an organism's fitness to stressful environments. Pikas (order Lagomorpha, endemic, non-hibernating mammals in the modern Holarctic Region, live in cold regions at either high altitudes or high latitudes and have a maximum distribution of species diversification confined to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Variations in energy metabolism are remarkable for them living in cold environments. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, plays important roles in energy homeostasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine the extent of leptin variations within the Ochotona family, we cloned the entire coding sequence of pika leptin from 6 species in two regions (Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and Inner Mongolia steppe in China and the leptin sequences of plateau pikas (O. curzonia from different altitudes on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. We carried out both DNA and amino acid sequence analyses in molecular evolution and compared modeled spatial structures. Our results show that positive selection (PS acts on pika leptin, while nine PS sites located within the functionally significant segment 85-119 of leptin and one unique motif appeared only in pika lineages-the ATP synthase alpha and beta subunit signature site. To reveal the environmental factors affecting sequence evolution of pika leptin, relative rate test was performed in pikas from different altitudes. Stepwise multiple regression shows that temperature is significantly and negatively correlated with the rates of non-synonymous substitution (Ka and amino acid substitution (Aa, whereas altitude does not significantly affect synonymous substitution (Ks, Ka and Aa. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings support the viewpoint that adaptive evolution may occur in pika leptin, which may play important roles in pikas' ecological adaptation to

  13. Accumulation of acidic SK₃ dehydrins in phloem cells of cold- and drought-stressed plants of the Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabala, Bartosz Mieczyslaw; Fudali, Sylwia; Rorat, Tadeusz

    2014-04-01

    The role of acidic SK(n) dehydrins in stress tolerance of important crop and model species of the Solanaceae remains unknown. We have previously shown that the acidic SK₃ dehydrin DHN24 from Solanum sogarandinum is constitutively expressed and its expression is associated with cold acclimation. Here we found that DHN24 is specifically localized to phloem cells of vegetative organs of non-acclimated plants. More precise localization of DHN24 revealed that it is primarily found in sieve elements (SEs) and companion cells (CCs) of roots and stems. In cold-acclimated plants, DHN24 is mainly present in all cell types of the phloem. Dhn24 transcripts are also predominantly localized to phloem cells of cold-acclimated stems. Immunoelectron microscopy localized DHN24 to the cytosol and close to organelle membranes of phloem cells, the lumen with phloem protein filaments, parietal cytoplasm of SEs and the nucleoplasm of some nuclei. Cell fractionation experiments revealed that DHN24 was detected in the cytosolic, nuclear and microsomal fractions. We also determined whether homologous members of the acidic subclass dehydrins from Capsicum annuum and Lycopersicon chilense share the characteristics of DHN24. We showed that they are also constitutively expressed, but their protein level is upregulated preferentially by drought stress. Immunofluorescent localization revealed that they are detected in SEs and CCs of unstressed plants and throughout the phloem in drought-stressed plants. These results suggest that one of the primary roles of DHN24 and its homologs may be the protection of the phloem region from adverse effects of abiotic stresses.

  14. Effect of cold water immersion performed on successive days on physical performance, muscle damage, and inflammatory, hormonal, and oxidative stress markers in volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Victor H; Ramos, Solange P; Bara-Filho, Maurício G; Freitas, Daniel G S; Coimbra, Danilo R; Cecchini, Rubens; Guarnier, Flávia A; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2017-03-08

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of daily cold water immersion (CWI) on physical performance, muscle damage, and inflammatory, hormonal, and oxidative stress markers in volleyball. Six players were submitted to CWI and six players to a placebo, during 5 training days. Thigh circumference, squat jump, and agility were measured on the 1, 3 and 6 days. On the 1 and 6 days, blood and saliva were collected for analysis of oxidative stress, muscle damage, and inflammatory and hormonal levels. Muscle soreness and countermovement jump were quantified daily. The physical performance comparisons did not present differences and the only between group comparison with a large effect size (ES = -1.39) was in Δ% between day 1 and day 2 for CMJ. DOMS and creatine kinase increased in both groups and the ES of between group comparisons of Δ% between moments were not more than moderate. Thigh circumference increased only in the placebo group (P = 0.04) and the ES of the between group comparisons of Δ% between moments was large (1.53). No differences were found in oxidative stress, or inflammatory markers. Cortisol decreased only in the CWI-group (P muscle edema and hormonal status, the limited effects of CWI on performance, muscle damage, inflammation markers, and ROS mediators signal the unimportance of the daily practice of this recovery method in volleyball players.

  15. Oxidative stress and its downstream signaling in aging eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo-Durán, María Dolores; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; García-Medina, Jose Javier; Zanón-Moreno, Vicente; Nucci, Carlo; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Martínez-Castillo, Sebastián; Galbis-Estrada, Carmen; Marco-Ramírez, Carla; López-Gálvez, Maria Isabel; Galarreta, David J; Díaz-Llópis, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and its biomarkers are the biochemical end point of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the ability of the antioxidant (AOX) biological systems to fight against oxidative injury. We reviewed the role of OS and its downstream signaling in aging eyes. A search of the literature and current knowledge on the physiological and pathological mechanisms of OS were revisited in relation to the eyes and the aging process. Most prevalent ocular diseases have been analyzed herein in relation to OS and nutraceutic supplements, such as dry-eye disorders, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. Clinical, biochemical, and molecular data from anterior and posterior eye segment diseases point to OS as the common pathogenic mechanism in the majority of these ocular disorders, many of which are pathologies causing visual impairment, blindness, and subsequent loss of life quality. Studies with nutraceutic supplements in aging eye-related pathologies have also been reviewed. OS, nutritional status, and nutraceutic supplements have to be considered within the standards of care of older ophthalmologic patients. OS biomarkers and surrogate end points may help in managing the aging population with ocular diseases.

  16. Genotypes Associated with Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Displaying Impaired or Enhanced Tolerances to Cold, Salt, Acid, or Desiccation Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingston, Patricia; Chen, Jessica; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K.; Laing, Chad; Bertelli, Claire; Gannon, Victor; Tasara, Taurai; Allen, Kevin; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth; Wang, Siyun

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a large concern in the food industry where its continuous detection in food products has caused a string of recalls in North America and Europe. Most recognized for its ability to grow in foods during refrigerated storage, L. monocytogenes can also tolerate several other food-related stresses with some strains possessing higher levels of tolerances than others. The objective of this study was to use a combination of phenotypic analyses and whole genome sequencing to elucidate potential relationships between L. monocytogenes genotypes and food-related stress tolerance phenotypes. To accomplish this, 166 L. monocytogenes isolates were sequenced and evaluated for their ability to grow in cold (4°C), salt (6% NaCl, 25°C), and acid (pH 5, 25°C) stress conditions as well as survive desiccation (33% RH, 20°C). The results revealed that the stress tolerance of L. monocytogenes is associated with serotype, clonal complex (CC), full length inlA profiles, and the presence of a plasmid which was identified in 55% of isolates. Isolates with full length inlA exhibited significantly (p stress tolerance of L. monocytogenes. Specifically, a number of cold and desiccation sensitive isolates contained PMSCs in σB regulator genes (rsbS, rsbU, rsbV). Collectively, the results suggest that knowing the sequence type of an isolate in addition to screening for the presence of full-length inlA and a plasmid, could help food processors and food agency investigators determine why certain isolates might be persisting in a food processing environment. Additionally, increased sequencing of L. monocytogenes isolates in combination with stress tolerance profiling, will enhance the ability to identify genetic elements associated with higher risk strains. PMID:28337186

  17. Tolerance to drought and salt stress in plants: Unraveling the signaling networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dortje eGolldack

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Tolerance of plants to abiotic stressors such as drought and salinity is triggered by complex multicomponent signaling pathways to restore cellular homeostasis and promote survival. Major plant transcription factor families such as bZIP, NAC, AP2/ERF and MYB orchestrate regulatory networks underlying abiotic stress tolerance. Sucrose nonfermenting 1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2 and MAPK pathways contribute to initiation of stress adaptive downstream responses and promote plant growth and development. As a convergent point of multiple abiotic cues, cellular effects of environmental stresses are not only imbalances of ionic and osmotic homeostasis but also impaired photosynthesis, cellular energy depletion, and redox imbalances. Recent evidence of regulatory systems that link sensing and signaling of environmental conditions and the intracellular redox status have shed light on interfaces of stress and energy signaling. ROS (reactive oxygen species cause severe cellular damage by peroxidation and de-esterification of membrane lipids, however, current models also define a pivotal signaling function of ROS in triggering tolerance against stress. Recent research advances suggest and support a regulatory role of ROS in the cross talks of stress triggered hormonal signaling such as the abscisic acid (ABA pathway and endogenously induced redox and metabolite signals. Here, we discuss and review the versatile molecular convergence in the abiotic stress responsive signaling networks in the context of ROS and lipid derived signals and the specific role of stomatal signaling.

  18. Effect of residual stress induced by cold expansion on fatigue crack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fatigue life and fatigue crack growth rate are controlled by stress ratio, stress level, orientation of crack, temper-ature, residual stress, corrosion, etc. The effects of residual stress on fatigue crack growth in aluminium (Al) alloy 2024-T351 by Mode I crack were investigated by applying constant amplitude cycles based on ...

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling in Mammalian Oocytes and Embryos: Life in the Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes and embryos are exquisitely sensitive to a wide range of insults related to physical stress, chemical exposure, and exposures to adverse maternal nutrition or health status. Although cells manifest specific responses to various stressors, many of these stressors intersect at the endoplasmic reticulum, where disruptions in protein folding and production of reactive oxygen species initiate downstream signaling events. These signals modulate mRNA translation and gene transcription, leading to recovery, activation of autophagy, or with severe and prolonged stress, apoptosis. ER stress signaling has recently come to the fore as a major contributor to embryo demise. Accordingly, agents that modulate or inhibit ER stress signaling have yielded beneficial effects on embryo survival and long-term developmental potential. We review here the mechanisms of ER stress signaling, their connections to mammalian oocytes and embryos, and the promising indications that interventions in this pathway may provide new opportunities for improving mammalian reproduction and health. PMID:25805126

  20. Genetic screening for Arabidopsis mutants defective in STA1 regulation under thermal stress implicates the existence of regulators of its specific expression, and the genetic interactions in the stress signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-in eYu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To cope with environmental stresses, plants have developed various stress tolerance mechanisms that involve the induction of many stress responsive genes through stress-specific and common signaling pathways. Stress-specific/common transcription factors, rather than general basal factors, were considered important in this stress tolerance. The Arabidopsis STABILIZED1 (STA1 gene encodes a putative pre-mRNA splicing factor that is similar to the human U5 snRNP-associated 102-kDa protein and the yeast pre-mRNA splicing factors, PRP1p and Prp6p. As pre-mRNA splicing is a necessary process for proper gene expression in eukaryotes, STA1 is expected to be constantly functional in all conditions. Interestingly, STA1 expression is induced by temperature stresses, and STA1 recessive mutation (sta1-1 resulted in temperature stress-specific hypersensitivity. This suggests STA1’s stress specific function in addition to its presumed housekeeping role. In order to establish the genetic system to understand the regulation of STA1 expression in temperature stresses, we generated a bioluminescent Arabidopsis plant harboring the STA1 promoter fused to the firefly luciferase coding sequence (STA1p-LUC. Through genetic analysis, the bioluminescent Arabidopsis homozygous for one-copy STA1p-LUC was isolated and characterized. In this STA1p-LUC line, the expression patterns of STA1p-LUC were similar to those of the endogenous STA1 gene under cold and heat stresses. The STA1p-LUC line was then chemically mutagenized and screened to isolate the genetic loci of STA1 regulators under cold or heat stresses. Mutants with altered STA1p-LUC luminescence were identified and further confirmed through luminescence imaging in the next generation and analysis of endogenous STA1 expression. The categorization of STA1p-LUC deregulated mutants implicated the existence of cold or heat stress-specific as well as common genetic regulators for STA1 expression. Interestingly, some

  1. Downregulation of endocannabinoid signaling in the hippocampus following chronic unpredictable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Matthew N; Patel, Sachin; Carrier, Erica J; Rademacher, David J; Ormerod, Brandi K; Hillard, Cecilia J; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2005-03-01

    Deficits in cognitive functioning and flexibility are seen following both chronic stress and modulation of endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) signaling. Here, we investigated whether alterations in eCB signaling might contribute to the cognitive impairments induced by chronic stress. Chronic stress impaired reversal learning and induced perseveratory behavior in the Morris water maze without significant effect on task acquisition. These cognitive impairments were reversed by exogenous cannabinoid administration, suggesting deficient eCB signaling underlies these phenomena. In line with this hypothesis, chronic stress downregulated CB1 receptor expression and significantly reduced the content of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol within the hippocampus. CB1 receptor density and 2-arachidonylglycerol content were unaffected in the limbic forebrain. These data suggest that stress-induced downregulation of hippocampal eCB signaling contributes to problems in behavioral flexibility and could play a role in the development of perseveratory and ruminatory behaviors in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

  2. Cold inducible RNA binding protein upregulation in pituitary corticotroph adenoma induces corticotroph cell proliferation via Erk signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wei; Tang, Hao; Chen, Xiao; Zhao, Yao; Zheng, Lili; Pan, Sijian; Wang, Weiqing; Bian, Liuguan; Sun, Qingfang

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease is caused by pituitary corticotroph adenoma, and the pathogenesis of it has remained obscure. Here, we showed that cold inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP) was markedly elevated in corticotroph tumors. Forced overexpression of CIRP in murine AtT20 pituitary corticotroph cell line increased corticotroph precursor hormone proopiomelanocortin (POMC) transcription, ACTH secretion and cellular proliferation. In vivo, CIRP overexpression promotes murine corticotroph tumor growth and enhances ACTH production. Mechanistically, we show that CIRP could promote AtT20 cells proliferation by inducing cyclinD1 and decreasing p27 expression via Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Clinically, CIRP overexpression is significantly correlated with Cushing's disease recurrence. CIRP appears to play a critical tumorigenesis function in Cushing's disease and its expression might be a useful biomarker for tumor recurrence. PMID:26824322

  3. Specific Features of the Hypothalamic Leptin Signaling Response to Cold Exposure Are Reflected in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Rats and Ferrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bàrbara Reynés

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cold exposure induces hyperphagia to counteract fat loss related to lipid mobilization and thermogenic activation. The aim of this study was investigate on the molecular mechanisms involved in cold-induced compensatory hyperphagia.Methods: We analyzed the effect of cold exposure on gene expression of orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides, and of leptin signaling-related genes in the hypothalamus of rats at different ages (1, 2, 4, and 6 months, as well as in ferrets. We also evaluated the potential of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to reflect hypothalamic molecular responses.Results: As expected, cold exposure induced hypoleptinemia in rats, which could be responsible for the increased ratio of orexigenic/anorexigenic peptides gene expression in the hypothalamus, mainly due to decreased anorexigenic gene expression, especially in young animals. In ferrets, which resemble humans more closely, cold exposure induced greater changes in hypothalamic mRNA levels of orexigenic genes. Despite the key role of leptin in food intake control, the effect of cold exposure on the expression of key hypothalamic leptin signaling cascade genes is not clear. In our study, cold exposure seemed to affect leptin signaling in 4-month-old rats (increased Socs3 and Lepr expression, likely associated with the smaller-increase in food intake and decreased body weight observed at this particular age. Similarly, cold exposed ferrets showed greater hypothalamic Socs3 and Stat3 gene expression. Interestingly, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC mimicked the hypothalamic increase in Lepr and Socs3 observed in 4-month-old rats, and the increased Socs3 mRNA expression observed in ferrets in response to cold exposure.Conclusions: The most outstanding result of our study is that PBMC reflected the specific modulation of leptin signaling observed in both animal models, rats and ferrets, which points forwards PBMC as easily obtainable biological material to be

  4. Effects of Cold and Heat Stress on Egg Quality Traits of a Newly Developed Native Hybrid Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Durmuş

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ATAK-S is a newly developed native hybrid layer. Although the laying performance of this hybrid has been studied and determined, the performance response of the hybrid to different environmental temperature conditions is not known. This study was therefore undertaken to determine the effect of cold and heat stress on egg quality traits. Hens were divided into three different groups; control (20°C, low (12°C and high (32°C. A total of 360 hens, with 120 in each of the groups, were used in the study. Hens were held in three tier battery cages in an environmentally controlled poultry house. The study lasted for 3 weeks. No differences were found among different groups in terms of shape index, albumen height and Haugh unit of the egg quality traits. It was found that the differences among the heat groups in terms of egg shell breaking strength, egg weight, shell thickness and yolk colour were significant and the value of these traits decreased under the heat stress conditions, whereas they were not affected from the cold stress.

  5. The U-box family genes in Medicago truncatula: Key elements in response to salt, cold, and drought stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jianbo; Mo, Xiaowei; Yang, Haiqi; Yue, Luming; Song, Jun; Mo, Beixin

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitination pathway regulates growth, development, and stress responses in plants, and the U-box protein family of ubiquitin ligases has important roles in this pathway. Here, 64 putative U-box proteins were identified in the Medicago truncatula genome. In addition to the conserved U-box motif, other functional domains, such as the ARM, kinase, KAP, and WD40 domains, were also detected. Phylogenetic analysis of the M. truncatula U-box proteins grouped them into six subfamilies, and chromosomal mapping and synteny analyses indicated that tandem and segmental duplications may have contributed to the expansion and evolution of the U-box gene family in this species. Using RNA-seq data from M. truncatula seedlings subjected to three different abiotic stresses, we identified 33 stress-inducible plant U-box genes (MtPUBs). Specifically, 25 salinity-, 15 drought-, and 16 cold-regulated MtPUBs were detected. Among them, MtPUB10, MtPUB17, MtPUB18, MtPUB35, MtPUB42, and MtPUB44 responded to all three stress conditions. Expression profiling by qRT-PCR was consistent with the RNA-seq data, and stress-related elements were identified in the promoter regions. The present findings strongly indicate that U-box proteins play critical roles in abiotic stress response in M. truncatula.

  6. Phenolic acids identified in sorghum distillery residue demonstrated antioxidative and anti-cold-stress properties in cultured tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin-Mei; Lin, Jing-Jen; Liao, Chih-Yuan; Cheng, Hui-Ling; Pan, Bonnie Sun

    2014-05-21

    This study aimed to identify the bioactive compounds and evaluate the anti-cold-stress function of the sorghum distillery residue (SDR) using tilapia as an alternative animal model. The highest contents of water-soluble bioactive compounds in SDR were polyphenols, followed by tannins, anthocyanins, and flavonoids. SDR was extracted with double-distilled water, 95% ethanol, and ethyl acetate, separately. The ethanol extract (SDR-E) yielded the highest polyphenol content [15.03 mg/g of SDR dry weight (dw)], of which the EC50 value of R,R-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging efficiency was 0.56 ± 0.04 mg/mL. The SDR-E suppressed the oxidation of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) more efficiently than that of other extracts. Tilapia fed a diet containing 3.6% SDR-E decreased accumulative mortality during cold stress, of 46.2%. The accumulative morality of the control was 92.9%. The phenolic acids identified in SDR included gallic acid (0.36 ± 0.08 mg/g of SDR dw), 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (0.16 ± 0.12 mg/g of SDR dw), and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (0.49 ± 0.23 mg/g of SDR dw). Diets supplemented with 0.5% 4-hydroxybenzoic acid fed to tilapia showed a lower mortality rate than that fed 1.0% 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, comparable to that of the tilapia fed 20% SDR. The latter showed lower mortality than that of the control. These results suggested that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid is one of the major anti-cold-stress compounds in SDR.

  7. Crosstalk between secondary messengers, hormones and MAPK modules during abiotic stress signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smékalová, Veronika; Doskočilová, Anna; Komis, George; Samaj, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    The crosstalk between second messengers, hormones and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in plant signalling systems facilitates adaptation and survival in the face of diverse environmental stresses. This review focuses on the transduction of second messenger and hormone signals by MAPK modules in plant abiotic stress responses. We discuss how this crosstalk regulates gene expression (e.g. by controlling transcription factor activity) and other cellular and physiological responses to enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stresses. © 2013.

  8. Behavior of cold-worked AISI-304 steel in stress-corrosion cracking process: Microstructural aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, A.; Novotny, R.; Uca, O.; Krsjak, V.; Macak, J.; Debarberis, L.

    2008-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steel is one of the key structural materials for a wide-range of components for present nuclear power plants. Moreover, this type of steel is also foreseen as a key structural material in future reactor systems, the so-called Generation IV. However, for the successful application of these materials in new environmental conditions an integrated Research and Development program needs to be successfully completed. This work is focused to the evaluation of cold-worked AISI-304 stainless steel from 20 to 45% of cold-worked deformation by different spectroscopic techniques within the aim to study the microstructural characteristics. In particular, positron annihilation spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering have been used for characterization of phase transformation and microstructural behavior. Furthermore, outcomes of corrosion properties of cold-worked AISI-304 stainless steel exposed for 100 and 500 h in super-critical water reactor conditions are correlated with the obtained results.

  9. Oxidative macromolecular alterations in the rat central nervous system in response to experimentally co-induced chlorpyrifos and cold stress: a comparative assessment in aging rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basha, P Mahaboob; Poojary, Annappa

    2012-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are generated as a result of a number of physiological and pathological processes which can promote multiple forms of oxidative damage including protein oxidation, and thereby influence the function of a diverse array of cellular processes. In our previous study we have reported that co-exposure to chlorpyrifos and cold stress in aging rats markedly influence the toxic outcome as a result of oxidative stress. In the present study, key neurochemical/enzymes were measured in order to evaluate the macromolecular alterations in response to experimentally co-induced chlorpyrifos and cold stress (15 and 20°C) either concurrently or individually in vivo for 48 h in discrete regions of brain and spinal cord of different age group rats. CPF and cold stress exposure either individually or in combination substantially increased the activity/levels of protein carbonyls, AST, ALT and decreased protein thiols, DNA, RNA and total proteins in discrete regions of CNS. Overall, the effects of co-exposure were appreciably different from either of the exposures. However, synergistic-action of CPF and cold stress at 15°C showed higher dyshomeostasis in comparison with CPF and cold stress alone and together at 20°C indicating the extent of oxidative macromolecular damage in discrete regions of brain and spinal cord. Furthermore, the present study demonstrates that macromolecular oxidative damage is highly pronounced in neonates and juveniles than the young adults.

  10. Genotypes Associated with Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Displaying Impaired or Enhanced Tolerances to Cold, Salt, Acid, or Desiccation Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingston, Patricia; Chen, Jessica; Dhillon, Bhavjinder K; Laing, Chad; Bertelli, Claire; Gannon, Victor; Tasara, Taurai; Allen, Kevin; Brinkman, Fiona S L; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth; Wang, Siyun

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a large concern in the food industry where its continuous detection in food products has caused a string of recalls in North America and Europe. Most recognized for its ability to grow in foods during refrigerated storage, L. monocytogenes can also tolerate several other food-related stresses with some strains possessing higher levels of tolerances than others. The objective of this study was to use a combination of phenotypic analyses and whole genome sequencing to elucidate potential relationships between L. monocytogenes genotypes and food-related stress tolerance phenotypes. To accomplish this, 166 L. monocytogenes isolates were sequenced and evaluated for their ability to grow in cold (4°C), salt (6% NaCl, 25°C), and acid (pH 5, 25°C) stress conditions as well as survive desiccation (33% RH, 20°C). The results revealed that the stress tolerance of L. monocytogenes is associated with serotype, clonal complex (CC), full length inlA profiles, and the presence of a plasmid which was identified in 55% of isolates. Isolates with full length inlA exhibited significantly (p < 0.001) enhanced cold tolerance relative to those harboring a premature stop codon (PMSC) in this gene. Similarly, isolates possessing a plasmid demonstrated significantly (p = 0.013) enhanced acid tolerance. We also identified nine new L. monocytogenes sequence types, a new inlA PMSC, and several connections between CCs and the presence/absence or variations of specific genetic elements. A whole genome single-nucleotide-variants phylogeny revealed sporadic distribution of tolerant isolates and closely related sensitive and tolerant isolates, highlighting that minor genetic differences can influence the stress tolerance of L. monocytogenes. Specifically, a number of cold and desiccation sensitive isolates contained PMSCs in σB regulator genes (rsbS, rsbU, rsbV). Collectively, the results suggest that knowing the sequence type of an isolate in

  11. Endogenous retroviruses in systemic response to stress signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kiho; Lee, Young-Kwan; Greenhalgh, David G

    2008-08-01

    Infection of germline cells with retroviruses initiates permanent proviral colonization of the germline genome. The germline-integrated proviruses, called endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), are inherited to offspring in a Mendelian order and belong to the transposable element family. Endogenous retroviruses and other long terminal repeat retroelements constitute ~8% and ~10% of the human and mouse genomes, respectively. It is likely that each individual has a distinct genomic ERV profile. Recent studies have revealed that a substantial fraction of ERVs retains the coding potentials necessary for virion assembly and replication. There are several layers of potential mechanisms controlling ERV expression: intracellular transcription environment (e.g., transcription factor pool, splicing machinery, hormones), epigenetic status of the genome (e.g., proviral methylation, histone acetylation), profile of transcription regulatory elements on each ERV's promoter, and a range of stress signals (e.g., injury, infection, environment). Endogenous retroviruses may exert pathophysiologic effects by infection followed by random reintegration into the genome, by their gene products (e.g., envelope, superantigen), and by altering the expression of neighboring genes. Several studies have provided evidence that ERVs are associated with a range of pathogenic processes involving multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, breast cancer, and the response to burn injury. For instance, the proinflammatory properties of the human ERV-W envelope protein play a central role in demyelination of oligodendrocytes. As reviewed in this article, recent advances in ERV biology and mammalian genomics suggest that ERVs may have a profound influence on various pathogenic processes including the response to injury and infection. Understanding the roles of ERVs in the pathogenesis of injury and infection will broaden insights into the underlying mechanisms of systemic immune disorder and organ

  12. Heat stress induced, ligand-independent MET and EGFR signalling in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Scott M; Jondal, Danielle E; Butters, Kim A; Knudsen, Bruce E; Anderson, Jill L; Stokes, Matthew P; Jia, Xiaoying; Grande, Joseph P; Roberts, Lewis R; Callstrom, Matthew R; Woodrum, David A

    2017-11-06

    The aims of the present study were 2-fold: first, to test the hypothesis that heat stress induces MET and EGFR signalling in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and inhibition of this signalling decreases HCC clonogenic survival; and second, to identify signalling pathways associated with heat stress induced MET signalling. MET(+) and EGFR(+) HCC cells were pre-treated with inhibitors to MET, EGFR, PI3K/mTOR or vehicle and subjected to heat stress or control ± HGF or EGF growth factors and assessed by colony formation assay, Western blotting and/or quantitative mass spectrometry. IACUC approved partial laser thermal or sham ablation was performed on orthotopic N1S1 and AS30D HCC tumours and liver/tumour assessed for phospho-MET and phospho-EGFR immunostaining. Heat-stress induced rapid MET and EGFR phosphorylation that is distinct from HGF or EGF in HCC cells and thermal ablation induced MET but not EGFR phosphorylation at the HCC tumour ablation margin. Inhibition of the MET and EGFR blocked both heat stress and growth factor induced MET and EGFR phosphorylation and inhibition of MET decreased HCC clonogenic survival following heat stress. Pathway analysis of quantitative phosphoproteomic data identified downstream pathways associated with heat stress induced MET signalling including AKT, ERK, Stat3 and JNK. However, inhibition of heat stress induced MET signalling did not block AKT signalling. Heat-stress induced MET and EGFR signalling is distinct from growth factor mediated signalling in HCC cells and MET inhibition enhances heat stress induced HCC cell killing via a PI3K/AKT/mTOR-independent mechanism.

  13. Delayed response to cold stress is characterized by successive metabolic shifts culminating in apple fruit peel necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapper, Nigel E; Hertog, Maarten L A T M; Lee, Jinwook; Buchanan, David A; Leisso, Rachel S; Fei, Zhangjun; Qu, Guiqin; Giovannoni, James J; Johnston, Jason W; Schaffer, Robert J; Nicolaï, Bart M; Mattheis, James P; Watkins, Christopher B; Rudell, David R

    2017-04-21

    Superficial scald is a physiological disorder of apple fruit characterized by sunken, necrotic lesions appearing after prolonged cold storage, although initial injury occurs much earlier in the storage period. To determine the degree to which the transition to cell death is an active process and specific metabolism involved, untargeted metabolic and transcriptomic profiling was used to follow metabolism of peel tissue over 180 d of cold storage. The metabolome and transcriptome of peel destined to develop scald began to diverge from peel where scald was controlled using antioxidant (diphenylamine; DPA) or rendered insensitive to ethylene using 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) beginning between 30 and 60 days of storage. Overall metabolic and transcriptomic shifts, representing multiple pathways and processes, occurred alongside α-farnesene oxidation and, later, methanol production alongside symptom development. Results indicate this form of peel necrosis is a product of an active metabolic transition involving multiple pathways triggered by chilling temperatures at cold storage inception rather than physical injury. Among multiple other pathways, enhanced methanol and methyl ester levels alongside upregulated pectin methylesterases are unique to peel that is developing scald symptoms similar to injury resulting from mechanical stress and herbivory in other plants.

  14. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh Doni; Rasmussen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking. RE...

  15. Engineering carpel-specific cold stress tolerance: a case study in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freezing temperatures during winter generally do not injure floral buds of horticulturally important crops. Entry into dormancy coupled with cold acclimation provides adequate protection unless the temperatures are exceptionally low. This measure of protection is lost in spring when the floral bud...

  16. CD36 is indispensable for thermogenesis under conditions of fasting and cold stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putri, Mirasari [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Department of Public Health, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A.A. [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Universitas Padjadjaran, Jl. Raya Bandung Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, West Java 45363 (Indonesia); Iso, Tatsuya, E-mail: isot@gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Education and Research Support Center, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Aiko; Hanaoka, Hirofumi [Department of Bioimaging Information Analysis, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Sunaga, Hiroaki [Department of Laboratory Sciences, Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Koitabashi, Norimichi [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Matsui, Hiroki [Department of Laboratory Sciences, Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi [Department of Public Health, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Tsushima, Yoshito [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); and others

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia can occur during fasting when thermoregulatory mechanisms, involving fatty acid (FA) utilization, are disturbed. CD36/FA translocase is a membrane protein which facilitates membrane transport of long-chain FA in the FA consuming heart, skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissues. It also accelerates uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein by brown adipose tissue (BAT) in a cold environment. In mice deficient for CD36 (CD36{sup −/−} mice), FA uptake is markedly reduced with a compensatory increase in glucose uptake in the heart and SkM, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose especially during fasting. However, the role of CD36 in thermogenic activity during fasting remains to be determined. In fasted CD36{sup −/−} mice, body temperature drastically decreased shortly after cold exposure. The hypothermia was accompanied by a marked reduction in blood glucose and in stores of triacylglycerols in BAT and of glycogen in glycolytic SkM. Biodistribution analysis using the FA analogue {sup 125}I-BMIPP and the glucose analogue {sup 18}F-FDG revealed that uptake of FA and glucose was severely impaired in BAT and glycolytic SkM in cold-exposed CD36{sup −/−} mice. Further, induction of the genes of thermogenesis in BAT was blunted in fasted CD36{sup −/−} mice after cold exposure. These findings strongly suggest that CD36{sup −/−} mice exhibit pronounced hypothermia after fasting due to depletion of energy storage in BAT and glycolytic SkM and to reduced supply of energy substrates to these tissues. Our study underscores the importance of CD36 for nutrient homeostasis to survive potentially life-threatening challenges, such as cold and starvation. - Highlights: • We examined the role of CD36 in thermogenesis during cold exposure. • CD36{sup −/−} mice exhibit rapid hypothermia after cold exposure during fasting. • Uptake of fatty acid and glucose is impaired in thermogenic tissues during fasting. • Storage of energy substrates is

  17. CD36 is indispensable for thermogenesis under conditions of fasting and cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Mirasari; Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A A; Iso, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Aiko; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Sunaga, Hiroaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Matsui, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Tsushima, Yoshito; Yokoyama, Tomoyuki; Koyama, Hiroshi; Abumrad, Nada A; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia can occur during fasting when thermoregulatory mechanisms, involving fatty acid (FA) utilization, are disturbed. CD36/FA translocase is a membrane protein which facilitates membrane transport of long-chain FA in the FA consuming heart, skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissues. It also accelerates uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein by brown adipose tissue (BAT) in a cold environment. In mice deficient for CD36 (CD36(-/-) mice), FA uptake is markedly reduced with a compensatory increase in glucose uptake in the heart and SkM, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose especially during fasting. However, the role of CD36 in thermogenic activity during fasting remains to be determined. In fasted CD36(-/-) mice, body temperature drastically decreased shortly after cold exposure. The hypothermia was accompanied by a marked reduction in blood glucose and in stores of triacylglycerols in BAT and of glycogen in glycolytic SkM. Biodistribution analysis using the FA analogue (125)I-BMIPP and the glucose analogue (18)F-FDG revealed that uptake of FA and glucose was severely impaired in BAT and glycolytic SkM in cold-exposed CD36(-/-) mice. Further, induction of the genes of thermogenesis in BAT was blunted in fasted CD36(-/-) mice after cold exposure. These findings strongly suggest that CD36(-/-) mice exhibit pronounced hypothermia after fasting due to depletion of energy storage in BAT and glycolytic SkM and to reduced supply of energy substrates to these tissues. Our study underscores the importance of CD36 for nutrient homeostasis to survive potentially life-threatening challenges, such as cold and starvation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression of Selected Ginkgo biloba Heat Shock Protein Genes After Cold Treatment Could Be Induced by Other Abiotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fuliang; Cheng, Hua; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Linling; Xu, Feng; Yu, Wanwen; Yuan, Honghui

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play various stress-protective roles in plants. In this study, three HSP genes were isolated from a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of Ginkgo biloba leaves treated with cold stress. Based on the molecular weight, the three genes were designated GbHSP16.8, GbHSP17 and GbHSP70. The full length of the three genes were predicted to encode three polypeptide chains containing 149 amino acids (Aa), 152 Aa, and 657 Aa, and their corresponding molecular weights were predicted as follows: 16.67 kDa, 17.39 kDa, and 71.81 kDa respectively. The three genes exhibited distinctive expression patterns in different organs or development stages. GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70 showed high expression levels in leaves and a low level in gynoecia, GbHSP17 showed a higher transcription in stamens and lower level in fruit. This result indicates that GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70 may play important roles in Ginkgo leaf development and photosynthesis, and GbHSP17 may play a positive role in pollen maturation. All three GbHSPs were up-regulated under cold stress, whereas extreme heat stress only caused up-regulation of GbHSP70, UV-B treatment resulted in up-regulation of GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP17, wounding treatment resulted in up-regulation of GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70, and abscisic acid (ABA) treatment caused up-regulation of GbHSP70 primarily. PMID:22754330

  19. Simultaneous over-expression of PaSOD and RaAPX in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana confers cold stress tolerance through increase in vascular lignifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Amrina; Dogra, Vivek; Gill, Tejpal; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant enzymes play a significant role in eliminating toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated during stress from living cells. In the present study, two different antioxidant enzymes namely copper-zinc superoxide dismutase derived from Potentilla astrisanguinea (PaSOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (RaAPX) from Rheum austral both of which are high altitude cold niche area plants of Himalaya were cloned and simultaneously over-expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana to alleviate cold stress. It was found that the transgenic plants over-expressing both the genes were more tolerant to cold stress than either of the single gene expressing transgenic plants during growth and development. In both single (PaSOD, RaAPX) and double (PaSOD + RaAPX) transgenic plants higher levels of total antioxidant enzyme activities, chlorophyll content, total soluble sugars, proline content and lower levels of ROS, ion leakage were recorded when compared to the WT during cold stress (4°C), besides increase in yield. In the present study, Confocal and SEM analysis in conjunction with qPCR data on the expression pattern of lignin biosynthetic pathway genes revealed that the cold stress tolerance of the transgenic plants might be because of the peroxide induced up-regulation of lignin by antioxidant genes mediated triggering.

  20. Effects of acupuncturing Tsusanli (ST36) on expression of nitric oxide synthase in hypothalamus and adrenal gland in rats with cold stress ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jin-Ping; Pei, Hai-Tao; Jin, Xiang-Lan; Yin, Ling; Tian, Qing-Hua; Tian, Shu-Jun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effect of acupuncturing Tsusanli (ST36) on cold stress ulcer, and the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in hypothalamus and adrenal gland. METHODS: Ulcer index in rats and RT-PCR were used to study the protective effect of acupuncture on cold stress ulcer, and the expression of NOS in hypothalamus and adrenal gland. Images were analyzed with semi-quantitative method. RESULTS: The ulcer index significantly decreased in rats with stress ulcer. Plasma cortisol concentration was up regulated during cold stress, which could be depressed by pre-acupuncture. The expression of NOS1 in hypothalamus increased after acupuncture. The increased expression of NOS2 was related with stress ulcer, which could be decreased by acupuncture. The expression of NOS3 in hypothalamus was similar to NOS2, but the effect of acupuncture was limited. The expression of NOS2 and NOS3 in adrenal gland increased after cold stress, only the expression of NOS1 could be repressed with acupuncture. There was no NOS2 expression in adrenal gland in rats with stress ulcer. CONCLUSION: The protective effect of acupuncturing Tsusanli (ST36) on the expression of NOS in hypothalamus and adrenal gland can be achieved. PMID:16124046

  1. A nonparametric mean-variance smoothing method to assess Arabidopsis cold stress transcriptional regulator CBF2 overexpression microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pingsha; Maiti, Tapabrata

    2011-01-01

    Microarray is a powerful tool for genome-wide gene expression analysis. In microarray expression data, often mean and variance have certain relationships. We present a non-parametric mean-variance smoothing method (NPMVS) to analyze differentially expressed genes. In this method, a nonlinear smoothing curve is fitted to estimate the relationship between mean and variance. Inference is then made upon shrinkage estimation of posterior means assuming variances are known. Different methods have been applied to simulated datasets, in which a variety of mean and variance relationships were imposed. The simulation study showed that NPMVS outperformed the other two popular shrinkage estimation methods in some mean-variance relationships; and NPMVS was competitive with the two methods in other relationships. A real biological dataset, in which a cold stress transcription factor gene, CBF2, was overexpressed, has also been analyzed with the three methods. Gene ontology and cis-element analysis showed that NPMVS identified more cold and stress responsive genes than the other two methods did. The good performance of NPMVS is mainly due to its shrinkage estimation for both means and variances. In addition, NPMVS exploits a non-parametric regression between mean and variance, instead of assuming a specific parametric relationship between mean and variance. The source code written in R is available from the authors on request.

  2. A nonparametric mean-variance smoothing method to assess Arabidopsis cold stress transcriptional regulator CBF2 overexpression microarray data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingsha Hu

    Full Text Available Microarray is a powerful tool for genome-wide gene expression analysis. In microarray expression data, often mean and variance have certain relationships. We present a non-parametric mean-variance smoothing method (NPMVS to analyze differentially expressed genes. In this method, a nonlinear smoothing curve is fitted to estimate the relationship between mean and variance. Inference is then made upon shrinkage estimation of posterior means assuming variances are known. Different methods have been applied to simulated datasets, in which a variety of mean and variance relationships were imposed. The simulation study showed that NPMVS outperformed the other two popular shrinkage estimation methods in some mean-variance relationships; and NPMVS was competitive with the two methods in other relationships. A real biological dataset, in which a cold stress transcription factor gene, CBF2, was overexpressed, has also been analyzed with the three methods. Gene ontology and cis-element analysis showed that NPMVS identified more cold and stress responsive genes than the other two methods did. The good performance of NPMVS is mainly due to its shrinkage estimation for both means and variances. In addition, NPMVS exploits a non-parametric regression between mean and variance, instead of assuming a specific parametric relationship between mean and variance. The source code written in R is available from the authors on request.

  3. Inhibition of c-Kit signaling is associated with reduced heat and cold pain sensitivity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceko, Marta; Milenkovic, Nevena; le Coutre, Philipp; Westermann, Jörg; Lewin, Gary R

    2014-07-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptor c-Kit is critically involved in the modulation of nociceptive sensitivity in mice. Ablation of the c-Kit gene results in hyposensitivity to thermal pain, whereas activation of c-Kit produces hypersensitivity to noxious heat, without altering sensitivity to innocuous mechanical stimuli. In this study, we investigated the role of c-Kit signaling in human pain perception. We hypothesized that subjects treated with Imatinib or Nilotinib, potent inhibitors of tyrosine kinases including c-Kit but also Abl1, PDFGFRα, and PDFGFRβ, that are used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), would experience changes in thermal pain sensitivity. We examined 31 asymptomatic CML patients (14 male and 17 female) receiving Imatinib/Nilotinib treatment and compared them to 39 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (12 male and 27 female). We used cutaneous heat and cold stimulation to test normal and noxious thermal sensitivity, and a grating orientation task to assess tactile acuity. Thermal pain thresholds were significantly increased in the Imatinib/Nilotinib-treated group, whereas innocuous thermal and tactile thresholds were unchanged compared to those in the control group. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the biological effects of c-Kit inhibition are comparable in mice and humans in that c-Kit activity is required to regulate thermal pain sensitivity but does not affect innocuous thermal and mechanical sensation. The effect on experimental heat pain observed in our study is comparable to those of several common analgesics; thus modulation of the c-Kit pathway can be used to specifically modulate noxious heat and cold sensitivity in humans. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cold Responsive Gene Expression Profiling of Sugarcane and Saccharum spontaneum with Functional Analysis of a Cold Inducible Saccharum Homolog of NOD26-Like Intrinsic Protein to Salt and Water Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Won; Benatti, Thiago R; Marconi, Thiago; Yu, Qingyi; Solis-Gracia, Nora; Mora, Victoria; da Silva, Jorge A

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of sugarcane hybrid CP72-1210 (cold susceptible) and Saccharum spontaneum TUS05-05 (cold tolerant) using Sugarcane Assembled Sequences (SAS) from SUCEST-FUN Database showed that a total of 35,340 and 34,698 SAS genes, respectively, were expressed before and after chilling stress. The analysis revealed that more than 600 genes are differentially expressed in each genotype after chilling stress. Blast2Go annotation revealed that the major difference in gene expression profiles between CP72-1210 and TUS05-05 after chilling stress are present in the genes related to the transmembrane transporter activity. To further investigate the relevance of transmembrane transporter activity against abiotic stress tolerance, a S. spontaneum homolog of a NOD26-like major intrinsic protein gene (SspNIP2) was selected for functional analysis, of which expression was induced after chilling stress in the cold tolerant TUS05-05. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that SspNIP2 expression was increased ~2.5 fold at 30 minutes after cold treatment and stayed induced throughout the 24 hours of cold treatment. The amino acid sequence analysis of the cloned SspNIP2 confirmed the presence of six transmembrane domains and two NPA (Asn-Pro-Ala) motifs, signature features of major intrinsic protein families. Amino acid analysis confirmed that four amino acids, comprising the ar/R (aromatic residue/arginine) region responsible for the substrate specificity among MIPs, are conserved among monocot silicon transporters and SspNIP2. Salinity stress test on SspNIP2 transgenic tobacco plants resulted in more vigorous transgenic lines than the non-transgenic tobacco plants, suggesting some degree of tolerance to salt stress conferred by SspNIP2. SspNIP2-transgenic plants, exposed to 2 weeks of water stress without irrigation, developed various degrees of water stress symptom. The water stress test confirmed that the SspNIP2 transgenic lines had lower evapotranspiration rates than non

  5. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    KAUST Repository

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  6. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuz, Sarah; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation. PMID:27319358

  7. Fiber vs Rolling Texture: Stress State Dependence for Cold-Drawn Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorina, M. A.; Karabanalov, M. S.; Stepanov, S. I.; Demakov, S. L.; Loginov, Yu. N.; Lobanov, M. L.

    2018-02-01

    The texture of the cold-drawn copper wire was investigated along the radius using electron backscatter diffraction. The complex fiber texture of the central region of the wire was considered as the rolling texture consisting of a set of preferred orientations. The texture of the periphery region was revealed to be similar to the shear texture. The orientation-dependent properties of the wire were proven to be determined by the texture of the near-surface layers.

  8. Fiber vs Rolling Texture: Stress State Dependence for Cold-Drawn Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorina, M. A.; Karabanalov, M. S.; Stepanov, S. I.; Demakov, S. L.; Loginov, Yu. N.; Lobanov, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    The texture of the cold-drawn copper wire was investigated along the radius using electron backscatter diffraction. The complex fiber texture of the central region of the wire was considered as the rolling texture consisting of a set of preferred orientations. The texture of the periphery region was revealed to be similar to the shear texture. The orientation-dependent properties of the wire were proven to be determined by the texture of the near-surface layers.

  9. Sodic alkaline stress mitigation by exogenous melatonin in tomato needs nitric oxide as a downstream signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Na; Gong, Biao; Jin, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiufeng; Wei, Min; Yang, Fengjuan; Li, Yan; Shi, Qinghua

    2015-08-15

    The present study was designed to determine the interactive effect of exogenous melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) on sodic alkaline stress mitigation in tomato seedlings. It was observed that exogenous melatonin treatment elevated NO levels in alkaline-stressed tomato roots. However, exogenous NO had little effects on melatonin levels. Importantly, melatonin-induced NO generation was accompanied by increased tolerance to alkaline stress. Chemical scavenging of NO reduced melatonin-induced alkaline stress tolerance and defense genes' expression. However, inhibition of melatonin biosynthesis had a little effect on NO-induced alkaline stress tolerance. These results strongly suggest that NO, acting as a downstream signal, is involved in the melatonin-induced tomato tolerance to alkaline stress. This process creates a new signaling pathway for improving stress tolerance in plant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Cold Environment Exacerbates Brain Pathology and Oxidative Stress Following Traumatic Brain Injuries: Potential Therapeutic Effects of Nanowired Antioxidant Compound H-290/51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José Vicente; Sjöquist, Per-Ove; Patnaik, Ranjana; Ryan Tian, Z; Ozkizilcik, Asya; Sharma, Hari S

    2017-08-30

    The possibility that traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurring in a cold environment exacerbates brain pathology and oxidative stress was examined in our rat model. TBI was inflicted by making a longitudinal incision into the right parietal cerebral cortex (2 mm deep and 4 mm long) in cold-acclimatized rats (5 °C for 3 h daily for 5 weeks) or animals at room temperature under Equithesin anesthesia. TBI in cold-exposed rats exhibited pronounced increase in brain lucigenin (LCG), luminol (LUM), and malondialdehyde (MDA) and marked pronounced decrease in glutathione (GTH) as compared to identical TBI at room temperature. The magnitude and intensity of BBB breakdown to radioiodine and Evans blue albumin, edema formation, and neuronal injuries were also exacerbated in cold-exposed rats after injury as compared to room temperature. Nanowired delivery of H-290/51 (50 mg/kg) 6 and 8 h after injury in cold-exposed group significantly thwarted brain pathology and oxidative stress whereas normal delivery of H-290/51 was neuroprotective after TBI at room temperature only. These observations are the first to demonstrate that (i) cold aggravates the pathophysiology of TBI possibly due to an enhanced production of oxidative stress, (ii) and in such conditions, nanodelivery of antioxidant compound has superior neuroprotective effects, not reported earlier.

  11. Precursor Evolution and Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation of Cold-Worked Alloy 690 in Simulated Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Ziqing [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Toloczko, Mychailo [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Kruska, Karen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.; Bruemmer, Stephen [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 622 Horn Rapids Road, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352.

    2017-05-22

    Stress corrosion crack initiation of two thermally-treated, cold-worked (CW) alloy 690 (UNS N06690) materials was investigated in 360oC simulated PWR primary water using constant load tensile (CLT) tests and blunt notch compact tension (BNCT) tests equipped with direct current potential drop (DCPD) for in-situ detection of cracking. SCC initiation was not detected by DCPD for either the 21% or 31%CW CLT specimens loaded at their yield stress after ~9,220 hours, however intergranular (IG) precursor damage and isolated surface cracks were observed on the specimens. The two 31%CW BNCT specimens loaded at moderate stress intensity after several cyclic loading ramps showed DCPD-indicated crack initiation after 10,400 hours of exposure at constant stress intensity, which was resulted from significant growth of IG cracks. The 21%CW BNCT specimens only exhibited isolated small IG surface cracks and showed no apparent DCPD change throughout the test. Post-test cross-section examinations revealed many grain boundary (GB) nano-cavities in the bulk of all the CLT and BNCT specimens particularly for the 31%CW materials. Cavities were also found along GBs extending to the surface suggesting an important role in crack nucleation. This paper provides an overview of the evolution of GB cavities and discusses their effects on crack initiation in CW alloy 690.

  12. Dysregulated stress signal sensitivity and inflammatory disinhibition as a pathophysiological mechanism of stress-related chronic fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahler, Jana; Skoluda, Nadine; Rohleder, Nicolas; Nater, Urs M

    2016-09-01

    Chronic stress and its subsequent effects on biological stress systems have long been recognized as predisposing and perpetuating factors in chronic fatigue, although the exact mechanisms are far from being completely understood. In this review, we propose that sensitivity of immune cells to glucocorticoids (GCs) and catecholamines (CATs) may be the missing link in elucidating how stress turns into chronic fatigue. We searched for in vitro studies investigating the impact of GCs or CATs on mitogen-stimulated immune cells in chronically stressed or fatigued populations, with 34 original studies fulfilling our inclusion criteria. Besides mixed cross-sectional findings for stress- and fatigue-related changes of GC sensitivity under basal conditions or acute stress, longitudinal studies indicate a decrease with ongoing stress. Research on CATs is still scarce, but initial findings point towards a reduction of CAT sensitivity under chronic stress. In the long run, resistance of immune cells to stress signals under conditions of chronic stress might translate into self-maintaining inflammation and inflammatory disinhibition under acute stress, which in turn lead to fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. De novo transcriptome sequencing of Isaria cateniannulata and comparative analysis of gene expression in response to heat and cold stresses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingfeng Wang

    Full Text Available Isaria cateniannulata is a very important and virulent entomopathogenic fungus that infects many insect pest species. Although I. cateniannulata is commonly exposed to extreme environmental temperature conditions, little is known about its molecular response mechanism to temperature stress. Here, we sequenced and de novo assembled the transcriptome of I. cateniannulata in response to high and low temperature stresses using Illumina RNA-Seq technology. Our assembly encompassed 17,514 unigenes (mean length = 1,197 bp, in which 11,445 unigenes (65.34% showed significant similarities to known sequences in NCBI non-redundant protein sequences (Nr database. Using digital gene expression analysis, 4,483 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified after heat treatment, including 2,905 up-regulated genes and 1,578 down-regulated genes. Under cold stress, 1,927 DEGs were identified, including 1,245 up-regulated genes and 682 down-regulated genes. The expression patterns of 18 randomly selected candidate DEGs resulting from quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR were consistent with their transcriptome analysis results. Although DEGs were involved in many pathways, we focused on the genes that were involved in endocytosis: In heat stress, the pathway of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE was active; however at low temperature stresses, the pathway of clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE was active. Besides, four categories of DEGs acting as temperature sensors were observed, including cell-wall-major-components-metabolism-related (CWMCMR genes, heat shock protein (Hsp genes, intracellular-compatible-solutes-metabolism-related (ICSMR genes and glutathione S-transferase (GST. These results enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of I. cateniannulata in response to temperature stresses and provide a valuable resource for the future investigations.

  14. Performance of stress-laminated timber highway bridges in cold climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Wacker

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes recent laboratory and field data studies on thermal performance of stress-laminated timber highway bridges. Concerns about the reliability of stress-laminated deck bridges when exposed to sub-freezing temperatures triggered several investigations. Two laboratory studies were conducted to study the effects of wood species, preservative, moisture...

  15. Strand specific RNA-sequencing and membrane lipid profiling reveals growth phase-dependent cold stress response mechanisms in Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingston, Patricia; Chen, Jessica; Allen, Kevin; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes continues to pose a challenge in the food industry, where it is known to contaminate ready-to-eat foods and grow during refrigerated storage. Increased knowledge of the cold-stress response of this pathogen will enhance the ability to control it in the food-supply-chain. This study utilized strand-specific RNA sequencing and whole cell fatty acid (FA) profiling to characterize the bacterium’s cold stress response. RNA and FAs were extracted from a cold-tolerant strain at five time points between early lag phase and late stationary-phase, both at 4°C and 20°C. Overall, more genes (1.3×) were suppressed than induced at 4°C. Late stationary-phase cells exhibited the greatest number (n = 1,431) and magnitude (>1,000-fold) of differentially expressed genes (>2-fold, pmonocytogenes, the growth-phase dependency of its cold-stress regulon, and the active roles of antisense transcripts in regulating its cold stress response. PMID:28662112

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction in oxidative stress : On the impact of neuronal KCa channels & calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honrath, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondriale dysfunctie in oxidatieve stress – over de impact van neuronale KCa kanalen en calcium signalering in neurodegeneratie (246 words) Neurodegeneratieve ziektes, zoals de ziekte van Alzheimer of Parkinson, worden gekarakteriseerd door een verlies van neuronen in verschillende

  17. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses. PMID:26103991

  18. A New Approach to Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Signaling during Labour in Healthy Mothers and Neonates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Díaz-Castro, Javier; Florido, Jesus; Kajarabille, Naroa; Prados, Sonia; de Paco, Catalina; Ocon, Olga; Pulido-Moran, Mario; Ochoa, Julio J

    2015-01-01

      The objective of the current study was to investigate for the first time and simultaneously the oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling induced during the delivery in healthy mothers and their neonates...

  19. A new approach to oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling during labour in healthy mothers and neonates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Díaz-Castro, Javier; Florido, Jesus; Kajarabille, Naroa; Prados, Sonia; de Paco, Catalina; Ocon, Olga; Pulido-Moran, Mario; Ochoa, Julio J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate for the first time and simultaneously the oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling induced during the delivery in healthy mothers and their neonates...

  20. CALCULATION OF RESIDUAL STRESSES RESULTING FROM BENDING OF COLD FORMED STEEL BARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökmen ATLIHAN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the residual stresses in the forming of the seed capsule which used in manifacturing the ferforje was carried out. These residual stresses were made up in the process which bars with 8 mm diameter were converted to 6 x 6 mm2 square profiles. This process was actually a Rolling process performed at three levels. Plastic constant and strain hardening parameter were calculated at each level . Then, elasto-plastic stress analysis of the bar subjected to bending was analzed by means of Newton Cotes formulation. The load value that cause residual stresses on the steel bar was assumed to be constant in elasto-plastic analysis. Elastic, plastic and residual stresses under the load value were determined in each level and results were presented in the graphical format.

  1. The hidden cost of housing practices: using noninvasive imaging to quantify the metabolic demands of chronic cold stress of laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, John M; Chatziioannou, Arion F; Taschereau, Richard; Wang, Hongkai; Stout, David B

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory mice routinely are housed at 20 to 22 °C-well below the murine thermoneutral zone of 29 to 34 °C. Chronic cold stress requires greater energy expenditure to maintain core body temperature and can lead to the failure of mouse models to emulate human physiology. We hypothesized that mice housed at ambient temperatures of 20 to 22 °C are chronically cold-stressed, have greater energy expenditure, and have high glucose utilization in brown adipose tissue. To test our hypotheses, we used indirect calorimetry to measure energy expenditure and substrate utilization in C57BL/6J and Crl:NU-Foxn1(nu) nude mice at routine vivarium (21 °C), intermediate (26 °C), and heated (31 °C) housing temperatures. We also examined the activation of interscapular brown adipose tissue, the primary site of nonshivering thermogenesis, via thermography and glucose uptake in this region by using positron emission tomography. Energy expenditure of mice was significantly higher at routine vivarium temperatures compared with intermediate and heated temperatures and was associated with a shift in metabolism toward glucose utilization. Brown adipose tissue showed significant activation at routine vivarium and intermediate temperatures in both hirsuite and nude mice. Crl:NU-Foxn1(nu) mice experienced greater cold stress than did C57BL/6J mice. Our data indicate mice housed under routine vivarium conditions are chronically cold stress. This novel use of thermography can measure cold stress in laboratory mice housed in vivaria, a key advantage over classic metabolic measurement tools. Therefore, thermography is an ideal tool to evaluate novel husbandry practices designed to alleviate murine cold stress.

  2. Stress activates pronociceptive endogenous opioid signalling in DRG neurons during chronic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Alba, Raquel; Valdez-Morales, Eduardo E; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Lopez-Lopez, Cintya; Jaramillo-Polanco, Josue; Okamoto, Takanobu; Nasser, Yasmin; Bunnett, Nigel W; Lomax, Alan E; Vanner, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Psychological stress accompanies chronic inflammatory diseases such as IBD, and stress hormones can exacerbate pain signalling. In contrast, the endogenous opioid system has an important analgesic action during chronic inflammation. This study examined the interaction of these pathways. Mouse nociceptive dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons were incubated with supernatants from segments of inflamed colon collected from patients with chronic UC and mice with dextran sodium sulfate (cDSS)-induced chronic colitis. Stress effects were studied by adding stress hormones (epinephrine and corticosterone) to dissociated neurons or by exposing cDSS mice to water avoidance stress. Changes in excitability of colonic DRG nociceptors were measured using patch clamp and Ca2+ imaging techniques. Supernatants from patients with chronic UC and from colons of mice with chronic colitis caused a naloxone-sensitive inhibition of neuronal excitability and capsaicin-evoked Ca2+ responses. Stress hormones decreased signalling induced by human and mouse supernatants. This effect resulted from stress hormones signalling directly to DRG neurons and indirectly through signalling to the immune system, leading to decreased opioid levels and increased acute inflammation. The net effect of stress was a change endogenous opioid signalling in DRG neurons from an inhibitory to an excitatory effect. This switch was associated with a change in G protein-coupled receptor excitatory signalling to a pathway sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase A-protein, phospholipase C-protein and G protein βϒ subunits. Stress hormones block the inhibitory actions of endogenous opioids and can change the effect of opioid signalling in DRG neurons to excitation. Targeting these pathways may prevent heavy opioid use in IBD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Evaluation of the dark signal performance of different SiPM-technologies under irradiation with cold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durini, Daniel, E-mail: d.durini@fz-juelich.de [Central Institute of Engineering, Electronics and Analytics ZEA-2 – Electronic Systems, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Degenhardt, Carsten; Rongen, Heinz [Central Institute of Engineering, Electronics and Analytics ZEA-2 – Electronic Systems, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Feoktystov, Artem [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Schlösser, Mario; Palomino-Razo, Alejandro [Central Institute of Engineering, Electronics and Analytics ZEA-2 – Electronic Systems, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Frielinghaus, Henrich [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Lichtenbergstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Waasen, Stefan van [Central Institute of Engineering, Electronics and Analytics ZEA-2 – Electronic Systems, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we report the results of the assessment of changes in the dark signal delivered by three silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detector arrays, fabricated by three different manufacturers, when irradiated with cold neutrons (wavelength λ{sub n}=5 Å or neutron energy of E{sub n}=3.27 meV) up to a neutron dose of 6×10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2}. The dark signals as well as the breakdown voltages (V{sub br}) of the SiPM detectors were monitored during the irradiation. The system was characterized at room temperature. The analog SiPM detectors, with and without a 1 mm thick Cerium doped {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator material located in front of them, were operated using a bias voltage recommended by the respective manufacturer for a proper detector performance. I{sub out}-V{sub bias} measurements, used to determine the breakdown voltage of the devices, were repeated every 30 s during the first hour and every 300 s during the rest of the irradiation time. The digital SiPM detectors were held at the advised bias voltage between the respective breakdown voltage and dark count mappings repeated every 4 min. The measurements were performed on the KWS-1 instrument of the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ) in Garching, Germany. The two analog and one digital SiPM detector modules under investigation were respectively fabricated by SensL (Ireland), Hamamatsu Photonics (Japan), and Philips Digital Photon Counting (Germany).

  4. PprM, a Cold Shock Domain-Containing Protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, Confers Oxidative Stress Tolerance to Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Ha; Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Jeong, Sunwook; Choi, Yong Jun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Narumi, Issay; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a representative microorganism that is frequently used for industrial biotechnology; thus its cellular robustness should be enhanced for the widespread application of E. coli in biotechnology. Stress response genes from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans have been used to enhance the stress tolerance of E. coli. In the present study, we introduced the cold shock domain-containing protein PprM from D. radiodurans into E. coli and observed that the tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was significantly increased in recombinant strains (Ec-PprM). The overexpression of PprM in E. coli elevated the expression of some OxyR-dependent genes, which play important roles in oxidative stress tolerance. Particularly, mntH (manganese transporter) was activated by 9-fold in Ec-PprM, even in the absence of H2O2 stress, which induced a more than 2-fold increase in the Mn/Fe ratio compared with wild type. The reduced production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and low protein carbonylation levels (a marker of oxidative damage) in Ec-PprM indicate that the increase in the Mn/Fe ratio contributes to the protection of cells from H2O2 stress. PprM also conferred H2O2 tolerance to E. coli in the absence of OxyR. We confirmed that the H2O2 tolerance of oxyR mutants reflected the activation of the ycgZ-ymgABC operon, whose expression is activated by H2O2 in an OxyR-independent manner. Thus, the results of the present study showed that PprM could be exploited to improve the robustness of E. coli.

  5. PprM, a Cold Shock Domain-Containing Protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, Confers Oxidative Stress Tolerance to Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Ha; Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Jeong, Sunwook; Choi, Yong Jun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Narumi, Issay; Lim, Sangyong

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a representative microorganism that is frequently used for industrial biotechnology; thus its cellular robustness should be enhanced for the widespread application of E. coli in biotechnology. Stress response genes from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans have been used to enhance the stress tolerance of E. coli. In the present study, we introduced the cold shock domain-containing protein PprM from D. radiodurans into E. coli and observed that the tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was significantly increased in recombinant strains (Ec-PprM). The overexpression of PprM in E. coli elevated the expression of some OxyR-dependent genes, which play important roles in oxidative stress tolerance. Particularly, mntH (manganese transporter) was activated by 9-fold in Ec-PprM, even in the absence of H2O2 stress, which induced a more than 2-fold increase in the Mn/Fe ratio compared with wild type. The reduced production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and low protein carbonylation levels (a marker of oxidative damage) in Ec-PprM indicate that the increase in the Mn/Fe ratio contributes to the protection of cells from H2O2 stress. PprM also conferred H2O2 tolerance to E. coli in the absence of OxyR. We confirmed that the H2O2 tolerance of oxyR mutants reflected the activation of the ycgZ-ymgABC operon, whose expression is activated by H2O2 in an OxyR-independent manner. Thus, the results of the present study showed that PprM could be exploited to improve the robustness of E. coli. PMID:28119668

  6. Comparative proteomic and metabolomic analyses reveal mechanisms of improved cold stress tolerance in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.) by exogenous calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitao; Ye, Tiantian; Zhong, Bao; Liu, Xun; Chan, Zhulong

    2014-11-01

    As an important second messenger, calcium is involved in plant cold stress response, including chilling (stress tolerances, while ethylene glycol-bis-(β-aminoethyl) ether-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) reversed CaCl2 effects in bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.). Physiological analyses showed that CaCl2 treatment alleviated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst and cell damage triggered by chilling stress, via activating antioxidant enzymes, non-enzymatic glutathione antioxidant pool, while EGTA treatment had the opposite effects. Additionally, comparative proteomic analysis identified 51 differentially expressed proteins that were enriched in redox, tricarboxylicacid cycle, glycolysis, photosynthesis, oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and amino acid metabolisms. Consistently, 42 metabolites including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, and sugar alcohols were regulated by CaCl2 treatment under control and cold stress conditions, further confirming the common modulation of CaCl2 treatment in carbon metabolites and amino acid metabolism. Taken together, this study reported first evidence of the essential and protective roles of endogenous and exogenous calcium in bermudagrass response to cold stress, partially via activation of the antioxidants and modulation of several differentially expressed proteins and metabolic homeostasis in the process of cold acclimation. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Soapwort extract supplementation alters antioxidant status of serum, liver and heart tissues in growing Japanese quails reared under chronic intermittent cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestami Dalkilic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant effect of dietary soapwort extract supplementation was studied in growing Japanese quails suffering from chronic intermittent cold stress. For this purpose, a total of ninety 15-d-old quails were divided into three groups with three replicates. Chronic intermittent cold stress was applied every night between 22.00 to 06.00 h; starting at 14 °C for the first week, and gradually weekly lowered to 8 °C. Three groups were fed with corn-soy based standard diets supplemented with 0, 50, and 100 ppm soapwort extract for four weeks. At the end of the study, three males and three females were slaughtered to determine total antioxidant and oxidant status of serum, malondialdehyde, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase activity, superoxide dismutase of liver and heart tissues. Although the dietary soapwort extract had no effect on serum total antioxidant capacity, it significantly lowered the total oxidant status of serum in cold stressed quails. Glutathione and superoxide dismutase enzyme activity of liver and heart tissues were similar among groups. While the dietary soapwort extract had no effect on glutathione peroxidase activity of the heart tissue, it significantly increased glutathione peroxidase activity in the liver tissue. In relation to the control group, malondialdehyde concentrations in the liver and heart tissues were significantly lower in soapwort extract groups. These data suggest that dietary soapwort extract could alleviate the detrimental effects of oxidative stress in growing Japanese quails exposed to cold stress.

  8. Lumped-parameter tissue temperature-blood perfusion model of a cold-stressed fingertip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitzer, A; Stroschein, L A; Gonzalez, R R; Pandolf, K B

    1996-05-01

    A lumped-parameter model of a fingertip is presented. The semispherical model includes the effects of heat storage, heat exchange with the environment, and heat transport by blood perfusion. The thermal insulation on the surface of the fingertip is represented by the overall heat transfer coefficient that is calculated by common engineering formulas. The model is solved analytically for the simple case of constant blood perfusion rate. The general case of variable blood perfusion rates is solved by an Euler finite difference technique. At this stage, the model does not include active control mechanisms of blood perfusion. Thus the effects of cold-induced vasodilatation have to be superimposed and are modeled by symmetrical triangular waveforms because these were found to best depict the behavior of fingers exposed to cold environments. Results of this model were compared with experimental data obtained in two separate studies. One included 60-min infrared thermograms of the dorsal surface of bare hands of sedentary subjects horizontally suspended on a fish net in a 0 degree C environment. Another study, on gloved finger temperatures, involved 0 and -6.7 degrees C environments. Fingertip (nail bed) temperatures of both these studies were compared with model predictions. Blood perfusion rates were assumed and adjusted within physiologically reasonable limits. Comparison of measured and computed temperature records showed very good conformity in both cases studied.

  9. Brassinosteroids accelerate recovery of photosynthetic apparatus from cold stress by balancing the electron partitioning, carboxylation and redox homeostasis in cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu-Ping; Huang, Li-Feng; Cheng, Fei; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Mao, Wei-Hua; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of brassinosteroids (BRs) in protecting the photosynthetic apparatus from cold-induced damage in cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants. Recovery at both high light (HL) and low light (LL) after a cooling at 10/7°C induced irreversible inhibition of CO2 assimilation, photoinhibition at photosystem I (PSI) and inhibition of enzyme activities of Calvin cycle and ascorbate (AsA)-reduced glutathione (GSH) cycle, followed by accumulation of H2 O2 and malondialdehyde. However, cold-induced photoinhibition at PSII was fully recovered at LL but not at HL. Meanwhile, recovery at HL increased electron flux to O2 -dependent alternative pathway [Ja(O2 -dependent)]. Foliar application of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) accelerated recovery from photoinhibition of PSII but not of PSI. EBR also significantly increased CO2 assimilation, activity of Calvin cycle enzymes and electron flux to carbon reduction [Je(PCR)], with a concomitant decrease in Ja(O2 -dependent); meanwhile EBR increased the activity of enzymes in AsA-GSH cycle and cellular redox states. However, the positive effect of EBR on plant recovery was observed only at HL, but not LL. These results indicate that BR accelerates the recovery of photosynthetic apparatus at HL by activation of enzymes in Calvin cycle and increasing the antioxidant capacity, which in turn mitigate the photooxidative stress and the inhibition of plant growth during the recovery. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  10. Redox Signaling and CBF-Responsive Pathway are Involved in Salicylic Acid-Improved Photosynthesis and Growth under Chilling Stress in Watermelon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Salicylic acid (SA plays an important role in plant response to abiotic stresses. This study investigated the potential role of SA in alleviating the adverse effects of chilling stress on photosynthesis and growth in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus. Chilling stress induced the simultaneous accumulation of free and conjugated SA in watermelon plants, and the chilling-induced SA production was attributed to the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase pathway. Applying SA at moderate concentrations induced chilling tolerance, whereas inhibition of SA biosynthesis by L-ɑ-aminooxy-β-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP increased the photooxidation of PS II under chilling stress in watermelon, resulting in reduced photosynthesis and growth. Chilling induced a transient increase in the ratios of reduced to oxidized glutathione and reduced ascorbate to dehydroascorbate. Then, the expression of antioxidant genes was upregulated, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, SA-induced chilling tolerance was associated with cellular glutathione and ascorbate homeostasis, which served as redox signals to regulate antioxidant metabolism under chilling stress. AOPP treatment stimulated the chilling-induced expression of cold-responsive genes, particularly via C-repeat binding factors CBF3 and CBF4. These results confirm the synergistic role of SA signaling and the CBF-dependent responsive pathway during chilling stress in watermelon.

  11. VaCPK20, a calcium-dependent protein kinase gene of wild grapevine Vitis amurensis Rupr., mediates cold and drought stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovina, Alexandra S; Kiselev, Konstantin V; Khristenko, Valeriya S; Aleynova, Olga A

    2015-08-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity, cold and heat, are major environmental factors that limit crop productivity. Vitis amurensis Rupr. is a wild grapevine species displaying a high level of abiotic and biotic stress resistance. Protein kinases, including Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), are known to mediate plant acclimation to various environmental changes. However, the functions of most grape CDPKs have not been clarified. A recent CDPK gene expression analysis revealed that 10 CDPK genes of V. amurensis were up-regulated under different abiotic stress treatments. The expression of the VaCPK20 gene was significantly up-regulated under low and high temperature stress in V. amurensis. In the current study, the effects of overexpressing the VaCPK20 gene in callus cell lines of V. amurensis and transgenic plants of A. thaliana on their responses to abiotic stresses were investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing the VaCPK20 gene showed higher tolerance to freezing and drought stresses, and transgenic grape cell cultures overexpressing the VaCPK20 gene showed higher resistance to cold stress in comparison with the controls transformed by the "empty" vector. Heat and salt stress resistance of the transgenic V. amurensis calli and A. thaliana was comparable to that of the wild type and vector controls. Overexpression of the VaCPK20 gene increased the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as COR47, NHX1, KIN1, or ABF3, in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants under non-stress conditions, after freezing, and under drought stress. The results imply that VaCPK20 may act as a regulatory factor involved in cold and drought stress response pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterizing the effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking of cold worked Alloy 690 in supercritical water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lefu; Chen, Kai; Du, Donghai; Gao, Wenhua; Andresen, Peter L.; Guo, Xianglong

    2017-08-01

    The effect of creep on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was studied by measuring crack growth rates (CGRs) of 30% cold worked (CW) Alloy 690 in supercritical water (SCW) and inert gas environments at temperatures ranging from 450 °C to 550 °C. The SCC crack growth rate under SCW environments can be regarded as the cracking induced by the combined effect of corrosion and creep, while the CGR in inert gas environment can be taken as the portion of creep induced cracking. Results showed that the CW Alloy 690 sustained high susceptibility to intergranular (IG) cracking, and creep played a dominant role in the SCC crack growth behavior, contributing more than 80% of the total crack growth rate at each testing temperature. The temperature dependence of creep induced CGRs follows an Arrhenius dependency, with an apparent activation energy (QE) of about 225 kJ/mol.

  13. [Reactive oxygen species and stress signaling in plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolupaev, Iu E; Karpets, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    Data on the basic processes and the compartments, involved in formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells, are generalised. The features of structure and regulation of NADPH-oxidase as the one of main enzymatic producers of ROS are characterized. The two-component histidine kinases, ROS-sensitive transcript-factors, ROS-sensitive protein kinase and redox-regulated ionic channels are discussed as the possible sensors of redox-signals in plant cells. The interaction between ROS and other signal mediators, in particular nitric oxide and calcium ions, is discussed. The ROS role as the signal mediators in the development of plant resistance to hyperthermia, osmotic shock and other abiotic stressors is analyzed.

  14. Chilling Out With Colds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a little earlier for a few nights. De-stress. Kids who are stressed out feel worse when they have colds. Relax and use the time to read, listen to music, or watch a movie. In other words, chill ...

  15. Aluminum stress and its role in the phospholipid signaling pathway in plants and possible biotechnological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poot-Poot, Wilberth; Hernandez-Sotomayor, Soledad M Teresa

    2011-10-01

    An early response of plants to environmental signals or abiotic stress suggests that the phospholipid signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in these mechanisms. The phospholipid signaling cascade is one of the main systems of cellular transduction and is related to other signal transduction mechanisms. These other mechanisms include the generation of second messengers and their interactions with various proteins, such as ion channels. This phospholipid signaling cascade is activated by changes in the environment, such as phosphate starvation, water, metals, saline stres, and plant-pathogen interactions. One important factor that impacts agricultural crops is metal-induced stress. Because aluminum has been considered to be a major toxic factor for agriculture conducted in acidic soils, many researchers have focused on understanding the mechanisms of aluminum toxicity in plants. We have contributed the last fifteen years in this field by studying the effects of aluminum on phospholipid signaling in coffee, one of the Mexico's primary crops. We have focused our research on aluminum toxicity mechanisms in Coffea arabica suspension cells as a model for developing future contributions to the biotechnological transformation of coffee crops such that they can be made resistant to aluminum toxicity. We conclude that aluminum is able to not only generate a signal cascade in plants but also modulate other signal cascades generated by other types of stress in plants. The aim of this review is to discuss possible involvement of the phospholipid signaling pathway in the aluminum toxicity response of plant cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Oxidative Stress Promotes Peroxiredoxin Hyperoxidation and Attenuates Pro-survival Signaling in Aging Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John A; Wood, Scott T; Nelson, Kimberly J; Rowe, Meredith A; Carlson, Cathy S; Chubinskaya, Susan; Poole, Leslie B; Furdui, Cristina M; Loeser, Richard F

    2016-03-25

    Oxidative stress-mediated post-translational modifications of redox-sensitive proteins are postulated as a key mechanism underlying age-related cellular dysfunction and disease progression. Peroxiredoxins (PRX) are critical intracellular antioxidants that also regulate redox signaling events. Age-related osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aging and oxidative stress on chondrocyte intracellular signaling, with a specific focus on oxidation of cytosolic PRX2 and mitochondrial PRX3. Menadione was used as a model to induce cellular oxidative stress. Compared with chondrocytes isolated from young adult humans, chondrocytes from older adults exhibited higher levels of PRX1-3 hyperoxidation basally and under conditions of oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was associated with inhibition of pro-survival Akt signaling and stimulation of pro-death p38 signaling. These changes were prevented in cultured human chondrocytes by adenoviral expression of catalase targeted to the mitochondria (MCAT) and in cartilage explants from MCAT transgenic mice. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was observedin situin human cartilage sections from older adults and in osteoarthritic cartilage. MCAT transgenic mice exhibited less age-related osteoarthritis. These findings demonstrate that age-related oxidative stress can disrupt normal physiological signaling and contribute to osteoarthritis and suggest peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation as a potential mechanism. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Phosphatidic acid: a multifunctional stress-signalling lipid in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Testerink, C.; Munnik, T.

    2005-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) has only recently been identified as an important signaling molecule in both plants and animals. Nonetheless, it already promises to rival the importance of the classic second messengers Ca(2+) and cAMP. In plants, its formation is triggered in response to various biotic and

  18. Phosphatidic acid, a versatile water-stress signal in roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLoughlin, F.; Testerink, C.

    2013-01-01

    Adequate water supply is of utmost importance for growth and reproduction of plants. In order to cope with water deprivation, plants have to adapt their development and metabolism to ensure survival. To maximize water use efficiency, plants use a large array of signaling mediators such as hormones,

  19. Phosphoinositides and lipid kinases in oxidative stress signalling and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keune, W.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are implicated in virtually all aspects of cellular welfare. They help to maintain the structure of biomembranes, but are also essential signal transduction molecules. This is illustrated by PtdIns(4,5)P2, a versatile and important phosphoinositide that regulates many cellular

  20. Global Plant Stress Signaling: Reactive Oxygen Species at the Cross-Road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewelam, Nasser; Kazan, Kemal; Schenk, Peer M

    2016-01-01

    Current technologies have changed biology into a data-intensive field and significantly increased our understanding of signal transduction pathways in plants. However, global defense signaling networks in plants have not been established yet. Considering the apparent intricate nature of signaling mechanisms in plants (due to their sessile nature), studying the points at which different signaling pathways converge, rather than the branches, represents a good start to unravel global plant signaling networks. In this regard, growing evidence shows that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the most common plant responses to different stresses, representing a point at which various signaling pathways come together. In this review, the complex nature of plant stress signaling networks will be discussed. An emphasis on different signaling players with a specific attention to ROS as the primary source of the signaling battery in plants will be presented. The interactions between ROS and other signaling components, e.g., calcium, redox homeostasis, membranes, G-proteins, MAPKs, plant hormones, and transcription factors will be assessed. A better understanding of the vital roles ROS are playing in plant signaling would help innovate new strategies to improve plant productivity under the circumstances of the increasing severity of environmental conditions and the high demand of food and energy worldwide.

  1. Cellular stress response and innate immune signaling: integrating pathways in host defense and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Sujatha; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research in the past decade has identified innate immune recognition receptors and intracellular signaling pathways that culminate in inflammatory responses. Besides its role in cytoprotection, the importance of cell stress in inflammation and host defense against pathogens is emerging. Recent studies have shown that proteins in cellular stress responses, including the heat shock response, ER stress response, and DNA damage response, interact with and regulate signaling intermediates involved in the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The effect of such regulation by cell stress proteins may dictate the inflammatory profile of the immune response during infection and disease. In this review, we describe the regulation of innate immune cell activation by cell stress pathways, present detailed descriptions of the types of stress response proteins and their crosstalk with immune signaling intermediates that are essential in host defense, and illustrate the relevance of these interactions in diseases characteristic of aberrant immune responses, such as chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Understanding the crosstalk between cellular stress proteins and immune signaling may have translational implications for designing more effective regimens to treat immune disorders. PMID:23990626

  2. Molecular analysis of the role of osmolyte transporters opuCA and betL in Listeria monocytogenes after cold and freezing stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi, Hanene; Elabed, Hamouda; Ben Slama, Rihab; Rhim, Amel; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2017-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of humans and other animals. The striking ability to survive several stresses usually used for food preservation makes L. monocytogenes one of the biggest concerns to the food industry. This ubiquity can be partly explained by the ability of the organism to grow and persist at very low temperatures, a consequence of its ability to accumulate cryoprotective compound called osmolytes. A quantitative RT-PCR assay was used to measure mRNA transcript accumulation for the stress response genes opuCA and betL (encoding carnitine and betaine transporters, respectively) and the housekeeping gene 16S rRNA. Assays were conducted on mid-exponential phase L. monocytogenes cells exposed to conditions reflecting cold and freezing stress, conditions usually used to preserve foods. We showed that expression of the two cold-adapted genes encoded the transporters of the cryoprotectants carnitine and betaine in ATCC 19115 and the food-isolated L. monocytogenes S1 is induced after cold and freezing stress exposure. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis of the genes encoding opuCA and betL revealed that each transporter is induced to different degrees upon cold shock of L. monocytogenes ATCC 19115 and S1. Our results confirm an increase in carnitine uptake at low temperatures more than in betaine after cold-shocked temperature compared to the non-stress control treatment. It was concluded the use of carnitine and betaine as cryoprotectants is essential for rapid induction of the tested stress response under conditions typically encountered during food preservation.

  3. Oxidative stress in fungi: its function in signal transduction, interaction with plant hosts, and lignocellulose degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenbach, Michael; Weber, Manuela; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Karl, Thomas; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore

    2015-04-03

    In this review article, we want to present an overview of oxidative stress in fungal cells in relation to signal transduction, interaction of fungi with plant hosts, and lignocellulose degradation. We will discuss external oxidative stress which may occur through the interaction with other microorganisms or plant hosts as well as internally generated oxidative stress, which can for instance originate from NADPH oxidases or "leaky" mitochondria and may be modulated by the peroxiredoxin system or by protein disulfide isomerases thus contributing to redox signaling. Analyzing redox signaling in fungi with the tools of molecular genetics is presently only in its beginning. However, it is already clear that redox signaling in fungal cells often is linked to cell differentiation (like the formation of perithecia), virulence (in plant pathogens), hyphal growth and the successful passage through the stationary phase.

  4. Oxidative Stress in Fungi: Its Function in Signal Transduction, Interaction with Plant Hosts, and Lignocellulose Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Breitenbach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, we want to present an overview of oxidative stress in fungal cells in relation to signal transduction, interaction of fungi with plant hosts, and lignocellulose degradation. We will discuss external oxidative stress which may occur through the interaction with other microorganisms or plant hosts as well as internally generated oxidative stress, which can for instance originate from NADPH oxidases or “leaky” mitochondria and may be modulated by the peroxiredoxin system or by protein disulfide isomerases thus contributing to redox signaling. Analyzing redox signaling in fungi with the tools of molecular genetics is presently only in its beginning. However, it is already clear that redox signaling in fungal cells often is linked to cell differentiation (like the formation of perithecia, virulence (in plant pathogens, hyphal growth and the successful passage through the stationary phase.

  5. Investigation of Stress Intensity Factor for Overloaded Holes and Cold-Expanded Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    the elastic stress in the neighbourhood of a circular hole in a finite-width plate, taken from Howland [31], is used: w...1 ) / ) n n n nn n l R x w n n m R x w           where are coefficients defined in Howland [31], , , ,n n nm d e ln re is the...Plastic Deformation Aspects of Fatigue Crack Growth, ASTM STP 637, ASTM, pp 153–175, 1977. 31. RCJ Howland . On the stresses in the neighbourhood of a

  6. Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

    KAUST Repository

    Yun, Kil-Young

    2010-01-25

    Background: The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10C), an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach.Results: Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters.Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters.Conclusion: Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries. 2010 Yun et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  7. Relaxation phenomena of electrical signal emissions from rock following application of abrupt mechanical stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Hloupis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The emission of electrical signals during application of mechanical stress to brittle geo-materials (the so-called pressure-stimulated current; PSC can provide significant information regarding the mechanical status of a studied rock sample. PSCs originate as a result of the opening of cracks and microfractures in rock. In this study, such electrical signal emissions are detected and studied when rock samples are subjected to step-wise mechanical stress, increased from low stress levels vL up to higher stress levels vH. This increase is performed at high stress rates and consequently the stress is maintained practically constant for a long period. During this time, the applied stress reaches its maximum value, and the emitted PSC decays gradually and relaxes back to a minimum value. The conducted experiments suggest that the characteristics of the relaxation processes of the PSC depend directly on the high level of the applied stress that is maintained constant after the application of each stress step. Analysis of the macroscopic parameters that characterize the relaxation phenomenon of the PSC provides clear information regarding the proximity of the applied stress to the fracture limit of the rock sample.

  8. Cold priming drives the sub-cellular antioxidant systems to protect photosynthetic electron transport against subsequent low temperature stress in winter wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiangnan; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature seriously depresses the growth of wheat through inhibition of photosynthesis, while earlier cold priming may enhance the tolerance of plants to subsequent low temperature stress. Here, winter wheat plants were firstly cold primed (5.2°C lower temperature than the ambient temperatu......-cellular antioxidant systems, depressing the oxidative burst in photosynthetic apparatus, hereby enhanced the tolerance to subsequent low temperature stress in winter wheat plants.......Low temperature seriously depresses the growth of wheat through inhibition of photosynthesis, while earlier cold priming may enhance the tolerance of plants to subsequent low temperature stress. Here, winter wheat plants were firstly cold primed (5.2°C lower temperature than the ambient temperature......, viz., 10.0°C) at the Zadoks growth stage 28 (i.e.re-greening stage, starting on 20th of March) for 7d, and after 14d of recovery the plants were subsequently subjected to a 5d low temperature stress (8.4°C lower than the ambient temperature, viz., 14.1°C) at the Zadoks growth stage 31 (i...

  9. Proteome Analysis of Cold Response in Spring and Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Crowns Reveals Similarities in Stress Adaptation and Differences in Regulatory Processes between the Growth Habits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kosová, K.; Vítámvás, P.; Planchon, S.; Renaut, J.; Vaňková, Radomíra; Prášil, I.T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 11 (2013), s. 4830-4845 ISSN 1535-3893 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/09/2058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : 2D-DIGE analysis * cold stress * spring and winter growth habit Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 5.001, year: 2013

  10. Management of Heat and Cold Stress - Guidance to NATO Medical Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    to retain body water. Other beverages or fluids served in dining facilities (except those containing alcohol), such as milk , are acceptable for...additional acclimatization sessions; inserting acclimatization with training; alternating acclimatization days with training days, and no detraining...in ice beverage cooler with ice water mixture).  Ineffective Technologies. Other recent technologies have been found not to mitigate heat stress

  11. MM97.48 Influence of multidirectional deformation mode on flow stress behaviour during cold forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Maria; Pavel, Huml; Mendoza, Camus Luis

    1997-01-01

    In the present experimental investigation the influence of strain path on behaviour and final properties has been simulated in uni-, two- and three-directional deformation regimes. Pure iron and a low carbon steel have been investigated considering stress strain behaviour. Brass and copper...

  12. The Effect of Orifice Diameter to the Acoustic Signals Captured at the Cold Part of a Ranque-Hilsch Vortex Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnoe Wirachman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, acoustic analysis and thermofluid performance of a Ranque-Hilsch Vortex Tube (RHVT is experimentally investigated under different orifice diameters at its cold tube. The orifice diameters used are 2mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm and 6 mm. The inlet pressure (gage is set at 10 psi, 15 psi, 20 psi and 25 psi for each orifice diameter. The sound produced by the tube is recorded using a microphone located outside the cold tube. The acoustic signal is processed using Fast-Fourier Transform (FFT to obtain the frequency representation. Main frequencies are then extracted to constitute the signature of the signal for that specific configuration. It is observed that different orifice diameters give different signatures. These signatures are then associated with the thermofluid performance of the device to obtain the relation among the parameters.

  13. Effects of heat, cold, acid and bile salt adaptations on the stress tolerance and protein expression of kefir-isolated probiotic Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens M1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Ju; Tang, Hsin-Yu; Chiang, Ming-Lun

    2017-09-01

    Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens M1 is a probiotic strain isolated from Taiwanese kefir grains. The present study evaluated the effects of heat, cold, acid and bile salt adaptations on the stress tolerance of L. kefiranofaciens M1. The regulation of protein expression of L. kefiranofaciens M1 under these adaptation conditions was also investigated. The results showed that adaptation of L. kefiranofaciens M1 to heat, cold, acid and bile salts induced homologous tolerance and cross-protection against heterologous challenge. The extent of induced tolerance varied depending on the type and condition of stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that 27 proteins exhibited differences in expression between non-adapted and stress-adapted L. kefiranofaciens M1 cells. Among these proteins, three proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism (triosephosphate isomerase, enolase and NAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), two proteins involved in pH homeostasis (ATP synthase subunits AtpA and AtpB), two stress response proteins (chaperones DnaK and GroEL) and one translation-related protein (30S ribosomal protein S2) were up-regulated by three of the four adaptation treatments examined. The increased synthesis of these stress proteins might play a critical protective role in the cellular defense against heat, cold, acid and bile salt stresses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Protection against oxidative stress caused by intermittent cold exposure by combined supplementation with vitamin E and C in the aging rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, K R; Subramanyam, M V V; Asha Devi, S

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of combined supplementation with vitamin E and C against oxidative stress (OS) caused by intermittent cold exposure (ICE) in the hypothalamus (HY) of aging male Wistar rats [adult (3-months), middle-aged (18-months) and old (24-months)]. Each age was divided into sub-groups: control (CON), cold-exposed at 10 °C (C10), cold-exposed at 5 °C (C5), supplemented control (CON+S) and supplemented cold-exposed at either 5 °C (C5+S) or 10 °C (C10+S). The supplement was a daily dose of 400 mg vitamin C and 50 IU of vitamin E/kg body weight. Cold exposure lasted 2 h/day for 4 weeks. All age groups exposed to cold showed increase in body mass and feeding efficiency. Feeding efficiency in the supplemented old group showed a statistically significant increase in the cold (p Age-related increases in levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), protein carbonyl (PrC), advanced oxidation protein products and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were further increased by cold in the HY. Cold reduced thiol(P-SH) levels and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and, catalase (CAT) activities as well as Hsp72 levels. However, supplementation lowered H2O2, PrC and TBARS with decreases in Hsp72 levels and in SOD and CAT activities. These changes were concomitant with elevations in P-SH, vitamin E and C levels. The results show that the OS caused by ICE in the HY and its subsequent protection following supplementation is related to the intensity of ICE as well as age of the animal. Immunohistochemical studies are underway to examine the findings on ICE-induced oxidative injury in the HY, and the prospects for vitamin E and C supplementation in the senescent.

  15. STUDY ON DE-NOISING METHODS FOR SOIL COMPRESSIVE STRESS SIGNAL DURING VIBRATION COMPACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhe Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The compressive stress signal of soil during vibration compaction is an unstable and transient saltation signal accompanied by broadband noise, and the spectra of the signal and noise always overlap. To extract the ideal original signal from noisy data, this paper studies several signal de-noising methods such as low-pass filtering, multi-resolution wavelet transform, spectrum subtraction and independent component analysis. Experiments show that the traditional low-pass filter is only applicable when the spectra of the signal and noise can be separated in the frequency domain. The multi-resolution wavelet transform can decompose the signal into different frequency bands and remove the noise efficiently by extracting useful the frequency band of the signal, but this method is not reliable when the signal to noise ratio (SNR is low. Spectrum subtraction can remove strong background noise with stationary statistical characteristics even if the noise level is high and the spectrum of the signal overlaps with that of the noise. Independent component analysis can extract weak signals which are combined with heavy noise and can separate the noise from signal effectively when the independent channel hypothesis holds. These de-noising methods are of great importance for further analysing vibration signals in engineering.

  16. Stat5 signaling specifies basal versus stress erythropoietic responses through distinct binary and graded dynamic modalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermelinda Porpiglia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (Epo-induced Stat5 phosphorylation (p-Stat5 is essential for both basal erythropoiesis and for its acceleration during hypoxic stress. A key challenge lies in understanding how Stat5 signaling elicits distinct functions during basal and stress erythropoiesis. Here we asked whether these distinct functions might be specified by the dynamic behavior of the Stat5 signal. We used flow cytometry to analyze Stat5 phosphorylation dynamics in primary erythropoietic tissue in vivo and in vitro, identifying two signaling modalities. In later (basophilic erythroblasts, Epo stimulation triggers a low intensity but decisive, binary (digital p-Stat5 signal. In early erythroblasts the binary signal is superseded by a high-intensity graded (analog p-Stat5 response. We elucidated the biological functions of binary and graded Stat5 signaling using the EpoR-HM mice, which express a "knocked-in" EpoR mutant lacking cytoplasmic phosphotyrosines. Strikingly, EpoR-HM mice are restricted to the binary signaling mode, which rescues these mice from fatal perinatal anemia by promoting binary survival decisions in erythroblasts. However, the absence of the graded p-Stat5 response in the EpoR-HM mice prevents them from accelerating red cell production in response to stress, including a failure to upregulate the transferrin receptor, which we show is a novel stress target. We found that Stat5 protein levels decline with erythroblast differentiation, governing the transition from high-intensity graded signaling in early erythroblasts to low-intensity binary signaling in later erythroblasts. Thus, using exogenous Stat5, we converted later erythroblasts into high-intensity graded signal transducers capable of eliciting a downstream stress response. Unlike the Stat5 protein, EpoR expression in erythroblasts does not limit the Stat5 signaling response, a non-Michaelian paradigm with therapeutic implications in myeloproliferative disease. Our findings show how the

  17. Novel connections in plant organellar signalling link different stress responses and signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmiecik, Przemyslaw; Leonardelli, Manuela; Teige, Markus

    2016-06-01

    To coordinate growth, development and responses to environmental stimuli, plant cells need to communicate the metabolic state between different sub-compartments of the cell. This requires signalling pathways, including protein kinases, secondary messengers such as Ca(2+) ions or reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as metabolites and plant hormones. The signalling networks involved have been intensively studied over recent decades and have been elaborated more or less in detail. However, it has become evident that these signalling networks are also tightly interconnected and often merge at common targets such as a distinct group of transcription factors, most prominently ABI4, which are amenable to regulation by phosphorylation, potentially also in a Ca(2+)- or ROS-dependent fashion. Moreover, the signalling pathways connect several organelles or subcellular compartments, not only in functional but also in physical terms, linking for example chloroplasts to the nucleus or peroxisomes to chloroplasts thereby enabling physical routes for signalling by metabolite exchange or even protein translocation. Here we briefly discuss these novel findings and try to connect them in order to point out the remaining questions and emerging developments in plant organellar signalling. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. WRKY Proteins: Signaling and Regulation of Expression during Abiotic Stress Responses

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    Aditya Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available WRKY proteins are emerging players in plant signaling and have been thoroughly reported to play important roles in plants under biotic stress like pathogen attack. However, recent advances in this field do reveal the enormous significance of these proteins in eliciting responses induced by abiotic stresses. WRKY proteins act as major transcription factors, either as positive or negative regulators. Specific WRKY factors which help in the expression of a cluster of stress-responsive genes are being targeted and genetically modified to induce improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The knowledge regarding the signaling cascade leading to the activation of the WRKY proteins, their interaction with other proteins of the signaling pathway, and the downstream genes activated by them are altogether vital for justified targeting of the WRKY genes. WRKY proteins have also been considered to generate tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses with possible roles in mediating a cross talk between abiotic and biotic stress responses. In this review, we have reckoned the diverse signaling pattern and biological functions of WRKY proteins throughout the plant kingdom along with the growing prospects in this field of research.

  19. WRKY proteins: signaling and regulation of expression during abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditya; Roychoudhury, Aryadeep

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are emerging players in plant signaling and have been thoroughly reported to play important roles in plants under biotic stress like pathogen attack. However, recent advances in this field do reveal the enormous significance of these proteins in eliciting responses induced by abiotic stresses. WRKY proteins act as major transcription factors, either as positive or negative regulators. Specific WRKY factors which help in the expression of a cluster of stress-responsive genes are being targeted and genetically modified to induce improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The knowledge regarding the signaling cascade leading to the activation of the WRKY proteins, their interaction with other proteins of the signaling pathway, and the downstream genes activated by them are altogether vital for justified targeting of the WRKY genes. WRKY proteins have also been considered to generate tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses with possible roles in mediating a cross talk between abiotic and biotic stress responses. In this review, we have reckoned the diverse signaling pattern and biological functions of WRKY proteins throughout the plant kingdom along with the growing prospects in this field of research.

  20. WRKY Proteins: Signaling and Regulation of Expression during Abiotic Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    WRKY proteins are emerging players in plant signaling and have been thoroughly reported to play important roles in plants under biotic stress like pathogen attack. However, recent advances in this field do reveal the enormous significance of these proteins in eliciting responses induced by abiotic stresses. WRKY proteins act as major transcription factors, either as positive or negative regulators. Specific WRKY factors which help in the expression of a cluster of stress-responsive genes are being targeted and genetically modified to induce improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The knowledge regarding the signaling cascade leading to the activation of the WRKY proteins, their interaction with other proteins of the signaling pathway, and the downstream genes activated by them are altogether vital for justified targeting of the WRKY genes. WRKY proteins have also been considered to generate tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses with possible roles in mediating a cross talk between abiotic and biotic stress responses. In this review, we have reckoned the diverse signaling pattern and biological functions of WRKY proteins throughout the plant kingdom along with the growing prospects in this field of research. PMID:25879071

  1. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Pathway Regulation in T-Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Turrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has shown its antitumor activity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. However, the mechanisms at the basis of CAP-cell interaction are not yet completely understood. The aim of this study is to investigate CAP proapoptotic effect and identify some of the molecular mechanisms triggered by CAP in human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells. CAP treatment was performed by means of a wand electrode DBD source driven by nanosecond high-voltage pulses under different operating conditions. The biological endpoints were assessed through flow cytometry and real-time PCR. CAP caused apoptosis in Jurkat cells mediated by p53 upregulation. To test the involvement of intrinsic and/or extrinsic pathway, the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-8 was analyzed. The activation of caspase-8 and the upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 were observed. Moreover, CAP treatment increased ROS intracellular level. The situation reverts after a longer time of treatment. This is probably due to compensatory cellular mechanisms such as the posttranscriptional upregulation of SOD1, CAT, and GSR2. According to ROS increase, CAP induced a significant increase in DNA damage at all treatment conditions. In conclusion, our results provide a deeper understanding of CAP potential in the oncological field and pose the basis for the evaluation of its toxicological profile.

  2. Cold-induced retrotransposition of fish LINEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shue; Yu, Mengchao; Chu, Xu; Li, Wenhao; Yin, Xiujuan; Chen, Liangbiao

    2017-08-20

    Classes of retrotransposons constitute a large portion of metazoan genome. There have been cases reported that genomic abundance of retrotransposons is correlated with the severity of low environmental temperatures. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such correlation are unknown. We show here by cell transfection assays that retrotransposition (RTP) of a long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) from an Antarctic notothenioid fish Dissostichus mawsoni (dmL1) could be activated by low temperature exposure, causing increased dmL1 copies in the host cell genome. The cold-induced dmL1 propagation was demonstrated to be mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)/p38 signaling pathway, which is activated by accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cold-stressed conditions. Surprisingly, dmL1 transfected cells showed an increase in the number of viable cells after prolonged cold exposures than non-transfected cells. Features of cold inducibility of dmL1 were recapitulated in LINEs of zebrafish origin both in cultured cell lines and tissues, suggesting existence of a common cold-induced LINE amplification in fishes. The findings reveal an important function of LINEs in temperature adaptation and provid insights into the MAPK/p38 stress responsive pathway that shapes LINE composition in fishes facing cold stresses. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Effects of redecoration of a hospital isolation room with natural materials on stress levels of denizens in cold season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Hiromi; Maruyama, Megumi; Tanabe, Yoko; Hara, Toshiko; Nishino, Yoshihiko; Tsujino, Yoshio; Morita, Eishin; Kobayashi, Shotai; Shido, Osamu

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the effects of redecoration of a hospital isolation room with natural materials on thermoregulatory, cardiovascular and hormonal parameters of healthy subjects staying in the room. Two isolation rooms with almost bilaterally-symmetrical arrangements were used. One room (RD) was redecorated with wood paneling and Japanese paper, while the other (CN) was unchanged (with concrete walls). Seven healthy male subjects stayed in each room for over 24 h in the cold season. Their rectal temperature (Tre) and heart rate, and the room temperature (Ta) and relative humidity were continuously measured. Arterial blood pressures, arterial vascular compliance, thermal sensation and thermal comfort were measured every 4 h except during sleeping. Blood was sampled after the stay in the rooms. In RD, Ta was significantly higher by about 0.4°C and relative humidity was lower by about 5% than in CN. Diurnal Tre levels of subjects in RD significantly differed from those in CN, i.e., Tres were significantly higher in RD than in CN especially in the evening. In RD, the subjects felt more thermally-comfortable than in CN. Redecoration had minimal effects on cardiovascular parameters. Plasma levels of catecholamines and antidiuretic hormone did not differ, while plasma cortisol level was significantly lower after staying in RD than in CN by nearly 20%. The results indicate that, in the cold season, redecoration with natural materials improves the thermal environment of the room and contributes to maintaining core temperature of denizens at preferable levels. It also seems that redecoration of room could attenuate stress levels of isolated subjects.

  4. Signaling in a polluted world: oxidative stress as an overlooked mechanism linking contaminants to animal communication

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    Valeria Marasco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to communicate effectively with other individuals plays a critical role in the daily life of an individual and can have important fitness consequences. Animals rely on a number of visual and non-visual signals, whose production brings costs to the individual. The theory of honest signaling states that these costs are higher for low than for high-quality individuals, which prevents cheating and makes signals, such as skin and plumage colouration, indicators of individual’s quality or condition. The condition-dependent nature of signals makes them ideally suited as indicators of environmental quality, implying that signal production might be affected by contaminants. In this mini-review article, we have made the point that oxidative stress (OS is one overlooked mechanism linking exposure to contaminants to signaling because (i many contaminants can influence the individual’s oxidative balance, and (ii generation of both visual and non-visual signals is sensitive to oxidative stress. To this end, we have provided the first comprehensive review on the way both non-organic (heavy metals, especially mercury and organic (persistent organic pollutants contaminants may influence either OS or sexual signaling. We have also paid special attention to emerging classes of pollutants like brominated flame-retardants and perfluoroalkoxy alkanes in order to stimulate research in this area. We have finally provided suggestions and warnings for future work on the links among OS, sexual signaling and contaminant exposure.

  5. Mitochondrial stress signaling in longevity: a new role for mitochondrial function in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Shauna; Van Remmen, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are principal regulators of cellular function and metabolism through production of ATP for energy homeostasis, maintenance of calcium homeostasis, regulation of apoptosis and fatty acid oxidation to provide acetyl CoA for fueling the electron transport chain. In addition, mitochondria play a key role in cell signaling through production of reactive oxygen species that modulate redox signaling. Recent findings support an additional mechanism for control of cellular and tissue function by mitochondria through complex mitochondrial-nuclear communication mechanisms and potentially through extracellular release of mitochondrial components that can act as signaling molecules. The activation of stress responses including mitophagy, mitochondrial number, fission and fusion events, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(MT)) requires mitochondrial-nuclear communication for the transcriptional activation of nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial quality control and metabolism. The induction of these signaling pathways is a shared feature in long-lived organisms spanning from yeast to mice. As a result, the role of mitochondrial stress signaling in longevity has been expansively studied. Current and exciting studies provide evidence that mitochondria can also signal among tissues to up-regulate cytoprotective activities to promote healthy aging. Alternatively, mitochondria release signals to modulate innate immunity and systemic inflammatory responses and could consequently promote inflammation during aging. In this review, established and emerging models of mitochondrial stress response pathways and their potential role in modulating longevity are discussed.

  6. Mitochondrial stress signaling in longevity: A new role for mitochondrial function in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shauna Hill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are principal regulators of cellular function and metabolism through production of ATP for energy homeostasis, maintenance of calcium homeostasis, regulation of apoptosis and fatty acid oxidation to provide acetyl CoA for fueling the electron transport chain. In addition, mitochondria play a key role in cell signaling through production of reactive oxygen species that modulate redox signaling. Recent findings support an additional mechanism for control of cellular and tissue function by mitochondria through complex mitochondrial–nuclear communication mechanisms and potentially through extracellular release of mitochondrial components that can act as signaling molecules. The activation of stress responses including mitophagy, mitochondrial number, fission and fusion events, and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRMT requires mitochondrial–nuclear communication for the transcriptional activation of nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial quality control and metabolism. The induction of these signaling pathways is a shared feature in long-lived organisms spanning from yeast to mice. As a result, the role of mitochondrial stress signaling in longevity has been expansively studied. Current and exciting studies provide evidence that mitochondria can also signal among tissues to up-regulate cytoprotective activities to promote healthy aging. Alternatively, mitochondria release signals to modulate innate immunity and systemic inflammatory responses and could consequently promote inflammation during aging. In this review, established and emerging models of mitochondrial stress response pathways and their potential role in modulating longevity are discussed.

  7. A cold responsive galactinol synthase gene from Medicago falcata (MfGolS1) is induced by myo-inositol and confers multiple tolerances to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Chunliu; Wang, Ting; Lu, Shaoyun; Zhao, Yaqing; Li, Xiaoguang; Guo, Zhenfei

    2013-09-01

    Galactinol synthase (GolS, EC 2.4.1.123) catalyzes formation of galactinol and the subsequent synthesis of raffinose family oligosaccharides. The relationship of GolS to drought and salt tolerance has been well documented, however, little information is available about the role of GolS gene in cold tolerance. A coding sequence of MfGolS1 cDNA was cloned from Medicago sativa spp falcata (i.e. M. falcata), a species that exhibits greater cold tolerance than alfalfa (M. sativa). MfGolS1 transcript was not detected in untreated vegetative tissues using RNA blot hybridization; however, it was greatly induced in leaves, but not in stem and petiole, after cold treatment. Higher levels of MfGolS1 transcript were induced and maintained in M. falcata than in M. sativa during cold acclimation. Accordingly, more sugars including sucrose, galactinol, raffinose and stachyose were accumulated in M. falcata than in M. sativa. The data indicated that MfGolS1 transcript and its resultant sugar accumulation were associated with the differential cold tolerance between M. falcata and M. sativa. MfGolS1 transcript was weakly induced by dehydration and salt stresses, but not responsive to abscisic acid. MfGolS1 could be induced by myo-inositol, which is proposed to participate in cold-induced MfGolS1 expression. Overexpression of MfGolS1 in tobacco resulted in elevated tolerance to freezing and chilling in transgenic plants as a result of enhanced levels of galactinol, raffinose and stachyose. Tolerance to drought and salt stresses was also increased in the transgenic tobacco plants. It is suggested that MfGolS1 plays an important role in plant tolerance to abiotic stresses. © 2012 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. A detailed view of Listeria monocytogenes’ adaptation and survival under cold temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hingston, P.; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Wang, S.

    The human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) continues to be a challenge for the food industry where it is known to contaminate ready-to-eat foods and grow during refrigerated storage. In order to gain increased control of Lm in the food-supply-chain, an improved understanding of low temperature...... stress adaptation methods is needed. In this study, RNA-seq (strand specific Illumina libraries;22-39 million 2x100bp reads) and cell membrane fatty acid profiling were used to analyze adaptation mechanisms used by a fast growing, serotype 1/2a, Lm food plant isolate at 4°C. Brain heart infusion (BHI...

  9. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway

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    Yao Zhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL, one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and NAD(PH dehydrogenase (quinone1 (NQO1. However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA, and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  10. Differential acetylation of histone H3 at the regulatory region of OsDREB1b promoter facilitates chromatin remodelling and transcription activation during cold stress.

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    Dipan Roy

    Full Text Available The rice ortholog of DREB1, OsDREB1b, is transcriptionally induced by cold stress and over-expression of OsDREB1b results in increase tolerance towards high salt and freezing stress. This spatio-temporal expression of OsDREB1b is preceded by the change in chromatin structure at the promoter and the upstream region for gene activation. The promoter and the upstream region of OsDREB1b genes appear to be arranged into a nucleosome array. Nucleosome mapping of ∼ 700 bp upstream region of OsDREB1b shows two positioned nucleosomes between -610 to -258 and a weakly positioned nucleosome at the core promoter and the TSS. Upon cold stress, there is a significant change in the nucleosome arrangement at the upstream region with increase in DNaseI hypersensitivity or MNase digestion in the vicinity of cis elements and TATA box at the core promoter. ChIP assays shows hyper-acetylation of histone H3K9 throughout the locus whereas region specific increase was observed in H3K14ac and H3K27ac. Moreover, there is an enrichment of RNA PolII occupancy at the promoter region during transcription activation. There is no significant change in the H3 occupancy in OsDREB1b locus negating the possibility of nucleosome loss during cold stress. Interestingly, cold induced enhanced transcript level of OsDREB1b as well as histone H3 acetylation at the upstream region was found to diminish when stressed plants were returned to normal temperature. The result indicates absolute necessity of changes in chromatin conformation for the transcription up-regulation of OsDREB1b gene in response to cold stress. The combined results show the existence of closed chromatin conformation at the upstream and promoter region of OsDREB1b in the transcription "off" state. During cold stress, changes in region specific histone modification marks promote the alteration of chromatin structure to facilitate the binding of transcription machinery for proper gene expression.

  11. Cold priming drives the sub-cellular antioxidant systems to protect photosynthetic electron transport against subsequent low temperature stress in winter wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangnan; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai; Dai, Tingbo; Cao, Weixing; Jiang, Dong

    2014-09-01

    Low temperature seriously depresses the growth of wheat through inhibition of photosynthesis, while earlier cold priming may enhance the tolerance of plants to subsequent low temperature stress. Here, winter wheat plants were firstly cold primed (5.2 °C lower temperature than the ambient temperature, viz., 10.0 °C) at the Zadoks growth stage 28 (i.e. re-greening stage, starting on 20th of March) for 7 d, and after 14 d of recovery the plants were subsequently subjected to a 5 d low temperature stress (8.4 °C lower than the ambient temperature, viz., 14.1 °C) at the Zadoks growth stage 31 (i.e. jointing stage, starting on 8th April). Compared to the non-primed plants, the cold-primed plants possessed more effective oxygen scavenging systems in chloroplasts and mitochondria as exemplified by the increased activities of SOD, APX and CAT, resulting in a better maintenance in homeostasis of ROS production. The trapped energy flux (TRO/CSO) and electron transport (ETO/CSO) in the photosynthetic apparatus were found functioning well in the cold-primed plants leading to higher photosynthetic rate during the subsequent low temperature stress. Collectively, the results indicate that cold priming activated the sub-cellular antioxidant systems, depressing the oxidative burst in photosynthetic apparatus, hereby enhanced the tolerance to subsequent low temperature stress in winter wheat plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Epigenetic signaling in psychiatric disorders: stress and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Labonté, Benoit; Peña, Catherine J; Nestler, Eric J

    2014-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders are complex multifactorial disorders involving chronic alterations in neural circuit structure and function. While genetic factors play a role in the etiology of disorders such as depression, addiction, and schizophrenia, relatively high rates of discordance among identical twins clearly point to the importance of additional factors. Environmental factors, such as stress, play a major role in the psychiatric disorders by inducing stable changes in gene expression, neural circuit function, and ultimately behavior. Insults at the developmental stage and in adulthood appear to induce distinct maladaptations. Increasing evidence indicates that these sustained abnormalities are maintained by epigenetic modifications in specific brain regions. Indeed, transcriptional dysregulation and associated aberrant epigenetic regulation is a unifying theme in psychiatric disorders. Aspects of depression can be modeled in animals by inducing disease-like states through environmental manipulations, and these studies can provide a more general understanding of epigenetic mechanisms in psychiatric disorders. Understanding how environmental factors recruit the epigenetic machinery in animal models is providing new insights into disease mechanisms in humans.

  13. Regulation of AP-1 by MAPK Signaling in Metal-Stressed Sea Anemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agron, Maayan; Brekhman, Vera; Morgenstern, David; Lotan, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    AP-1 transcription factor plays a conserved role in the immediate response to stress. Activation of AP-1 members jun and fos is mediated by complex signaling cascades to control cell proliferation and survival. To understand the evolution of this broadly-shared pathway, we studied AP-1 regulation by MAPK signaling in a basal metazoan. Metal- stressed cnidarian Nematostella vectensis anemones were tested with kinase inhibitors and analyzed for gene expression levels and protein phosphorylation. We show that in cnidarian, AP-1 is regulated differently than in bilaterian models. ERK2 and ERK5, the main MAPK drivers of AP-1 activation in Bilateria, down-regulated fos1 and jun1 transcription in anemones exposed to metal stress, whereas p38 MAPK, triggered transcription of jun1 but not fos1. Furthermore, our results reveal that GSK3-β is the main driver of the immediate stress response in Nematostella. GSK3-β triggered transcription of AP-1 and two other stress-related genes, egr1 and hsp70. Finally, phylogenetic analysis and protein characterization show that while MAPKs and GSK3-β are evolutionarily conserved, Fos and Jun proteins in Nematostella and other cnidarians lack important regulatory and phosphorylation sites found in Bilateria. These findings reveal alternative network interactions of conserved signaling kinases, providing insight into the evolutionary plasticity of immediate stress response mechanisms. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Regulation of AP-1 by MAPK Signaling in Metal-Stressed Sea Anemone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maayan Agron

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: AP-1 transcription factor plays a conserved role in the immediate response to stress. Activation of AP-1 members jun and fos is mediated by complex signaling cascades to control cell proliferation and survival. To understand the evolution of this broadly-shared pathway, we studied AP-1 regulation by MAPK signaling in a basal metazoan. Methods: Metal- stressed cnidarian Nematostella vectensis anemones were tested with kinase inhibitors and analyzed for gene expression levels and protein phosphorylation. Results: We show that in cnidarian, AP-1 is regulated differently than in bilaterian models. ERK2 and ERK5, the main MAPK drivers of AP-1 activation in Bilateria, down-regulated fos1 and jun1 transcription in anemones exposed to metal stress, whereas p38 MAPK, triggered transcription of jun1 but not fos1. Furthermore, our results reveal that GSK3-β is the main driver of the immediate stress response in Nematostella. GSK3-β triggered transcription of AP-1 and two other stress-related genes, egr1 and hsp70. Finally, phylogenetic analysis and protein characterization show that while MAPKs and GSK3-β are evolutionarily conserved, Fos and Jun proteins in Nematostella and other cnidarians lack important regulatory and phosphorylation sites found in Bilateria. Conclusion: These findings reveal alternative network interactions of conserved signaling kinases, providing insight into the evolutionary plasticity of immediate stress response mechanisms.

  15. Characterization of LpGPAT Gene in Lilium pensylvanicum and Response to Cold Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-kun Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available LpGPAT was obtained from L. pensylvanicum using RT-PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The cloned full-length cDNA was 1544 bp; it encoded 410 amino acids and had a molecular size of 46 KDa. The nucleic acid sequence analysis showed that it shared high homology with other known GPATs. SMAT result suggests that there is a PlsC that exists in 176-322 amino acid sequence of LpGAPT; it means LpGPAT protein is a member of the family of acyltransferase and has acyltransferase enzymatic activity. Result of real-time quantitative PCR and semiquantitative PCR support LpGPAT gene is definitely induced by low temperature stress.

  16. Performance differences of Rhode Island Red, Bashang Long-tail Chicken, and their reciprocal crossbreds under natural cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shanshan; Yang, Xukai; Gao, Yahui; Jiao, Wenjie; Li, Xinghua; Li, Yajie; Ning, Zhonghua

    2017-10-01

    The Bashang Long-tail chicken (BS), an indigenous Chinese breed, is considered cold tolerant. We selected BS, the Rhode Island Red (RIR), and their reciprocal crossbreds for the present study. The objectives were: i) to validate whether BS is cold tolerant and whether egg production and cold tolerance of crossbreds could be improved; and ii) to determine the physiological characteristics that underlie cold tolerance and favorable egg production performance in cold environments. A total of 916 chickens were reared in warm and natural cold environments (daily mean ambient temperature varied from 7.4°C to 26.5°C in the warm environment and from -17.5°C to 27.0°C in the cold environment). To investigate their adaptability to the cold environment, the egg production performance and body weight were monitored and compared between breeds and environments. The cloacal temperature and serum biochemical parameters were monitored to reveal the physiological characteristics underlie cold tolerance and favorable egg production performance in the cold environment. The warm environment experiment showed that RIR had the highest egg production performance, and that the reciprocal crossbreds had a higher egg production performance than BS. While in the cold environment RIR had the lowest egg production performance, and the reciprocal crossbreds had a higher egg production performance than BS. In the cold environment BS and reciprocal crossbreds had higher triiodothyronine, tetraiodothyronine levels than RIR. At 35 and 39 wk of age, when the ambient temperature was extremely low (varied from -20°C to 0°C), serum glucose, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol of BS and crossbreds were higher than RIR. Bashang Long-tail chicken has a favorable cold tolerance ability. Crossbreeding with RIR and BS is an effective way to develop cold tolerant chickens with improved egg production performance.

  17. Perspective Research Progress in Cold Responses of Capsella bursa-pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Ali; Kanwal, Hina; Khalid, Noreen; Sanaullah, Tayyaba; Tufail, Aasma; Masood, Atifa; Sabir, Sabeeh-ur-Rasool; Aqeel, Muhammad; He, Shuilin

    2017-01-01

    Plants respond to cold stress by modulating biochemical pathways and array of molecular events. Plant morphology is also affected by the onset of cold conditions culminating at repression in growth as well as yield reduction. As a preventive measure, cascades of complex signal transduction pathways are employed that permit plants to endure freezing or chilling periods. The signaling pathways and related events are regulated by the plant hormonal activity. Recent investigations have provided a prospective understanding about plant response to cold stress by means of developmental pathways e.g., moderate growth involved in cold tolerance. Cold acclimation assays and bioinformatics analyses have revealed the role of potential transcription factors and expression of genes like CBF, COR in response to low temperature stress. Capsella bursa-pastoris is a considerable model plant system for evolutionary and developmental studies. On different occasions it has been proved that C. bursa-pastoris is more capable of tolerating cold than A. thaliana. But, the mechanism for enhanced low or freezing temperature tolerance is still not clear and demands intensive research. Additionally, identification and validation of cold responsive genes in this candidate plant species is imperative for plant stress physiology and molecular breeding studies to improve cold tolerance in crops. We have analyzed the role of different genes and hormones in regulating plant cold resistance with special reference to C. bursa-pastoris. Review of collected data displays potential ability of Capsella as model plant for improvement in cold stress regulation. Information is summarized on cold stress signaling by hormonal control which highlights the substantial achievements and designate gaps that still happen in our understanding. PMID:28855910

  18. Perspective Research Progress in Cold Responses of Capsella bursa-pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Noman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to cold stress by modulating biochemical pathways and array of molecular events. Plant morphology is also affected by the onset of cold conditions culminating at repression in growth as well as yield reduction. As a preventive measure, cascades of complex signal transduction pathways are employed that permit plants to endure freezing or chilling periods. The signaling pathways and related events are regulated by the plant hormonal activity. Recent investigations have provided a prospective understanding about plant response to cold stress by means of developmental pathways e.g., moderate growth involved in cold tolerance. Cold acclimation assays and bioinformatics analyses have revealed the role of potential transcription factors and expression of genes like CBF, COR in response to low temperature stress. Capsella bursa-pastoris is a considerable model plant system for evolutionary and developmental studies. On different occasions it has been proved that C. bursa-pastoris is more capable of tolerating cold than A. thaliana. But, the mechanism for enhanced low or freezing temperature tolerance is still not clear and demands intensive research. Additionally, identification and validation of cold responsive genes in this candidate plant species is imperative for plant stress physiology and molecular breeding studies to improve cold tolerance in crops. We have analyzed the role of different genes and hormones in regulating plant cold resistance with special reference to C. bursa-pastoris. Review of collected data displays potential ability of Capsella as model plant for improvement in cold stress regulation. Information is summarized on cold stress signaling by hormonal control which highlights the substantial achievements and designate gaps that still happen in our understanding.

  19. Pre-mRNA splicing repression triggers abiotic stress signaling in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Yu

    2016-09-24

    Alternative splicing (AS) of precursor RNAs enhances transcriptome plasticity and proteome diversity in response to diverse growth and stress cues. Recent work has shown that AS is pervasive across plant species, with more than 60% of intron-containing genes producing different isoforms. Mammalian cell-based assays have discovered various inhibitors of AS. Here, we show that the macrolide pladienolide B (PB) inhibits constitutive splicing and AS in plants. Also, our RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data revealed that PB mimics abiotic stress signals including salt, drought and abscisic acid (ABA). PB activates the abiotic stress- and ABA-responsive reporters RD29A

  20. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response

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    Andreas Stengel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates—in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis—other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a broader anti-stress effect by blunting the endocrine, autonomic, behavioral (with a focus on food intake and visceral gastrointestinal motor responses through the involvement of distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  1. Insulin Signaling in the Aging of Healthy and Proteotoxically Stressed Mechanosensory Neurons

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    Courtney eScerbak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Insulin signaling is central to cellular metabolism and organismal aging. However, the role of insulin signaling in natural and proteotoxically stressed aging neurons has yet to be fully described. We studied aging of Caenorbaditis elegans mechanosensory neurons expressing a neurotoxic expanded polyglutamine transgene (polyQ128, or lacking this proteotoxicity stressor (polyQ0, under conditions in which the insulin signaling pathway was disrupted by RNA interference (RNAi. We describe specific changes in lifespan, mechanosensory neuronal morphologies, and mechansensory function following RNAi treatment targeting the insulin signaling pathway. Overall, we confirmed that transcription factor DAF-16 is neuroprotective in the proteotoxically stressed model, though not strikingly in the naturally aging model. Decreased insulin signaling through daf-2 RNAi improved mechanosensory function in both models and decreased protein aggregation load in polyQ128, yet showed opposing effects on accumulation of neuronal aberrations in both strains. Decreased daf-2 signaling slightly enhanced mechanosensation while greatly enhancing branching of the mechanosensory neuron axons and dendrites in polyQ0 animals, suggesting that branching is an adaptive response in natural aging. These effects in polyQ0 did not appear to involve DAF-16, suggesting the existence of a non-canonical DAF-2 pathway for the modulation of morphological adaptation. However, in polyQ128 animals, decreased daf-2 signaling significantly enhanced mechanosensation while decreasing neuronal aberrations. Unlike other interventions that reduce the strength of insulin signaling, daf-2 RNAi dramatically redistributed large polyQ128 aggregates to the cell body, away from neuronal processes. Our results suggest that insulin signaling strength can differentially affect specific neurons aging naturally or under proteotoxic stress.

  2. The Role of MAPK Modules and ABA during Abiotic Stress Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Zélicourt, Axel de

    2016-05-01

    To respond to abiotic stresses, plants have developed specific mechanisms that allow them to rapidly perceive and respond to environmental changes. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) was shown to be a pivotal regulator of abiotic stress responses in plants, triggering major changes in plant physiology. The ABA core signaling pathway largely relies on the activation of SnRK2 kinases to mediate several rapid responses, including gene regulation, stomatal closure, and plant growth modulation. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have also been implicated in ABA signaling, but an entire ABA-activated MAPK module was uncovered only recently. In this review, we discuss the evidence for a role of MAPK modules in the context of different plant ABA signaling pathways. Abiotic stresses impact average yield in agriculture by more than 50% globally.Since ABA is a key regulator of abiotic stress responses, an understanding of its functioning at the molecular level is essential for plant breeding. Although the ABA core signaling pathway has been unraveled, several downstream events are still unclear.MAPKs are involved in most plant developmental stages and in response to stresses. Several members of the MAPK family were shown to be directly or indirectly activated by the ABA core signaling pathway.Recent evidence shows that the complete MAP3K17/18-MKK3-MPK1/2/7/14 module is under the control of ABA, whose members are under the transcriptional and post-translational control of the ABA core signaling pathway. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The mixed impact of chemical and physical factors on reproductive system of rats in conditions of cold stress

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    Zavgorodnii I.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental investigations on studying features of gonadotoxic effect of nitrobenzene (NB, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE and electromagnetic radiation (EMR both in conditions of cold stress and in conditions of thermal acceptability are given. The investigations were carried out on laboratory animals, in 30-fold intragastric administration of NB or MTBE in a dose of 1/10 LD50 and exposition of animals in two different thermal regimens – 4 hours a day, 5 times a week. Effect of EMR was simulated in 70 kHz frequency, 600 V/m voltage. The features of gonadotoxic effect of NB and MTBE were studied by the indices of spermatozoa functional state, general histological analysis of the state of testicle tissues, supplemented with morphometric values, was carried out,. The analysis of results of experimental research proves that morpho-functional changes of reproductive system in laboratory animals during the influence of chemical factors (NB and MTBE, physical factors (EMR in two different thermal regimens are similar provided that there is the increase of gonadotoxic effect in mixed effect of mentioned factors and decreased temperature.

  4. Cortisol, hunger, and desire to binge eat following a cold stress test in obese women with binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Marci E; Geliebter, Allan; Hung, Jennifer; Yahav, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Increased basal cortisol levels have been found in bulimia nervosa. After stress, increased cortisol levels have been associated with increased food intake in healthy women. Therefore, we assessed cortisol, hunger, and desire to binge eat after a cold pressor test (CPT) among women with binge eating disorder (BED). Twenty-two obese (body mass index [BMI] = 36.7 +/- 6.5 SD) females (11 non-BED, 11 BED) completed the Zung depression scale and underwent the CPT, hand submerged in ice water for 2 minutes. Over 60 minutes, periodic ratings of hunger and desire to binge eat were obtained, just before blood draws for cortisol, as well as insulin. On a separate day, participants had a 1-mg oral dexamethasone suppression test (DST). The BED group had higher depression scores than the non-BED (p = .04), but depression was not a significant covariate for the cortisol response or to DST. After controlling for contraceptive use (n = 3), the BED group had higher basal cortisol than the non-BED group (p = .03), but cortisol did not differ after DST (p = .40). The BED group had nearly significant greater cortisol AUC after the CPT (p = .057) after controlling for insulin AUC and contraceptive use (p = .057). The BED group also had greater AUC for hunger (p = .03) and desire to binge eat (p = .02) after the CPT. These findings support our hypothesis of a hyperactive HPA-axis in BED, which may contribute to greater hunger and binge eating.

  5. Resilience to stress and disturbance, and resistance to Bromus tectorum L. invasion in cold desert shrublands of western North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Jeanne C.; Bradley, Bethany A.; Brown, Cynthia S.; D'Antonio, Carla; Germino, Matthew J.; Grace, James B.; Hardegree, Stuart P.; Miller, Richard F.; Pyke, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Alien grass invasions in arid and semi-arid ecosystems are resulting in grass–fire cycles and ecosystem-level transformations that severely diminish ecosystem services. Our capacity to address the rapid and complex changes occurring in these ecosystems can be enhanced by developing an understanding of the environmental factors and ecosystem attributes that determine resilience of native ecosystems to stress and disturbance, and resistance to invasion. Cold desert shrublands occur over strong environmental gradients and exhibit significant differences in resilience and resistance. They provide an excellent opportunity to increase our understanding of these concepts. Herein, we examine a series of linked questions about (a) ecosystem attributes that determine resilience and resistance along environmental gradients, (b) effects of disturbances like livestock grazing and altered fire regimes and of stressors like rapid climate change, rising CO2, and N deposition on resilience and resistance, and (c) interacting effects of resilience and resistance on ecosystems with different environmental conditions. We conclude by providing strategies for the use of resilience and resistance concepts in a management context. At ecological site scales, state and transition models are used to illustrate how differences in resilience and resistance influence potential alternative vegetation states, transitions among states, and thresholds. At landscape scales management strategies based on resilience and resistance—protection, prevention, restoration, and monitoring and adaptive management—are used to determine priority management areas and appropriate actions.

  6. Segmental dynamics in polymers: from cold melts to ageing and stressed glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K; Saltzman, E J; Schweizer, K S

    2009-12-16

    Recent progress in developing statistical mechanical theories of supercooled polymer melts and glasses is reviewed. The focus is on those approaches that are either explicitly formulated for polymers, or are applications of more generic theories to interpret polymeric phenomena. These include two configurational entropy theories, a percolated free volume distribution model, and the activated barrier hopping nonlinear Langevin theory. Both chemically-specific and universal aspects are discussed. After a brief summary of classic phenomenological approaches, a discussion of the relevant length scales and key experimental phenomena in both the supercooled liquid and glassy solid state is presented including ageing and nonlinear mechanical response. The central concepts that underlie the theories in the molten state are then summarized and key predictions discussed, including the glass transition in oriented polymer liquids and deformed rubber networks. Physical ageing occurs in the nonequilibrium glass, and theories for its consequences on the alpha relaxation are discussed. Very recent progress in developing a segment scale theory for the dramatic effects of external stress on polymer glasses, including acceleration of relaxation, yielding, plastic flow and strain hardening, is summarized. The article concludes with a discussion of outstanding theoretical challenges.

  7. Cyanobacterial Alkanes Modulate Photosynthetic Cyclic Electron Flow to Assist Growth under Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berla, Bertram M; Saha, Rajib; Maranas, Costas D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2015-10-13

    All cyanobacterial membranes contain diesel-range C15-C19 hydrocarbons at concentrations similar to chlorophyll. Recently, two universal but mutually exclusive hydrocarbon production pathways in cyanobacteria were discovered. We engineered a mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that produces no alkanes, which grew poorly at low temperatures. We analyzed this defect by assessing the redox kinetics of PSI. The mutant exhibited enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF), especially at low temperature. CEF raises the ATP:NADPH ratio from photosynthesis and balances reductant requirements of biosynthesis with maintaining the redox poise of the electron transport chain. We conducted in silico flux balance analysis and showed that growth rate reaches a distinct maximum for an intermediate value of CEF equivalent to recycling 1 electron in 4 from PSI to the plastoquinone pool. Based on this analysis, we conclude that the lack of membrane alkanes causes higher CEF, perhaps for maintenance of redox poise. In turn, increased CEF reduces growth by forcing the cell to use less energy-efficient pathways, lowering the quantum efficiency of photosynthesis. This study highlights the unique and universal role of medium-chain hydrocarbons in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes: they regulate redox balance and reductant partitioning in these oxygenic photosynthetic cells under stress.

  8. Noninvasive evaluation of mental stress using by a refined rough set technique based on biomedical signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tung-Kuan; Chen, Yeh-Peng; Hou, Zone-Yuan; Wang, Chao-Chih; Chou, Jyh-Horng

    2014-06-01

    Evaluating and treating of stress can substantially benefits to people with health problems. Currently, mental stress evaluated using medical questionnaires. However, the accuracy of this evaluation method is questionable because of variations caused by factors such as cultural differences and individual subjectivity. Measuring of biomedical signals is an effective method for estimating mental stress that enables this problem to be overcome. However, the relationship between the levels of mental stress and biomedical signals remain poorly understood. A refined rough set algorithm is proposed to determine the relationship between mental stress and biomedical signals, this algorithm combines rough set theory with a hybrid Taguchi-genetic algorithm, called RS-HTGA. Two parameters were used for evaluating the performance of the proposed RS-HTGA method. A dataset obtained from a practice clinic comprising 362 cases (196 male, 166 female) was adopted to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. The empirical results indicate that the proposed method can achieve acceptable accuracy in medical practice. Furthermore, the proposed method was successfully used to identify the relationship between mental stress levels and bio-medical signals. In addition, the comparison between the RS-HTGA and a support vector machine (SVM) method indicated that both methods yield good results. The total averages for sensitivity, specificity, and precision were greater than 96%, the results indicated that both algorithms produced highly accurate results, but a substantial difference in discrimination existed among people with Phase 0 stress. The SVM algorithm shows 89% and the RS-HTGA shows 96%. Therefore, the RS-HTGA is superior to the SVM algorithm. The kappa test results for both algorithms were greater than 0.936, indicating high accuracy and consistency. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for both the RS-HTGA and a SVM method were greater than 0.77, indicating

  9. Stable Signal Peptides and the Response to Secretion Stress in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craney, Arryn; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2017-12-12

    Protein secretion is essential, but how it is managed is poorly understood. In bacteria, most secreted proteins require release from the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane by type I signal peptidase (SPase), which cleaves the mature protein from its membrane-bound N-terminal signal peptide. As the first step that occurs outside the protected cytoplasmic environment and because insufficient activity can rapidly result in the toxic accumulation of preproteins, the activity of SPase is expected to be closely monitored and perhaps supplemented when insufficient. Indeed, we previously demonstrated that inhibition of SPase in Staphylococcus aureus results in derepression of the ayrRABC operon, which encodes an alternate mechanism to release proteins. However, in this case, the proteins are released with partially intact signal peptides, with the exception of IsaA, which is released with a virtually intact signal peptide. Here we show that mutation of AyrA [ayrA(R233K)] results in constitutive derepression of ayrRABC and that mutation of IsaA's signal peptide [isaA(K2Q)] results in hyperderepression upon SPase inhibition, which also requires AyrA. Further studies demonstrate that the inducing signal for ayrRABC derepression is accumulation of a subset of preproteins with signal peptides that are stable toward further processing and that the signal is critically amplified by the K2Q mutation and relayed to AyrR by AyrA. These results elucidate the mechanism by which S. aureus monitors and responds to secretion stress. The presence of ayrRA in other bacteria suggests that it may represent a general strategy linking membrane stress to appropriate transcriptional responses.IMPORTANCE Bacteria interact with their environment by secreting proteins that perform a myriad of functions, and the final step is the release of the mature protein from the cell surface via the activity of type I signal peptidase (SPase). While the bacterial response to many stresses is understood

  10. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Shoots and Roots of TNG67 and TCN1 Rice Seedlings under Cold Stress and Following Subsequent Recovery: Insights into Metabolic Pathways, Phytohormones, and Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Wei Yang

    Full Text Available Cold stress affects rice growth, quality and yield. The investigation of genome-wide gene expression is important for understanding cold stress tolerance in rice. We performed comparative transcriptome analysis of the shoots and roots of 2 rice seedlings (TNG67, cold-tolerant; and TCN1, cold-sensitive in response to low temperatures and restoration of normal temperatures following cold exposure. TNG67 tolerated cold stress via rapid alterations in gene expression and the re-establishment of homeostasis, whereas the opposite was observed in TCN1, especially after subsequent recovery. Gene ontology and pathway analyses revealed that cold stress substantially regulated the expression of genes involved in protein metabolism, modification, translation, stress responses, and cell death. TNG67 takes advantage of energy-saving and recycling resources to more efficiently synthesize metabolites compared with TCN1 during adjustment to cold stress. During recovery, expression of OsRR4 type-A response regulators was upregulated in TNG67 shoots, whereas that of genes involved in oxidative stress, chemical stimuli and carbohydrate metabolic processes was downregulated in TCN1. Expression of genes related to protein metabolism, modification, folding and defense responses was upregulated in TNG67 but not in TCN1 roots. In addition, abscisic acid (ABA-, polyamine-, auxin- and jasmonic acid (JA-related genes were preferentially regulated in TNG67 shoots and roots and were closely associated with cold stress tolerance. The TFs AP2/ERF were predominantly expressed in the shoots and roots of both TNG67 and TCN1. The TNG67-preferred TFs which express in shoot or root, such as OsIAA23, SNAC2, OsWRKY1v2, 24, 53, 71, HMGB, OsbHLH and OsMyb, may be good candidates for cold stress tolerance-related genes in rice. Our findings highlight important alterations in the expression of cold-tolerant genes, metabolic pathways, and hormone-related and TF-encoding genes in TNG67 rice

  11. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Shoots and Roots of TNG67 and TCN1 Rice Seedlings under Cold Stress and Following Subsequent Recovery: Insights into Metabolic Pathways, Phytohormones, and Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Wei; Chen, Hung-Chi; Jen, Wei-Fu; Liu, Li-Yu; Chang, Men-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cold stress affects rice growth, quality and yield. The investigation of genome-wide gene expression is important for understanding cold stress tolerance in rice. We performed comparative transcriptome analysis of the shoots and roots of 2 rice seedlings (TNG67, cold-tolerant; and TCN1, cold-sensitive) in response to low temperatures and restoration of normal temperatures following cold exposure. TNG67 tolerated cold stress via rapid alterations in gene expression and the re-establishment of homeostasis, whereas the opposite was observed in TCN1, especially after subsequent recovery. Gene ontology and pathway analyses revealed that cold stress substantially regulated the expression of genes involved in protein metabolism, modification, translation, stress responses, and cell death. TNG67 takes advantage of energy-saving and recycling resources to more efficiently synthesize metabolites compared with TCN1 during adjustment to cold stress. During recovery, expression of OsRR4 type-A response regulators was upregulated in TNG67 shoots, whereas that of genes involved in oxidative stress, chemical stimuli and carbohydrate metabolic processes was downregulated in TCN1. Expression of genes related to protein metabolism, modification, folding and defense responses was upregulated in TNG67 but not in TCN1 roots. In addition, abscisic acid (ABA)-, polyamine-, auxin- and jasmonic acid (JA)-related genes were preferentially regulated in TNG67 shoots and roots and were closely associated with cold stress tolerance. The TFs AP2/ERF were predominantly expressed in the shoots and roots of both TNG67 and TCN1. The TNG67-preferred TFs which express in shoot or root, such as OsIAA23, SNAC2, OsWRKY1v2, 24, 53, 71, HMGB, OsbHLH and OsMyb, may be good candidates for cold stress tolerance-related genes in rice. Our findings highlight important alterations in the expression of cold-tolerant genes, metabolic pathways, and hormone-related and TF-encoding genes in TNG67 rice during cold

  12. Diverse accumulation of several dehydrin-like proteins in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis), Arabidopsis thaliana and yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) mitochondria under cold and heat stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Dehydrins represent hydrophilic proteins acting mainly during cell dehydration and stress response. Dehydrins are generally thermostable; however, the so-called dehydrin-like (dehydrin-related) proteins show variable thermolability. Both groups immunoreact with antibodies directed against the K-segment of dehydrins. Plant mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins are poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to extend previous reports on plant dehydrins by comparing the level of immunoprecipitated dehydrin-like proteins in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis), Arabidopsis thaliana and yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) mitochondria under cold and heat stress. Results All the analyzed plant species showed constitutive accumulation of thermostable mitochondrial putative dehydrins ranging from 50 to 70 kDa. The mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins observed in cauliflower and Arabidopsis ranged from 10 to 100 kDa and in lupin imbibed seeds and hypocotyls - from 20 to 90 kDa. Cold treatment increased mainly the accumulation of 10-100 kDa cauliflower and Arabidopsis dehydrin-like proteins, in the patterns different in cauliflower leaf and inflorescence mitochondria. However, in lupin mitochondria, cold affected mainly 25-50 kDa proteins and seemed to induce the appearance of some novel dehydrin-like proteins. The influence of frost stress on cauliflower leaf mitochondrial dehydrin- like proteins was less significant. The impact of heat stress was less significant in lupin and Arabidopsis than in cauliflower inflorescence mitochondria. Cauliflower mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins are localized mostly in the mitochondrial matrix; it seems that some of them may interact with mitochondrial membranes. Conclusions All the results reveal an unexpectedly broad spectrum of dehydrin-like proteins accumulated during some abiotic stress in the mitochondria of the plant species analyzed. They display only limited similarity in size to those reported previously

  13. Dysregulated phosphatidylinositol signaling promotes endoplasmic-reticulum-stress-mediated intestinal mucosal injury and inflammation in zebrafish

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    Prakash C. Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulated phosphatidylinositol (PI signaling has been implicated in human gastrointestinal (GI malignancies and inflammatory states, underlining the need to study pathophysiological roles of PI in an in vivo genetic model. Here, we study the significance of PI in GI pathophysiology using the zebrafish mutant cdipthi559, which lacks PI synthesis, and unravel a crucial role of PI in intestinal mucosal integrity and inflammation. The cdipthi559 mutants exhibit abnormal villous architecture and disorganized proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, with pathologies reminiscent of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including apoptosis of goblet cells, abnormal mucosecretion, bacterial overgrowth and leukocyte infiltration. The mutant IECs exhibit vacuolation, microvillus atrophy and impaired proliferation. The cdipthi559 gene expression profile shows enrichment of acute phase response signaling, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress factors hspa5 and xbp1 are robustly activated in the mutant GI tissue. Temporal electron micrographic analyses reveal that PI-deficient IECs undergo sequential ER-Golgi disruption, mitochondrial depletion, macroautophagy and cell death, consistent with chronic ER-stress-mediated cytopathology. Furthermore, pharmacological induction of ER stress by inhibiting protein glycosylation or PI synthase inhibition in leukocyte-specific reporter lines replicates the cdipthi559 inflammatory phenotype, suggesting a fundamental role of PI metabolism and ER stress in mucosal inflammation. Antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs resolved the inflammation, but not the autophagic necroapoptosis of IECs, suggesting that bacterial overgrowth can exacerbate ER stress pathology, whereas persistent ER stress is sufficient to trigger inflammation. Interestingly, the intestinal phenotype was partially alleviated by chemical chaperones, suggesting their therapeutic potential. Using zebrafish genetic and pharmacological models, this

  14. Heat stress differentially modifies ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in pea floral and fruit tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savada, Raghavendra P; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Jayasinghege, Charitha P A; Waduthanthri, Kosala D; Reinecke, Dennis M

    2017-10-01

    Ethylene biosynthesis is regulated in reproductive tissues in response to heat stress in a manner to optimize resource allocation to pollinated fruits with developing seeds. High temperatures during reproductive development are particularly detrimental to crop fruit/seed production. Ethylene plays vital roles in plant development and abiotic stress responses; however, little is known about ethylene's role in reproductive tissues during development under heat stress. We assessed ethylene biosynthesis and signaling regulation within the reproductive and associated tissues of pea during the developmental phase that sets the stage for fruit-set and seed development under normal and heat-stress conditions. The transcript abundance profiles of PsACS [encode enzymes that convert S-adenosyl-L-methionine to 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC)] and PsACO (encode enzymes that convert ACC to ethylene), and ethylene evolution were developmentally, environmentally, and tissue-specifically regulated in the floral/fruit/pedicel tissues of pea. Higher transcript abundance of PsACS and PsACO in the ovaries, and PsACO in the pedicels was correlated with higher ethylene evolution and ovary senescence and pedicel abscission in fruits that were not pollinated under control temperature conditions. Under heat-stress conditions, up-regulation of ethylene biosynthesis gene expression in pre-pollinated ovaries was also associated with higher ethylene evolution and lower retention of these fruits. Following successful pollination and ovule fertilization, heat-stress modified PsACS and PsACO transcript profiles in a manner that suppressed ovary ethylene evolution. The normal ethylene burst in the stigma/style and petals following pollination was also suppressed by heat-stress. Transcript abundance profiles of ethylene receptor and signaling-related genes acted as qualitative markers of tissue ethylene signaling events. These data support the hypothesis that ethylene biosynthesis is

  15. Overexpression of OsCYP19-4 increases tolerance to cold stress and enhances grain yield in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dae Hwa; Lee, Sang Sook; Park, Hyun Ji; Lyu, Jae Il; Chong, Won Seog; Liu, Jang Ryol; Kim, Beom-Gi; Ahn, Jun Cheul; Cho, Hye Sun

    2016-01-01

    AtCYP19-4 (also known as CYP5) was previously identified as interacting in vitro with GNOM, a member of a large family of ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors that is required for proper polar localization of the auxin efflux carrier PIN1. The present study demonstrated that OsCYP19-4, a gene encoding a putative homologue of AtCYP19-4, was up-regulated by several stresses and showed over 10-fold up-regulation in response to cold. The study further demonstrated that the promoter of OsCYP19-4 was activated in response to cold stress. An OsCYP19-4-GFP fusion protein was targeted to the outside of the plasma membrane via the endoplasmic reticulum as determined using brefeldin A, a vesicle trafficking inhibitor. An in vitro assay with a synthetic substrate oligomer confirmed that OsCYP19-4 had peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity, as was previously reported for AtCYP19-4. Rice plants overexpressing OsCYP19-4 showed cold-resistance phenotypes with significantly increased tiller and spike numbers, and consequently enhanced grain weight, compared with wild-type plants. Based on these results, the authors suggest that OsCYP19-4 is required for developmental acclimation to environmental stresses, especially cold. Furthermore, the results point to the potential of manipulating OsCYP19-4 expression to enhance cold tolerance or to increase biomass. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. A cold-induced myo-inositol transporter-like gene confers tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambe, Mame Abdou Nahr; He, Xueying; Tu, Qinghua; Guo, Zhenfei

    2015-03-01

    A full length cDNA encoding a myo-inositol transporter-like protein, named as MfINT-like, was cloned from Medicago sativa subsp. falcata (herein falcata), a species with greater cold tolerance than alfalfa (M. sativa subsp. sativa). MfINT-like is located on plasma membranes. MfINT-like transcript was induced 2-4 h after exogenous myo-inositol treatment, 24-96 h with cold, and 96 h by salinity. Given that myo-inositol accumulates higher in falcata after 24 h of cold treatment, myo-inositol is proposed to be involved in cold-induced expression of MfINT-like. Higher levels of myo-inositol was observed in leaves of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing MfINT-like than the wild-type but not in the roots of plants grown on myo-inositol containing medium, suggesting that transgenic plants had higher myo-inositol transport activity than the wild-type. Transgenic plants survived better to freezing temperature, and had lower ion leakage and higher maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv /Fm ) after chilling treatment. In addition, greater plant fresh weight was observed in transgenic plants as compared with the wild-type when plants were grown under drought or salinity stress. The results suggest that MfINT-like mediated transport of myo-inositol is associated with plant tolerance to abiotic stresses. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  18. A transcriptome resource for the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 under cold and high hydrostatic pressure shock stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Huahua; Li, Shengkang; Tang, Xixiang; Xiao, Xiang

    2016-12-01

    Low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) are two of the most remarkable environmental factors influencing deep-sea ecosystem. The adaptive mechanisms of microorganisms which live in these extreme environments to low temperature and high pressure warrant investigation. In this study, the global gene expression patterns of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 in response to cold (0 °C) and HHP (50 MPa) shock were evaluated through DNA microarray analysis. Results revealed that 22, 66, and 106 genes were differentially expressed after WP3 was respectively exposed to cold shock for 30, 60, and 90 min. Of these genes, 16 genes were identified as common differentially expressed genes (DEGs). After 30 min and 120 min of HHP shock, 5 and 10 genes were respectively identified as DEGs. The hierarchical clustering analysis of the DEG pattern indicated that WP3 may employ different adaptive strategies to cope with cold and HHP shock stress. Taken together, our study provided a transcriptome resource for deep-sea bacterial responses to cold and HHP stress. This study also established a basis for further investigations on environmental adaptive mechanisms utilized by benthic bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effects of Cold Stress at Germination and Seedling Stages on Antioxidant Enzymes and Some Physiological Aspects of Chickpea (Cicer arientinum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wanaei

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of cold stress on antioxidant enzymes and physiological characteristics in chickpea, two separate experiments were conducted at germination and seedling stages. Each experiment with six temperature levels (T1(control=15C°, T2=5C°, T3=0C°, T4=-5C°, T5=-10C° and T6=-15C° and three varieties (V1=Pirouz V2=ILC482 V3=Bivaniej was carried out in a randomized complete block design with three replications at controlled condition in crop physiological laboratory of Kurdistan university at 2009. The results showed that cold treatment increased Catalase and Peroxdase activity, cell membrane injury and H2O2 concentration significantly. The temperature -5C° treatment had the most influence on physiological traits. Based on germination stage trial, ILC482 was known as resistance cultivar and Pirouz showed highest sensitivity to cold treatments. There were positive and significant correlation between H2O2 concentration with Catalase (r = 0.98** and Peroxidase (r = 0.89** at germination stage. Peroxidase activity was about tenfold more of the Catalase activity. In general, the results showed that cold stress increased reactive oxygen species; these product lead to oxidative damages to cell membrane.

  20. Measurement of heart rate variability and stress evaluation by using microwave reflectometric vital signal sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, Daisuke; Mase, Atsushi

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we present two robust signal processing techniques for stress evaluation using a microwave reflectometric cardiopulmonary sensing instrument. These techniques enable the heart rate variability (HRV) to be recovered from measurements of body-surface dynamic motion, which is subsequently used for the stress evaluation. Specifically, two novel elements are introduced: one is a reconfiguration of the HRV from the cross-correlation function between a measurement signal and a template signal which is constructed by averaging periodic component over a measurement time. The other is a reconstruction of the HRV from the time variation of the heartbeat frequency; this is evaluated by a repetition of the maximum entropy method. These two signal processing techniques accomplish the reconstruction of the HRV, though they are completely different algorithms. For validations of our model, an experimental setup is presented and several sets of experimental data are analyzed using the two proposed signal processing techniques, which are subsequently used for the stress evaluation. The results presented herein are consistent with electrocardiogram data.

  1. The role of carbon monoxide signaling in the responses of plants to abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huyi; He, Longfei

    2014-11-15

    Whether carbon monoxide (CO) exerts toxic or protective effect is dependent on the concentration and location of CO in animals. Similarly, it has been increasingly evident that CO also is involved in diverse physiological processes in plants, from seed germination and dormancy to stomatal closure to regulation of multiple environmental stresses. In this review, we focus on CO synthesis and the role of CO in plant responses to abiotic stresses, such as salinity, drought, cadmium and mercury. In general, abiotic stresses induce CO production in plants. CO can alleviate oxidative damage by improving the activities of antioxidative enzymes and antioxidant metabolism. In addition, cross talk between CO signaling and other signaling molecules including nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) also is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Signal Characteristic of acoustic emission from plant by the water stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Woo [Pukyong National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-15

    To improve environmental control in plant, a signal characteristics of plant has been studied by a nondestructive technique. Hereupon, the acoustic emission (AE) for plant was discussed for water stress detection. AE signals were taken from angiosperms and gymnosperm. It has found that the AE sensor could detect the AE signals on the plant stem right below the sensor. The AE hit counts in daytime was higher than that in night tim, and it was realised that the daily hit counts pattern corresponded with the water stress in the plant. The frequency band of the angiosperms was different from the gymnosperm. The frequency band from outdoor was in accord with that of indoor obtained from the same conditions.

  3. Making memories of stressful events: a journey along epigenetic, gene transcription and signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M.H.M. eReul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong psychologically stressful events are known to have a long-lasting impact on behavior. The consolidation of such, largely adaptive, behavioral responses to stressful events involves changes in gene expression in limbic brain regions such as the hippocampus and amygdala. The underlying molecular mechanisms however were until recently unresolved. More than a decade ago we started to investigate the role of these hormones in signaling and epigenetic mechanisms participating in the effects of stress on gene transcription in hippocampal neurons. We discovered a novel, rapid non-genomic mechanism in which glucocorticoids via glucocorticoid receptors (GRs facilitate signaling of the ERK MAPK signaling pathway to the downstream nuclear kinases MSK1 and Elk-1 in dentate gyrus (DG granule neurons. Activation of this signaling pathway results in serine10 (S10 phosphorylation and lysine14 (K14 acetylation at histone H3 (H3S10p-K14ac, leading to the induction of the immediate early genes c-Fos and Egr-1. In addition, we found a role of the DNA methylation status of gene promoters. A series of studies showed that these molecular mechanisms play a critical role in the long-lasting consolidation of behavioral responses in the forced swim test and Morris water maze. Furthermore, an important role of GABA was found in controlling the epigenetic and gene transcriptional responses to psychological stress. Thus, psychologically stressful events evoke a long-term impact on behavior through changes in hippocampal function brought about by distinct glutamatergic and glucocorticoid-driven changes in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription which are modulated by (local GABAergic interneurons and limbic afferent inputs. These epigenetic processes may play an important role in the etiology of stress-related mental disorders such as major depressive and anxiety disorders like PTSD.

  4. Statistical Analysis of Stress Signals from Bridge Monitoring by FBG System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Ye

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG-based stress monitoring system instrumented on an orthotropic steel deck arch bridge is demonstrated. The FBG sensors are installed at two types of critical fatigue-prone welded joints to measure the strain and temperature signals. A total of 64 FBG sensors are deployed around the rib-to-deck and rib-to-diagram areas at the mid-span and quarter-span of the investigated orthotropic steel bridge. The local stress behaviors caused by the highway loading and temperature effect during the construction and operation periods are presented with the aid of a wavelet multi-resolution analysis approach. In addition, the multi-modal characteristic of the rainflow counted stress spectrum is modeled by the method of finite mixture distribution together with a genetic algorithm (GA-based parameter estimation approach. The optimal probability distribution of the stress spectrum is determined by use of Bayesian information criterion (BIC. Furthermore, the hot spot stress of the welded joint is calculated by an extrapolation method recommended in the specification of International Institute of Welding (IIW. The stochastic characteristic of stress concentration factor (SCF of the concerned welded joint is addressed. The proposed FBG-based stress monitoring system and probabilistic stress evaluation methods can provide an effective tool for structural monitoring and condition assessment of orthotropic steel bridges.

  5. Statistical Analysis of Stress Signals from Bridge Monitoring by FBG System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiao-Wei; Su, You-Hua; Xi, Pei-Sen

    2018-02-07

    In this paper, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG)-based stress monitoring system instrumented on an orthotropic steel deck arch bridge is demonstrated. The FBG sensors are installed at two types of critical fatigue-prone welded joints to measure the strain and temperature signals. A total of 64 FBG sensors are deployed around the rib-to-deck and rib-to-diagram areas at the mid-span and quarter-span of the investigated orthotropic steel bridge. The local stress behaviors caused by the highway loading and temperature effect during the construction and operation periods are presented with the aid of a wavelet multi-resolution analysis approach. In addition, the multi-modal characteristic of the rainflow counted stress spectrum is modeled by the method of finite mixture distribution together with a genetic algorithm (GA)-based parameter estimation approach. The optimal probability distribution of the stress spectrum is determined by use of Bayesian information criterion (BIC). Furthermore, the hot spot stress of the welded joint is calculated by an extrapolation method recommended in the specification of International Institute of Welding (IIW). The stochastic characteristic of stress concentration factor (SCF) of the concerned welded joint is addressed. The proposed FBG-based stress monitoring system and probabilistic stress evaluation methods can provide an effective tool for structural monitoring and condition assessment of orthotropic steel bridges.

  6. Silicon: a duo synergy for regulating crop growth and hormonal signaling under abiotic stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon-Ha; Khan, Abdul Latif; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-12-01

    Abiotic stresses, such as salinity, heavy metals and drought, are some of the most devastating factors hindering sustainable crop production today. Plants use their own defensive strategies to cope with the adverse effects of these stresses, via the regulation of the expression of essential phytohormones, such as gibberellins (GA), salicylic acid (SA), jasmonates (JA), abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene (ET). However, the efficacy of the endogenous defensive arsenals of plants often falls short if the stress persists over an extended period. Various strategies are developed to improve stress tolerance in plants. For example, silicon (Si) is widely considered to possess significant potential as a substance which ameliorate the negative effects of abiotic stresses, and improves plant growth and biomass accumulation. This review aims to explain how Si application influences the signaling of the endogenous hormones GA, SA, ABA, JA and ET during salinity, wounding, drought and metal stresses in crop plants. Phytohormonal cross talk plays an important role in the regulation of induced defences against stress. However, detailed molecular and proteomic research into these interactions is needed in order to identify the underlying mechanisms of stress tolerance that is imparted by Si application and uptake.

  7. The allosteric behavior of Fur mediates oxidative stress signal transduction in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePelliciari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is exposed to oxidative stress originating from the aerobic environment, the oxidative burst of phagocytes and the formation of reactive oxygen species, catalyzed by iron excess. Accordingly, the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress defense have been repeatedly linked to the ferric uptake regulator Fur. Moreover, mutations in the Fur protein affect the resistance to metronidazole, likely due to loss-of-function in the regulation of genes involved in redox control. Although many advances in the molecular understanding of HpFur function were made, little is known about the mechanisms that enable Fur to mediate the responses to oxidative stress.Here we show that iron-inducible, apo-Fur repressed genes, such as pfr and hydA, are induced shortly after oxidative stress, while their oxidative induction is lost in a fur knockout strain. On the contrary, holo-Fur repressed genes, such as frpB1 and fecA1, vary modestly in response to oxidative stress. This indicates that the oxidative stress signal specifically targets apo-Fur repressed genes, rather than impairing indiscriminately the regulatory function of Fur. Footprinting analyses showed that the oxidative signal strongly impairs the binding affinity of Fur towards apo-operators, while the binding towards holo-operators is less affected. Further evidence is presented that a reduced state of Fur is needed to maintain apo-repression, while oxidative conditions shift the preferred binding architecture of Fur towards the holo-operator binding conformation, even in the absence of iron. Together the results demonstrate that the allosteric regulation of Fur enables transduction of oxidative stress signals in H. pylori, supporting the concept that apo-Fur repressed genes can be considered oxidation inducible Fur regulatory targets. These findings may have important implications in the study of H. pylori treatment and resistance to

  8. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics reveals the biochemical mechanism of cold stress adaption of razor clam during controlled freezing-point storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Chu, Jianjun; Fu, Linglin; Wang, Yanbo; Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Deqing

    2018-05-01

    Razor clam is a major cultivated shellfish of great economic importance and high nutritional value. Due to high corruptible potential, razor clam is generally preserved by controlled freezing-point storage (CFPS). Here, we applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling to investigate the biochemical mechanism of cold stress adaption in razor clam during CFPS. In total, 369 proteins were quantified, and 27 of them were identified as differentially expressed proteins during CFPS, mostly involved in energy metabolism process, DNA duplication and protein synthesis, and stress response, specifically, MAPK is the predominant pathway. Further qPCR results revealed H2A and S6K 2 alpha to be the critical post-transcriptionally regulated genes. Our results provided proteomics information with respect to the biochemical mechanism of cold stress adaption in razor clam, shed light on the further elongation of razor clams storage period, and help clarify the novel mechanisms of cold tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Soybean DREB1/CBF-type transcription factors function in heat and drought as well as cold stress-responsive gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidokoro, Satoshi; Watanabe, Keitaro; Ohori, Teppei; Moriwaki, Takashi; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Mizoi, Junya; Myint Phyu Sin Htwe, Nang; Fujita, Yasunari; Sekita, Sachiko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2015-02-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is a globally important crop, and its growth and yield are severely reduced by abiotic stresses, such as drought, heat, and cold. The cis-acting element DRE (dehydration-responsive element)/CRT plays an important role in activating gene expression in response to these stresses. The Arabidopsis DREB1/CBF genes that encode DRE-binding proteins function as transcriptional activators in the cold stress responsive gene expression. In this study, we identified 14 DREB1-type transcription factors (GmDREB1s) from a soybean genome database. The expression of most GmDREB1 genes in soybean was strongly induced by a variety of abiotic stresses, such as cold, drought, high salt, and heat. The GmDREB1 proteins activated transcription via DREs (dehydration-responsive element) in Arabidopsis and soybean protoplasts. Transcriptome analyses using transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing GmDREB1s indicated that many of the downstream genes are cold-inducible and overlap with those of Arabidopsis DREB1A. We then comprehensively analyzed the downstream genes of GmDREB1B;1, which is closely related to DREB1A, using a transient expression system in soybean protoplasts. The expression of numerous genes induced by various abiotic stresses were increased by overexpressing GmDREB1B;1 in soybean, and DREs were the most conserved element in the promoters of these genes. The downstream genes of GmDREB1B;1 included numerous soybean-specific stress-inducible genes that encode an ABA receptor family protein, GmPYL21, and translation-related genes, such as ribosomal proteins. We confirmed that GmDREB1B;1 directly activates GmPYL21 expression and enhances ABRE-mediated gene expression in an ABA-independent manner. These results suggest that GmDREB1 proteins activate the expression of numerous soybean-specific stress-responsive genes under diverse abiotic stress conditions. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Redox signalling and mitochondrial stress responses; lessons from inborn errors of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Cornelius, Nanna; Gregersen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    in the form of oxidative stress, has been linked to a wide variety of diseases including inborn errors of metabolism. In this review we will summarize how the functional state of mitochondria -- and especially the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced in connection with the respiratory...... chain -- regulates cellular stress responses by redox regulation of nuclear gene networks involved in repair systems to maintain cellular homeostasis and health. Based on our own and other's studies we re-introduce the ROS triangle model and discuss how inborn errors of mitochondrial metabolism......, by production of pathological amounts of ROS, may cause disturbed redox signalling and induce chronic cell stress with non-resolving or compromised cell repair responses and increased susceptibility to cell stress induced cell death. We suggest that this model may have important implications for those inborn...

  11. Autoinducer-2 signaling is involved in regulation of stress-related genes of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Li, Tao; Dai, Shang; Yu, Jiangliu; Chen, Xiuqin; Wang, Liangyan; Wang, Yunguang; Hua, Yuejin; Tian, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) serves as a quorum-sensing signaling molecule that mediates both intraspecies and interspecies communication among bacteria, and plays critical roles in regulating various bacterial behaviors. In the present study, we investigated the functions of AI-2 signaling in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 by construction of the LuxS gene disruption mutant, survival phenotype assay and gene transcription assay. The gene mutant (DRΔLuxS), which was unable to produce AI-2, was significantly more sensitive to both gamma radiation and H2O2 compared with the wild-type strain. Addition of the wild-type-derived spent medium into the cell culture of DRΔLuxS fully restored the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. A higher level of reactive oxygen species accumulated in the mutant compared with the wild type under normal or oxidative stress. Quantitative real-time PCR assays showed that transcriptional levels of stress-related proteins, including catalase, extracellular nuclease, Dps-1 and ABC transporters, were decreased in DRΔLuxS, indicating that AI-2 is involved in regulation of stress-related genes of D. radiodurans. Hence, AI-2 signaling may contribute to the extreme resistance of D. radiodurans to radiation and oxidative stresses.

  12. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-08

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.  Created: 2/8/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 2/8/2016.

  13. Jasmonates: signal transduction components and their roles in environmental stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Jonas; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Schweizer, Fabian; Goossens, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Jasmonates, oxylipin-type plant hormones, are implicated in diverse aspects of plant growth development and interaction with the environment. Following diverse developmental and environmental cues, jasmonate is produced, conjugated to the amino acid isoleucine and perceived by a co-receptor complex composed of the Jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) repressor proteins and an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing the F-box CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1). This event triggers the degradation of the JAZ proteins and the release of numerous transcription factors, including MYC2 and its homologues, which are otherwise bound and inhibited by the JAZ repressors. Here, we will review the role of the COI1, JAZ and MYC2 proteins in the interaction of the plant with its environment, illustrating the significance of jasmonate signalling, and of the proteins involved, for responses to both biotic stresses caused by insects and numerous microbial pathogens and abiotic stresses caused by adverse climatic conditions. It has also become evident that crosstalk with other hormone signals, as well as light and clock signals, plays an important role in the control and fine-tuning of these stress responses. Finally, we will discuss how several pathogens exploit the jasmonate perception and early signalling machinery to decoy the plants defence systems.

  14. Oxidative stress parameters in juvenile Brazilian flounder Paralichthys orbignyanus (Valenciennes, 1839 (Pleuronectiformes: Paralichthyidae exposed to cold and heat shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano de O. Garcia

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine oxidative stress parameters in the liver and gill of Brazilian flounder juveniles (307.0 ± 16.0 g and 30.0 ± 4.0 cm submitted to different water temperature (17.1, 23.0 and 28.8ºC for 72 h and maintained at salinity 25‰. After the acclimation of 7 days, in 23ºC, fish were transferred to 200 L tanks containing seawater (salinity 25‰ at 28.8ºC (heat shock, 17.1ºC (cold shock or 23.0ºC (control, five replicates (five fish tank-1. The sampled collection occurred in 0 (pre-challenge, 3, 24, 48 and 72 h after temperature shock. Flounder exposed to 17.1ºC and 28.8ºC showed significantly higher TBARS levels and GST activity in the liver post-exposition (PE in relation to the control (23ºC. CAT activity in liver present a significantly increase at 17.1ºC, in first 48 h, and subsequently decrease in 72 h PE in relation to 28.8ºC. The gills of flounder showed significantly higher TBARS levels, GST and CAT activity when submitted at 17.1 and 28.8ºC in relation to 23.0ºC. There were observed changes in lipid peroxidation levels (LPO, CAT and GST activities in the liver and gill of Brazilian flounder in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by thermal shocks.

  15. Dry skin conditions are related to the recovery rate of skin temperature after cold stress rather than to blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida-Amano, Yasuko; Nomura, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Iwata, Kayoko; Higaki, Yuko; Tanahashi, Masanori

    2017-02-01

    Cutaneous blood flow plays an important role in the thermoregulation, oxygen supply, and nutritional support necessary to maintain the skin. However, there is little evidence for a link between blood flow and skin physiology. Therefore, we conducted surveys of healthy volunteers to determine the relationship(s) between dry skin properties and cutaneous vascular function. Water content of the stratum corneum, transepidermal water loss, and visual dryness score were investigated as dry skin parameters. Cutaneous blood flow in the resting state, the recovery rate (RR) of skin temperature on the hand after a cold-stress test, and the responsiveness of facial skin blood flow to local cooling were examined as indices of cutaneous vascular functions. The relationships between dry skin parameters and cutaneous vascular functions were assessed. The RR correlated negatively with the visual dryness score of skin on the leg but correlated positively with water content of the stratum corneum on the arm. No significant correlation between the resting state of blood flow and dry skin parameters was observed. In both the face and the body, deterioration in skin dryness from summer to winter was significant in subjects with low RR. The RR correlated well with the responsiveness of facial skin blood flow to local cooling, indicating that the RR affects systemic dry skin conditions. These results suggest that the RR but not blood flow at the resting state is associated with dry skin conditions and is involved in skin homeostasis during seasonal environmental changes. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society of Dermatology.

  16. CD47 signaling pathways controlling cellular differentiation and responses to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Pantoja, David R; Kaur, Sukhbir; Roberts, David D

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed integral membrane protein that serves as the counter-receptor for the inhibitory phagocyte receptor signal-regulatory protein-α (SIRPα) and as a signaling receptor for the secreted matricellular protein thrombospondin-1. Recent studies employing mice and somatic cells lacking CD47 have revealed important pathophysiological functions of CD47 in cardiovascular homeostasis, immune regulation, resistance of cells and tissues to stress and chronic diseases of aging including cancer. With the emergence of experimental therapeutics targeting CD47, a more thorough understanding of CD47 signal transduction is essential. CD47 lacks a substantial cytoplasmic signaling domain, but several cytoplasmic binding partners have been identified, and lateral interactions of CD47 with other membrane receptors play important roles in mediating signaling resulting from the binding of thrombospondin-1. This review addresses recent advances in identifying the lateral binding partners, signal transduction pathways and downstream transcription networks regulated through CD47 in specific cell lineages. Major pathways regulated by CD47 signaling include calcium homeostasis, cyclic nucleotide signaling, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis and signaling and stem cell transcription factors. These pathways and other undefined proximal mediators of CD47 signaling regulate cell death and protective autophagy responses, mitochondrial biogenesis, cell adhesion and motility and stem cell self-renewal. Although thrombospondin-1 is the best characterized agonist of CD47, the potential roles of other members of the thrombospondin family, SIRPα and SIRPγ binding and homotypic CD47 interactions as agonists or antagonists of signaling through CD47 should also be considered.

  17. NPKS uptake, sensing, and signaling and miRNAs in plant nutrient stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Manoj; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-05-01

    Sessile nature of higher plants consequently makes it highly adaptable for nutrient absorption and acquisition from soil. Plants require 17 essential elements for their growth and development which include 14 minerals (macronutrients: N, P, K, Mg, Ca, S; micronutrients: Cl, Fe, B, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mo) and 3 non-mineral (C, H, O) elements. The roots of higher plants must acquire these macronutrients and micronutrients