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Sample records for cold iron core

  1. Superconducting superferric dipole magnet with cold iron core for the VLHC

    CERN Document Server

    Foster, G W

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic system of the stage I Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) is based on 2 Tesla superconducting magnets with combined functions. These magnets have a room temperature iron yoke with two 20 mm air gaps. Magnetic field in both horizontally separated air gaps is generated by a single, 100 kA superconducting transmission line. An alternative design with a cold iron yoke, horizontally or vertically separated air gaps is under investigation. The cold iron option with horizontally separated air gaps reduces the amount of iron, which is one of the major cost drivers for the 233-km magnet system of future accelerator. The vertical beam separation decreases the superconductor volume, heat load from the synchrotron radiation and eliminates fringe field from the return bus. Nevertheless, the horizontal beam separation provides lowest volume of the iron yoke and, therefore, smaller heat load on the cryogenic system during cooling down. All these options are discussed and compared in the paper. Superconducting correct...

  2. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  3. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  4. Influence of New Sol-gel Refractory Coating on the Casting Properties of Cold Box and Furan Cores for Grey Cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Poulsen, T.; Bischoff, C

    2010-01-01

    New Sol-Gel coated sand cores made from coldbox and furan binder systems were investigated. The idea of the coating was to improve the surface quality of castings. Grey iron was cast on the cores in a sand casting process. The effect of the high temperature of the melt on the cores was assessed...... by measuring the heating curves. The viscosity of the coating, moisture content and the permeability of the cores were evaluated. The surface quality of the castings was investigated using SEM and OM. The results show that the moisture content of the cores affected the permeability. In furan cores the vapour...... transport zone (VTZ) when in contact with the melt is larger than it is in a coldbox which means the furan cores have higher moisture content. The new sol-gel coating has the potential for improving the surface quality of castings without negative effects on the graphite distribution. The surface...

  5. Advantages of iron core in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettis, E.S.; Ballou, J.K.; Becraft, W.R.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Watts, H.L.

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative comparison of the iron core vs air core concepts was carried out on a preliminary basis by using a representative tokamak reactor design with the following self-consistent reference parameters. In the area of plasma engineering, poloidal field and MHD equilibrium considerations with an unsaturated iron core is discussed. The question of proper poloidal field coils to maintain D-shaped plasmas of relatively high anti β (7%) with a saturated iron core is also discussed. Estimates of the required iron core size, volt seconds, magnetic flux and its influence on force loading on the superconducting toroidal field coils are shown. Conceptual designs of the mechanical structure of an iron core device are presented. Favorable impacts on the OH power supply cost and complexity are indicated

  6. On the collapse of iron stellar cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkat, Z.; Rakavy, G.; Reiss, Y.; Wilson, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The collapse of iron stellar cores is investigated to see whether the outward shock produced by the bounce at neutron star density is sufficient to burn appreciable amounts of the envelope around the iron core. Several models were tried, and in all cases no appreciable burn took place; hence no explosion results from the collapse of these models

  7. Core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2004-01-01

    We present studies of the magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. By combining Mossbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy we have been able to measure the change from a Fe3O4-like to a gamma-Fe2O3-like composition from the interface to the surface. Furthermore, we have...

  8. Extrap with iron-cored coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, B.

    1985-05-01

    In Extrap configurations there is a high average beta value with respect to the plasma confinement volume. The externally imposed magnetic field which is required for stabilization therefore comes out to have a rather moderate strength, even under expected reactor conditions. As a consequence, this field can be generated not only by conventional external conductor arrangements, but also by iron-cored coils being operated below the saturation limit. A proposal for such iron-cored coil systems is presented in this paper. As compared to conventional conductors, this has the advantage of localizing the magnetic energy of the externally imposed magnetic field mainly to the discharge vessel and the plasma volume, thereby increasing the engineering beta value substantially. Also the problems of the coil stresses and of irradiation of the coils appear to become simplified, as well as replacement of the coil system. A main limitation of this proposal is due to combination of iron core saturation with the required stabilization effect from an ion Larmor radius of sufficient relative magnitude. This limitaion requires further investigation, especially in the full-scale reactor case. Also the modifications of the field geometry by iron core shaping needs further analysis. (Author)

  9. Iron snow in the Martian core?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Christopher J.; Pommier, Anne

    2018-01-01

    The decline of Mars' global magnetic field some 3.8-4.1 billion years ago is thought to reflect the demise of the dynamo that operated in its liquid core. The dynamo was probably powered by planetary cooling and so its termination is intimately tied to the thermochemical evolution and present-day physical state of the Martian core. Bottom-up growth of a solid inner core, the crystallization regime for Earth's core, has been found to produce a long-lived dynamo leading to the suggestion that the Martian core remains entirely liquid to this day. Motivated by the experimentally-determined increase in the Fe-S liquidus temperature with decreasing pressure at Martian core conditions, we investigate whether Mars' core could crystallize from the top down. We focus on the "iron snow" regime, where newly-formed solid consists of pure Fe and is therefore heavier than the liquid. We derive global energy and entropy equations that describe the long-timescale thermal and magnetic history of the core from a general theory for two-phase, two-component liquid mixtures, assuming that the snow zone is in phase equilibrium and that all solid falls out of the layer and remelts at each timestep. Formation of snow zones occurs for a wide range of interior and thermal properties and depends critically on the initial sulfur concentration, ξ0. Release of gravitational energy and latent heat during growth of the snow zone do not generate sufficient entropy to restart the dynamo unless the snow zone occupies at least 400 km of the core. Snow zones can be 1.5-2 Gyrs old, though thermal stratification of the uppermost core, not included in our model, likely delays onset. Models that match the available magnetic and geodetic constraints have ξ0 ≈ 10% and snow zones that occupy approximately the top 100 km of the present-day Martian core.

  10. Toroidal equilibrium in an iron-core reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.

    1984-04-01

    An analytical theory of toroidal equilibrium in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch is obtained, including effects of iron cores and resistive shell. The iron cores alter the form of the equilibrium condition and cause the equilibrium to be unstable on the shell resistive time scale

  11. Vortex core properties in iron pnictides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharchuk I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of unconventional superconductivity in recently discovered Fe-based superconductors has been intensively discussed. A plausible candidate is the superconducting (SC pairing mediated by antiferromagnetic (AFM interactions. There are two different approaches predicting the s± pairing state, in which the SC gap shows an s-wave symmetry that changes sign between different Fermi-surface (FS sheets. The first one is based on the itinerant spin fluctuations promoted by FS nesting, and the second is based on the local AFM exchange couplings. We apply quasiclassical Eilenberger approach to the vortex state to calculate the cutoff parameter, ξh, at different levels of impurity scattering rates and to compare results with experimental data for iron pnictides. The s±-wave pairing symmetry is considered as a presumable state for these materials. Magnetic field dependence of ξh/ξc2 is found to be nonuniversal for s± pairing: depending on the chosen parameter set it can reside both below and above analytical Ginzburg-Landau curve. It is also found that normalized ξ2/ξc2(B/Bc2 dependence is increasing with pair-breaking (interband impurity scattering, and the intraband scattering results in decreasing of the ξ2/ξc2 value. Here, ξ2 is the vortex core size and ξc2 is the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length determined from the upper critical field. The ξ2/ξc2(B/Bc2 curve has a minimum at low temperatures and small scattering evolving into monotonously decreasing function at strong scattering and high temperatures.

  12. Reduction of vibrational interference from the iron core on HBTXIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcock, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    The HBTXIA machine is a toroidal reversed field pinch which utilises a 1 volt second iron core. This paper looks briefly at the sources of vibration from the iron core and describes the design of a novel support system that has been installed to minimise the transmission of vibration to plasma diagnostics and other equipment during the machine pulse. Vibration measurements on the completed installation when the core is driven to saturation are reported and compared with calculations for a ground mounted core. (author)

  13. Experimental evidence of body centered cubic iron in Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrubiak, R.; Meng, Y.; Shen, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's core is mainly composed of iron. While seismic evidence has shown a liquid outer core and a solid inner core, the crystalline nature of the solid iron at the core condition remains debated, largely due to the difficulties in experimental determination of exact polymorphs at corresponding pressure-temperature conditions. We have examined crystal structures of iron up to 220 GPa and 6000 K with x-ray diffraction using a double-sided laser heating system at HPCAT, Advanced Photon Source. The iron sample is confined in a small chamber surrounded by single crystal MgO. The laser power can be modulated together with temperature measurements. The modulated heating of iron in an MgO single crystal matrix allows for microstructure analysis during heating and after the sample is quenched. We present experimental evidence of a body-centered-cubic (BCC) iron from about 100 GPa and 3000 K to at least 220 GPa and 4000 K. The observed BCC phase may be consistent with a theoretically predicted BCC phase that is dynamically stable in similar pressure-temperature conditions [1]. We will discuss the stability region of the BCC phase and the melting curve of iron and their implications in the nature of the Earth's inner core. References: A. B. Belonoshko et al., Nat. Geosci., 1-6 (2017).

  14. Iron-carbonate interaction at Earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Prakapenka, V.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage and flux in the deep Earth are moderated by oxygen fugacity and interactions with iron-bearing phases. The amount of carbon stored in Earth's mantle versus the core depends on carbon-iron chemistry at the core-mantle boundary. Oxidized carbonates subducted from Earth's surface to the lowermost mantle may encounter reduced Fe0 metal from disproportionation of Fe2+ in lower mantle silicates or mixing with the core. To understand the fate of carbonates in the lowermost mantle, we have performed experiments on sandwiches of single-crystal (Ca0.6Mg0.4)CO3 dolomite and Fe foil in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle conditions of 49-110 GPa and 1800-2500 K. Syntheses were conducted with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to identify phase assemblages. After quench to ambient conditions, samples were sectioned with a focused Ga+ ion beam for composition analysis with transmission electron microscopy. At the centers of the heated spots, iron melted and reacted completely with the carbonate to form magnesiowüstite, iron carbide, diamond, magnesium-rich carbonate and calcium carbonate. In samples heated at 49 and 64 GPa, the two carbonates exhibit a eutectoid texture. In the sample heated at 110 GPa, the carbonates form rounded ~150-nm-diameter grains with a higher modal proportion of interspersed diamonds. The presence of reduced iron in the deep lower mantle and core-mantle boundary region will promote the formation of diamonds in carbonate-bearing subducted slabs. The complete reaction of metallic iron to oxides and carbides in the presence of mantle carbonate supports the formation of these phases at the Earth's core-mantle boundary and in ultra-low velocity zones.

  15. Structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Luise Theil; Bojesen, A.; Timmermann, L.

    2002-01-01

    We present studies of the structural and magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoparticles. alpha-Fe nanoparticles were fabricated by sputtering and subsequently covered with a protective nanocrystalline oxide shell consisting of either maghaemite (gamma-Fe2O3) or partially oxidized...... magnetite (Fe3O4). We observed that the nanoparticles were stable against further oxidation, and Mossbauer spectroscopy at high applied magnetic fields and low temperatures revealed a stable form of partly oxidized magnetite. The nanocrystalline structure of the oxide shell results in strong canting...... of the spin structure in the oxide shell, which thereby modifies the magnetic properties of the core-shell nanoparticles....

  16. Rotating collapse of stellar iron cores in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, C D; Dimmelmeier, H; Marek, A; Janka, H-T; Zink, B; Hawke, I; Schnetter, E

    2007-01-01

    We present results from the first 2 + 1 and 3 + 1 simulations of the collapse of rotating stellar iron cores in general relativity employing a finite-temperature equation of state and an approximate treatment of deleptonization during collapse. We compare full 3 + 1 and conformally-flat spacetime evolution methods and find that the conformally-flat treatment is sufficiently accurate for the core-collapse supernova problem. We focus on the gravitational wave (GW) emission from rotating collapse, core bounce and early postbounce phases. Our results indicate that the GW signature of these phases is much more generic than previously estimated. In addition, we track the growth of a nonaxisymmetric instability of dominant m = 1 character in two of our models that leads to prolonged narrow-band GW emission at ∼920-930 Hz over several tens of milliseconds

  17. Viable cold-tolerant iron-reducing microorganisms in geographically diverse subglacial environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Sophie L.; Telling, Jon P.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-03-01

    Subglacial environments are known to harbour metabolically diverse microbial communities. These microbial communities drive chemical weathering of underlying bedrock and influence the geochemistry of glacial meltwater. Despite its importance in weathering reactions, the microbial cycling of iron in subglacial environments, in particular the role of microbial iron reduction, is poorly understood. In this study we address the prevalence of viable iron-reducing microorganisms in subglacial sediments from five geographically isolated glaciers. Iron-reducing enrichment cultures were established with sediment from beneath Engabreen (Norway), Finsterwalderbreen (Svalbard), Leverett and Russell glaciers (Greenland), and Lower Wright Glacier (Antarctica). Rates of iron reduction were higher at 4 °C compared with 15 °C in all but one duplicated second-generation enrichment culture, indicative of cold-tolerant and perhaps cold-adapted iron reducers. Analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes indicates Desulfosporosinus were the dominant iron-reducing microorganisms in low-temperature Engabreen, Finsterwalderbreen and Lower Wright Glacier enrichments, and Geobacter dominated in Russell and Leverett enrichments. Results from this study suggest microbial iron reduction is widespread in subglacial environments and may have important implications for global biogeochemical iron cycling and export to marine ecosystems.

  18. The end of the iron-core age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The terrestrial planets aggregated essentially from small particles, to begin as solid cool bodies with the same general compositions, and there is no possibility of an iron-core developing within any of them at any stage. Their differing internal and surface properties receive ready explanation from their different masses which determine whether the pressures within are sufficient to bring about phase-changes. The claim that the terrestrial core can be identified by means of shock-wave data as nickel-iron is based on theoretical misconception, whereas the actual seismic data establish an uncompressed-density value much lower than any such mixture could have. The onset of the Ramsey phase-change in the earth takes the form of a rapid initial collapse to produce a large core in metallic state which thereafter continues to grow secularly as a result of radioactive heating and leads to reduction of surface-area at long last adequate to account for folded and thrusted mountain-building.

  19. Plasma current sustainment after iron core saturation in the STOR-M tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitarai, O., E-mail: omitarai@ktmail.tokai-u.jp [Kumamoto Liberal Arts Education Center, Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Higashi-ku, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Ding, Y.; Hubeny, M.; Lu, Y.; Onchi, T.; McColl, D.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Plasma current can be started up by small iron core without central solenoid. • Iron core removes central solenoid. • Plasma current can be maintained after iron core saturation. • Hysteresis curve shows the partial core saturation. • Image field from iron core is estimated during discharge. • Spherical tokamak reactor without CS is proposed using the small iron core. - Abstract: We propose to use of a small iron core transformer to start up the plasma current in a spherical tokamak (ST) reactor without central solenoid (CS). Taking advantage of the high aspect ratio of the STOR-M iron core tokamak, we have demonstrated that the plasma current up to 10–15 kA can be started up using the outer Ohmic heating (OH) coils without CS, and that the plasma current can be maintained further by increasing the outer OH coil current during iron core saturation phase. When the magnetizing current reaches 1.2 kA and the iron core becomes saturated, the third capacitor bank connected to the outer OH coils is discharged to maintain the plasma current. The plasma current is slightly increased and maintained for additional 5 ms as expected from numerical calculations. Core saturation has been clearly observed on the hysteresis curve. This is the first experimental demonstration of the feasibility of slow transition from the iron core to air core transformer phase without CS. The results implies that a plasma current can be initiated by a small iron core and could be ramped up by additional heating and vertical field after iron core saturation in future STs without CS.

  20. Iron/iron oxide core-shell nanoclusters for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang You; Antony, Jiji; Sharma, Amit; Nutting, Joseph; Sikes, Daniel; Meyer, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles have been found promising in several biomedical applications for tagging, imaging, sensing and separation in recent years. Most magnetic particles or beads currently used in biomedical applications are based on ferromagnetic iron oxides with very low specific magnetic moments of about 20-30 emu/g. Here we report a new approach to synthesize monodispersed core-shell nanostructured clusters with high specific magnetic moments above 200 emu/g. Iron nanoclusters with monodispersive size of diameters from 2 nm to 100 nm are produced by our newly developed nanocluster source and go to a deposition chamber, where a chemical reaction starts, and the nanoclusters are coated with iron oxides. HRTEM Images show the coatings are very uniform and stable. The core-shell nanoclusters are superparamagnetic at room temperature for sizes less than 15 nm, and then become ferromagnetic when the cluster size increases. The specific magnetic moment of core-shell nanoclusters is size dependent, and increases rapidly from about 80 emu/g at the cluster size of around 3 nm to over 200 emu/g up to the size of 100 nm. The use of high magnetic moment nanoclusters for biomedical applications could dramatically enhance the contrast for MRI, reduce the concentration of magnetic particle needs for cell separation, or make drug delivery possible with much lower magnetic field gradients

  1. All Metal Iron Core For A Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.A.; Jun, C.; Zatz, I.; Zolfaghari, A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel concept for incorporating a iron core transformer within a axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device with a high neutron flux is described. This design enables conceptual design of low aspect ratio devices which employ standard transformer-driven plasma startup by using all-metal high resistance separators between the toroidal field windings. This design avoids the inherent problems of a multiturn air core transformer which will inevitably suffer from strong neutron bombardment and hence lose the integrity of its insulation, both through long term material degradation and short term neutron-induced conductivity. A full 3-dimensional model of the concept has been developed within the MAXWELL program and the resultant loop voltage calculated. The utility of the result is found to be dependent on the resistivity of the high resistance separators. Useful loop voltage time histories have been obtained using achievable resistivities.

  2. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Pearce, Carolyn; McCloy, John S.

    2014-12-02

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) and core-shell iron/iron-oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanomaterials prepared by a cluster deposition system were irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions and the structures determined by x-ray diffraction as consisting of 100% magnetite and 36/64 wt% Fe/FeO, respectively. However, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) indicates similar surfaces in the two samples, slightly oxidized and so having more Fe3+ than the expected magnetite structure, with XMCD intensity much lower for the irradiated core-shell samples indicating weaker magnetism. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data lack the signature for FeO, but the irradiated core-shell system consists of Fe-cores with ~13 nm of separating oxide crystallite, so it is likely that FeO exists deeper than the probe depth of the XAS (~5 nm). Exchange bias (Hex) for both samples becomes increasingly negative as temperature is lowered, but the irradiated Fe3O4 sample shows greater sensitivity of cooling field on Hex. Loop asymmetries and Hex sensitivities of the irradiated Fe3O4 sample are due to interfaces and interactions between grains which were not present in samples before irradiation as well as surface oxidation. Asymmetries in the hysteresis curves of the irradiated core/shell sample are related to the reversal mechanism of the antiferromagnetic FeO and possibly some near surface oxidation.

  3. Equilibrium and stability studies for an iron-core tokamak with a poloidal divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano, E.R.; Neilson, G.H.; Lao, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    A study of plasma equilibrium and stability in a tokamak with an unsaturated iron core is presented. A spool model is developed for the iron. Both, a simplified force balance code and a Grad-Shafranov solver are used to study the plasma equilibrium. It is observed that the iron can strongly modify the conditions for equilibrium and stability, and in some cases an infinite cylinder model for the iron core is not adequate. New criteria for plasma position stability in the presence of an iron core are introduced. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  4. First order study for an iron core OH system for TNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.K.; Schultz, J.

    1977-01-01

    A simple comparison has been made between an air core and an iron core ohmic heating system for a particular device, and it was shown that the peak power requirements can be substantially reduced by the use of an iron core to power levels handled by industry today. It was also shown that for an ohmic heating system initiated plasma that the cost of the iron core ohmic heating power system (iron core, dual rectifier, and DC switch) is less than the cost for a subset of the power system for an air core system (dual rectifier and DC switch). There is considerable work being done on other methods of initiating the plasma none of which seem to be incompatible with the use of an iron core system

  5. A novel approach to linearization of the electromagnetic parameters of tokamaks with an iron core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, P. E-mail: fupeng@mail.ipp.ac.cn; Liu, Z.Z.; Zou, J.H

    2002-05-01

    The equivalent model of an iron core tokamak is developed, in which the electromagnetic parameters of several pairs of coils in opposite series (PCOS) are not dependent on the saturation of the iron core during tokamak operation. With this the electromagnetic parameters of all the coils in an iron core tokamak can be linearized, As an example, the electromagnetic parameters of Hefei Super-conductive Tokamak with iron core (HT-7) are linearized, and it is in good agreement with the experimental results. The linearization approach can be applied in real time plasma control and electromagnetic analysis.

  6. Impact of protein pre-treatment conditions on the iron encapsulation efficiency of whey protein cold-set gel particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.H.; Jong, G.A.H. de

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the possibility for iron fortification of food using protein gel particles in which iron is entrapped using cold-set gelation. The aim is to optimize the iron encapsulation efficiency of whey protein by giving the whey protein different heat treatment prior to gelation with

  7. Development of microtextures in cold rolled iron-oligocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeslau, J.; Raabe, D.

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of microtexture in cold rolled Fe-oligocrystals was investigated. The use of oligocrystals, i.e. polycrystals consisting of only a few large grains, allows the investigation of the development of the orientation distribution (OD) within single grains with respect to the rolling degree, to the initial grain orientation and to the geometrical and orientational constraints imposed by the neighbouring grains. It is shown that during deformation the average misorientation between adjacent regions within a single grain increases and that fragmentation of initially homogeneous grains occurs. It is revealed that the starting orientation of the grain has a considerable impact on the formation of the single grain OD. The experiments were carried out by use of single orientation measurement in the scanning electron microscope and by taking X-ray pole figures (PF). (orig.)

  8. WARM EXTENDED DENSE GAS AT THE HEART OF A COLD COLLAPSING DENSE CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G.; Furuya, Ray S.; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate when and how the birth of a protostellar core occurs, we made survey observations of four well-studied dense cores in the Taurus molecular cloud using CO transitions in submillimeter bands. We report here the detection of unexpectedly warm (∼30-70 K), extended (radius of ∼2400 AU), dense (a few times 10 5 cm -3 ) gas at the heart of one of the dense cores, L1521F (MC27), within the cold dynamically collapsing components. We argue that the detected warm, extended, dense gas may originate from shock regions caused by collisions between the dynamically collapsing components and outflowing/rotating components within the dense core. We propose a new stage of star formation, 'warm-in-cold core stage (WICCS)', i.e., the cold collapsing envelope encases the warm extended dense gas at the center due to the formation of a protostellar core. WICCS would constitute a missing link in evolution between a cold quiescent starless core and a young protostar in class 0 stage that has a large-scale bipolar outflow.

  9. Iron-rich Oxides at the Core-mantle Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, J. K.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Bower, D. J.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic observations near the base of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) have detected 5-20 km thick patches in which the seismic wave velocities are reduced by up to 30%. These ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) have been interpreted as aggregates of partially molten material (e.g. Williams and Garnero 1996, Hernlund and Jellinek, 2010) or as solid, iron-enriched residues (e.g. Knittle and Jeanloz, 1991; Mao et al., 2006; Wicks et al., 2010), typically based on proposed sources of velocity reduction. The stabilities of these structure types have been explored through dynamic models that have assembled a relationship between ULVZ stability and density (Hernlund and Tackley, 2007; Bower et al., 2010). Now, to constrain the chemistry and mineralogy of ULVZs, more information is needed on the relationship between density and sound velocity of candidate phases. We present the pressure-volume-temperature equation of state of (Mg0.06 57Fe0.94)O determined up to pressures of 120 GPa and temperatures of 2000 K. Volume was measured with X-ray diffraction at beamline 13-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), where high pressures and temperatures are achieved in a diamond anvil cell with in-situ laser heating. Sample assemblies were prepared using dehydrated NaCl as an insulator and neon as a pressure transmitting medium. We present results with and without iron as a buffer and thermal pressure gauge. We have also determined the room temperature Debye velocity (VD) of (Mg0.06 57Fe0.94)O using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and in-situ X-ray diffraction, up to 80 GPa at 3-ID-B of the APS. The effect of the electronic environment of the iron sites on the velocities was tracked in-situ using synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy. Using our measured equation of state, the seismically relevant compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities were calculated from the Debye velocities. We combine these studies with a simple mixing model to predict the properties of a solid

  10. Size-Dependent Specific Surface Area of Nanoporous Film Assembled by Core-Shell Iron Nanoclusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji Antony

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous films of core-shell iron nanoclusters have improved possibilities for remediation, chemical reactivity rate, and environmentally favorable reaction pathways. Conventional methods often have difficulties to yield stable monodispersed core-shell nanoparticles. We produced core-shell nanoclusters by a cluster source that utilizes combination of Fe target sputtering along with gas aggregations in an inert atmosphere at 7∘C. Sizes of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters are observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The specific surface areas of the porous films obtained from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET process are size-dependent and compared with the calculated data.

  11. Reconstruction of core inlet temperature distribution by cold leg temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saarinen, S.; Antila, M.

    2010-01-01

    The reduced core of Loviisa NPP contains 33 thermocouple measurements measuring the core inlet temperature. Currently, these thermocouple measurements are not used in determining the inlet temperature distribution. The average of cold leg temperature measurements is used as inlet temperature for each fuel assembly. In practice, the inlet temperature distribution is not constant. Thus, using a constant inlet temperature distribution induces asymmetries in the measured core power distribution. Using a more realistic inlet temperature distribution would help us to reduce virtual asymmetries of the core power distribution and increase the thermal margins of the core. The thermocouples at the inlet cannot be used directly to measure the inlet temperature accurately because the calibration of the thermocouples that is done at hot zero power conditions is no longer valid at full power, when there is temperature change across the core region. This is due to the effect of neutron irradiation on the Seebeck coefficient of the thermocouple wires. Therefore, we investigate in this paper a method to determine the inlet temperature distribution based on the cold leg temperature measurements. With this method we rely on the assumption that although the core inlet thermocouple measurements do not measure the absolute temperature accurately they do measure temperature changes with sufficient accuracy particularly in big disturbances. During the yearly testing of steam generator safety valves we observe a large temperature increase up to 12 degrees in the cold leg temperature. The change in the temperature of one of the cold legs causes a local disturbance in the core inlet temperature distribution. Using the temperature changes observed in the inlet thermocouple measurements we are able to fit six core inlet temperature response functions, one for each cold leg. The value of a function at an assembly inlet is determined only by the corresponding cold leg temperature disturbance

  12. Energy and generating mechanism of a subsurface, cold core eddy in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Babu, M.T.; Rao, D.P.

    Computation of available potential energy (APE) of a recently observed cold core, subsurface eddy (centered at 17 degrees 40'N and 85 degrees 19'E) in the Bay of Bengal revealed that the energy maxima associated with the eddy was of the order of 1...

  13. Between East and West: polio vaccination across the Iron Curtain in Cold War Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargha, Dora

    2014-01-01

    In 1950s Hungary, with an economy and infrastructure still devastated from World War II and facing further hardships, thousands of children became permanently disabled and many died in the severe polio epidemic that shook the globe. The relatively new communist regime invested significantly in solving the public health crisis, initially importing a vaccine from the West and later turning to the East for a new solution. Through the history of polio vaccination in Hungary, this article shows how Cold War politics shaped vaccine evaluation and implementation in the 1950s. On the one hand, the threat of polio created a safe place for hitherto unprecedented, open cooperation among governments and scientific communities on the two sides of the Iron Curtain. On the other hand, Cold War rhetoric influenced scientific evaluation of vaccines, choices of disease prevention, and ultimately the eradication of polio.

  14. Two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in core in SCTF Core-II cold leg injection tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Okubo, Tsutomu; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Adachi, Hiromichi

    1985-07-01

    Major purpose of the Slab Core Test Program is to investigate the two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in the core during the reflood phase in a PWR-LOCA. In order to investigate the effects of radial power profile, three cold leg injection tests with different radial power profiles under the same total heating power and core stored energy were performed by using the Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) Core-II. It was revealed by comparing these three tests that the heat transfer was enhanced in the higher power bundles and degraded in the lower power bundles in the non-uniform radial power profile tests. The turnaround temperature in the high power bundles were evaluated to be reduced by about 40 to 120 K. On the other hand, a two-dimensional flow in the core was also induced by the non-uniform water accumulation in the upper plenum and the quench was delayed resultantly in the bundles corresponding to the peripheral bundles of a PWR. However, the effect of the non-uniform upper plenum water accumulation on the turnaround temperature was small because the effect dominated after the turnaround of the cladding temperature. Selected data from Tests S2-SH1, S2-SH2 and S2-O6 are also presented in this report. Some data from Tests S2-SH1 and S2-SH2 were compared with TRAC post-test calculations performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. (author)

  15. Cutaneous vascular and core temperature responses to sustained cold exposure in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Grant H; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Minson, Christopher T; Halliwill, John R

    2011-10-01

    We tested the effect of hypoxia on cutaneous vascular regulation and defense of core temperature during cold exposure. Twelve subjects had two microdialysis fibres placed in the ventral forearm and were immersed to the sternum in a bathtub on parallel study days (normoxia and poikilocapnic hypoxia with an arterial O(2) saturation of 80%). One fibre served as the control (1 mM propranolol) and the other received 5 mM yohimbine (plus 1 mM propranolol) to block adrenergic receptors. Skin blood flow was assessed at each site (laser Doppler flowmetry), divided by mean arterial pressure to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC), and scaled to baseline. Cold exposure was first induced by a progressive reduction in water temperature from 36 to 23°C over 30 min to assess cutaneous vascular regulation, then by clamping the water temperature at 10°C for 45 min to test defense of core temperature. During normoxia, cold stress reduced CVC in control (-44 ± 4%) and yohimbine sites (-13 ± 7%; both P cooling but resulted in greater reductions in CVC in control (-67 ± 7%) and yohimbine sites (-35 ± 11%) during cooling (both P cooling rate during the second phase of cold exposure was unaffected by hypoxia (-1.81 ± 0.23°C h(-1) in normoxia versus -1.97 ± 0.33°C h(-1) in hypoxia; P > 0.05). We conclude that hypoxia increases cutaneous (non-noradrenergic) vasoconstriction during prolonged cold exposure, while core cooling rate is not consistently affected.

  16. Pure-iron/iron-based-alloy hybrid soft magnetic powder cores compacted at ultra-high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tatsuya; Tsuruta, Hijiri; Watanabe, Asako; Ishimine, Tomoyuki; Ueno, Tomoyuki

    2018-04-01

    We developed Fe/FeSiAl soft magnetic powder cores (SMCs) for realizing the miniaturization and high efficiency of an electromagnetic conversion coil in the high-frequency range (˜20 kHz). We found that Fe/FeSiAl SMCs can be formed with a higher density under higher compaction pressure than pure-iron SMCs. These SMCs delivered a saturation magnetic flux density of 1.7 T and iron loss (W1/20k) of 158 kW/m3. The proposed SMCs exhibited similar excellent characteristics even in block shapes, which are closer to the product shapes.

  17. Pure-iron/iron-based-alloy hybrid soft magnetic powder cores compacted at ultra-high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Saito

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We developed Fe/FeSiAl soft magnetic powder cores (SMCs for realizing the miniaturization and high efficiency of an electromagnetic conversion coil in the high-frequency range (∼20 kHz. We found that Fe/FeSiAl SMCs can be formed with a higher density under higher compaction pressure than pure-iron SMCs. These SMCs delivered a saturation magnetic flux density of 1.7 T and iron loss (W1/20k of 158 kW/m3. The proposed SMCs exhibited similar excellent characteristics even in block shapes, which are closer to the product shapes.

  18. Non-chondritic iron isotope ratios in planetary mantles as a result of core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elardo, Stephen M.; Shahar, Anat

    2017-02-01

    Information about the materials and conditions involved in planetary formation and differentiation in the early Solar System is recorded in iron isotope ratios. Samples from Earth, the Moon, Mars and the asteroid Vesta reveal significant variations in iron isotope ratios, but the sources of these variations remain uncertain. Here we present experiments that demonstrate that under the conditions of planetary core formation expected for the Moon, Mars and Vesta, iron isotopes fractionate between metal and silicate due to the presence of nickel, and enrich the bodies' mantles in isotopically light iron. However, the effect of nickel diminishes at higher temperatures: under conditions expected for Earth's core formation, we infer little fractionation of iron isotopes. From our experimental results and existing conceptual models of magma ocean crystallization and mantle partial melting, we find that nickel-induced fractionation can explain iron isotope variability found in planetary samples without invoking nebular or accretionary processes. We suggest that near-chondritic iron isotope ratios of basalts from Mars and Vesta, as well as the most primitive lunar basalts, were achieved by melting of isotopically light mantles, whereas the heavy iron isotope ratios of terrestrial ocean floor basalts are the result of melting of near-chondritic Earth mantle.

  19. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko [Department of Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Horie, Toshiharu, E-mail: t.horie@thu.ac.jp [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutics, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  20. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  1. Cold leg injection reflood test results in the SCTF Core-I under constant system pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiromichi; Iwamura, Takamichi; Sobajima, Makoto; Osakabe, Masahiro; Ohnuki, Akira; Abe, Yutaka; Murao, Yoshio.

    1990-08-01

    The Slab Core Test Facility (SCTF) was constructed to investigate two-dimensional thermal-hydrodynamics in the core and the interaction in fluid behavior between the core and the upper plenum during the last part of blowdown, refill and reflood phases of a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The present report describes the analytical results on the system behavior observed in the SCTF Core-I cold leg injection tests, S1-14 (Run 520), S1-15 (521), S1-16 (522), S1-17 (523), S1-20 (530), S1-21 (531), S1-23 (536) and S1-24 (537), performed under constant system pressure condition during transient. Major discussion items are: (1) steam binding, (2) U-tube oscillations, (3) bypass of ECC water (4) core cooling behavior, (5) effect of vent valve and (6) other parameter effects. These results give us very useful information and suggestion on reflood behavior. (author)

  2. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, C.; Treffry, A.; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M.; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits 'ferroxidase' activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial 'burst', the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported

  3. Polymorphic Nature of Iron and Degree of Lattice Preferred Orientation Beneath the Earth's Inner Core Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattesini, Maurizio; Belonoshko, Anatoly B.; Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2018-01-01

    Deciphering the polymorphic nature and the degree of iron lattice-preferred orientation in the Earth's inner core holds a key to understanding the present status and evolution of the inner core. A multiphase lattice-preferred orientation pattern is obtained for the top 350 km of the inner core by means of the ab initio based Candy Wrapper Velocity Model coupled to a Monte Carlo phase discrimination scheme. The achieved geographic distribution of lattice alignment is characterized by two regions of freezing, namely within South America and the Western Central Pacific, that exhibit an uncommon high degree of lattice orientation. In contrast, widespread regions of melting of relatively weak lattice ordering permeate the rest of the inner core. The obtained multiphase lattice-preferred orientation pattern is in line with mantle-constrained geodynamo simulations and allows to setup an ad hoc mineral physics scenario for the complex Earth's inner core. It is found that the cubic phase of iron is the dominating iron polymorph in the outermost part of the inner core.

  4. Analysis of the plasma magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium in iron core transformer Tokamak HL-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoguang; Yuan Baoshan

    1992-01-01

    The physical and mathematical model are presented on the problem of MHD equilibrium with the self consistent in iron core transformer HL-1M. Calculation and analysis for the plasma equilibrium of the stable boundary and free boundary are shown respectively, in an axisymmetric equilibrium model of two dimensions. First, a variation formulation of the problem is written and the equations of the poloided flux ψ are solved by a finite element method; the Picard and Newton algorithms are tested for the non-linearities. The plasma boundary and the magnetic surfaces are being simulated, with the currents in the coils, the total plasma current, its current density function and the magnetic permeability of the iron being the data for the problem; a certain number of the characteristic parameter of the equilibrium configuration is calculated. Secondly, a simple method of calculation is adopted in the determination of equilibrium fields and currents in iron core HL-1M tokamak device. In the plasma equilibrium, the magnetic effect of the air gaps in the iron core and the iron magnetic shielded plate are considered in HL-1M device. Reliable data are provided for designing and constructing the poloidal field system of HL-1M device. A good computer code is constructed, which may be useful in operating on analysis for the future device

  5. Torque decomposition and control in an iron core linear permanent magnet motor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overboom, T.T.; Smeets, J.P.C.; Stassen, J.M.; Jansen, J.W.; Lomonova, E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract—This paper concerns the decomposition and control of the torque produced by an iron core linear permanent magnet motor. The proposed method is based on the dq0-decomposition of the three-phase currents using Park’s transformation. The torque is decomposed into a reluctance component and two

  6. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  7. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  8. SOLUBILITY OF IRON IN METALLIC HYDROGEN AND STABILITY OF DENSE CORES IN GIANT PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, Sean M.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is most commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H 2 O, MgO, and SiO 2 dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interiors, particularly for Saturn-mass planets. Understanding the distribution of iron and other heavy elements in gas giants may be relevant in understanding mass-radius relationships, as well as deviations in transport properties from pure hydrogen-helium mixtures

  9. DENSE GAS IN MOLECULAR CORES ASSOCIATED WITH PLANCK GALACTIC COLD CLUMPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Jinghua; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hong-Li [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Wu, Yuefang; Chen, Ping; Hu, Runjie [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Liu, Tie [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute 776, Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Tianwei [Peking University Health Science Center, Xueyuan Road 38th, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Meng, Fanyi [Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Str. 77, D-50937 (Germany); Wang, Ke, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-03-20

    We present the first survey of dense gas toward Planck Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCCs). Observations in the J = 1–0 transitions of HCO{sup +} and HCN toward 621 molecular cores associated with PGCCs were performed using the Purple Mountain Observatory’s 13.7 m telescope. Among them, 250 sources were detected, including 230 cores detected in HCO{sup +} and 158 in HCN. Spectra of the J = 1–0 transitions from {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O at the centers of the 250 cores were extracted from previous mapping observations to construct a multi-line data set. The significantly low detection rate of asymmetric double-peaked profiles, together with the good consistency among central velocities of CO, HCO{sup +}, and HCN spectra, suggests that the CO-selected Planck cores are more quiescent than classical star-forming regions. The small difference between line widths of C{sup 18}O and HCN indicates that the inner regions of CO-selected Planck cores are no more turbulent than the exterior. The velocity-integrated intensities and abundances of HCO{sup +} are positively correlated with those of HCN, suggesting that these two species are well coupled and chemically connected. The detected abundances of both HCO{sup +} and HCN are significantly lower than values in other low- to high-mass star-forming regions. The low abundances may be due to beam dilution. On the basis of an inspection of the parameters given in the PGCC catalog, we suggest that there may be about 1000 PGCC objects that have a sufficient reservoir of dense gas to form stars.

  10. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-02

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  11. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the iron core transformer for the EXTRAP T1 device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bures, M.

    1983-11-01

    The possibility of driving the discharge current of the toroidal EXTRAP T1 device, using the iron core transformer, is investigated. It is shown that the breakdown voltage 20 kV can be supplied, along the zero line of the vacuum magnetic field, at a time shorter than 1 μs. this is made possible by the transient build-up of the magnetic field in the iron core laminations. The plasma current rise time is determined by the evolution of the inductance and resistance of the discharge. This enables the plasma current to be built up to an amplitude I(sub)p=50 kA within 10-15 μs and sustained at this value during a steady-state period of 100 μs. The premagnetized iron core of the cross-sectional area 0.16 m 2 is sufficient to provide the necessary flux swing, if the saturation induction is not lower than 1 T. It is further concluded that the SiFe lamination is adequate for the present application. However, to reduce the stray field interfering with the zero line of the octupole field, a lamination of thickness d < 0.1 mm with high resistivity should be employed. The interlamination voltage should be reduced by segmenting the core. The steady-state is supplied by an 0.4Ω, 20 kV artificial line consisting of 20 μF capacitive elements. (author)

  12. Effects of peripheral cold application on core body temperature and haemodynamic parameters in febrile patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgar Pour, Hossein; Yavuz, Meryem

    2014-04-01

    This study designed to assess the effects of peripheral cold application (PCA) on core body temperature and haemodynamic parameters in febrile patients. This study was an experimental, repeated-measures performed in the neurosurgical intensive-care unit. The research sample included all patients with fever in postoperative period. PCA was performed for 20 min. During fever, systolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation (O2 Sat) decreased by 5.07 ± 7.89 mm Hg, 0.191 ± 6.00 mm Hg and 0.742% ± 0.97%, respectively, whereas the pulse rate and diastolic blood pressure increased by 8.528 ± 4.42 beats/ min and 1.842 ± 6.9 mmHg, respectively. Immediately after PCA, core body temperature and pulse rate decreased by 0.3°C, 3.3 beats/min, respectively, whereas systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and O2 Sat increased by, 1.40 mm Hg, 1.87 mm Hg, 0.98 mmHg and 0.27%, respectively. Thirty minutes after the end of PCA, core body temperature, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate decreased by 0.57°C, 0.34 mm Hg, 0.60 mm Hg and 4.5 beats/min, respectively, whereas systolic blood pressure and O2 Sat increased by 0.98 mm Hg and 0.04%, respectively. The present results showed that PCA increases systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressure and O2 Sat, and decreases core body temperature and pulse rate. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Precipitation of iron species on the cold side of PWR steam generator and its possible correlation to dose rate elevation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, Bernt; Chen, Jiaxin; Andersson, Petter

    2014-01-01

    For the last 10 years of service of Ringhals PWR unit 4, operating with Alloy-600MA steam generator tubing materials and a coolant pH of 7.2 (a)300°C, the cold water channel heads experienced continuous dose rate elevation. In the hot parts, however, it remained stable. Similar observations were made in Ringhals unit 2 and 3 after SGR to Alloy 690 and sometimes in other PWRs operated at similarly 'low' pH-regime. Following the introduction of elevated pH regime at Ringhals PWRs the cold side dose rates dropped to the similar levels as on the hot side. The phenomena are analysed in this paper from three different aspects: (1) the general plant observations in dose rate development under different coolant pH regimes; (2) the concentrations of dissolved and soluble iron species at the low and high coolant pH values and (3) the microstructures of the oxide films formed on the cold and hot sides of a steam generator tube pulled from a retired steam generator. Based on the analyses a hypothesis is elaborated that the formation of a thin but highly radioactive layer of iron-rich oxide deposit on the cold side may be responsible for the dose rate elevation and that its formation may be harder at the elevated pH regime. (author)

  14. Estimation of residual stress in cold rolled iron-disks from strain measurements on the high resolution Fourier diffractometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Balagurov, A.M.; Taran, Yu.V.

    1995-01-01

    The results of estimating residual stresses in cold rolled iron disks by measurements with the high resolution Fourier diffractometer (HRFD) at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor are presented. These measurements were made for calibration of magnetic and ultrasonic measurements carried out at the Fraunhofer-Institute for Nondestructive Testing in Saarbrucken (Germany). The tested objects were cold rolled steel disks of 2.5 mm thickness and diameter of about 500 mm used for forming small, gas pressure tanks. Neutron diffraction experiments were carried out at the scattering angle 2θ=+152 d eg with resolution Δd/d=1.5·10 -3 . The gauge volume was chosen according to the magnetic measurements lateral resolution 20x20 mm 2 . In the nearest future the neutron diffraction measurements with cold rolled iron disks at the scattering angle 2θ=±90 0 are planned. Also the texture analysis will be included in the Rietveld refinement procedure for more correct calculation of residual stress fields in the cold rolled materials. 8 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  15. Influence of cold work to increase swelling of pure iron irradiated in the BR-10 reactor to ∼6 and ∼25 dpa at ∼400 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvoriashin, A.M.; Porollo, S.I.; Konobeev, Yu.V.; Garner, F.A.

    2000-01-01

    Irradiation of pure iron in several starting conditions at 400 deg. C has been conducted in the BR-10 fast reactor. Contrary to expectations, cold working appears to significantly accelerate the onset of void swelling. When compared to a similar experiment conducted in this reactor at the same time, it appears that iron experiences a rather long transient duration before the onset of steady-state swelling. The transient appears to be shortened by both cold-working and lower atomic displacement rates

  16. Modern Cored Wire Injection 2PE-9 Method in the Production of Ductile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Guzik

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies on the use of modern two cored wires injection method for production of nodular graphite cast iron with use of unique implementation of drum ladle as a treatment/ transport and casting ladle instead vertical treatment ladle was described. The injection of length of Ø 9mm wires, cored: in FeSi + Mg nodulariser mixture and inoculant master alloy is a treatment method which can be used to produce iron melted in coreless induction furnace. This paper describes the results of using this method for possibility production of ductile iron under specific industrial conditions. In this case was taken ductile iron with material designation: EN-GJS-450- 10 Grade according PN-EN 1563:2000. Microstructure of 28 trials was controlled on internally used sample which has been correlated with standard sample before. The paper presents typical metallic matrix and graphite characteristic. Additionally, mechanical properties were checked in one experiment. Because of further possibility treatment temperature reduction only the rough magnesium recovery and cost of this new method are given.

  17. Evidence for propagation of cold-adapted yeast in an ice core from a Siberian Altai glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Jun; Kohshima, Shiro; Nakazawa, Fumio; Takeuchi, Nozomu; Fujita, Koji; Miyake, Takayuki; Narita, Hideki; Aizen, Vladimir; Nakawo, Masayoshi

    2011-03-01

    Cold environments, including glacier ice and snow, are known habitats for cold-adapted microorganisms. We investigated the potential for cold-adapted yeast to have propagated in the snow of the high-altitude Belukha glacier. We detected the presence of highly concentrated yeast (over 104 cells mL-1) in samples of both an ice core and firn snow. Increasing yeast cell concentrations in the same snow layer from July 2002 to July 2003 suggests that the yeast cells propagated in the glacier snow. A cold-adapted Rhodotorula sp. was isolated from the snow layer and found to be related to psychrophilic yeast previously found in other glacial environments (based on the D1/D2 26S rRNA domains). 26S rRNA clonal analysis directly amplified from meltwater within the ice core also revealed the presence of genus Rhodotorula. Analyses of the ice core showed that all peaks in yeast concentration corresponded to the peaks in indices of surface melting. These results support the hypothesis that occasional surface melting in an accumulation area is one of the major factors influencing cold-adapted yeast propagation.

  18. Acoustic propagations in the presence of a subsurface cold core eddy in the Bay of Bengal - A case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Murty, T.V.R.; Murty, C.S.

    Acoustic characteristics of a cold core eddy, observed in the Bay of Bengal during southwest monsoon period is studied using CTD data along the western boundary. The presence of eddy brings about a reduction in the ambient sound speEd. by 10 m.s sup...

  19. The effect of cold water endurance swimming on core temperature in aspiring English Channel swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversi, Tara; Franks-Kardum, Vanessa; Climstein, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if cold water swimmers (CWS) developed hypothermia over a 6-h cold water endurance swim and whether body composition, stroke rate (SR) or personal characteristics correlated with core temperature (TC) change. Nine experienced male and female CWS who were aspiring English Channel (EC) swimmers volunteered to participate. Subjects aimed to complete their 6-h EC qualifying swim (water 15-15.8 °C/air 15-25 °C) while researchers intermittently monitored TC and SR. Data obtained included anthropometry (height, mass, segmental body composition), training volume and EC completion. Of the nine swimmers who volunteered, all successfully completed their EC qualifying swim. Six CWS had complete data included in analysis. One CWS demonstrated hypothermia (34.8 °C) at 6-h. TC rate of decline was slower in the first 3 h (-0.06 °C/hr) compared to the last 3 h (-0.36 °C/hr) of the swim. Older age was significantly correlated to TC change (r = -0.901, p swim was 57.8 spm (range 48-73 spm), and a significant (p pool and open water (OW); however, they swam significantly [t (7) = -2.433, p swim (CWES) of 6-h duration at 15-16 °C resulted in TC reduction in the majority of swimmers regardless of anthropometry. More research is required to determine why some CWS are able to maintain their TC throughout a CWES. Our results indicate that older swimmers are at greater risk of developing hypothermia, and that SR decline is an indicator of TC decline. Our results also suggest that OW swimming training combined with pool training is important for EC swim success.

  20. Neutrino energy loss rates due to key iron isotopes for core-collapse physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabi, J.-U.

    2008-07-01

    Accurate estimates of neutrino energy loss rates are needed for the study of the late stages of the stellar evolution, in particular for the cooling of neutron stars and white dwarfs. The energy spectra of neutrinos and antineutrinos arriving at the Earth can also provide useful information on the primary neutrino fluxes as well as neutrino mixing scenario. Proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory has recently being used for a microscopic calculation of stellar weak interaction rates of fp-shell nuclide, particularly iron isotopes, with success. Here I present the calculation of neutrino and antineutrino energy loss rates due to key iron isotopes in stellar matter using the pn-QRPA theory. The rates are calculated on a fine grid of temperature-density scale suitable for core-collapse simulators. The calculated rates are compared against earlier calculations. The neutrino cooling rates due to even-even isotopes of iron, 54,56 Fe, are in good agreement with the rates calculated using the large-scale shell model. The pn-QRPA calculated neutrino energy loss rates due to 55 Fe are enhanced roughly around an order of magnitude compared to the large-scale shell model calculation during the oxygen and silicon shell burning stages of massive stars and favor a lower entropy for the cores of massive stars. (author)

  1. The formation of a cold-core eddy in the East Australian Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H. S.; Roughan, M.; Baird, M. E.; Wilkin, J.

    2016-02-01

    Cold-core eddies (CCEs) frequently form in western boundary currents and can affect continental shelf processes. It is not always clear, however, if baroclinic or barotropic instabilities contribute more to their formation. The Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) is used to investigate the ocean state during the formation of a CCE in the East Australian Current (EAC) during October 2009. The observed eddy initially appeared as a small billow (approx. 50 km in length) that perturbed the landward edge of the EAC. The billow grew into a mesoscale CCE (approx. 100 km in diameter), diverting the EAC around it. A ROMS simulation with a realistic wind field reproduced a similar eddy. This eddy formed from negative vorticity waters found on the continental shelf south of the EAC separation point. A sensitivity analysis is performed whereby the impact of 3 different wind forcing scenarios, upwelling, downwelling, and no winds, are investigated. A CCE formed in all wind scenarios despite the wind induced changes in hydrographic conditions in the continental shelf and slope waters. As such, the source of energy for eddy formation did not come from the interactions of wind with the continental shelf waters. Analysis of strain and energy transformation confirms this by showing that the prevailing source of CCE energy was kinetic energy of the offshore EAC. These results clearly link the formation of the CCE to the swift flowing EAC and barotropic instabilities.

  2. "Conjugate channeling" effect in dislocation core diffusion: carbon transport in dislocated BCC iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akio; Li, Ju; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Dislocation pipe diffusion seems to be a well-established phenomenon. Here we demonstrate an unexpected effect, that the migration of interstitials such as carbon in iron may be accelerated not in the dislocation line direction ξ, but in a conjugate diffusion direction. This accelerated random walk arises from a simple crystallographic channeling effect. c is a function of the Burgers vector b, but not ξ, thus a dislocation loop possesses the same everywhere. Using molecular dynamics and accelerated dynamics simulations, we further show that such dislocation-core-coupled carbon diffusion in iron has temperature-dependent activation enthalpy like a fragile glass. The 71° mixed dislocation is the only case in which we see straightforward pipe diffusion that does not depend on dislocation mobility.

  3. Chemically durable iron phosphate glasses for vitrifying sodium bearing waste (SBW) using conventional and cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.W. E-mail: cheol@umr.edu; Ray, C.S.; Zhu, D.; Day, D.E.; Gombert, D.; Aloy, A.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Karabulut, M

    2003-11-01

    A simulated sodium bearing waste (SBW) was successfully vitrified in iron phosphate glasses (IPG) at a maximum waste loading of 40 wt% using conventional and cold crucible induction melting (CCIM) techniques. No sulfate segregation or crystalline phases were detectable in the IPG when examined by SEM and XRD. The IPG wasteforms containing 40 wt% SBW satisfy current DOE requirements for aqueous chemical durability as evaluated from their bulk dissolution rate (D{sub R}), product consistency test, and vapor hydration test. The fluid IPG wasteforms can be melted at a relatively low temperature (1000 deg. C) and for short times (<6 h). These properties combined with a significantly higher waste loading, and the feasibility of CCIM melting offer considerable savings in time, energy, and cost for vitrifying the SBW stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in iron phosphate glasses.

  4. Effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of nickel-chromium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Onimura, K.

    1987-01-01

    In order to grasp the stress corrosion cracking resistance of cold worked nickel base alloys in PWR primary water, the effect of cold working on the stress corrosion cracking resistance of alloys 600, X-750 and 690, in high temperature water, have been studied. Stress corrosion cracking tests were conducted at 360 0 C (633K) in a simulated PWR primary water for about 12,000 hours (43.2Ms). From the test results, it is concluded that the stress corrosion cracking resistance in the cold worked Alloy 600 at the same applied stress level increases with an increase in cold working ratio, and the cold worked alloys of thermally treated 690 and X-750 have excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance. (Author)

  5. Gold nanorod@iron oxide core-shell heterostructures: synthesis, characterization, and photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Zhao, Junwei; You, Wenlong; Cheng, Danhong; Ni, Weihai

    2017-03-17

    Iron oxides are directly coated on the surface of cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped gold nanorods (AuNRs) in aqueous solutions at room temperature, which results in AuNR@Fe 2 O 3 , AuNR@Fe 3 O 4 , and AuNR@Fe 2 O 3 @Fe 3 O 4 core-shell heterostructures. The iron oxide shells are uniform, smooth, with characteristic porous structure, and their thickness can be readily tuned. The shell formation is highly dependent on the reaction parameters including pH and CTAB concentration. The Fe 2 O 3 shell is amorphous and exhibits nearly zero remanence and coercivity, while the Fe 3 O 4 shell is ferromagnetic with a low saturation magnetization of about 0.5 emu g -1 due to its low crystallinity and the porous structure. At elevated temperatures achieved by plasmonic heating of the Au core, the Fe 2 O 3 shell transforms from amorphous to γ-Fe 2 O 3 and α-Fe 2 O 3 phases, while the Fe 3 O 4 phase disappears because of the oxidation of Fe 2+ . A 1.4-fold increase of photocatalytic performance is observed due to the plasmonic resonance provided by the Au core. The photocatalytic efficiency of Fe 3 O 4 is about 1.7-fold higher than Fe 2 O 3 as more surface defects are present on the Fe 3 O 4 shell, promoting the adsorption and activation of reagents on the surface during the catalytic reactions. This approach can be readily extended to other nanostructures including Au spherical nanoparticles and nanostars. These highly uniform and multifunctional core-shell heterostructures can be of great potential in a variety of energy, magnetic, and environment applications.

  6. Reactive Desorption of CO Hydrogenation Products under Cold Pre-stellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Qasim, D.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2018-02-01

    The astronomical gas-phase detection of simple species and small organic molecules in cold pre-stellar cores, with abundances as high as ∼10‑8–10‑9 n H, contradicts the generally accepted idea that at 10 K, such species should be fully frozen out on grain surfaces. A physical or chemical mechanism that results in a net transfer from solid-state species into the gas phase offers a possible explanation. Reactive desorption, i.e., desorption following the exothermic formation of a species, is one of the options that has been proposed. In astronomical models, the fraction of molecules desorbed through this process is handled as a free parameter, as experimental studies quantifying the impact of exothermicity on desorption efficiencies are largely lacking. In this work, we present a detailed laboratory study with the goal of deriving an upper limit for the reactive desorption efficiency of species involved in the CO–H2CO–CH3OH solid-state hydrogenation reaction chain. The limit for the overall reactive desorption fraction is derived by precisely investigating the solid-state elemental carbon budget, using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and the calibrated solid-state band-strength values for CO, H2CO and CH3OH. We find that for temperatures in the range of 10 to 14 K, an upper limit of 0.24 ± 0.02 for the overall elemental carbon loss upon CO conversion into CH3OH. This corresponds with an effective reaction desorption fraction of ≤0.07 per hydrogenation step, or ≤0.02 per H-atom induced reaction, assuming that H-atom addition and abstraction reactions equally contribute to the overall reactive desorption fraction along the hydrogenation sequence. The astronomical relevance of this finding is discussed.

  7. Temporary core liquid level depression during cold-leg small-break LOCA effect of break size and power level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Y.; Kumamaru, H.; Mimura, Y.; Kukita, Y.; Tasaka, K.

    1989-01-01

    Cold-leg small break LOCA experiments (0.5-10% break) were conducted at the large scale test facility (LSTF), a volumetrically-scaled (1/48) simulator of a PWR, of the ROSA-IV Program. When a break area was less than 2.5% of the scaled cold-leg flow area, the core liquid level was temporarily further depressed to the bottom elevation of the crossover leg during the loop seal clearing early in the transient only by the manometric pressure balance since no coolant remained in the upper portion of the primary system. When the break size was larger than 5%, the core liquid level was temporarily further depressed lower than the bottom elevation of the crossover leg during the loop seal clearing since coolant remained at the upper portion of the primary system; the steam generator (SG) U-tube upflow side and the SG inlet plenum, due to counter current flow limiting by updrafting steam while the coolant drained. The amount of coolant trapped there was dependent on the vapor velocity (core power); the larger the core power, the lower the minimum core liquid level. The RELAP5/MOD2 code reasonable predicted phenomena observed in the experiments. (orig./DG)

  8. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  9. Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta: Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possibly with about 25% of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15% by mass (or 8 volume %) of the asteroid. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. Melting in the Fe-Ni-S system begins at a cotectic temperature of 940 deg. C. Only about 40% of the total metal phase, or 3-4 volume % of Vesta, melts prior to the onset of silicate melting. Liquid iron in solid silicate initially forms isolated pockets of melt; connected melt channels, which are necessary if the metal is to segregate from the silicate, are only possible when the metal phase exceeds about 5 volume %. Thus, metal segregation to form a core does not occur prior to the onset of silicate melting.

  10. Differentiation of Asteroid 4 Vesta: Core Formation by Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft while orbiting asteroid 4 Vesta, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possible with about 25 percent of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15 percent by mass (or 8 percent by volume) of the asteroid, with a composition of 73.7 percent by weight Fe, 16.0 percent by weight S, and 10.3 percent by weight Ni. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. The combination of the melting phase relationships for the silicate and metal phases, together with the moderately siderophile element concentrations together require that complete melting of the metal phase occurred (temperature is greater than1350 degrees Centigrade), along with substantial (greater than 40 percent) melting of the silicate material. Thus, core formation on Vesta occurs as iron rain sinking through a silicate magma ocean.

  11. Consequences of the conversion of research reactor cores on experimental facilities at the example of a cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roegler, H.-J.; Goebs, H.; Stroemich, A.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences for and specifically the potential reduction of the performance of research reactors have been in discussions very often within the last five years as one of the draw-backs which has to be paid for the reduction of the proliferation risk at research reactor plants. Up to now and up to our knowledge the available results are restricted to unperturbated fluxes. Thus, this contribution makes the attempt to demonstrate the consequence of core conversion on an example of a real experimental facility and - at the same time - on one that is going to be used in the next decade a lot, i.e. a cold neutron source (CNS). (author)

  12. Muscle, Skin and Core Temperature after −110°C Cold Air and 8°C Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Joseph Thomas; Culligan, Kevin; Selfe, James; Donnelly, Alan Edward

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the reductions in muscle, skin and core temperature following exposure to −110°C whole body cryotherapy (WBC), and compare these to 8°C cold water immersion (CWI). Twenty active male subjects were randomly assigned to a 4-min exposure of WBC or CWI. A minimum of 7 days later subjects were exposed to the other treatment. Muscle temperature in the right vastus lateralis (n = 10); thigh skin (average, maximum and minimum) and rectal temperature (n = 10) were recorded before and 60 min after treatment. The greatest reduction (Psporting setting. PMID:23139763

  13. Substitution of manganese and iron into hydroxyapatite: Core/shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Meejoo, Siwaporn; Tang, I.-Ming

    2008-01-01

    The bioceramics, hydroxyapatite (HAP), is a material which is biocompatible to the human body and is well suited to be used in hyperthermia applications for the treatment of bone cancer. We investigate the substitution of iron and manganese into the hydroxyapatite to yield ceramics having the empirical formula Ca 9.4 Fe 0.4 Mn 0.2 (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 . The samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. The formation of the nanocrystallites in the HAP structure as the heating temperatures were raised to obtain a glass-ceramic system are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED) and electron spin resonance (ESR). TEM images show the core/shell structure of the nanoparticles, with the core being formed by the ferrites and the shell by the hydroxyapatite. The ED patterns indicate the nanoparticles formed at 500 deg. C have an amorphous structure while the nanoparticles formed at 1000 deg. C are crystalline. ESR spectroscopy indicated that the Fe 3+ ions have a g-factor of 4.23 and the Mn 2+ ions have a g-factor of 2.01. The values of the parameters in the spin Hamiltonian which describes the interaction between the transition metal ions and the Ca 2+ ions, indicate that the Mn 2+ ion substitute into the Ca 2+ sites which are ninefold coordinated, i.e., the Ca(1) sites

  14. Shape preferred orientation of iron grains compatible with Earth's uppermost inner core hemisphericity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Marie; Margerin, Ludovic

    2018-01-01

    Constraining the possible patterns of iron fabrics in the Earth's Uppermost Inner Core (UIC) is key to unravel the mechanisms controlling its growth and dynamics. In the framework of crystalline micro-structures composed of ellipsoidal, aligned grains, we discuss possible textural models of UIC compatible with observations of P-wave attenuation and velocity dispersion. Using recent results from multiple scattering theory in textured heterogeneous materials, we compute the P-wave phase velocity and scattering attenuation as a function of grain volume, shape, and orientation wrt to the propagation direction of seismic P-waves. Assuming no variations of the grain volume between the Eastern and Western hemisphere, we show that two families of texture are compatible with the degree-one structure of the inner core as revealed by the positive correlation between seismic velocity and attenuation. (1) Strong flattening of grains parallel to the Inner Core Boundary in the Western hemisphere and weak anisometry in the Eastern hemisphere. (2) Strong radial elongation of grains in the Western hemisphere and again weak anisometry in the Eastern hemisphere. Both textures can quantitatively explain the seismic data in a limited range of grain volumes. Furthermore, the velocity and attenuation anisotropy locally observed under Africa demands that the grains be locally elongated in the direction of Earth's meridians. Our study demonstrates that the hemispherical seismic structure of UIC can be entirely explained by changes in the shape and orientation of grains, thereby offering an alternative to changes in grain volumes. In the future, our theoretical toolbox could be used to systematically test the compatibility of textures predicted by geodynamical models with seismic observations.

  15. Large enhanced dielectric permittivity in polyaniline passivated core-shell nano magnetic iron oxide by plasma polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, Lija K.; Sooraj, V.; Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R., E-mail: mraiyer@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-682022, Kerala (India); Sajeev, U. S. [Department of Physics, Government College, Kottayam-686613, Kerala (India); Nair, Swapna S. [Department of Physics, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Central University of Kerala, Kasargode-671123, Kerala (India); Narayanan, T. N. [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikkudi-630006, Tamil Nadu (India); Ajayan, P. M. [Department of Material Science and Nano Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, Texas 7700 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    Commercial samples of Magnetite with size ranging from 25–30 nm were coated with polyaniline by using radio frequency plasma polymerization to achieve a core shell structure of magnetic nanoparticle (core)–Polyaniline (shell). High resolution transmission electron microscopy images confirm the core shell architecture of polyaniline coated iron oxide. The dielectric properties of the material were studied before and after plasma treatment. The polymer coated magnetite particles exhibited a large dielectric permittivity with respect to uncoated samples. The dielectric behavior was modeled using a Maxwell–Wagner capacitor model. A plausible mechanism for the enhancement of dielectric permittivity is proposed.

  16. Urine temperature as an index for the core temperature of industrial workers in hot or cold environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanami, Shoko; Horie, Seichi; Inoue, Jinro; Yamashita, Makiko

    2012-11-01

    Workers working in hot or cold environments are at risk for heat stroke and hypothermia. In Japan, 1718 people including 47 workers died of heat stroke in 2010 (Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare, Japan 2011). While the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) recommendation lists the abnormal core temperature of workers as a criterion for halting work, no method has been established for reliably measuring core temperatures at workplaces. ISO 9886 (Ergonomics-evaluation of thermal strain by physiological measurements. ISO copyright office, Geneva, pp 3-14; 2004) recognizes urine temperature as an index of core temperature only at normal temperature. In this study we ascertained whether or not urine temperature could serve as an index for core temperature at temperatures above and below the ISO range. We measured urine temperature of 31 subjects (29.8 ± 11.9 years) using a thermocouple sensor placed in the toilet bowl at ambient temperature settings of 40, 20, and 5˚C, and compared them with rectal temperature. At all ambient temperature settings, urine temperature correlated closely with rectal temperature exhibiting small mean bias. Urine temperature changed in a synchronized manner with rectal temperature at 40˚C. A Bland and Altman analysis showed that the limits of agreement (mean bias ± 2SD) between rectal and urine temperatures were -0.39 to +0.15˚C at 40˚C (95%CI -0.44 to +0.20˚C) and -0.79 to +0.29˚C at 5˚C (-0.89 to +0.39˚C). Hence, urine temperature as measured by the present method is a practical surrogate index for rectal temperature and represents a highly reliable biological monitoring index for assessing hot and cold stresses of workers at actual workplaces.

  17. Toroidal HTS transformer with cold magnetic core - analysis with FEM software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzesik, B; Stepien, M; Jez, R

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a thorough characterization of the toroidal HTS transformer by means of FEM analysis. The analysis was a 2D/3D harmonic electromagnetic and thermal analysis. The toroidal transformer operated in LN2 by being immersed together with the magnetic core in it, for which its power losses were acceptable. Two extreme variants of windings were analysed. The first one called parallel and the second called perpendicular. Three variants of the magnetic core were considered. In the first one the core was put outside of the windings, in the second the core was inside of the windings and in the third variant the core was outside as well as inside of the windings. The windings were made of HTS tape BiSCCO-2223/Ag while the magnetic core was made of the nanocrystalline material Finemet. The two windings, with a 1:1 turn-to-turn ratio, were uniformly distributed along the whole torus circumference. The output power, efficiency and power density are in the results of the analysis. The temperature distribution was also calculated. In summary, the performance of the transformer is better than those currently known.

  18. A Study of THT Cold Cores Population in the Star-Forming Region in Serpens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorellino, Eleonora

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to produce the Core Mass Function (CMF) of the Serpens star-forming region and confront it with the Initial Mass Function (IMF), the statistical distribution of initial star mass. As Testi & Sergent (1998) discovered, the power-law index of the slope of the CMF is very close to the one of the Salpeter's IMF (Salpeter, 1955): dN/dM / M2.35. This strongly suggests that the stellar IMF results from the fragmentation process in turbulent cloud cores rather than from stellar accretion mechanisms and gives a huge contribute to undestanding the star formation. For this work, we started from the data delivered by the European satellite Herschel and produced the maps of the Serpens with Unimap code (Piazzo et al, 2015). Hence we obtained a core catalogue with two different softwares getsources (Men'shchikov et al, 2012) and CuTEx (Molinari et al, 2011) and we eliminated from it any source that is not a core. A full discussion of the cores physical propreties as well as the whole region is under preparation.

  19. Microwave absorption properties of the core/shell-type iron and nickel nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, B.; Dong, X.L.; Huang, H.; Zhang, X.F.; Zhu, X.G.; Lei, J.P.; Sun, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    Iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) nanoparticles were prepared by the DC arc-discharge method in a mixture of hydrogen and argon gases, using bulk metals as the raw materials. The microstructure of core/shell (metal/metal oxide) in nanoparticle formed after in situ passivation process. The complex electromagnetic parameters (permittivity ε r =ε r ' +iε r '' and permeability μ r =μ r ' +iμ r '' ) of the paraffin-mixed nanocomposite samples (paraffin:nanoparticles=1:1 in mass ratio) were measured in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The polarization mechanisms of the space charge and dipole coexist in both the Fe and Ni nanoparticles. The orientational polarization is a particular polarization for Fe nanoparticles and brings a relatively higher dielectric loss. Natural resonance is the main reason for magnetic loss and the corresponding frequencies are 11.6 and 5.2 GHz for the Fe and Ni nanoparticles, respectively. The paraffin composite with Fe nanoparticles provided excellent microwave absorption properties (reflection loss <-20 dB) in the range 6.8-16.6 GHz over the absorber thickness of 1.1-2.3 mm

  20. Microwave absorption properties of the core/shell-type iron and nickel nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, B.; Dong, X. L.; Huang, H.; Zhang, X. F.; Zhu, X. G.; Lei, J. P.; Sun, J. P.

    Iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) nanoparticles were prepared by the DC arc-discharge method in a mixture of hydrogen and argon gases, using bulk metals as the raw materials. The microstructure of core/shell (metal/metal oxide) in nanoparticle formed after in situ passivation process. The complex electromagnetic parameters (permittivity ɛ=ɛr'+iɛr″ and permeability μ=μr'+iμr″) of the paraffin-mixed nanocomposite samples (paraffin:nanoparticles=1:1 in mass ratio) were measured in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The polarization mechanisms of the space charge and dipole coexist in both the Fe and Ni nanoparticles. The orientational polarization is a particular polarization for Fe nanoparticles and brings a relatively higher dielectric loss. Natural resonance is the main reason for magnetic loss and the corresponding frequencies are 11.6 and 5.2 GHz for the Fe and Ni nanoparticles, respectively. The paraffin composite with Fe nanoparticles provided excellent microwave absorption properties (reflection loss <-20 dB) in the range 6.8-16.6 GHz over the absorber thickness of 1.1-2.3 mm.

  1. An Iron-Rain Model for Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is differentiated into a crust, mantle, and core, as demonstrated by studies of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites and by data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Most models for the differentiation and thermal evolution of Vesta assume that the metal phase completely melts within 20 degrees of the eutectic temperature, well before the onset of silicate melting. In such a model, core formation initially happens by Darcy flow, but this is an inefficient process for liquid metal and solid silicate. However, the likely chemical composition of Vesta, similar to H chondrites with perhaps some CM or CV chondrite, has 13-16 weight percent S. For such compositions, metal-sulfide melting will not be complete until a temperature of at least 1350 degrees Centigrade. The silicate solidus for Vesta's composition is between 1100 and 1150 degrees Centigrade, and thus metal and silicate melting must have substantially overlapped in time on Vesta. In this chemically and physically more likely view of Vesta's evolution, metal sulfide drops will sink by Stokes flow through the partially molten silicate magma ocean in a process that can be envisioned as "iron rain". Measurements of eucrites show that moderately siderophile elements such as Ni, Mo, and W reached chemical equilibrium between the metal and silicate phases, which is an important test for any Vesta differentiation model. The equilibration time is a function of the initial metal grain size, which we take to be 25-45 microns based on recent measurements of H6 chondrites. For these sizes and reasonable silicate magma viscosities, equilibration occurs after a fall distance of just a few meters through the magma ocean. Although metal drops may grow in size by merger with other drops, which increases their settling velocities and decreases the total core formation time, the short equilibration distance ensures that the moderately siderophile elements will reach chemical equilibrium between metal and silicate before

  2. Iron Phosphate Glass for Vitrifying Hanford AZ102 LAW in Joule Heated and Cold Crucible Induction Melters - 12240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Delbert E.; Brow, Richard K.; Ray, Chandra S.; Reis, Signo T. [Missouri University of Science and Technology, 1870 Miner Circle, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Kim, Cheol-Woon [MO-SCI Corporation, 4040 HyPoint North, Rolla, MO 65401 (United States); Vienna, John D.; Sevigny, Gary [Pacific North West National Laboratory, Battelle Blvd., Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Peeler, David; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Hansen, Eric K. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, 999-W, Aiken, SC 29803 (United States); Soelberg, Nick [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Pegg, Ian L.; Gan, Hao [Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, N.E., Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    An iron phosphate composition for vitrifying a high sulfate (∼17 wt%) and high alkali (∼80 wt%) Hanford low activity waste (LAW), known as AZ-102 LAW, has been developed for processing in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) or a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). This composition produced a glass waste form, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, with a waste loading of 26 wt% of the AZ-102 which corresponded to a total alkali and sulfate (represented as SO{sub 3}) content of 21 and 4.4 wt%, respectively. A slurry (7 M Na{sup +}) of MS26AZ102F-2 simulant was melted continuously at temperatures between 1030 and 1090 deg. C for 10 days in a small JHM at PNNL and for 70 hours in a CCIM at INL. The as-cast glasses produced in both melters and in trial laboratory experiments along with their canister centerline cooled (CCC) counterparts met the requirements for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Vapor Hydration Test (VHT) responses in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Contract. These glass waste forms retained up to 77 % of the SO{sub 3} (3.3 wt%), 100% of the Cesium, and 33 to 44% of the rhenium (used as a surrogate for Tc) all of which either exceeded or were comparable to the retention limit for these species in borosilicate glass nuclear waste form. Analyses of commercial K-3 refractory lining and the Inconel 693 metal electrodes used in JHM indicated only minimum corrosion of these components by the iron phosphate glass. This is the first time that an iron phosphate composition was melted continuously in a slurry fed JHM and in the US, thereby, demonstrating that iron phosphate glasses can be used as alternative hosts for vitrifying nuclear waste. The following conclusions are drawn from the results of the present work. (1) An iron phosphate composition, designated as MS26AZ102F-2, containing 26 wt% of the simulated high sulfate (17 wt%), high alkali (80 wt%) Hanford AZ-102 LAW meets all the criteria for processing in a JHM and CCIM. This

  3. A code for the correction of field imperfections in iron-core superconducting magnets by shimming of iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, J.; Bhunia, U.; Dey, M.K.; Mallik, C.; Bhandari, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic field measurement of the median plane of K500 superconducting cyclotron at VECC have been carried out. A code has been developed using the mathematical software to calculate the magnetic field distribution for an arbitrary shaped saturated iron piece, and the various harmonics therein

  4. Repetitive on-demand drug release from polymeric matrices containing a macroscopic spherical iron core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovers, Stefan A; Kemmere, Maartje F; Keurentjes, Jos T F; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2017-09-15

    A system for multiple on-demand drug release has been prepared that can be activated with an alternating magnetic field as external trigger. The core/shell samples have been developed based on a macroscopic spherical iron core coated with a thermoresponsive polymer, poly(styrene-stat-butyl methacrylate), containing ibuprofen as a model drug. During exposure of the samples to the magnetic field (ON state), the release rate of ibuprofen is significantly increased, up to 35 times the release rate without the magnetic field (OFF state). Using one sample or two samples in line with the magnetic field does not influence the ON/OFF ratio of the system, showing the possibility of using multiple samples to increase and tune the drug dose. Increasing the concentration of ibuprofen in the polymer layer is shown to increase the release rate in both the ON and OFF states. Increasing the size of the iron core and, consequently, decreasing the polymer thickness, was found to only increase the release rate during exposure resulting in higher ON/OFF ratios. The developed on demand drug delivery systems represents a promising development towards on demand drug delivery implants. During my chemical engineering studies, it was only during my master thesis work that I decided to continue with PhD research as I really enjoyed doing original research. When coming to the end of my PhD research under supervision of Prof. Ulrich S. Schubert, I developed the ambition to pursue an academic career. Fortunately, I got the opportunity to stay with Prof. Schubert as project leader for the Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI). Within this position, I supervised ten researchers and was able to start developing my independent research lines. Despite that I now advise students to not stay in the same laboratory, this first position allowed me to gain some initial independence and to publish a large number of papers that has been a great benefit in my further career. After two and a half years I needed a new

  5. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction

  6. Gas and grain chemical composition in cold cores as predicted by the Nautilus three-phase model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruaud, Maxime; Wakelam, Valentine; Hersant, Franck

    2016-07-01

    We present an extended version of the two-phase gas-grain code NAUTILUS to the three-phase modelling of gas and grain chemistry of cold cores. In this model, both the mantle and the surface are considered as chemically active. We also take into account the competition among reaction, diffusion and evaporation. The model predictions are confronted to ice observations in the envelope of low-mass and massive young stellar objects as well as towards background stars. Modelled gas-phase abundances are compared to species observed towards TMC-1 (CP) and L134N dark clouds. We find that our model successfully reproduces the observed ice species. It is found that the reaction-diffusion competition strongly enhances reactions with barriers and more specifically reactions with H2, which is abundant on grains. This finding highlights the importance having a good approach to determine the abundance of H2 on grains. Consequently, it is found that the major N-bearing species on grains go from NH3 to N2 and HCN when the reaction-diffusion competition is taken into account. In the gas phase and before a few 105 yr, we find that the three-phase model does not have a strong impact on the observed species compared to the two-phase model. After this time, the computed abundances dramatically decrease due to the strong accretion on dust, which is not counterbalanced by the desorption less efficient than in the two-phase model. This strongly constrains the chemical age of cold cores to be of the order of few 105 yr.

  7. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  8. Flexural strength and the probability of failure of cold isostatic pressed zirconia core ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarampi, Eleni; Kontonasaki, Eleana; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Zorba, Triantafillia; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos M; Koidis, Petros

    2012-08-01

    The flexural strength of zirconia core ceramics must predictably withstand the high stresses developed during oral function. The in-depth interpretation of strength parameters and the probability of failure during clinical performance could assist the clinician in selecting the optimum materials while planning treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the flexural strength based on survival probability and Weibull statistical analysis of 2 zirconia cores for ceramic restorations. Twenty bar-shaped specimens were milled from 2 core ceramics, IPS e.max ZirCAD and Wieland ZENO Zr, and were loaded until fracture according to ISO 6872 (3-point bending test). An independent samples t test was used to assess significant differences of fracture strength (α=.05). Weibull statistical analysis of the flexural strength data provided 2 parameter estimates: Weibull modulus (m) and characteristic strength (σ(0)). The fractured surfaces of the specimens were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The investigation of the crystallographic state of the materials was performed with x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Higher mean flexural strength (Plines zones). Both groups primarily sustained the tetragonal phase of zirconia and a negligible amount of the monoclinic phase. Although both zirconia ceramics presented similar fractographic and crystallographic properties, the higher flexural strength of WZ ceramics was associated with a lower m and more voids in their microstructure. These findings suggest a greater scattering of strength values and a flaw distribution that are expected to increase failure probability. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A High-Mass Cold Core in the Auriga-California Giant Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus McGehee, Peregrine; Paladini, Roberta; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti; Toth, Viktor; Sayers, Jack

    2015-08-01

    The Auriga-California Giant Molecular Cloud is noted for its relatively low star formation rate, especially at the high-mass end of the Initial Mass Function. We combine maps acquired by the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory's Multiwavelength Submillimeter Inductance Camera [MUSIC] in the wavelength range 0.86 to 2.00 millimeters with Planck and publicly-available Herschel PACS and SPIRE data in order to characterize the mass, dust properties, and environment of the bright core PGCC G163.32-8.41.

  10. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  11. Synthesis of composite nanoparticles using co-precipitation of a magnetic iron-oxide shell onto core nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primc, Darinka; Belec, Blaž; Makovec, Darko

    2016-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles can be synthesized by coating a shell made of one material onto core nanoparticles made of another material. Here we report on a novel method for coating a magnetic iron oxide onto the surface of core nanoparticles in an aqueous suspension. The method is based on the heterogeneous nucleation of an initial product of Fe"3"+/Fe"2"+ co-precipitation on the core nanoparticles. The close control of the supersaturation of the precipitating species required for an exclusively heterogeneous nucleation and the growth of the shell were achieved by immobilizing the reactive Fe"3"+ ions in a nitrate complex with urea ([Fe((CO(NH_2)_2)_6](NO_3)_3) and by using solid Mg(OH)_2 as the precipitating reagent. The slow thermal decomposition of the complex at 60 °C homogeneously releases the reactive Fe"3"+ ions into the suspension of the core nanoparticles. The key stage of the process is the thermal hydrolysis of the released Fe"3"+ ions prior to the addition of Mg(OH)_2. The thermal hydrolysis results in the formation of γ-FeOOH, exclusively at the surfaces of the core nanoparticles. After the addition of the solid hydroxide Mg(OH)_2, the pH increases and at pH ~ 5.7 the Fe"2"+ precipitates and reacts with the γ-FeOOH to form magnetic iron oxide with a spinel structure (spinel ferrite) at the surfaces of the core nanoparticles. The proposed low-temperature method for the synthesis of composite nanoparticles is capable of forming well-defined interfaces between the two components, important for the coupling of the different properties. The procedure is environmentally friendly, inexpensive, and appropriate for scaling up to mass production.Graphical abstract

  12. Very low sound velocities in iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O: Implications for the core-mantle boundary region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, J.K.; Jackson, J.M.; Sturhahn, W.

    2010-01-01

    The sound velocities of (Mg .16 Fe .84 )O have been measured to 121 GPa at ambient temperature using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The effect of electronic environment of the iron sites on the sound velocities were tracked in situ using synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy. We found the sound velocities of (Mg .16 Fe .84 )O to be much lower than those in other presumed mantle phases at similar conditions, most notably at very high pressures. Conservative estimates of the effect of temperature and dilution on aggregate sound velocities show that only a small amount of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O can greatly reduce the average sound velocity of an assemblage. We propose that iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O be a source of ultra-low velocity zones. Other properties of this phase, such as enhanced density and dynamic stability, strongly support the presence of iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O in localized patches above the core-mantle boundary.

  13. Thermal hydraulic And RSG-Gas Core Reactivity Characteristics Due To Cold Water Insertion Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastuti, Endiah Puji; Suparlina, Lily; Tukiran

    2000-01-01

    Under normal operating condition,the primary coolant is circulated by 2 out of the 3 primary coolant pumps. Unnecessary operation of the reserve pump would result in a temperatur decrease of the primary coolant by less than 5 o C. the corresponding increase of reactivity amounts to Δρ ≤0,1 %. The analysis was done using silicide core configuration data with 3.55 gU /cm 3 fuel loading. The calculation model was done with and without automatic control rod. The calculation results for the worst case condition, shows that reactor reached the maximum power 28.52 MW at 81.1 seconds, after the accident occurred. The maximal fuel element, cladding and outlet coolant temperatures are 148.3 o C,142.1 o C, and 75.7 o C, respectively. Safety margins for DNBR and flow instability reached 1.25 and 4.20, respectively. Comparing to the RSG-GAS safety margin at transient condition reguirement >1.48, RSG-GAS has enough safety margin if the power trip executed at 114% of 25 MW

  14. Study of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution: Implication for the analysis of ferritin-like iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenkina, I. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Tugarova, A. V.; Biró, B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Kamnev, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The results of a comparative study of two samples of the rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense (strain Sp245) prepared in different conditions and of human liver ferritin using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution demonstrated the presence of ferritin-like iron (i.e. iron similar to that found in ferritin-like proteins) in the bacterium. Mössbauer spectra of these samples were fitted in two ways: as a rough approximation using a one quadrupole doublet fit (the homogeneous iron core model) and using a superposition of quadrupole doublets (the heterogeneous iron core model). Both results demonstrated differences in the Mössbauer parameters for mammalian ferritin and for bacterial ferritin-like iron. Moreover, some differences in the Mössbauer parameters were observed between the two samples of A. brasilense Sp245 related to the differences in their preparation conditions.

  15. Multistage Core Formation in Planetesimals Revealed by Numerical Modeling and Hf-W Chronometry of Iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, W.; Kruijer, T. S.; Breuer, D.; Kleine, T.

    2018-02-01

    Iron meteorites provide some of the most direct insights into the processes and timescales of core formation in planetesimals. Of these, group IVB irons stand out by having one of the youngest 182Hf-182W model ages for metal segregation (2.9 ± 0.6 Ma after solar system formation), as well as the lowest bulk sulfur content and hence highest liquidus temperature. Here, using a new model for the internal evolution of the IVB parent body, we show that a single stage of metal-silicate separation cannot account for the complete melting of pure Fe metal at the relatively late time given by the Hf-W model age. Instead, a complex metal-silicate separation scenario is required that includes migration of partial silicate melts, formation of a shallow magma ocean, and core formation in two distinct stages of metal segregation. In the first stage, a protocore formed at ≈1.5 Ma via settling of metal particles in a mantle magma ocean, followed by metal segregation from a shallow magma ocean at ≈5.4 Ma. As these stages of metal segregation occurred at different times, the two metal fractions had different 182W compositions. Consequently, the final 182W composition of the IVB core does not correspond to a single differentiation event, but represents the average composition of early- and late-segregated core fractions. Our best fit model indicates an ≈100 km radius for the IVB parent body and provides an accretion age of ≈0.1-0.5 Ma after solar system formation. The computed solidification time is, furthermore, consistent with the Re-Os age for crystallization of the IVB core.

  16. Uranium isotope ratios of Muonionalusta troilite and complications for the absolute age of the IVA iron meteorite core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecka, Gregory A.; Amelin, Yuri; Kleine, Thorsten

    2018-05-01

    The crystallization ages of planetary crustal material (given by basaltic meteorites) and planetary cores (given by iron meteorites) provide fiducial marks for the progress of planetary formation, and thus, the absolute ages of these objects fundamentally direct our knowledge and understanding of planet formation and evolution. The lone precise absolute age of planetary core material was previously obtained on troilite inclusions from the IVA iron meteorite Muonionalusta. This previously reported Pb-Pb age of 4565.3 ± 0.1 Ma-assuming a 238U/235U =137.88-only post-dated the start of the Solar System by approximately 2-3 million years, and mandated fast cooling of planetary core material. Since an accurate Pb-Pb age requires a known 238U/235U of the sample, we have measured both 238U/235U and Pb isotopic compositions of troilite inclusions from Muonionalusta. The measured 238U/235U of the samples range from ∼137.84 to as low as ∼137.22, however based on Pb and U systematics, terrestrial contamination appears pervasive and has affected samples to various extents for Pb and U. The cause of the relative 235U excess in one sample does not appear to be from terrestrial contamination or the decay of short-lived 247Cm, but is more likely from fractionation of U isotopes during metal-silicate separation during core formation, exacerbated by the extreme U depletion in the planetary core. Due to limited Pb isotopic variation and terrestrial disturbance, no samples of this study produced useful age information; however the clear divergence from the previously assumed 238U/235U of any troilite in Muonionalusta introduces substantial uncertainty to the previously reported absolute age of the sample without knowledge of the 238U/235U of the sample. Uncertainties associated with U isotope heterogeneity do not allow for definition of a robust age of solidification and cooling for the IVA core. However, one sample of this work-paired with previous work using short

  17. The design, fabrication and testing of an iron-core current compensated magnetic channel for cyclotron extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laxdale, R.E.; Fong, K.; Houtman, H.

    1994-06-01

    An iron-core current compensated magnetic channel has been built ss part of the TRIUMF 450 MeV H - extraction feasibility project. The channel would operate in the 0.5 T cyclotron field and was designed using the two-dimensional code POISSON. Recent beam tests with the channel installed in the TRIUMF cyclotron confirmed that the electro-mechanical design is reliable and that the effect on the circulating beam is in agreement with calculation. The design and hardware details will be described and the beam test results reported. (author)

  18. Electron-capture and Low-mass Iron-core-collapse Supernovae: New Neutrino-radiation-hydrodynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radice, David; Burrows, Adam; Vartanyan, David; Skinner, M. Aaron; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2017-11-01

    We present new 1D (spherical) and 2D (axisymmetric) simulations of electron-capture (EC) and low-mass iron-core-collapse supernovae (SN). We consider six progenitor models: the ECSN progenitor from Nomoto; two ECSN-like low-mass low-metallicity iron-core progenitors from A. Heger (2016, private communication); and the 9, 10, and 11 {M}⊙ (zero-age main-sequence) progenitors from Sukhbold et al. We confirm that the ECSN and ESCN-like progenitors explode easily even in 1D with explosion energies of up to a 0.15 Bethes (1 {{B}}\\equiv {10}51 {erg}), and are a viable mechanism for the production of very-low-mass neutron stars. However, the 9, 10, and 11 {M}⊙ progenitors do not explode in 1D and are not even necessarily easier to explode than higher-mass progenitor stars in 2D. We study the effect of perturbations and of changes to the microphysics and we find that relatively small changes can result in qualitatively different outcomes, even in 1D, for models sufficiently close to the explosion threshold. Finally, we revisit the impact of convection below the protoneutron star (PNS) surface. We analyze 1D and 2D evolutions of PNSs subject to the same boundary conditions. We find that the impact of PNS convection has been underestimated in previous studies and could result in an increase of the neutrino luminosity by up to factors of two.

  19. Current limiting behavior in three-phase transformer-type SFCLs using an iron core according to variety of fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong-Sun; Jung, Byung-Ik; Ha, Kyoung-Hun; Choi, Soo-Geun; Park, Hyoung-Min; Choi, Hyo-Sang

    To apply the superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) to the power system, the reliability of the fault-current-limiting operation must be ensured in diverse fault conditions. The SFCL must also be linked to the operation of the high-speed recloser in the power system. In this study, a three-phase transformer-type SFCL, which has a neutral line to improve the simultaneous quench characteristics of superconducting elements, was manufactured to analyze the fault-current-limiting characteristic according to the single, double, and triple line-to-ground faults. The transformer-type SFCL, wherein three-phase windings are connected to one iron core, reduced the burden on the superconducting element as the superconducting element on the sound phase was also quenched in the case of the single line-to-ground fault. In the case of double or triple line-to-ground faults, the flux from the faulted phase winding was interlinked with other faulted or sound phase windings, and the fault-current-limiting rate decreased because the windings of three phases were inductively connected by one iron core.

  20. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Magnetic Iron Oxide@SiO₂-Au@C Particles with Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo; Li, Xiangcun; Qi, Xinhong; Luo, Fan; He, Gaohong

    2015-05-12

    The preparation of nonspherical magnetic core-shell nanostructures with uniform sizes still remains a challenge. In this study, magnetic iron oxide@SiO2-Au@C particles with different shapes, such as pseduocube, ellipsoid, and peanut, were synthesized using hematite as templates and precursors of magnetic iron oxide. The as-obtained magnetic particles demonstrated uniform sizes, shapes, and well-designed core-shell nanostructures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis showed that the Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) of ∼6 nm were uniformly distributed between the silica and carbon layers. The embedding of the metal nanocrystals into the two different layers prevented the aggregation and reduced the loss of the metal nanocrystals during recycling. Catalytic performance of the peanut-like particles kept almost unchanged without a noticeable decrease in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in 8 min even after 7 cycles, indicating excellent reusability of the particles. Moreover, the catalyst could be readily recycled magnetically after each reduction by an external magnetic field.

  1. Characterization of Coated Sand Cores from Two Different Binder Systems for Grey Iron Castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Poulsen, Thomas

    or veining and metal penetration defects. The use of refractory coatings on cores is fundamental to obtaining acceptable casting surface quality and is used on resin bonded cores in production foundries. In this study new sol gel-coated sand cores made from coldbox and furan binder systems were investigated......Expansion defects on the surface of the castings include sand burn-in, metal penetration and/or veining, finning or scab. Veining or finning and metal penetration are of interest. These defects are associated with silica sand and result from the penetration of liquid metal into cracks formed during...... differential expansion of the core during heating. The rapid expansion of silica sand up to 600 oC and especially at 573 oC, where the α – β phase transformation occurs, is the cause of stresses in the core system. These stresses cause crack formation and metal melt flows into these cracks causing finning...

  2. Direct observations of the viscosity of Earth's outer core and extrapolation of measurements of the viscosity of liquid iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smylie, D E; Brazhkin, Vadim V; Palmer, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Estimates vary widely as to the viscosity of Earth's outer fluid core. Directly observed viscosity is usually orders of magnitude higher than the values extrapolated from high-pressure high-temperature laboratory experiments, which are close to those for liquid iron at atmospheric pressure. It turned out that this discrepancy can be removed by extrapolating via the widely known Arrhenius activation model modified by lifting the commonly used assumption of pressure-independent activation volume (which is possible due to the discovery that at high pressures the activation volume increases strongly with pressure, resulting in 10 2 Pa s at the top of the fluid core, and in 10 11 Pa s at its bottom). There are of course many uncertainties affecting this extrapolation process. This paper reviews two viscosity determination methods, one for the top and the other for the bottom of the outer core, the former of which relies on the decay of free core nutations and yields 2371 ± 1530 Pa s, while the other relies on the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the solid inner core oscillations and yields an average of 1.247 ± 0.035 Pa s. Encouraged by the good performance of the Arrhenius extrapolation, a differential form of the Arrhenius activation model is used to interpolate along the melting temperature curve and to find the viscosity profile across the entire outer core. The viscosity variation is found to be nearly log-linear between the measured boundary values. (methodological notes)

  3. A/C magnetic hyperthermia of melanoma mediated by iron(0)/iron oxide core/shell magnetic nanoparticles: a mouse study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balivada, Sivasai; Koper, Olga B; Tamura, Masaaki; Chikan, Viktor; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L; Rachakatla, Raja Shekar; Wang, Hongwang; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Dani, Raj Kumar; Pyle, Marla; Kroh, Franklin O; Walker, Brandon; Leaym, Xiaoxuan

    2010-01-01

    There is renewed interest in magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment modality for cancer, especially when it is combined with other more traditional therapeutic approaches, such as the co-delivery of anticancer drugs or photodynamic therapy. The influence of bimagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) combined with short external alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure on the growth of subcutaneous mouse melanomas (B16-F10) was evaluated. Bimagnetic Fe/Fe 3 O 4 core/shell nanoparticles were designed for cancer targeting after intratumoral or intravenous administration. Their inorganic center was protected against rapid biocorrosion by organic dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. TCPP (4-tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin) units were attached to the dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. The magnetic hyperthermia results obtained after intratumoral injection indicated that micromolar concentrations of iron given within the modified core-shell Fe/Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles caused a significant anti-tumor effect on murine B16-F10 melanoma with three short 10-minute AMF exposures. We also observed a decrease in tumor size after intravenous administration of the MNPs followed by three consecutive days of AMF exposure 24 hrs after the MNPs injection. These results indicate that intratumoral administration of surface modified MNPs can attenuate mouse melanoma after AMF exposure. Moreover, we have found that after intravenous administration of micromolar concentrations, these MNPs are capable of causing an anti-tumor effect in a mouse melanoma model after only a short AMF exposure time. This is a clear improvement to state of the art

  4. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tunable Size Synthesis and Analysis in Terms of the Core-Shell Structure and Mixed Coercive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phong, P. T.; Oanh, V. T. K.; Lam, T. D.; Phuc, N. X.; Tung, L. D.; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.; Manh, D. H.

    2017-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are currently a very active research field. To date, a comprehensive study of iron oxide NPs is still lacking not only on the size dependence of structural phases but also in the use of an appropriate model. Herein, we report on a systematic study of the structural and magnetic properties of iron oxide NPs prepared by a co-precipitation method followed by hydrothermal treatment. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the NPs have an inverse spinel structure of iron oxide phase (Fe3O4) with average crystallite sizes ( D XRD) of 6-19 nm, while grain sizes ( D TEM) are of 7-23 nm. In addition, the larger the particle size, the closer the experimental lattice constant value is to that of the magnetite structure. Magnetic field-dependent magnetization data and analysis show that the effective anisotropy constants of the Fe3O4 NPs are about five times larger than that of their bulk counterpart. Particle size ( D) dependence of the magnetization and the non-saturating behavior observed in applied fields up to 50 kOe are discussed using the core-shell structure model. We find that with decreasing D, while the calculated thickness of the shell of disordered spins ( t ˜ 0.3 nm) remains almost unchanged, the specific surface areas S a increases significantly, thus reducing the magnetization of the NPs. We also probe the coercivity of the NPs by using the mixed coercive Kneller and Luborsky model. The calculated results indicate that the coercivity rises monotonously with the particle size, and are well matched with the experimental ones.

  5. Muscle, skin and core temperature after -110°c cold air and 8°c water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Joseph Thomas; Culligan, Kevin; Selfe, James; Donnelly, Alan Edward

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the reductions in muscle, skin and core temperature following exposure to -110°C whole body cryotherapy (WBC), and compare these to 8°C cold water immersion (CWI). Twenty active male subjects were randomly assigned to a 4-min exposure of WBC or CWI. A minimum of 7 days later subjects were exposed to the other treatment. Muscle temperature in the right vastus lateralis (n=10); thigh skin (average, maximum and minimum) and rectal temperature (n=10) were recorded before and 60 min after treatment. The greatest reduction (P<0.05) in muscle (mean ± SD; 1 cm: WBC, 1.6 ± 1.2°C; CWI, 2.0 ± 1.0°C; 2 cm: WBC, 1.2 ± 0.7°C; CWI, 1.7 ± 0.9°C; 3 cm: WBC, 1.6 ± 0.6°C; CWI, 1.7 ± 0.5°C) and rectal temperature (WBC, 0.3 ± 0.2°C; CWI, 0.4 ± 0.2°C) were observed 60 min after treatment. The largest reductions in average (WBC, 12.1 ± 1.0°C; CWI, 8.4 ± 0.7°C), minimum (WBC, 13.2 ± 1.4°C; CWI, 8.7 ± 0.7°C) and maximum (WBC, 8.8 ± 2.0°C; CWI, 7.2 ± 1.9°C) skin temperature occurred immediately after both CWI and WBC (P<0.05). Skin temperature was significantly lower (P<0.05) immediately after WBC compared to CWI. The present study demonstrates that a single WBC exposure decreases muscle and core temperature to a similar level of those experienced after CWI. Although both treatments significantly reduced skin temperature, WBC elicited a greater decrease compared to CWI. These data may provide information to clinicians and researchers attempting to optimise WBC and CWI protocols in a clinical or sporting setting.

  6. Muscle, skin and core temperature after -110°c cold air and 8°c water treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Thomas Costello

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the reductions in muscle, skin and core temperature following exposure to -110°C whole body cryotherapy (WBC, and compare these to 8°C cold water immersion (CWI. Twenty active male subjects were randomly assigned to a 4-min exposure of WBC or CWI. A minimum of 7 days later subjects were exposed to the other treatment. Muscle temperature in the right vastus lateralis (n=10; thigh skin (average, maximum and minimum and rectal temperature (n=10 were recorded before and 60 min after treatment. The greatest reduction (P<0.05 in muscle (mean ± SD; 1 cm: WBC, 1.6 ± 1.2°C; CWI, 2.0 ± 1.0°C; 2 cm: WBC, 1.2 ± 0.7°C; CWI, 1.7 ± 0.9°C; 3 cm: WBC, 1.6 ± 0.6°C; CWI, 1.7 ± 0.5°C and rectal temperature (WBC, 0.3 ± 0.2°C; CWI, 0.4 ± 0.2°C were observed 60 min after treatment. The largest reductions in average (WBC, 12.1 ± 1.0°C; CWI, 8.4 ± 0.7°C, minimum (WBC, 13.2 ± 1.4°C; CWI, 8.7 ± 0.7°C and maximum (WBC, 8.8 ± 2.0°C; CWI, 7.2 ± 1.9°C skin temperature occurred immediately after both CWI and WBC (P<0.05. Skin temperature was significantly lower (P<0.05 immediately after WBC compared to CWI. The present study demonstrates that a single WBC exposure decreases muscle and core temperature to a similar level of those experienced after CWI. Although both treatments significantly reduced skin temperature, WBC elicited a greater decrease compared to CWI. These data may provide information to clinicians and researchers attempting to optimise WBC and CWI protocols in a clinical or sporting setting.

  7. Gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Q.; Cuppen, H. M.; Herbst, E.

    2007-07-01

    Aims:We have recently developed a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to study surface chemistry on interstellar grains and the morphology of ice mantles. The method is designed to eliminate the problems inherent in the rate-equation formalism to surface chemistry. Here we report the first use of this method in a chemical model of cold interstellar cloud cores that includes both gas-phase and surface chemistry. The surface chemical network consists of a small number of diffusive reactions that can produce molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, methanol and assorted radicals. Methods: The simulation is started by running a gas-phase model including accretion onto grains but no surface chemistry or evaporation. The starting surface consists of either flat or rough olivine. We introduce the surface chemistry of the three species H, O and CO in an iterative manner using our stochastic technique. Under the conditions of the simulation, only atomic hydrogen can evaporate to a significant extent. Although it has little effect on other gas-phase species, the evaporation of atomic hydrogen changes its gas-phase abundance, which in turn changes the flux of atomic hydrogen onto grains. The effect on the surface chemistry is treated until convergence occurs. We neglect all non-thermal desorptive processes. Results: We determine the mantle abundances of assorted molecules as a function of time through 2 × 105 yr. Our method also allows determination of the abundance of each molecule in specific monolayers. The mantle results can be compared with observations of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methanol ices in the sources W33A and Elias 16. Other than a slight underproduction of mantle CO, our results are in very good agreement with observations.

  8. Cold Extrusion but Not Coating Affects Iron Bioavailability from Fortified Rice in Young Women and Is Associated with Modifications in Starch Microstructure and Mineral Retention during Cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Laura; Speich, Cornelia; Zeder, Christophe; Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Adelmann, Horst; de Pee, Saskia; Tay, Fabian; Zimmermann, Michael B; Moretti, Diego

    2017-12-01

    Background: Rice can be fortified with the use of hot or cold extrusion or coating, but the nutritional qualities of the resulting rice grains have never been directly compared. Objective: Using fortified rice produced by coating or hot or cold extrusion, we compared 1 ) iron and zinc absorption with the use of stable isotopes, 2 ) iron and zinc retention during cooking, and 3 ) starch microstructure. Methods: We conducted 2 studies in young women: in study 1 [ n = 19; mean ± SD age: 26.2 ± 3.4 y; body mass index (BMI; in kg/m 2 ): 21.3 ± 1.6], we compared the fractional iron absorption (FAFe) from rice meals containing isotopically labeled ferric prophosphate ( 57 FePP), zinc oxide (ZnO), citric acid, and micronutrients fortified through hot extrusion (HER1) with rice meals fortified through cold extrusion containing 57 FePP, ZnO, citric acid, and micronutrients (CER); in study 2 ( n = 22; age: 24 ± 4 y; BMI: 21.2 ± 1.3), we compared FAFe and fractional zinc absorption (FAZn) from rice meals fortified through hot extrusion (HER2) compared with rice meals fortified through coating containing 57 FePP, ZnO, a citric acid and trisodium cirate mixture (CA/TSC), and micronutrients (COR) relative to rice meals extrinsically fortified with ferrous sulfate (reference). Rice types HER1 and CER contained citric acid, whereas types HER2 and COR contained CA/TSC. We assessed retention during standardized cooking experiments and characterized the rice starch microstructure. Results: FAFe (95% CI) was greater from CER [2.2% (1.4%, 3.4%)] than from HER1 [1.2% (0.7%, 2.0%)] ( P = 0.036). There was no difference in FAFe between HER2 [5.1% (3.7%, 7.1%)] and COR [4.0% (2.9%, 5.4%)] ( P = 0.14), but FAFe from COR was lower than that from the reference meal [6.6% (4.9%, 9.0%)] ( P = 0.003), and the geometric mean FAZn (95% CI) did not differ between HER2 [9.5% (7.9%, 11.6%)] and COR [9.6% (8.7%, 10.7%)] ( P = 0.92). Cooking in a rice-to-water ratio of 1:2 resulted in iron and zinc

  9. Equation of state of iron under core conditions of large rocky exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Raymond F.; Fratanduono, Dayne E.; Braun, David G.; Duffy, Thomas S.; Wicks, June K.; Celliers, Peter M.; Ali, Suzanne J.; Fernandez-Pañella, Amalia; Kraus, Richard G.; Swift, Damian C.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Eggert, Jon H.

    2018-06-01

    The recent discovery of thousands of planets outside our Solar System raises fundamental questions about the variety of planetary types and their corresponding interior structures and dynamics. To better understand these objects, there is a strong need to constrain material properties at the extreme pressures found within planetary interiors1,2. Here we used high-powered lasers at the National Ignition Facility to ramp compress iron over nanosecond timescales to 1.4 TPa (14 million atmospheres)—a pressure four times higher than for previous static compression data. A Lagrangian sound-speed analysis was used to determine pressure, density and sound speed along a continuous isentropic compression path. Our peak pressures are comparable to those predicted at the centre of a terrestrial-type exoplanet of three to four Earth masses3, representing the first absolute equation of state measurements for iron at such conditions. These results provide an experiment-based mass-radius relationship for a hypothetical pure iron planet that can be used to evaluate plausible compositional space for large, rocky exoplanets.

  10. Synthesis and magnetic properties of cobalt-iron/cobalt-ferrite soft/hard magnetic core/shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro Londoño-Calderón, César; Moscoso-Londoño, Oscar; Muraca, Diego; Arzuza, Luis; Carvalho, Peterson; Pirota, Kleber Roberto; Knobel, Marcelo; Pampillo, Laura Gabriela; Martínez-García, Ricardo

    2017-06-01

    A straightforward method for the synthesis of CoFe2.7/CoFe2O4 core/shell nanowires is described. The proposed method starts with a conventional pulsed electrodeposition procedure on alumina nanoporous template. The obtained CoFe2.7 nanowires are released from the template and allowed to oxidize at room conditions over several weeks. The effects of partial oxidation on the structural and magnetic properties were studied by x-ray spectrometry, magnetometry, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that the final nanowires are composed of 5 nm iron-cobalt alloy nanoparticles. Releasing the nanowires at room conditions promoted surface oxidation of the nanoparticles and created a CoFe2O4 shell spinel-like structure. The shell avoids internal oxidation and promotes the formation of bi-magnetic soft/hard magnetic core/shell nanowires. The magnetic properties of both the initial single-phase CoFe2.7 nanowires and the final core/shell nanowires, reveal that the changes in the properties from the array are due to the oxidation more than effects associated with released processes (disorder and agglomeration).

  11. Analysis of twenty five impurities in uranium matrix by ICP-MS with iron measurement optimized by using reaction collision cell, cold plasma or medium resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quemet, Alexandre; Brennetot, Rene; Chevalier, Emilie; Prian, Edwina; Laridon, Anne-Laure; Fichet, Pascal; Goutelard, Florence; Mariet, Clarisse; Laszak, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    An analytical procedure was developed to determine the concentration of 25 impurities (Li, Be, Ti, V. Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, W, Pb, Bi and Th) in a uranium matrix using the quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS). The dissolution of U 3 O 8 powder was made with a mixture of hydrochloric acid and nitric acid. Then, a selective separation of uranium using the UTEVA column was used before measurement by Q-ICP-MS. The procedure developed was verified using the Certified Reference Material 'Morille'. The analytical results agree well except for 5 elements where values are underestimated (Li, Be, In, Pb and Bi). Among the list of impurities, iron was particularly investigated because it is well known that this element possesses a polyatomic interference that increases the detection limit. A comparison between iron detection limits obtained with different methods was performed. Iron polyatomic interference was at least reduced, or at best entirely resolved in some cases, by using the cold plasma or the collision/reaction cell with several gases (He, NH 3 and CH 4 ). High-resolution ICP-MS was used to compare the results obtained. A detection limit as low as 8 ng L -1 was achieved. (authors)

  12. Analysis of twenty five impurities in uranium matrix by ICP-MS with iron measurement optimized by using reaction collision cell, cold plasma or medium resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quemet, Alexandre; Brennetot, Rene; Chevalier, Emilie; Prian, Edwina; Laridon, Anne-Laure; Mariet, Clarisse; Fichet, Pascal; Laszak, Ivan; Goutelard, Florence

    2012-09-15

    An analytical procedure was developed to determine the concentration of 25 impurities (Li, Be, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, W, Pb, Bi and Th) in a uranium matrix using the quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS). The dissolution of U(3)O(8) powder was made with a mixture of hydrochloric acid and nitric acid. Then, a selective separation of uranium using the UTEVA column was used before measurement by Q-ICP-MS. The procedure developed was verified using the Certified Reference Material "Morille". The analytical results agree well except for 5 elements where values are underestimated (Li, Be, In, Pb and Bi). Among the list of impurities, iron was particularly investigated because it is well known that this element possesses a polyatomic interference that increases the detection limit. A comparison between iron detection limits obtained with different methods was performed. Iron polyatomic interference was at least reduced, or at best entirely resolved in some cases, by using the cold plasma or the collision/reaction cell with several gases (He, NH(3) and CH(4)). High-resolution ICP-MS was used to compare the results obtained. A detection limit as low as 8 ng L(-1) was achieved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Determining the size of nanoparticles in the example of magnetic iron oxide core-shell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzębski, Maciej; Kościński, Mikołaj; Białopiotrowicz, Tomasz

    2017-08-01

    The size of nanoparticles is one of the most important factors for their possible applications. Various techniques for the nanoparticle size characterization are available. In this paper selected techniques will be considered base on the prepared core-shell magnetite nanoparticles. Magnetite is one of the most investigated and developed magnetic material. It shows interesting magnetic properties which can be used for biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, hypothermia and also as a contrast agent. To reduce the toxic effects of Fe3O4, magnetic core was covered by dextran and gelatin. Moreover, the shell was doped by fluorescent dye for confocal microscopy investigation. The main investigation focused on the methods for particles size determination of modified magnetite nanoparticles prepared with different techniques. The size distribution were obtained by nanoparticle tracking analysis, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, fluorescent correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and confocal microscopy were used to compare the results for particle size determination of core-shell systems.

  14. A/C magnetic hyperthermia of melanoma mediated by iron(0/iron oxide core/shell magnetic nanoparticles: a mouse study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koper Olga B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is renewed interest in magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment modality for cancer, especially when it is combined with other more traditional therapeutic approaches, such as the co-delivery of anticancer drugs or photodynamic therapy. Methods The influence of bimagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs combined with short external alternating magnetic field (AMF exposure on the growth of subcutaneous mouse melanomas (B16-F10 was evaluated. Bimagnetic Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell nanoparticles were designed for cancer targeting after intratumoral or intravenous administration. Their inorganic center was protected against rapid biocorrosion by organic dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. TCPP (4-tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin units were attached to the dopamine-oligoethylene glycol ligands. Results The magnetic hyperthermia results obtained after intratumoral injection indicated that micromolar concentrations of iron given within the modified core-shell Fe/Fe3O4 nanoparticles caused a significant anti-tumor effect on murine B16-F10 melanoma with three short 10-minute AMF exposures. We also observed a decrease in tumor size after intravenous administration of the MNPs followed by three consecutive days of AMF exposure 24 hrs after the MNPs injection. Conclusions These results indicate that intratumoral administration of surface modified MNPs can attenuate mouse melanoma after AMF exposure. Moreover, we have found that after intravenous administration of micromolar concentrations, these MNPs are capable of causing an anti-tumor effect in a mouse melanoma model after only a short AMF exposure time. This is a clear improvement to state of the art.

  15. Distribution of iron, manganese, cobalt and nickel in sediment cores of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, Ch.M.; Setty, M.G.A.P.

    :72; 3:205; and 6:265; (b) for the slope it is 1:116; and (c) the basin 6:170. The values are highest in one core. This suggests an enrichment of manganese in the shelf region and in the basin, but great mobility in the slope and parts of the shelf...

  16. The biological properties of iron oxide core high-density lipoprotein in experimental atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skajaa, Torjus; Cormode, David P.; Jarzyna, Peter A.; Delshad, Amanda; Blachford, Courtney; Barazza, Alessandra; Fisher, Edward A.; Gordon, Ronald E.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Lipoproteins are a family of plasma nanoparticles responsible for the transportation of lipids throughout the body. High-density lipoprotein (HDL), the smallest of the lipoprotein family, measures 7-13 nm in diameter and consists of a cholesteryl ester and triglyceride core that is covered with a

  17. Cold injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  18. Influence of the dislocation core on the glide of the 1/2 < 111 >{110} edge dislocation in bcc-iron: An embedded atom method study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haghighat, S.M.H.; von Pezold, J.; Race, C. P.; Kormann, F.; Friák, Martin; Neugebauer, J.; Raabe, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 87, MAY (2014), s. 274-282 ISSN 0927-0256 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Molecular dynamics * Edge dislocation * Core structure * Dislocation glide * Iron Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.131, year: 2014

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  20. Transport properties of iron at Earth’s core conditions: The effect of spin disorder

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drchal, Václav; Kudrnovský, Josef; Wagenknecht, D.; Turek, I.; Khmelevskyi, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 2 (2017), s. 1-5, č. článku 024432. ISSN 2469-9950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13436S Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015042; Ga MŠk(CZ) LM2015070 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Earth's core * electrical conductivity * spin-disorder resistivity * violation of Matthiessen rule Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.836, year: 2016

  1. Research on the development strategy of Pingdingshan iron and steel industry cluster with Wugang Company as the core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arouse the great potential of the industrial clusters will play a significant role in promoting the development of local WuGang company. The article takes the Pingdingshan City as the research object, who is a typical resource-based city and develops on the basis of the local resources of coal and iron ore, the core enterprise WuGang Company is a large state-owned enterprise based on the wide and thick steel plate production. Many problems also exit in the cluster innovation, company network construction, company cooperation. The article is from the perspective of steel industry cluster and cluster innovation. Firstly, the article introduces the correlation theory about the steel industry cluster and the basic development information of Pingdingshan steel industry cluster, and promotes the research purpose and meaning.The article will give the analysis to the problems from the Pingdingshan steel industry cluster and develop the reform proposals and development strategy according to the actual situation.

  2. Use of an elliptical aperture to control saturation in closely-coupled, cold iron, superconducting dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, G.

    1985-01-01

    The high fields permitted by superconducting windings result in saturation of closely-coupled iron in dipole and quadrupole beam transport magnets. Coupland suggested using a triangular cutout at the poles to reduce the change in the sextupole (b 2 ) term due to saturation. The use of an elliptical aperture in a close-coupled dipole for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has been studied using the BNL computer program MDP (a version of GFUN). The ellipse aspect ratio was varied while holding the horizontal (minor) radius constant. The proper aspect ratio gives no shift in b 2 sue to saturation, and a reduction in the b 4 shift. A modification of the ellipse also reduces b 4 . The elliptical aperture introduces a large b 2 term at low field which must be compensated for by the coil design. A practical coil design which does this for the RHIC magnet is presented. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  4. Zero-valent iron treatment of dark brown colored coffee effluent: Contributions of a core-shell structure to pollutant removals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Mayuka; Kurosu, Shunji; Kobayashi, Maki; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2016-12-01

    The decolorization and total organic carbon (TOC) removal of dark brown colored coffee effluent by zero-valent iron (ZVI) have been systematically examined with solution pH of 3.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 under oxic and anoxic conditions. The optimal decolorization and TOC removal were obtained at pH 8.0 with oxic condition. The maximum efficiencies of decolorization and TOC removal were 92.6 and 60.2%, respectively. ZVI presented potential properties for pollutant removal at nearly neutral pH because of its core-shell structure in which shell or iron oxide/hydroxide layer on ZVI surface dominated the decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent. To elucidate the contribution of the core-shell structure to removals of color and TOC at the optimal condition, the characterization of ZVI surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was conducted. It was confirmed that the core-shell structure was formed and the shell on ZVI particulate surface and the precipitates formed during the course of ZVI treatment consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. They were significantly responsible for decolorization and TOC removal of coffee effluent via adsorption to shell on ZVI surface and inclusion into the precipitates rather than the oxidative degradation by OH radicals and the reduction by emitted electrons. The presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) enhanced the formation of the core-shell structure and as a result improved the efficiency of ZVI treatment for the removal of colored components in coffee effluents. ZVI was found to be an efficient material toward the treatment of coffee effluents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced bio-compatibility of ferrofluids of self-assembled superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica core-shell nanoparticles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narayanan, T.N.; Mary, A.P.R.; Swalih, P.K.A.; Kumar, D.S.; Makarov, D.; Albrecht, M.; Puthumana, J.; Anas, A.; Anantharaman, A.

    -interacting, monodispersed and hence the synthesis of such nanostructures has great relevance in the realm of nanoscience. Silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles based ferrofluids were prepared using polyethylene glycol as carrier fluid by employing a...

  6. An Optical and X-Ray Study of Abell 576, a Galaxy Cluster with a Cold Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Joseph J.; Geller, Margaret J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Wegner, Gary; Thorstensen, John; Richstone, Douglas O.

    1996-10-01

    We analyze the galaxy population and dynamics of the galaxy cluster A576; the observational constraints include 281 redshifts (230 new), R- band CCD galaxy photometry over a 2 h^-1^ Mpc x 2 h^-1^ Mpc region centered on the cluster, an Einstein IPC X-ray image, and an Einstein MPC X-ray spectrum. We focus on an 86% complete magnitude-limited sample (R_23.5_ 4 keV at 90% confidence). Because (1) the low-dispersion galaxy population is no more luminous than the global population and (2) the evidence for a cooling flow is weak, we suggest that the core of A576 may contain the remnants of a lower mass subcluster. We examine the cluster mass, baryon fraction, and luminosity function. The cluster virial mass varies significantly depending on the galaxy sample used. Consistency between the hydrostatic and virial estimators can be achieved if (1) the gas temperature at r~1 h^-1^ Mpc is T_X_ ~ 8 keV (the best-fit value) and (2) several velocity outliers are excluded from the virial calculation. Although the best-fit Schechter function parameters and the ratio of galaxy to gas mass in A576 are typical of other clusters, the baryon fraction is relatively low. Using the consistent cluster binding mass, we show that the gas mass fraction is ~3 h^-3/2^% and the baryon fraction is ~4%.

  7. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  8. Comparative performance of fluorescent iron-core ballasts and electronic ballasts. Rendement comparatif des ballasts a noyau de fer et des ballasts electroniques pour eclairage fluorescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasini, I

    1987-01-01

    Commercially available one- and two-lamp fluorescent luminaires were tested, and a number of electrical parameters were measured using varying combinations of lamps and either iron-core or electronic ballasts. Comprehensive photometric tests and thermal measurements were also conducted. The test results were tabulated and compared. The performance of the iron-core ballasts was found to be sufficiently close to nominally rated values to not raise concerns. Results from testing the electronic ballasts showed that the user has to be careful when selecting these ballasts, as they far exceed standard specification limits for current and voltage crest factors. All other electrical, photometric and thermal parameters are within accepted levels. An economic analysis was undertaken to determine cost benefits and payback periods for using electronic ballasts, the use of which will result in higher efficiency and lower power consumption. A project life of 20 years was assumed, and analysis was run for a power cost of $0.04/kWh. A unit made by Fyrnetics showed the lowest total annual owning and operating costs and had a payback period of 12.1 years. 13 figs., 13 tabs.

  9. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  10. Magnetic properties of iron/graphite core-shell nanoparticles prepared by annealing of Fe-C-N-based nanocomposite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    David, Bohumil; Pizúrová, Naděžda; Schneeweiss, Oldřich; Bezdička, Petr; Alexandrescu, R.; Morjan, I.; Cruneteanu, A.; Voicu, I.

    290-291, - (2005), s. 179-182 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/04/0221; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK1010104 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : magnetism * iron * nanoparticle Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.985, year: 2005

  11. Comparative study of the iron cores in human liver ferritin, its pharmaceutical models and ferritin in chicken liver and spleen tissues using Moessbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alenkina, I.V.; Semionkin, V.A. [Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Faculty of Experimental Physics, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Oshtrakh, M.I. [Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Klepova, Yu.V.; Sadovnikov, N.V. [Faculty of Physiology and Biotechnology, Ural State Agricultural Academy, Ekaterinburg, (Russian Federation); Dubiel, S.M. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Application of the Moessbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) for a study of iron-containing biological species is of great interest. Improving the velocity resolution allows to reveal small variations in the electronic structure of iron, and to obtain hyperfine parameters with smaller instrumental (systematic) errors in comparison with measurements performed in 512 channels or less. It also allows a more reliable fitting of complex Moessbauer spectra. In the present study the Moessbauer spectroscopy with the high velocity resolution was used for a comparative analysis of ferritin and its pharmaceutically important models as well as iron storage proteins in a chicken liver and a spleen. The ferritin, an iron storage protein, consists of a nanosized polynuclear iron core formed by a ferrihydrite surrounded by a protein shell. Iron-polysaccharide complexes contain {beta}-FeOOH iron cores coated with various polysaccharides. The Moessbauer spectra of the ferritin and commercial products Imferon, MaltoferR and Ferrum Lek as well as those of the chicken liver and spleen tissues were measured with the high velocity resolution at 295 and 90 K. They were fitted using two models: (1) with a homogeneous iron core (an approximation using one quadrupole doublet), and (2) with a heterogeneous iron core (an approximation using several quadrupole doublets). The model (1) can be used as the first approximation fit to visualize small variations in the hyperfine parameters. Using this model, differences in the Moessbauer hyperfine parameters were obtained in both 295 and 90 K Moessbauer spectra. However, this model was considered as a rough approximation because the measured Moessbauer spectra had non-Lorentzian line shapes. Therefore, the spectra of the ferritin, Imferon, MaltoferR and Ferrum Lek as well as those of the liver and spleen tissues were fitted again using the model (2) in which a different number of the quadrupole doublets was

  12. The state of the warm and cold gas in the extreme starburst at the core of the Phoenix galaxy cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Michael; Bautz, Marshall W.; Swinbank, Mark; Edge, Alastair C.; Hogan, Michael T.; Wilner, David J.; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Benson, Bradford A.; Marrone, Daniel P.; McNamara, Brian R.; Wei, Lisa H.

    2014-01-01

    We present new optical integral field spectroscopy (Gemini South) and submillimeter spectroscopy (Submillimeter Array) of the central galaxy in the Phoenix cluster (SPT-CLJ2344-4243). This cluster was previously reported to have a massive starburst (∼800 M ☉ yr –1 ) in the central, brightest cluster galaxy, most likely fueled by the rapidly cooling intracluster medium. These new data reveal a complex emission-line nebula, extending for >30 kpc from the central galaxy, detected at [O II]λλ3726, 3729, [O III]λλ4959, 5007, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ, [Ne III]λ3869, and He II λ4686. The total Hα luminosity, assuming Hα/Hβ = 2.85, is L Hα = 7.6 ± 0.4 ×10 43 erg s –1 , making this the most luminous emission-line nebula detected in the center of a cool core cluster. Overall, the relative fluxes of the low-ionization lines (e.g., [O II], Hβ) to the UV continuum are consistent with photoionization by young stars. In both the center of the galaxy and in a newly discovered highly ionized plume to the north of the galaxy, the ionization ratios are consistent with both shocks and active galactic nucleus (AGN) photoionization. We speculate that this extended plume may be a galactic wind, driven and partially photoionized by both the starburst and central AGN. Throughout the cluster we measure elevated high-ionization line ratios (e.g., He II/Hβ, [O III]/Hβ), coupled with an overall high-velocity width (FWHM ≳ 500 km s –1 ), suggesting that shocks are likely important throughout the interstellar medium of the central galaxy. These shocks are most likely driven by a combination of stellar winds from massive young stars, core-collapse supernovae, and the central AGN. In addition to the warm, ionized gas, we detect a substantial amount of cold, molecular gas via the CO(3-2) transition, coincident in position with the galaxy center. We infer a molecular gas mass of M H 2 = 2.2 ± 0.6 × 10 10 M ☉ , which implies that the starburst will consume its fuel in ∼30 Myr if

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating Dizziness Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the ... Our support of SBIR/STTR programs is helping advance research in iron-deficiency anemia, in part by ...

  14. Metal-Organic Framework Derived Iron Sulfide-Carbon Core-Shell Nanorods as a Conversion-Type Battery Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Shuo; Cao, Xianyi

    2017-01-01

    of a redox conversion-type lithium-ion battery, this composite material has demonstrated high lithium-ion storage capacity at 1148 mA h g-1 under the current rate of 500 mA g-1 for 170 cycles and an impressive rate-retention capability at 657 mA h g-1 with a current density of 2000 mA g-1. On the basis......We report the design and nanoengineering of carbon-film-coated iron sulfide nanorods (C@Fe7S8) as an advanced conversion-type lithium-ion storage material. The structural advantages of the iron-based metal-organic framework (MIL-88-Fe) as both a sacrificed template and a precursor are explored...

  15. Three-dimensional structure of a swarm of the salp Thalia democratica within a cold-core eddy off southeast Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, J. D.; Baird, M. E.; Suthers, I. M.

    2011-12-01

    Swarms of the salp Thalia democratica periodically occur off southeast Australia following the austral spring bloom of phytoplankton. In October 2008 a filament of upwelled water was advected south by the adjacent East Australian Current and formed a 30 km diameter cold-core eddy (CCE). The three-dimensional structure of a subsurface swarm of T. democratica within the eddy was examined using both oblique and vertical hauls and an optical plankton counter (OPC) deployed on a towed body. The CCE displayed distinct uplift of the nutricline and elevated fluorescence. Net samples show the zooplankton community was dominated by T. democratica, comprising 73%-88% of zooplankton abundance. The size distribution of T. democratica measured from net samples was 0.5-5 mm and was used to interpret the OPC transects, which showed the swarm formed a 15 km diameter disc located 20-40 m deep in the center of the eddy. The maximum salp abundance was in the pycnocline and coincided with the subsurface fluorescence maximum. The mean abundance of T. democratica size particles within the disc was 5003 individuals m-3 (ind. m-3), contrasted with only 604 ind. m-3 at the outer edge of the eddy. The vertically concentrated and horizontally constrained disc-shaped salp swarm occurred at the interface of salp-bearing inner shelf water and nutrient-rich upwelled water in a CCE. The physical processes that formed the CCE on the inshore edge of the western boundary current led to the largest density of salps recorded.

  16. Emission of organic compounds from mould and core binders used for casting iron, aluminium and bronze in sand moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Crepaz, Rudolf; Eggert, Torben

    2010-01-01

    compositions were tested. A test method that provides uniform test conditions is described. The method can be used as general test method to analyse off gasses from binders. Moulds containing a standard size casting were produced and the amount and type of organic compounds resulting from thermal degradation...... of binders was monitored when cast iron, bronze and aluminium was poured in the moulds. Binder degradation was measured by collecting off gasses in a specially designed ventilation hood at a constant flow rate. Samples were taken from the ventilation system and analysed for hydrocarbons and CO content...

  17. Emission of BTEX and PAHs from molding sands with furan cold setting resins containing different contents of free furfuryl alcohol during production of cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Holtzer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available At present, furan resin is the largest selling no-bake system of moulding sands. The most commonly used furan no-bake binders (FNB are condensation products of furfuryl alcohol (FA urea, formaldehyde and phenol. They are generally cured by exposure to organic sulfonic acids. FNB provide excellent mold and core strength, cure rapidly and allow the sand to be reclaimed at fairly high yields, generally 75%-80%, especially in applications where due allowance is made for the need to keep total sulfur content below 0.1%. However, due to probable carcinogenic properties of furfuryl alcohol, the EU Directive limits the content of this substance (in a monomer form in resin to 25%. The classification of furfuryl alcohol and the resulting furan resin products has changed from "harmful" to "toxic" by inhalation? The aim of this study was to determine the effect of free furfuryl alcohol content in the resin on the emission of harmful substances from the BTEX (Benzene Toluene Ethylbenzene & Xylene and PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon group exposed to high temperature and how it affects the emissions allowance of reclaimed sand in the matrix. Three resins from a leading manufacturer were examined, which contain a free furfuryl alcohol content of 71%-72%, about 50% and < 25%, respectively. The hardener for each resin was 65% aqueous solution of paratoluenesulfonic acid. Tests were carried out in semi-industrial conditions where liquid cast-iron was poured into sample sand mold at 1,350 ìC. The matrix of the studied sands was reclaimed in the amount of 0, 50%, 100%, respectively. With the increase of free furfuryl alcohol content, the volume of evolved gases decreased. For all resins the main component from the BTEX group dominating in the emitted gases was benzene; however toluene also appeared in the amount of a few percentages. In contrast, ethylbenzene and xylenes occurred only in the gases emitted from resin-bonded sands with the largest furfuryl

  18. Evaluation of applicability of 2D iron core model for two-limb configuration of GOLEM tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Markovič, Tomáš; Gryaznevich, M.; Ďuran, Ivan; Svoboda, V.; Vondrášek, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, 6-8 (2013), s. 835-838 ISSN 0920-3796. [Symposium on Fusion Technology (SOFT-27)/27./. Liège, 24.09.2012-28.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Tokamak * Ferromagnetic core * Integral method * Tokamak GOLEM Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.149, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379613002573#

  19. Human nitric oxide biomarker as potential NO donor in conjunction with superparamagnetic iron oxide @ gold core shell nanoparticles for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nimisha; Patel, Khushbu; Sahoo, Suban K; Kumar, Rajender

    2018-03-01

    Nitric oxide releasing superparamagnetic (Fe 3 O 4 -Au@NTHP) nanoparticles were synthesized by conjugation of human biomarker of nitric oxide, N-nitrosothioproline with iron oxide-gold (Fe 3 O 4 -Au) core shell nanoparticles. The structure and morphology of the prepared nanoparticles were confirmed by ATR-FTIR, HR-TEM, EDAX, XPS, DLS and VSM measurements. N-nitrosothioproline is a natural molecule and nontoxic to humans. Thus, the core shell nanoparticles prepared were highly biocompatible. The prepared Fe 3 O 4 -Au@NTHP nanoparticles also provided an excellent release of nitric oxide in dark and upon light irradiation for cancer treatment. The amount of NO release was controllable with the wavelength of light and time of irradiation. The developed nanoparticles provided efficient cellular uptake and good cytotoxicity in picomolar range when tested on HeLa cancerous cells. These nanoparticles on account of their controllable NO release can also be used to release small amount of NO for killing cancerous cells without any toxic effect. Furthermore, the magnetic and photochemical properties of these nanoparticles provides dual platform for magneto therapy and phototherapy for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of flow regimes and heat transfer modes in Angra-2 core during the simulation of the small break loss of coolant accident of 250 cm2 in the cold leg of primary loop using RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used by RELAP5/MOD3.2. gamma code in Angra-2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 250cm 2 of rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of Angra-2 (FSAR-A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of Angra-2 during the postulated accident. The results obtained for Angra-2 nuclear reactor core during the postulated accident were satisfactory when compared with the FSAR-A2. Additionally, the results showed the correct actuation of the ECCS guaranteeing the integrity of the reactor core. (author)

  1. Identification of flow regimes and heat transfer modes in Angra-2 core during the simulation of the small break loss of coolant accident of 250 cm{sup 2} in the cold leg of primary loop using RELAP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Eduardo M.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: borges.em@hotmail.com, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the flow regimes, the heat transfer modes, and the correlations used by RELAP5/MOD3.2. gamma code in Angra-2 during the Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) with a 250cm{sup 2} of rupture area in the cold leg of primary loop. The Chapter 15 of the Final Safety Analysis Report of Angra-2 (FSAR-A2) reports this specific kind of accident. The results from this work demonstrated the several flow regimes and heat transfer modes that can be present in the core of Angra-2 during the postulated accident. The results obtained for Angra-2 nuclear reactor core during the postulated accident were satisfactory when compared with the FSAR-A2. Additionally, the results showed the correct actuation of the ECCS guaranteeing the integrity of the reactor core. (author)

  2. Dence Cold Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavinskiy Alexey

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Possible way to create dense cold baryonic matter in the laboratory is discussed. The density of this matter is comparable or even larger than the density of neutron star core. The properties of this matter can be controlled by trigger conditions. Experimental program for the study of properties of dense cold matter for light and heavy ion collisions at initial energy range √sNN~2-3GeV is proposed..

  3. Rapid Endovascular Catheter Core Cooling Combined With Cold Saline as an Adjunct to Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for the Treatment of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlinge, David; Götberg, Matthias; Lang, Irene

    2014-01-01

    : In a multicenter study, 120 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions (rapid infusion of 600 to 2,000 ml cold saline and endovascular cooling or standard of care. Hypothermia was initiated...

  4. PROGENITOR-EXPLOSION CONNECTION AND REMNANT BIRTH MASSES FOR NEUTRINO-DRIVEN SUPERNOVAE OF IRON-CORE PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugliano, Marcella; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Arcones, Almudena [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 2, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-09-20

    We perform hydrodynamic supernova (SN) simulations in spherical symmetry for over 100 single stars of solar metallicity to explore the progenitor-explosion and progenitor-remnant connections established by the neutrino-driven mechanism. We use an approximative treatment of neutrino transport and replace the high-density interior of the neutron star (NS) by an inner boundary condition based on an analytic proto-NS core-cooling model, whose free parameters are chosen such that explosion energy, nickel production, and energy release by the compact remnant of progenitors around 20 M{sub Sun} are compatible with SN 1987A. Thus, we are able to simulate the accretion phase, initiation of the explosion, subsequent neutrino-driven wind phase for 15-20 s, and the further evolution of the blast wave for hours to days until fallback is completed. Our results challenge long-standing paradigms. We find that remnant mass, launch time, and properties of the explosion depend strongly on the stellar structure and exhibit large variability even in narrow intervals of the progenitors' zero-age main-sequence mass. While all progenitors with masses below {approx}15 M{sub Sun} yield NSs, black hole (BH) as well as NS formation is possible for more massive stars, where partial loss of the hydrogen envelope leads to weak reverse shocks and weak fallback. Our NS baryonic masses of {approx}1.2-2.0 M{sub Sun} and BH masses >6 M{sub Sun} are compatible with a possible lack of low-mass BHs in the empirical distribution. Neutrino heating accounts for SN energies between some 10{sup 50} erg and {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg but can hardly explain more energetic explosions and nickel masses higher than 0.1-0.2 M{sub Sun }. These seem to require an alternative SN mechanism.

  5. Performance Improvement of a Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun by adopting Iron-core Bias Coil and New Pre-Ionization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo, Takahiro; Asai, T.; Tanaka, F.; Yamada, S.; Hosozawa, A.; Gota, H.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Matsumoto, T.

    2017-10-01

    A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) is a device used to generate a compact toroid (CT), which has a spheromak-like configuration. A typical MCPG consists of a set of axisymmetric cylindrical electrodes, bias coil, and gas-puff valves. In order to expand the CT operating range, the distributions of the bias magnetic field and neutral gas have been investigated. We have developed a new means of generating stuffing flux. By inserting an iron core into the bias coil, the magnetic field increases dramatically; even a small current of a few Amps produces a sufficient bias field. According to a simulation result, it was also suggested that the radial distribution of the bias field is easily controlled. The ejected CT and the target FRC are cooled by excess neutral gas that typical MCPGs require to initiate a breakdown; therefore, we have adopted a miniature gun as a new pre-ionization (PI) system. By introducing this PI system, the breakdown occurs at lower neutral gas density so that the amount of excess neutral gas can be reduced.

  6. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The transmission resonance model (TRM) is combined with some electrochemistry of the cathode surface and found to provide a good fit to new data on excess heat. For the first time, a model for cold fusion not only fits calorimetric data but also predicts optimal trigger points. This suggests that the model is meaningful and that the excess heat phenomenon claimed by Fleischmann and Pons is genuine. A crucial role is suggested for the overpotential and, in particular, for the concentration overpotential, i.e., the hydrogen overvoltage. Self-similar geometry, or scale invariance, i.e., a fractal nature, is revealed by the relative excess power function. Heat bursts are predicted with a scale invariance in time, suggesting a possible link between the TRM and chaos theory. The model describes a near-surface phenomenon with an estimated excess power yield of ∼1 kW/cm 3 Pd, as compared to 50 W/cm 3 of reactor core for a good fission reactor. Transmission resonance-induced nuclear transmutation, a new type of nuclear reaction, is strongly suggested with two types emphasized: transmission resonance-induced neutron transfer reactions yielding essentially the same end result as Teller's hypothesized catalytic neutron transfer and a three-body reaction promoted by standing de Broglie waves. In this paper suggestions for the anomalous production of heat, particles, and radiation are given

  7. ROSA/LSTF experiment report for RUN SB-CL-24 repeated core heatup phenomena during 0.5% cold leg break LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Anoda, Yoshinari [Department of Reactor Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) in a Westinghouse-type four-loop PWR was simulated in an experiment (SB-CL-24) conducted at the Large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) with an intention to study repeated core heatup during a long-term cooldown process. The experiment was conducted on February 28, 1990 with specified test conditions including failure assumptions both on the high pressure injection (HPI) and the auxiliary feedwater systems, and the intentional secondary system depressurization as an operator action. The secondary depressurization contributed to promote the primary depressurization and the actuation of accumulator injection system (AIS). A temporary core heatup was observed in each of three loopseal clearing (LSC) processes. A significant core heatup occurred in the following boil-off process after loss of the secondary coolant mass and the AIS termination due to increase of the primary pressure. By additional opening of the pressurizer relief valves and safety valves, the primary pressure rapidly decreased to result in the low pressure injection (LPI) which cooled the heated core. This report summarizes results of the experiment (SB-CL-24) in addition to typical responses of some accident indication systems including the core exit thermocouples (CETs) and the water level meters in the primary system. (author)

  8. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  9. Clumpy cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  10. Oil quenched malleable iron, the strength of an old material in a “green cast” development and a new future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis J. van Ettinger

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Malleable iron lost the interest and the development stopped in the turbulent seventies of tremendous developments of new technologies. The personal computer, emission spectrometer, thermal analysis, cold-box core system and automatic vertical moulding were introduced into the foundry industry. Experience shows that these new technologies do not always match up with malleable iron. Solidification and mould filling simulation programs are not always capable to handle a low carbon equivalent iron like malleable iron. Recent developments show however by using these new technologies and combined with practical experience, it is possible to increase the casting yield of malleable iron to the same level as ductile iron. The mechanical properties, especially the yield strength of malleable iron according to the standard are equivalent to those of ductile iron, however the yield strength of oil quenched malleable iron is significantly higher than that of ductile iron. An extensive investigation is made between ductile iron, air quenched and oil quenched malleable irons based on the properties of more than 350 test bars produced under the same conditions. The results are compared with the existing international standards and discussed. Other properties like fatigue strength and response to surface treatments as induction hardening are also discussed. The costs of malleable iron are reviewed and compared with other ferro alloys. These recent developments in increasing the casting yield, the understanding of the strength, makes malleable iron competitive with ductile iron and cheaper than the first grade of ausferritic ductile iron, or steel qualities. It is possible to design lighter and save weight which is essential in the automotive industry. An example of “green cast” development for typical applications, used in automotive transmissions and engines are shown.

  11. Analysis of the behavior of orthogonal-core-type push-pull parametric transformer with iron and copper losses. Tetsuson oyobi doson wo koryoshita chokko jishinkei push pull parametric hen prime atsuki no dosa kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, K; Anazawa, Y; Kaga, A [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Mining College; Ichinokura, O [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1991-04-30

    This paper reports on a precise numerical analysis of operating characteristics of the push-pull parametric transformer of orthogonal-core type (proposed by the authors in the preceding papers) made in consideration of both the iron loss of its magnetic core and the copper loss of its windings. A model of magnetic circuit in the core is presented, which involves magnetic reluctances representing saturation characteristics of the core and magnetic inductances representing effects produced by hysteresis. Use is made of the function that expresses the saturation characteristics by a twenty-first power series of magnetic flux, the coefficient of each term being determined by use of experimental data on a specified sample of the magnetic core. Furthermore, recourse is had to the circuit simulator SPICE in order to analyze the operating characteristics of the transformer. Comparing results of the present analysis with experimental results, the following are noted: first, both output voltages and currents of windings of the transformer under the condition of parametric oscillation are calculated with sufficient accuracy; second, the present analysis is capable of evaluating the conversion efficiency of electric power and input power factor of the transformer, and of providing more accurate values of both voltage and current in the case of the maximum output under loading conditions as compared with the analyses so far presented. 8 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Cold Sore

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may reduce how often they return. Symptoms A cold sore usually passes through several stages: Tingling and itching. Many people feel an itching, burning or tingling sensation around their lips for a day or so ...

  13. Comparison of high temperature, high frequency core loss and dynamic B-H loops of two 50 Ni-Fe crystalline alloys and an iron-based amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieserman, W.R.; Schwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The availability of experimental data that characterizes the performance of soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high temperature and high frequency is almost non-existent. An experimental investigation was conducted over the temperature range of 23 to 300 C and frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz to determine the effects of temperature and frequency on the core loss and dynamic B-H loops of three different soft magnetic materials; an oriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, a nonoriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy, and an iron-based amorphous material (Metglas 2605SC). A comparison of these materials show that the nonoriented-grain 50Ni-50Fe alloy tends to have either the lowest or next lowest core loss for all temperatures and frequencies investigated

  14. Iron: A Key Element for Understanding the Origin and Evolution of Interstellar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The origin and depletion of iron differ from all other abundant refractory elements that make up the composition of the interstellar dust. Iron is primarily synthesized in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and in core collapse supernovae (CCSN), and is present in the outflows from AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars. Only the latter two are observed to be sources of interstellar dust, since searches for dust in SN Ia have provided strong evidence for the absence of any significant mass of dust in their ejecta. Consequently, more than 65 percent of the iron is injected into the ISM (Inter-Stellar Matter) in gaseous form. Yet, ultraviolet and X-ray observations along many lines of sight in the ISM show that iron is severely depleted in the gas phase compared to expected solar abundances. The missing iron, comprising about 90 percent of the total, is believed to be locked up in interstellar dust. This suggests that most of the missing iron must have precipitated from the ISM gas by cold accretion onto preexisting silicate, carbon, or composite grains. Iron is thus the only element that requires most of its growth to occur outside the traditional stellar condensation sources. This is a robust statement that does not depend on our evolving understanding of the dust destruction efficiency in the ISM. Reconciling the physical, optical, and chemical properties of such composite grains with their many observational manifestations is a major challenge for understanding the nature and origin of interstellar dust.

  15. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this contribution the author the phenomenom of so-called cold fusion, inspired by the memorable lecture of Moshe Gai on his own search for this effect. Thus much of what follows was presented by Dr. Gai; the rest is from independent reading. What is referred to as cold fusion is of course the observation of possible products of deuteron-deuteron (d-d) fusion within deuterium-loaded (dentended) electrodes. The debate over the two vanguard cold fusion experiments has raged under far more public attention than usually accorded new scientific phenomena. The clamor commenced with the press conference of M. Fleishmann and S. Pons on March 23, 1989 and the nearly simultaneous wide circulation of a preprint of S. Jones and collaborators. The majority of work attempting to confirm these observations has at the time of this writing yet to appear in published form, but contributions to conferences and electronic mail over computer networks were certainly filled with preliminary results. To keep what follows to a reasonable length the author limit this discussion to the searches for neutron (suggested by ref. 2) or for excessive heat production (suggested by ref. 1), following a synopsis of the hypotheses of cold fusion

  16. Project COLD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  17. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Suk Yong; You, Jae Jun

    1996-01-01

    Nearly every technical information is chased in the world. All of them are reviewed and analyzed. Some of them are chosen to study further more to review every related documents. And a probable suggestion about the excitonic process in deuteron absorbed condensed matter is proposed a way to cold fusion. 8 refs. (Author)

  18. Geologic field notes and geochemical analyses of outcrop and drill core from Mesoproterozoic rocks and iron-oxide deposits and prospects of southeast Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Warren C.; Granitto, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources/Missouri Geological Survey, undertook a study from 1988 to 1994 on the iron-oxide deposits and their host Mesoproterozoic igneous rocks in southeastern Missouri. The project resulted in an improvement of our understanding of the geologic setting, mode of formation, and the composition of many of the known deposits and prospects and the associated rocks of the St. Francois terrane in Missouri. The goal for this earlier work was to allow the comparison of Missouri iron-oxide deposits in context with other iron oxide-copper ± uranium (IOCG) types of mineral deposits observed globally. The raw geochemical analyses were released originally through the USGS National Geochemical Database (NGDB, http://mrdata.usgs.gov). The data presented herein offers all of the field notes, locations, rock descriptions, and geochemical analyses in a coherent package to facilitate new research efforts in IOCG deposit types. The data are provided in both Microsoft Excel (Version Office 2010) spreadsheet format (*.xlsx) and MS-DOS text formats (*.txt) for ease of use by numerous computer programs.

  19. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost......We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...

  20. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik

    1995-02-01

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4 He, 3 He, 3 H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4 He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  1. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  2. Translation and convection of Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, M.; Calvet, M.; Margerin, L.; Mizzon, H.; Souriau, A.

    2012-12-01

    outer core. Translation is a particular solution of Navier-Stokes equation with permeable boundary conditions, but depending on the viscosity of the solid core, modes with higher spherical harmonics degree can develop. At low viscosity, these modes can be dominant and dissipate the degree l=1 of thermal heterogeneities. Hence, a viscosity threshold may be expected below which translation cannot take place, thereby constraining the viscosity of iron at inner core conditions. Using a hybrid finite-difference spherical harmonics Navier-Stokes solver, we investigate the interplay between translation and convection in a 3D spherical model with permeable boundary conditions. Our numerical simulations show the dominance of pure translation for viscosities of the inner core higher than 5 x 1018 Pas. Translation is almost completely hampered by convective motions for viscosities lower than 1017 Pas and the phase change becomes an almost impermeable boundary. Between these values, a well developed circulation at the harmonic degree l=1 persists, but composed of localized cold downwellings, a passive upward flow taking place on the opposite side (the melting side). Such a convective structure remains compatible with the seismic asymmetry. Alboussiere, T., Deguen, R., Melzani, M., 2010. Nature 466 (7307), 744-U9. Monnereau, M., Calvet, M., Margerin, L., Souriau, A., 2010. Science 328 (5981), 1014-1017.

  3. Chemistry of Selected Core Samples, Concentrate, Tailings, and Tailings Pond Waters: Pea Ridge Iron (-Lanthanide-Gold) Deposit, Washington County, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauch, Richard I.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Seeger, Cheryl M.; Budahn, James R.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2010-01-01

    The Minerals at Risk and for Emerging Technologies Project of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Resources Program is examining potential sources of lanthanide elements (rare earth elements) as part of its objective to provide up-to-date geologic information regarding mineral commodities likely to have increased demand in the near term. As part of the examination effort, a short visit was made to the Pea Ridge iron (-lanthanide-gold) deposit, Washington County, Missouri in October 2008. The deposit, currently owned by Wings Enterprises, Inc. of St. Louis, Missouri (Wings), contains concentrations of lanthanides that may be economic as a primary product or as a byproduct of iron ore production. This report tabulates the results of chemical analyses of the Pea Ridge samples and compares rare earth elements contents for world class lanthanide deposits with those of the Pea Ridge deposit. The data presented for the Pea Ridge deposit are preliminary and include some company data that have not been verified by the USGS or by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Land Survey (DGLS), Geological Survey Program (MGS). The inclusion of company data is for comparative purposes only and does not imply an endorsement by either the USGS or MGS.

  4. Model for texture evolution in cold rolling of 2.4 wt.-% Si non-oriented electrical steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, X.; Hojda, S.; Dierdorf, J.; Lohmar, J.; Hirt, G.

    2017-10-01

    Iron loss and limited magnetic flux density are constraints for NGO electrical steel used in highly efficient electrical machinery cores. The most important factors that affect these properties are the final microstructure and the texture of the NGO steel. Reviewing the whole process chain, cold rolling plays an important role because the recrystallization and grain growth during the final heat treatment can be strongly affected by the stored energy and microstructure of cold rolling, and some texture characteristics can be inherited as well. Therefore, texture evolution during cold rolling of NGO steel is worth a detailed investigation. In this paper, texture evolution in cold rolling of non-oriented (NGO) electrical steel is simulated with a crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM) model. In previous work, a CPFEM model has been implemented for simulating the texture evolution with periodic boundary conditions and a phenomenological constitutive law. In a first step the microstructure in the core of the workpiece was investigated and mapped to a representative volume element to predict the texture evolution. In this work an improved version of the CPFEM model is described that better reflects the texture evolution in cold rolling of NGO electrical steel containing 2.4 wt.-% Si. This is achieved by applying the deformation gradient and calibrating the flow curve within the CPFEM model. Moreover, the evolution of dislocation density is calculated and visualized in this model. An in depth comparison of the numerical and experimental results reveals, that the improved CPFEM model is able to represent the important characteristics of texture evolution in the core of the workpiece during cold rolling with high precision.

  5. A combined vector potential-scalar potential method for FE computation of 3D magnetic fields in electrical devices with iron cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1991-01-01

    A method of combined use of magnetic vector potential based finite-element (FE) formulations and magnetic scalar potential (MSP) based formulations for computation of three-dimensional magnetostatic fields is introduced. In this method, the curl-component of the magnetic field intensity is computed by a reduced magnetic vector potential. This field intensity forms the basic of a forcing function for a global magnetic scalar potential solution over the entire volume of the region. This method allows one to include iron portions sandwiched in between conductors within partitioned current-carrying subregions. The method is most suited for large-scale global-type 3-D magnetostatic field computations in electrical devices, and in particular rotating electric machinery.

  6. The earths innermost core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    A new earth model is advanced with a solid innermost core at the centre of the Earth where elements heavier than iron, over and above what can be retained in solution in the iron core, are collected. The innermost core is separated from the solid iron-nickel core by a shell of liquid copper. The innermost core has a natural vibration measured on the earth's surface as the long period 26 seconds microseisms. The earth was formed initially as a liquid sphere with a relatively thin solid crust above the Byerly discontinuity. The trace elements that entered the innermost core amounted to only 0.925 ppm of the molten mass. Gravitational differentiation must have led to the separation of an explosive thickness of pure 235 U causing a fission explosion that could expel beyond the Roche limit a crustal scab which would form the centre piece of the moon. A reservoir of helium floats on the liquid copper. A small proportion of helium-3, a relic of the ancient fission explosion present there will spell the exciting magnetic field. The field is stable for thousands of years because of the presence of large quantity of helium-4 which accounts for most of the gaseous collisions that will not disturb the atomic spin of helium-3 atoms. This field is prone to sudden reversals after long periods of stability. (author). 14 refs

  7. Study of AC Magnetic Properties and Core Losses of Fe/Fe3O4-epoxy Resin Soft Magnetic Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxminarayana, T. A.; Manna, Subhendu Kumar; Fernandes, B. G.; Venkataramani, N.

    Soft Magnetic Composites (SMC) were prepared by coating of nanocrystalline Fe3O4 particles, synthesized by co-precipitation method, on atomized iron powder of particle size less than 53 μm in size using epoxy resin as a binder between iron and Fe3O4. Fe3O4 was chosen, for its high electric resistivity and suitable magnetic properties, to keep the coating layer magnetic and seek improvement to the magnetic properties of SMC. SEM images and XRD patterns were recorded in order to investigate the coatings on the surface of iron powder. A toroid was prepared by cold compaction of coated iron powder at 1050 MPa and subsequently cured at 150˚C for 1 hr in argon atmosphere. For comparison of properties, a toroid of uncoated iron powder was also compacted at 1050 MPa and annealed at 600˚C for 2 hr in argon atmosphere. The coated iron powder composite has a resistivity of greater than 200 μΩm, measured by four probe method. A comparison of Magnetic Hysteresis loops and core losses using B-H Loop tracer in the frequency range 0 to 1500 Hz on the coated and uncoated iron powder is reported.

  8. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  9. Iron-titanium oxide minerals and magnetic susceptibility anomalies in the Mariano Lake-Lake Valley cores - Constraints on conditions of uranium mineralization in the Morrison Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, R.L.; Fishman, N.S.; Scott, J.H.; Hudson, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Petrographic study of the Mariano Lake-Lake Valley cores reveals three distinct zones of postdepositional alteration of detrital Fe-Ti (iron-titanium) oxide minerals in the Westwater Canyon Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrisson Formation. In the uranium-bearing and adjacent portions of the Westwater Canyon, these detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals have been thoroughly altered by leaching of iron. Stratigraphically lower parts of the Westwater Canyon and the underlying Recapture Member are characterized by preservation of Fe-Ti oxide grains, primarily magnetite and ilmenite, and of hematite, and by an absence or uranium concentrations. Partly destroyed Fe-Ti oxide minerals occupy an interval between the zones of destruction and preservation. Alteration patterns of the Fe-Ti oxide minerals are reflected in bore-hole magnetic susceptibility logs. Magnetic susceptibility response in the upper parts of the Westwater Canyon Member is flat and uniformly <500 μSI units, but at greater depths it fluctuates sharply, from <1,000 to nearly 8,000 μSI units. The boundary between uniformly low and high magnetic susceptibility response corresponds closely to the interval that divides the zone of completely altered from the zone of preserved detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals. The alteration pattern suggests that solutions responsible for destruction of the Fe-ti oxide minerals originated in the overlying Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation. Previous studies indicate that these solutions were rich in soluble organic matter and perhaps in uranium. Uranium precipitation may have been controlled by a vertically fluctuation interface between organic-rich solutions and geochemically different fluids in which the detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals were preserved

  10. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth / For Teens / Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... resfriado Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  11. Iron-oxide Magnetic, Morphologic, and Compositional Tracers of Sediment Provenance and Ice Sheet Extent in the ANDRILL AND-1B Drill Core, Ross Sea, Antarctica (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachfeld, S. A.; Pinzon, J.; Darley, J. S.; Sagnotti, L.; Kuhn, G.; Florindo, F.; Wilson, G. S.; Ohneiser, C.; Monien, D.; Joseph, L. H.

    2013-12-01

    The first drilling season of the Antarctic Drilling Program (ANDRILL) recovered a 13.57 million year Miocene through Pleistocene record of paleoclimate change (core AND-1B) within the Ross Sea. The magnetic mineral assemblage records the varying contributions of biological productivity, changing sediment sources, the emergence of volcanic centers, and post-depositional diagenesis. Characterization of bedrock samples from the McMurdo Volcanic Group (MVG) and Transantarctic Mountain (TAM) lithologic units allows us to construct fingerprints for the major source rocks bordering the Ross Sea, and identify their signatures within the AND-1B sediment. Key parameters that can be traced from source rock to sediment for the MVG-derived sediment include a 100-200 C order-disorder transition, titanomaghemite grains with homogenous textures but with substantial Al and Mg content, Fe-spinels with substantial Al, Cr, Mg, and Ti content, and titanomagnetite host grains with 1-3 swarms of ilmenite lamellae (both with variable amounts of oxidation). Distinctive signatures in TAM lithologies include low S-ratios in Koettlitz Group gneisses and Fe-sulfides with magnetite intergrowths in Byrd Glacier basement samples. The Cambrian Granite Harbor Intrusive Complex is characterized by coarse, homogeneous Mn-bearing ilmenite and nearly pure magnetite. The Jurassic dolerites and basalts of the Ferrar Group contain pseudo single domain to stable single domain-sized Fe-oxides with low-Ti content and homogeneous textures. Cu-Fe sulfides are also present in the Ferrar Group. Diamictites in the Pliocene-Pleistocene section of the AND-1B drill core contains Fe-oxide assemblages with MVG-type rock magnetic and textural characteristics, while the Miocene diamictites contain TAM-type signatures. These observations can be explained by increased ice flow from the west during the Miocene and/or the absence of MVG volcanic centers, which had not yet reached a significant size. During the Pliocene and

  12. Development of iron aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKamey, C.G.; Viswanathan, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Sikka, V.K.

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrating that improved engineering ductility (to 10-15% in Fe 3 Al) can be achieved in wrought Fe 3 Al-based iron aluminide alloys through control of composition and microstructure are discussed. Accompanying this improvement has been an increased understanding of the causes for ambient temperature embrittlement in this system. Because of these advances, iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. The understanding and control of cast structures are important steps in making iron-aluminide alloys viable engineering materials. This includes understanding the various components of cast structure, their evolution, their properties, their behavior during further processing, and, finally, their effect on mechanical properties. The first phase of the study of cast Fe 3 Al-based alloys characterized the various components of the cast structure in the FA-129 alloy, while the current phase of the research involves characterizing the as-cast mechanical properties of Fe 3 Al-based alloys. The investigation of the room temperature mechanical properties of as-cast Fe 3 Al, including tensile tests in air, oxygen, and water vapor environments is described. Studies have begun to refine the grain size of the cast structure. An investigation of the effect of environmental hydrogen embrittlement on the weldability of wrought alloys was also initiated during this period with the aim of understanding the role of environment in the cold-cracking of iron aluminides

  13. Models of the earth's core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of seismology, high pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to strong constraints on core models. The synthesis presented here is devoted to the defense of the following properties: (1) core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; (2) the outer, liquid core is predominately iron but cannot be purely iron; (3) the inner core-outer core boundary represents a thermodynamic equilibrium between a liquid alloys and a predominanately iron solid; (4) thermodynamic and transport properties of outer core can be estimated from liquid-state theories; and (5) the outer core is probably adiabatic and uniform in composition. None of these propositions are universally accepted by geophysicists. But, the intent of this paper is to present a coherent picture which explains most of the data with the fewest ad hoc assumptions. Areas in which future progress is both essential and likely are geo- and cosmochronology, seismological determinations of core structure, fluid dynamics of the core and mantle, and condensed matter physics

  14. Phosphorus in antique iron music wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodway, M

    1987-05-22

    Harpsichords and other wire-strung musical instruments were made with longer strings about the beginning of the 17th century. This change required stronger music wire. Although these changes coincided with the introduction of the first mass-produced steel (iron alloyed with carbon), carbon was not found in samples of antique iron harpsichord wire. The wire contained an amount of phosphorus sufficient to have impeded its conversion to steel, and may have been drawn from iron rejected for this purpose. The method used to select pig iron for wire drawing ensured the highest possible phosphorus content at a time when its presence in iron was unsuspected. Phosphorus as an alloying element has had the reputation for making steel brittle when worked cold. Nevertheless, in replicating the antique wire, it was found that lowcarbon iron that contained 0.16 percent phosphorus was easily drawn to appropriate gauges and strengths for restringing antique harpsichords.

  15. Evaluation of stator core loss of high speed motor by using thermography camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takeru; Enokizono, Masato

    2018-04-01

    In order to design a high-efficiency motor, the iron loss that is generated in the motor should be reduced. The iron loss of the motor is generated in a stator core that is produced with an electrical steel sheet. The iron loss characteristics of the stator core and the electrical steel sheet are agreed due to a building factor. To evaluate the iron loss of the motor, the iron loss of the stator core should be measured more accurately. Thus, we proposed the method of the iron loss evaluation of the stator core by using a stator model core. This stator model core has been applied to the surface mounted permanent magnet (PM) motors without windings. By rotate the permanent magnet rotor, the rotating magnetic field is generated in the stator core like a motor under driving. To evaluate the iron loss of the stator model core, the iron loss of the stator core can be evaluated. Also, the iron loss can be calculated by a temperature gradient. When the temperature gradient is measured by using thermography camera, the iron loss of entire stator core can be evaluated as the iron loss distribution. In this paper, the usefulness of the iron loss evaluation method by using the stator model core is shown by the simulation with FEM and the heat measurement with thermography camera.

  16. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  17. Grooved cold moderator tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, K.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Iwasa, H.; Watanabe, N.; Ikeda, S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Ishikawa, Y.

    1983-01-01

    We performed some grooved cold moderator experiments for methane at 20 K by using the Hokkaido University linac to obtain information to be used in the planning of the KENS-I' project. Cold neutron gains, spatial distribution of emitted beams and time distribution of the neutrons in the grooved cold moderator were measured. Furthermore, we assessed the effects of the grooved cold moderator on the performances of the spectrometers presently installed at the KENS-I cold source. We concluded that the grooved cold moderator benefited appreciably the performances of the spectrometers

  18. Carbon mineralization and carbonate preservation in modern cold-water coral reef sediments on the Norwegian shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Wehrmann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral ecosystems are considered hot-spots of biodiversity and biomass production and may be a regionally important contributor to carbonate production. The impact of these ecosystems on biogeochemical processes and carbonate preservation in associated sediments were studied at Røst Reef and Traenadjupet Reef, two modern (post-glacial cold-water coral reefs on the Mid-Norwegian shelf. Sulfate and iron reduction as well as carbonate dissolution and precipitation were investigated by combining pore-water geochemical profiles, steady state modeling, as well as solid phase analyses and sulfate reduction rate measurements on gravity cores of up to 3.25 m length. Low extents of sulfate depletion and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC production, combined with sulfate reduction rates not exceeding 3 nmol S cm−3 d−1, suggested that overall anaerobic carbon mineralization in the sediments was low. These data showed that the coral fragment-bearing siliciclastic sediments were effectively decoupled from the productive pelagic ecosystem by the complex reef surface framework. Organic matter being mineralized by sulfate reduction was calculated to consist of 57% carbon bound in CH2O groups and 43% carbon in -CH2- groups. Methane concentrations were below 1 μM, and failed to support the hypothesis of a linkage between the distribution of cold-water coral reefs and the presence of hydrocarbon seepage. Reductive iron oxide dissolution linked to microbial sulfate reduction buffered the pore-water carbonate system and inhibited acid-driven coral skeleton dissolution. A large pool of reactive iron was available leading to the formation of iron sulfide minerals. Constant pore-water Ca2+, Mg2+ and Sr2+ concentrations in most cores and decreasing Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations with depth in core 23–18 GC indicated diagenetic carbonate precipitation. This was

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  20. Conceptualizing Cold Disasters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauta, Kristian Cedervall; Dahlberg, Rasmus; Vendelø, Morten Thanning

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we explore in more depth the particular circumstances and characteristics of governing what we call ‘cold disasters’, and thereby, the paper sets out to investigate how disasters in cold contexts distinguish themselves from other disasters, and what the implications hereof...... are for the conceptualization and governance of cold disasters. Hence, the paper can also be viewed as a response to Alexander’s (2012a) recent call for new theory in the field of disaster risk reduction. The article is structured in four overall parts. The first part, Cold Context, provides an overview of the specific...... conditions in a cold context, exemplified by the Arctic, and zooms in on Greenland to provide more specific background for the paper. The second part, Disasters in Cold Contexts, discusses “cold disasters” in relation to disaster theory, in order to, elucidate how cold disasters challenge existing...

  1. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.

  2. Colds and the Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (COPD). What medicines can I give my child? There is no cure for the cold or the flu, and antibiotics do not work against the viruses that cause colds and the flu. Pain relievers such as ...

  3. Cold knife cone biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References Baggish ...

  4. Cold medicines and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ingredient. Avoid giving more than one OTC cold medicine to your child. It may cause an overdose with severe side ... the dosage instructions strictly while giving an OTC medicine to your child. When giving OTC cold medicines to your child: ...

  5. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  6. Effect of annealing process of iron powder on magnetic properties ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Iron powder magnetic cores are used as soft magnetic rotors, in micro special motors such as BS brake motors, refrigerator compressor motors and brushless servo motors. Heat treatment of iron powder played an important role in the magnetic properties and loss of the motor cores. After the annealing process,.

  7. IRON DOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6 Israeli Navy 'First Arm of the Sea: The Successful Interception of the Iron Dome Rocket .... sky to destroy them whilst in flight to minimise civilian casualties. ..... Including The Moon and Celestial Bodies.53 Demeyere further emphasises the.

  8. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tracing) X-ray to detect and track iron tablets through the stomach and intestines Treatment may include: ... BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  9. Workshop on cold-blanket research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    The objective of the workshop was to identify and discuss cold-plasma blanket systems. In order to minimize the bombardment of the walls by hot neutrals the plasma should be impermeable. This requires a density edge-thickness product of nΔ > 10 15 cm -2 . An impermeable cold plasma-gas blanket surrounding a hot plasma core reduces the plasma wall/limiter interaction. Accumulation of impurities in this blanket can be expected. Fuelling from a blanket may be possible as shown by experimental results, though not fully explained by classical transport of neutrals. Refuelling of a reacting plasma had to be ensured by inward diffusion. Experimental studies of a cold impermeable plasma have been done on the tokamak-like Ringboog device. Simulation calculations for the next generation of large tokamaks using a particular transport model, indicate that the plasma edge profile can be controlled to reduce the production of sputtered impurities to an acceptable level. Impurity control requires a small fraction of the radial space to accomodate the cold-plasma layer. The problem of exhaust is, however, more complicated. If the cold-blanket scheme works as predicted in the model calculations, then α-particles generated by fusion will be transported to the cold outside layer. The Communities' experimental programme of research has been discussed in terms of the tokamaks which are available and planned. Two options present themselves for the continuation of cold-blanket research

  10. The Capitalist World-System and U.S. Cold War Policies in the Core and the Periphery: A Comparative Analysis of Post-World War II American Nation-building in Germany and Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hugh Jo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In response to the emerging cold war, why did the United States stress industrial expansion in Western Europe but focus on primary production alongside policing operations in the non-western world? Examining US postwar occupation in Germany and Korea from a world-systems perspective, this article argues that a given country’s standing in the capitalist economy generally shapes American foreign policy toward that particular country in the early cold war years. A paladin of system-wide prosperity and peace, the United States sought to restore the international division of labor after World War II. Reactions varied across the system, however, because of distinct socio-economic developments. The presence of capital-intensive export-dependent industry afforded western Germany flexible labor-management relations. Politics was overall stable there, and America dispensed with heavy-handed intervention. In southern Korea, labor-exploitive tenancy farming rendered interclass compromise virtually impossible. As intransigent peasants threatened the market economy, the United States used force to keep the ally in the system.

  11. How cold is cold dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T.

    2014-01-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed

  12. HFIR cold neutron source moderator vessel design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.J.

    1998-04-01

    A cold neutron source capsule made of aluminum alloy is to be installed and located at the tip of one of the neutron beam tubes of the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Cold hydrogen liquid of temperature approximately 20 degree Kelvin and 15 bars pressure is designed to flow through the aluminum capsule that serves to chill and to moderate the incoming neutrons produced from the reactor core. The cold and low energy neutrons thus produced will be used as cold neutron sources for the diffraction experiments. The structural design calculation for the aluminum capsule is reported in this paper

  13. Metallization of Various Polymers by Cold Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hanqing; Chu, Xin; Vo, Phuong; Yue, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Previous results have shown that metallic coatings can be successfully cold sprayed onto polymeric substrates. This paper studies the cold sprayability of various metal powders on different polymeric substrates. Five different substrates were used, including carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polyether ether ketone (PEEK), polyethylenimine (PEI); mild steel was also used as a benchmark substrate. The CFRP used in this work has a thermosetting matrix, and the ABS, PEEK and PEI are all thermoplastic polymers, with different glass transition temperatures as well as a number of distinct mechanical properties. Three metal powders, tin, copper and iron, were cold sprayed with both a low-pressure system and a high-pressure system at various conditions. In general, cold spray on the thermoplastic polymers rendered more positive results than the thermosetting polymers, due to the local thermal softening mechanism in the thermoplastics. Thick copper coatings were successfully deposited on PEEK and PEI. Based on the results, a method is proposed to determine the feasibility and deposition window of cold spraying specific metal powder/polymeric substrate combinations.

  14. The State of the Art in Cold Forging Lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    1994-01-01

    The manufature of components in steel, aluminium and copper alloys by cold forging production has increased ever since the 1950's. Typical processes are forward rod extrusion and backward can extrusion, upsetting, ironing, tube extrusion and radial extrusion. The tribological conditions in cold...... forging are extremely severe due to large surface expansion and normal pressure in the tool/workpiece interface combined with elevated tool temperatures. Except for the more simple cold forging operations successful production therefore requires advanced lubrication systems. The present paper gives...... a detailed description of the state of art for lubricant systems for cold forging of C-steels and low alloy steels as well as aluminium alloys including all the basic operations such as cleaning of the slugs, application of eventual conversion coating and lubrication. As regards cold forging of steel...

  15. Cytosolic iron chaperones: Proteins delivering iron cofactors in the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Caroline C; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Frey, Avery; Patel, Sarju

    2017-08-04

    Eukaryotic cells contain hundreds of metalloproteins that are supported by intracellular systems coordinating the uptake and distribution of metal cofactors. Iron cofactors include heme, iron-sulfur clusters, and simple iron ions. Poly(rC)-binding proteins are multifunctional adaptors that serve as iron ion chaperones in the cytosolic/nuclear compartment, binding iron at import and delivering it to enzymes, for storage (ferritin) and export (ferroportin). Ferritin iron is mobilized by autophagy through the cargo receptor, nuclear co-activator 4. The monothiol glutaredoxin Glrx3 and BolA2 function as a [2Fe-2S] chaperone complex. These proteins form a core system of cytosolic iron cofactor chaperones in mammalian cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Cold formability of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafond, G.; Leclerq, G.; Moliexe, F.; Namdar, R.; Roesch, L.; Sanz, G.

    1977-01-01

    This work was essentially aimed to the study of the following three questions. Is it possible to assess the cold formability of steels using simple material properties as criteria. What values of mechanical properties can one expect to reach in cold formed parts. Are there simple ways of characterizing the speroidization treatments carried out on steels before cold forming operations. The present report describes the results obtained during this investigation. It is logically divided into three separate parts. Experimental study of cold formability in wire drawing. Influence of metallurgical variables on mechanical properties of high carbon cold drawn wires. Contribution to the study of characterization methods of cold forming steels subjected to a spheroidization heat treatment

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron- ... of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  19. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reasonable amounts of iron are also found in lamb, pork, and shellfish. Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, ... strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) also increase iron absorption. Cooking foods in a cast-iron skillet can also ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests are also done. Ferritin measure ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  7. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and severity. Treatments may include iron supplements, procedures, surgery, and dietary ... iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  10. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  11. [Imperial Oil's Cold Lake oil sands operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingle, H. B.

    1999-01-01

    Imperial Oil Limited's Cold Lake oil sands resources, production and operations in Alberta are discussed. Cold Lake is the company's largest single asset and its largest source of crude oil production. In 1998, Cold Lake accounted for just under half of Imperial's total liquid production, averaging more than 135,000 barrels of bitumen a day. Despite the very difficult operating conditions experienced by the oil sands industry in 1998, Imperial Oil's Cold Lake operations generated a positive cash flow and earnings. Just as important, the near and long-term potential of Cold Lake property continues to be strong, even with the tough market conditions today and the foreseeable future. Proved reserves at the end of 1997 were 1.3 billions barrels, equal to about 24 years of current production, but even more important is Imperial's resource base in the Athabasca region, which represents 150 years of production at current rates. Although production forecasts for the near future are are revised downward because of production shut-in due to low prices, the company is confident of its long-term prospects mainly because of existing infrastructure, superior reservoir quality, 30 years worth of operating improvements and established bitumen-blend markets. Details of the company's future Cold Lake development plans are discussed. The need to continue technology development, which has been at the core of the industry's growth in the past and will continue to be the key to the future, are emphasized

  12. Cold water recovery reduces anaerobic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, M J; O'Connor, D; Rudd, D

    2007-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of cold water immersion on recovery from anaerobic cycling. Seventeen (13 male, 4 female) active subjects underwent a crossover, randomised design involving two testing sessions 2 - 6 d apart. Testing involved two 30-s maximal cycling efforts separated by a one-hour recovery period of 10-min cycling warm-down followed by either passive rest or 15-min cold water immersion (13 - 14 degrees C) with passive rest. Peak power, total work and postexercise blood lactate were significantly reduced following cold water immersion compared to the first exercise test and the control condition. These variables did not differ significantly between the control tests. Peak exercise heart rate was significantly lower after cold water immersion compared to the control. Time to peak power, rating of perceived exertion, and blood pH were not affected by cold water immersion compared to the control. Core temperature rose significantly (0.3 degrees C) during ice bath immersion but a similar increase also occurred in the control condition. Therefore, cold water immersion caused a significant decrease in sprint cycling performance with one-hour recovery between tests.

  13. Supernova mass ejection and core hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgate, S.A.

    1978-01-01

    Simplifications that have emerged in the descriptions of stellar unstable collapse to a neutron star are discussed. The neutral current weak interaction leads to almost complete neutrino trapping in the collapse and to an electron fraction Y/sub e/ congruent to 0.35 in equilibrium with trapped electron neutrinos and ''iron'' nuclei. A soft equation of state (γ congruent to 1.30) leads to collapse, and bounce occurs on a hard core, γ = 2.5, at nuclear densities. Neutrino emission is predicted from a photosphere at r congruent to 2 x 10 7 cm and E/sub ν/ congruent to 10 MeV. The ejection of matter by an elastic core bounce and a subsequent escaping shock is marginal and may not be predicted for accurate values of the equation of state. A new concept of Rayleigh-Taylor driven core instabilities is invoked to predict an increased mass ejection either due to an increased flux and energy of neutrinos at second bounce time and, or, the rapid 0.1 to 0.4 second formation of a more energetically bound neutron star. The instability is caused by highly neutronized external matter from which neutrinos have escaped being supported by lighter matter of the lepton trapped core. An initial anisotropy of 10 -2 to 10 -3 should lead to adequately rapid (several milliseconds) overturn following several (2 to 4) bounces. Subsequent to the overturnwith or without a strong ejection shock, a weak ejection shock will allow an accretion shock to form on the ''cold'' neutron star core due to the reimplosion or rarefaction wave in the weakly ejected matter. The accretion shock forms at low enough mass accumulation rate, 1 / 2 M/sub solar/ sec -1 , such that a black body neutrino flux can escape from the shock front (kT congruent to 10 MeV, [E/sub ν/] congruent to 30 MeV). This strongly augments the weaker bounce ejection shock by heating the external matter in the mantle by electron neutrino scattering (congruent to 10 52 ergs) causing adequate mass ejection

  14. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Silva, Sebastião William da; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos de [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); Morais, Paulo César [Instituto de Física, Núcleo de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF 70910-900 (Brazil); School of Automation, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel, E-mail: jafeli@iq.unesp.br [Laboratório de Materiais Magnéticos e Coloides, Departamento de Físico-química, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil)

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic iron nanoparticles were passivated in tetraethylene glycol media. • Passivated nanoparticles presented pomegranate-like core@shell structure. • Passivation of metallic iron correlates with the tetraethylene glycol degradation. • Boron enriched metallic iron phase was more susceptible to oxidation. • The iron oxide shell was identified as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with a mass fraction of 43:53 related to αFe. - Abstract: The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90–120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron–iron oxide were 145 emu g{sup −1} and 131 emu g{sup −1}, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  15. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato; Silva, Sebastião William da; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos de; Morais, Paulo César; Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metallic iron nanoparticles were passivated in tetraethylene glycol media. • Passivated nanoparticles presented pomegranate-like core@shell structure. • Passivation of metallic iron correlates with the tetraethylene glycol degradation. • Boron enriched metallic iron phase was more susceptible to oxidation. • The iron oxide shell was identified as Fe 3 O 4 with a mass fraction of 43:53 related to αFe. - Abstract: The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90–120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron–iron oxide were 145 emu g −1 and 131 emu g −1 , respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy

  16. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D 2 molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D 2 fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into 4 He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; 3 He to 4 He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of 3 He/ 4 He

  17. Contribution to the experimental study of the critical scattering of cold neutrons in iron; Contriiution a l'etude experimentale de la diffusion critique des neutrons froids par le fer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstantinovic, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-15

    The aim of the present work is a study of magnetic fluctuations which are produced in iron in the neighbourhood of the Curie temperature, by neutron scattering. We start by briefly recalling the theory of scattering of neutrons by magnetic substances and Landau's theory of second order phase transitions which enables one to derive the magnetic cross section near the Curie temperature. Following this is a description of the experimental apparatus after which we present the experimental results. The analysis of the results confirms the four-third law obeyed by the magnetic susceptibility near the Curie point, predicted by recent theories based on the Heisenberg model. However, the analysis reveals a non-zero relaxation time for the magnetic fluctuations at the Curie point, which is in disagreement with theoretical conclusions. (author) [French] L'objet du present travail est l'etude des fluctuations d'aimantation qui prennent naissance dans le fer au voisinage de sa temperature de Curie par la diffusion des neutrons. Nous commencons par rappeler brievement les generalites sur la diffusion des neutrons par les substances magnetiques et la theorie de Landau des transitions de phase du second ordre qui permet de deriver une expression de la section efficace magnetique pres de la temperature de Curie. Ensuite, apres la description du dispositif experimental, nous presentons les resultats experimentaux. L'analyse de ces resultats confirme les theories recentes suivant le modele d'Heisenberg en ce qui concerne la 'loi en 4/3' de la susceptibilite magnetique au voisinage du point de Curie; mais par ailleurs elle revele l'existence d'un temps de relaxation des fluctuations d'aimantation non nul en ce point, ce qui est en desaccord avec les previsions theoriques actuelles. (auteur)

  18. Core Characteristics Deterioration due to Plastic Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Chikara; Arai, Satoshi

    This paper discusses the effect of plastic deformation at core manufacturing on the characteristics of cores where non-oriented electrical steel sheets are used as core material. Exciting field and iron loss increase proportionally to plastic deformation in the case of rPeddy currents increase because plastic deformations of crystalline grains are distributed and then the flux distribution is induced. In the case of rP>20, the deterioration tend to saturate, and the increases in magnetic field and iron loss are 1000 to 1500A/m and 2 to 4W/kg. They are related to grain size, and high grade with larger grain may have lager field increase and smaller iron loss increase. Anomalous eddy current losses scarcely increase in this region. In actual motors, the plastic deformation affects iron loss increase although exciting current increases a little.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  20. Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-24

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012494 TITLE: Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold...part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP012489 thru ADP012577 UNCLASSIFIED Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen G...and positrons. The antiprotons come initially from the new Antiproton Decel- erator facility at CERN. Good control of such cold antimatter plasmas is

  1. Creep-rupture, steam oxidation and recovery behaviours upon dynamic transients up to 1300 C of cold-worked 304 stainless steel tubes dedicated to nuclear core fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, L.; Brachet, J.C.; Vandenberghe, V.; Guilbert, T.; Lezaud-Chaillioux, V.; Bernard, C.; Rabeau, V.

    2011-01-01

    An ambitious mechanical tests program was conducted on the fuel rod cladding of the CABRI facility between 2004 and 2009 to re-evaluate the cladding tubes materials behaviour. As an offspring of this major scientific investment several conclusions of interest could be drawn on the 304 stainless steel material. In particular, the specific behaviour of the materials during hypothetical and extreme 'dry-out' conditions was investigated. In such a scenario, the cladding tube materials should experience a very brief incursion at high temperatures, in a steam environment, up to 1300 C, before cladding rewetting. Some of the measurements performed in the range of interest for the safety case were on purpose developed beyond the conservatively safe domain. Some of the results obtained for these non-conventional heating rates, pressures and temperature ranges will be presented. First in order to assess the high temperature creep-rupture material behaviour under internal pressure upon dynamic transient conditions, tests have been performed on cold-worked 304 stainless cladding tubes in a steam environment, for heating rates up to 100 C*s -1 and pressure ramp rates up to 10 bar*s -1 thanks to the use of the EDGAR facility. Other tests performed at a given pressure allowed us to check the steady-state secondary creep rate of the materials in the 1100-1200 C temperature range. It was also possible to determine the rupture strength value and the failure mode as a function of the thermal and pressure loading history applied. It is worth noticing that, for very specific conditions, a surprising pure intergranular brittle failure mode of the clad has been observed. Secondly, in order to check the materials oxidation resistance of the materials, two-side steam oxidation tests have been performed at 1300 C, using the DEZIROX facility. It was shown that, thanks to the use of Ring Compression tests, the 304 cladding tube keeps significant ductility for oxidation times up to at least

  2. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  3. Polycrystalline Materials as a Cold Neutron and Gamma Radiation Filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, N.

    2009-01-01

    The total neutron cross-section of polycrystalline beryllium, graphite and iron has been calculated beyond their cut-off wavelength using a general formula. The computer Cold Filter code was developed in order to provide the required calculations. The code also permits the calculation of attenuation of reactor gamma radiation, The calculated neutron transmissions through polycrystalline Be graphite and iron at different temperatures were compared with the experimental data measured at the ETRR-1 reactor using two TOF spectrometers. An overall agreement is obtained between the formula fits and experimental data at different temperatures. A feasibility study is carried on using polycrystalline Be, graphite and iron an efficient filter for cold neutrons and gamma radiation.

  4. A uranium core for the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouat, S.

    2003-01-01

    According to the theory of M. Herndon, a US independent geophysicist, the center of the Earth's core should be made of a uranium sphere of about 8 km of diameter. This natural reactor, or 'geo-reactor', should be at the origin of the internal heat and of the magnetic field of the Earth. M. Herndon has extended his theory to the other planets of the solar system. This theory contradicts the one adopted since the 1940's by the community of geophysicists and which involves a crystallized iron and nickel internal core inside a liquid iron external core. Herndon's theory can explain also the geomagnetic field reversals. (J.S.)

  5. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-08

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.  Created: 2/8/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 2/8/2016.

  6. Cold-Weather Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth / For Teens / Cold-Weather Sports What's in this article? What to Do? Classes ... weather. What better time to be outdoors? Winter sports can help you burn calories, increase your cardiovascular ...

  7. Cold fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy

  8. COLD-WORKED HARDWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Strizhak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The different types of cold-worked accessory are examined in the article. The necessity of development of such type of accessory in the Republic of Belarus due to requirements of market is shown. High emphasis is placed on the methods of increase of plasticity of cold-worked accessory from usual mill of RUP and CIS countries.

  9. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  10. Approach to criticality in cold core of the Unit 1 of the cycle 10 of the Laguna Verde power plant with control rods similar in design to the original ones and the advanced ones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perusquia, R.; Ramirez, J.R.; Ortiz, J.J.; Hernandez, J.L.; Montes, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the Laguna Verde power plant (CLV) worn out control bars have been replacing for control rods of advanced design. At the moment of the 109 rods of similar design to the original of the Unit 1 of the CLV, 14 of them have been substituted with two types of different advanced control rods. The same as the original rods the advanced rods use boron carbide as control element for neutrons, but additionally they use hafnium, to achieve a longer useful half life. The rods of similar design to the original are homogeneous axially on the other hand the advanced presenting several zones. In principle the advanced rods were designed to be neutronically compatible to the original rods. However the differences in the design and of constituents assumed to consider a different performance during the operation. Since the one numbers of advanced bars is growing with the number of cycles of the CLV reactor has requested to the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to evaluate in detailed form the performance of the control rods. Previously the calculations and analysis of cycle design that that were carried out assumed that control rods should be of similar design as the original. Using the HELIOS/CM-LENDS system, the effect of the inclusion of advanced rods was analyzed in the approximation of the criticality in cold (20 C) in the cycle 10 of the Unit 1. Four scenarios were poposed, where the type of the rod of substitution control is varied. The value of reactivity was calculated for the rods similar in design to the original and for the advanced one. By comparison of these values, it was found that the value of reactivity of the control rods of the advanced design was superior to the value for rods similar to the original ones by 7.6% for one of the advanced designs and of 13.6% for the other one. (Author)

  11. Body temperature and cold sensation during and following exercise under temperate room conditions in cold-sensitive young trained females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Naoto; Aoki-Murakami, Erii; Tsuji, Bun; Kenny, Glen P; Nagashima, Kei; Kondo, Narihiko; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-11-01

    We evaluated cold sensation at rest and in response to exercise-induced changes in core and skin temperatures in cold-sensitive exercise trained females. Fifty-eight trained young females were screened by a questionnaire, selecting cold-sensitive (Cold-sensitive, n  = 7) and non-cold-sensitive (Control, n  = 7) individuals. Participants rested in a room at 29.5°C for ~100 min after which ambient temperature was reduced to 23.5°C where they remained resting for 60 min. Participants then performed 30-min of moderate intensity cycling (50% peak oxygen uptake) followed by a 60-min recovery. Core and mean skin temperatures and cold sensation over the whole-body and extremities (fingers and toes) were assessed throughout. Resting core temperature was lower in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group (36.4 ± 0.3 vs. 36.7 ± 0.2°C). Core temperature increased to similar levels at end-exercise (~37.2°C) and gradually returned to near preexercise rest levels at the end of recovery (>36.6°C). Whole-body cold sensation was greater in the Cold-sensitive relative to Control group during resting at a room temperature of 23.5°C only without a difference in mean skin temperature between groups. In contrast, cold sensation of the extremities was greater in the Cold-sensitive group prior to, during and following exercise albeit this was not paralleled by differences in mean extremity skin temperature. We show that young trained females who are sensitive to cold exhibit augmented whole-body cold sensation during rest under temperate ambient conditions. However, this response is diminished during and following exercise. In contrast, cold sensation of extremities is augmented during resting that persists during and following exercise. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  12. Stable Composition of the Nano- and Picoplankton Community during the Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiment LOHAFEX

    KAUST Repository

    Thiele, Stefan

    2014-11-17

    The iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX was conducted in a cold-core eddy in the Southern Atlantic Ocean during austral summer. Within a few days after fertilization, a phytoplankton bloom developed dominated by nano- and picoplankton groups. Unlike previously reported for other iron fertilization experiments, a diatom bloom was prevented by iron and silicate co-limitation. We used 18S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing to investigate the diversity of these morphologically similar cell types within the nano- and picoplankton and microscopically enumerated dominant clades after catalyzed reported deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) with specific oligonucleotide probes. In addition to Phaeocystis, members of Syndiniales group II, clade 10–11, and the Micromonas clades ABC and E made up a major fraction of the tag sequences of the nano- and picoplankton community within the fertilized patch. However, the same clades were also dominant before the bloom and outside the fertilized patch. Furthermore, only little changes in diversity could be observed over the course of the experiment. These results were corroborated by CARD-FISH analysis which confirmed the presence of a stable nano- and picoplankton community dominated by Phaeocystis and Micromonas during the entire course of the experiment. Interestingly, although Syndiniales dominated the tag sequences, they could hardly be detected by CARD-FISH, possibly due to the intracellular parasitic life style of this clade. The remarkable stability of the nano- and picoplankton community points to a tight coupling of the different trophic levels within the microbial food web during LOHAFEX.

  13. Condensation of galactic cold dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visinelli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We consider the steady-state regime describing the density profile of a dark matter halo, if dark matter is treated as a Bose-Einstein condensate. We first solve the fluid equation for “canonical” cold dark matter, obtaining a class of density profiles which includes the Navarro-Frenk-White profile, and which diverge at the halo core. We then solve numerically the equation obtained when an additional “quantum pressure” term is included in the computation of the density profile. The solution to this latter case is finite at the halo core, possibly avoiding the “cuspy halo problem” present in some cold dark matter theories. Within the model proposed, we predict the mass of the cold dark matter particle to be of the order of M_χc"2≈10"−"2"4 eV, which is of the same order of magnitude as that predicted in ultra-light scalar cold dark matter models. Finally, we derive the differential equation describing perturbations in the density and the pressure of the dark matter fluid.

  14. Examining the Possibility of Carbon as a Light Element in the Core of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen; McCubbin, Francis M.; Turner, Amber; Ross, D. Kent

    2017-01-01

    Results from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft have shown elevated abundances of C on the surface of Mercury. Peplowski et al. used GRS data from MESSENGER to show an average northern hemisphere abundance of C on the planet of 0 to 4.1 wt% C at the three-sigma detection limit. Confirmation of C on the planet prompts many questions regarding the role of C during the differentiation and evolution of Mercury. The elevated abundances of both S and C on Mercury's surface, coupled with the low abundances of iron, suggest that the oxygen fugacity of the planet is several log10 units below the Iron-Wustite buffer. These observations spark questions about the bulk composition of Mercury's core. This experimental study seeks to understand the impact of C as a light element on potential mercurian core compositions. In order to address this question, experiments were conducted at 1 GPa and a variety of temperatures (700 - 1500 C) on metal compositions ranging from Si5Fe95 to Si22Fe78, possibly representative of the mercurian core. All starting metals were completely enclosed in a graphite capsule to ensure C saturation at a given set of run conditions. All elements, including C, were analyzed using electron probe microanalysis. Precautions were taken to ensure accurate measurements of C with this technique including using the LDE2 crystal, the cold finger on the microprobe to minimize contamination and increase the vacuum, and an instrument with no oil based pumps. Based on the superliquidus experimental results in the present study, as Fe-rich cores become more Si-rich, the C content of that core composition will decrease. Furthermore, although C concentration at graphite saturation (CCGS) varies from a liquid to a solid, temperature does not seem to play a substantial role in CCGS, at least at 1 GPa.

  15. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced

  16. Astrochemical Properties of Planck Cold Clumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatematsu, Ken’ichi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Nguyễn Lu’o’ng, Quang; Hirota, Tomoya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Liu, Tie; Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Kim, Kee-Tae [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daedeokdaero 776, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Ohashi, Satoshi [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Hirano, Naomi [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 11F of Astronomy-Mathematics Building, AS/NTU. No.1, Section 4, Roosevelt Rd, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Thompson, Mark A. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Fuller, Gary [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Wu, Yuefang [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, 100871, Beijing (China); Li, Di [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100012 (China); Francesco, James Di [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Wang, Ke [European Southern Observatory (Germany); Ristorcelli, Isabelle [IRAP, CNRS (UMR5277), Universite Paul Sabatier, 9 avenue du Colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028, Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Juvela, Mika [Department of physics, University of Helsinki, FI-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Shinnaga, Hiroko, E-mail: k.tatematsu@nao.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35, Korimoto, Kagoshima, 890-0065 (Japan); Collaboration: JCMT Large Program “SCOPE” collaboration; TRAO Key Science Program “TOP” collaboration; and others

    2017-02-01

    We observed 13 Planck cold clumps with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope/SCUBA-2 and with the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope. The N{sub 2}H{sup +} distribution obtained with the Nobeyama telescope is quite similar to SCUBA-2 dust distribution. The 82 GHz HC{sub 3}N, 82 GHz CCS, and 94 GHz CCS emission are often distributed differently with respect to the N{sub 2}H{sup +} emission. The CCS emission, which is known to be abundant in starless molecular cloud cores, is often very clumpy in the observed targets. We made deep single-pointing observations in DNC, HN{sup 13}C, N{sub 2}D{sup +}, and cyclic-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} toward nine clumps. The detection rate of N{sub 2}D{sup +} is 50%. Furthermore, we observed the NH{sub 3} emission toward 15 Planck cold clumps to estimate the kinetic temperature, and confirmed that most targets are cold (≲20 K). In two of the starless clumps we observed, the CCS emission is distributed as it surrounds the N{sub 2}H{sup +} core (chemically evolved gas), which resembles the case of L1544, a prestellar core showing collapse. In addition, we detected both DNC and N{sub 2}D{sup +}. These two clumps are most likely on the verge of star formation. We introduce the chemical evolution factor (CEF) for starless cores to describe the chemical evolutionary stage, and analyze the observed Planck cold clumps.

  17. Nucleosynthesis in cold white dwarf explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canal, R.; Hernanz, M.

    1986-01-01

    Type I supernovae (SNI) are generally thought to be the main contributors to the galactic nucleosynthesis of iron-peak elements and their yields of intermediate-mass elements may also be important. We concentrate here upon a different class of models, based on the explosion of cold, massive, partially solid white dwarfs. We show that such white dwarfs must be relatively frequent among SNI progenitors and how their hydrodynamics upon ignition is very different from that of hotter, fluid white dwarfs. The implications for nucleosynthesis are briefly discussed and some preliminary results are presented

  18. Moessbauer and positron annihilation studies of microstructural peculiarities of iron-dextran complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshtrakh, M.I.; Kopelyan, E.A.; Semionkin, V.A.; Livshits, A.B.; Kozlov, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    The microstructural peculiarities of pharmaceutically important iron-dextran complexes were studied by Moessbauer and positron annihilation techniques. The results of Moessbauer spectroscopy showed variations of the iron cores in iron-dextran complexes containing different forms of FeOOH and different electronic and magnetic states of iron. The results of angular correlations of annihilation radiation and positron life-time spectroscopies showed microstructural variations of the dextran shell of the iron-dextran complexes. (author) 19 refs.; 4 tabs

  19. Stellar core collapse and supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.R.; Mayle, R.; Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.

    1985-04-01

    Massive stars that end their stable evolution as their iron cores collapse to a neutron star or black hole long been considered good candidates for producing Type II supernovae. For many years the outward propagation of the shock wave produced by the bounce of these iron cores has been studied as a possible mechanism for the explosion. For the most part, the results of these studies have not been particularly encouraging, except, perhaps, in the case of very low mass iron cores or very soft nuclear equations of state. The shock stalls, overwhelmed by photodisintegration and neutrino losses, and the star does not explode. More recently, slow late time heating of the envelope of the incipient neutron star has been found to be capable of rejuvenating the stalled shock and producing an explosion after all. The present paper discusses this late time heating and presents results from numerical calculations of the evolution, core collapse, and subsequent explosion of a number of recent stellar models. For the first time they all, except perhaps the most massive, explode with reasonable choices of input physics. 39 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab

  20. Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic Ocean during the last ice age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, A.

    2015-12-01

    Dust has the potential to modify global climate by influencing the radiative balance of the atmosphere and by supplying iron and other essential limiting micronutrients to the ocean. The scarcity of iron limits marine productivity and carbon uptake in one-quarter of the world ocean where the concentration of major nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) is perennially high. The Southern Ocean is the region where variations in iron availability can have the largest effect on Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystems. Paleoceanographic records from the Subantarctic Atlantic have revealed a remarkable correlation between phytoplankton productivity and aeolian iron flux during glacial periods supporting the iron fertilization hypothesis. In addition, a recent study has shown that peak glacial times and millennial cold events were nearly universally associated not only with increases in dust flux and export production, but also with an increase in nutrient consumption (the last indicated by higher foraminifera-bound δ15N) (Martinez-Garcia et al. 2014). This combination of changes is uniquely consistent with ice age iron fertilization of the Subantarctic Atlantic. The strengthening of the biological pump associated with the observed increase in Subantarctic nutrient consumption during the high-dust intervals of the last two ice ages can explain up to ~40 ppm of the CO2 decrease that characterizes the transitions from mid-climate states to full ice age conditions. However, the impact of iron fertilization in other sectors of the Southern Ocean characterized by lower ice age dust fluxes than the Atlantic remains unclear. A series of recently published records from the Subantarctic Pacific indicate that dust deposition and marine export production were three times higher during glacial periods than during interglacials (Lamy et al. 2014). Here we present new measurements of foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes in a sediment core located in the

  1. Study of lime vs. no lime in cold in-place recycled asphalt concrete pavements : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    The resilient characteristics of cold in-place recycled asphalt concrete with and without lime were examined. Six core samples were obtained from a site two months after construction; six months later, six additional core samples were obtained from t...

  2. Impairment of exercise performance following cold water immersion is not attenuated after 7 days of cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Douglas M; Roelands, Bart; Bailey, Stephen P; Buono, Michael J; Meeusen, Romain

    2018-03-19

    It is well-documented that severe cold stress impairs exercise performance. Repeated immersion in cold water induces an insulative type of cold acclimation, wherein enhanced vasoconstriction leads to greater body heat retention, which may attenuate cold-induced exercise impairments. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to investigate changes in exercise performance during a 7-day insulative type of cold acclimation. Twelve healthy participants consisting of eight males and four females (mean ± SD age: 25.6 ± 5.2 years, height: 174.0 ± 8.9 cm, weight: 75.6 ± 13.1 kg) performed a 20 min self-paced cycling test in 23 °C, 40% humidity without prior cold exposure. Twenty-four hours later they began a 7-day cold acclimation protocol (daily 90 min immersion in 10 °C water). On days one, four, and seven of cold acclimation, participants completed the same cycling test. Measurements of work completed, core and skin temperatures, heart rate, skin blood flow, perceived exertion, and thermal sensation were measured during each cycling test. Successful insulative cold acclimation was observed. Work produced during the baseline cycling test (220 ± 70 kJ) was greater (p immersions (195 ± 58, 197 ± 60, and 194 ± 62 kJ) despite similar ratings of perceived exertion during each test, suggesting that cold exposure impaired cycling performance. This impairment, however, was not attenuated over the cold acclimation period. Results suggest that insulative cold acclimation does not attenuate impairments in exercise performance that were observed following acute cold water immersion.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  6. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  7. Chilling Out With Colds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and use the time to read, listen to music, or watch a movie. In other words, chill out and you might prevent a cold! Reviewed by: Patricia ... Policy Permissions Guidelines Privacy Policy & Terms of Use Notice ...

  8. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  9. The role of mitochondria in cellular iron-sulfur protein biogenesis and iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Roland; Hoffmann, Bastian; Molik, Sabine; Pierik, Antonio J; Rietzschel, Nicole; Stehling, Oliver; Uzarska, Marta A; Webert, Holger; Wilbrecht, Claudia; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in iron metabolism in that they synthesize heme, assemble iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins, and participate in cellular iron regulation. Here, we review the latter two topics and their intimate connection. The mitochondrial Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly machinery consists of 17 proteins that operate in three major steps of the maturation process. First, the cysteine desulfurase complex Nfs1-Isd11 as the sulfur donor cooperates with ferredoxin-ferredoxin reductase acting as an electron transfer chain, and frataxin to synthesize an [2Fe-2S] cluster on the scaffold protein Isu1. Second, the cluster is released from Isu1 and transferred toward apoproteins with the help of a dedicated Hsp70 chaperone system and the glutaredoxin Grx5. Finally, various specialized ISC components assist in the generation of [4Fe-4S] clusters and cluster insertion into specific target apoproteins. Functional defects of the core ISC assembly machinery are signaled to cytosolic or nuclear iron regulatory systems resulting in increased cellular iron acquisition and mitochondrial iron accumulation. In fungi, regulation is achieved by iron-responsive transcription factors controlling the expression of genes involved in iron uptake and intracellular distribution. They are assisted by cytosolic multidomain glutaredoxins which use a bound Fe/S cluster as iron sensor and additionally perform an essential role in intracellular iron delivery to target metalloproteins. In mammalian cells, the iron regulatory proteins IRP1, an Fe/S protein, and IRP2 act in a post-transcriptional fashion to adjust the cellular needs for iron. Thus, Fe/S protein biogenesis and cellular iron metabolism are tightly linked to coordinate iron supply and utilization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  11. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  12. Hypothermic general cold adaptation induced by local cold acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savourey, G; Barnavol, B; Caravel, J P; Feuerstein, C; Bittel, J H

    1996-01-01

    To study relationships between local cold adaptation of the lower limbs and general cold adaptation, eight subjects were submitted both to a cold foot test (CFT, 5 degrees C water immersion, 5 min) and to a whole-body standard cold air test (SCAT, 1 degree C, 2 h, nude at rest) before and after a local cold acclimation (LCA) of the lower limbs effected by repeated cold water immersions. The LCA induced a local cold adaptation confirmed by higher skin temperatures of the lower limbs during CFT and a hypothermic insulative general cold adaptation (decreased rectal temperature and mean skin temperature P adaptation was related to the habituation process confirmed by decreased plasma concentrations of noradrenaline (NA) during LCA (P general cold adaptation was unrelated either to local cold adaptation or to the habituation process, because an increased NA during SCAT after LCA (P syndrome" occurring during LCA.

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ... and lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... delivery or giving birth to a baby with low birth weight In people with chronic conditions, iron- ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  2. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amount of iron, and medical conditions that make it hard for your body to absorb iron from ... hepcidin. Hepcidin prevents iron from leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy ... sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  10. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark ... choose nonmeat sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ESAs are usually used with iron therapy or IV iron, or when iron therapy alone is not enough. Look for Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend, including lifelong lifestyle changes ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  14. Planck 2015 results: XXVIII. The Planck Catalogue of Galactic cold clumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present the Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC), an all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold clump candidates detected by Planck. This catalogue is the full version of the Early Cold Core (ECC) catalogue, which was made available in 2011 with the Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (E...

  15. Acid Pit Stabilization Project (Volume 1 - Cold Testing) and (Volume 2 - Hot Testing)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G. G.; Zdinak, A. P.; Ewanic, M. A.; Jessmore, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    During the summer and fall of Fiscal Year 1997, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study was performed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The study involved subsurface stabilization of a mixed waste contaminated soil site called the Acid Pit. This study represents the culmination of a successful technology development effort that spanned Fiscal Years 1994-1996. Research and development of the in situ grout stabilization technique was conducted. Hardware and implementation techniques are currently documented in a patent pending with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. The stabilization technique involved using jet grouting of an innovative grouting material to form a monolith out of the contamination zone. The monolith simultaneously provides a barrier to further contaminant migration and closes voids in the soil structure against further subsidence. This is accomplished by chemical incorporation of contaminants into less soluble species and achieving a general reduction in hydraulic conductivity within the monolith. The grout used for this study was TECT-HG, a relatively dense iron oxide-based cementitious grout. The treatability study involved cold testing followed by in situ stabilization of the Acid Pit. Volume 1 of this report discusses cold testing, performed as part of a ''Management Readiness Assessment'' in preparation for going hot. Volume 2 discusses the results of the hot Acid Pit Stabilization phase of this project. Drilling equipment was specifically rigged to reduce the spread of contamination, and all grouting was performed under a concrete block containing void space to absorb any grout returns. Data evaluation included examination of implementability of the grouting process and an evaluation of the contaminant spread during grouting. Following curing of the stabilized pit, cores were obtained and evaluated for toxicity characteristic leach ing

  16. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  18. Cold moderators at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, A. T.

    1997-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold moderators were not an 'Oak Ridge first', but would have been the largest both physically and in terms of cold neutron flux. Two cold moderators were planned each 410 mm in diameter and containing about 30L of liquid deuterium. They were to be completely independent of each other. A modular system design was used to provide greater reliability and serviceability. When the ANS was terminated, upgrading of the resident High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was examined and an initial study was made into the feasibility of adding a cold source. Because the ANS design was modular, it was possible to use many identical design features. Sub-cooled liquid at 4 bar abs was initially chosen for the HFIR design concept, but this was subsequently changed to 15 bar abs to operate above the critical pressure. As in the ANS, the hydrogen will operate at a constant pressure throughout the temperature range and a completely closed loop with secondary containment was adopted. The heat load of 2 kW made the heat flux comparable with that of the ANS. Subsequent studies into the construction of cryogenic moderators for the proposed new Synchrotron Neutron source indicated that again many of the same design concepts could be used. By connecting the two cold sources together in series, the total heat load of 2 kW is very close to that of the HFIR allowing a very similar supercritical hydrogen system to be configured. The two hydrogen moderators of the SNS provide a comparable heat load to the HFIR moderator. It is subsequently planned to connect the two in series and operate from a single cold loop system, once again using supercritical hydrogen. The spallation source also provided an opportunity to re-examine a cold pellet solid methane moderator operating at 20K.

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  20. Iron and manganese oxide mineralization in the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J. R.; Koschinsky, A.; Halbach, P.; Manheim, F. T.; Bau, M.; Jung-Keuk, Kang; Lubick, N.

    1997-01-01

    Iron, manganese, and iron-manganese deposits occur in nearly all geomorphologic and tectonic environments in the ocean basins and form by one or more of four processes: (1) hydrogenetic precipitation from cold ambient seawater, (2) precipitation from hydrothermal fluids, (3) precipitation from sediment pore waters that have been modified from bottom water compositions by diagenetic reactions in the sediment column and (4) replacement of rocks and sediment. These processes are discussed.

  1. Purification of Lysosomes Using Supraparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofe, Adam P; Pryor, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lysosomes can be rapidly isolated from tissue culture cells using supraparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIONs). In this protocol, colloidal iron dextran (FeDex) particles, a type of SPION, are taken up by cultured mouse macrophage cells via the endocytic pathway. The SPIONs accumulate in lysosomes, the end point of the endocytic pathway, permitting the lysosomes to be isolated magnetically. The purified lysosomes are suitable for in vitro fusion assays or for proteomic analysis. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Cold water injection nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kura, Masaaki; Maeda, Masamitsu; Endo, Takio.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To inject cold water in a reactor without applying heat cycles to a reactor container and to the inner wall of a feedwater nozzle by securing a perforated plate at the outlet of the cold water injection nozzle. Constitution: A disc-like cap is secured to the final end of a return nozzle of a control rod drive. The cap prevents the flow of a high temperature water flowing downward in the reactor from entering into the nozzle. The cap is perforated with a plurality of bore holes for injecting cold water into the reactor. The cap is made to about 100 mm in thickness so that the cold water passing through the bore holes is heated by the heat conduction in the cap. Accordingly, the flow of high temperature water flowing downwardly in the reactor is inhibited by the cap from backward flowing into the nozzle. Moreover, the flow of the cold water in the nozzle is controlled and rectified when passed through the bore holes in the cap and then injected into the reactor. (Yoshino, Y.)

  3. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  4. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  5. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  6. Anti frictional materials iron-pig iron-brass manufacture using shaving waste products of pig-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasamov, S. N.; Krivij, N.; Gudenau, H. W.; Babich, A. I.; Garcia, L. L.; Formoso, A.; Cores, A.

    2003-01-01

    Parts based on iron and steel powders are widely used in the manufacture of automobile and domestic equipment. This work was done to study the anti-friction properties of iron-pig iron-brass compositions of materials which were obtained by pressing and sintering from a mix of iron powders and industrial by products of cast-iron turnings, brass, talc and technical sulphur. Experiments were performed using cold pressure technology in the flowing matrix of the powder composite without solid lubricants. The subsequent sintering was carried out at 1200 degree centigree under isothermal conditions in a nitrogen atmosphere in the sintering zone during 1 h. The physical-mechanical and anti-friction properties were almost double by the active drainage of the gases from the compression mould. The study of the microstructure of the sintered materials showed that free cementite existed between the particle limits and around the pores. large agglomerations of dark inclusions could be observed, consisting of graphite, zinc and iron oxides, which were points of tension in the materials that reduce its durability and, therefore, its wear resistance to dry friction. (Author) 34 refs

  7. Early diagenetic processes affecting nutrients in the pore waters of Central Indian Ocean cores

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Mudholkar, A.V.

    and unoxidized organic carbon are observed in the Arabian Sea core, while nitrification with intermediate low nitrate and high organic carbon are found in the mottled zones of the pelagic cores. Mobilization of iron-host oxyhydroxides and peaked profiles...

  8. Cold regions isotope applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids

  9. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock-induced oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Sion, Benoit; Chalmel, Frédéric; D Rolland, Antoine; Lemonnier, Loïc; De Clerck, Tatiana; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Derouiche, Sandra; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Mauduit, Claire; Benahmed, Mohamed; Roudbaraki, Morad; Jégou, Bernard; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Bidaux, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    Testes of most male mammals present the particularity of being externalized from the body and are consequently slightly cooler than core body temperature (4-8°C below). Although, hypothermia of the testis is known to increase germ cells apoptosis, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms, including cold sensors, transduction pathways, and apoptosis triggers. In this study, using a functional knockout mouse model of the cold and menthol receptors, dubbed transient receptor potential melastatine 8 (TRPM8) channels, we found that TRPM8 initiated the cold-shock response by differentially modulating cold- and heat-shock proteins. Besides, apoptosis of germ cells increased in proportion to the cooling level in control mice but was independent of temperature in knockout mice. We also observed that the rate of germ cell death correlated positively with the reactive oxygen species level and negatively with the expression of the detoxifying enzymes. This result suggests that the TRPM8 sensor is a key determinant of germ cell fate under hypothermic stimulation.-Borowiec, A.-S., Sion, B., Chalmel, F., Rolland, A. D., Lemonnier, L., De Clerck, T., Bokhobza, A., Derouiche, S., Dewailly, E., Slomianny, C., Mauduit, C., Benahmed, M., Roudbaraki, M., Jégou, B., Prevarskaya, N., Bidaux, G. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock-induced oxidation. © The Author(s).

  10. Geochemistry of sediment cores of the western equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, P.S.N.; Cronan, D.S.; Rao, Ch.M.; Paropkari, A.L.; Topgi, R.S.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Colley, N.

    the Somali Basin, and that among the Somali Basin cores depth appears to influence the variable distributions of metals in them. Iron, aluminium and titanium appear to be mainly supplied from terrigenous sources, manganese from authigenic sources...

  11. Recycle of valuable products from oily cold rolling mill sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Shen-gen; Tian, Jian-jun; Pan, De-an; Liu, Yang; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2013-10-01

    Oily cold rolling mill (CRM) sludge contains lots of iron and alloying elements along with plenty of hazardous organic components, which makes it as an attractive secondary source and an environmental contaminant at the same time. The compound methods of "vacuum distillation + oxidizing roasting" and "vacuum distillation + hydrogen reduction" were employed for the recycle of oily cold rolling mill sludge. First, the sludge was dynamically vacuum distilled in a rotating furnace at 50 r/min and 600°C for 3 h, which removed almost hazardous organic components, obtaining 89.2wt% ferrous resultant. Then, high purity ferric oxide powders (99.2wt%) and reduced iron powders (98.9wt%) were obtained when the distillation residues were oxidized and reduced, respectively. The distillation oil can be used for fuel or chemical feedstock, and the distillation gases can be collected and reused as a fuel.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  14. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  15. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ... iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  18. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  19. Commemoration of a cold war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farbøl, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    This article brings together the fields of Cold War studies and memory studies. In Denmark, a remarkable institutionalisation of Cold War memory has taken place in the midst of a heated ideological battle over the past and whether to remember the Cold War as a ‘war’. Using Danish Cold War museums...... and heritage sites as case studies, this article sheds new light on the politics of history involved in Cold War commemoration. It suggests that the Cold War is commemorated as a war, yet this war memory is of a particular kind: it is a war memory without victims....

  20. Preparation and chemical stability of iron-nitride-coated iron microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xin; Liu Shixiong

    2007-01-01

    Iron-nitride-coated iron microparticles were prepared by nitridation of the surface of iron microparticles with ammonia gas at a temperature of 510 deg. C. The phases, composition, morphology, magnetic properties, and chemical stability of the particles were studied. The phases were α-Fe, ε-Fe 3 N, and γ-Fe 4 N. The composition varied from the core to the surface, with 99.8 wt% Fe in the core, and 93.8 wt% Fe and 6 wt% N in the iron-nitride coating. The thickness of the iron-nitride coating was about 0.28 μm. The chemical stability of the microparticles was greatly improved, especially the corrosion resistance in corrosive aqueous media. The saturation magnetization and the coercive force were 17.1x10 3 and 68 kA/m, respectively. It can be concluded that iron-nitride-coated iron microparticles will be very useful in many fields, such as water-based magnetorheological fluids and polishing fluids

  1. Cusp-core problem and strong gravitational lensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Nan; Chen Daming

    2009-01-01

    Cosmological numerical simulations of galaxy formation have led to the cuspy density profile of a pure cold dark matter halo toward the center, which is in sharp contradiction with the observations of the rotation curves of cold dark matter-dominated dwarf and low surface brightness disk galaxies, with the latter tending to favor mass profiles with a flat central core. Many efforts have been devoted to resolving this cusp-core problem in recent years, among them, baryon-cold dark matter interactions are considered to be the main physical mechanisms erasing the cold dark matter (CDM) cusp into a flat core in the centers of all CDM halos. Clearly, baryon-cold dark matter interactions are not customized only for CDM-dominated disk galaxies, but for all types, including giant ellipticals. We first fit the most recent high resolution observations of rotation curves with the Burkert profile, then use the constrained core size-halo mass relation to calculate the lensing frequency, and compare the predicted results with strong lensing observations. Unfortunately, it turns out that the core size constrained from rotation curves of disk galaxies cannot be extrapolated to giant ellipticals. We conclude that, in the standard cosmological paradigm, baryon-cold dark matter interactions are not universal mechanisms for galaxy formation, and therefore, they cannot be true solutions to the cusp-core problem.

  2. Cold Vacuum Drying facility deionized water system design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) de-ionized water system. The de-ionized water system is used to provide clean, conditioned water, free from contaminants, chlorides and iron for the CVD Facility. Potable water is supplied to the deionized water system, isolated by a backflow prevention device. After the de-ionization process is complete, via a packaged de-ionization unit, de-ionized water is supplied to the process deionization unit

  3. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D [Stuart, FL; Sanders, Stuart A [Palm Beach Gardens, FL

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  4. Cold fusion - todays situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmqvist, K.

    1993-01-01

    A brief review of the history of cold fusion is given. It is noted that it is not possible to draw any definite conclusions about all the experimental and theoretical details, but that some of the results presented do not seem to be reached according to the normal scientific methods. 6 figs

  5. Recent Cold War Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  6. Expert Cold Structure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, T.; Demuysere, P.

    2011-05-01

    The EXPERT Program is funded by ESA. The objective of the EXPERT mission is to perform a sub-orbital flight during which measurements of critical aero- thermodynamic phenomena will be obtained by using state-of-the-art instrumentation. As part of the EXPERT Flight Segment, the responsibility of the Cold Structure Development Design, Manufacturing and Validation was committed to the Belgian industrial team SONACA/SABCA. The EXPERT Cold Structure includes the Launcher Adapter, the Bottom Panel, the Upper Panel, two Cross Panels and the Parachute Bay. An additional Launcher Adapter was manufactured for the separation tests. The selected assembly definition and manufacturing technologies ( machined parts and sandwich panels) were dictated classically by the mass and stiffness, but also by the CoG location and the sensitive separation interface. Used as support for the various on-board equipment, the Cold Structure is fixed to but thermally uncoupled from the PM 1000 thermal shield. It is protect on its bottom panel by a thermal blanket. As it is a protoflight, analysis was the main tool for the verification. Low level stiffness and modal analysis tests have also been performed on the Cold Structure equipped with its ballast. It allowed to complete its qualification and to prepare SONACA/SABCA support for the system dynamic tests foreseen in 2011. The structure was finally coated with a thermal control black painting and delivered on time to Thales Alenia Space-Italy end of March 201.

  7. Detection of cold pain, cold allodynia and cold hyperalgesia in freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Clifford J

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is elicited by cold, and a major feature of many neuropathic pain states is that normally innocuous cool stimuli begin to produce pain (cold allodynia. To expand our understanding of cold induced pain states we have studied cold pain behaviors over a range of temperatures in several animal models of chronic pain. Results We demonstrate that a Peltier-cooled cold plate with ± 1°C sensitivity enables quantitative measurement of a detection withdrawal response to cold stimuli in unrestrained rats. In naïve rats the threshold for eliciting cold pain behavior is 5°C. The withdrawal threshold for cold allodynia is 15°C in both the spared nerve injury and spinal nerve ligation models of neuropathic pain. Cold hyperalgesia is present in the spared nerve injury model animals, manifesting as a reduced latency of withdrawal response threshold at temperatures that elicit cold pain in naïve rats. We also show that following the peripheral inflammation produced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, a hypersensitivity to cold occurs. Conclusion The peltier-cooled provides an effective means of assaying cold sensitivity in unrestrained rats. Behavioral testing of cold allodynia, hyperalgesia and pain will greatly facilitate the study of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in cold/cool sensations and enable measurement of the efficacy of pharmacological treatments to reduce these symptoms.

  8. Metallic nanoshells with semiconductor cores: optical characteristics modified by core medium properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Grady, Nathaniel K; Ali, Tamer; Halas, Naomi J

    2010-10-26

    It is well-known that the geometry of a nanoshell controls the resonance frequencies of its plasmon modes; however, the properties of the core material also strongly influence its optical properties. Here we report the synthesis of Au nanoshells with semiconductor cores of cuprous oxide and examine their optical characteristics. This material system allows us to systematically examine the role of core material on nanoshell optical properties, comparing Cu(2)O core nanoshells (ε(c) ∼ 7) to lower core dielectric constant SiO(2) core nanoshells (ε(c) = 2) and higher dielectric constant mixed valency iron oxide nanoshells (ε(c) = 12). Increasing the core dielectric constant increases nanoparticle absorption efficiency, reduces plasmon line width, and modifies plasmon energies. Modifying the core medium provides an additional means of tailoring both the near- and far-field optical properties in this unique nanoparticle system.

  9. Burning Cold: Involvement of TRPA1 in Noxious Cold Sensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Kelvin Y.; Corey, David P.

    2009-01-01

    Soon after its discovery ten years ago, the ion channel TRPA1 was proposed as a sensor of noxious cold. Evidence for its activation by painfully cold temperatures (below ~15° C) has been mixed, however. Some groups found that cold elicits a nonselective conductance in cells expressing TRPA1; others found no activation, or argued that activation is an indirect effect of elevated \\(Ca^{ 2+}\\) . Sensory cells from the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia that are activated by cold were sometimes c...

  10. Iron absorption in relation to iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.; Hallberg, L.; Rossander, L.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption from a 3 mg dose of ferrous iron was measured in 250 male subjects. The absorption was related to the log concentration of serum ferritin in 186 subjects of whom 99 were regular blood donors (r= -0.76), and to bone marrow haemosiderin grading in 52 subjects with varying iron status. The purpose was to try and establish a percentage absorption from such a dose that is representative of subjects who are borderline iron deficient. This information is necessary for food iron absorption studies in order (1) to calculate the absorption of iron from the diet at a given iron status and (2) compare the absorption of iron from different meals studied in different groups of subjects by different investigarors. The results suggest that an absorption of about 40% of a 3 mg reference dose of ferrous iron is given in a fasting state, roughly corresponds to the absorption in borderline-iron-deficient subjects. The results indicate that this 40% absorption value corresponds to a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l and that food iron absorption in a group of subjects should be expressed preferably as the absorption corresponding to a reference-dose absorption of 45%, or possibly a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l. (author)

  11. Planck early results. XXII. The submillimetre properties of a sample of Galactic cold clumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    We perform a detailed investigation of sources from the Cold Cores Catalogue of Planck Objects (C3PO). Our goal is to probe the reliability of the detections, validate the separation between warm and cold dust emission components, provide the first glimpse at the nature, internal morphology and p...

  12. Flu and Colds: In Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to prevent colds or relieve cold symptoms. Andrographis (Andrographis paniculata) Chinese herbal medicines Green tea Guided imagery Hydrotherapy ... measurements (VAS) to assess the effectiveness of standardized Andrographis paniculata extract SHA-10 in reducing the symptoms of ...

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  14. Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of iron-storage proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St. Pierre, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    /sup 57/Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study iron storage proteins. Various cryostats and a superconducting magnet were used to obtain sample environment temperatures from 1.3 to 200K and applied magnetic fields of up to 10T. The Moessbauer spectra of ferritins isolated from iron-overloaded human spleen, limpet (Patella vulgata), giant limpet (Patella laticostata) and chiton (Clavarizona hirtosa) hemolymph, and bacterial (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) cells are used to gain information on the magnetic ordering- and superparamagnetic transition temperatures of the microcrystalline cores of the proteins. Investigations were made about the cause of the difference in the magnetic anisotropy constants of the cores of iron-overloaded human spleen ferritin and hemosiderin. Livers taken from an iron-overloaded hornbill and artificially iron-loaded rats showed no component with a superparamagnetic transition temperature approaching that of the human spleen hemosiderin.

  15. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  16. Imaging with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, E.H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-01-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 A). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects-choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  17. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    OpenAIRE

    Daanen, Hein A.M.; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000?y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations...

  18. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold.

  19. Effect of cold plastic deformation on the properties of semihard-magnetic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalev, P.M.; Khazanov, S.A.; Chernyak, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of pass and overall reduction during cold plastic deformation on magnetic properties of the 25KKh15 and 25KFN14 iron-cobalt alloys has been studied. It has been found out that gamma-α transformation which intensity id defined by the deformation temperature occurs during the 25KFN14 and 25KKh15 alloy cold rolling. The pass reduction decrease fostering complete proceeding of #betta#-α transformation is equivalent to the increase of overall reduction

  20. The need to be cold : cold warriors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, L.

    2008-10-15

    This article discussed the changing climate of Ellesmere Island and the adaptation of the Inuit in response to the climate change, with particular reference to Canada's most northern community of Grise Fiord. Because of the changing climate, the vast northern landscape that the Inuit navigated for centuries by reading its subtle signs is becoming warmer, softer, and unpredictable. The geographic history and demographics of Grise Fiord were described. The community's main water supply comes from a glacier which is sinking. The negative impacts of ice shrinkage on this northern community and on the environment were presented. These included more international shipping through the Arctic, more resource exploration, a greater risk of environmental contamination, and reduced habitat for the polar bears and seals that eat, mate, and reproduce on the ice. Climate change impacts on the sea and sea ice were also discussed. Several photographs illustrating the changing climate were presented. The article noted that climate change could destroy the Inuit culture, making climate change an issue of human rights, notably the right to live connected to the land and the right to be cold. It was concluded that in one generation, Inuit were swept up by both a social and an economic upheaval. In one more generation, they will undergo an environmental shift. 13 figs.

  1. Commissioning of the Opal reactor cold neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiering, R.; Lu, W.; Ullah, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: At OPAL, Australia's first cold neutron facility will form an essential part of the reactor's research programs. Fast neutrons, born in the core of a reactor, interact with a cryogenic material, in this case liquid deuterium, to give them very low energies ( 1 0 m eV). A cold neutron flux of 1.4 1 0 E 1 4 n /cm 2/ s is expected, with a peak in the energy spectrum at 4.2m eV. The cold neutron source reached cryogenic conditions for the first time in late 2005. The cold neutron source operates with a sub-cooled liquid Deuterium moderator at 24 K. The moderator chamber, which contains the deuterium, has been constructed from AlMg 5. The thermosiphon and moderator chamber are cooled by helium gas, in a natural convection thermosiphon loop. The helium refrigeration system utilises the Brayton cycle, and is fully insulated within a high vacuum environment. Despite the proximity of the cold neutron source to the reactor core, it has been considered as effectively separate to the reactor system, due to the design of its special vacuum containment vessel. As OPAL is a multipurpose research reactor, used for beam research as well as radiopharmaceutical production and industrial irradiations, the cold neutron source has been designed with a stand-by mode, to maximise production. The stand-by mode is a warm operating mode using only gaseous deuterium at ambient temperatures (∼ 3 00 K ), allowing for continued reactor operations whilst parts of the cold source are unavailable or in maintenance. This is the first time such a stand-by feature has been incorporated into a cold source facility

  2. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  3. Progress with cold antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Doser, M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Johnson, I; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A G; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; Van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2006-01-01

    The creation of cold antihydrogen by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations, working at CERN's unique Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility, has ushered in a new era in atomic physics. This contribution will briefly review recent results from the ATHENA experiment. These include discussions of antiproton slowing down in a cold positron gas during antihydrogen formation, information derived on the dependence of the antihydrogen formation rate upon the temperature of the stored positron plasma and, finally, upon the spatial distribution of the emitted anti-atoms. We will discuss the implications of these studies for the major outstanding goal of trapping samples of antihydrogen for precise spectroscopic comparisons with hydrogen. The physics motivations for undertaking these challenging experiments will be briefly recalled.

  4. Cold nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Shinji.

    1991-01-01

    Selection of cathode material is a key to the attainment of cold nuclear fusion. However, there are only few reports on the cathode material at present and an effective development has been demanded. The device comprises an anode and a cathode and an electrolytic bath having metal salts dissolved therein and containing heavy water in a glass container. The anode is made of gold or platinum and the cathode is made of metals of V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta, and a voltage of 3-25V is applied by way of a DC power source between them. The metal comprising V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta absorbs deuterium formed by electrolysis of heavy water effectively to cause nuclear fusion reaction at substantially the same frequency and energy efficiency as palladium and titanium. Accordingly, a cold nuclear fusion device having high nuclear fusion generation frequency can be obtained. (N.H.)

  5. Cold source economic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, Serge.

    1975-01-01

    This computer code is intended for the statement of the general economic balance resulting from using a given cold source. The balance includes the investments needed for constructing the various materials, and also production balances resulting from their utilization. The case of either using an open circuit condenser on sea or river, or using air cooling systems with closed circuits or as auxiliaries can be dealt with. The program can be used to optimize the characteristics of the various parts of the cold source. The performance of the various materials can be evaluated for a given situation from using very full, precise economic balances, these materials can also be classified according to their possible uses, the outer constraints being taken into account (limits for heat disposal into rivers or seas, water temperature, air temperature). Technical choices whose economic consequences are important have been such clarified [fr

  6. The CMS COLD BOX

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is built around a large solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 3.8 Tesla: about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. To run, this superconducting magnet needs to be cooled down to very low temperature with liquid helium. Providing this is the job of a compressor station and the so-called “cold box”.

  7. Engine Cold Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    matching pre- calibrated amplifier • BEI Shaft Encoder (0.2 CAD) • Wolff Instrumented Injector The high speed data was recorded and post-processed by...14. ABSTRACT These fuels were used for testing a GEP 6.5L turbocharged V-8 diesel engine operation in a cold box. This engine architecture is...Z39.18 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A fuel’s cetane number is very important for the operation of modern diesel

  8. Support for cold neutron utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kye Hong; Han, Young Soo; Choi, Sungmin; Choi, Yong; Kwon, Hoon; Lee, Kwang Hee

    2012-06-01

    - Support for experiments by users of cold neutron scattering instrument - Short-term training of current and potential users of cold neutron scattering instrument for their effective use of the instrument - International collaboration for advanced utilization of cold neutron scattering instruments - Selection and training of qualified instrument scientists for vigorous research endeavors and outstanding achievements in experiments with cold neutron - Research on nano/bio materials using cold neutron scattering instruments - Bulk nano structure measurement using small angle neutron scattering and development of analysis technique

  9. Properties shaping and repair of selected types of cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research results of twofold use of TIG - Tungsten Inert Gas also known as GTA - Gas Tungsten Arc. First is surfacing by welding on cold and hot-cold to repair chromium cast iron with chromium content about 15%. Second is remelting with electric arc of selected gray (with pearlitic matrix and ductile (with ferritic-pearlitic matrix cast iron. Repair of cast iron elements was realized in order to cut out a casting defects. Defects decrease a usability of castings for constructional application and increase a manufacturing costs. Application of surface heat treatment guarantees mechanical properties i.e. hardness and wear resistance improvement. The result of investigations show possibility of castings repair by put on defects a good quality padding welds, which have comparable properties with base material. Use of electric arc surface heat treatment resulted in increase of hardness and wear resistance, which was measured on the basis of ASTM G 65 - 00 standard.

  10. Cold neutron production and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Noboru.

    1976-01-01

    The first part gives general introduction to cold neutrons, namely the definition and the role as a probe in basic science and technology. The second part reviews various methods of cold neutron production. Some physical characteristics required for cold moderators are presented, and a list summarizes a number of cold moderators and their reactor physics constants. The definition of flux gain factor and the measured values for liquid light- and heavy-hydrogen are also given. The cold neutron spectra in methane and liquid hydrogen measured by LINAC time-of-flight method are presented to show the advantage of solid methane. The cold neutron sources using experimental reactors or linear accelerators are explained along with the examples of existing facilities. Two Japanese programs, the one is the use of a high flux reactor and the other is the use of a LINAC, are also presented. The third part of this report reviews the application areas of cold neutrons. (Aoki, K.)

  11. Facile preparation of surface-exchangeable core@shell iron oxide@gold nanoparticles for magnetic solid-phase extraction: Use of gold shell as the intermediate platform for versatile adsorbents with varying self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaping [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Living Biosystems, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate School, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qi, Li, E-mail: qili@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Living Biosystems, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shen, Ying [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Living Biosystems, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate School, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma, Huimin [Beijing National Laboratory of Molecular Sciences, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Living Biosystems, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-02-06

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •The core@shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Au nanoparticles functionalized with SAMs were successfully constructed. •The SAMs could be transformed from one kind to another via thiol exchange process. •The developed nanomaterials could be applied in mode switching MSPE. -- Abstract: The core@shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Au nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with exchangeable self-assembled monolayers have been developed for mode switching magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) using high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The adsorbents were synthesized by chemical coprecipitation to prepare magnetic cores followed by sonolysis to produce gold shells. Functionalization of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Au NPs surface was realized through self-assembly of commercially available low molecular weight thiol-containing ligands using gold shells as intermediate platform and the dynamic nature of Au–S chemistry allowed substituent of one thiol-containing ligand with another simply by thiol exchange process. The resultant adsorbents were characterized by transmission electronic microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, contact angle measurement, and vibrating sample magnetometry. To evaluate the versatile performance of the developed MSPE adsorbents, they were applied for normal-phase SPE followed by reversed-phase SPE. A few kinds of diphenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were employed as model analytes, respectively. The predominant parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum experimental conditions, wide dynamic linear range (6.25–1600 μg L{sup −1} for diphenols and 1.56–100 μg L{sup −1} for PAHs) with good linearity (r{sup 2} ≥ 0.989) and low detection limits (0.34–16.67 μg L{sup −1} for diphenols and 0.26–0.52 μg L{sup −1} for PAHs) were achieved. The advantage of the developed method is that the Fe{sub 3}O

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. ... for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  7. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  8. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. Certain ... domestic small businesses that have strong potential for technology commercialization through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less ... include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... be hard to get the recommended amount from food alone. Pregnant women need more iron to support ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron ...

  16. Coping with low incomes and cold homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Will; White, Vicki; Finney, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a study of low-income households in Great Britain which explored households’ strategies for coping both with limited financial resources in the winter months, when demand for domestic energy increases, and, in some cases, with cold homes. The study combined a national survey of 699 households with an income below 60 per cent of national median income with in-depth interviews with a subsample of 50 households. The primary strategy adopted by low-income households to cope with financial constraint was to reduce spending, including spending on essentials such as food and fuel, and thereby keep up with core financial commitments. While spending on food was usually reduced by cutting the range and quality of food purchased, spending on energy was usually reduced by cutting consumption. Sixty-three per cent of low-income households had cut their energy consumption in the previous winter and 47 per cent had experienced cold homes. Improvements to the thermal performance of homes reduced but did not eliminate the risk of going cold as any heating cost could be a burden to households on the lowest incomes. Householders’ attitudes were central to their coping strategies, with most expressing a determination to ‘get by’ come what may.

  17. Iron absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenved, G.

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study iron absorption from different iron preparations in different types of subjects and under varying therapeutic conditions. The studies were performed with different radioiron isotope techniques and with a serum iron technique. The preparations used were solutions of ferrous sulphate and rapidly-disintegrating tablets containing ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate and ferrous carbonate and a slow-release ferrous sulphate tablet of an insoluble matrix type (Duroferon Durules). The serum iron method was evaluated and good correlation was found between the serum iron response and the total amount of iron absorbed after an oral dose of iron given in solution or in tablet form. New technique for studying the in-vivo release properties of tablets was presented. Iron tablets labelled with a radio-isotope were given to healthy subjects. The decline of the radioactivity in the tablets was followed by a profile scanning technique applied to different types of iron tablets. The release of iron from the two types of tablets was shown to be slower in vivo than in vitro. It was found that co-administration of antacids and iron tablets led to a marked reduction in the iron absorption and that these drugs should not be administered sumultaneously. A standardized meal markedly decreased the absorbability of iron from iron tablets. The influence of the meal was more marked with rapidly-disintegrating than with slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets. The absorption from rapidly-disintegrating and slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets was compared under practical clinical conditions during an extended treatment period. The studies were performed in healthy subjects, blood donors and patients with iron deficiency anaemia and it was found that the absorption of iron from the slow-release tablets was significantly better than from the rapidly-disintegrating tablets in all three groups of subjects. (author)

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ... and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... This is sometimes used to deliver iron through a blood vessel to increase iron levels in the blood. One benefit of IV iron ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  5. Iron and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413534049; Trapet, P.L.; Stringlis, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41185206X; Kruijs, Sophie; Bakker, P.A.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074744623; Pieterse, C.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most life on Earth because it functions as a crucial redox catalyst in many cellular processes. However, when present in excess iron can lead to the formation of harmful hydroxyl radicals. Hence, the cellular iron balance must be tightly controlled. Perturbation of

  6. Glutathione, Glutaredoxins, and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-11-20

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant cellular low-molecular-weight thiol in the majority of organisms in all kingdoms of life. Therefore, functions of GSH and disturbed regulation of its concentration are associated with numerous physiological and pathological situations. Recent Advances: The function of GSH as redox buffer or antioxidant is increasingly being questioned. New functions, especially functions connected to the cellular iron homeostasis, were elucidated. Via the formation of iron complexes, GSH is an important player in all aspects of iron metabolism: sensing and regulation of iron levels, iron trafficking, and biosynthesis of iron cofactors. The variety of GSH coordinated iron complexes and their functions with a special focus on FeS-glutaredoxins are summarized in this review. Interestingly, GSH analogues that function as major low-molecular-weight thiols in organisms lacking GSH resemble the functions in iron homeostasis. Since these iron-related functions are most likely also connected to thiol redox chemistry, it is difficult to distinguish between mechanisms related to either redox or iron metabolisms. The ability of GSH to coordinate iron in different complexes with or without proteins needs further investigation. The discovery of new Fe-GSH complexes and their physiological functions will significantly advance our understanding of cellular iron homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1235-1251.

  7. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bleeding or other abnormalities, such as growths or cancer of the lining of the colon. For this test, a ... that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  10. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... you: Adopt healthy lifestyle changes such as heart-healthy eating patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  19. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency isn't corrected, it can lead to iron-deficiency anemia (a decrease in the number of red blood ... Parents Kids Teens Anemia Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron) Iron-Deficiency Anemia Vegetarianism Menstrual Problems Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the ... cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  2. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  3. Cold deformation of ADI castings: Martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navea, Lilian R; Mannheim, Rodolfo M; Garin, Jorge L

    2004-01-01

    Research and applications in austempered ductile iron (ADI castings) have recently undergone noticeable progress in the industrialized world, becoming a highly competitive engineering material. The notable properties of these castings derive from their austenitic matrix stabilized by carbon, a thermally stable austenite during the austenizing process but possibly turning into martensite when undergoing plastic deformation. This work aims to study the changing structure of an ADI casting caused by one directional cold lamination. The samples that were studied were obtained from two nodular castings, one without alloying and the other alloyed with Cu, Ni and Mo. The samples were austenized in the first stage of the austempering process at 910 o C for 80 min. Then in the second stage the unalloyed samples were austempered at 410 o C for 10 min and the alloyed samples for 120 min. After the thermal treatment, the test pieces were deformed 0% to 25% by cold lamination. The quantification of the phases was performed using x-ray diffraction and the metallographic study using optic and Scanning Electronic Microscopy. The results show that the martensitic phase obtained by deformation is a very fine structure that evolves into a thicker one when the deformation of the samples increases (CW)

  4. Cold fusion in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, L.

    1989-01-01

    Since early April a great deal of excitement has been created over the Fleischmann/Pons cold fusion experiment, which if it performs as advertised, could turn out to be mankind's best hope of heading off the energy crisis scheduled for early in the next century. Dozens of groups around the world are now attempting to duplicate the experiment to see if Fleischmann and Pons' discovery is an experimental mistake, an unknown electrochemical effect or a new kind of fusion reaction. This article puts the experiment into the perspective of today and looks at how it might affect the energy scene tomorrow if it should turn out to be commercially exploitable. (author)

  5. A modular approach to the design of cold moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, A.T.

    1998-01-01

    Cold moderators are usually designed to the specific requirements of the parent neutron source. However since all cryogenic moderators within a broad design envelope require certain common parameters, it should be possible to create a central core design served by smaller packages designed, or selected to satisfy a wide range of individual requirements. This paper describes a modular design philosophy that has been applied to two very different cold sources with only minor changes to two of the modules in the system. Both of the systems and the basic differences between them are described in detail

  6. Laser guiding of cold atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasishin, A V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Shuvaev, V A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using photonic crystals with a lattice defect for the laser guiding of cold atoms is analysed. We have found a configuration of a photonic-crystal lattice and a defect ensuring the distribution of a potential in the defect mode of the photonic crystal allowing the guiding of cold atoms along the defect due to the dipole force acting on atoms. Based on quantitative estimates, we have demonstrated that photonic crystals with a lattice defect permit the guiding of atoms with much higher transverse temperatures and a much higher transverse localisation degree than in the case of hollow-core fibres. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. One-pot synthesis of water soluble iron nanoparticles using rationally-designed peptides and ligand release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papst, Stefanie; Cheong, Soshan; Banholzer, Moritz J; Brimble, Margaret A; Williams, David E; Tilley, Richard D

    2013-05-18

    Herein we report the rational design of new phosphopeptides for control of nucleation, growth and aggregation of water-soluble, superparamagnetic iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles. The use of the designed peptides enables a one-pot synthesis that avoids utilizing unstable or toxic iron precursors, organic solvents, and the need for exchange of capping agent after synthesis of the NPs.

  8. Effect of cold work on creep properties of oxygen-free copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinsson, Aasa; Andersson-Oestling, Henrik C.M.

    2009-03-01

    Spent nuclear fuel is in Sweden planned to be disposed by encapsulating in waste packages consisting of a cast iron insert surrounded by a copper canister. The cast iron is load bearing and the copper canister gives corrosion protection. The waste package is heavy. Throughout the manufacturing process from the extrusion/pierce-and-draw manufacturing to the final placement in the repository, the copper is subjected to handling which could introduce cold work in the material. It is well known that the creep properties of engineering materials at higher temperatures are affected by cold working. The study includes creep testing of four series of cold worked, oxygen-free, phosphorus doped copper (Cu-OFP) at 75 deg C. The results are compared to reference series for as series of copper cold worked in tension (12 and 24 %) and two series cold worked in compression (12 % parallel to creep load axis and 15 % perpendicular to creep load axis) were tested. The results show that pre-straining in tension of copper leads to prolonged creep life at 75 deg C. The creep rate and ductility are reduced. The influence on the creep properties increases with the amount of cold work. Cold work in compression applied along the creep load axis has no effect on the creep life or the creep rate. Nonetheless the ductility is still impaired. However, cold work in compression applied perpendicular to the creep load direction has a positive effect on the creep life. Cold work in both tension and compression results in a pronounced reduction of the initial creep strain, which is the strain obtained from the beginning of the loading until full creep load is achieved. Yet the area reduction is unaffected by the degree of cold work

  9. The melting curve of iron to 250 gigapascals - A constraint on the temperature at earth's center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Quentin; Jeanloz, Raymond; Bass, Jay; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    The melting curve of iron, the primary constituent of earth's core, has been measured to pressures of 250 gigapascals with a combination of static and dynamic techniques. The melting temperature of iron at the pressure of the core-mantle boundary (136 GPa) is 4800 + or - 200 K, whereas at the inner core-outer core boundary (330 GPa), it is 7600 + or - 500 K. A melting temperature for iron-rich alloy of 6600 K at the inner core-outer core boundary and a maximum temperature of 6900 K at earth's center are inferred. This latter value is the first experimental upper bound on the temperature at earth's center, and these results imply that the temperature of the lower mantle is significantly less than that of the outer core.

  10. Cold source vessel development for the advanced neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), will be a user-oriented neutron research facility that will produce the most intense flux of neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the productions of cold neutrons is a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410 mm diameter sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design are being performed with multi-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This paper presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that will be used to verify the final design.

  11. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  12. Toward a mineral physics reference model for the Moon's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Morard, Guillaume; Schmerr, Nicholas C; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Krisch, Michael; Fiquet, Guillaume; Fei, Yingwei

    2015-03-31

    The physical properties of iron (Fe) at high pressure and high temperature are crucial for understanding the chemical composition, evolution, and dynamics of planetary interiors. Indeed, the inner structures of the telluric planets all share a similar layered nature: a central metallic core composed mostly of iron, surrounded by a silicate mantle, and a thin, chemically differentiated crust. To date, most studies of iron have focused on the hexagonal closed packed (hcp, or ε) phase, as ε-Fe is likely stable across the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's core. However, at the more moderate pressures characteristic of the cores of smaller planetary bodies, such as the Moon, Mercury, or Mars, iron takes on a face-centered cubic (fcc, or γ) structure. Here we present compressional and shear wave sound velocity and density measurements of γ-Fe at high pressures and high temperatures, which are needed to develop accurate seismic models of planetary interiors. Our results indicate that the seismic velocities proposed for the Moon's inner core by a recent reanalysis of Apollo seismic data are well below those of γ-Fe. Our dataset thus provides strong constraints to seismic models of the lunar core and cores of small telluric planets. This allows us to propose a direct compositional and velocity model for the Moon's core.

  13. Scientific communication across the Iron Curtain

    CERN Document Server

    Hollings, Christopher D

    2016-01-01

    This monograph provides a concise introduction to the tangled issues of communication between Russian and Western scientists during the Cold War. It details the extent to which mid-twentieth-century researchers and practitioners were able to communicate with their counterparts on the opposite side of the Iron Curtain. Drawing upon evidence from a range of disciplines, a decade-by-decade account is first given of the varying levels of contact that existed via private correspondence and conference attendance. Next, the book examines the exchange of publications and the availability of one side's work in the libraries of the other. It then goes on to compare general language abilities on opposite sides of the Iron Curtain, with comments on efforts in the West to learn Russian and the systematic translation of Russian work. In the end, author Christopher Hollings argues that physical accessibility was generally good in both directions, but that Western scientists were afflicted by greater linguistic difficultie...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of reconstructed ferritin as an iron-induced pathological model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balejcikova, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Strbak, Oliver [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Baciak, Ladislav [Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology STU, Radlinskeho 9, 812 37 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kovac, Jozef [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Masarova, Marta; Krafcik, Andrej; Frollo, Ivan [Institute of Measurement Science SAS, Dubravska cesta 9, 841 04 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Dobrota, Dusan [Biomedical Center Martin, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine in Martin, Comenius University in Bratislava, Mala Hora 4, 036 01 Martin (Slovakia); Kopcansky, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2017-04-01

    Iron, an essential element of the human body, is a significant risk factor, particularly in the case of its concentration increasing above the specific limit. Therefore, iron is stored in the non-toxic form of the globular protein, ferritin, consisting of an apoferritin shell and iron core. Numerous studies confirmed the disruption of homeostasis and accumulation of iron in patients with various diseases (e.g. cancer, cardiovascular or neurological conditions), which is closely related to ferritin metabolism. Such iron imbalance enables the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a sensitive technique for the detection of iron-based aggregates through changes in the relaxation times, followed by the change in the inherent image contrast. For our in vitrostudy, modified ferritins with different iron loadings were prepared by chemical reconstruction of the iron core in an apoferritin shell as pathological model systems. The magnetic properties of samples were studied using SQUID magnetometry, while the size distribution was detected via dynamic light scattering. We have shown that MRI could represent the most advantageous method for distinguishing native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin which, after future standardisation, could then be suitable for the diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation. - Highlights: • MRI is the sensitive technique for detecting iron-based aggregates. • Reconstructed Ferritin is suitable model system of iron-related disorders. • MRI allow distinguish of native ferritin from reconstructed ferritin. • MRI could be useful for diagnostics of diseases associated with iron accumulation.

  15. Magnetothermal release of payload from iron oxide/silica drug delivery agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luong, T.T., E-mail: thientai.luong@chem.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Hanoi National University of Education, Faculty of Chemistry, Xuan Thuy 136, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Knoppe, S.; Bloemen, M.; Brullot, W.; Strobbe, R. [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Locquet, J.-P. [KU Leuven, Department of Physics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium); Verbiest, T. [KU Leuven, Department of Chemistry, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Heverlee 3001 (Belgium)

    2016-10-15

    The release of covalently bound Rhodamine B from iron oxide/mesoporous silica core/shell nanoparticles under magnetically induced heating was studied. The system acts as a model to study drug delivery and payload release under magnetothermal heating. - Graphical abstract: The release of covalently bound Rhodamine B from iron oxide/mesoporous silica core/shell nanoparticles under magnetically induced heating was studied. - Highlights: • Iron oxide/mesoporous-SiO{sub 2} core-shell NPs were synthesized. • The dye was covalently bound to SiO{sub 2} shells. • The release of dye under magnetothermal heating was studied. • The results are relevant for controlled drug release.

  16. Cold moderator scattering kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    New thermal-scattering-law files in ENDF format have been developed for solid methane, liquid methane liquid ortho- and para-hydrogen, and liquid ortho- and para-deuterium using up-to-date models that include such effects as incoherent elastic scattering in the solid, diffusion and hindered vibration and rotations in the liquids, and spin correlations for the hydrogen and deuterium. These files were generated with the new LEAPR module of the NJOY Nuclear Data Processing System. Other modules of this system were used to produce cross sections for these moderators in the correct format for the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP) being used for cold-moderator-design calculations at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). 20 refs., 14 figs

  17. Experiments in cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models

  18. Monitoring the vaccine cold chain.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheriyan, E

    1993-01-01

    Maintaining the vaccine cold chain is an essential part of a successful immunisation programme. A continuous electronic temperature monitor helped to identify breaks in the cold chain in the community and the study led to the issue of proper guidelines and replacement of faulty equipment.

  19. Cold gelation of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords : globular proteins, whey protein, ovalbumin, cold gelation, disulfide bonds, texture, gel hardnessProtein gelation in food products is important to obtain desirable sensory and textural properties. Cold gelation is a novel method to produce protein-based gels. It is a two step process in

  20. Initial heating in cold cars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Teunissen, L.P.J.; Hoogh, I.M. de

    2012-01-01

    During the initial minutes after entering a cold car, people feel uncomfortably cold. Six different warming systems were investigated in a small car in order to find out how to improve the feeling of comfort using 16 volunteers. The methods were: no additional warming next to a standard heating

  1. The status of cold fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  2. Facts about the Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different viruses. Rhinovirus is the most common cause, accounting for 10 to 40 percent of colds. Other common cold viruses include coronavirus and ... RSS | Terms Of Use | Privacy | Sitemap Our Family Of Sites ... Introduction Risk Factors Screening Symptoms Tumor Testing Summary '; var ...

  3. Atomic absorption assessment of mineral iron quantity in ferritin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinova, M.; Vladimirova, L.

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities for quantitative determination of the number of iron atoms in the mineral core of ferritin by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) are investigated in the work. Different measurements with AAS show an iron content from 1000 up to 4500 atoms per molecule ferritin. This motivated us to investigate the amount of iron in the Horse Spleen Ferritin with atomic absorption spectroscopy under application of the Bulgarian standard BDS EN 14082/2003 Foodstuffs - Determination of trace elements - Determination of lead, cadmium, zinc, copper, iron and chromium by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) after dry ashing. The obtained results give approx. 1800 atoms per molecule Ferritin. It is in accordance with previous results, published by leading researchers. The investigation of the iron content with AAS under the use of the Bulgarian standard is a good opportunity to study many other objects of biological interest. (authors)

  4. Cellular iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research.

  5. Development of cold neutron spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Changhee; Lee, C. H.; So, J. Y.; Park, S.; Han, Y. S.; Cho, S. J.; Moon, M. K.; Choi, Y. H.; Sun, G. M.

    2012-03-01

    Cold Neutron Triple Axsis Spectrometer (Cold-TAS) Development Ο Fabrication and Installation of the Major Cold-TAS Components Ο Performance Test of the Cold-TAS □ Cold Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectrometer(DC-TOF) Development Ο Fabrication of the Major DC-TOF Components Ο Development DC-TOF Data Reduction Software □ Expected Contribution The two world-class inelastic neutron scattering instruments measure atomic or molecular scale dynamics of meV energy range. This unprecedented measurement capability in the country will enable domestic and international scientists to observe new phenomena in their materials research to obtain world class results. Especially those who work in the fields of magnetic properties of superconductors and multiferroics, molecular dynamics, etc. will get more benefit from these two instruments

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  7. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–. Langalata iron ore ...... sure to sea water. Uranium in these samples varies ..... Ce oxidation and removal (Elderfield and Greaves. 1982; De Baar et ...

  8. Cognitive Performance during a 24-Hour Cold Exposure Survival Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Taber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivor of a ship ground in polar regions may have to wait more than five days before being rescued. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore cognitive performance during prolonged cold exposure. Core temperature (Tc and cognitive test battery (CTB performance data were collected from eight participants during 24 hours of cold exposure (7.5°C ambient air temperature. Participants (recruited from those who have regular occupational exposure to cold were instructed that they could freely engage in minimal exercise that was perceived to maintaining a tolerable level of thermal comfort. Despite the active engagement, test conditions were sufficient to significantly decrease Tc after exposure and to eliminate the typical 0.5–1.0°C circadian rise and drop in core temperature throughout a 24 h cycle. Results showed minimal changes in CTB performance regardless of exposure time. Based on the results, it is recommended that survivors who are waiting for rescue should be encouraged to engage in mild physical activity, which could have the benefit of maintaining metabolic heat production, improve motivation, and act as a distractor from cold discomfort. This recommendation should be taken into consideration during future research and when considering guidelines for mandatory survival equipment regarding cognitive performance.

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of (group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 cold shock response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Dahlsten

    Full Text Available Profound understanding of the mechanisms foodborne pathogenic bacteria utilize in adaptation to the environmental stress they encounter during food processing and storage is of paramount importance in design of control measures. Chill temperature is a central control measure applied in minimally processed foods; however, data on the mechanisms the foodborne pathogen Clostridium botulinum activates upon cold stress are scarce. Transcriptomic analysis on the C. botulinum ATCC 3502 strain upon temperature downshift from 37°C to 15°C was performed to identify the cold-responsive gene set of this organism. Significant up- or down-regulation of 16 and 11 genes, respectively, was observed 1 h after the cold shock. At 5 h after the temperature downshift, 199 and 210 genes were up- or down-regulated, respectively. Thus, the relatively small gene set affected initially indicated a targeted acute response to cold shock, whereas extensive metabolic remodeling appeared to take place after prolonged exposure to cold. Genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis, oxidative stress response, and iron uptake and storage were induced, in addition to mechanisms previously characterized as cold-tolerance related in bacteria. Furthermore, several uncharacterized DNA-binding transcriptional regulator-encoding genes were induced, suggesting involvement of novel regulatory mechanisms in the cold shock response of C. botulinum. The role of such regulators, CBO0477 and CBO0558A, in cold tolerance of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was demonstrated by deteriorated growth of related mutants at 17°C.

  10. New technology for recyclingmaterials from oily cold rollingmill sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Shen-gen; Tian, Jian-jun; Pan, De-an; Meng, Ling; Liu, Yang

    2013-12-01

    Oily cold rolling mill (CRM) sludge is one of metallurgical industry solid wastes. The recycle of these wastes can not only protect the environment but also permit their reutilization. In this research, a new process of "hydrometallurgical treatment + hydrothermal synthesis" was investigated for the combined recovery of iron and organic materials from oily CRM sludge. Hydrometallurgical treatment, mainly including acid leaching, centrifugal separation, neutralization reaction, oxidizing, and preparation of hydrothermal reaction precursor, was first utilized for processing the sludge. Then, micaceous iron oxide (MIO) pigment powders were prepared through hydrothermal reaction of the obtained precursor in alkaline media. The separated organic materials can be used for fuel or chemical feedstock. The quality of the prepared MIO pigments is in accordance with the standards of MIO pigments for paints (ISO 10601-2007). This clean, effective, and economical technology offers a new way to recycle oily CRM sludge.

  11. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Rare Cause of Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, T

    2018-01-01

    We describe the case of a 17-month-old boy with a hypochromic microcytic anaemia, refractory to oral iron treatment. After exclusion of dietary and gastrointestinal causes of iron deficiency, a genetic cause for iron deficiency was confirmed by finding two mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene, consistent with a diagnosis of iron-refractory iron deficiency anaemia (IRIDA).

  12. Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores with ultra-low core loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiangyue, E-mail: wangxiangyue1986@163.com [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China); Lu, Zhichao; Lu, Caowei; Li, Deren [China Iron and Steel Research Institute Group, Beijing 100081 (China); Center of Advanced Technology and Materials Co., Ltd., Beijing 100081 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Melt-spun amorphous Fe{sub 73.5}Cu{sub 1}Nb{sub 3}Si{sub 15.5}B{sub 7} alloy strip was crushed to make flake-shaped fine powders. The passivated powders by phosphoric acid were mixed with organic and inorganic binder, followed by cold compaction to form toroid-shaped bonded powder-metallurgical magnets. The powder cores were heat-treated to crystallize the amorphous structure and to control the nano-grain structure. Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the the core loss with the insulation of each powder. FeCuNbSiB nanocrystalline alloy powder core prepared from the powder having phosphate-oxide layer exhibits a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. Especially, the core loss could be reduced remarkably. At the other hand, the softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores. - Highlights: • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores were prepared with low core loss. • Well-coated phosphate-oxide insulation layer on the powder surface decreased the core loss. • Fe-based nanocrystalline powder cores exhibited a stable permeability up to high frequency range over 2 MHz. • The softened inorganic binder in the annealing process could effectively improve the intensity of powder cores.

  13. Mineralogy of Sediments on a Cold and Icy Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, E. B.; Horgan, B. H. N.; Smith, R.; Scudder, N.; Rutledge, A. M.; Bamber, E.; Morris, R. V.

    2017-12-01

    The water-related minerals discovered in ancient martian terrains suggest liquid water was abundant on the surface and/or near subsurface during Mars' early history. The debate remains, however, whether these minerals are indicative of a warm and wet or cold and icy climate. To characterize mineral assemblages of cold and icy mafic terrains, we analyzed pro- and supraglacial rocks and sediments from the Collier and Diller glacial valleys in Three Sisters, Oregon. We identified primary and secondary phases using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopies with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM, TEM, EDS), and visible/short-wave-infrared (VSWIR) and thermal-infrared (TIR) spectroscopies. Samples from both glacial valleys are dominated by primary igneous minerals (i.e., plagioclase and pyroxene). Sediments in the Collier glacial valley contain minor to trace amounts of phyllosilicates and zeolites, but these phases are likely detrital and sourced from hydrothermally altered units on North Sister. We find that the authigenic phases in cold and icy mafic terrains are poorly crystalline and/or amorphous. TEM-EDS analyses of the materials, including iron oxides, devitrified volcanic glass, and Fe-Si-Al (e.g., proto-clay) phases. A variety of primary and secondary amorphous materials (e.g., volcanic glass, leached glass, allophane) have been suggested from orbital IR data from Mars, and the CheMin XRD on the Curiosity rover has identified X-ray amorphous materials in all rocks and soils measured to date. The compositions of the Gale Crater amorphous components cannot be explained by primary volcanic glass alone and likely include secondary silicates, iron oxides, and sulfates. We suggest that the prevalence of amorphous materials on the martian surface and the variety of amorphous components may be a signature of a cold and icy climate on Early Mars.

  14. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  15. The convenient preparation of stable aryl-coated zerovalent iron nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga A. Guselnikova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for the in situ synthesis of zerovalent aryl-coated iron nanoparticles (NPs based on diazonium salt chemistry is proposed. Surface-modified zerovalent iron NPs (ZVI NPs were prepared by simple chemical reduction of iron(III chloride aqueous solution followed by in situ modification using water soluble arenediazonium tosylate. The resulting NPs, with average iron core diameter of 21 nm, were coated with a 10 nm thick organic layer to provide long-term protection in air for the highly reactive zerovalent iron core up to 180 °C. The surface-modified iron NPs possess a high grafting density of the aryl group on the NPs surface of 1.23 mmol/g. FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, TGA/DTA, and elemental analysis were performed in order to characterize the resulting material.

  16. Cold fusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akihito.

    1994-01-01

    A Pt wire electrode is supported from the periphery relative to a Pd electrode by way of a polyethylene or teflon plate in heavy water, and electrolysis is applied while varying conditions successively in a sawteeth fashion at an initial stage, and after elapse of about one week, a pulse current is supplied to promote nuclear reaction and to generate excess heat greater than a charged electric power. That is, small amount of neutron emission is increased and electrolytic cell temperature is elevated by varying the electrolysis conditions successively in the sawteeth fashion at the initial stage. In addition, when the pulse electric current is supplied after elapse of about one week, the electrolytic cell temperature is abnormally elevated, so that the promotion of nuclear reaction phenomenon and the generation of excess heat greater than the charged electric power are recognized. Then, a way to control power level and time fluctuation of cold fusion is attained, thereby contributing to development of a further method for generating excess heat as desired. In addition, it contributes to a development for a method of obtaining such an excess heat that can be taken as a new energy. (N.H.)

  17. Cold Rydberg molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raithel, Georg; Zhao, Jianming

    2017-04-01

    Cold atomic systems have opened new frontiers at the interface of atomic and molecular physics. These include research on novel types of Rydberg molecules. Three types of molecules will be reviewed. Long-range, homonuclear Rydberg molecules, first predicted in [1] and observed in [2], are formed via low-energy electron scattering of the Rydberg electron from a ground-state atom within the Rydberg atom's volume. The binding mostly arises from S- and P-wave triplet scattering. We use a Fermi model that includes S-wave and P-wave singlet and triplet scattering, the fine structure coupling of the Rydberg atom and the hyperfine structure coupling of the 5S1/2 atom (in rubidium [3]). The hyperfine structure gives rise to mixed singlet-triplet potentials for both low-L and high-L Rydberg molecules [3]. A classification into Hund's cases [3, 4, 5] will be discussed. The talk further includes results on adiabatic potentials and adiabatic states of Rydberg-Rydberg molecules in Rb and Cs. These molecules, which have even larger bonding length than Rydberg-ground molecules, are formed via electrostatic multipole interactions. The leading interaction term of neutral Rydberg-Rydberg molecules is between two dipoles, while for ionic Rydberg molecules it is between a dipole and a monopole. NSF (PHY-1506093), NNSF of China (61475123).

  18. Cold-Adapted Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georlette, D.; Bentahir, M.; Claverie, P.; Collins, T.; D'amico, S.; Delille, D.; Feller, G.; Gratia, E.; Hoyoux, A.; Lonhienne, T.; Meuwis, M.-a.; Zecchinon, L.; Gerday, Ch.

    In the last few years, increased attention has been focused on enzymes produced by cold-adapted micro-organisms. It has emerged that psychrophilic enzymes represent an extremely powerful tool in both protein folding investigations and for biotechnological purposes. Such enzymes are characterised by an increased thermosensitivity and, most of them, by a higher catalytic efficiency at low and moderate temperatures, when compared to their mesophilic counterparts. The high thermosensitivity probably originates from an increased flexibility of either a selected area of the molecular edifice or the overall protein structure, providing enhanced abilities to undergo conformational changes during catalysis at low temperatures. Structure modelling and recent crystallographic data have allowed to elucidate the structural parameters that could be involved in this higher resilience. It was demonstrated that each psychrophilic enzyme adopts its own adaptive strategy. It appears, moreover, that there is a continuum in the strategy of protein adaptation to temperature, as the previously mentioned structural parameters are implicated in the stability of thermophilic proteins. Additional 3D crystal structures, site-directed and random mutagenesis experiments should now be undertaken to further investigate the stability-flexibility-activity relationship.

  19. Observations of cold antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, J N; Gabrielse, G; Oxley, P; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Wessels, M; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Schepers, G; Sefzick, T; Walz, J; Pittner, H; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A

    2004-01-01

    ATRAP's e/sup +/ cooling of p in a nested Penning trap has led to reports of cold H produced during such cooling by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations. To observe H, ATHENA uses coincident annihilation detection and ATRAP uses field ionization followed by p storage. Advantages of ATRAP's field ionization method include the complete absence of any background events, and the first way to measure which H states are produced. ATRAP enhances the H production rate by driving many cycles of e/sup +/ cooling in the nested trap, with more H counted in an hour than the sum of all the other antimatter atoms ever reported. The number of H counted per incident high energy p is also higher than ever observed. The first measured distribution of H states is made using a pre-ionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions. The high rate and the high Rydberg states suggest that the H is formed via three-body recombination, as expected. (22 refs).

  20. Observations of cold antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, J.N.; Bowden, N.S.; Gabrielse, G.; Oxley, P.; Speck, A.; Storry, C.H.; Wessels, M.; Grzonka, D.; Oelert, W.; Schepers, G.; Sefzick, T.; Walz, J.; Pittner, H.; Haensch, T.W.; Hessels, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    ATRAP's e + cooling of p-bar in a nested Penning trap has led to reports of cold H-bar produced during such cooling by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations. To observe H-bar, ATHENA uses coincident annihilation detection and ATRAP uses field ionization followed by p-bar storage. Advantages of ATRAP's field ionization method include the complete absence of any background events, and the first way to measure which H-bar states are produced. ATRAP enhances the H-bar production rate by driving many cycles of e + cooling in the nested trap, with more H-bar counted in an hour than the sum of all the other antimatter atoms ever reported. The number of H-bar counted per incident high energy p-bar is also higher than ever observed. The first measured distribution of H-bar states is made using a pre-ionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions. The high rate and the high Rydberg states suggest that the H-bar is formed via three-body recombination, as expected

  1. Subsurface geology of the Cold Creek syncline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, C.W.; Price, S.M.

    1981-07-01

    Bedrock beneath the Hanford Site is being evaluated by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) for possible use by the US Department of Energy as a geologic repository for nuclear waste storage. Initial BWIP geologic and hydrologic studies served to determine that the central Hanford Site contains basalt flows with thick, dense interiors that have low porosities and permeabilities. Furthermore, within the Cold Creek syncline, these flows appear to be nearly flat lying across areas in excess of tens of square kilometers. Such flows have been identified as potential repository host rock candidates. The Umtanum flow, which lies from 900 to 1150 m beneath the surface, is currently considered the leading host rock candidate. Within the west-central Cold Creek syncline, a 47-km 2 area designated as the reference repository location (RRL) is currently considered the leading candidate site. The specific purpose of this report is to present current knowledge of stratigraphic, lithologic, and structural factors that directly relate to the suitability of the Umtanum flow within the Cold Creek syncline for use as a nuclear waste repository host rock. The BWIP geologic studies have concentrated on factors that might influence groundwater transport of radionuclides from this flow. These factors include: (1) intraflow structures within the interiors of individual lava flows, (2) interflow zones and flow fronts between adjacent lava flows, and (3) bedrock structures. Data have been obtained primarily through coring and geophysical logging of deep boreholes, petrographic, paleomagnetic, and chemical analysis, seismic-reflection, gravity, and magnetic (ground and multilevel airborne) surveys, and surface mapping. Results included in this document comprise baseline data which will be utilized to prepare a Site Characterization Report as specified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  2. Exploring Microbial Iron Oxidation in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Muyzer, G.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; den Oudsten, F.; Laanbroek, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    sequences all represented novel culturable iron oxidizers most closely related to Gallionella spp. Based on their nucleotide sequences four groups could be identified, which were comparable to the DGGE banding pattern obtained before with the gradient tubes enrichments. The above mentioned nested PCR-DGGE method was used to study the distribution and community composition of Gallionella-like iron-oxidizing bacteria under the influence of plants species, soil depth, as well as season. Soil samples from Appels, Belgium, an intertidal, freshwater marsh known to hold intensive iron cycling, were taken from 5 different vegetation types in April, July and October 2007. Soil cores were sliced at 1-cm intervals and subjected to chemical and molecular analyses. The DGGE patterns showed that the community of iron-oxidizing bacteria differed with vegetation type, and sediment depth. Samples taken in autumn held lower diversity in Gallionella-related iron oxidizers than those sampled in spring and summer.

  3. Cold-formed steel design

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wei-Wen

    2010-01-01

    The definitive text in the field, thoroughly updated and expanded Hailed by professionals around the world as the definitive text on the subject, Cold-Formed Steel Design is an indispensable resource for all who design for and work with cold-formed steel. No other book provides such exhaustive coverage of both the theory and practice of cold-formed steel construction. Updated and expanded to reflect all the important developments that have occurred in the field over the past decade, this Fourth Edition of the classic text provides you with more of the detailed, up-to-the-minute techni

  4. Cold neutron source conceptual designing for Tehran Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khajvand, N.; Mirvakili, S.M.; Faghihi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cold neutron source conceptual designing for Tehran research reactor is carried out. • Type and geometry of moderator and dimensions of cold neutron source are analyzed. • Liquid hydrogen with more ortho-concentration can be better option as moderator. - Abstract: A cold neutron source (CNS) conceptual designing for the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) were carried out using MCNPX code. In this study, a horizontal beam tube of the core which has appropriate the highest thermal flux is selected and parametric analysis to choose the type and geometry of the moderator, and the required CNS dimensions for maximizing the cold neutron production was performed. In this design the moderator cell has a spherical annulus structure, and the cold neutron flux and its brightness are calculated together with the nuclear heat load of the CNS for a variety of materials including liquid hydrogen, liquid deuterium, and solid methane. Based on our study, liquid hydrogen with more ortho-concentration than para and solid methane are the best options.

  5. Study of liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium cold neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harig, H.D.

    1969-01-01

    In view of the plant of the cold neutron source for a high flux reactor (maximal thermal flux of about 10 15 n/cm 2 s) an experimental study of several cold sources of liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium has been made in a low power reactor (100 kW, about 10 12 n/cm 2 s). We have investigated: -cold neutron sources of liquid hydrogen shaped as annular layers of different thickness. Normal liquid hydrogen was used as well as hydrogen with a high para-percentage. -Cold neutron sources of liquid deuterium in cylinders of 18 and 38 cm diameter. In this case the sources could be placed into different positions to the reactor core within the heavy water reflector. This report gives a general description of the experimental device and deals more detailed with the design of the cryogenic systems. Then, the measured results are communicated, interpreted and finally compared with those of a theoretical study about the same cold moderators which have been the matter of the experimental investigation. (authors) [fr

  6. CAUSE AND EFFECT OF FEEDBACK: MULTIPHASE GAS IN CLUSTER CORES HEATED BY AGN JETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspari, M.; Ruszkowski, M.; Sharma, P.

    2012-01-01

    Multiwavelength data indicate that the X-ray-emitting plasma in the cores of galaxy clusters is not cooling catastrophically. To a large extent, cooling is offset by heating due to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) via jets. The cool-core clusters, with cooler/denser plasmas, show multiphase gas and signs of some cooling in their cores. These observations suggest that the cool core is locally thermally unstable while maintaining global thermal equilibrium. Using high-resolution, three-dimensional simulations we study the formation of multiphase gas in cluster cores heated by collimated bipolar AGN jets. Our key conclusion is that spatially extended multiphase filaments form only when the instantaneous ratio of the thermal instability and free-fall timescales (t TI /t ff ) falls below a critical threshold of ≈10. When this happens, dense cold gas decouples from the hot intracluster medium (ICM) phase and generates inhomogeneous and spatially extended Hα filaments. These cold gas clumps and filaments 'rain' down onto the central regions of the core, forming a cold rotating torus and in part feeding the supermassive black hole. Consequently, the self-regulated feedback enhances AGN heating and the core returns to a higher entropy level with t TI /t ff > 10. Eventually, the core reaches quasi-stable global thermal equilibrium, and cold filaments condense out of the hot ICM whenever t TI /t ff ∼< 10. This occurs despite the fact that the energy from AGN jets is supplied to the core in a highly anisotropic fashion. The effective spatial redistribution of heat is enabled in part by the turbulent motions in the wake of freely falling cold filaments. Increased AGN activity can locally reverse the cold gas flow, launching cold filamentary gas away from the cluster center. Our criterion for the condensation of spatially extended cold gas is in agreement with observations and previous idealized simulations.

  7. Current understanding of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2017-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element, but it is also toxic in excess, and thus mammals have developed elegant mechanisms for keeping both cellular and whole-body iron concentrations within the optimal physiologic range. In the diet, iron is either sequestered within heme or in various nonheme forms. Although the absorption of heme iron is poorly understood, nonheme iron is transported across the apical membrane of the intestinal enterocyte by divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and is exported into the circulation via ferroportin 1 (FPN1). Newly absorbed iron binds to plasma transferrin and is distributed around the body to sites of utilization with the erythroid marrow having particularly high iron requirements. Iron-loaded transferrin binds to transferrin receptor 1 on the surface of most body cells, and after endocytosis of the complex, iron enters the cytoplasm via DMT1 in the endosomal membrane. This iron can be used for metabolic functions, stored within cytosolic ferritin, or exported from the cell via FPN1. Cellular iron concentrations are modulated by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) IRP1 and IRP2. At the whole-body level, dietary iron absorption and iron export from the tissues into the plasma are regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin. When tissue iron demands are high, hepcidin concentrations are low and vice versa. Too little or too much iron can have important clinical consequences. Most iron deficiency reflects an inadequate supply of iron in the diet, whereas iron excess is usually associated with hereditary disorders. These disorders include various forms of hemochromatosis, which are characterized by inadequate hepcidin production and, thus, increased dietary iron intake, and iron-loading anemias whereby both increased iron absorption and transfusion therapy contribute to the iron overload. Despite major recent advances, much remains to be learned about iron physiology and pathophysiology. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Effects of Core Cavity on a Flow Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae-Soon; Kim, Kihwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The axial pressure drop is removed in the free core condition, But the actual core has lots of fuel bundles and mixing vanes to the flow direction. The axial pressure drop induces flow uniformity. In a uniform flow having no shear stress, the cross flow or cross flow mixing decreases. The mixing factor is important in the reactor safety during a Steam Line Break (SLB) or Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) transients. And the effect of core cavity is needed to evaluate the realistic core mixing factor quantification. The multi-dimensional flow mixing phenomena in a core cavity has been studied using a CFD code. The 1/5-scale model was applied for the reactor flow analysis. A single phase water flow conditions were considered for the 4-cold leg and DVI flows. To quantify the mixing intensity, a boron scalar was introduced to the ECC injection water at cold legs and DVI nozzles. The present CFD pre-study was performed to quantify the effects of core structure on the mixing phenomena. The quantified boron mixing scalar in the core simulator model represented the effect of core cavity on the core mixing phenomena. This simulation results also give the information for sensor resolution to measure the boron concentration in the experiments and response time to detect mixing phenomena at the core and reactor vessel.

  9. The Triaging and Treatment of Cold-Induced Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Christoph; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Daigeler, Adrien; Goertz, Ole

    2015-10-30

    In Central Europe, cold-induced injuries are much less common than burns. In a burn center in western Germany, the mean ratio of these two types of injury over the past 10 years was 1 to 35. Because cold-induced injuries are so rare, physicians often do not know how to deal with them. This article is based on a review of publications (up to December 2014) retrieved by a selective search in PubMed using the terms "freezing," "frostbite injury," "non-freezing cold injury," and "frostbite review," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. Freezing and cold-induced trauma are part of the treatment spectrum in burn centers. The treatment of cold-induced injuries is not standardized and is based largely on case reports and observations of use. distinction is drawn between non-freezing injuries, in which there is a slow temperature drop in tissue without freezing, and freezing injuries in which ice crystals form in tissue. In all cases of cold-induced injury, the patient should be slowly warmed to 22°-27°C to prevent reperfusion injury. Freezing injuries are treated with warming of the body's core temperature and with the bathing of the affected body parts in warm water with added antiseptic agents. Any large or open vesicles that are already apparent should be debrided. To inhibit prostaglandin-mediated thrombosis, ibuprofen is given (12 mg/kg body weight b.i.d.). The treatment of cold-induced injuries is based on their type, severity, and timing. The recommendations above are grade C recommendations. The current approach to reperfusion has yielded promising initial results and should be further investigated in prospective studies.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your ... very young red blood cells. Peripheral smear to see if your red blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is the most common treatment ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect ... in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored Cardiovascular Health Study ...

  20. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Certain conditions or medicines can decrease your body’s ability to absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency ... environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those ... environments Children who have lead in ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  9. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  15. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... age, sex, and whether you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  20. Oilsands south : Cold Lake producers expanding operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaremko, D.

    2005-09-01

    New construction and expansion activities at Cold Lake, Alberta were reviewed. Devon Canada, Canadian Natural Resources Ltd., Imperial Oil Ltd., EnCana, BlackRock Ventures Inc., and Husky Energy all have interests in the area, as well as plans to take production to new levels in the coming years. Devon has recently announced its purchase of $200 million worth of properties in the area from ExxonMobil Canada. Devon plans to drill 800 wells at Iron River over the next 4 years. Companies have been drilling in the areas since the 1960s, which has made current exploitation projects easier. Iron River currently produces 3000 barrels of oil per day, and production is expected to increase to 25,000 barrels per day by 2010. Over the last 20 years, Imperial Oil has completed 13 phases of commercial development at Cold Lake, with production that now averages 125,000 barrels per day. There are more than 3800 wells on-site that are directionally drilled off pads. In addition Imperial Oil has recently received regulatory approval to go ahead with expansion phases 14 to 16. The Nabiye Project is expected to add 250 million barrels of recoverable reserves. Cyclic Steam Stimulation (CSS) is used in the projects, a process which involves the steaming of reservoirs until they fracture. At Wolf Lake central facility, CNRL currently produces 50,000 barrels of bitumen per day from CSS and Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) operations. Details of their Primrose North facility expansion were presented, with production expected to be above 100,000 barrels per day over the next 25 years. Details of EnCana's Foster Creek projects and expansion schedules were also presented. New SAGD projects are planned by Husky Energy at their Tucker thermal project, and regulatory approval has been given for BlackRock Ventures to operate an SAGD pilot adjacent to Imperial Oil's facility. To date, the pilot plant has produced 1.2 million barrels of oil and project start-up is expected in 2007

  1. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  2. Cold War Space Sleuths The Untold Secrets of the Soviet Space Program

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Cold War Space Sleuths reads like a Cold War espionage novel, but the reality of the story about the dedicated amateur observers bent on finding out about Soviet spaceflight during the Cold War is just as exciting and absorbing. Told in the sleuth's own words, each chapter unfolds a piece of the hidden history of what was happening behind the Iron Curtain. Coming from all over the world, including Russia itself, the amateur spies give first-hand accounts of often-forgotten aspects of the Cold War space race. Amongst others, their stories include: - the history of the Kettering Group; - looking inside the Russian archives; - unsolved mysteries, such as why cosmonauts were airbrushed out of the official archives; - reading between the lines of the Soviet media; - the impact of Gorbachev's glasnost on sleuthing; - new research, including chapters by James Oberg, Asif Siddiqi, and Bart Hendrickx.

  3. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  4. Iron transport and storage in the coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Andrej; Böttger, Lars H; Matzanke, Berthold F; Carrano, Carl J

    2012-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for all living organisms due to its ubiquitous role in redox and other enzymes, especially in the context of respiration and photosynthesis. The iron uptake and storage systems of terrestrial/higher plants are now reasonably well understood with two basic strategies for iron uptake being distinguished: strategy I plants use a mechanism involving soil acidification and induction of Fe(III)-chelate reductase (ferrireductase) and Fe(II) transporter proteins while strategy II plants have evolved sophisticated systems based on high-affinity, iron specific, binding compounds called phytosiderophores. In contrast, there is little knowledge about the corresponding systems in marine plant-like lineages. Herein we report a study of the iron uptake and storage mechanisms in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Short term radio-iron uptake studies indicate that iron is taken up by Emiliania in a time and concentration dependent manner consistent with an active transport process. Based on inhibitor studies it appears that iron is taken up directly as Fe(iii). However if a reductive step is involved the Fe(II) must not be accessible to the external environment. Upon long term exposure to (57)Fe we have been able, using a combination of Mössbauer and XAS spectroscopies, to identify a single metabolite which displays spectral features similar to the phosphorus-rich mineral core of bacterial and plant ferritins.

  5. Cold nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, E.N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@coldfusion-power.com [Cold Fusion Power, International (United States); Bavizhev, M.D. [LLC “Radium”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Buryakov, M.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Dabagov, S.B. [RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovatyuk, V.M.; Lobastov, S.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of {sup 4}He{sup ∗}.

  6. Hydrothermal Cold Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaoyu

    C, respectively. Process variables were defined and effects of individual parameters were studied systematically through control variable method with Li2MoO4-water system. Crystalline structure, fractured surface morphology and chemical bonding information of the cold sintered pellets were studied with X-ray diffraction (XRD), field effect scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Raman spectroscopy, etc. Densification mechanism studies were conducted on ZnO. Through comparison experiments, it was found that the Zn2+ concentration in the solution is critical for densification, while dissolution of grains only serves as a means to the former. Through pressure dependent studies, a critical value was found, which correlated well with the hydrostatic pressure keeping liquid water from thermal expansion. These results confirmed establishment of hydrothermal condition that would be important for mass transport in densification. Densification rate variations with process time was estimated and similar time dependence to Kingery's model was found. The densification process was proposed to be consist of three consecutive stages, which are quick initial compaction, grain rearrangement and dissolution-reprecipitation events. Binary metal oxides with different acidities were subjected to cold sintering with various aqueous solutions in establishing a criteria for material selection. It was found that in general materials with high solubility at around neutral pH, high dissolution kinetics and similar free energy to their hydroxides or hydrates at ambient would be more likely for full densification with high phase purity. The anions in solution should also be wisely selected to avoid stable compound or complex formation. To extend the applicable material list for full densification, non-aqueous solvent of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) based solution was studied for cold sintering. Both improvement of pellet density and suppression of hydroxide formation were achieved for MnO by using DMSO

  7. Phonon forces and cold denaturatio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob

    2003-01-01

    Protein unfolds upon temperature reduction as Well as upon In increase in temperature, These phenomena are called cold denaturation and hot denaturation, respectively. The contribution from quantum mode forces to denaturation is estimated using a simple phenomenological model describing the molec......Protein unfolds upon temperature reduction as Well as upon In increase in temperature, These phenomena are called cold denaturation and hot denaturation, respectively. The contribution from quantum mode forces to denaturation is estimated using a simple phenomenological model describing...... the molecule Is a continuum. The frequencies of the vibrational modes depend on the molecular dimensionality; hence, the zero-point energies for the folded and the denatured protein are estimated to differ by several electron volts. For a biomolecule such an energy is significant and may contribute to cold...... denaturing. This is consistent with the empirical observation that cold denaturation is exothermic anti hot denaturation endothermic....

  8. Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease Updated:Sep 16,2015 Th is winter ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Cardiovascular Conditions • Conditions Home • Arrhythmia and Atrial Fibrillation • Cardiac ...

  9. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Champagne, V. K; Leyman, P.F; Helfritch, D. J

    2008-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory has developed a cold spray process to reclaim magnesium components that shows significant improvement over existing methods and is in the process of qualification for use on rotorcraft...

  10. Equation of State of Fe3C and Implications for the Carbon Content of Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A.; Brauser, N.; Thompson, E. C.; Chidester, B.; Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Campbell, A.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon is a common component in protoplanetary cores, as represented by iron meteorites. Therefore, along with silicon, oxygen, and other light elements, it is likely to be an alloying component with iron in Earth's core. Previous studies of the densities of iron carbides have not reached the combined pressure and temperature conditions relevant to Earth's core. To better understand the geophysical implications of carbon addition to Earth's core, we report P-V-T measurements of Fe3C to pressures and temperatures exceeding 110 GPa and 2500 K, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a laser heated diamond anvil cell. Fitting these measurements to an equation of state and assuming 1.5% density change upon melting and a 4000 K core-mantle boundary temperature, we report a value of 6 wt% carbon necessary to match the PREM density in the outer core. This value should be considered an upper bound due to the likely presence of other light elements.

  11. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1978-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide state of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (DG) [de

  12. Method of reducing the hazard which may occur as a consequence of a reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donne, M.D.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1985-01-01

    The core melt resulting from a meltdown accident of a GFB, LWR or LMFRR is collected by a core catcher from graphite placed below the core. The core melt is penetrating step by step into a borate store in the collecting vessel and is dissolving in it. Therefore the borate at the same time will absorb the decay heat. In order to remove the solidified and cooled down melted mass water is applied eliminating the borate. The remaining oxide states of the powdery core is sucked off again from the core catcher together with the water. The borate store (e.g. alkali borate) itself consists of separate layers with shaped parts, the coverings of which are made of steel, iron, cast iron, nickel, iron or nickel alloys, ceramic material or glass. (orig./PW)

  13. Nonfreezing Cold-Induced Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    cold injury. ( Modi - fi ed from Jia J, Pollock M: The pathogenesis of non-freezing cold nerve injury: Observations in the rat, Brain 120:631, 1997...myelitis and sinus development ( Figures 7-17 to 7-19 ). Appearance and behavior of the neuropathic foot have many similarities to those of the diabetic ...foot. In the diabetic foot, infections tend to be polymicrobial with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Enterococcus and

  14. Tip model of cold fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goennenwein, F.; Boersig, B.

    1991-01-01

    Cold fission is defined to be the limiting case of nuclear fission where virtually all of the available energy is converted into the total kinetic energy of the fragments. The fragments have, therefore, to be born in or at least close to their respective ground states. Starting from the viewpoint that cold fission corresponds to most compact scission configurations, energy constraints have been exploited to calculate minimum tip distances between the two nascent fragments in binary fission. Crucial input parameters to this tip model of cold fission are the ground-state deformations of fragment nuclei. It is shown that the minimum tip distances being compatible with energy conservation vary strongly with both the mass and charge fragmentation of the fission prone nucleus. The tip distances refer to nuclei with equivalent sharp surfaces. In keeping with the size of the surface width of leptodermous nuclei, only configurations where the tip distances are smaller than a few fm may be considered as valid scission configurations. From a comparison with experimental data on cold fission this critical tip distance appears to be 3.0 fm for the model parameters chosen. Whenever the model calculation yields tip distances being smaller than the critical value, a necessary condition for attaining cold fission is considered to be fulfilled. It is shown that this criterion allows to understand in fair agreement with experiment which mass fragmentations are susceptible to lead to cold fission and which fragment-charge divisions are the most favored in each isobaric mass chain. Being based merely on energy arguments, the model cannot aim at predicting fragment yields in cold fission. However, the tip model proposed appears well suited to delineate the phase space where cold fission phenomena may come into sight. (orig.)

  15. Tidal disruption of fuzzy dark matter subhalo cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaolong; Schwabe, Bodo; Niemeyer, Jens C.; Bürger, David

    2018-03-01

    We study tidal stripping of fuzzy dark matter (FDM) subhalo cores using simulations of the Schrödinger-Poisson equations and analyze the dynamics of tidal disruption, highlighting the differences with standard cold dark matter. Mass loss outside of the tidal radius forces the core to relax into a less compact configuration, lowering the tidal radius. As the characteristic radius of a solitonic core scales inversely with its mass, tidal stripping results in a runaway effect and rapid tidal disruption of the core once its central density drops below 4.5 times the average density of the host within the orbital radius. Additionally, we find that the core is deformed into a tidally locked ellipsoid with increasing eccentricities until it is completely disrupted. Using the core mass loss rate, we compute the minimum mass of cores that can survive several orbits for different FDM particle masses and compare it with observed masses of satellite galaxies in the Milky Way.

  16. Role of glutaredoxin 3 in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an essential mineral nutrient that is tightly regulated through mechanisms involving iron regulatory genes, intracellular storage, and iron recycling. Dysregulation of these mechanisms often results in either excess tissue iron accumulation (overload) or iron deficiency (anemia). Many bioche...

  17. Iron Acquisition in Bacillus cereus: The Roles of IlsA and Bacillibactin in Exogenous Ferritin Iron Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Christophe; Daou, Nadine; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Arosio, Paolo; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Nielsen Le Roux, Christina

    2014-01-01

    In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A) binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:24550730

  18. Iron acquisition in Bacillus cereus: the roles of IlsA and bacillibactin in exogenous ferritin iron mobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Segond

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis.

  19. Liver Iron Contents in Rats after Administration of Certain Iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of consumption of certain iron compounds on liver iron deposition was ... extra iron probably depends on the type of food prepared, .... main groups. Each main group consisted of 4 subgroups. (8 rats per subgroup) which received the same basic diet but differing amounts of iron of a specific type. Each animal was ...

  20. Arc-Discharge Synthesis of Iron Encapsulated in Carbon Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chaitoglou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work is to improve the protection against the oxidation that usually appears in core@shell nanoparticles. Spherical iron nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell were obtained by a modified arc-discharge reactor, which permits controlling the diameter of the iron core and the carbon shell of the particles. Oxidized iron nanoparticles involve a loss of the magnetic characteristics and also changes in the chemical properties. Our nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior and high magnetic saturation owing to the high purity α-Fe of core and to the high core sealing, provided by the carbon shell. A liquid iron precursor was injected in the plasma spot dragged by an inert gas flow. A fixed arc-discharge current of 40 A was used to secure a stable discharge, and several samples were produced at different conditions. Transmission electron microscopy indicated an iron core diameter between 5 and 9 nm. Selected area electron diffraction provided evidences of a highly crystalline and dense iron core. The magnetic properties were studied up to 5 K temperature using a superconducting quantum interference device. The results reveal a superparamagnetic behaviour, a narrow size distribution (σg=1.22, and an average diameter of 6 nm for nanoparticles having a blocking temperature near 40 K.