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Sample records for cold induced adaptive

  1. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D.; Daanen, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced metabolism. van Marken Lichtenbelt WD, Daanen HA. Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesi

  2. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic

  3. Molecular dynamics of mesophilic-like mutants of a cold-adapted enzyme: insights into distal effects induced by the mutations.

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    Elena Papaleo

    Full Text Available Networks and clusters of intramolecular interactions, as well as their "communication" across the three-dimensional architecture have a prominent role in determining protein stability and function. Special attention has been dedicated to their role in thermal adaptation. In the present contribution, seven previously experimentally characterized mutants of a cold-adapted α-amylase, featuring mesophilic-like behavior, have been investigated by multiple molecular dynamics simulations, essential dynamics and analyses of correlated motions and electrostatic interactions. Our data elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of single and multiple mutations to globally modulate dynamic properties of the cold-adapted α-amylase, including both local and complex unpredictable distal effects. Our investigation also shows, in agreement with the experimental data, that the conversion of the cold-adapted enzyme in a warm-adapted variant cannot be completely achieved by the introduction of few mutations, also providing the rationale behind these effects. Moreover, pivotal residues, which are likely to mediate the effects induced by the mutations, have been identified from our analyses, as well as a group of suitable candidates for protein engineering. In fact, a subset of residues here identified (as an isoleucine, or networks of mesophilic-like salt bridges in the proximity of the catalytic site should be considered, in experimental studies, to get a more efficient modification of the features of the cold-adapted enzyme.

  4. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic respon

  5. Biodiversity and cold adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles

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    Yuhua Xin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-adapted bacteria and archaea are widely distributed in cold environments on Earth, such as permafrost, cold soils and deserts, glaciers, lakes, sea ice in the Arctic, Antarctic and high mountains, as well as the deep sea, ice caves and the atmospheric stratosphere etc. Cold-adapted organisms inhabiting these environments exhibit rich diversity. Studies on the biogeography of psychrophiles will enable us to understand their biodiversity, distribution and origins. Due to long-term living in cold regions, cold-adapted bacteria and archeae have developed specific physiological mechanisms of adaptation to cold environments. These mechanisms include: regulating the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane through adjusting the composition of membrane lipids; achieving low-temperature protection through compatibility solute, antifreeze proteins, ice-binding proteins, ice-nucleation proteins and anti-nucleating proteins; production of heat-shock and coldshock proteins, cold acclimation protein and DEAD-box RNA helicase at low temperatures; production of cold-active enzymes; increasing energy generation and conservation. With the rapid development of sequencing technology, various omics-based approaches have been used to reveal cold-adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles at the genomic level.

  6. Trainability of cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Stoop, M.

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral cold injuries are often reported in mountaineers. Not only low ambient temperatures, but also the hypobaric circumstances are known to be major environmental risk factors. When the fingers are exposed to extreme cold for several minutes, cold induced vasodilation (CIVD) occurs, that is

  7. Trainability of cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Stoop, M.

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral cold injuries are often reported in mountaineers. Not only low ambient temperatures, but also the hypobaric circumstances are known to be major environmental risk factors. When the fingers are exposed to extreme cold for several minutes, cold induced vasodilation (CIVD) occurs, that is re

  8. Rapid cold hardening process of insects and its ecologically adaptive significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xianhui; QI Xianlei; KANG Le

    2003-01-01

    In contrast to overwintering cold hardening, a rapid cold hardening process has recently been described in insects. This process can rapidly enhance cold tolerance of insects in several hours or even minutes. The characteristics of rapid cold hardening include inducing conditions, cold hardening effects, and fitness costs. Physiological and biochemical mechanisms of rapid cold hardening include rapid changes in the phospholipid composition and the increase in hemolymph osmolalities, polyols production, proline and cold-induced proteins. Moreover, there are different views about the ecologically adaptive significance of rapid cold hardening in insects. This paper reviews research results about rapid cold hardening of insects since 1987, focusing on forms of cold injury, strategies of cold tolerance, and definitions, characteristics, physiological and biochemical mechanisms and adaptive significance of rapid cold hardening.

  9. [Role of thyroid system in adaptation to cold].

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    Maslov, L N; Vychuzhanova, E A; Gorbunov, A S; Tsybul'nikov, S Iu; Khaliulin, I G; Chauski, E

    2014-06-01

    Adaptation to cold promotes an increase in blood T3 and T4 levels in men and animals. The long-term cold exposure can induce a decrease in concentration of serum total and free T3 in human due to an enhancement of this hormone clearance. Endogenous catecholamines during adaptation to cold raise iodothyronine deiodinase D2 activity in brown fat due to α1-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Triiodothyronine is an inductor of iodothyronine deiodinase expression in brown fat, liver and kidney. Iodothyronine deiodinase D2 plays an important role in adaptation of organism to cold contributing to the high adrenergic reactivity of brown fat. At adaptation to cold T3 interacts with T3Rβ, it is formed T3Rβ-RXR complex, which binds to DNA with following transcription of UCP-1 and UCP-3 genes and UCP-1 and UCP-3 protein synthesis and uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation and an increase in heat production, where T3Rβ is T3-receptor-β, RXR is retinoid X-receptor, UCP is uncoupling protein. Triiodothyronine contributes to normal response to adrenergic agents of brown fat due to T3Rα activation. Sympatho-adrenomedullary and thyroid systems act as synergists in adaptation to cold.

  10. Finger cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    There are indications that subjects with a reduced finger CIVD response are more prone to get local cold injuries, but more epidemiological research is needed to establish a firm relationship. Although it was observed that an early CIVD onset was associated with initially superior manual performance

  11. Role of Leptin in Metabolic Adaptation During Cold Acclimation

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    Gang-Bin Tang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic cold exposure stimulates thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue, resulting in fat mobilization and compensatory hyperphagia. Mostly, these physiological events are accompanied by a remarkable reduction in serum leptin levels. However, the physiological roles of hypoleptinemia in cold adaptation are still not fully clear. We hypothesized that leptin is the keystone of the regulatory systems linking energy balance to cold adaptation. Leptin treatment (5μg/day decreased food intake, body weight, serum ghrelin levels and hypothalamic melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH gene expression. Food restriction in the pair-fed group mimicked most of the effects induced by leptin treatment. Central coadministration of ghrelin (1.2 μg/day partially reversed the effect of leptin on hypothalamic MCH mRNA, but it did not block the reducing effects of leptin on food intake, body weight and serum ghrelin levels. In addition, hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression increased significantly in response to the coadministration of leptin and ghrelin. Collectively, we conclude that the regulatory effects of leptin on energy balance in cold-acclimated rats are dependent on feeding, which may involve the reduction of hypothalamic MCH gene expression. We found no evidence for ghrelin involvement in the regulation of leptin on food intake and body weight during cold acclimation.

  12. Anthranilate degradation by a cold-adapted Pseudomonas sp.

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    Kim, Dockyu; Yoo, Miyoun; Kim, Eungbin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-03-01

    An alpine soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25931 was characterized as eurypsychrophilic (both psychrophilic and mesotolerant) with a broad temperature range of 5-30 °C both for anthranilate (2-aminobenzoate) degradation and concomitant cell growth. Two degradative gene clusters (antABC and catBCA) were detected from a fosmid clone in the PAMC 25931 genomic library; each cluster was confirmed to be specifically induced by anthranilate. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant AntABC (anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase, AntDO) converted anthranilate into catechol, exhibiting strict specificity toward anthranilate. Recombinant CatA (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, C12O) from the organism was active over a broad temperature range (5-37 °C). However, CatA rapidly lost the enzyme activity when incubated at above 25 °C. For example, 1 h-preincubation at 37 °C resulted in 100% loss of enzyme activity, while a counterpart from mesophilic Pseudomonas putida mt-2 did not show any negative effect on the initial enzyme activity. These results suggest that CatA is a new cold-adapted thermolabile enzyme, which might be a product through the adaptation process of PAMC 25931 to naturally cold environments and contribute to its ability to grow on anthranilate there.

  13. Cold-induced changes in amphibian oocytes

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    Angelier, N.; Moreau, N.A.; N' Da, E.A.; Lautredou, N.F. (Centre de Biologie Cellulaire, Ivry-sur-Seine (France))

    1989-08-01

    Female Pleurodeles waltl newts (Amphibia, urodele), usually raised at 20 degrees C, were submitted to low temperatures; oocytes responded to this cold stress by drastic changes both in lampbrush chromosome structure and in protein pattern. Preexisting lateral loops of lampbrush chromosomes were reduced in size and number, while cold-induced loops which were tremendously developed, occurred on defined bivalents of the oocyte at constant, reproducible sites. A comparison of protein patterns in control and stressed oocytes showed two main differences: in stressed oocytes, overall protein synthesis was reduced, except for a set of polypeptides, the cold-stress proteins; second, there was a striking inversion of the relative amount of beta- and gamma-actin found in the oocyte nucleus before and after cold stress. Whereas beta-actin was the predominant form in control oocytes, gamma-actin became the major form in stressed oocytes.

  14. How adaptive optics may have won the Cold War

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    Tyson, Robert K.

    2013-05-01

    While there are many theories and studies concerning the end of the Cold War, circa 1990, I postulate that one of the contributors to the result was the development of adaptive optics. The emergence of directed energy weapons, specifically space-based and ground-based high energy lasers made practicable with adaptive optics, showed that a successful defense against inter-continental ballistic missiles was not only possible, but achievable in a reasonable period of time.

  15. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

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    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs.

  16. Cold-induced thermoregulation and biological aging.

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    Florez-Duquet, M; McDonald, R B

    1998-04-01

    Aging is associated with diminished cold-induced thermoregulation (CIT). The mechanisms accounting for this phenomenon have yet to be clearly elucidated but most likely reflect a combination of increased heat loss and decreased metabolic heat production. The inability of the aged subject to reduce heat loss during cold exposure is associated with diminished reactive tone of the cutaneous vasculature and, to a lesser degree, alterations in the insulative properties of body fat. Cold-induced metabolic heat production via skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis and brown adipose tissue nonshivering thermogenesis appears to decline with age. Few investigations have directly linked diminished skeletal muscle shivering thermogenesis with the age-related reduction in cold-induced thermoregulatory capacity. Rather, age-related declines in skeletal muscle mass and metabolic activity are cited as evidence for decreased heat production via shivering. Reduced mass, GDP binding to brown fat mitochondria, and uncoupling protein (UCP) levels are cited as evidence for attenuated brown adipose tissue cold-induced nonshivering thermogenic capacity during aging. The age-related reduction in brown fat nonshivering thermogenic capacity most likely reflects altered cellular signal transduction rather than changes in neural and hormonal signaling. The discussion in this review focuses on how alterations in CIT during the life span may offer insight into possible mechanisms of biological aging. Although the preponderance of evidence presented here demonstrates that CIT declines with chronological time, the mechanism reflecting this attenuated function remains to be elucidated. The inability to draw definitive conclusions regarding biological aging and CIT reflects the lack of a clear definition of aging. It is unlikely that the mechanisms accounting for the decline in cold-induced thermoregulation during aging will be determined until biological aging is more precisely defined.

  17. Genetic AVP deficiency abolishes cold-induced diuresis but does not attenuate cold-induced hypertension.

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    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-06-01

    Chronic cold exposure causes hypertension and diuresis. The aim of this study was to determine whether vasopressin (AVP) plays a role in cold-induced hypertension and diuresis. Two groups of Long-Evans (LE) and two groups of homozygous AVP-deficient Brattleboro (VD) rats were used. Blood pressure (BP) was not different among the four groups during a 2-wk control period at room temperature (25 degrees C, warm). After the control period, one LE group and one VD group were exposed to cold (5 degrees C); the remaining groups were kept at room temperature. BP and body weight were measured weekly during exposure to cold. Food intake, water intake, urine output, and urine osmolality were measured during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of cold exposure. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma AVP. Kidneys were removed for measurement of renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) protein expression. BP of LE and VD rats increased significantly by week 2 of cold exposure and reached a high level by week 5. BP elevations developed at approximately the same rate and to the same degree in LE and VD rats. AVP deficiency significantly increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality. Chronic cold exposure increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality in LE rats, indicating that cold exposure caused diuresis in LE rats. Cold exposure failed to affect these parameters in VD rats, suggesting that the AVP system is responsible for cold-induced diuresis. Cold exposure did not alter plasma AVP in LE rats. Renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and AQP-2 protein expression levels were decreased significantly in the cold-exposed LE rats, suggesting that cold exposure inhibited renal V2 receptors and AVP-inducible AQP-2 water channels. We conclude that 1) AVP may not be involved in the pathogenesis of cold-induced hypertension, 2) the AVP system plays a critical role

  18. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

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    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications.

  19. Human Adaptations to Heat and Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-01

    recuits. Med.Sci.Sports Exerc. 28: 939-944, 1996. 26. Gonzales -Alonso, J., C. Teller, S. L. Anderson, F. B. Jensen, T. Hyldig, and B. Nielsen. Influence...induced thermogenesis of women. Int.JBiometeorol. 33: 222-226, 1989. 93. Skidmore, R., J. A. Gutierrez , V. Guerriero, and K. C. Kregel. HSP70 induction

  20. Functional evolution of leptin of Ochotona curzoniae in adaptive thermogenesis driven by cold environmental stress.

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    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental stress can accelerate the directional selection and evolutionary rate of specific stress-response proteins to bring about new or altered functions, enhancing an organism's fitness to challenging environments. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae, an endemic and keystone species on Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, is a high hypoxia and low temperature tolerant mammal with high resting metabolic rate and non-shivering thermogenesis to cope in this harsh plateau environment. Leptin is a key hormone related to how these animals regulate energy homeostasis. Previous molecular evolutionary analysis helped to generate the hypothesis that adaptive evolution of plateau pika leptin may be driven by cold stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis, recombinant pika leptin was first purified. The thermogenic characteristics of C57BL/6J mice injected with pika leptin under warm (23±1°C and cold (5±1°C acclimation is investigated. Expression levels of genes regulating adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue and the hypothalamus are compared between pika leptin and human leptin treatment, suggesting that pika leptin has adaptively and functionally evolved. Our results show that pika leptin regulates energy homeostasis via reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure under both warm and cold conditions. Compared with human leptin, pika leptin demonstrates a superior induced capacity for adaptive thermogenesis, which is reflected in a more enhanced β-oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis and heat production. Moreover, leptin treatment combined with cold stimulation has a significant synergistic effect on adaptive thermogenesis, more so than is observed with a single cold exposure or single leptin treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support the hypothesis that cold stress has driven the functional evolution of plateau pika leptin as an ecological adaptation to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  1. Functional Evolution of Leptin of Ochotona curzoniae in Adaptive Thermogenesis Driven by Cold Environmental Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Bromage, Timothy G.; Zhao, Qian; Xu, Bao Hong; Gao, Wei Li; Tian, Hui Fang; Tang, Hui Jun; Liu, Dian Wu; Zhao, Xin Quan

    2011-01-01

    Background Environmental stress can accelerate the directional selection and evolutionary rate of specific stress-response proteins to bring about new or altered functions, enhancing an organism's fitness to challenging environments. Plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae), an endemic and keystone species on Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, is a high hypoxia and low temperature tolerant mammal with high resting metabolic rate and non-shivering thermogenesis to cope in this harsh plateau environment. Leptin is a key hormone related to how these animals regulate energy homeostasis. Previous molecular evolutionary analysis helped to generate the hypothesis that adaptive evolution of plateau pika leptin may be driven by cold stress. Methodology/Principal Findings To test the hypothesis, recombinant pika leptin was first purified. The thermogenic characteristics of C57BL/6J mice injected with pika leptin under warm (23±1°C) and cold (5±1°C) acclimation is investigated. Expression levels of genes regulating adaptive thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue and the hypothalamus are compared between pika leptin and human leptin treatment, suggesting that pika leptin has adaptively and functionally evolved. Our results show that pika leptin regulates energy homeostasis via reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure under both warm and cold conditions. Compared with human leptin, pika leptin demonstrates a superior induced capacity for adaptive thermogenesis, which is reflected in a more enhanced β-oxidation, mitochondrial biogenesis and heat production. Moreover, leptin treatment combined with cold stimulation has a significant synergistic effect on adaptive thermogenesis, more so than is observed with a single cold exposure or single leptin treatment. Conclusions/Significance These findings support the hypothesis that cold stress has driven the functional evolution of plateau pika leptin as an ecological adaptation to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. PMID:21698227

  2. Adapted cold shower as a potential treatment for depression.

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    Shevchuk, Nikolai A

    2008-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating mood disorder that is among the top causes of disability worldwide. It can be characterized by a set of somatic, emotional, and behavioral symptoms, one of which is a high risk of suicide. This work presents a hypothesis that depression may be caused by the convergence of two factors: (A) A lifestyle that lacks certain physiological stressors that have been experienced by primates through millions of years of evolution, such as brief changes in body temperature (e.g. cold swim), and this lack of "thermal exercise" may cause inadequate functioning of the brain. (B) Genetic makeup that predisposes an individual to be affected by the above condition more seriously than other people. To test the hypothesis, an approach to treating depression is proposed that consists of adapted cold showers (20 degrees C, 2-3 min, preceded by a 5-min gradual adaptation to make the procedure less shocking) performed once or twice daily. The proposed duration of treatment is several weeks to several months. The following evidence appears to support the hypothesis: Exposure to cold is known to activate the sympathetic nervous system and increase the blood level of beta-endorphin and noradrenaline and to increase synaptic release of noradrenaline in the brain as well. Additionally, due to the high density of cold receptors in the skin, a cold shower is expected to send an overwhelming amount of electrical impulses from peripheral nerve endings to the brain, which could result in an anti-depressive effect. Practical testing by a statistically insignificant number of people, who did not have sufficient symptoms to be diagnosed with depression, showed that the cold hydrotherapy can relieve depressive symptoms rather effectively. The therapy was also found to have a significant analgesic effect and it does not appear to have noticeable side effects or cause dependence. In conclusion, wider and more rigorous studies would be needed to test the validity of the

  3. Trainability of cold induced vasodilatation in fingers and toes.

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    Daanen, Hein A M; Koedam, Jens; Cheung, Stephen S

    2012-07-01

    Subjects that repeatedly have to expose the extremities to cold may benefit from a high peripheral temperature to maintain dexterity and tissue integrity. Therefore, we investigated if repeated immersions of a hand and a foot in cold water resulted in increased skin temperatures. Nine male and seven female subjects (mean 20.4; SD 2.2 years) immersed their right (trained) hand and foot simultaneously in 8°C water, 30 min daily for 15 days. During the pre and post-test (days 1 and 15, respectively) the left (untrained) hand and foot were immersed as well. Pain, tactile sensitivity and skin temperatures were measured every day. Mean (SD) toe temperature of the trained foot increased from 9.49°C (0.89) to 10.03°C (1.38) (p cold induced vasodilation (CIVD) reactions decreased from 52% during the first test to 24% during the last test. No significant differences occurred in the untrained extremities. Pain diminished over time and tactile sensitivity decreased with skin temperature. The combination of less CIVD responses in the fingers after training, reduced finger skin temperatures in subjects that did show CIVD and the reduced pain and tactile sensitivity over time may lead to an increased risk for finger cold injuries. It is concluded that repeated cold exposure of the fingers does not lead to favorable adaptations, but may instead increase the injury risk.

  4. Finger cold-induced vasodilation of older Korean female divers, haenyeo: effects of chronic cold exposure and aging

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    Lee, Joo-Young; Park, Joonhee; Koh, Eunsook; Cha, Seongwon

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the local cold tolerance of older Korean female divers, haenyeo ( N = 22) in terms of cold acclimatization and ageing. As control groups, older non-diving females ( N = 25) and young females from a rural area ( N = 15) and an urban area ( N = 51) participated in this study. To evaluate local cold tolerance, finger cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) during finger immersion of 4 °C water was examined. As a result, older haenyeos showed greater minimum finger temperature and recovery finger temperature than older non-diving females ( P heart rate, blood pressure, and thermal and pain sensations as those of older non-diving females. Another novel finding was that young urban females showed more vulnerable responses to local cold in CIVD variables and subjective sensations when compared to older females, whereas young rural females had the most excellent cold tolerance in terms of maximum temperature and frequency of CIVD among the four groups ( P < 0.05). The present results imply that older haenyeos still retain cold acclimatized features on the periphery even though they changed their cotton diving suits to wet suits in the early 1980s. However, cardiovascular responses and subjective sensations to cold reflect aging effects. In addition, we suggest that young people who have been adapted to highly insulated clothing and indoor heating systems in winter should be distinguished from young people who were exposed to less modern conveniences when compared to the aged in terms of cold tolerance.

  5. Cold-Adapted Enzymes and Their Cold-Adapted Mechanism%适冷酶及其适冷机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴继卫

    2011-01-01

    Compared with their mesophilic analogs, cold-adapted enzymes take on higher catalytic efficiency at low temperature, have lower optimal reaction temperature, and are more sensitive to heat. The high catalytic efficiency of cold-adapted enzymes at low temperature is associated with their loose and flexible structure. Such structure can achieve conformational change for catalysis with low energy, which is achieved by the weakening of the interaction between amino acid residues and the enzyme molecules as well as the enhancing of the interaction between enzyme and solvent molecules. Improvement of the interaction between the cold-adapted enzyme molecules and solvent molecules will reduce the internal tightness of the cold-adapted enzyme molecules, which may be one reason leading to the high sensitivity to heat and poor resistance to change of the cold-adapted enzymes.%与同类中温酶相比,适冷酶在较低的温度下具有较高的催化效率,最适反应温度较低,对热较敏感.适冷酶能够在较低的温度下保持较高的催化效率与其松散且更具柔性的蛋白结构相关联.这种蛋白质结构容许利用更少的能量产生具有催化效能的构象变化,它主要依赖于酶分子内氨基酸残基之间相互作用的减弱以及酶和溶剂分子相互作用的增强.适冷酶与溶剂相互作用的提高,会降低其分子内部的紧密度,这可能是适冷酶热敏感性高、抗变能力差的原因之一.

  6. Cold-induced vasodilatation in cold-intolerant rats after nerve injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, E.S.; Duraku, L.S.; Niehof, S.P.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Hovius, S.E.R.; Selles, R.W.; Walbeehm, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Purpose: Cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) is a cyclic regulation of blood flow during prolonged cooling of protruding body parts. It is generally considered to be a protective mechanism against local cold injuries and cold intolerance after peripheral nerve injury. The aim of this study

  7. Adaptation of grapevine flowers to cold involves different mechanisms depending on stress intensity.

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    Mélodie Sawicki

    Full Text Available Grapevine flower development and fruit set are influenced by cold nights in the vineyard. To investigate the impact of cold stress on carbon metabolism in the inflorescence, we exposed the inflorescences of fruiting cuttings to chilling and freezing temperatures overnight and measured fluctuations in photosynthesis and sugar content. Whatever the temperature, after the stress treatment photosynthesis was modified in the inflorescence, but the nature of the alteration depended on the intensity of the cold stress. At 4°C, photosynthesis in the inflorescence was impaired through non-stomatal limitations, whereas at 0°C it was affected through stomatal limitations. A freezing night (-3°C severely deregulated photosynthesis in the inflorescence, acting primarily on photosystem II. Cold nights also induced accumulation of sugars. Soluble carbohydrates increased in inflorescences exposed to -3°C, 0°C and 4°C, but starch accumulated only in inflorescences of plants treated at 0 and -3°C. These results suggest that inflorescences are able to cope with cold temperatures by adapting their carbohydrate metabolism using mechanisms that are differentially induced according to stress intensity.

  8. Isolation and functional characterization of cold-regulated promoters, by digitally identifying peach fruit cold-induced genes from a large EST dataset

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    Santiago Margarita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cold acclimation is the process by which plants adapt to the low, non freezing temperatures that naturally occur during late autumn or early winter. This process enables the plants to resist the freezing temperatures of winter. Temperatures similar to those associated with cold acclimation are also used by the fruit industry to delay fruit ripening in peaches. However, peaches that are subjected to long periods of cold storage may develop chilling injury symptoms (woolliness and internal breakdown. In order to better understand the relationship between cold acclimation and chilling injury in peaches, we isolated and functionally characterized cold-regulated promoters from cold-inducible genes identified by digitally analyzing a large EST dataset. Results Digital expression analyses of EST datasets, revealed 164 cold-induced peach genes, several of which show similarities to genes associated with cold acclimation and cold stress responses. The promoters of three of these cold-inducible genes (Ppbec1, Ppxero2 and Pptha1 were fused to the GUS reporter gene and characterized for cold-inducibility using both transient transformation assays in peach fruits (in fruta and stable transformation in Arabidopsis thaliana. These assays demonstrate that the promoter Pptha1 is not cold-inducible, whereas the Ppbec1 and Ppxero2 promoter constructs are cold-inducible. Conclusion This work demonstrates that during cold storage, peach fruits differentially express genes that are associated with cold acclimation. Functional characterization of these promoters in transient transformation assays in fruta as well as stable transformation in Arabidopsis, demonstrate that the isolated Ppbec1 and Ppxero2 promoters are cold-inducible promoters, whereas the isolated Pptha1 promoter is not cold-inducible. Additionally, the cold-inducible activity of the Ppbec1 and Ppxero2 promoters suggest that there is a conserved heterologous cold-inducible regulation

  9. Cold shock genes cspA and cspB from Caulobacter crescentus are posttranscriptionally regulated and important for cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzon, Ricardo R; Lang, Elza A S; Silva, Carolina A P T; Marques, Marilis V

    2012-12-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSPs) are nucleic acid binding chaperones, first described as being induced to solve the problem of mRNA stabilization after temperature downshift. Caulobacter crescentus has four CSPs: CspA and CspB, which are cold induced, and CspC and CspD, which are induced only in stationary phase. In this work we have determined that the synthesis of both CspA and CspB reaches the maximum levels early in the acclimation phase. The deletion of cspA causes a decrease in growth at low temperature, whereas the strain with a deletion of cspB has a very subtle and transient cold-related growth phenotype. The cspA cspB double mutant has a slightly more severe phenotype than that of the cspA mutant, suggesting that although CspA may be more important to cold adaptation than CspB, both proteins have a role in this process. Gene expression analyses were carried out using cspA and cspB regulatory fusions to the lacZ reporter gene and showed that both genes are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Deletion mapping of the long 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of each gene identified a common region important for cold induction, probably via translation enhancement. In contrast to what was reported for other bacteria, these cold shock genes have no regulatory regions downstream from ATG that are important for cold induction. This work shows that the importance of CspA and CspB to C. crescentus cold adaptation, mechanisms of regulation, and pattern of expression during the acclimation phase apparently differs in many aspects from what has been described so far for other bacteria.

  10. Cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of TRPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, M-K; Wang, S

    2011-09-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction.

  11. Evolutionary genomics of the cold-adapted diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    KAUST Repository

    Mock, Thomas

    2017-01-17

    The Southern Ocean houses a diverse and productive community of organisms. Unicellular eukaryotic diatoms are the main primary producers in this environment, where photosynthesis is limited by low concentrations of dissolved iron and large seasonal fluctuations in light, temperature and the extent of sea ice. How diatoms have adapted to this extreme environment is largely unknown. Here we present insights into the genome evolution of a cold-adapted diatom from the Southern Ocean, Fragilariopsis cylindrus, based on a comparison with temperate diatoms. We find that approximately 24.7 per cent of the diploid F. cylindrus genome consists of genetic loci with alleles that are highly divergent (15.1 megabases of the total genome size of 61.1 megabases). These divergent alleles were differentially expressed across environmental conditions, including darkness, low iron, freezing, elevated temperature and increased CO2. Alleles with the largest ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions also show the most pronounced condition-dependent expression, suggesting a correlation between diversifying selection and allelic differentiation. Divergent alleles may be involved in adaptation to environmental fluctuations in the Southern Ocean.

  12. Anti-biofilm activities from marine cold adapted bacteria against staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna ePapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world’s economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules.The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules.The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules

  13. Enhancement of the safety of live influenza vaccine by attenuating mutations from cold-adapted hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Jae [Graduate Program in Biomaterials Science and Engineering, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vaccine Translational Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Yo Han [Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Paul; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Young Jae [Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vaccine Translational Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Kyusik [Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Baik Lin, E-mail: blseong@yonsei.ac.kr [Graduate Program in Biomaterials Science and Engineering, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vaccine Translational Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In our previous study, X-31ca-based H5N1 LAIVs, in particular, became more virulent in mice than the X-31ca MDV, possibly by the introduction of the surface antigens of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, implying that additional attenuation is needed in this cases to increase the safety level of the vaccine. In this report we suggest an approach to further increase the safety of LAIV through additional cold-adapted mutations in the hemagglutinin. The cold-adaptation of X-31 virus resulted in four amino acid mutations in the HA. We generated a panel of 7:1 reassortant viruses each carrying the hemagglutinins with individual single amino acid mutations. We examined their phenotypes and found a major attenuating mutation, N81K. This attenuation marker conferred additional temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotype to the LAIV. Our data indicate that the cold-adapted mutation in the HA confers additional attenuation to the LAIV strain, without compromising its productivity and immune response. - Highlights: • Cold-adaptation process induced four amino acid mutations in the HA of X-31 virus. • The four mutations in the HA also contributed to attenuation of the X-31ca virus • N81K mutation was the most significant marker for the attenuation of X-31ca virus. • Introduction of N81K mutation into H3N2 LAIV further attenuated the vaccine. • This approach provides a useful guideline for enhancing the safety of the LAIVs.

  14. Anti-Biofilm Activities from Marine Cold Adapted Bacteria Against Staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Rosanna; Selan, Laura; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Tilotta, Marco; Sannino, Filomena; Feller, Georges; Tutino, Maria L; Artini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms have great negative impacts on the world's economy and pose serious problems to industry, public health and medicine. The interest in the development of new approaches for the prevention and treatment of bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation has increased. Since, bacterial pathogens living in biofilm induce persistent chronic infections due to the resistance to antibiotics and host immune system. A viable approach should target adhesive properties without affecting bacterial vitality in order to avoid the appearance of resistant mutants. Many bacteria secrete anti-biofilm molecules that function in regulating biofilm architecture or mediating the release of cells from it during the dispersal stage of biofilm life cycle. Cold-adapted marine bacteria represent an untapped reservoir of biodiversity able to synthesize a broad range of bioactive compounds, including anti-biofilm molecules. The anti-biofilm activity of cell-free supernatants derived from sessile and planktonic cultures of cold-adapted bacteria belonging to Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, and Psychromonas species were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Reported results demonstrate that we have selected supernatants, from cold-adapted marine bacteria, containing non-biocidal agents able to destabilize biofilm matrix of all tested pathogens without killing cells. A preliminary physico-chemical characterization of supernatants was also performed, and these analyses highlighted the presence of molecules of different nature that act by inhibiting biofilm formation. Some of them are also able to impair the initial attachment of the bacterial cells to the surface, thus likely containing molecules acting as anti-biofilm surfactant molecules. The described ability of cold-adapted bacteria to produce effective anti-biofilm molecules paves the way to further characterization of the most promising molecules and to test their

  15. Finger cold-induced vasodilation of older Korean female divers, haenyeo: effects of chronic cold exposure and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Young; Park, Joonhee; Koh, Eunsook; Cha, Seongwon

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the local cold tolerance of older Korean female divers, haenyeo (N = 22) in terms of cold acclimatization and ageing. As control groups, older non-diving females (N = 25) and young females from a rural area (N = 15) and an urban area (N = 51) participated in this study. To evaluate local cold tolerance, finger cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) during finger immersion of 4 °C water was examined. As a result, older haenyeos showed greater minimum finger temperature and recovery finger temperature than older non-diving females (P < 0.05), but similar responses in onset time, peak time, maximum finger temperature, frequency of CIVD, heart rate, blood pressure, and thermal and pain sensations as those of older non-diving females. Another novel finding was that young urban females showed more vulnerable responses to local cold in CIVD variables and subjective sensations when compared to older females, whereas young rural females had the most excellent cold tolerance in terms of maximum temperature and frequency of CIVD among the four groups (P < 0.05). The present results imply that older haenyeos still retain cold acclimatized features on the periphery even though they changed their cotton diving suits to wet suits in the early 1980s. However, cardiovascular responses and subjective sensations to cold reflect aging effects. In addition, we suggest that young people who have been adapted to highly insulated clothing and indoor heating systems in winter should be distinguished from young people who were exposed to less modern conveniences when compared to the aged in terms of cold tolerance.

  16. Cold-induced urticaria: challenges in diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstadter, Elana Fay; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    Cold-induced urticaria (CU) is a chronic physical urticaria that can be hard to diagnose and manage. Symptoms of CU can vary from mild localised urticaria, angio-oedema to anaphylaxis. CU may be induced by a wide range of cold triggers from aquatic activities to ingestions of cold substances. This exemplifies the importance of accurate diagnosis and management of patients with CU. We present three cases of CU that demonstrate the variability in triggers and clinical presentation. PMID:23839613

  17. Adaptive Automatic Gauge Control of a Cold Strip Rolling Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMAN, N.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper tackles with thickness control structure of the cold rolled strips. This structure is based on the rolls position control of a reversible quarto rolling mill. The main feature of the system proposed in the paper consists in the compensation of the errors introduced by the deficient dynamics of the hydraulic servo-system used for the rolls positioning, by means of a dynamic compensator that approximates the inverse system of the servo-system. Because the servo-system is considered variant over time, an on-line identification of the servo-system and parameter adapting of the compensator are achieved. The results obtained by numerical simulation are presented together with the data taken from real process. These results illustrate the efficiency of the proposed solutions.

  18. Cold-induced vasodilation : letter to the editor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Reactie op: Flouris, et al. Effect of body temperature on cold induced vasodilationa. Eur J Applied Phys 2008;104:491-499. De aurteurs hebben daar weer een reply op geschreven; Flouris AD, Cheung SS (2009) Authors’ response to H. Daanen’s ‘cold-induced vasodilation’ letter. Eur J Appl Physiol 106:31

  19. Cold-induced vasodilation : letter to the editor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Reactie op: Flouris, et al. Effect of body temperature on cold induced vasodilationa. Eur J Applied Phys 2008;104:491-499. De aurteurs hebben daar weer een reply op geschreven; Flouris AD, Cheung SS (2009) Authors’ response to H. Daanen’s ‘cold-induced vasodilation’ letter. Eur J Appl Physiol

  20. Cold-induced vasodilation : letter to the editor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Reactie op: Flouris, et al. Effect of body temperature on cold induced vasodilationa. Eur J Applied Phys 2008;104:491-499. De aurteurs hebben daar weer een reply op geschreven; Flouris AD, Cheung SS (2009) Authors’ response to H. Daanen’s ‘cold-induced vasodilation’ letter. Eur J Appl Physiol 106:31

  1. Baby, It's Cold Outside: Host-Microbiota Relationships Drive Temperature Adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez de la Torre Canny, Sol; Rawls, John F

    2015-12-09

    When exposed to cold temperatures, mammals undergo remarkable physiological adaptations including thermogenesis, increased intake of dietary energy, and enhanced capacity for intestinal absorption. In a recent Cell paper, Chevalier, Stojanović, and colleagues reveal that these key adaptations to life in the cold are facilitated by the intestinal microbiota (Chevalier et al., 2015). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Does Regular Post-exercise Cold Application Attenuate Trained Muscle Adaptation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, M; Ohnishi, N; Matsumoto, T

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the effects of regular post-exercise cold application on muscular and vascular adaptations induced by moderate-intensity resistance training. 14 male subjects participated in resistance training: 5 sets of 8 wrist-flexion exercises at workload of 70-80% of the single repetition maximum, 3 times a week for 6 weeks. 7 subjects immersed their experimental forearms in cold water (10±1°C) for 20 min after wrist-flexion exercises (cooled group), and the other 7 served as control subjects (noncooled group). Measurements were taken before and after the training period; wrist-flexor thickness, brachial-artery diameter, maximal muscle strength, and local muscle endurance were measured in upper extremities. Wrist-flexor thicknesses of the experimental arms increased after training in both groups, but the extent of each increase was significantly less in the cooled group compared with the noncooled group. Maximal muscle strength and brachial-artery diameter did not increase in the cooled group, while they increased in the noncooled group. Local muscle endurance increased in both groups, but the increase in the cooled group tended to be lower compared to the noncooled group. Regular post-exercise cold application to muscles might attenuate muscular and vascular adaptations to resistance training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Inducible competitors and adaptive diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beren W. ROBINSON, David W. PFENNIG

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the causes of diversification is central to evolutionary biology. The ecological theory of adaptive diversification holds that the evolution of phenotypic differences between populations and species––and the formation of new species––stems from divergent natural selection, often arising from competitive interactions. Although increasing evidence suggests that phenotypic plasticity can facilitate this process, it is not generally appreciated that competitively mediated selection often also provides ideal conditions for phenotypic plasticity to evolve in the first place. Here, we discuss how competition plays at least two key roles in adaptive diversification depending on its pattern. First, heterogenous competition initially generates heterogeneity in resource use that favors adaptive plasticity in the form of “inducible competitors”. Second, once such competitively induced plasticity evolves, its capacity to rapidly generate phenotypic variation and expose phenotypes to alternate selective regimes allows populations to respond readily to selection favoring diversification, as may occur when competition generates steady diversifying selection that permanently drives the evolutionary divergence of populations that use different resources. Thus, competition plays two important roles in adaptive diversification––one well-known and the other only now emerging––mediated through its effect on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity [Current Zoology 59 (4: 537–552, 2013].

  4. Inducible competitors and adaptive diversification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beren W.ROBINSON; David W.PFENNIG

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the causes of diversification is central to evolutionary biology.The ecological theory of adaptive diversification holds that the evolution of phenotypic differences between populations and species-and the formation of new species-stems from divergent natural selection,often arising from competitive interactions.Although increasing evidence suggests that phenotypic plasticity can facilitate this process,it is not generally appreciated that competitively mediated selection often also provides ideal conditions for phenotypic plasticity to evolve in the first place.Here,we discuss how competition plays at least two key roles in adaptive diversification depending on its pattern.First,heterogenous competition initially generates heterogeneity in resource use that favors adaptive plasticity in the form of"inducible competitors".Second,once such competitively induced plasticity evolves,its capacity to rapidly generate phenotypic variation and expose phenotypes to alternate selective regimes allows populations to respond readily to selection favoring diversification,as may occur when competition generates steady diversifying selection that permanently drives the evolutionary divergence of populations that use different resources.Thus,competition plays two important roles in adaptive diversification--one well-known and the other only now emerging-mediated through its effect on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity.

  5. Efficiency and adaptability of the benthic methane filter at Quepos Slide cold seeps, offshore Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeb, P.; Krause, S.; Linke, P.; Hensen, C.; Dale, A. W.; Nuzzo, M.; Treude, T.

    2014-11-01

    Large amounts of methane are delivered by fluids through the erosive forearc of the convergent margin offshore Costa Rica and lead to the formation of cold seeps at the sediment surface. Besides mud extrusion, numerous cold seeps are created by landslides induced by seamount subduction or fluid migration along major faults. Most of the dissolved methane reaching the seafloor at cold seeps is oxidized within the benthic microbial methane filter by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Measurements of AOM and sulfate reduction as well as numerical modeling of porewater profiles revealed a highly active and efficient benthic methane filter at Quepos Slide site; a landslide on the continental slope between the Nicoya and Osa Peninsula. Integrated areal rates of AOM ranged from 12.9 ± 6.0 to 45.2 ± 11.5 mmol m-2 d-1, with only 1 to 2.5% of the upward methane flux being released into the water column. Additionally, two parallel sediment cores from Quepos Slide were used for in vitro experiments in a recently developed Sediment-F low-Through (SLOT) system to simulate an increased fluid and methane flux from the bottom of the sediment core. The benthic methane filter revealed a high adaptability whereby the methane oxidation efficiency responded to the increased fluid flow within 150-170 days. To our knowledge, this study provides the first estimation of the natural biogeochemical response of seep sediments to changes in fluid flow.

  6. [Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by cold-adapted microorganisms: research advance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-jie; Wang, Xiang; Lu, Gui-lan; Wang, Qun-hui; Li, Fa-sheng; Guo, Guan-lin

    2011-04-01

    Cold-adapted microorganisms such as psychrotrophs and psychrophiles widely exist in the soils of sub-Arctic, Arctic, Antarctic, alpine, and high mountains, being the important microbial resources for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperature. Using the unique advantage of cold-adapted microorganisms to the bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in low temperature region has become a research hotspot. This paper summarized the category and cold-adaptation mechanisms of the microorganisms able to degrade petroleum hydrocarbon at low temperature, biodegradation characteristics and mechanisms of different petroleum fractions under the action of cold-adapted microorganisms, bio-stimulation techniques for improving biodegradation efficiency, e. g., inoculating petroleum-degrading microorganisms and adding nutrients or bio-surfactants, and the present status of applying molecular biotechnology in this research field, aimed to provide references to the development of bioremediation techniques for petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.

  7. In vivo measurement of energy substrate contribution to cold-induced brown adipose tissue thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Sébastien M; Caron, Alexandre; Bakan, Inan; Laplante, Mathieu; Carpentier, André C; Lecomte, Roger; Richard, Denis

    2015-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of cold on brown adipose tissue (BAT) energy substrate utilization in vivo using the positron emission tomography tracers [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (glucose uptake), 14(R,S)-[(18)F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid [nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) uptake], and [(11)C]acetate (oxidative activity). The measurements were performed in rats adapted to 27°C, which were acutely subjected to cold (10°C) for 2 and 6 hours, and in rats chronically adapted to 10°C for 21 days, which were returned to 27°C for 2 and 6 hours. Cold exposure (acutely and chronically) led to increases in BAT oxidative activity, which was accompanied by concomitant increases in glucose and NEFA uptake. The increases were particularly high in cold-adapted rats and largely readily reduced by the return to a warm environment. The cold-induced increase in oxidative activity was meaningfully blunted by nicotinic acid, a lipolysis inhibitor, which emphasizes in vivo the key role of intracellular lipid in BAT thermogenesis. The changes in BAT oxidative activity and glucose and NEFA uptakes were paralleled by inductions of genes involved in not only oxidative metabolism but also in energy substrate replenishment (triglyceride and glycogen synthesis). The capacity of BAT for energy substrate replenishment is remarkable. © FASEB.

  8. The two-component system CBO2306/CBO2307 is important for cold adaptation of Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Yağmur; Isokallio, Marita; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2013-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a notorious foodborne pathogen. Its ability to adapt to and grow at low temperatures is of interest for food safety. Two-component systems (TCSs) have been reported to be involved in cold-shock and growth at low temperatures. Here we show the importance of TCS CBO2306/CBO2307 in the cold-shock response of C. botulinum ATCC 3502. The relative expression levels of the cbo2306 and cbo2307 were up to 4.4-fold induced in the cold-shocked cultures but negatively regulated in the late-log and stationary growth phase in relation to early logarithmic growth phase in non-shocked cultures. Importance of the CBO2306/CBO2307 in the cold stress was further demonstrated by impaired growth of insertional cbo2306 or cbo2307 knockout mutants in relation to the wild-type strain ATCC 3502. The results suggest that the TCS CBO2306/CBO2307 is important for cold-shock response and adaptation of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 to low temperature.

  9. Cold Suppresses Agonist-induced Activation of TRPV1

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppress...

  10. [The physiological analysis of cross adaptation to regular cold exposure and physical activities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son'kin, V D; Iakushkin, A V; Akimov, E B; Andreev, R S; Kalenov, Iu N; Kozlov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Research is devoted to the comparative analysis of results of cold adaptation and physical training. The adaptive shifts occurring in an organism under the influence of a hardening (douche by a cold shower 2 times a day 2 minutes long within 6 weeks) and running training on the treadmill (30 minutes at 70-80% of individual VO2max, 3 times a week, within 6 weeks) were compared at 6 the same subjects. The interval between the two cycles of training was no less than 3 months. The indicators registered during ramp test and standard cold exposure test before and after each cycle of trainings were compared. It is shown that patterns of adaptive shifts at adaptation to factors of various modality strongly differ. Shifts at adaptation to physical activities were as a whole more expressed, than at adaptation to regular cold exposition. An individual variety of adaptive reactions suggests the feasibility of developing new approaches to the theory of the adaptation, connected with studying of physiological individuality.

  11. Cold adaptation of the mononuclear molybdoenzyme periplasmic nitrate reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Philippa J.L. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Codd, Rachel, E-mail: rachel.codd@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology) and Bosch Institute, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cold-adapted phenotype of NapA from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein homology model of NapA from S. gelidimarina and mesophilic homologue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six amino acid residues identified as lead candidates governing NapA cold adaptation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular-level understanding of designing cool-temperature in situ oxyanion sensors. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalysed in bacteria by periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) which describes a system of variable protein subunits encoded by the nap operon. Nitrate reduction occurs in the NapA subunit, which contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (Mo-MGD) cofactor and one [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster. The activity of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) isolated as native protein from the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina (Nap{sub Sgel}) and middle-temperature adapted (mesophilic) Shewanella putrefaciens (Nap{sub Sput}) was examined at varied temperature. Irreversible deactivation of Nap{sub Sgel} and Nap{sub Sput} occurred at 54.5 and 65 Degree-Sign C, respectively. When Nap{sub Sgel} was preincubated at 21-70 Degree-Sign C for 30 min, the room-temperature nitrate reductase activity was maximal and invariant between 21 and 54 Degree-Sign C, which suggested that Nap{sub Sgel} was poised for optimal catalysis at modest temperatures and, unlike Nap{sub Sput}, did not benefit from thermally-induced refolding. At 20 Degree-Sign C, Nap{sub Sgel} reduced selenate at 16% of the rate of nitrate reduction. Nap{sub Sput} did not reduce selenate. Sequence alignment showed 46 amino acid residue substitutions in Nap{sub Sgel} that were conserved in NapA from mesophilic Shewanella, Rhodobacter and Escherichia species and could be associated with the Nap{sub Sgel} cold-adapted phenotype. Protein homology modeling of Nap{sub Sgel} using a

  12. Investigation of the thermal adaptability for a mobile cold atom gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-Yu; Wang, Zhao-Ying; Fu, Zhi-Jie; Lin, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The cold atom gravimeter offers the prospect of a new generation of inertial sensors for field applications. We accomplish a mobile atom gravimeter. With the compact and stable system, a sensitivity of 1.4×10-7 g·Hz-1/2 is achieved. Moreover, a continuous gravity monitoring of 80 h is carried out. However, the harsh outdoor environment is a big challenge for the atom gravimeter when it is for field applications. In this paper, we present the preliminary investigation of the thermal adaptability for our mobile cold atom gravimeter. Here, we focus on the influence of the air temperature on the performance of the atom gravimeter. The responses to different factors (such as laser power, fiber coupling efficiency, etc.) are evaluated when there is a great temperature shift of 10 °C. The result is that the performances of all the factors deteriorate to different extent, nevertheless, they can easily recover as the temperature comes back. Finally, we conclude that the variation of air temperature induces the increase of noise and the system error of the atom gravimeter as well, while the process is reversible with the recovery of the temperature. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174249 and 61475139), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA060504), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB329501), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2016FZA3004).

  13. Cold stress and immunity: Do chickens adapt to cold by trading-off immunity for thermoregulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.

    2006-01-01

    Future animal husbandry aims at enhanced animal welfare, with minimal use of preventive medical treatments. These husbandry conditions will resemble more natural or ecological conditions. Under such farming systems, animals will experience various kinds of stressors such as environmental (e.g. cold,

  14. Cold stress and immunity: Do chickens adapt to cold by trading-off immunity for thermoregulation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.

    2006-01-01

    Future animal husbandry aims at enhanced animal welfare, with minimal use of preventive medical treatments. These husbandry conditions will resemble more natural or ecological conditions. Under such farming systems, animals will experience various kinds of stressors such as environmental (e.g. cold,

  15. People who live in a cold climate: thermal adaptation differences based on availability of heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Cao, G; Cui, W; Ouyang, Q; Zhu, Y

    2013-08-01

    Are there differences in thermal adaptation to cold indoor environments between people who are used to living in heating and non-heating regions in China? To answer this question, we measured thermal perceptions and physiological responses of young men from Beijing (where there are indoor space heating facilities in winter) and Shanghai (where there are not indoor space heating facilities in winter) during exposures to cold. Subjects were exposed to 12°C, 14°C, 16°C, 18°C, 20°C for 1 h. Subjects from Beijing complained of greater cold discomfort and demonstrated poorer physiological acclimatization to cold indoor environments than those from Shanghai. These findings indicate that people's chronic indoor thermal experience might be an important determinant of thermal adaptation.

  16. Biocontrol activity of a cold-adapted yeast from Tibet against gray mold in cherry tomato and its action mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hao; Wisniewski, Michael E; Abdelfattah, Ahmed; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2017-07-01

    Cold-adapted biocontrol yeast was selected from four yeast isolates from Tibet against gray mold of cherry tomato in cold storage. The strain numbered LB2 showed the best biocontrol activity and identified as Cryptococcus laurentii. Competition for nutrient, space, and induced fruit resistance was also its antagonistic mechanism. Compared with C. laurentii from sea-level place, the reason why LB2 had a better biocontrol activity was studied. More trehalose and proline in cell of LB2 made it exhibit a better cellular activity at low temperature, such as higher population dynamics in the wounds of cherry tomato and more biocontrol-related enzyme secretion, chitinase and β-glucanase. The better oxidative stress tolerance was another characteristic of LB2. Maybe because of the ideal culture condition, there was no obvious difference between these two yeasts in the growth in vitro test at low temperature. Although the same phenomenon existed in the low pH stress test, LB2 still had higher cell concentration under this stress. Comparative transcriptomics method was also applied to analyze the cell activity of LB2 and C. laurentii at different temperatures. The results showed that more active response in the intracellular structure and intracellular metabolic process to cold temperature made LB2 had a better activity. The present study indicated a possibility to select cold-adapted biocontrol yeast from Tibet and also showed its primary action mechanism.

  17. Cold induced peripheral vasodilation at high altitudes- a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ruiten, H.J.A. van

    2000-01-01

    A significant reduction in cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is observed at high altitudes. No agreement is found in the literature about acclimatization effects on CIVD. Two studies were performed to investigate the effect of altitude acclimatization on CIVD. In the first study 13 male subjects imme

  18. Cold induced peripheral vasodilation at high altitudes- a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ruiten, H.J.A. van

    2000-01-01

    A significant reduction in cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is observed at high altitudes. No agreement is found in the literature about acclimatization effects on CIVD. Two studies were performed to investigate the effect of altitude acclimatization on CIVD. In the first study 13 male subjects imme

  19. Does cold acclimation induce nonshivering thermogenesis in juvenile birds? Experiments with Pekin ducklings and Japanese quail chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjoniemi, K; Hohtola, E

    2000-11-01

    The capability to produce heat in cold by nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) was studied in Pekin ducklings and Japanese quail chicks acclimated to cold for 3 weeks using indirect calorimetry (oxygen consumption) and electromyography from breast (M. pectoralis) and leg muscles (quails: M. gastrocnemius; ducklings: M. gastrocnemius, M. iliofibularis). Respiration of muscles in vitro was studied by measuring cytochrome c oxidase activity. In both species, cold acclimation induced clear morphometric and physiological changes, but no clear evidence of nonshivering thermogenesis. This was evident because increased shivering at least in one muscle coincided with increased oxygen consumption. In ducklings, however, amplitudes of shivering EMGs were low (muscles studied in both the control and cold-acclimated groups. Ducklings reacted to cold mainly by means of increasing body weight (1796 g in control, 2095 g in cold-acclimated) and circulatory changes. Acclimation did not change oxygen consumption either in vivo or in vitro. In quails, in addition to increased body weight (78.1 g control, 89.9 g cold-acclimated), improved insulation and metabolic adaptation to cold (increased respiration in vivo and in M. pectoralis in vitro) was also utilized. In Japanese quail chicks, 3 weeks of cold acclimation does not seem to induce NST, while in Pekin ducklings the existence of NST could not be totally excluded because of weak overall shivering activity.

  20. Cold acclimation induced genes of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can-kui; Lang, Ping; Dane, Fenny; Ebel, Robert C; Singh, Narendra K; Locy, Robert D; Dozier, William A

    2005-03-01

    Commercial citrus varieties are sensitive to low temperature. Poncirus trifoliata is a close relative of Citrus species and has been widely used as a cold-hardy rootstock for citrus production in low-temperature environments. mRNA differential display-reverse transcription (DDRT)-PCR and quantitative relative-RT-PCR were used to study gene expression of P. trifoliata under a gradual cold-acclimation temperature regime. Eight up-regulated cDNA fragments were isolated and sequenced. These fragments showed high similarities at the amino acid level to the following genes with known functions: betaine/proline transporter, water channel protein, aldo-keto reductase, early light-induced protein, nitrate transporter, tetratricopeptide-repeat protein, F-box protein, and ribosomal protein L15. These cold-acclimation up-regulated genes in P. trifoliata are also regulated by osmotic and photo-oxidative signals in other plants.

  1. The Antarctic Chlamydomonas raudensis: an emerging model for cold adaptation of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolhi, Jenna M; Maxwell, Denis P; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M

    2013-09-01

    Permanently cold habitats dominate our planet and psychrophilic microorganisms thrive in cold environments. Environmental adaptations unique to psychrophilic microorganisms have been thoroughly described; however, the vast majority of studies to date have focused on cold-adapted bacteria. The combination of low temperatures in the presence of light is one of the most damaging environmental stresses for a photosynthetic organism: in order to survive, photopsychrophiles (i.e. photosynthetic organisms adapted to low temperatures) balance temperature-independent reactions of light energy capture/transduction with downstream temperature-dependent metabolic processes such as carbon fixation. Here, we review research on photopsychrophiles with a focus on an emerging model organism, Chlamydomonas raudensis UWO241 (UWO241). UWO241 is a psychrophilic green algal species and is a member of the photosynthetic microbial eukaryote community that provides the majority of fixed carbon for ice-covered lake ecosystems located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The water column exerts a range of environmental stressors on the phytoplankton community that inhabits this aquatic ecosystem, including low temperatures, extreme shade of an unusual spectral range (blue-green), high salinity, nutrient deprivation and extremes in seasonal photoperiod. More than two decades of work on UWO241 have produced one of our most comprehensive views of environmental adaptation in a cold-adapted, photosynthetic microbial eukaryote.

  2. Fermentation Performance and Characterization of Cold-Adapted Lipase Produced with Pseudomonas Lip35

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hong-wei; HAN Jun; LI Ning; QIE Xiao-sha; JIA Ying-min

    2009-01-01

    Strain of Pseudomonas Lip35 producing lipase was isolated in a refrigerator. Lipase production and characterization of this strain were investigated under different conditions. The Pseudomonas was cultivated in shaking flasks in a fermentation medium in various nutritional and physical environments. Lipase production has been influenced by the presence of yeast-extract, soybean powder, NaCl, and Tween-80. Maximum lipase productivity was obtained when the physical environment of the fermentation medium was optimal for 67 h. The production of lipase reached 58.9 U mL-1 The lipase of Pseudomonas Lip35 can be considered to be inducible, but the inducer had little influence on the production of lipase.The lipase was characterized and showed high lipolytic activity from pH 7.5-8.0. The optimum temperature was observed at 20℃ and the thermal inactivation of lipase was obvious at 60℃. The lipase activity was inhibited by K+, stimulated by Ca2+, and thermostability decreased in the presence of Ca2+, therefore the lipase was Ca2+-dependent cold-adapted enzyme.

  3. Identification and expression analysis of early cold-induced genes from cold-hardy Citrus relative Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin-Çevik, Mehtap

    2013-01-10

    Citrus is one of the most economically important fruit crops growing in subtropical and tropical regions. Most commercially important Citrus varieties are susceptible to cold; therefore, low and freezing temperatures are the main limiting factors for citrus production in subtropical areas. Since Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf. is a cold-hardy, interfertile Citrus relative, it serves as a genetic resource for improving cold tolerance in cold sensitive commercial Citrus species. While gene induced in response to long-term cold acclimation was previously identified in Poncirus, early response of Poncirus to cold has not been explored in detail. To identify early cold-responsive genes, a subtractive cDNA library was constructed using 4-h cold-treated and untreated control Poncirus seedlings in this study. A total of 210 randomly picked clones from the subtracted library with cold-induced genes were sequenced. The sequences obtained from the majority of these clones shared homology with previously identified cold-induced and/or environmental stress-regulated genes in other plants. Reverse northern blot analysis of the expression of these cDNAs with cold-treated and untreated control probes revealed that expression of 64 cDNAs was increased two to 11 fold in response to 4-h cold treatment. While the majority of these genes were related with cell rescue, defense, cell death and aging, transcription, metabolism, protein fate, energy, cellular communication and signal transduction, transport facilitation and development, some of them did not show homology with genes with known functions. Individual expression analysis of nine selected genes by semi-quantitative RT-PCR using mRNA from cold-treated and untreated control plants confirmed that the expression of selected cDNAs was all induced in response to cold. The results demonstrated that although a few genes were commonly induced in response to both short and long-term cold acclimation in Poncirus, majority of early cold

  4. [Structural and functional reorganization of photosynthetic apparatus in cold adaptation of wheat plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzhik, Ju V; Titov, D F; Talanova, V V; Miroslavov, E D; Koteeva, N K

    2012-01-01

    The structural and functional characteristics of the photosynthetic apparatus (PSA) and the cold resistance of wheat seedlings were studied during low-temperature adaptation. It has been established that large chloroplasts with thylakoid system of "sun type" forme in the mesophyll cells in the early hours of plants hardening. At the same time the functional reorganization of the PSA in the leaves of wheat occurs: content of pigments changes, stabilization of the pigment-protein complexes is observed, non-photochemical quenching of excess energy increases. The stabilization of photosynthesis during cold adaptation occurs due to structural and functional reorganization of the PSA. It is assumed that the reorganization of the PSA is a prerequisite for formation of increased cold resistance of leaf cells, and this, along with other physiological and biochemical changes occurring in cells and tissues of plants, allows the plants to survive in chilling.

  5. Prediction of Rolling Force Using AN Adaptive Neural Network Model during Cold Rolling of Thin Strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, H. B.; Jiang, Z. Y.; Tieu, A. K.; Liu, X. H.; Wang, G. D.

    Customers for cold rolled strip products expect the good flatness and surface finish, consistent metallurgical properties and accurate strip thickness. These requirements demand accurate prediction model for rolling parameters. This paper presents a set-up optimization system developed to predict the rolling force during cold strip rolling. As the rolling force has the very nonlinear and time-varying characteristics, conventional methods with simple mathematical models and a coarse learning scheme are not sufficient to achieve a good prediction for rolling force. In this work, all the factors that influence the rolling force are analyzed. A hybrid mathematical roll force model and an adaptive neural network have been improved by adjusting the adaptive learning algorithm. A good agreement between the calculated results and measured values verifies that the approach is applicable in the prediction of rolling force during cold rolling of thin strips, and the developed model is efficient and stable.

  6. The Lysozyme from Insect (Manduca sexta) is a Cold-Adapted Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotelo-Mundo,R.; Lopez-Zavala, A.; Garcia-Orozco, K.; Arvizu-Flores, A.; Velazquez-Contreras, E.; Valenzuela-Soto, E.; Rojo-Dominguez, A.; Kanost, M.

    2007-01-01

    Enzymatic activity is dependent on temperature, although some proteins have evolved to retain activity at low temperatures at the expense of stability. Cold adapted enzymes are present in a variety of organisms and there is ample interest in their structure-function relationships. Lysozyme (E.C. 3.2.1.17) is one of the most studied enzymes due to its antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria and is also a cold adapted protein. In this work the characterization of lysozyme from the insect Manduca sexta and its activity at low temperatures is presented. Both M. sexta lysozymes natural and recombinant showed a higher content of {alpha}-helix secondary structure compared to that of hen egg white lysozyme and a higher specific enzymatic activity in the range of 5-30 {sup o}C. These results together with measured thermodynamic activation parameters support the designation of M. sexta lysozyme as a cold adapted enzyme. Therefore, the insect recombinant lysozyme is feasible as a model for structure-function studies for cold-adapted proteins.

  7. Fatal cold agglutinin-induced haemolytic anaemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reverberi Roberto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cold agglutinin disease usually develops as a result of the production of a specific immunoglobulin M auto-antibody directed against the I/i and H antigens, precursors of the ABH and Lewis blood group substances, on red blood cells. Autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and other infections can be associated with the production of cold agglutinins. In its classic presentation with haemolytic anaemia and Raynaud's syndrome, cold agglutinin disease is usually idiopathic. Several factors play a role in determining the ability of a cold agglutinin to induce a haemolytic anaemia such as antibody concentration and temperature range, in particular the highest temperature at which antibodies interact with red blood cells. Case presentation A 48-year-old Caucasian man presented to our hospital with symptoms of extreme asthenia caused by severe anaemia. The transfusion of red blood cells (O Rh-positive, started as prescribed by the emergency guidelines in force without pre-transfusion tests, induced fatal haemolysis because of the presence of high levels of anti-H antibodies in his blood, that reacted with the large amount of H antigen in universal (0 red blood cells. Conclusion Emergency transfusion of universal red blood cells (0 Rh-positive or negative is usually accepted by the international guidelines in force in emergency departments. In this report we describe a rare complication caused by the very high concentration in the recipient of cold agglutinins and the activation of the complement system, responsible for red blood cell lysis and consequent fatal cardiovascular shock. We conclude that emergency transfusion of universal red blood cells (0 Rh-positive or negative may be dangerous and its risk should be assessed against the risk of delaying transfusion until the pre-transfusion tests are completed.

  8. Uncovering Mechanisms for Repair and Protection in Cold Environments Through Studies of Cold Adapted Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-18

    Contract Number: FA9550-07-1-0085 Rick Cavicchioli, Tim Williams, Oliver Pilak University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Introduction...adapted microorganism . Objective 1: Progress All three chaperonin genes from M. burtonii have been cloned and the gene products have been...2ºC, 1ºC, 4ºC, 10ºC, 16ºC, 23ºC, 28ºC), which encompasses the lower to upper growth limits of M. burtonii. We also examined the effect of

  9. Pharmacological investigations on adaptation in rats subjected to cold water immersion stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arvind; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2011-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether adaptogenic factors may be transferred from stress adapted rats to naïve rats and to explore the nature of endogenous adaptogens by pharmacological modulation. The rats were subjected to cold water immersion stress by placing them individually in a tank of water (depth=15.5cm; temperature=16±2°C) for 5min. The rats were subjected to single episode of cold water immersion stress for acute stress; while for adaptation, the rats were subjected to repeated episodes of same stressor for 5 consecutive days. The plasma of stress adapted rats was administered to naïve rats before subjecting to acute stress. The stress related behavioral alterations were assessed using the actophotometer, the hole board, the open field and the social interaction tests. Acute stress with single episode of cold water immersion was associated with behavioral alterations. However, the behavioral alterations were significantly restored on subjecting repeated episodes of cold water immersion. Administration of plasma of stress adapted rats also attenuated acute stress associated behavioral alterations. Administration of naltrexone abolished the restoration of behavioral changes as a part of adaptive process in repeated stress subjected rats as well as the anti-stress effects of plasma of stress adapted rat. It may be concluded that opioids may be the potential endogenous adaptogens that tend to restore the homeostasis during repeated episodes of stress. Furthermore, the endogenous adaptogens may be transferred in the form of plasma from repeated stress subjected rats to the naïve rats to confer the anti-stress properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cold adaptation of a mesophilic cellulase, EG III from Trichoderma reesei, by directed evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO; Zhizhuang(肖志壮); WANG; Pan(王攀); QU; Yinbo(曲音波); GAO; Peiji(高培基); WANG; Tianhong(汪天虹)

    2002-01-01

    Cold-active enzymes have received little research attention although they are very useful in industries. Since the structure bases of cold adaptation of enzymes are still unclear, it is also very difficult to obtain cold-adapted enzymes for industrial applications using routine protein engineering methods. In this work, we employed directed evolution method to randomly mutate a mesophilic cellulase, endoglucanase III (EG III) from Trichoderma reesei, and obtained a cold- adapted mutant, designated as w-3. DNA sequence analysis indicates that w-3 is a truncated form of native EG III with a deletion of 25 consecutive amino acids at C-terminus. Further examination of enzymatic kinetics and thermal stability shows that mutant w-3 has a higher Kcat value and becomes more thermolabile than its parent. In addition, activation energies of w-3 and wild type EG III calculated from Arrhenius equation are 13.3 kJ@mol-1 and 26.2 kJ@mol-1, respectively. Therefore, the increased specific activity of w-3 at lower temperatures could result from increased Kcat value and decreased activation energy.

  11. Effects of heat, cold, acid and bile salt adaptations on the stress tolerance and protein expression of kefir-isolated probiotic Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens M1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Ju; Tang, Hsin-Yu; Chiang, Ming-Lun

    2017-09-01

    Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens M1 is a probiotic strain isolated from Taiwanese kefir grains. The present study evaluated the effects of heat, cold, acid and bile salt adaptations on the stress tolerance of L. kefiranofaciens M1. The regulation of protein expression of L. kefiranofaciens M1 under these adaptation conditions was also investigated. The results showed that adaptation of L. kefiranofaciens M1 to heat, cold, acid and bile salts induced homologous tolerance and cross-protection against heterologous challenge. The extent of induced tolerance varied depending on the type and condition of stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that 27 proteins exhibited differences in expression between non-adapted and stress-adapted L. kefiranofaciens M1 cells. Among these proteins, three proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism (triosephosphate isomerase, enolase and NAD-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), two proteins involved in pH homeostasis (ATP synthase subunits AtpA and AtpB), two stress response proteins (chaperones DnaK and GroEL) and one translation-related protein (30S ribosomal protein S2) were up-regulated by three of the four adaptation treatments examined. The increased synthesis of these stress proteins might play a critical protective role in the cellular defense against heat, cold, acid and bile salt stresses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of fatty acids in cold adaptation of Antarctic psychrophilic Flavobacterium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Králová, Stanislava

    2017-09-01

    Cold-loving microorganisms developed numerous adaptation mechanisms allowing them to survive in extremely cold habitats, such as adaptation of the cell membrane. The focus of this study was on the membrane fatty acids of Antarctic Flavobacterium spp., and their adaptation response to cold-stress. Fatty acids and cold-response of Antarctic flavobacteria was also compared to mesophilic and thermophilic members of the genus Flavobacterium. The results showed that the psychrophiles produced more types of major fatty acids than meso- and thermophilic members of this genus, namely C15:1 iso G, C15:0 iso, C15:0 anteiso, C15:1ω6c, C15:0 iso 3OH, C17:1ω6c, C16:0 iso 3OH and C17:0 iso 3OH, summed features 3 (C16:1ω7cand/or C16:1ω6c) and 9 (C16:0 10-methyl and/or C17:1 iso ω9c). It was shown that the cell membrane of psychrophiles was composed mainly of branched and unsaturated fatty acids. The results also implied that Antarctic flavobacteria mainly used two mechanisms of membrane fluidity alteration in their cold-adaptive response. The first mechanism was based on unsaturation of fatty acids, and the second mechanism on de novo synthesis of branched fatty acids. The alteration of the cell membrane was shown to be similar for all thermotypes of members of the genus Flavobacterium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) Induces Hypothermia During Acute Cold Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Josh; Mauger, Alexis R; Govus, Andrew; Hewson, David; Taylor, Lee

    2017-08-01

    Acetaminophen is an over-the-counter drug used to treat pain and fever, but it has also been shown to reduce core temperature (T c) in the absence of fever. However, this side effect is not well examined in humans, and it is unknown if the hypothermic response to acetaminophen is exacerbated with cold exposure. To address this question, we mapped the thermoregulatory responses to acetaminophen and placebo administration during exposure to acute cold (10 °C) and thermal neutrality (25 °C). Nine healthy Caucasian males (aged 20-24 years) participated in the experiment. In a double-blind, randomised, repeated measures design, participants were passively exposed to a thermo-neutral or cold environment for 120 min, with administration of 20 mg/kg lean body mass acetaminophen or a placebo 5 min prior to exposure. T c, skin temperature (T sk), heart rate, and thermal sensation were measured every 10 min, and mean arterial pressure was recorded every 30 min. Data were analysed using linear mixed effects models. Differences in thermal sensation were analysed using a cumulative link mixed model. Acetaminophen had no effect on T c in a thermo-neutral environment, but significantly reduced T c during cold exposure, compared with a placebo. T c was lower in the acetaminophen compared with the placebo condition at each 10-min interval from 80 to 120 min into the trial (all p  0.05). This preliminary trial suggests that acetaminophen-induced hypothermia is exacerbated during cold stress. Larger scale trials seem warranted to determine if acetaminophen administration is associated with an increased risk of accidental hypothermia, particularly in vulnerable populations such as frail elderly individuals.

  14. An exceptionally cold-adapted alpha-amylase from a metagenomic library of a cold and alkaline environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A cold-active α-amylase, AmyI3C6, identified by a functional metagenomics approach was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Sequence analysis showed that the AmyI3C6 amylase was similar to α-amylases from the class Clostridia and revealed classical characteristics of cold......-adapted enzymes, as did comparison of the kinetic parameters Km and kcat to a mesophilic α-amylase. AmyI3C6 was shown to be heat-labile. Temperature optimum was at 10-15 °C, and more than 70 % of the relative activity was retained at 1 °C. The pH optimum of AmyI3C6 was at pH 8-9, and the enzyme displayed activity...... in two commercial detergents tested, suggesting that the AmyI3C6 α-amylase may be useful as a detergent enzyme in environmentally friendly, low-temperature laundry processes....

  15. Salient Distractors Can Induce Saccade Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsheen Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When saccadic eye movements consistently fail to land on their intended target, saccade accuracy is maintained by gradually adapting the movement size of successive saccades. The proposed error signal for saccade adaptation has been based on the distance between where the eye lands and the visual target (retinal error. We studied whether the error signal could alternatively be based on the distance between the predicted and actual locus of attention after the saccade. Unlike conventional adaptation experiments that surreptitiously displace the target once a saccade is initiated towards it, we instead attempted to draw attention away from the target by briefly presenting salient distractor images on one side of the target after the saccade. To test whether less salient, more predictable distractors would induce less adaptation, we separately used fixed random noise distractors. We found that both visual attention distractors were able to induce a small degree of downward saccade adaptation but significantly more to the more salient distractors. As in conventional adaptation experiments, upward adaptation was less effective and salient distractors did not significantly increase amplitudes. We conclude that the locus of attention after the saccade can act as an error signal for saccade adaptation.

  16. Cold-induced exodus of postsynaptic proteins from dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui-Hsuan; Huang, Zu-Han; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Chow, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2009-02-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions on neuronal dendrites and the major target of the excitatory inputs in mammalian brains. Cultured neurons and brain slices are important tools in studying the biochemical and cellular properties of dendritic spines. During the processes of immunocytochemical studies of neurons and the preparation of brain slices, neurons were often kept at temperatures lower than 37 degrees C for varied lengths of time. This study sought to investigate whether and how cold treatment would affect the protein composition of dendritic spines. The results indicated that upon cold treatment four postsynaptic proteins, namely, alpha,beta-tubulins, calcium, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha, and cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain and microtubule-associated protein 2, but not PSD-95 or AMPA receptors, exited from the majority of dendritic spines of cultured rat hippocampal neurons in a Gd(3+)-sensitive manner. The cold-induced exit of tubulins from dendritic spines was further found to be an energy-dependent process involving the activation of Gd(3+)-sensitive calcium channels and ryanodine receptors. The results thus indicate that changes in temperature, calcium concentration, and energy supply of the medium surrounding neurons would affect the protein composition of the dendritic spines and conceivably the protein composition of the subcellular organizations, such as the postsynaptic density, in the cytoplasm of dendritic spines.

  17. Cold-adapted organic solvent tolerant alkalophilic family I.3 lipase from an Antarctic Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganasen, Menega; Yaacob, Norhayati; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Leow, Adam Thean Chor; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    Lipolytic enzymes with cold adaptation are gaining increasing interest due to their biotechnological prospective. Previously, a cold adapted family I.3 lipase (AMS8 lipase) was isolated from an Antarctic Pseudomonas. AMS8 lipase was largely expressed in insoluble form. The refolded His-tagged recombinant AMS8 lipase was purified with 23.0% total recovery and purification factor of 9.7. The purified AMS8 lipase migrated as a single band with a molecular weight approximately 65kDa via electrophoresis. AMS8 lipase was highly active at 30°C at pH 10. The half-life of AMS8 lipase was reported at 4 and 2h under the incubation of 30 and 40°C, respectively. The lipase was stable over a broad range of pH. It showed enhancement effect in its relative activity under the presence of Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) after 30min treatment. Heavy metal ions such as Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+) inhibited AMS8 activity. This cold adapted alkalophilic AMS lipase was also active in various organic solvent of different polarity. These unique properties of this biological macromolecule will provide considerable potential for many biotechnological applications and organic synthesis at low temperature.

  18. Efficiency and adaptability of the benthic methane filter at Quepos Slide cold seeps, offshore of Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeb, P.; Krause, S.; Linke, P.; Hensen, C.; Dale, A. W.; Nuzzo, M.; Treude, T.

    2015-11-01

    Large amounts of methane are delivered by fluids through the erosive forearc of the convergent margin offshore of Costa Rica and lead to the formation of cold seeps at the sediment surface. Besides mud extrusion, numerous cold seeps are created by landslides induced by seamount subduction or fluid migration along major faults. Most of the dissolved methane migrating through the sediments of cold seeps is oxidized within the benthic microbial methane filter by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Measurements of AOM and sulfate reduction as well as numerical modeling of porewater profiles revealed a highly active and efficient benthic methane filter at the Quepos Slide site, a landslide on the continental slope between the Nicoya and Osa Peninsula. Integrated areal rates of AOM ranged from 12.9 ± 6.0 to 45.2 ± 11.5 mmol m-2 d-1, with only 1 to 2.5 % of the upward methane flux being released into the water column. Additionally, two parallel sediment cores from Quepos Slide were used for in vitro experiments in a recently developed sediment-flow-through (SLOT) system to simulate an increased fluid and methane flux from the bottom of the sediment core. The benthic methane filter revealed a high adaptability whereby the methane oxidation efficiency responded to the increased fluid flow within ca. 170 d. To our knowledge, this study provides the first estimation of the natural biogeochemical response of seep sediments to changes in fluid flow.

  19. Synchronized turbo apoptosis induced by cold-shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, J. H.; Dieker, J. W.; Hilbrands, L. B.; Berden, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    In our research on the role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we aim to evaluate the effects of early and late apoptotic cells and blebs on antigen presenting cells. This requires the in vitro generation of sufficiently large and homogeneous populations of early and late apoptotic cells. Here, we present a quick method encountered by serendipity that results in highly reproducible synchronized homogeneous apoptotic cell populations. In brief, granulocytic 32Dcl3 cells are incubated on ice for 2 h and subsequently rewarmed at 37°C. After 30–90 min at 37°C more than 80–90% of the cells become early apoptotic (Annexin V positive/propidium iodide negative). After 24 h of rewarming at 37°C 98% of the cells were late apoptotic (secondary necrotic; Annexin V positive/propidium iodide positive). Cells already formed apoptotic blebs at their cell surface after approximately 20 min at 37°C. Inter-nucleosomal chromatin cleavage and caspase activation were other characteristics of this cold-shock-induced process of apoptosis. Consequently, apoptosis could be inhibited by a caspase inhibitor. Finally, SLE-derived anti-chromatin autoantibodies showed a high affinity for apoptotic blebs generated by cold-shock. Overall, cold-shock induced apoptosis is achieved without the addition of toxic compounds or antibodies, and quickly leads to synchronized homogeneous apoptotic cell populations, which can be applied for various research questions addressing apoptosis. PMID:20972831

  20. Lipid-induced thermogenesis is up-regulated by the first cold-water immersions in juvenile penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulier, Loïc; Rey, Benjamin; Tornos, Jérémy; Le Coadic, Marion; Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Bourguignon, Aurore; Dolmazon, Virginie; Romestaing, Caroline; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2016-07-01

    The passage from shore to marine life is a critical step in the development of juvenile penguins and is characterized by a fuel selection towards lipid oxidation concomitant to an enhancement of lipid-induced thermogenesis. However, mechanisms of such thermogenic improvement at fledging remain undefined. We used two different groups of pre-fledging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to investigate the specific contribution of cold exposure during water immersion to lipid metabolism. Terrestrial penguins that had never been immersed in cold water were compared with experimentally cold-water immersed juveniles. Experimentally immersed penguins underwent ten successive immersions at approximately 9-10 °C for 5 h over 3 weeks. We evaluated adaptive thermogenesis by measuring body temperature, metabolic rate and shivering activity in fully immersed penguins exposed to water temperatures ranging from 12 to 29 °C. Both never-immersed and experimentally immersed penguins were able to maintain their homeothermy in cold water, exhibiting similar thermogenic activity. In vivo, perfusion of lipid emulsion at thermoneutrality induced a twofold larger calorigenic response in experimentally immersed than in never-immersed birds. In vitro, the respiratory rates and the oxidative phosphorylation efficiency of isolated muscle mitochondria were not improved with cold-water immersions. The present study shows that acclimation to cold water only partially reproduced the fuel selection towards lipid oxidation that characterizes penguin acclimatization to marine life.

  1. A cold-adapted reptile becomes a more effective thermoregulator in a thermally challenging environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, Anne Amélie; Cree, Alison

    2010-07-01

    Thermoregulation is of great importance for the survival and fitness of ectotherms as physiological functions are optimized within a narrow range of body temperature (T(b)). The precision with which reptiles thermoregulate has been proposed to be related to the thermal quality of their environments. Although a number of studies have looked at the effect of thermal constraints imposed by diel, seasonal and altitudinal variation on thermoregulatory strategies, few have addressed this question in a laboratory setting. We conducted a laboratory experiment to test whether tuatara, Sphenodon punctatus (order Rhynchocephalia), a cold-adapted reptile endemic to New Zealand, modify their thermoregulatory behaviour in response to different thermal environments. We provided tuatara with three thermal treatments: high-quality habitat [preferred T(b) (T(sel)) could be reached for 8 h/day], medium-quality habitat (T(sel) available for 5 h/day) and low-quality habitat (T(sel) available for 3 h/day). All groups maintained body mass, but tuatara in the low-quality habitat thermoregulated more accurately and tended to maintain higher T (b)s than tuatara in the high-quality habitat. This study thus provides experimental evidence that reptiles are capable of adjusting their thermoregulatory behaviour in response to different thermal constraints. This result also has implications for the conservation of tuatara. A proposed translocation from their current habitat to a higher latitudinal range within New Zealand (similar to the shift from our 8 h/day to our 5 h/day regime) is unlikely to induce thermoconformity; rather, tuatara will probably engage in more effective thermoregulatory behaviour.

  2. Cold Adaptation, Ca2+ Dependency and Autolytic Stability Are Related Features in a Highly Active Cold-Adapted Trypsin Resistant to Autoproteolysis Engineered for Biotechnological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera-Nappa, Alvaro; Reyes, Fernando; Andrews, Barbara A.; Asenjo, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Pig trypsin is routinely used as a biotechnological tool, due to its high specificity and ability to be stored as an inactive stable zymogen. However, it is not an optimum enzyme for conditions found in wound debriding for medical uses and trypsinization processes for protein analysis and animal cell culturing, where low Ca2+ dependency, high activity in mild conditions and easy inactivation are crucial. We isolated and thermodynamically characterized a highly active cold-adapted trypsin for medical and laboratory use that is four times more active than pig trypsin at 10° C and at least 50% more active than pig trypsin up to 50° C. Contrary to pig trypsin, this enzyme has a broad optimum pH between 7 and 10 and is very insensitive to Ca2+ concentration. The enzyme is only distantly related to previously described cryophilic trypsins. We built and studied molecular structure models of this trypsin and performed molecular dynamic calculations. Key residues and structures associated with calcium dependency and cryophilicity were identified. Experiments indicated that the protein is unstable and susceptible to autoproteolysis. Correlating experimental results and structural predictions, we designed mutations to improve the resistance to autoproteolysis and conserve activity for longer periods after activation. One single mutation provided around 25 times more proteolytic stability. Due to its cryophilic nature, this trypsin is easily inactivated by mild denaturation conditions, which is ideal for controlled proteolysis processes without requiring inhibitors or dilution. We clearly show that cold adaptation, Ca2+ dependency and autolytic stability in trypsins are related phenomena that are linked to shared structural features and evolve in a concerted fashion. Hence, both structurally and evolutionarily they cannot be interpreted and studied separately as previously done. PMID:23951314

  3. Cold adaptation, ca2+ dependency and autolytic stability are related features in a highly active cold-adapted trypsin resistant to autoproteolysis engineered for biotechnological applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Olivera-Nappa

    Full Text Available Pig trypsin is routinely used as a biotechnological tool, due to its high specificity and ability to be stored as an inactive stable zymogen. However, it is not an optimum enzyme for conditions found in wound debriding for medical uses and trypsinization processes for protein analysis and animal cell culturing, where low Ca(2+ dependency, high activity in mild conditions and easy inactivation are crucial. We isolated and thermodynamically characterized a highly active cold-adapted trypsin for medical and laboratory use that is four times more active than pig trypsin at 10(° C and at least 50% more active than pig trypsin up to 50(° C. Contrary to pig trypsin, this enzyme has a broad optimum pH between 7 and 10 and is very insensitive to Ca(2+ concentration. The enzyme is only distantly related to previously described cryophilic trypsins. We built and studied molecular structure models of this trypsin and performed molecular dynamic calculations. Key residues and structures associated with calcium dependency and cryophilicity were identified. Experiments indicated that the protein is unstable and susceptible to autoproteolysis. Correlating experimental results and structural predictions, we designed mutations to improve the resistance to autoproteolysis and conserve activity for longer periods after activation. One single mutation provided around 25 times more proteolytic stability. Due to its cryophilic nature, this trypsin is easily inactivated by mild denaturation conditions, which is ideal for controlled proteolysis processes without requiring inhibitors or dilution. We clearly show that cold adaptation, Ca(2+ dependency and autolytic stability in trypsins are related phenomena that are linked to shared structural features and evolve in a concerted fashion. Hence, both structurally and evolutionarily they cannot be interpreted and studied separately as previously done.

  4. [Stress-induced cellular adaptive mutagenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linjiang; Li, Qi

    2014-04-01

    The adaptive mutations exist widely in the evolution of cells, such as antibiotic resistance mutations of pathogenic bacteria, adaptive evolution of industrial strains, and cancerization of human somatic cells. However, how these adaptive mutations are generated is still controversial. Based on the mutational analysis models under the nonlethal selection conditions, stress-induced cellular adaptive mutagenesis is proposed as a new evolutionary viewpoint. The hypothetic pathway of stress-induced mutagenesis involves several intracellular physiological responses, including DNA damages caused by accumulation of intracellular toxic chemicals, limitation of DNA MMR (mismatch repair) activity, upregulation of general stress response and activation of SOS response. These responses directly affect the accuracy of DNA replication from a high-fidelity manner to an error-prone one. The state changes of cell physiology significantly increase intracellular mutation rate and recombination activity. In addition, gene transcription under stress condition increases the instability of genome in response to DNA damage, resulting in transcription-associated DNA mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize these two molecular mechanisms of stress-induced mutagenesis and transcription-associated DNA mutagenesis to help better understand the mechanisms of adaptive mutagenesis.

  5. Hot experience for cold-adapted microorganisms: temperature sensitivity of soil enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shibin; Razavidezfuly, Baharsadat; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    The temperature sensitivity of enzymes responsible for organic matter decomposition in cold environment soil, where warming is expected to be greatest is crucial. Based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Arrhenius function, we hypothesized that cold-adapted microorganisms will produce high efficient enzymes at cold temperatures (enzymes with lower apparent activation energy (Ea) at cold temperature ranges). To test our hypothesis, 30 g soil of Tibetan Plateau (4100 m a.s.l., annual temperature 2.4 °C) in 4 replicates were incubated for one month over a temperature range of 0-40 °C (with 5 °C steps) and determined the kinetic parameters of six enzymes involved in decomposing organics: cellobiohydrolase and β-glucosidase, which are commonly measured as enzymes responsible for consecutive stages of cellulose degradation; xylanase, which is responsible for breaking down hemicelluloses; acid phosphatase, which mineralizes organic P to phosphate by hydrolyzing phosphoric (mono) ester bonds under acidic conditions. Activities of leucine aminopeptidase and tyrosine aminopeptidase were analyzed to assess the hydrolysis of L-peptide bonds. The apparent activation energy varied between enzymes from 42 (phosphatase) to 54 (cellobiohydrolase) kJ mol-1 corresponding to the Q10 values of the enzyme reactions of 1.8-2.3. The increase of substrate affinity (Km) with temperature was gradual for most tested enzymes from 0-20 °C (enzymes involved in C cycle), (proteases) and 0-40 °C (phosphatase). However, within a high range of temperatures (25-40 °C) the hydrolytic activity was governed by enzymes with nearly constant substrate affinity. Overall, for enzymes involved in C cycle and proteases, a strong increase (30-40%) in Km at high temperatures (25 °C) reflects an expression of multiple isoenzymes each with different temperature optima and probable shift of microbial community. The general trend of catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) demonstrated a gradual increase with

  6. Parallel molecular routes to cold adaptation in eight genera of New Zealand stick insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Alice B; Dunning, Luke T; Sinclair, Brent J; Buckley, Thomas R

    2015-09-10

    The acquisition of physiological strategies to tolerate novel thermal conditions allows organisms to exploit new environments. As a result, thermal tolerance is a key determinant of the global distribution of biodiversity, yet the constraints on its evolution are not well understood. Here we investigate parallel evolution of cold tolerance in New Zealand stick insects, an endemic radiation containing three montane-occurring species. Using a phylogeny constructed from 274 orthologous genes, we show that stick insects have independently colonized montane environments at least twice. We compare supercooling point and survival of internal ice formation among ten species from eight genera, and identify both freeze tolerance and freeze avoidance in separate montane lineages. Freeze tolerance is also verified in both lowland and montane populations of a single, geographically widespread, species. Transcriptome sequencing following cold shock identifies a set of structural cuticular genes that are both differentially regulated and under positive sequence selection in each species. However, while cuticular proteins in general are associated with cold shock across the phylogeny, the specific genes at play differ among species. Thus, while processes related to cuticular structure are consistently associated with adaptation for cold, this may not be the consequence of shared ancestral genetic constraints.

  7. [Cold-induced urticaria and angioedema. Classification, diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, K; Degener, F; Altrichter, S; Ardelean, E; Kalogeromitros, D; Magerl, M; Metz, M; Siebenhaar, F; Weller, K; Maurer, M

    2010-09-01

    The onset of wheals and/or angioedema following the exposure to cold may be associated with a number of different diseases. Most frequently this occurs in cold contact urticaria, a type of physical urticaria, which is characterized by a positive cold stimulation test. The clinical symptoms are based on cold-dependent mast cell activation with subsequent release of proinflammatory mediators. In cases of negative or atypical reaction to cold stimulation testing rare acquired atypical or familiar cold urticaria forms may be suspected. Strict avoidance of cold should be recommended as far as possible. As the underlying causes of cold contact urticaria are widely unknown, the symptomatic use of non-sedating antihistamines is the treatment of first choice. The very rare familiar cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS) is based on CIAS1/NLRP3 mutations and may be treated effectively by neutralization of pathogenic interleukin 1beta.

  8. Molecular cloning, expression and biochemical characterisation of a cold-adapted novel recombinant chitinase from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli Aizi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cold-adapted enzymes are proteins produced by psychrophilic organisms that display a high catalytic efficiency at extremely low temperatures. Chitin consists of the insoluble homopolysaccharide β-(1, 4-linked N-acetylglucosamine, which is the second most abundant biopolymer found in nature. Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14 play an important role in chitin recycling in nature. Biodegradation of chitin by the action of cold-adapted chitinases offers significant advantages in industrial applications such as the treatment of chitin-rich waste at low temperatures, the biocontrol of phytopathogens in cold environments and the biocontrol of microbial spoilage of refrigerated food. Results A gene encoding a cold-adapted chitinase (CHI II from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12 was isolated using Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE and RT-PCR techniques. The isolated gene was successfully expressed in the Pichia pastoris expression system. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed the presence of an open reading frame of 1,215 bp, which encodes a 404 amino acid protein. The recombinant chitinase was secreted into the medium when induced with 1% methanol in BMMY medium at 25°C. The purified recombinant chitinase exhibited two bands, corresponding to the non-glycosylated and glycosylated proteins, by SDS-PAGE with molecular masses of approximately 39 and 50 kDa, respectively. The enzyme displayed an acidic pH characteristic with an optimum pH at 4.0 and an optimum temperature at 15°C. The enzyme was stable between pH 3.0-4.5 and was able to retain its activity from 5 to 25°C. The presence of K+, Mn2+ and Co2+ ions increased the enzyme activity up to 20%. Analysis of the insoluble substrates showed that the purified recombinant chitinase had a strong affinity towards colloidal chitin and little effect on glycol chitosan. CHI II recombinant chitinase exhibited higher Vmax and Kcat values toward colloidal chitin than other substrates at low

  9. ULTRASOUND INDUCED AND LASER ENHANCED COLD FUSION CHEMISTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.V.Prevenslik

    1995-01-01

    The standard model of sonoluminescence suggests that the coulomb barrer to deuterium fusion may be overcome by high bubble gas temperatures caused by compression heating if the bubble diameter remains spherical during bubble collapse.However,in the more likely collapse geometry of a pancake shape,the temperature rise in the bubbles is negligible.But the collapsing pancake bubble is fund to significantly increase the frequency of the infrared energy available in the vibrational state of the water molecules at ambient temperature.For a collapse to liquied density,ultraviolet radiation at about 10eV is fund.Although the ultraviolet radiation is of a low intensity,higher intensities may be possible if the bubble collapse is enhanced by visible and infrared lases.Neither hot nor cold fusion is predicted in bubble collapse but the ultraviolet energy at about 10eV developed in the bubble is sufficient to provide the basis for a new field of chemistry called ultrasound induced and laser enhanced cold fusion chemistry.

  10. Adaptive functional evolution of leptin in cold-adaptive pika family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Aresearch team led by Prof.ZHAO Xinquan with the CAS Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology has put forward the viewpoint for the first time that adaptive functional evolution may occur in the leptin protein of the pika (Ochotona) family, a typical coldadaptive mammal.

  11. Protein cold adaptation : Role of physico-chemical parameters in adaptation of proteins to low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shokrollahzade, Soheila; Sharifi, Fatemeh; Vaseghi, Akbar; Faridounnia, Maryam; Jahandideh, Samad

    2015-01-01

    During years 2007 and 2008, we published three papers (Jahandideh, 2007a, JTB, 246, 159-166; Jahandideh, 2007b, JTB, 248, 721-726; Jahandideh, 2008, JTB, 255, 113-118) investigating sequence and structural parameters in adaptation of proteins to low temperatures. Our studies revealed important featu

  12. The cold adaptability of microorganisms with different carbon source in activated sludge treating synthetical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chuan; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2012-11-01

    The cold adaptability of microorganisms with different carbon source under 5°C was studied in activated sludge for treating synthetical wastewater. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis indicated contents of unsaturated fatty acids in cell membrane at 5°C were 13.66% and 24.96% higher for glucose and sodium acetate source than that at 25°C. PLFA biomarkers showed more Gram-negative bacteria enriched than Gram-positive bacteria in low-temperature activated sludge. The Shannon-Wiener diversity analysis demonstrated glucose fed reactor in low temperature had lower PLFA diversity index (1.21-1.30) than that at 25°C and sodium acetate source was reverse (1.08-0.69). The 16S rRNA analysis manifested certain microbes were considerably suitable for existence under cold environment, most of which belong to Gram-negative bacteria.

  13. A novel cold-inducible zinc finger protein from soybean, SCOF-1, enhances cold tolerance in transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J C; Lee, S H; Cheong, Y H; Yoo, C M; Lee, S I; Chun, H J; Yun, D J; Hong, J C; Lee, S Y; Lim, C O; Cho, M J

    2001-02-01

    Cold stress on plants induces changes in the transcription of cold response genes. A cDNA clone encoding C2H2-type zinc finger protein, SCOF-1, was isolated from soybean. The transcription of SCOF-1 is specifically induced by low temperature and abscisic acid (ABA) but not by dehydration or high salinity. Constitutive overexpression of SCOF-1 induced cold-regulated (COR) gene expression and enhanced cold tolerance of non-acclimated transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants. SCOF-1 localized to the nucleus but did not bind directly to either C-repeat/dehydration (CRT/DRE) or ABA responsive element (ABRE), cis-acting DNA regulatory elements present in COR gene promoters. However, SCOF-1 greatly enhanced the DNA binding activity of SGBF-1, a soybean G-box binding bZIP transcription factor, to ABRE in vitro. SCOF-1 also interacted with SGBF-1 in a yeast two-hybrid system. The SGBF-1 transactivated the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene driven by the ABRE element in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts. Furthermore, the SCOF-1 enhanced ABRE-dependent gene expression mediated by SGBF-1. These results suggest that SCOF-1 may function as a positive regulator of COR gene expression mediated by ABRE via protein-protein interaction, which in turn enhances cold tolerance of plants.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of cold adaptation in indigenous Siberian populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Cardona

    Full Text Available Following the dispersal out of Africa, where hominins evolved in warm environments for millions of years, our species has colonised different climate zones of the world, including high latitudes and cold environments. The extent to which human habitation in (sub-Arctic regions has been enabled by cultural buffering, short-term acclimatization and genetic adaptations is not clearly understood. Present day indigenous populations of Siberia show a number of phenotypic features, such as increased basal metabolic rate, low serum lipid levels and increased blood pressure that have been attributed to adaptation to the extreme cold climate. In this study we introduce a dataset of 200 individuals from ten indigenous Siberian populations that were genotyped for 730,525 SNPs across the genome to identify genes and non-coding regions that have undergone unusually rapid allele frequency and long-range haplotype homozygosity change in the recent past. At least three distinct population clusters could be identified among the Siberians, each of which showed a number of unique signals of selection. A region on chromosome 11 (chr11:66-69 Mb contained the largest amount of clustering of significant signals and also the strongest signals in all the different selection tests performed. We present a list of candidate cold adaption genes that showed significant signals of positive selection with our strongest signals associated with genes involved in energy regulation and metabolism (CPT1A, LRP5, THADA and vascular smooth muscle contraction (PRKG1. By employing a new method that paints phased chromosome chunks by their ancestry we distinguish local Siberian-specific long-range haplotype signals from those introduced by admixture.

  15. Characterisation of Newly Polar Psychrotrophic Streptomycetes Isolates from Polar Soils with Cold Adapted Bioremediation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela COTARLET

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Novel polar streptomycetes coded 4 Alga, P2C4 and MIUG 12P, isolated from soil and vegetation samples prelevated from East Antarctica, were genetically and biochemically characterized in order to set up the phylogeny and to identify the capability to grow at lower temperature and to generate amylase and protease cold-active. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of isolate coded 4 Alga was 100% identical to sequences of Streptomyces sp. isolates from Norway and from Solomon Islands, which also were the closest relatives of P2C4 (99.53% and MIUG 12P (99.53% isolates. The data emphasised the skills of the strains Streptomyces 4 Alga, Streptomyces P2C4 and Streptomyces MIUG 12P to biosynthesis cold-adapted amylases and proteases suitable in bioconversion processes at low temperature. These results are quit valuable, because only few streptomycetes, particularly psychrotolerant ones, have so far been explored for their enzymatic potential in cold conditions.

  16. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Post-Translational Mechanisms for Cold-Induced Metabolic Changes in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Li; Alma L.Burlingame; Zhi-Ping Deng; Zhi Yong Wang; Shou-Ling Xu; Juan A.Oses-Prieto; Sunita Putil; Peng Xu; Rui-Ju Wang; Kathy H.Li; David A.Malty; Liz-He An

    2011-01-01

    Cold-induced changes of gene expression and metabolism are critical for plants to survive freezing. Largely by changing gene expression, exposure to a period of non-freezing low temperatures increases plant tolerance to freezing-a phenomenon known as cold acclimation. Cold also induces rapid metabolic changes, which provide instant protection before temperature drops below freezing point. The molecular mechanisms for such rapid metabolic responses to cold remain largely unknown. Here, we use two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) analysis of sub-cellular fractions of Arabidopsis thaliana proteome coupled with spot identification by tandem mass spectrometry to identify early cold-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis. These proteins include four enzymes involved in starch degradation, three HSP100 proteins, several proteins in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and sucrose metabolism. Upon cold treatment, the Disproportionating Enzyme 2 (DPE2), a cytosolic transglucosidase metabolizing maltose to glucose, increased rapidly in the centrifugation pellet fraction and decreased in the soluble fraction. Consistent with cold-induced inactivation of DPE2 enzymatic activity, the dpe2 mutant showed increased freezing tolerance without affecting the C-repeat binding transcription factor (CBF) transcriptional pathway. These results support a model that cold-induced inactivation of DPE2 leads to rapid accumulation of maltose, which is a cold-induced compatible solute that protects cells from freezing damage. This study provides evidence for a key role of rapid post-translational regulation of carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in plant protection against sudden temperature drop.

  17. Diversity and bioprospecting of fungal communities associated with endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Valéria M; Furbino, Laura E; Santiago, Iara F; Pellizzari, Franciane M; Yokoya, Nair S; Pupo, Diclá; Alves, Tânia M A; Junior, Policarpo A S; Romanha, Alvaro J; Zani, Carlos L; Cantrell, Charles L; Rosa, Carlos A; Rosa, Luiz H

    2013-07-01

    We surveyed the distribution and diversity of fungi associated with eight macroalgae from Antarctica and their capability to produce bioactive compounds. The collections yielded 148 fungal isolates, which were identified using molecular methods as belonging to 21 genera and 50 taxa. The most frequent taxa were Geomyces species (sp.), Penicillium sp. and Metschnikowia australis. Seven fungal isolates associated with the endemic Antarctic macroalgae Monostroma hariotii (Chlorophyte) displayed high internal transcribed spacer sequences similarities with the psychrophilic pathogenic fungus Geomyces destructans. Thirty-three fungal singletons (66%) were identified, representing rare components of the fungal communities. The fungal communities displayed high diversity, richness and dominance indices; however, rarefaction curves indicated that not all of the fungal diversity present was recovered. Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6034 and Penicillium sp. UFMGCB 6120, recovered from the endemic species Palmaria decipiens (Rhodophyte) and M. hariotii, respectively, yielded extracts with high and selective antifungal and/or trypanocidal activities, in which a preliminary spectral analysis using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicated the presence of highly functionalised aromatic compounds. These results suggest that the endemic and cold-adapted macroalgae of Antarctica shelter a rich, diversity and complex fungal communities consisting of a few dominant indigenous or mesophilic cold-adapted species, and a large number of rare and/or endemic taxa, which may provide an interesting model of algal-fungal interactions under extreme conditions as well as a potential source of bioactive compounds.

  18. Testing phylogeographic hypotheses in a Euro-Siberian cold-adapted leaf beetle with coalescent simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardulyn, Patrick; Mikhailov, Yuri E; Pasteels, Jacques M

    2009-10-01

    Few studies to date have investigated the impact of Pleistocene climatic oscillations on the genetic diversity of cold-adapted species. We focus on the geographic distribution of genetic diversity in a Euro-Siberian boreo-montane leaf beetle, Gonioctena pallida. We present the molecular variation from three independent gene fragments over the entire geographic range of this insect. The observed sequence variation identifies a genetic diversity hot spot in the Carpathian Mountains, in central Europe, which reveals the presence of (1) an ancestral refuge population or (2) a secondary contact zone in this area. Modeling of population evolution in a coalescent framework allowed us to favor the ancestral refuge hypothesis. These analyses suggest that the Carpathian Mountains served as a refuge for G. pallida, whereas the rest of the species distribution, that spans a large portion of Europe and Asia, experienced a dramatic reduction in genetic variation probably associated to bottlenecks and/or founder events. We estimated the time of isolation of the ancestral refuge population, using an approximate Bayesian method, to be larger than 90,000 years. If true, the current pattern of genetic variation in this cold-adapted organism was shaped by a climatic event predating by far the end of the last ice age.

  19. The genome of the polar eukaryotic microalga Coccomyxa subellipsoidea reveals traits of cold adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, Guillaume; Agarkova, Irina; Grimwood, Jane; Kuo, Alan; Brueggeman, Andrew; Dunigan, David D.; Gurnon, James; Ladunga, Istvan; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Proschold, Thomas; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Weeks, Donald; Tamada, Takashi; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Van Etten, James L.

    2012-02-13

    Background Little is known about the mechanisms of adaptation of life to the extreme environmental conditions encountered in polar regions. Here we present the genome sequence of a unicellular green alga from the division chlorophyta, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C-169, which we will hereafter refer to as C-169. This is the first eukaryotic microorganism from a polar environment to have its genome sequenced. Results The 48.8 Mb genome contained in 20 chromosomes exhibits significant synteny conservation with the chromosomes of its relatives Chlorella variabilis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The order of the genes is highly reshuffled within synteny blocks, suggesting that intra-chromosomal rearrangements were more prevalent than inter-chromosomal rearrangements. Remarkably, Zepp retrotransposons occur in clusters of nested elements with strictly one cluster per chromosome probably residing at the centromere. Several protein families overrepresented in C. subellipsoidae include proteins involved in lipid metabolism, transporters, cellulose synthases and short alcohol dehydrogenases. Conversely, C-169 lacks proteins that exist in all other sequenced chlorophytes, including components of the glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol anchoring system, pyruvate phosphate dikinase and the photosystem 1 reaction center subunit N (PsaN). Conclusions We suggest that some of these gene losses and gains could have contributed to adaptation to low temperatures. Comparison of these genomic features with the adaptive strategies of psychrophilic microbes suggests that prokaryotes and eukaryotes followed comparable evolutionary routes to adapt to cold environments.

  20. Cold rolling induced alloying behaviors in metallic multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe

    Phase transformation and atomic scale intermixing induced by deformation are important and fundamental issues in the mechanical alloying processes. Repeated cold rolling and folding experiments were performed on the metallic multilayers in order to study the deformation driven behaviors. Various binary systems such as isomorphous, eutectic and thermodynamically immiscible systems were studied. Moreover, monometallic Pd, Pt and Fe were selected in order to study the deformation driven recrystallization behavior. In Cu/Ni multilayers, the composition of the solid solution is revealed by an oscillation in the composition profile across the multilayers, which is different from the smoothly varying profile due to thermally activated diffusion. During the reaction, Cu mixed into Ni preferentially compared to Ni mixing into Cu, which is also in contrast to the thermal diffusion behavior. During the cold rolling of multilayers of Ni and V, deformation induces phase transformation and an interfacial mixing with suppression of nucleation of intermetallic phases. The results also demonstrate that between pure Ni and V layers a metastable fcc solid solution phase forms in Ni70V30, a metastable bcc solid solution phase forms in Ni30V70 and metastable fcc and bcc solid solution phases form in Ni57V43. Compared to the stored energy due to dislocation and interfaces, the excess chemical free energy from the interfacial mixing is the largest portion of total stored energy from deformation, which represents a form of mechanochemical transduction. The difference in the intermixing behaviors between Cu/Ni and Ni/V systems is due to that the systems have different heat of mixing and interface characters. Deformation of Cu/Fe multilayers yields a smooth and monotonic variation in the composition profile. From the local composition consumption it is revealed that that Fe mixes into Cu preferentially than Cu mixing into Fe. The room temperature deformation driven recrystallization was

  1. Trainability of cold induced vasodilatation in fingers and toes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Koedam, J.; Cheung, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Subjects that repeatedly have to expose the extremities to cold may benefit from a high peripheral temperature to maintain dexterity and tissue integrity. Therefore, we investigated if repeated immersions of a hand and a foot in cold water resulted in increased skin temperatures. Nine male and seven

  2. Metabolic cold adaptation of polar fish based on measurements of aerobic oxygen consumption: fact or artefact? Artefact!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2002-01-01

    a considerably elevated resting oxygen consumption, or standard metabolic rate, compared with oxygen consumption values of tropical or temperate fish extrapolated to similar low polar temperatures. Recent experiments on arctic and Antarctic fish, however, do not show elevated resting aerobic oxygen consumption......Whether metabolic cold adaptation in polar fish, based on measurements of aerobic standard metabolic rate, is a fact or an artefact has been a dispute since Holeton asked the question in 1974. So far polar fish had been considered to be metabolically cold adapted because they were reported to have...

  3. Frequent extreme cold exposure and brown fat and cold-induced thermogenesis: a study in a monozygotic twin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten J Vosselman

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Mild cold acclimation is known to increase brown adipose tissue (BAT activity and cold-induced thermogenesis (CIT in humans. We here tested the effect of a lifestyle with frequent exposure to extreme cold on BAT and CIT in a Dutch man known as 'the Iceman', who has multiple world records in withstanding extreme cold challenges. Furthermore, his monozygotic twin brother who has a 'normal' sedentary lifestyle without extreme cold exposures was measured. METHODS: The Iceman (subject A and his brother (subject B were studied during mild cold (13°C and thermoneutral conditions (31°C. Measurements included BAT activity and respiratory muscle activity by [18F]FDG-PET/CT imaging and energy expenditure through indirect calorimetry. In addition, body temperatures, cardiovascular parameters, skin perfusion, and thermal sensation and comfort were measured. Finally, we determined polymorphisms for uncoupling protein-1 and β3-adrenergic receptor. RESULTS: Subjects had comparable BAT activity (A: 1144 SUVtotal and B: 1325 SUVtotal, within the range previously observed in young adult men. They were genotyped with the polymorphism for uncoupling protein-1 (G/G. CIT was relatively high (A: 40.1% and B: 41.9%, but unlike during our previous cold exposure tests in young adult men, here both subjects practiced a g-Tummo like breathing technique, which involves vigorous respiratory muscle activity. This was confirmed by high [18F]FDG-uptake in respiratory muscle. CONCLUSION: No significant differences were found between the two subjects, indicating that a lifestyle with frequent exposures to extreme cold does not seem to affect BAT activity and CIT. In both subjects, BAT was not higher compared to earlier observations, whereas CIT was very high, suggesting that g-Tummo like breathing during cold exposure may cause additional heat production by vigorous isometric respiratory muscle contraction. The results must be interpreted with caution given the

  4. Eccentric Contraction-Induced Muscle Fibre Adaptation

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    Arabadzhiev T. I.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hard-strength training induces strength increasing and muscle damage, especially after eccentric contractions. Eccentric contractions also lead to muscle adaptation. Symptoms of damage after repeated bout of the same or similar eccentrically biased exercises are markedly reduced. The mechanism of this repeated bout effect is unknown. Since electromyographic (EMG power spectra scale to lower frequencies, the adaptation is related to neural adaptation of the central nervous system (CNS presuming activation of slow-non-fatigable motor units or synchronization of motor unit firing. However, the repeated bout effect is also observed under repeated stimulation, i.e. without participation of the CNS. The aim of this study was to compare the possible effects of changes in intracellular action potential shape and in synchronization of motor units firing on EMG power spectra. To estimate possible degree of the effects of central and peripheral changes, interferent EMG was simulated under different intracellular action potential shapes and different degrees of synchronization of motor unit firing. It was shown that the effect of changes in intracellular action potential shape and muscle fibre propagation velocity (i.e. peripheral factors on spectral characteristics of EMG signals could be stronger than the effect of synchronization of firing of different motor units (i.e. central factors.

  5. Finger cold-induced vasodilatation during hypothermia, hyperthermia and at thermoneutrality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ducharme, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure of the fingers to severe cold leads to cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD). The influence of ambient temperature on the CIVD-response is well understood and documented, but the response of CIVD to hyperthermia and mild hypothermia has rarely been investigated. METHODS: To investiga

  6. A new multistep Ca2+-Induced Cold Gelation Process for ß-Lactoglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, C.; Baptist, H.G.M.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain -lactoglobulin (-lg) gels at very low protein concentrations using a new multistep Ca2+-induced cold gelation process. In the conventional cold gelation process, salt free -lg solutions were heated at neutral pH, cooled, and cross-linked by adding salts. In

  7. Cold adaptation of the Antarctic haloarchaea Halohasta litchfieldiae and Halorubrum lacusprofundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy J; Liao, Yan; Ye, Jun; Kuchel, Rhiannon P; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2017-02-20

    Halohasta litchfieldiae represents ∼ 44% and Halorubrum lacusprofundi ∼ 10% of the hypersaline, perennially cold (≥ -20°C) Deep Lake community in Antarctica. We used proteomics and microscopy to define physiological responses of these haloarchaea to growth at high (30°C) and low (10 and 4°C) temperatures. The proteomic data indicate that both species responded to low temperature by modifying their cell envelope including protein N-glycosylation, maintaining osmotic balance and translation initiation, and modifying RNA turnover and tRNA modification. Distinctions between the two species included DNA protection and repair strategies (e.g. roles of UspA and Rad50), and metabolism of glycerol and pyruvate. For Hrr. lacusprofundi, low temperature led to the formation of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) as a storage compound with the process of PHA granule formation occurring by an unknown mechanism. Hrr. lacusprofundi also formed biofilms and synthesized high levels of Hsp20 chaperones. Hht. litchfieldiae was characterized by an active CRISPR system, and elevated levels of the core gene expression machinery, which contrasted markedly to the decreased levels of Hrr. lacusprofundi. These findings greatly expand the understanding of cellular mechanisms of cold adaptation in psychrophilic archaea, and provide insight into how Hht. litchfieldiae gains dominance in Deep Lake. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Are mountain habitats becoming more suitable for generalist than cold-adapted lizards thermoregulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Zaida; Mencía, Abraham; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    Mountain lizards are highly vulnerable to climate change, and the continuous warming of their habitats could be seriously threatening their survival. We aim to compare the thermal ecology and microhabitat selection of a mountain lizard, Iberolacerta galani, and a widely distributed lizard, Podarcis bocagei, in a montane area. Both species are currently in close syntopy in the study area, at 1,400 m above the sea level. We determined the precision, accuracy and effectiveness of thermoregulation, and the thermal quality of habitat for both species. We also compared the selection of thermal microhabitats between both species. Results show that I. galani is a cold-adapted thermal specialist with a preferred temperature range of 27.9-29.7 °C, while P. bocagei would be a thermal generalist, with a broader and higher preferred temperature range (30.1-34.5 °C). In addition, I. galani selects rocky substrates while P. bocagei selects warmer soil and leaf litter substrates. The thermal quality of the habitat is higher for P. bocagei than for I. galani. Finally, P. bocagei achieves a significantly higher effectiveness of thermoregulation (0.87) than I. galani (0.80). Therefore, these mountain habitat conditions seem currently more suitable for performance of thermophilic generalist lizards than for cold-specialist lizards.

  9. Are mountain habitats becoming more suitable for generalist than cold-adapted lizards thermoregulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaida Ortega

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mountain lizards are highly vulnerable to climate change, and the continuous warming of their habitats could be seriously threatening their survival. We aim to compare the thermal ecology and microhabitat selection of a mountain lizard, Iberolacerta galani, and a widely distributed lizard, Podarcis bocagei, in a montane area. Both species are currently in close syntopy in the study area, at 1,400 m above the sea level. We determined the precision, accuracy and effectiveness of thermoregulation, and the thermal quality of habitat for both species. We also compared the selection of thermal microhabitats between both species. Results show that I. galani is a cold-adapted thermal specialist with a preferred temperature range of 27.9–29.7 °C, while P. bocagei would be a thermal generalist, with a broader and higher preferred temperature range (30.1–34.5 °C. In addition, I. galani selects rocky substrates while P. bocagei selects warmer soil and leaf litter substrates. The thermal quality of the habitat is higher for P. bocagei than for I. galani. Finally, P. bocagei achieves a significantly higher effectiveness of thermoregulation (0.87 than I. galani (0.80. Therefore, these mountain habitat conditions seem currently more suitable for performance of thermophilic generalist lizards than for cold-specialist lizards.

  10. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of mouse cerebral edema induced by cold injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhun; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-06-01

    For the first time, we have implemented photoacoustic tomography (PAT) to image the water content of an edema in vivo. We produced and imaged a cold-induced cerebral edema transcranially, then obtained blood vessel and water accumulation images at 610 and 975 nm, respectively. We tracked the changes at 12, 24, and 36 h after the cold injury. The blood volume decreased after the cold injury, and the maximum area of edema was observed 24 h after the cold injury. We validated PAT of the water content of the edema through magnetic Resonance Imaging and the water spectrum from the spectrophotometric measurement.

  11. Cold gelation of alginates induced by monovalent cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakasyan, C; Legros, M; Lack, S; Brunel, F; Maingault, P; Ducouret, G; Hourdet, D

    2010-11-08

    A new reversible gelation pathway is described for alginates in aqueous media. From various samples differing by their mannuronic/guluronic content (M/G), both enthalpic and viscoelastic experiments demonstrate that alginates having a high M content are able to form thermoreversible assemblies in the presence of potassium salts. The aggregation behavior is driven by the low solubility of M-blocks at low temperature and high ionic strength. In semidilute solutions, responsive assemblies induce a strong increase of the viscosity below a critical temperature. A true physical gel is obtained in the entangled regime, although the length scale of specific interactions between M-blocks decreases with increasing density of entanglements. Cold setting takes place at low temperatures, below 0 °C for potassium concentrations lower than 0.2 mol/kg, but the aggregation process can be easily shifted to higher temperatures by increasing the salt concentration. The self-assembling process of alginates in solution of potassium salts is characterized by a sharp gelation exotherm and a broad melting endotherm with a large hysteresis of 20-30 °C between the transition temperatures. The viscoelastic properties of alginate gels in potassium salts closely depend on thermal treatment (rate of cooling, time, and temperature of storage), polymer and salt concentrations, and monomer composition as well. In the case of alginates with a high G content, a similar aggregation behavior is also evidenced at higher salt concentrations, but the extent of the self-assembling process remains too weak to develop a true gelation behavior in solution.

  12. Cold stress aggravates inflammatory responses in an LPS-induced mouse model of acute lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Su-Yeon; Park, Mi-Ju; Kim, Kyun-Ha; Choi, Hee-Jung; Chung, Tae-Wook; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Joung Hee; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Joo, Myungsoo; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2016-08-01

    Although the relationship between environmental cold temperature and susceptibility to respiratory infection is generally accepted, the effect of ambient cold temperature on host reactivity in lung inflammation has not been fully studied. To examine the function of ambient cold temperature on lung inflammation, mice were exposed to 4 °C for 8 h each day for 14 days. In the lungs of mice exposed to cold stress, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissues were slightly increased by about twofold. However, the structures of pulmonary epithelial cells were kept within normal limits. Next, we examined the effect of cold stress on the inflammatory responses in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mouse model. The infiltration of neutrophils and inflammation of lung tissue determined by histology were significantly increased by exposure to ambient cold temperature. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17, and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was elevated by exposure to cold stress. Therefore, we suggest that cold stress is a factor that exacerbates lung inflammation including ALI. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the relationship between cold stress and severity of lung inflammation.

  13. The association of cholinergic and cold-induced urticaria: diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Bahar; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Physical urticaria is often challenging to diagnose and manage. We present a case of both cholinergic and cold-induced urticaria and discuss the diagnosis and management strategies of these two important conditions. PMID:25694628

  14. Uncoupling protein and ATP/ADP carrier increase mitochondrial proton conductance after cold adaptation of king penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Darren A; Duchamp, Claude; Rey, Benjamin; Hanuise, Nicolas; Rouanet, Jean Louis; Sibille, Brigitte; Brand, Martin D

    2004-07-01

    Juvenile king penguins develop adaptive thermogenesis after repeated immersion in cold water. However, the mechanisms of such metabolic adaptation in birds are unknown, as they lack brown adipose tissue and uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1), which mediate adaptive non-shivering thermogenesis in mammals. We used three different groups of juvenile king penguins to investigate the mitochondrial basis of avian adaptive thermogenesis in vitro. Skeletal muscle mitochondria isolated from penguins that had never been immersed in cold water showed no superoxide-stimulated proton conductance, indicating no functional avian UCP. Skeletal muscle mitochondria from penguins that had been either experimentally immersed or naturally adapted to cold water did possess functional avian UCP, demonstrated by a superoxide-stimulated, GDP-inhibitable proton conductance across their inner membrane. This was associated with a markedly greater abundance of avian UCP mRNA. In the presence (but not the absence) of fatty acids, these mitochondria also showed a greater adenine nucleotide translocase-catalysed proton conductance than those from never-immersed penguins. This was due to an increase in the amount of adenine nucleotide translocase. Therefore, adaptive thermogenesis in juvenile king penguins is linked to two separate mechanisms of uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle mitochondria: increased proton transport activity of avian UCP (dependent on superoxide and inhibited by GDP) and increased proton transport activity of the adenine nucleotide translocase (dependent on fatty acids and inhibited by carboxyatractylate).

  15. The Role of Cold-Shock Proteins in Low-Temperature Adaptation of Food-Related Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Jeroen A.; Rombouts, Frank M.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de; Abee, T.

    2000-01-01

    There is a considerable interest in the cold adaptation of food-related bacteria, including starter cultures for industrial food fermentations, food spoilage bacteria and food-borne pathogens. Mechanisms that permit low-temperature growth involve cellular modifications for maintaining membrane fluid

  16. Cloning, expression and structural stability of a cold-adapted ß-Galactosidase from Rahnella sp.R3

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel gene was isolated for the first time from a psychrophilic gram-negative bacterium Rahnella sp.R3. It encoded a cold-adapted ß-galactosidase (R-ß-Gal). Recombinant R-ß-Gal was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), purified, and characterized. R-ß-Gal belongs to the glycosyl hydrolase fami...

  17. Chilling- and Freezing-Induced Alterations in Cytosine Methylation and Its Association with the Cold Tolerance of an Alpine Subnival Plant, Chorispora bungeana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Song

    Full Text Available Chilling (0-18°C and freezing (<0°C are two distinct types of cold stresses. Epigenetic regulation can play an important role in plant adaptation to abiotic stresses. However, it is not yet clear whether and how epigenetic modification (i.e., DNA methylation mediates the adaptation to cold stresses in nature (e.g., in alpine regions. Especially, whether the adaptation to chilling and freezing is involved in differential epigenetic regulations in plants is largely unknown. Chorispora bungeana is an alpine subnival plant that is distributed in the freeze-thaw tundra in Asia, where chilling and freezing frequently fluctuate daily (24 h. To disentangle how C. bungeana copes with these intricate cold stresses through epigenetic modifications, plants of C. bungeana were treated at 4°C (chilling and -4°C (freezing over five periods of time (0-24 h. Methylation-sensitive amplified fragment-length polymorphism markers were used to investigate the variation in DNA methylation of C. bungeana in response to chilling and freezing. It was found that the alterations in DNA methylation of C. bungeana largely occurred over the period of chilling and freezing. Moreover, chilling and freezing appeared to gradually induce distinct DNA methylation variations, as the treatment went on (e.g., after 12 h. Forty-three cold-induced polymorphic fragments were randomly selected and further analyzed, and three of the cloned fragments were homologous to genes encoding alcohol dehydrogenase, UDP-glucosyltransferase and polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein. These candidate genes verified the existence of different expressive patterns between chilling and freezing. Our results showed that C. bungeana responded to cold stresses rapidly through the alterations of DNA methylation, and that chilling and freezing induced different DNA methylation changes. Therefore, we conclude that epigenetic modifications can potentially serve as a rapid and flexible mechanism for C. bungeana

  18. Trainability of cold induced vasodilatation in fingers and toes

    OpenAIRE

    Daanen, Hein A. M.; Koedam, Jens; Cheung, Stephen S.

    2011-01-01

    Subjects that repeatedly have to expose the extremities to cold may benefit from a high peripheral temperature to maintain dexterity and tissue integrity. Therefore, we investigated if repeated immersions of a hand and a foot in cold water resulted in increased skin temperatures. Nine male and seven female subjects (mean 20.4; SD 2.2 years) immersed their right (trained) hand and foot simultaneously in 8°C water, 30 min daily for 15 days. During the pre and post-test (days 1 and 15, respectiv...

  19. Expression of the heat shock gene clpL of Streptococcus thermophilus is induced by both heat and cold shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naclerio Gino

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat and cold shock response are normally considered as independent phenomena. A small amount of evidence suggests instead that interactions may exist between them in two Lactococcus strains. Results We show the occurrence of molecular relationships between the mechanisms of cold and heat adaptations in Streptococcus thermophilus, a lactic acid bacterium widely used in dairy fermentation, where it undergoes both types of stress. We observed that cryotolerance is increased when cells are pre-incubated at high temperature. In addition, the production of a protein, identified as ClpL, a member of the heat-shock ATPase family Clp A/B, is induced at both high and low temperature. A knock-out clpL mutant is deficient in both heat and cold tolerance. However lack of production of this protein does not abolish the positive effect of heat pre-treatment towards cryotolerance. Conclusion Dual induction of ClpL by cold and heat exposure of cells and reduced tolerance to both temperature shocks in a clpL mutant indicates that the two stress responses are correlated in S. thermophilus. However this protein is not responsible by itself for cryotolerance of cells pre-treated at high temperature, indicating that ClpL is necessary for the two phenomena, but does not account by itself for the relationships between them.

  20. Salmon calcitonin reduces oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Manahito; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Sakamoto, Kenji; Ishii, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is commonly used anti-cancer drugs, but it frequently causes peripheral neuropathic pain. Recently, we reported that elcatonin, a synthetic analog of eel calcitonin, attenuated the oxaliplatin- and paclitaxel-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in rats. In the present study, we determined whether salmon calcitonin also had anti-allodynic effects on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rats. The rats were treated with a single dose of oxaliplatin (6 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)). Oxaliplatin resulted in cold and mechanical allodynia. We assessed the anti-allodynic effects of subcutaneously administered salmon calcitonin (20 U/kg/d) by cold stimulation (8°C) directly to the hind paw of the rats and by using the von Frey test. Salmon calcitonin almost completely reversed the effects of both cold and mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that salmon calcitonin is also useful for treatment of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy clinically.

  1. Purification and Characterization of Cold-active α-Amylase Excreted by A Strain of Marine Cold-adaptive Penicillia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tian-hong; ZHANG Gang; HOU Yun-hua

    2004-01-01

    The filamentous fungi from the Huanghai sea sludge were screened according to their ability to produce cold-active α-amylase. The strain with the highest amylase activity was identified as Penicillium species. The α-amylase purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and column chromatography on DEAE-sepharose and sephadex G-100 shows a molecular weight of about 55000 and a pI of 4.38. The enzyme is stable in a pH range of 5.5-8.0 and has a maximum activity at pH 6.0. Compared with the α-amylase from mesophiles and thermophiles, the cold-active enzyme shows a high enzyme activity at lower temperatures and a high sensitivity at temperatures higher than 50 ℃. The optimal temperature is 40 ℃ and the activity decreases dramatically at temperatures above 50 ℃. Ca2+ shows a significant effect on maintaining the structure and the activity of the enzyme. EDTA and Cu2+ are its inhibitors. The products from the hydrolysis of soluble starch with the cold-active enzyme are maltose and other oligosaccharides.

  2. Behavioral buffering of global warming in a cold-adapted lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Zaida; Mencía, Abraham; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-07-01

    Alpine lizards living in restricted areas might be particularly sensitive to climate change. We studied thermal biology of Iberolacerta cyreni in high mountains of central Spain. Our results suggest that I. cyreni is a cold-adapted thermal specialist and an effective thermoregulator. Among ectotherms, thermal specialists are more threatened by global warming than generalists. Alpine lizards have no chance to disperse to new suitable habitats. In addition, physiological plasticity is unlikely to keep pace with the expected rates of environmental warming. Thus, lizards might rely on their behavior in order to deal with ongoing climate warming. Plasticity of thermoregulatory behavior has been proposed to buffer the rise of environmental temperatures. Therefore, we studied the change in body and environmental temperatures, as well as their relationships, for I. cyreni between the 1980s and 2012. Air temperatures have increased more than 3.5°C and substrate temperatures have increased by 6°C in the habitat of I. cyreni over the last 25 years. However, body temperatures of lizards have increased less than 2°C in the same period, and the linear relationship between body and environmental temperatures remains similar. These results show that alpine lizards are buffering the potential impact of the increase in their environmental temperatures, most probably by means of their behavior. Body temperatures of I. cyreni are still cold enough to avoid any drop in fitness. Nonetheless, if warming continues, behavioral buffering might eventually become useless, as it would imply spending too much time in shelter, losing feeding, and mating opportunities. Eventually, if body temperature exceeds the thermal optimum in the near future, fitness would decrease abruptly.

  3. Searching for signatures of cold adaptations in modern and archaic humans: hints from the brown adipose tissue genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazzini, M; Schiavo, G; De Fanti, S; Martelli, P L; Casadio, R; Luiselli, D

    2014-09-01

    Adaptation to low temperatures has been reasonably developed in the human species during the colonization of the Eurasian landmass subsequent to Out of Africa migrations of anatomically modern humans. In addition to morphological and cultural changes, also metabolic ones are supposed to have favored human isolation from cold and body heat production and this can be hypothesized also for most Neandertal and at least for some Denisovan populations, which lived in geographical areas that strongly experienced the last glacial period. Modulation of non-shivering thermogenesis, for which adipocytes belonging to the brown adipose tissue are the most specialized cells, might have driven these metabolic adaptations. To perform an exploratory analysis aimed at looking into this hypothesis, variation at 28 genes involved in such functional pathway was investigated in modern populations from different climate zones, as well as in Neandertal and Denisovan genomes. Patterns of variation at the LEPR gene, strongly related to increased heat dissipation by mitochondria, appeared to have been shaped by positive selection in modern East Asians, but not in Europeans. Moreover, a single potentially cold-adapted LEPR allele, different from the supposed adaptive one identified in Homo sapiens, was found also in Neandertal and Denisovan genomes. These findings suggest that independent mechanisms for cold adaptations might have been developed in different non-African human groups, as well as that the evolution of possible enhanced thermal efficiency in Neandertals and in some Denisovan populations has plausibly entailed significant changes also in other functional pathways than in the examined one.

  4. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptation and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qian; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna

    2015-06-16

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced in pH 5.0 tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSB-YE) at 37 °C. Subsequently, the stability of acid stress adaptation, which was defined as the capacity to maintain its acquired acid adaptation after induction in the absence of sublethal acid stress, was determined at 37 °C, 22 °C or 4 °C in broth and in different food substrates. Then, the acid stress adaptation induced cross protection against lauric arginate (LAE) and its stability was investigated in TSB-YE, milk and carrot juice. Our findings show that the acid stress adaptation was stable at 4 °C up to 24h but was reversed at 37 °C or 22 °C within 2h. In the cross protection assay with LAE, the acid stress adapted cells had approximately 2 log CFU/ml greater survival than non-adapted cells in broth at 22 °C or in milk and carrot juice at 4 °C. The acid adaptation induced cross protection against LAE in L. monocytogenes was reversible within 1h at 4 °C in the absence of sublethal acid stress. Our findings suggest that the stability of acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes under cold conditions should be taken into account when the risk analysis is performed during food processing.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of cold-induced CYP1A activation in rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepechaeva, Maria; Kolosova, Natalia; Grishanova, Alevtina

    2011-12-01

    Cytochrome P4501A (the CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 enzymes) is known to metabolize anthropogenic xenobiotics to carcinogenic and mutagenic compounds. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation is regulated via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent signal transduction pathway. CYP1A2 activation may occur through the AhR-dependent or AhR-independent signal transduction pathways. We used male Wistar rats to explore possible mechanisms of CYP1A activation induced by exposure to cold and the effects of the protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein, herbimycin A, and geldanamycin on the properties of hepatic CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 proteins following exposure to cold and to classic CYP1A inducers. The molecular mechanisms of cold-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 activation are different. The CYP1A2 activation apparently occurs at the post-transcriptional level. The CYP1A1 activation, whether caused by exposure to cold or by classic CYP1A inducers, is AhR-dependent and occurs at the transcriptional level. Protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors have no effect on benzo(a)pyrene-induced CYP1A expression but alter cold-induced CYP1A1 activity and the CYP1A1 mRNA level. Thus, treatment with herbimycin A or geldanamycin leads to an increase in CYP1A1 activity, while treatment with genistein increases CYP1A1 mRNA expression and decreases CYP1A2 activity. These data elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cold-induced CYP1A activation and the role of protein kinases in the regulation of CYP1A during exposure to cold. Our results can also help identify the differences between the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of the classic CYP1A inducers and the effects of cooling.

  6. Novel Cold-adaptive Penicillium Strain FS010 Secreting Thermo-labile Xylanase Isolated from Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Hua HOU; Tian-Hong WANG; Hao LONG; Hui-Yuan ZHU

    2006-01-01

    A novel cold-adaptive xylanolytic Penicillium strain FS010 was isolated from Yellow Sea sediments. The marine fungus grew well from 4 to 20 ℃; a lower (0 ℃) or higher (37 ℃) temperature limits its growth. The strain was identified as Penicillium chrysogenum. Compared with mesophilic P. chrysogenum,the cold-adaptive fungus secreted the cold-active xylanase (XYL) showing high hydrolytic activities at low temperature (2-15 ℃) and high sensitivity to high temperature (>50 ℃). The XYL gene was isolated from the cold-adaptive P. chrysogenum FS010 and designated as xyl. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein encoded by xyl showed high homology with the sequence of glycoside hydrolase family 10. The gene was subcloned into an expression vector pGEX-4T-1 and the encoded protein was overexpressed as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase in Escherichia coli BL21. The expression product was purified and subjected to enzymatic characterization. The optimal temperature and pH for recombinantXYL was 25 ℃ and 5.5, respectively. Recombinant XYL showed nearly 80% of its maximal activity at 4 ℃ and was active in the pH range 3.0-9.5.

  7. Contributions of Two-Component Regulatory Systems, Alternative σ Factors, and Negative Regulators to Listeria monocytogenes Cold Adaptation and Cold Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yvonne C.; Hu, Yuewei; Chaturongakul, Soraya; Files, Kali D.; Bowen, Barbara M.; Boor, Kathryn J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow at refrigeration temperatures is critical for transmission of this foodborne pathogen. We evaluated the contributions of different transcriptional regulators and two-component regulatory systems to L. monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth. L. monocytogenes parent strain 10403S and selected isogenic null mutants in genes encoding four alternative σ factors (sigB, sigH, sigC, and sigL), two regulators of σB (rsbT and rsbV), two negative regulators (ctsR and hrcA), and 15 two-component response regulators were grown in brain heart infusion broth at 4°C with (i) a high-concentration starting inoculum (108 CFU/ml), (ii) a low-concentration starting inoculum (102 CFU/ml), and (iii) a high-concentration starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells. With a starting inoculum of 108 CFU/ml, null mutants in genes encoding selected alternative σ factors (ΔsigH, ΔsigC, and ΔsigL), a negative regulator (ΔctsR), regulators of σB (ΔrsbT and ΔrsbV), and selected two-component response regulators (ΔlisR, Δlmo1172, and Δlmo1060) had significantly reduced growth (P < 0.05) compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4°C. The growth defect for ΔsigL was limited and was not confirmed by optical density (OD600) measurement data. With a starting inoculum of 102 CFU/ml and after monitoring growth at 4°C over 84 days, only the ΔctsR strain had a consistent but limited growth defect; the other mutant strains had either no growth defects or limited growth defects apparent at only one or two of the nine sampling points evaluated during the 84-day growth period (ΔsigB, ΔsigC, and Δlmo1172). With a 108 CFU/ml starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells, none of the mutant strains that had a growth defect when inoculation was performed with cells pregrown at 37°C had reduced growth as compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4°C, suggesting a specific defect in the ability of these mutant strains to adapt to 4

  8. The influence of cold water immersions on adaptation following a single bout of damaging exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howatson, Glyn; Goodall, S; van Someren, K A

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to elucidate the effects of cold water immersions (CWIs) following damaging exercise on the repeated bout effect (RBE). Sixteen males performed two bouts of drop jump exercise separated by 14-21 days. Participants were equally, but randomly assigned to either a CWI (12-min CWI at 15 degrees C) or control group (12-min seated rest). Treatments were given immediately after the first exercise bout, 24, 48 and 72 h post-exercise. No interventions were given following the second bout. Maximum voluntary contraction (MIVC), soreness (DOMS), creatine kinase (CK), thigh girth and range of motion (ROM) were recorded before and for 96 h following the initial and repeated bouts of damaging exercise. All variables, except ROM, showed a significant time effect (P muscle damage following the initial bout; there were no differences between the CWI and control groups after the initial bout. Following the repeated bout of exercise there was a significant attenuation in the reduction of MIVC (P = 0.002) and a reduction in DOMS (P < 0.001), which is indicative of the RBE. There were no significant differences between groups following the repeated bout of damaging exercise. These data show that CWI had no effect following damaging exercise and did not inhibit the RBE. Despite CWI being used routinely, its efficacy remains unclear and there is a need to elucidate the benefits of this intervention on recovery and adaptation to provide practitioners with evidence based practice.

  9. Structural characterization of metal binding to a cold-adapted frataxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, Martín E; Roman, Ernesto A; Rigal, Juan B; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier

    2015-06-01

    Frataxin is an evolutionary conserved protein that participates in iron metabolism. Deficiency of this small protein in humans causes a severe neurodegenerative disease known as Friedreich's ataxia. A number of studies indicate that frataxin binds iron and regulates Fe-S cluster biosynthesis. Previous structural studies showed that metal binding occurs mainly in a region of high density of negative charge. However, a comprehensive characterization of the binding sites is required to gain further insights into the mechanistic details of frataxin function. In this work, we have solved the X-ray crystal structures of a cold-adapted frataxin from a psychrophilic bacterium in the presence of cobalt or europium ions. We have identified a number of metal-binding sites, mainly solvent exposed, several of which had not been observed in previous studies on mesophilic homologues. No major structural changes were detected upon metal binding, although the structures exhibit significant changes in crystallographic B-factors. The analysis of these B-factors, in combination with crystal packing and RMSD among structures, suggests the existence of localized changes in the internal motions. Based on these results, we propose that bacterial frataxins possess binding sites of moderate affinity for a quick capture and transfer of iron to other proteins and for the regulation of Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, modulating interactions with partner proteins.

  10. Purification and characterization of cold-adapted beta-agarase from an Antarctic psychrophilic strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An extracellular β-agarase was purified from Pseudoalteromonas sp. NJ21, a Psychrophilic agar-degrading bacterium isolated from Antarctic Prydz Bay sediments. The purified agarase (Aga21 revealed a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with an apparent molecular weight of 80 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature of the agarase were 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively. However, it maintained as much as 85% of the maximum activities at 10 °C. Significant activation of the agarase was observed in the presence of Mg2+, Mn2+, K+; Ca2+, Na+, Ba2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Sr2+ and EDTA inhibited the enzyme activity. The enzymatic hydrolyzed product of agar was characterized as neoagarobiose. Furthermore, this work is the first evidence of cold-adapted agarase in Antarctic psychrophilic bacteria and these results indicate the potential for the Antarctic agarase as a catalyst in medicine, food and cosmetic industries.

  11. Structural basis for the cold adaptation of psychrophilic M37 lipase from Photobacterium lipolyticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Suk-Kyeong; Jeong, Dae Gwin; Lee, Mi Sook; Lee, Jung-Kee; Kim, Hyung-Kwoun; Ryu, Seong Eon; Park, Byoung Chul; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Seung Jun

    2008-04-01

    The M37 lipase from Photobacterium lipolyticum shows an extremely low activation energy and strong activity at low temperatures, with optimum activity seen at 298 K and more than 75% of the optimum activity retained down to 278 K. Though the M37 lipase is most closely related to the filamentous fungal lipase, Rhizomucor miehei lipase (RML) at the primary structure level, their activity characteristics are completely different. In an effort to identify structural components of cold adaptation in lipases, we determined the crystal structure of the M37 lipase at 2.2 A resolution and compared it to that of nonadapted RML. Structural analysis revealed that M37 lipase adopted a folding pattern similar to that observed for other lipase structures. However, comparison with RML revealed that the region beneath the lid of the M37 lipase included a significant and unique cavity that would be occupied by a lid helix upon substrate binding. In addition, the oxyanion hole was much wider in M37 lipase than RML. We propose that these distinct structural characteristics of M37 lipase may facilitate the lateral movement of the helical lid and subsequent substrate hydrolysis, which might explain its low activation energy and high activity at low temperatures.

  12. Expression of a cold-adapted fish trypsin in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macouzet, Martin; Simpson, Benjamin K; Lee, Byong H

    2005-06-01

    Trypsin is a highly valuable protease that has many industrial and biomedical applications. The growing demand for non-animal sources of the enzyme and for trypsins with special properties has driven the interest to clone and express this protease in microorganisms. Reports about expression of recombinant trypsins show wide differences in the degree of success and are contained mainly in patent applications, which disregard the difficulties associated with the developments. Although the yeast Pichia pastoris appears to be the microbial host with the greatest potential for the production of trypsin, it has shown problems when expressing cold-adapted fish trypsins (CAFTs). CAFTs are considered of immense value for their comparative advantage over other trypsins in a number of food-processing and biotechnological applications. Thus, to investigate potential obstacles related to the production of CAFTs in P. pastoris, the cunner fish trypsin (CFT) was cloned in different Pichia expression vectors. The vectors were constructed targeting both internal and secreted expression and keeping the CFT native signal peptide. Western-blotting analysis confirmed the expression with evident differences for each construct, observing a major effect of the leader peptide sequence on the expression patterns. Immobilized nickel affinity chromatography yielded a partially purified recombinant CFT, which exhibited trypsin-specific activity after activation with bovine enterokinase.

  13. Training induced adaptation in horse skeletal muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, K.G. van

    2006-01-01

    It appears that the physiological and biochemical adaptation of skeletal muscle to training in equine species shows a lot of similarities with human and rodent physiological adaptation. On the other hand it is becoming increasingly clear that intra-cellular mechanisms of adaptation (substrate transp

  14. Comparative proteome analysis of psychrophilic versus mesophilic bacterial species: Insights into the molecular basis of cold adaptation of proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Boojala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cold adapted or psychrophilic organisms grow at low temperatures, where most of other organisms cannot grow. This adaptation requires a vast array of sequence, structural and physiological adjustments. To understand the molecular basis of cold adaptation of proteins, we analyzed proteomes of psychrophilic and mesophilic bacterial species and compared the differences in amino acid composition and substitution patterns to investigate their likely association with growth temperatures. Results In psychrophilic bacteria, serine, aspartic acid, threonine and alanine are overrepresented in the coil regions of secondary structures, whilst glutamic acid and leucine are underrepresented in the helical regions. Compared to mesophiles, psychrophiles comprise a significantly higher proportion of amino acids that contribute to higher protein flexibility in the coil regions of proteins, such as those with tiny/small or neutral side chains. Amino acids with aliphatic, basic, aromatic and hydrophilic side chains are underrepresented in the helical regions of proteins of psychrophiles. The patterns of amino acid substitutions between the orthologous proteins of psychrophiles versus mesophiles are significantly different for several amino acids when compared to their substitutions in orthologous proteins of within the mesophiles or psychrophiles. Conclusion Current results provide quantitative substitution preferences (or avoidance of amino acids that lead to the adaptation of proteins to cold temperatures. These finding would help future efforts in selecting mutations for rational design of proteins with enhanced psychrophilic properties.

  15. Peripheral nervous control of cold-induced reduction in the respiratory quotient of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refinetti, Roberto

    1990-03-01

    Cold-exposed rats show a reduction in the respiratory quotient which is indicative of a relative shift from carbohydrates to lipids as substrates for oxidative metabolism. In the present study, the effects of food deprivation and cold exposure on the respiratory quotient were observed. In addition, the involvement of the three main branches of the peripheral nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic, and somatic) was investigated by means of synaptic blockade with propranolol, atropine, and quinine, respectively. Both propranolol and quinine blocked the cold-induced decrease in respiratory quotient and increase in heat production, whereas atropine had only minor and very brief effects. It is concluded that both the sympathetic and somatic branches are involved in the metabolic changes associated with cold-induced thermogenesis and that the increase in metabolic heat production involves a shift from carbohydrate to lipid utilization irrespective of which of the two branches is activated.

  16. Cold-atom physics using ultrathin optical fibers: light-induced dipole forces and surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagué, G; Vetsch, E; Alt, W; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2007-10-19

    The strong evanescent field around ultrathin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold-atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold cesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  17. Total lactate dehydrogenase activity of tail muscle is not cold-adapted in nocturnal lizards from cool-temperate habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, K M; Miller, J H; Clark, A G; Daugherty, C H

    2005-12-01

    The dependence of metabolic processes on temperature constrains the behavior, physiology and ecology of many ectothermic animals. The evolution of nocturnality in lizards, especially in temperate regions, requires adaptations for activity at low temperatures when optimal body temperatures are unlikely to be obtained. We examined whether nocturnal lizards have cold-adapted lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). LDH was chosen as a representative metabolic enzyme. We measured LDH activity of tail muscle in six lizard species (n=123: three nocturnal, two diurnal and one crepuscular) between 5 and 35 degrees C and found no differences in LDH-specific activity or thermal sensitivity among the species. Similarly, the specific activity and thermal sensitivity of LDH were similar between skinks and geckos. Similar enzyme activities among nocturnal and diurnal lizards indicate that there is no selection of temperature specific LDH enzyme activity at any temperature. As many nocturnal lizards actively thermoregulate during the day, LDH may be adapted for a broad range of temperatures rather than adapted specifically for the low temperatures encountered when the animals are active. The total activity of LDH in tropical and temperate lizards is not cold-adapted. More data are required on biochemical adaptations and whole animal thermal preferences before trends can be established.

  18. Habituation to the Perception of the Qualities of Cold-Induced Pain

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to measure the reported pain caused by cold immersions over a 5-day period to determine if habituation to the perception of cold pain occurs. Numerous authors have described a habituation phenomenon to therapeutic ice bath immersions. Athletic trainers often explain to athletes that their perceptions of the pain induced by a therapeutic ice bath will decrease each day as they proceed through therapy. Essentially, it is assumed that there is a habituation to t...

  19. Cold and L-menthol-induced sensitization in healthy volunteers--a cold hypersensitivity analogue to the heat/capsaicin model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Poulsen, Jeppe N; Uchida, Yugo; Nikbakht, Anahita; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-05-01

    Topical high-concentration L-menthol is the only established human experimental pain model to study mechanisms underlying cold hyperalgesia. We aimed at investigating the combinatorial effect of cold stimuli and topical L-menthol on cold pain and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia. Analogue to the heat-capsaicin model on skin sensitization, we proposed that cold/menthol enhances or prolong L-menthol-evoked sensitization. Topical 40% L-menthol or vehicle was applied (20 minutes) on the volar forearms of 20 healthy females and males (age, 28.7 ± 0.6 years). Cold stimulation of 5°C for 5 minutes was then applied to the treated area 3 times with 40-minute intervals. Cold detection threshold and pain, mechanical hyperalgesia (pinprick), static and dynamic mechanical allodynia (von Frey and brush), skin blood flow (laser speckle), and temperature (thermocamera) were assessed. Cold detection threshold and cold pain threshold (CPT) increased after L-menthol and remained high after the cold rekindling cycles (P menthol evoked secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick (P menthol (P menthol facilitated and prolonged L-menthol-induced cold pain and hyperalgesia. This model may prove beneficial for testing analgesic compounds when a sufficient duration of time is needed to see drug effects on CPT or mechanical hypersensitivity.

  20. [Influence of long-term adaptation to cold on the state of cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, L N; Vychuzhanova, E A

    2013-10-01

    The inhabitancy in Far North increases a probability of development of coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction and arterial hypertension. Catecholamines and NO deficiency play a substantial role in the development of cold hypertension, but these are not involved in acclimatization cardiac hypertrophy. Data of in vivo experiments indicate in favor of an involvement of α-adrenergic receptors (ARs) in the mechanism of an appearance of cold hypertension. Cold acclimatization promotes an elevation of β3-AR density and decrease in β1-AR and β2-AR quantity on sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes. Experimental data indicate the important role of aldosterone and angiotensin II in the development of acclimatization hypertension. Catecholamines, aldosterone and angiotensin II are not involved in cold hypertrophy of heart. Experimental data demonstrate the important role of endothelin ETA receptor in the formation of cold hypertrophy of heart and cardiofibrosis. Thyroid hormones play substantial role in the development of cold hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy.

  1. [IMPACT OF LONG-TERM ADAPTATION TO COLD ON THE STATE OF CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, L N; Naryzhnaia, N V

    2015-05-01

    The inhabitancy in Far North increases a probability of development of coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction and arterial hypertension. Catecholamines and NO deficiency play a substantial role in the development of cold hypertension but are not involved in acclimatization cardiac hypertrophy. Data of in vivo experiments indicate in favor of an involvement of α-adrenergic receptors (ARs) in the mechanism of an appearance of cold hypertension. Cold acclimatization promotes an elevation of β3-AR density and decrease in β1-AR and β2-AR quantity on sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes. Experimental data indicate about the important role of aldosterone and angiotensin-II in the development of acclimatization hypertension. Catecholamines, aldosterone and angiotensin-II are not involved in cold hypertrophy of heart. Experimental data say on the important role of endothelin ETA-receptor in the formation of cold hypertrophy of heart and cardiofibrosis. Thyroid hormones play substantial role in the development of cold hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy.

  2. Generation and characterization of a cold-adapted attenuated live H3N2 subtype influenza virus vaccine candidate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Wen-qi; LIU Xiu-fan; WANG Xi-liang; YANG Peng-hui; DUAN Yue-qiang; LUO De-yan; TANG Chong; JIA Wei-hong; XING Li; SHI Xin-fu; ZHANG Yu-jing

    2009-01-01

    Background H3N2 subtype influenza A viruses have been identified in humans worldwide, raising concerns about their pandemic potential and prompting the development of candidate vaccines to protect humans against this subtype of influenza A virus. The aim of this study was to establish a system for rescuing of a cold-adapted high-yielding H3N2 subtype human influenza virus by reverse genetics. Methods In order to generate better and safer vaccine candidate viruses, a cold-adapted high yielding reassortant H3N2 influenza A virus was genetically constructed by reverse genetics and was designated as rgAA-H3N2. The rgAA-H3N2 virus contained HA and NA genes from an epidemic strain A/Wisconsin/67/2005 (H3N2) in a background of internal genes derived from the master donor viruses (MDV), cold-adapted (ca), temperature sensitive (te), live attenuated influenza virus strain A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (MDV-A). Results In this presentation, the virus HA titer of rgAA-H3N2 in the allantoic fluid from infected embryonated eggs was as high as 1:1024. A fluorescent focus assay (FFU) was performed 24-36 hours post-infection using a specific antibody and bright staining was used for determining the virus titer. The allantoic fluid containing the recovered influenza virus was analyzed in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test and the specific inhibition was found. Conclusion The results mentioned above demonstrated that cold-adapted, attenuated reassortant H3N2 subtype influenza A virus was successfully generated, which laid a good foundation for the further related research.

  3. The influence of the social thermoregulation on the cold-adaptive growth of BAT in hairless and furred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmaier, G

    1975-03-26

    When mice were living in groups they developed less brown adipose tissue (BAT) during cold adaptation as compared with single mice. This effect of social aggregation was more pronounced in genetically hairless mice than in furred mice. In both races of mice the most significant difference in BAT growth was found between single mice and pairs of mice, indicating that the formation of pairs causes the relatively most effective improvement of thermal balance.

  4. A temporal-omic study of Propionibacterium freudenreichii CIRM-BIA1 adaptation strategies in conditions mimicking cheese ripening in the cold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dalmasso

    Full Text Available Propionibacterium freudenreichii is used as a ripening culture in Swiss cheese manufacture. It grows when cheeses are ripened in a warm room (about 24°C. Cheeses with an acceptable eye formation level are transferred to a cold room (about 4°C, inducing a marked slowdown of propionic fermentation, but P. freudenreichii remains active in the cold. To investigate the P. freudenreichii strategies of adaptation and survival in the cold, we performed the first global gene expression profile for this species. The time-course transcriptomic response of P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA1(T strain was analyzed at five times of incubation, during growth at 30°C then for 9 days at 4°C, under conditions preventing nutrient starvation. Gene expression was also confirmed by RT-qPCR for 28 genes. In addition, proteomic experiments were carried out and the main metabolites were quantified. Microarray analysis revealed that 565 genes (25% of the protein-coding sequences of P. freudenreichii genome were differentially expressed during transition from 30°C to 4°C (P1. At 4°C, a general slowing down was observed for genes implicated in the cell machinery. On the contrary, P. freudenreichii CIRM-BIA1(T strain over-expressed genes involved in lactate, alanine and serine conversion to pyruvate, in gluconeogenesis, and in glycogen synthesis. Interestingly, the expression of different genes involved in the formation of important cheese flavor compounds, remained unchanged at 4°C. This could explain the contribution of P. freudenreichii to cheese ripening even in the cold. In conclusion, P. freudenreichii remains metabolically active at 4°C and induces pathways to maintain its long-term survival.

  5. Study on the Morphological Characteristics of Skin and Hair Coat of Yak and the Adaptability to the Cold Living Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨博辉

    2005-01-01

    Selecting 6 heads of new yak strains(the offspring of reciprocal cross of F1 produced by wild yak male mated with domestic yak female)and 6 domestic yaks at 3 and 12 age in months respectively at Datong Yak Farm of Qinghai Province. This paper was studied for the morphological characteristics of the skin and hair coat of yak and their adaptability to the cold living environment in Qinghai-Tibetan plateau. The results indicated that it should be of vital importance marker for the morphological characteristics of the skin and hair coat with two type of yaks at 3 and 12 age in months and their regulations of growth and development to adapt to the cold living environment in Qinghai-Tibetan plateau,The main morphological indexes of the skin and hair coat of the rearing new yak strain were higher than those of the domestic yaks at the same age in months, or speak precisely, the new yak strain was more powerful adaptable to the alpine cold living environment than that of the domestic yaks. The resvlts above provided scientific basis for the native strain breeding of yak and the new yak strain rearing.

  6. Elucidation of different cold-adapted Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) trypsin X isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Bjarki; Sandholt, Gunnar B; Gudmundsdottir, Ágústa

    2017-01-01

    Trypsins from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), consisting of several isoenzymes, are highly active cold-adapted serine proteases. These trypsins are isolated for biomedical use in an eco-friendly manner from underutilized seafood by-products. Our group has explored the biochemical properties of trypsins and their high potential in biomedicine. For broader utilization of cod trypsins, further characterization of biochemical properties of the individual cod trypsin isoenzymes is of importance. For that purpose, a benzamidine purified trypsin isolate from Atlantic cod was analyzed. Anion exchange chromatography revealed eight peaks containing proteins around 24kDa with tryptic activity. Based on mass spectrometric analysis, one isoenzyme gave the best match to cod trypsin I and six isoenzymes gave the best match to cod trypsin X. Amino terminal sequencing of two of these six trypsin isoenzymes showed identity to cod trypsin X. Three sequence variants of trypsin X were identified by cDNA analysis demonstrating that various forms of this enzyme exist. One trypsin X isoenzyme was selected for further characterization based on abundance and stability. Stepwise increase in catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of this trypsin X isoenzyme was obtained with substrates containing one to three amino acid residues. The study demonstrates that the catalytic efficiency of this trypsin X isoenzyme is comparable to that of cod trypsin I, the most abundant and highly active isoenzyme in the benzamidine cod trypsin isolate. Differences in pH stability and sensitivity to inhibitors of the trypsin X isoenzyme compared to cod trypsin I were detected that may be important for practical use.

  7. Study on the storm surges induced by cold waves in the Northern East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Dongxue; Hou, Yijun; Li, Jian; Liu, Yahao

    2016-08-01

    Cold wave, a kind of severe weather system, can bring strong wind and induce significant sea level rise to the Northern East China Sea. Based on CFSR data, the study shows the monthly distributions of invaded days and the spatiotemporal distributions of cold-wave wind direction and wind speed. A three-dimensional numerical model (ROMS) was developed to study storm surges induced by cold waves. The role of wind direction, wind speed, wind duration, extratropical cyclone and tide-surge interaction is investigated by conducting different sensitivity experiments. The results indicate that storm surges mainly happen at the coasts perpendicular to the wind directions. Surge range and time lag are related to the geometry of the basin and the continental shelf. The response of the sea-level fluctuations to cold wave indicates that there is a positive correlation between crests and wind speed, a negative correlation between troughs and wind speed, but no obvious correlations to wind duration. Coupled weather cold waves, which yield a larger range and a multi-peak structure of surges, can be classified according to cold wave tracks and extratropical cyclones. The tide-surge interaction has an obvious and different effect on the magnitudes and phases of storm surges for different tidal stages.

  8. Mitofusin-2 protects against cold stress-induced cell injury in HEK293 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Yaomin; Yang, Qun; Che, Honglei; Chen, Xiangjun; Yao, Ting; Zhao, Fang; Liu, Mingchao; Ke, Tao [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Chen, Jingyuan, E-mail: jy_chen@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Luo, Wenjing, E-mail: luowenj@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2010-06-25

    Mitochondrial impairment is hypothesized to contribute to cell injury during cold stress. Mitochondria fission and fusion are closely related in the function of the mitochondria, but the precise mechanisms whereby these processes regulate cell injury during cold stress remain to be determined. HEK293 cells were cultured in a cold environment (4.0 {+-} 0.1 {sup o}C) for 2, 4, 8, or 12 h. Western blot analyses showed that these cells expressed decreased fission-related protein Drp1 and increased fusion-related protein Mfn2 at 4 h; meanwhile, electron microscopy analysis revealed large and long mitochondrial morphology within these cells, indicating increased mitochondrial fusion. With silencing of Mfn2 but not of Mfn1 by siRNA promoted cold-stress-induced cell death with decreased ATP production in HEK293 cells. Our results show that increased expression of Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are important for mitochondrial function as well as cell survival during cold stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of mitochondrial fusion and fission in cold-stress-induced cell injury.

  9. Cold-Chain Adaptability During Introduction of Inactivated Polio Vaccine in Bangladesh, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billah, Mallick M; Zaman, K; Estivariz, Concepcion F; Snider, Cynthia J; Anand, Abhijeet; Hampton, Lee M; Bari, Tajul I A; Russell, Kevin L; Chai, Shua J

    2017-07-01

    Introduction of inactivated polio vaccine creates challenges in maintaining the cold chain for vaccine storage and distribution. We evaluated the cold chain in 23 health facilities and 36 outreach vaccination sessions in 8 districts and cities of Bangladesh, using purposive sampling during August-October 2015. We interviewed immunization and cold-chain staff, assessed equipment, and recorded temperatures during vaccine storage and transportation. All health facilities had functioning refrigerators, and 96% had freezers. Temperature monitors were observed in all refrigerators and freezers but in only 14 of 66 vaccine transporters (21%). Recorders detected temperatures >8°C for >60 minutes in 5 of 23 refrigerators (22%), 3 of 6 cold boxes (50%) transporting vaccines from national to subnational depots, and 8 of 48 vaccine carriers (17%) used in outreach vaccination sites. Temperatures cold boxes (21%) transporting vaccine from subnational depots to health facilities and 14 of 48 vaccine carriers (29%). Bangladesh has substantial cold-chain storage and transportation capacity after inactivated polio vaccine introduction, but temperature fluctuations during vaccine transport could cause vaccine potency loss that could go undetected. Bangladesh and other countries should strive to ensure consistent and sufficient cold-chain storage and monitor the cold chain during vaccine transportation at all levels.

  10. Adaptation of psychrophilic and psychrotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria to permanently cold marine environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, MF; Jørgensen, BB

    1996-01-01

    The potential for sulfate reduction at low temperatures was examined in two different cold marine sediments, Mariager Fjord (Denmark), which is permanently cold (3 to 6 degrees C) but surrounded by seasonally warmer environments, and the Weddell Sea (Antarctica), which is permanently below 0 degr...

  11. The biological clock is regulated by adrenergic signaling in brown fat but is dispensable for cold-induced thermogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siming Li

    Full Text Available The biological clock plays an important role in integrating nutrient and energy metabolism with other cellular processes. Previous studies have demonstrated that core clock genes are rhythmically expressed in peripheral tissues, including the liver, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islets, and white and brown adipose tissues. These peripheral clocks are entrained by physiological cues, thereby aligning the circadian pacemaker to tissue functions. The mechanisms that regulate brown adipose tissue clock in response to physiological signals remain poorly understood. Here we found that the expression of core clock genes is highly responsive to cold exposure in brown fat, but not in white fat. This cold-inducible regulation of the clock network is mediated by adrenergic receptor activation and the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α. Brown adipocytes in mice lacking a functional clock contain large lipid droplets accompanied by dysregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and adaptive thermogenesis. Paradoxically, the "clockless" mice were competent in maintaining core body temperature during cold exposure. These studies elucidated the presence of adrenergic receptor/clock crosstalk that appears to be required for normal thermogenic gene expression in brown fat.

  12. Salidroside reduces cold-induced mucin production by inhibiting TRPM8 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiang-Dong; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2013-09-01

    Salidroside is an effective component of the traditional Chinese herb, Rhodiola rosea, that is known to have the ability to protect individuals from cold attacks. In the present study, we investigated the effects of salidroside on respiratory epithelial cells exposed to cold temperatures. We wished to determine whether salidroside exerts any effect on cold-induced mucin (MUC) production and the possible mechanisms involved in this process. We incubated HBE16 cells with salidroside, exposed them to a cold stimulus (18˚C), and assayed the following endpoints: MUC production (the expression of MUC5AC), concentration intracellular of free calcium ([Ca2+]i), the activation of the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel and the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Our results revealed a significant increase in the [Ca2+]i concentration, as well as in TRPM8 and CREB expression in the cold-stimulated cells. MUC5AC expression was also increased. Treatment of the cells with salidroside at concentrations of 50 and 100 µM decreased the [Ca2+]i concentration, with a maximal effect detected in the cells treated with 100 µM salidroside. The expression of TRPM8 and TRPM8 channel conductivity were also repressed by salidroside; salidroside decreased the high levels of CREB activity and phosphorylation observed in the cold-stimulated cells. Furthermore, we transfected the cold-stimulated cells with CREB small interfering RNA (siRNA) to analyze TRPM8 gene expression in the absence of CREB activity. The results revealed that the cells treated with either CREB siRNA or salidroside expressed low levels of TRPM8 mRNA and protein. These results indicate that salidroside reduces MUC overproduction induced by cold stimuli and that salidroside exerts its protective effects by inhibiting TRPM8 activation, mainly by decreasing CREB activity.

  13. Opposite regulation of brain angiotensin type 1 and type 2 receptors in cold-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J F; Phillips, M I

    2001-03-02

    Rats exposed chronically to mild cold (5 degrees C/41 degrees F) develop hypertension. This cold-induced hypertension (CIH) is an environmentally induced, non-surgical, non-pharmacological and non-genetic model for studying hypertension in rats. The blood renin angiotensin system (RAS) appears to play a role in both initiating and maintaining the high blood pressure in CIH. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of brain angiotensin type 1 and type 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) in CIH. Sprague-Dawley adult male rats were used. Thirty-six rats were kept in a cold room at 5 degrees C and the other 36 were kept at 24 degrees C as controls. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was recorded by tail cuff. The SBP was elevated in rats exposed to cold within 1 week (n=12, P>0.05), significantly increased at 3 weeks (Pcold-treated and the controls were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks. Specific brain sections were removed, either for reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to measure mRNA, or for autoradiography to measure receptor binding for AT1R and AT2R. The AT1R mRNA was increased significantly in hypothalamus and brainstem after the first week in cold-treated rats and was maintained throughout the time of exposure to cold (n=6, Pcold-treated rats after exposure to cold. The experiments show differential regulation of RAS components, AT1R and AT2R, in different brain areas in cold-exposed rats and provide evidence that up-regulated AT1R and down-regulated AT2R in different brain areas are involved in CIH. The opposing directions of expression of AT1R and AT2R suggest that they play counterbalancing roles in brain function.

  14. Mechanism of sand slide - cold lahar induced by extreme rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Yamada, Masumi; Dok, Atitkagna

    2014-05-01

    Along with the increasing frequencies of extreme rainfall events in almost every where on the earth, shallow slide - debris flow, i.e. cold lahars running long distance often occurs and claims downslope residents lives. In the midnight of 15 October 2013, Typhoon Wilpha attacked the Izu-Oshima, a active volcanic Island and the extreme rainfall of more than 800 mm / 24 hours was recorded. This downpour of more than 80 mm/hr lasted 4 hours at its peak and caused a number of cold lahars. The initial stage of those lahars was shallow slides of surface black volcanic ash deposits, containing mostly fine sands. The thickness was only 50 cm - 1 m. In the reconnaissance investigation, author found that the sliding surface was the boundary of two separate volcanic ash layers between the black and yellow colored and apparently showing contrast of permeability and hardness. Permeability contrast may have contributed to generation of excess pore pressure on the border and trigger the slide. Then, the unconsolidated, unpacked mass was easily fluidized and transformed into mud flows, that which volcanologists call cold lahars. Seismometers installed for monitoring the active volcano's activities, succeeded to detect many tremors events. Many are spikes but 5 larger and longer events were extracted. They lasted 2 -3 minutes and if we assume that this tremors reflects the runout movement, then we can calculate the mean velocity of the lahars. Estimated velocity was 45 - 60 km/h, which is much higher than the average speed 30 - 40 km/h of debris flows observed in Japan. Flume tests of volcanic ash flows by the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute showed the wet volcanic ash can run at higher speed than other materials. The two tremor records were compare d with the local residents witnessed and confirmed by newspaper reported that the reach of the lahar was observed at the exact time when tremor ends. We took the black volcanic ash and conducted ring shear tests to

  15. Effect of Bee Venom Acupuncture on Oxaliplatin-Induced Cold Allodynia in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong-Soo Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin, a chemotherapy drug, often leads to neuropathic cold allodynia after a single administration. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA has been used in Korea to relieve various pain symptoms and is shown to have a potent antiallodynic effect in nerve-injured rats. We examined whether BVA relieves oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia and which endogenous analgesic system is implicated. The cold allodynia induced by an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p. was evaluated by immersing the rat’s tail into cold water (4°C and measuring the withdrawal latency. BVA (1.0 mg/kg, s.c. at Yaoyangguan (GV3, Quchi (LI11, or Zusanli (ST36 acupoints significantly reduced cold allodynia with the longest effect being shown in the GV3 group. Conversely, a high dose of BVA (2.5 mg/kg at GV3 did not show a significant antiallodynic effect. Phentolamine (α-adrenergic antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p. partially blocked the relieving effect of BVA on allodynia, whereas naloxone (opioid antagonist, 2 mg/kg, i.p. did not. We further confirmed that an intrathecal administration of idazoxan (α2-adrenergic antagonist, 50 μg blocked the BVA-induced anti-allodynic effect. These results indicate that BVA alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, at least partly, through activation of the noradrenergic system. Thus, BVA might be a potential therapeutic option in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.

  16. Characterization of two novel cold-inducible K3 dehydrin genes from alfalfa (Medicago sativa spp. sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Marie-Pier; Castonguay, Yves; Cloutier, Jean; Michaud, Josée; Bertrand, Annick

    2013-03-01

    Dehydrin defines a complex family of intrinsically disordered proteins with potential adaptive value with regard to freeze-induced cell dehydration. Search within an expressed sequence tags library from cDNAs of cold-acclimated crowns of alfalfa (Medicago sativa spp. sativa L.) identified transcripts putatively encoding K(3)-type dehydrins. Analysis of full-length coding sequences unveiled two highly homologous sequence variants, K(3)-A and K(3)-B. An increase in the frequency of genotypes yielding positive genomic amplification of the K(3)-dehydrin variants in response to selection for superior tolerance to freezing and the induction of their expression at low temperature strongly support a link with cold adaptation. The presence of multiple allelic forms within single genotypes and independent segregation indicate that the two K(3) dehydrin variants are encoded by distinct genes located at unlinked loci. The co-inheritance of the K(3)-A dehydrin with a Y(2)K(4) dehydrin restriction fragment length polymorphism with a demonstrated impact on freezing tolerance suggests the presence of a genome domain where these functionally related genes are located. These results provide additional evidence that dehydrin play important roles with regard to tolerance to subfreezing temperatures. They also underscore the value of recurrent selection to help identify variants within a large multigene family in allopolyploid species like alfalfa.

  17. Forming of adaptation of students' organism to the cold factor by the methods of active conditioning to the cold in the process of physical education in the institute of higher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaydzhi S.V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A research purpose was a ground of the system forming of adaptation to the cold of organism of students which master speciality the "Cryogenic technique and technologies». 25 students of the first course took part in research. The level of adaptation possibilities of organism is found out to the cold for students. Offered and tested technology of improvement of these indexes. Medical tests, which allow to define the measure of adaptability of organism to cold a factor, design of method of adaptation this factor, were utillized. Methodical advices are recommended in relation to facilities of adaptation to the cold of organism in home terms within the framework of observance of healthy way of life. It is set that endurance and firmness to the sharp overfalls of temperatures is arrived at by implementation of exercises in the conditions of sharp fluctuations in a temperature: physical exercises in winter were executed in an apartment and then outdoors. It is also suggested to utillize a contrasting shower. It is set that the level of adaptation to the cold substantially became better: unsatisfactorily - 51,7 %, satisfactorily - 28,8 %, well-19,5 %.

  18. The Genome Sequence of the psychrophilic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii: the Role of Genome Evolution in Cold-adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Michelle A.; Lauro, Federico M.; Williams, Timothy J.; Burg, Dominic; Siddiqui, Khawar S.; De Francisci, David; Chong, Kevin W.Y.; Pilak, Oliver; Chew, Hwee H.; De Maere, Matthew Z.; Ting, Lily; Katrib, Marilyn; Ng, Charmaine; Sowers, Kevin R.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Anderson, Iain J.; Ivanova, Natalia; Dalin, Eileen; Martinez, Michelle; Lapidus, Alla; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Thomas, Torsten; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2009-04-01

    Psychrophilic archaea are abundant and perform critical roles throughout the Earth's expansive cold biosphere. Here we report the first complete genome sequence for a psychrophilic methanogenic archaeon, Methanococcoides burtonii. The genome sequence was manually annotated including the use of a five tiered Evidence Rating system that ranked annotations from Evidence Rating (ER) 1 (gene product experimentally characterized from the parent organism) to ER5 (hypothetical gene product) to provide a rapid means of assessing the certainty of gene function predictions. The genome is characterized by a higher level of aberrant sequence composition (51%) than any other archaeon. In comparison to hyper/thermophilic archaea which are subject to selection of synonymous codon usage, M. burtonii has evolved cold adaptation through a genomic capacity to accommodate highly skewed amino acid content, while retaining codon usage in common with its mesophilic Methanosarcina cousins. Polysaccharide biosynthesis genes comprise at least 3.3% of protein coding genes in the genome, and Cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis COG genes are over-represented. Likewise, signal transduction (COG category T) genes are over-represented and M. burtonii has a high 'IQ' (a measure of adaptive potential) compared to many methanogens. Numerous genes in these two over-represented COG categories appear to have been acquired from {var_epsilon}- and {delta}-proteobacteria, as do specific genes involved in central metabolism such as a novel B form of aconitase. Transposases also distinguish M. burtonii from other archaea, and their genomic characteristics indicate they play an important role in evolving the M. burtonii genome. Our study reveals a capacity for this model psychrophile to evolve through genome plasticity (including nucleotide skew, horizontal gene transfer and transposase activity) that enables adaptation to the cold, and to the biological and physical changes that have

  19. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces a Predominantly Necrotic Cell Death via the Microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Virard

    Full Text Available Cold plasma is a partially ionized gas generated by an electric field at atmospheric pressure that was initially used in medicine for decontamination and sterilization of inert surfaces. There is currently growing interest in using cold plasma for more direct medical applications, mainly due to the possibility of tuning it to obtain selective biological effects in absence of toxicity for surrounding normal tissues,. While the therapeutic potential of cold plasma in chronic wound, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment is beginning to be documented, information on plasma/cell interaction is so far limited and controversial.Using normal primary human fibroblast cultures isolated from oral tissue, we sought to decipher the effects on cell behavior of a proprietary cold plasma device generating guided ionization waves carried by helium. In this model, cold plasma treatment induces a predominantly necrotic cell death. Interestingly, death is not triggered by a direct interaction of the cold plasma with cells, but rather via a transient modification in the microenvironment. We show that modification of the microenvironment redox status suppresses treatment toxicity and protects cells from death. Moreover, necrosis is not accidental and seems to be an active response to an environmental cue, as its execution can be inhibited to rescue cells.These observations will need to be taken into account when studying in vitro plasma/cell interaction and may have implications for the design and future evaluation of the efficacy and safety of this new treatment strategy.

  20. Protein surface softness is the origin of enzyme cold-adaptation of trypsin.

    OpenAIRE

    Geir Villy Isaksen; Johan Åqvist; Bjørn Olav Brandsdal

    2014-01-01

    Life has effectively colonized most of our planet and extremophilic organisms require specialized enzymes to survive under harsh conditions. Cold-loving organisms (psychrophiles) express heat-labile enzymes that possess a high specific activity and catalytic efficiency at low temperatures. A remarkable universal characteristic of cold-active enzymes is that they show a reduction both in activation enthalpy and entropy, compared to mesophilic orthologs, which makes their reaction rates less se...

  1. Regeneration patterns in boreal Scots pine glades linked to cold-induced photoinhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, M.; Wirth, C.; Schumacher, J.; Mohren, G.M.J.; Shibistova, O.; Lloyd, J.; Ensminger, I.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Regeneration patterns of Pinus sylvestris L. juveniles in central Siberian glades were studied in relation to cold-induced photoinhibition. Spatial distribution of seedlings in different height classes revealed higher seedling densities beneath the canopy than beyond the canopy, and signific

  2. Ca2+-Induced Cold Set Gelation of Whey Protein Isolate Fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Hendrickx, H.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe the rheological behaviour of Ca2+-induced cold-set gels of whey protein mixtures. Coldset gels are important applications for products with a low thermal stability. In previous work [1], we determined the state diagram for whey protein mixtures that were heated for 10 h at

  3. Iron chelators do not reduce cold-induced cell injury in the isolated perfused rat kidney model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels-Stringer, M.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Wouterse, A.C.; Steenbergen, E.; Russel, F.G.M.; Kramers, C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro, cold-induced injury is an important contributor to renal tubular cell damage. It is mediated by iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and can be prevented by iron chelation. We studied whether iron chelators can prevent cold-induced damage in the isolated perfused

  4. Reactive oxygen species induced by cold stratification promote germination of Hedysarum scoparium seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liqiang; Lan, Qinying; Pritchard, Hugh W; Xue, Hua; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2016-12-01

    Seed germination is comprehensively regulated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relatively new among these factors. However, the role and underlying mechanisms of ROS in germination regulation remain largely unknown. In this study, we initially found that cold stratification could promote germination and respiration of Hedysarum scoparium seeds, especially at low temperature. We then noted that a ROS environment change induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or methylviologen (MV) could similarly promote seed germination. On the other hand, the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) suppressed germination of cold-stratified H. scoparium seeds, indicating a stimulatory role of ROS upon seed germination. An increased accumulation of O2(-) was detected in embryonic axes of cold-stratified seeds, and stratification-induced ROS generation as well as progressive accumulation of ROS during germination was further confirmed at the cellular level by confocal microscopy. Moreover, protein carbonylation in cold-stratified seeds was enhanced during germination, which was reversed by NAC treatment. Finally, the relationship between ROS and abscisic acid (ABA) or gibberellin (GA) in germination regulation was investigated. ABA treatment significantly inhibited germination and reduced the H2O2 content in both cold-stratified and non-cold-stratified seeds. Furthermore, we found that cold stratification mediates the down-regulation of the ABA content and increase of GA, suggesting an interaction between ROS and ABA/GA. These results in H. scoparium shed new light on the positive role of ROS and their cross-talk between plant hormones in seed germination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of free radicals formation induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound, and ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mati Ur; Jawaid, Paras; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Plasma medicine is increasingly recognized interdisciplinary field combining engineering, physics, biochemistry and life sciences. Plasma is classified into two categories based on the temperature applied, namely "thermal" and "non-thermal" (i.e., cold atmospheric plasma). Non-thermal or cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is produced by applying high voltage electric field at low pressures and power. The chemical effects of cold atmospheric plasma in aqueous solution are attributed to high voltage discharge and gas flow, which is transported rapidly on the liquid surface. The argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) induces efficient reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aqueous solutions without thermal decomposition. Their formation has been confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping, which is reviewed here. The similarities and differences between the plasma chemistry, sonochemistry, and radiation chemistry are explained. Further, the evidence for free radical formation in the liquid phase and their role in the biological effects induced by cold atmospheric plasma, ultrasound and ionizing radiation are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanism of electropulsing induced recrystallization in a cold-rolled Mg-9Al-1Zn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Yanbin, E-mail: jiangyanbin@tsinghua.org.cn [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing (MOE), University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Tang Guoyi [Advanced Materials Institute, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Shek Chanhung [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Xie Jianxin [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing (MOE), University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Xu Zhuohui [Shenzhen Nonfemet Technology Co., Ltd, Shenzhen 518122 (China); Zhang Zhihao [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials Processing (MOE), University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPT tremendously accelerated recrystallization of cold-rolled AZ91 alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure evolution of cold-rolled AZ91 alloy under EPT was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of EPT-induced recrystallization in cold-rolled AZ91 alloy is discussed. - Abstract: Electropulsing induced recrystallization of a cold-rolled Mg-9Al-1Zn alloy was studied using electron backscattering diffraction pattern (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and hardness test. The results indicated that compared with conventional heat treatment, electropulsing treatment (EPT) substantially accelerated recrystallization of the cold-rolled Mg-9Al-1Zn alloy within a short time of several seconds at relatively low temperature, as well as suppressed precipitation of {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase. Based on the EPT enhanced atomic diffusion resulting from the coupling of the thermal and athermal effects with the direct electron-atom interactions, EPT accelerated recrystallization due to significantly increasing both the velocity of dislocation motion and subgrain growth rate.

  7. Effects of L-citrulline diet on stress-induced cold hypersensitivity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kobayashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: L-citrulline is an amino acid discovered in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus, Cucurbitaceae and is a known component of the nitric oxide (NO cycle that plays an important role in adjusting blood circulation and supplying NO and a key component of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor. Objective: The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of L-citrulline on a newly established stress-induced cold hypersensitivity mouse model. Materials and Methods: When normal mice were forced to swim in water at 25°C for 15 min, their core body temperature dropped to 28.9°C, and then quickly recovered to normal temperature after the mice were transferred to a dry cage at room temperature (25°C. A 1-h immobilization before swimming caused the core body temperature to drop to ca. 24.1°C (4.8°C lower than normal mice, and the speed of core body temperature recovery dropped to 57% of the normal control. We considered this delay in recovery from hypothermia to be a sign of stress-induced cold hypersensitivity. Similar cold hypersensitivity was induced by administration of 50 mM L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester, a NO synthesis inhibitor. Results: In this study, we showed that recovery speed from the stress-induced hypothermia remarkably improved in mice fed a 1% L-citrulline-containing diet for 20 days. Furthermore, the nonfasting blood level of L-arginine and L-citrulline increased significantly in the L-citrulline diet group, and higher serum nitrogen oxide levels were observed during recovery from the cold. Conclusions: These results suggested that oral L-citrulline supplementation strengthens vascular endothelium function and attenuates stress-induced cold hypersensitivity by improving blood circulation.

  8. Herbal Prescription, DSGOST, Prevents Cold-Induced RhoA Activation and Endothelin-1 Production in Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Gook Cho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal prescription, Danggui-Sayuk-Ga-Osuyu-Saenggang-tang (DSGOST, has long been used to treat Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. However, a biological mechanism by which DSGOST ameliorates RP is yet deciphered. In this study, we demonstrate that DSGOST inhibits cold-induced activation of RhoA, in both vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC and endothelial cells (EC, and blocks endothelin-1-mediated paracrine path for cold response on vessels. While cold induced RhoA activity in both cell types, DSGOST pretreatment prevented cold-induced RhoA activation. DSGOST inhibition of cold-induced RhoA activation further blocked α2c-adrenoreceptor translocation to the plasma membrane in VSMC. In addition, DSGOST inhibited endothelin-1-mediated RhoA activation and α2c-adrenoreceptor translocation in VSMC. Meanwhile, DSGOST inhibited cold-induced or RhoA-dependent phosphorylation of FAK, SRC, and ERK. Consistently, DSGOST inhibited cold-induced endothelin-1 expression in EC. Therefore, DSGOST prevents cold-induced RhoA in EC and blocks endothelin-1-mediated paracrine path between EC and VSMC. In conclusion, our data suggest that DSGOST is beneficial for treating RP-like syndrome.

  9. "Starve a fever and feed a cold": feeding and anorexia may be adaptive behavioral modulators of autonomic and T helper balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazar, Kimberly A; Yun, A Joon; Lee, Patrick Y

    2005-01-01

    Anorexia is a common symptom accompanying infections, but the teleology of the phenomenon remains unexplained. We hypothesize that anorexia may represent a prehistoric behavioral adaptation to fight infection by maintaining T helper (Th)2 bias, which is particularly vital in fighting bacterial pathogens. Specifically, we propose that anorexia may avert the reduction of Th2/Th1 ratio by preventing feeding-induced neurohormonal and vagal output from the gut. Emerging evidence suggests that the vagal and neurohormonal output of the gut during feeding promotes Th1 function, which is desirable in fighting viral infections. Since fever may be an adaptation to fight bacteria and "colds" are generally viral in origin, the adage "starve a fever and feed a cold" may reflect a sensible behavioral strategy to tilt autonomic and Th balance in directions that are optimal for fighting the particular type of infection. The ability to modulate T helper balance through the neurohormonal and autonomic axis by adjusting food intake may be the mechanism behind other unexplained clinical observations such as the improved outcomes of ICU patients after enteric versus parenteric feedings. Compared to the prehistoric period when bacterial infection was commonplace, the anorexic response may be less adaptive today when viruses and cancers have become common triggers of anorexia. By promoting host anorexia, cachexia, and insomnia, cancers and viruses can deter behaviors such as digestion and sleep that would raise vagal and Th1 activity against tumors and viruses. Hydration and sleep, unexplained but widely accepted recommendations for flu patients, may also work by promoting vagal and Th1 functions. Modulating feeding, hydration, and sleep may prove beneficial in treating other conditions associated with abnormal autonomic and Th balance.

  10. Seasonal variation in expression pattern of genes under HSP70 : Seasonal variation in expression pattern of genes under HSP70 family in heat- and cold-adapted goats (Capra hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Dipak; Upadhyay, Ramesh C; Chaudhary, Umesh B; Kumar, Ravindra; Singh, Sohanvir; Ashutosh; G, Jagan Mohanarao; Polley, Shamik; Mukherjee, Ayan; Das, Tapan K; De, Sachinandan

    2014-05-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is one of the most abundant and best characterized heat shock protein family that consists of highly conserved stress proteins, expressed in response to stress, and plays crucial roles in environmental stress tolerance and adaptation. The present study was conducted to identify major types of genes under the HSP70 family and to quantify their expression pattern in heat- and cold-adapted Indian goats (Capra hircus) with respect to different seasons. Five HSP70 gene homologues to HSPA8, HSPA6, HSPA1A, HSPA1L, and HSPA2 were identified by gene-specific primers. The cDNA sequences showed high similarity to other mammals, and proteins have an estimated molecular weight of around 70 kDa. The expression of HSP70 genes was observed during summer and winter. During summer, the higher expression of HSPA8, HSPA6, and HSPA1A was observed, whereas the expression levels of HSPA1L and HSPA2 were found to be lower. It was also observed that the expression of HSPA1A and HSPA8 was higher during winter in both heat- and cold-adapted goats but downregulates in case of other HSPs. Therefore, both heat and cold stress induced the overexpression of HSP70 genes. An interesting finding that emerged from the study is the higher expression of HSP70 genes in cold-adapted goats during summer and in heat-adapted goats during winter. Altogether, the results indicate that the expression pattern of HSP70 genes is species- and breed-specific, most likely due to variations in thermal tolerance and adaptation to different climatic conditions.

  11. Aerobic exercise and cold pressor test induce hypoalgesia in active and inactive men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Jørgensen, Maria N.

    2015-01-01

    ). Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) was assessed by cold pressor testing. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) was assessed after 15 minutes bicycling at a heart rate corresponding to 75% VO2max. A control session of 15 minutes quiet rest was also included. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded...... and after exercise, PPTs increased to the same degree in active and inactive subjects, and the CPM and EIH responses were correlated (P CPM response immediately after cold pressor test was maintained in women but not in men. CONCLUSIONS: Cold pressor stimulation and aerobic exercise caused...... comparable multisegmental increases in PPT in active and inactive men and women. The CPM and EIH responses were correlated, but they have different temporal manifestation of hypoalgesia....

  12. Photosynthesis-dependent physiological and genetic crosstalk between cold acclimation and cold-induced resistance to fungal pathogens in triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wąsek, Iwona; Gołębiowska-Pikania, Gabriela; Dubas, Ewa; Żur, Iwona; Wędzony, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The breeding for resistance against fungal pathogens in winter triticale (Triticosecale Wittm.) continues to be hindered by a complexity of the resistance mechanisms, strong interaction with environmental conditions, and dependence on the plant genotype. We showed, that temperature below 4 °C induced the plant genotype-dependent resistance against the fungal pathogen Microdochium nivale. The mechanism involved, at least, the adjustment of the reactions in the PSII proximity and photoprotection, followed by an improvement of the growth and development. The genotypes capable to develop the cold-induced resistance, showed a higher maximum quantum yield of PSII and a more efficient integration of the primary photochemistry of light reactions with the dark reactions. Moreover, induction of the photoprotective mechanism, involving at least the peroxidases scavenging hydrogen peroxide, was observed for such genotypes. Adjustment of the photosynthesis and stress acclimation has enabled fast plant growth and avoidance of the developmental stages sensitive to fungal infection. The same mechanisms allowed the quick regrow of plants during the post-disease period. In contrast, genotypes that were unable to develop resistance despite cold hardening had less flexible balancing of the photoprotection and photoinhibition processes. Traits related to: photosynthesis-dependent cold-acclimation and cold-induced resistance; biomass accumulation and growth; as well as protection system involving peroxidases; were integrated also at a genetic level. Analysing 95 lines of the mapping population SaKa3006×Modus we determined region on chromosomes 5B and 7R shared within all tested traits. Moreover, similar expression pattern of a set of the genes related to PSII was determined with the metaanalysis of the multiple microarray experiments. Comparable results for peroxidases, involving APXs and GPXs and followed by PRXs, indicated a similar function during cold acclimation and defense

  13. Evaluation of cold shock-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in the house fly Musca domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mishra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low temperature affects the survival, growth and development of invertebrates, especially insects, based on the severity of cold and the duration of exposure. Although the effects of cold shock or direct chilling were previously analysed in terms of development patterns and defects, morphological changes, cold hardiness, cryopreservation and diapause in insects, very little information is available regarding the effects of cold shock at the chromosomal level. Material and Methods: Late third instar larvae of the house fly Musca domestica were exposed to low temperatures (10, 4, 0 and -5°C for different durations, in order to assess genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in the present study. The chromosomal aberration assay and micronucleus test were used as genotoxic end points. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by the mitotic index and the extent of tissue damage was observed using the Trypan blue staining method. Results: A significant (P<0.05, P<0.01 and P<0.001 increase in chromosome aberrations and micronucleus frequency was observed in all of the exposed groups compared to the control. The mitotic index showed a dose-dependent increase; however, it was lower in comparison to the control. The developmental patterns in exposed larvae exhibited an increase in larval mortality and a delay in adult emergence. Extensive tissue damage was observed at -5°C by Trypan blue staining. Conclusions: The present work suggests that cold shock induces chromosome aberrations and cytotoxicity and affects the developmental pattern in house fly, M. domestica.

  14. Cardiac-specific VLCAD deficiency induces dilated cardiomyopathy and cold intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Dingding; He, Huamei; James, Jeanne; Tokunaga, Chonan; Powers, Corey; Huang, Yan; Osinska, Hanna; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Balschi, James A.; Javadov, Sabzali; McGowan, Francis X.; Strauss, Arnold W.

    2013-01-01

    The very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) enzyme catalyzes the first step of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Patients with VLCAD deficiency present with hypoketotic hypoglycemia and cardiomyopathy, which can be exacerbated by fasting and/or cold stress. Global VLCAD knockout mice recapitulate these phenotypes: mice develop cardiomyopathy, and cold exposure leads to rapid hypothermia and death. However, the contribution of different tissues to development of these phenotypes has not been studied. We generated cardiac-specific VLCAD-deficient (cVLCAD−/−) mice by Cre-mediated ablation of the VLCAD in cardiomyocytes. By 6 mo of age, cVLCAD−/− mice demonstrated increased end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular dimensions and decreased fractional shortening. Surprisingly, selective VLCAD gene ablation in cardiomyocytes was sufficient to evoke severe cold intolerance in mice who rapidly developed severe hypothermia, bradycardia, and markedly depressed cardiac function in response to fasting and cold exposure (+5°C). We conclude that cardiac-specific VLCAD deficiency is sufficient to induce cold intolerance and cardiomyopathy and is associated with reduced ATP production. These results provide strong evidence that fatty acid oxidation in myocardium is essential for maintaining normal cardiac function under these stress conditions. PMID:24285112

  15. Long-Term Cold Adaptation Does Not Require FGF21 or UCP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keipert, Susanne; Kutschke, Maria; Ost, Mario; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Schothorst, van Evert M.; Lamp, Daniel; Brachthäuser, Laura; Hamp, Isabel; Mazibuko, Sithandiwe E.; Hartwig, Sonja; Lehr, Stefan; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Plettenburg, Oliver; Neff, Frauke; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Jastroch, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT)-dependent thermogenesis and its suggested augmenting hormone, FGF21, are potential therapeutic targets in current obesity and diabetes research. Here, we studied the role of UCP1 and FGF21 for metabolic homeostasis in the cold and dissected underlying molecular mechanisms

  16. Changes in white and brown adipose tissue microRNA expression in cold-induced mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Cong; Huang, Shujuan; Wang, Yajun; Wei, Gang; Zhang, Yang; Qi, Desheng; Wang, Yanfang; Li, Kui

    2015-07-31

    There are two classic adipose tissues in mammals, white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). It has been well known that browning of WAT can be induced by cold exposure. In this study, to identify the novel cold responsive key miRNAs that are involved in browning, mice were housed at 6 °C for 10 days, and deep sequencing of the miRNAs of WAT and BAT was performed. Our data showed that WAT and BAT displayed distinct expression profiles due to their different locations, morphology and biological function. A total of 27 BAT and 29 WAT differentially expressed (DE) miRNAs were identified in response to cold stimulation, respectively (fold change >2 and false discovery rate (FDR) adipose tissues. Furthermore, the potential target genes of the DE miRNAs from BAT and WAT were predicted computationally, and the KEGG pathway analysis revealed the enrichment pathways in cold stimulated adipose tissues. The expression pattern of miR-144-3p/Bmpr1b/Phlda1 and miR-146a-5p/Sphk2 were further measured by qPCR. Finally, we found that miR-146a-5p was significantly induced during the primary adipogenesis caused by BAT differentiation, whereas miR-144-3p was decreased. Our study identifies for the first time the novel miRNAs involved in browning of WAT by sequencing and expands the therapeutic approaches for combating metabolic diseases.

  17. Local melatonin application induces cold tolerance in distant organs of Citrullus lanatus L. via long distance transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Chang, Jingjing; Zheng, Junxian; Dong, Yuchuan; Liu, Qiyan; Yang, Xiaozhen; Wei, Chunhua; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Jianxiang; Zhang, Xian

    2017-01-19

    Melatonin is a ubiquitous chemical substance that regulates plant growth and responses to stress. Several recent studies show that exogenous melatonin confers cold tolerance to plants; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we report that melatonin application at optimal dose, either on the leaves or the roots, not only induced cold stress tolerance in the site of application, but also systemically induced cold tolerance in untreated distant parts. Foliar or rhizospheric treatment with melatonin increased the melatonin levels in untreated roots or leaves, respectively, under both normal and cold stress conditions, whereas rhizospheric melatonin treatment increased the melatonin exudation rates from the xylem. An increased accumulation of melatonin accompanied with an induction in antioxidant enzyme activity in distant untreated tissues alleviated cold-induced oxidative stress. In addition, RNA-seq analysis revealed that an abundance of cold defense-related genes involved in signal sensing and transduction, transcriptional regulation, protection and detoxification, and hormone signaling might mediate melatonin-induced cold tolerance. Taken together, our results suggest that melatonin can induce cold tolerance via long distance signaling, and such induction is associated with an enhanced antioxidant capacity and optimized defense gene expression. Such a mechanism can be greatly exploited to benefit the agricultural production.

  18. Purification and characterization of an extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase produced by psychrotrophic bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiuling; Chen, Guiyuan; Zhang, Qi; Lin, Lianbing; Wei, Yunlin

    2015-06-01

    An extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase from the psychrotrophic Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1 was purified 26-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme was active over a broad range spanning 0-60 °C with an optimum activity at 37 °C, and it was found to be alkaline-preferring with an optimum activity at pH 9.0. The molecular weight was estimated to be 34.3 KDa and monomeric. The lipase could be activated by Ca(2+) and low concentration (10%) of ethanol, dimethyl sulphoxide, methanol, and acetonitrile, whereas it was strongly inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), SDS, EDTA, and PMSF. Using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as a substrate at 37 °C, the Km and Vmax of the enzyme were found to be 16.58 mM and 5.24 × 10(5)  μM · min(-1), respectively. This extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase may be a good candidate for detergents and biocatalysts at low temperature.

  19. Genomic, Transcriptomic, and Proteomic Analysis Provide Insights Into the Cold Adaptation Mechanism of the Obligate Psychrophilic Fungus Mrakia psychrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mrakia psychrophila is an obligate psychrophilic fungus. The cold adaptation mechanism of psychrophilic fungi remains unknown. Comparative genomics analysis indicated that M. psychrophila had a specific codon usage preference, especially for codons of Gly and Arg and its major facilitator superfamily (MFS transporter gene family was expanded. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that genes involved in ribosome and energy metabolism were upregulated at 4°, while genes involved in unfolded protein binding, protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum, proteasome, spliceosome, and mRNA surveillance were upregulated at 20°. In addition, genes related to unfolded protein binding were alternatively spliced. Consistent with other psychrophiles, desaturase and glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which are involved in biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acid and glycerol respectively, were upregulated at 4°. Cold adaptation of M. psychrophila is mediated by synthesizing unsaturated fatty acids to maintain membrane fluidity and accumulating glycerol as a cryoprotectant. The proteomic analysis indicated that the correlations between the dynamic patterns between transcript level changes and protein level changes for some pathways were positive at 4°, but negative at 20°. The death of M. psychrophila above 20° might be caused by an unfolded protein response.

  20. Development of an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for the cold-adapted fungi Pseudogymnoascus destructans and P. pannorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Ren, Ping; Chaturvedi, Vishnu; Chaturvedi, Sudha

    2015-08-01

    The mechanisms of cold adaptation by fungi remain unknown. This topic is of high interest due to the emergence of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a skin infection of hibernating bats caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd). Recent studies indicated that apart from Pd, there is an abundance of other Pseudogymnoascus species in the hibernacula soil. We developed an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) system for Pd and a related fungus Pseudogymnoascus pannorum (Pp) to advance experimental studies. URE1 gene encoding the enzyme urease was used as an easy to screen marker to facilitate molecular genetic analyses. A Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent (USER) Friendly pRF-HU2 vector containing Pd or Pp ure1::hygromycin (HYG) disruption cassette was introduced into A. tumefaciens AGL-1 cells by electroporation and the resulting strains were co-cultivated with conidia of Pd or Pp for various durations and temperatures to optimize the ATMT system. Overall, 680 Pd (0.006%) and 1800 Pp (0.018%) transformants were obtained from plating of 10(7) conidia; their recoveries were strongly correlated with the length of the incubation period (96h for Pd; 72h for Pp) and with temperature (15-18°C for Pd; 25°C for Pp). The homologous recombination in transformants was 3.1% for Pd and 16.7% for Pp. The availability of a standardized ATMT system would allow future molecular genetic analyses of Pd and related cold-adapted fungi.

  1. Cytophysiological and ultrastructural modifications induced by cold in the microsporocytes and tapetum of Rhoeo discolor Hance

    OpenAIRE

    André Souvré; Louis Albertini; Hélené Grenet-Auberger

    2014-01-01

    The exposition of Rhoeo discolor to cold induces an alteration of the microsporocytes (PMC) and tapetum ultrastructure. In the young cooled PMC, the mitochondria present short and vesiculate cristae, the stroma of proplasts is clearer and the polyrilbasomes are deteriorated. During the phase tetrads-microspores, the alterations are more important: the chromatin coagulates, the nucleus swells while the nuclear membrane is modified; some large vesicules appear outside of the plasmalemma. In the...

  2. Protein surface softness is the origin of enzyme cold-adaptation of trypsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Villy Isaksen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Life has effectively colonized most of our planet and extremophilic organisms require specialized enzymes to survive under harsh conditions. Cold-loving organisms (psychrophiles express heat-labile enzymes that possess a high specific activity and catalytic efficiency at low temperatures. A remarkable universal characteristic of cold-active enzymes is that they show a reduction both in activation enthalpy and entropy, compared to mesophilic orthologs, which makes their reaction rates less sensitive to falling temperature. Despite significant efforts since the early 1970s, the important question of the origin of this effect still largely remains unanswered. Here we use cold- and warm-active trypsins as model systems to investigate the temperature dependence of the reaction rates with extensive molecular dynamics free energy simulations. The calculations quantitatively reproduce the catalytic rates of the two enzymes and further yield high-precision Arrhenius plots, which show the characteristic trends in activation enthalpy and entropy. Detailed structural analysis indicates that the relationship between these parameters and the 3D structure is reflected by significantly different internal protein energy changes during the reaction. The origin of this effect is not localized to the active site, but is found in the outer regions of the protein, where the cold-active enzyme has a higher degree of softness. Several structural mechanisms for softening the protein surface are identified, together with key mutations responsible for this effect. Our simulations further show that single point-mutations can significantly affect the thermodynamic activation parameters, indicating how these can be optimized by evolution.

  3. Protein surface softness is the origin of enzyme cold-adaptation of trypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2014-08-01

    Life has effectively colonized most of our planet and extremophilic organisms require specialized enzymes to survive under harsh conditions. Cold-loving organisms (psychrophiles) express heat-labile enzymes that possess a high specific activity and catalytic efficiency at low temperatures. A remarkable universal characteristic of cold-active enzymes is that they show a reduction both in activation enthalpy and entropy, compared to mesophilic orthologs, which makes their reaction rates less sensitive to falling temperature. Despite significant efforts since the early 1970s, the important question of the origin of this effect still largely remains unanswered. Here we use cold- and warm-active trypsins as model systems to investigate the temperature dependence of the reaction rates with extensive molecular dynamics free energy simulations. The calculations quantitatively reproduce the catalytic rates of the two enzymes and further yield high-precision Arrhenius plots, which show the characteristic trends in activation enthalpy and entropy. Detailed structural analysis indicates that the relationship between these parameters and the 3D structure is reflected by significantly different internal protein energy changes during the reaction. The origin of this effect is not localized to the active site, but is found in the outer regions of the protein, where the cold-active enzyme has a higher degree of softness. Several structural mechanisms for softening the protein surface are identified, together with key mutations responsible for this effect. Our simulations further show that single point-mutations can significantly affect the thermodynamic activation parameters, indicating how these can be optimized by evolution.

  4. Plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria and their role in adaptation to cold environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Extremely cold environments are a challenge for all organisms. They are mostly inhabited by psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria, which employ various strategies to cope with the cold. Such harsh environments are often highly vulnerable to the influence of external factors and may undergo frequent dynamic changes. The rapid adjustment of bacteria to changing environmental conditions is crucial for their survival. Such "short-term" evolution is often enabled by plasmids-extrachromosomal replicons that represent major players in horizontal gene transfer. The genomic sequences of thousands of microorganisms, including those of many cold-active bacteria have been obtained over the last decade, but the collected data have yet to be thoroughly analyzed. This report describes the results of a meta-analysis of the NCBI sequence databases to identify and characterize plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria. We have performed in-depth analyses of 66 plasmids, almost half of which are cryptic replicons not exceeding 10 kb in size. Our analyses of the larger plasmids revealed the presence of numerous genes, which may increase the phenotypic flexibility of their host strains. These genes encode enzymes possibly involved in (i) protection against cold and ultraviolet radiation, (ii) scavenging of reactive oxygen species, (iii) metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and lipids, (iv) energy production and conversion, (v) utilization of toxic organic compounds (e.g., naphthalene), and (vi) resistance to heavy metals, metalloids and antibiotics. Some of the plasmids also contain type II restriction-modification systems, which are involved in both plasmid stabilization and protection against foreign DNA. Moreover, approx. 50% of the analyzed plasmids carry genetic modules responsible for conjugal transfer or mobilization for transfer, which may facilitate the spread of these replicons among various bacteria, including across species boundaries.

  5. Legionella species diversity and dynamics from surface reservoir to tap water: from cold adaptation to thermophily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnik, René; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2016-05-01

    Water samples of the Drinking Water Supply System (DWSS) of the city of Braunschweig were analysed for its Legionella species composition using genus-specific PCR amplicons and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprint analyses based on 16S rRNA genes. These analyses comprised the whole supply chain including raw water, treatment process and large-scale storage, and a seasonal study of finished drinking water sampled monthly from cold and hot tap water. Treatment of raw water had a major impact on Legionella species by reducing their diversity and abundances. The Legionella species composition of the tap water was highly distinct from that of both source waters. In cold water, 8-14 different phylotypes of Legionella (PTLs) were observed per sample with relative abundances ranging from >1% to 53%. In hot water, L. pneumophila was present during all seasons at high relative abundances (8-40%) accompanied by 5-14 other PTLs of which 6 PTLs were in common with cold water. This thermophilic Legionella community, including L. pneumophila, was able to grow in the hot water above 50 °C. Such thermophilic Legionella populations are of general relevance for drinking water management and public health, but also for the ecology and evolution of the genus Legionella.

  6. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and adenosine triphosphate (ATP significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, glutathione S-transferase (GST, super oxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and

  7. A new mathematical model to simulate AVA cold-induced vasodilation reaction to local cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rida, Mohamad; Karaki, Wafaa; Ghaddar, Nesreen; Ghali, Kamel; Hoballah, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to integrate a new mathematical model with a bioheat model, based on physiology and first principles, to predict thermoregulatory arterio-venous anastomoses (AVA) and cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) reaction to local cooling. The transient energy balance equations of body segments constrained by thermoregulatory controls were solved numerically to predict segmental core and skin temperatures, and arterial blood flow for given metabolic rate and environmental conditions. Two similar AVA-CIVD mechanisms were incorporated. The first was activated during drop in local skin temperature (hand immersions in cold fluid. When compared with published data, the model predicted accurately the onset time of CIVD at 25 min and T CIVD,min at 10 °C for hand exposure to still air at 0 °C. Good agreement was also obtained between predicted finger skin temperature and experimentally published values for repeated immersion in cold water at environmental conditions of 30, 25, and 20 °C. The CIVD thermal response was found related to core body temperature, finger skin temperature, and initial finger sensible heat loss rate upon exposure to cold fluid. The model captured central and local stimulations of the CIVD and accommodated observed variability reported in literature of onset time of CIVD reaction and T CIVD,min.

  8. A new multistep Ca2+-induced cold gelation process for beta-lactoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerman, Cecile; Baptist, Harry; Sagis, Leonard M C; van der Linden, Erik

    2003-06-18

    The objective of this study was to obtain beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) gels at very low protein concentrations using a new multistep Ca(2+)-induced cold gelation process. In the conventional cold gelation process, salt free beta-lg solutions were heated at neutral pH, cooled, and cross-linked by adding salts. In our new process, first, long linear beta-lg fibrils were formed at pH 2. Solutions of these fibrils were cooled, and subsequently, the pH was adjusted to 7 or 8. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed that the long linear fibrils formed at pH 2 were stable when the pH was adjusted to 7 or 8. In the final step, the fibrils were cross-linked using CaCl(2). Using rheological measurements, the critical percolation concentration was determined. In the new multistep cold gelation process, the critical percolation concentration was an order of magnitude lower than in the conventional cold gelation method.

  9. Protective effect of doxorubicin induced heat shock protein 72 on cold preservation injury of rat livers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Chen; Ying-Yan Yu; Ming-Jun Zhang; Xia-Xing Deng; Wei-Ping Yang; Jun Ji; Cheng-Hong Peng; Hong-Wei Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the protective effect of heat shock protein 72 (HSP 72) induced by pretreatment of doxorubicin (DXR)on long-term cold preservation injury of rat livers.METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were administered intravenously DXR at a dose of 1 mg/kg body mass in DXR group and saline in control group. After 48 h, the rat liver was perfused with cold Linger′s and University of Wisconsin (UW) solutions and then was preserved in UW solution at 4 ℃ for 24, 36 and 48 h. AST, ALT, LDH and hyaluronic acid in preservative solution were determined. Routine HE,immunohistochemical staining for HSP 72 and electron microscopic examination of hepatic tissues were performed.RESULTS: After 24, 36 and 48 h, the levels of AST, ALT and hyaluronic acid in preservative solution were significantly higher in control group than in DXR group (P<0.05), while LDH level was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Hepatic tissues in DXR group were morphologically normal and significantly injured in control group. HSP 72was expressed in hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells in DXR group but not in control group.CONCLUSION: Pretreatment of DXR may extend the time of rat liver cold preservation and keep liver alive. The expression of HSP 72 in liver can prevent hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells from long-term cold preservation injury.

  10. Cold- and exercise-induced peak metabolic rates in tropical birds

    OpenAIRE

    Wiersma, Popko; Chappell, Mark A; Williams, Joseph B.

    2007-01-01

    Compared with temperate birds, tropical birds have low reproductive rates, slow development as nestlings, and long lifespans. These “slow” life history traits are thought to be associated with reduced energy expenditure, or a slow “pace of life.” To test predictions from this hypothesis, we measured exercise-induced peak metabolic rates (PMRE) in 45 species of tropical lowland forest birds and compared these data with PMRE for three temperate species. We also compared cold-induced PMR (PMRC) ...

  11. A comparative study of cold- and warm-adapted Endonucleases A using sequence analyses and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Davide; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav; Bon, Davide; Isaksen, Geir Villy; Tiberti, Matteo; Papaleo, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The psychrophilic and mesophilic endonucleases A (EndA) from Aliivibrio salmonicida (VsEndA) and Vibrio cholera (VcEndA) have been studied experimentally in terms of the biophysical properties related to thermal adaptation. The analyses of their static X-ray structures was no sufficient to rationalize the determinants of their adaptive traits at the molecular level. Thus, we used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to compare the two proteins and unveil their structural and dynamical differences. Our simulations did not show a substantial increase in flexibility in the cold-adapted variant on the nanosecond time scale. The only exception is a more rigid C-terminal region in VcEndA, which is ascribable to a cluster of electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonds, as also supported by MD simulations of the VsEndA mutant variant where the cluster of interactions was introduced. Moreover, we identified three additional amino acidic substitutions through multiple sequence alignment and the analyses of MD-based protein structure networks. In particular, T120V occurs in the proximity of the catalytic residue H80 and alters the interaction with the residue Y43, which belongs to the second coordination sphere of the Mg2+ ion. This makes T120V an amenable candidate for future experimental mutagenesis. PMID:28192428

  12. Prevention of asthma induced by cold air by cellulose-fabric face mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millqvist, E; Bake, B; Bengtsson, U; Löwhagen, O

    1995-03-01

    We have tested the effect of a porous cellulose fabric face mask. Nine asthmatic patients, anamnestically sensitive to cold, took part in exercise tests on an ergometer bicycle at a temperature of approximately -10 degrees C, with and without a face mask. For comparison, exercise tests were also performed with breathing taking place through a woolen scarf. Three minutes after finishing the exercise test, there was an average fall in FEV1 of 32% in the group without a face mask. The corresponding fall in FEV1 was 6% with a face mask and 17% with a scarf. In order to get some idea of the patients' attitudes to the face mask, it was used by 25 asthma patients during a period of 2 weeks in winter, after which they were asked to answer a simple questionnaire. Eighty-eight percent of the patients stated that the face mask had provided satisfactory protection against asthma complaints induced by cold air, and 72% reported that they had been able to spend more time out-of-doors. The results show that porous cellulose fabric designed as a face mask offers effective protection against asthma complaints induced by cold air and exercise, and that the patients appear to appreciate this protective aid highly despite the cosmetic disadvantages.

  13. Bioprospection of cold-adapted yeasts with biotechnological potential from Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorell, María Martha; Ruberto, Lucas Adolfo Mauro; Fernández, Pablo Marcelo; Castellanos de Figueroa, Lucía Inés; Mac Cormack, Walter Patricio

    2017-03-08

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes at low temperature of yeasts isolated from 25 de Mayo island, Antarctica, and to identify those exhibiting one or more of the evaluated enzymatic activities. A total of 105 yeast isolates were obtained from different samples and 66 were identified. They belonged to 12 basidiomycetous and four ascomycetous genera. Most of the isolates were ascribed to the genera Cryptococcus, Mrakia, Cystobasidium, Rhodotorula, Gueomyces, Phenoliferia, Leucosporidium, and Pichia. Results from enzymes production at low temperatures revealed that the Antarctic environment contains metabolically diverse cultivable yeasts, which represent potential tools for biotechnological applications. While most the isolates proved to produce 2-4 of the investigated exoenzymes, two of them evidenced the six evaluated enzymatic activities: Pichia caribbica and Guehomyces pullulans, which were characterized as psycrotolerant and psycrophilic, respectively. In addition, P. caribbica could assimilate several n-alkanes and diesel fuel. The enzyme production profile and hydrocarbons assimilation capacity, combined with its high level of biomass production and the extended exponential growth phase make P. caribbica a promising tool for cold environments biotechnological purposes in the field of cold-enzymes production and oil spills bioremediation as well.

  14. In vivo assessment of cold adaptation in insect larvae by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mietchen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Temperatures below the freezing point of water and the ensuing ice crystal formation pose serious challenges to cell structure and function. Consequently, species living in seasonally cold environments have evolved a multitude of strategies to reorganize their cellular architecture and metabolism, and the underlying mechanisms are crucial to our understanding of life. In multicellular organisms, and poikilotherm animals in particular, our knowledge about these processes is almost exclusively due to invasive studies, thereby limiting the range of conclusions that can be drawn about intact living systems. METHODOLOGY: Given that non-destructive techniques like (1H Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging and spectroscopy have proven useful for in vivo investigations of a wide range of biological systems, we aimed at evaluating their potential to observe cold adaptations in living insect larvae. Specifically, we chose two cold-hardy insect species that frequently serve as cryobiological model systems--the freeze-avoiding gall moth Epiblema scudderiana and the freeze-tolerant gall fly Eurosta solidaginis. RESULTS: In vivo MR images were acquired from autumn-collected larvae at temperatures between 0 degrees C and about -70 degrees C and at spatial resolutions down to 27 microm. These images revealed three-dimensional (3D larval anatomy at a level of detail currently not in reach of other in vivo techniques. Furthermore, they allowed visualization of the 3D distribution of the remaining liquid water and of the endogenous cryoprotectants at subzero temperatures, and temperature-weighted images of these distributions could be derived. Finally, individual fat body cells and their nuclei could be identified in intact frozen Eurosta larvae. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that high resolution MR techniques provide for interesting methodological options in comparative cryobiological investigations, especially in vivo.

  15. Multi-level cascaded electromagnetically induced transparency in cold atoms using an optical nanofibre interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ravi; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    Ultrathin optical fibres integrated into cold atom setups are proving to be ideal building blocks for atom-photon hybrid quantum networks. Such optical nanofibres (ONF) can be used for the demonstration of nonlinear optics and quantum interference phenomena in atomic media. Here, we report on the observation of multilevel cascaded electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using an optical nanofibre to interface cold $^{87}$Rb atoms through the intense evanescent fields that can be achieved at ultralow probe and coupling powers. Both the probe (at 780 nm) and the coupling (at 776 nm) beams propagate through the nanofibre. The observed multipeak transparency spectra of the probe beam could offer a method for simultaneously slowing down multiple wavelengths in an optical nanofibre or for generating ONF-guided entangled beams, showing the potential of such an atom-nanofibre system for quantum information. We also demonstrate all-optical-switching in the all fibred system using the obtained EIT effect.

  16. Cold tolerance and freeze-induced glucose accumulation in three terrestrial slugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slotsbo, Stine; Hansen, Lars Monrad; Jordaens, Kurt;

    2012-01-01

    in their habitat. Slugs spontaneously froze at about -4 °C when cooled under dry conditions, but freezing of body fluids was readily induced at -1 °C when in contact with external ice crystals. All three species survived freezing for 2 days at -1 °C, and some A. rufus and A. lusitanicus also survived freezing......Cold tolerance and metabolic responses to freezing of three slug species common in Scandinavia (Arion ater, Arion rufus and Arion lusitanicus) are reported. Autumn collected slugs were cold acclimated in the laboratory and subjected to freezing conditions simulating likely winter temperatures....... Glucose increased from about 6 to 22 µg/mg dry tissue upon freezing in A. rufus, but less so in A. ater and A. lusitanicus. Glucose may thus act as a cryoprotectant in these slugs, although the concentrations are not as high as reported for other freeze tolerant invertebrates....

  17. Cold-induced thermogenesis mediated by GABA in the preoptic area of anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Toshimasa

    2004-08-01

    Bilateral microinjections of GABA (300 mM, 100 nl) or the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (100 microM, 100 nl) into the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus increased the rate of whole body O(2) consumption (VO(2)) and the body core (colonic) temperature of urethane-chloralose-anesthetized, artificially ventilated rats. The most sensitive site was the dorsomedial POA at the level of the anterior commissure. The GABA-induced thermogenesis was accompanied by a tachycardic response and electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from the femoral or neck muscles. Pretreatment with muscle relaxants (1 mg/kg pancuronium bromide + 4 mg/kg vecuronium bromide i.v.) prevented GABA-induced EMG activity but had no significant effect on GABA-induced thermogenesis. However, pretreatment with the beta-adrenoceptor propranolol (5 mg/kg i.v.) greatly attenuated the GABA-induced increase in VO(2) and tachycardic responses. Accordingly, the GABA-induced increase in VO(2) reflected mainly nonshivering thermogenesis. On the other hand, cooling of the shaved back of the rat by contact with a plastic bag containing 28 degrees C water also elicited thermogenic, tachycardic, and EMG responses. Bilateral microinjections of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (500 microM, 100 nl), but not the vehicle saline, into the POA blocked these skin cooling-induced responses. These results suggest that GABA and GABA(A) receptors in the POA mediate cold information arising from the skin for eliciting cold-induced thermogenesis.

  18. Adaptive behavior of neighboring neurons during adaptation-induced plasticity of orientation tuning in V1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumikhina Svetlana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensory neurons display transient changes of their response properties following prolonged exposure to an appropriate stimulus (adaptation. In adult cat primary visual cortex, orientation-selective neurons shift their preferred orientation after being adapted to a non-preferred orientation. The direction of those shifts, towards (attractive or away (repulsive from the adapter depends mostly on adaptation duration. How the adaptive behavior of a neuron is related to that of its neighbors remains unclear. Results Here we show that in most cases (75%, cells shift their preferred orientation in the same direction as their neighbors. We also found that cells shifting preferred orientation differently from their neighbors (25% display three interesting properties: (i larger variance of absolute shift amplitude, (ii wider tuning bandwidth and (iii larger range of preferred orientations among the cluster of cells. Several response properties of V1 neurons depend on their location within the cortical orientation map. Our results suggest that recording sites with both attractive and repulsive shifts following adaptation may be located in close proximity to iso-orientation domain boundaries or pinwheel centers. Indeed, those regions have a more diverse orientation distribution of local inputs that could account for the three properties above. On the other hand, sites with all cells shifting their preferred orientation in the same direction could be located within iso-orientation domains. Conclusions Our results suggest that the direction and amplitude of orientation preference shifts in V1 depend on location within the orientation map. This anisotropy of adaptation-induced plasticity, comparable to that of the visual cortex itself, could have important implications for our understanding of visual adaptation at the psychophysical level.

  19. Reproducibility of exercise-induced modulation of cardiovascular responses to cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, H M; Leventhal, G; Madu, E C; Reddy, R; Cardoso, S

    1997-04-01

    The modulation of cardiovascular responses to the cold pressor test (CPT) as produced by exercise was studied in 13 volunteers. The reproducibility of the measurements selected for the study, i.e. heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), blood flow (BF) and skin temperature (ST), was investigated through repeat experiments in the fall of 1994 and the winter of 1995. HR was monitored before, during and after a 10-min period of bicycling at 70% of reserve HR. BP, cutaneous BF and ST were measured before and after exercise. Two CPTs (hand into ice-cold water for 1 min) were performed: one preceding exercise and another at 3 min after exercise. The results obtained allow us to conclude that in non-hypertensive volunteers (1) the pronounced cardiovascular responses (ST, BF and BP) induced by CPT are reproducible (p > 0.2) when compared to basal level values and (2) cardiovascular responses to cold stress are significantly attenuated by exercise (p < 0.03). Our study, therefore, supports and validates the use of our coupled exercise-CPT method in ongoing epidemiological studies attempting to identify individuals at risk for the development of hypertension as well as those most likely to benefit from preventative exercise programs.

  20. Cold-Inducible SIRT6 Regulates Thermogenesis of Brown and Beige Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting development and function of brown and beige fat may reduce obesity. Here, we show that fat SIRT6 expression is markedly induced by cold exposure and a β-adrenergic agonist. Deletion of SIRT6 in adipose tissue impairs the thermogenic function of brown adipocytes, causing a morphological “whitening” of brown fat, reduced oxygen (O2 consumption, obesity, decreased core body temperature, and cold sensitivity. Fat SIRT6-deleted mice exhibit increased blood glucose levels, severe insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. Moreover, SIRT6 deficiency inhibits the browning of white adipose tissue (WAT following cold exposure or β3-agonist treatment. Depletion of SIRT6 expression in brown adipocytes reduces expression of thermogenic genes, causing a reduction in cellular respiration. Conversely, SIRT6 overexpression in primary fat cells stimulates the thermogenic program. Mechanistically, SIRT6 interacts with and promotes phospho-ATF2 binding to the PGC-1α gene promoter to activate its expression. The present study reveals a critical role for SIRT6 in regulating thermogenesis of fat.

  1. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  2. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barbara P; de Los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H H V; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-03-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4-9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  3. Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA): Highly Temperature Sensitive Polioviruses as Novel Vaccine Strains for a Next Generation Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Barbara P.; de los Rios Oakes, Isabel; van Hoek, Vladimir; Bockstal, Viki; Kamphuis, Tobias; Uil, Taco G.; Song, Yutong; Cooper, Gillian; Crawt, Laura E.; Martín, Javier; Zahn, Roland; Lewis, John; Wimmer, Eckard; Custers, Jerome H. H. V.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Cello, Jeronimo; Edo-Matas, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The poliovirus vaccine field is moving towards novel vaccination strategies. Withdrawal of the Oral Poliovirus Vaccine and implementation of the conventional Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine (cIPV) is imminent. Moreover, replacement of the virulent poliovirus strains currently used for cIPV with attenuated strains is preferred. We generated Cold-Adapted Viral Attenuation (CAVA) poliovirus strains by serial passage at low temperature and subsequent genetic engineering, which contain the capsid sequences of cIPV strains combined with a set of mutations identified during cold-adaptation. These viruses displayed a highly temperature sensitive phenotype with no signs of productive infection at 37°C as visualized by electron microscopy. Furthermore, decreases in infectious titers, viral RNA, and protein levels were measured during infection at 37°C, suggesting a block in the viral replication cycle at RNA replication, protein translation, or earlier. However, at 30°C, they could be propagated to high titers (9.4–9.9 Log10TCID50/ml) on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. We identified 14 mutations in the IRES and non-structural regions, which in combination induced the temperature sensitive phenotype, also when transferred to the genomes of other wild-type and attenuated polioviruses. The temperature sensitivity translated to complete absence of neurovirulence in CD155 transgenic mice. Attenuation was also confirmed after extended in vitro passage at small scale using conditions (MOI, cell density, temperature) anticipated for vaccine production. The inability of CAVA strains to replicate at 37°C makes reversion to a neurovirulent phenotype in vivo highly unlikely, therefore, these strains can be considered safe for the manufacture of IPV. The CAVA strains were immunogenic in the Wistar rat potency model for cIPV, inducing high neutralizing antibody titers in a dose-dependent manner in response to D-antigen doses used for cIPV. In combination with the highly productive

  4. Photonic properties of one-dimensionally-ordered cold atomic vapors under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Schilke, Alexander; Guerin, William

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the photonic properties of a cold-atom sample trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that such a medium has two photonic band gaps. One of them is in the transparency window and gives rise to a Bragg mirror, which is spectrally very narrow and dynamically tunable. We discuss the advantages and the limitations of this system. As an illustration of a possible application we demonstrate a two-port all-optical switch.

  5. Plant protein kinase genes induced by drought, high salt and cold stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Drought, high salt and cold are three different kinds of environment stresses that severely influence the growth, development and productivity of crops. They all decrease the water state of plant cells, and consequently result in the harm of plant from water deficit. Several genes encoding protein kinases and induced by drought, high salt and low temperature have been isolated from Arabidopsis. These protein kinases include receptor protein kinase (RPK), MAP kinases, ribosomal-protein kinases and transcription-regulation protein kinase. The expression features of these genes and the regulatory roles of these protein kinases in stress response and signal transduction are discussed.

  6. The roles of iPLA2, TRPM8 and TRPA1 in chemically induced cold hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson David A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cooling agents menthol and icilin act as agonists at TRPM8 and TRPA1. In vitro, activation of TRPM8 by icilin and cold, but not menthol, is dependent on the activity of a sub-type of phospholipase A2, iPLA2. Lysophospholipids (e.g. LPC produced by PLA2 activity can also activate TRPM8. The role of TRPA1 as a primary cold sensor in vitro is controversial, although there is evidence that TRPA1 plays a role in behavioural responses to noxious cold stimuli. In this study, we have investigated the roles of TRPM8 and TRPA1 and the influence of iPLA2 on noxious cold sensitivities in naïve animals and after local administration of menthol, icilin and LPC. The roles of the channels in cold sensitivity were investigated in mice lacking either TRPM8 (Trpm8-/- or TRPA1 (Trpa1-/-. Results Intraplantar administration of icilin evoked a dose-dependent increase in sensitivity to a 10°C stimulus that was inhibited by iPLA2 inhibition with BEL. In contrast the cold hypersensitivities elicited by intraplantar menthol and LPC were not inhibited by BEL treatment. BEL had no effect on basal cold sensitivity and mechanical hypersensitivities induced by the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, and the P2X3 agonist α,β-methylene ATP. Both Trpm8-/- and Trpa1-/- mice showed longer latencies for paw withdrawal from a 10°C stimulus than wild-type littermates. Cold hypersensitivities induced by either icilin or LPC were absent in Trpm8-/- mice but were retained in Trpa1-/- mice. In contrast, cold hypersensitivity evoked by menthol was present in Trpm8-/- mice but was lost in Trpa1-/- mice. Conclusions The findings that iPLA2 inhibition blocked the development of cold hypersensitivity after administration of icilin but failed to affect menthol-induced hypersensitivity agree well with our earlier in vitro data showing a differential effect of iPLA2 inhibition on the agonist activities of these agents. The ability of LPC to induce cold hypersensitivity

  7. Cold exposure rapidly induces virtual saturation of brown adipose tissue nuclear T sub 3 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianco, A.C.; Silva, J.E. (Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1988-10-01

    Cold exposure induces a rapid increase in uncoupling protein (UCP) concentration in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of euthyroid, but not hypothyroid, rats. To normalize this response with exogenous 3,5,3{prime}-triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), it is necessary to cause systemic hyperthyroidism. In contrast, the same result can be obtained with just replacement doses of thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and, in euthyroid rats, the normal response of UCP to cold occurs without hyperthyroid plasma T{sub 3} levels. Consequently, the authors explored the possibility that the cold-induced activation of the type II 5{prime}-deiodinase resulted in high levels of nuclear T{sub 3} receptor occupancy in euthyroid rats. Studies were performed with pulse injections of tracer T{sub 3} or T{sub 4} in rats exposed to 4{degree}C for different lengths of time (1 h-3 wk). Within 4 h of cold exposure, they observed a significant increase in the nuclear ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} derived from the tracer ({sup 125}I)T{sub 4} injections (T{sub 3}(T{sub 4})) and a significant reduction in the nuclear ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} derived from ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3} injections (T{sub 3}(T{sub 3})). The number of BAT nuclear T{sub 3} receptors did not increase for up to 3 wk of observation at 4{degree}C. The mass of nuclear-bound T{sub 3} was calculated from the nuclear tracer ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3}(T{sub 3}) and ({sup 125}I)T{sub 3}(T{sub 4}) at equilibrium and the specific activity of serum T{sub 3} and T{sub 4}, respectively. By 4 h after the initiation of the cold exposure, the receptors were >95% occupied and remained so for the 3 weeks of observation. They conclude that the simultaneous activation of the deiodinase with adrenergic BAT stimulation serves the purpose of nearly saturating the nuclear T{sub 3} receptors. This makes possible the realization of the full thermogenic potential of the tissue without causing systemic hyperthyroidism.

  8. Cold induces micro- and nano-scale reorganization of lipid raft markers at mounds of T-cell membrane fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    Full Text Available Whether and how cold causes changes in cell-membrane or lipid rafts remain poorly characterized. Using the NSOM/QD and confocal imaging systems, we found that cold caused microscale redistribution of lipid raft markers, GM1 for lipid and CD59 for protein, from the peripheral part of microdomains to the central part on Jurkat T cells, and that cold also induced the nanoscale size-enlargement (1/3- to 2/3-fold of the nanoclusters of lipid raft markers and even the colocalization of GM1 and CD59 nanoclusters. These findings indicate cold-induced lateral rearrangement/coalescence of raft-related membrane heterogeneity. The cold-induced re-distribution of lipid raft markers under a nearly-natural condition provide clues for their alternations, and help to propose a model in which raft lipids associate themselves or interact with protein components to generate functional membrane heterogeneity in response to stimulus. The data also underscore the possible cold-induced artifacts in early-described cold-related experiments and the detergent-resistance-based analyses of lipid rafts at 4 degrees C, and provide a biophysical explanation for recently-reported cold-induced activation of signaling pathways in T cells. Importantly, our fluorescence-topographic NSOM imaging demonstrated that GM1/CD59 raft markers distributed and re-distributed at mounds but not depressions of T-cell membrane fluctuations. Such mound-top distribution of lipid raft markers or lipid rafts provides spatial advantage for lipid rafts or contact molecules interacting readily with neighboring cells or free molecules.

  9. Optimization of TaDREB3 gene expression in transgenic barley using cold-inducible promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Jia, Wei; Eini, Omid; Morran, Sarah; Pyvovarenko, Tatiana; Fletcher, Stephen; Bazanova, Natalia; Harris, John; Beck-Oldach, Kontanze; Shavrukov, Yuri; Langridge, Peter; Lopato, Sergiy

    2013-08-01

    Constitutive over-expression of the TaDREB3 gene in barley improved frost tolerance of transgenic plants at the vegetative stage of plant development, but leads to stunted phenotypes and 3- to 6-week delays in flowering compared to control plants. In this work, two cold-inducible promoters with contrasting properties, the WRKY71 gene promoter from rice and the Cor39 gene promoter from durum wheat, were applied to optimize expression of TaDREB3. The aim of the work was to increase plant frost tolerance and to decrease or prevent negative developmental phenotypes observed during constitutive expression of TaDREB3. The OsWRKY71 and TdCor39 promoters had low-to-moderate basal activity and were activated by cold treatment in leaves, stems and developing spikes of transgenic barley and rice. Expression of the TaDREB3 gene, driven by either of the tested promoters, led to a significant improvement in frost tolerance. The presence of the functional TaDREB3 protein in transgenic plants was confirmed by the detection of strong up-regulation of cold-responsive target genes. The OsWRKY71 promoter-driven TaDREB3 provides stronger activation of the same target genes than the TdCor39 promoter. Analysis of the development of transgenic plants in the absence of stress revealed small or no differences in plant characteristics and grain yield compared with wild-type plants. The WRKY71-TaDREB3 promoter-transgene combination appears to be a promising tool for the enhancement of cold and frost tolerance in crop plants but field evaluation will be needed to confirm that negative development phenotypes have been controlled.

  10. Critical role of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in acute cold exposure-induced stroke in renovascular hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunguang; Li, Xiangpen; Shen, Qingyu; Li, Yi; He, Lei; Li, Mei; Tang, Yamei; Wang, Yidong; He, Qingyu; Peng, Ying

    2013-11-01

    Our objectives are to investigate the role of MMP-9 in cold exposure-induced stroke and assess the preventive effect of doxycycline, a total of 200 rats were assigned to a control group, sham group, 2-kidney, 2-clip (2K-2C) group, and doxycycline-received 2K-2C group (2K-2C+doxy) (N=50, each), and subsequently, each group were randomly assigned to 2 groups: acute cold exposure (ACE) and nonacute cold exposure (NACE) (N=25, each). After the blood pressure was stabilized, rats were maintained on a 12-h light (22°C)/dark (4°C) cycle (ACE group) or a 12-h light (22°C)/dark (22°C) cycle (NACE group) for 3 cycles. The results showed that ACE upregulated Ang II and MMP-9 protein levels in brains and aortas and considerably enhanced stroke incidence in 2K-2C rats. In contrast, doxycycline treatment prevented upregulation of MMP-9 protein expression and activity in brains and aortas in response to ACE and significantly decreased stroke incidence. These findings suggest that cold exposure-induced MMP-9 via activation of RAS might play a critical role in the initiation of cold exposure-induced stroke during chronic hypertension and doxycycline shows protective effects against cold exposure-induced stroke. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Substitutions in woolly mammoth hemoglobin confer biochemical properties adaptive for cold tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Kevin L.; Roberts, Jason E.E.; Watson, Laura N.;

    2010-01-01

    We have genetically retrieved, resurrected and performed detailed structure-function analyses on authentic woolly mammoth hemoglobin to reveal for the first time both the evolutionary origins and the structural underpinnings of a key adaptive physiochemical trait in an extinct species. Hemoglobin...... on the chimeric β/δ-globin subunit of mammoth hemoglobin that provide a unique solution to this problem and thereby minimize energetically costly heat loss. This biochemical specialization may have been involved in the exploitation of high-latitude environments by this African-derived elephantid lineage during...

  12. Amelioration of cold injury-induced cortical brain edema formation by selective endothelin ETB receptor antagonists in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Michinaga

    Full Text Available Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological condition that often occurs in stroke and head trauma. Following brain insults, endothelins (ETs are increased and promote several pathophysiological responses. This study examined the effects of ETB antagonists on brain edema formation and disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a mouse cold injury model (Five- to six-week-old male ddY mice. Cold injury increased the water content of the injured cerebrum, and promoted extravasation of both Evans blue and endogenous albumin. In the injury area, expression of prepro-ET-1 mRNA and ET-1 peptide increased. Intracerebroventricular (ICV administration of BQ788 (ETB antagonist, IRL-2500 (ETB antagonist, or FR139317 (ETA antagonist prior to cold injury significantly attenuated the increase in brain water content. Bolus administration of BQ788, IRL-2500, or FR139317 also inhibited the cold injury-induced extravasation of Evans blue and albumin. Repeated administration of BQ788 and IRL-2500 beginning at 24 h after cold injury attenuated both the increase in brain water content and extravasation of markers. In contrast, FR139317 had no effect on edema formation when administrated after cold injury. Cold injury stimulated induction of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive reactive astrocytes in the injured cerebrum. Induction of reactive astrocytes after cold injury was attenuated by ICV administration of BQ788 or IRL-2500. These results suggest that ETB receptor antagonists may be an effective approach to ameliorate brain edema formation following brain insults.

  13. Cold Atom Physics Using Ultra-Thin Optical Fibers: Light-Induced Dipole Forces and Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sagu'e, G; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A; Vetsch, E

    2007-01-01

    The strong evanescent field around ultra-thin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold Caesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  14. A new generation of proto-oncogenes: cold-inducible RNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleonart, M E

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the roles of two major cold-inducible RNA binding proteins known in human cells: CIRP and RBM3. Both proteins were discovered when they were shown to be induced after exposure to a moderate cold-shock and other cellular stresses such as UV radiation and hypoxia. Initially, it was suggested that these proteins have a suppressive rather stimulatory effect on proliferation; however, proliferative and/or proto-oncogenic functions have recently been assigned to CIRP and RBM3. In a high throughput genetic screen, we recently identified CIRP as an immortalized gene in murine primary cells. On the other hand, the role of RBM3 in transformation has already been demonstrated. Interestingly, both CIRP and RBM3 have been found to be up-regulated in human tumors. This article highlights the roles of CIRP and RBM3 in tumorigenesis, and proposes a model by which CIRP might contribute to senescence bypass by counteracting the deleterious effects of oxidative damage.

  15. Rydberg-induced optical nonlinearities from a cold atomic ensemble trapped inside a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddeda, R.; Usmani, I.; Bimbard, E.; Grankin, A.; Ourjoumtsev, A.; Brion, E.; Grangier, P.

    2016-04-01

    We experimentally characterize the optical nonlinear response of a cold atomic medium placed inside an optical cavity, and excited to Rydberg states. The excitation to S and D Rydberg levels is carried out via a two-photon transition in an electromagnetically induced transparency configuration, with a weak (red) probe beam on the lower transition, and a strong (blue) coupling beam on the upper transition. The observed optical nonlinearities induced by S states for the probe beam can be explained using a semi-classical model with van der Waals’ interactions. For the D states, it appears necessary to take into account a dynamical decay of Rydberg excitations into a long-lived dark state. We show that the measured nonlinearities can be explained by using a Rydberg bubble model with a dynamical decay.

  16. Rydberg-induced optical nonlinearities from a cold atomic ensemble trapped inside a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Boddeda, Rajiv; Bimbard, Erwan; Grankin, Andrey; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Brion, Etienne; Grangier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally characterize the optical nonlinear response of a cold atomic medium placed inside an optical cavity, and excited to Rydberg states. The excitation to S and D Rydberg levels is carried out via a two-photon transition in an EIT (electromagnetically induced transparency) configuration, with a weak (red) probe beam on the lower transition, and a strong (blue) coupling beam on the upper transition. The observed optical nonlinearities induced by S states for the probe beam can be explained using a semi-classical model with van der Waals' interactions. For the D states, it appears necessary to take into account a dynamical decay of Rydberg excitations into a long-lived dark state. We show that the measured nonlinearities can be explained by using a Rydberg bubble model with a dynamical decay.

  17. Comparative genomics of the marine bacterial genus Glaciecola reveals the high degree of genomic diversity and genomic characteristic for cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qi-Long; Xie, Bin-Bin; Yu, Yong; Shu, Yan-Li; Rong, Jin-Cheng; Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Zhao, Dian-Li; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2014-06-01

    To what extent the genomes of different species belonging to one genus can be diverse and the relationship between genomic differentiation and environmental factor remain unclear for oceanic bacteria. With many new bacterial genera and species being isolated from marine environments, this question warrants attention. In this study, we sequenced all the type strains of the published species of Glaciecola, a recently defined cold-adapted genus with species from diverse marine locations, to study the genomic diversity and cold-adaptation strategy in this genus.The genome size diverged widely from 3.08 to 5.96 Mb, which can be explained by massive gene gain and loss events. Horizontal gene transfer and new gene emergence contributed substantially to the genome size expansion. The genus Glaciecola had an open pan-genome. Comparative genomic research indicated that species of the genus Glaciecola had high diversity in genome size, gene content and genetic relatedness. This may be prevalent in marine bacterial genera considering the dynamic and complex environments of the ocean. Species of Glaciecola had some common genomic features related to cold adaptation, which enable them to thrive and play a role in biogeochemical cycle in the cold marine environments.

  18. Gene Profiling for Invertase Activity: Assessment of Potato Varieties for Resistance towards Cold Induced Sweetening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfan Ali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Potato is the most important staple food in the world. Cold-induced sweetening occurs when potatoes are stored at low temperature for longer period of time. Due to non- enzymatic Millard reaction it causes unwanted changes in colour, taste and in flavor when fried and roasted at high temperature. However, long-term cold storage is mandatory to keep an adequate supply of potatoes throughout the year. The cause of cold-induced sweetening is invertase enzyme. Methods: Five potato varieties (Hermes (A Lady Rosetta (B Oscar (C Kuroda (D and Multa (E were investigated for invertase activity during two month cold storage at 4°C. Crude protein was extracted by PD Midi Trap G25 column technique. Quantification of mRNA expression was employed through QPCR. Determination of sucrose, reducing sugars and organic acids was simply done by 80% ethanol method and concentration were find out by using HPLC with already set standards. The correlation between invertase enzyme, sugar content and mRNA expression was calculated through Statistical methods. Results: Significant activity of invertase was observed at 4ºC with up to 6.3 nmol/min/mg of protein in the type-1 & 4 (cv. Hermes and Kuroda; 2.5 times less in type 2 (Rosetta and 3.5 times less in type 3 (Multa when compared with same at 4ºC. In addition, malic acid concentration was found positively correlated with invertase activity at 4ºC as compared with its concentration at harvesting time. However, citric acid and oxalic acid concentrations were independent of invertase enzyme activity. The transcript level of invertase enzyme was found significantly high in potato tubers stored at 4ºC in result 1 & 4 type, less in result type 2(C and negligible in result 3(E potato variety when revealed through reverse transcription PCR. Conclusions: In conclusion, Oscar (C and Multa (E were found more resistant to CIS at 4ºC storage and may be used for future variety improvement programs for CIS resistant

  19. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of a cold-adapted aspartate carbamoyltransferase from Moritella profunda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vos, Dirk; Hulpiau, Paco; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Savvides, Savvas N.; Van Beeumen, Jozef, E-mail: jozef.vanbeeumen@ugent.be [Laboratorium voor Eiwitbiochemie en Eiwitengineering, Universiteit Gent, K. L. Ledeganckstraat 35, Ghent (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Crystals of the aspartate carbamoyltransferase of the psychrophile M. profunda diffract X-rays to 2.85 Å. Three catalytic and three regulatory subunits are predicted per asymmetric unit. Aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ATCase) catalyzes the carbamoylation of the α-amino group of l-aspartate by carbamoyl phosphate (CP) to yield N-carbamoyl-l-aspartate and orthophosphate in the first step of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Apart from its key role in nucleotide metabolism, the enzyme is generally regarded as a model system in the study of proteins exhibiting allosteric behaviour. Here, the successful preparation, crystallization and diffraction data collection of the ATCase from the psychrophilic bacterium Moritella profunda are reported. To date, there is no structural representative of a cold-adapted ATCase. The structure of M. profunda ATCase is thus expected to provide important insights into the molecular basis of allosteric activity at low temperatures. Furthermore, through comparisons with the recently reported structure of an extremely thermostable ATCase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, it is hoped to contribute to general principles governing protein adaptation to extreme environments. A complete native data to 2.85 Å resolution showed that the crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = 129.25, b = 129.25, c = 207.23 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and that it contains three catalytic and three regulatory subunits per asymmetric unit. The three-dimensional structure of the Escherichia coli ATCase was sufficient to solve the structure of the M. profunda ATCase via the molecular-replacement method and to obtain electron density of good quality.

  20. Cold-induced vasoconstriction may persist long after cooling ends: an evaluation of multiple cryotherapy units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, Sepideh; Craik, Natalie K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Localized cooling is widely used in treating soft tissue injuries by modulating swelling, pain, and inflammation. One of the primary outcomes of localized cooling is vasoconstriction within the underlying skin. It is thought that in some instances, cryotherapy may be causative of tissue necrosis and neuropathy via cold-induced ischaemia leading to nonfreezing cold injury (NFCI). The purpose of this study is to quantify the magnitude and persistence of vasoconstriction associated with cryotherapy. Methods Data are presented from testing with four different FDA approved cryotherapy devices. Blood perfusion and skin temperature were measured at multiple anatomical sites during baseline, active cooling, and passive rewarming periods. Results Local cutaneous blood perfusion was depressed in response to cooling the skin surface with all devices, including the DonJoy (DJO, p = 2.6 × 10−8), Polar Care 300 (PC300, p = 1.1 × 10−3), Polar Care 500 Lite (PC500L, p = 0.010), and DeRoyal T505 (DR505, p = 0.016). During the rewarming period, parasitic heat gain from the underlying tissues and the environment resulted in increased temperatures of the skin and pad for all devices, but blood perfusion did not change significantly, DJO (n.s.), PC300 (n.s.), PC500L (n.s.), and DR505 (n.s.). Conclusions The results demonstrate that cryotherapy can create a deep state of vasoconstriction in the local area of treatment. In the absence of independent stimulation, the condition of reduced blood flow persists long after cooling is stopped and local temperatures have rewarmed towards the normal range, indicating that the maintenance of vasoconstriction is not directly dependent on the continuing existence of a cold state. The depressed blood flow may dispose tissue to NFCI. PMID:24562697

  1. Materials for damping the PTC-induced thermal fluctuations of the cold-head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, I.; Martins, D.; Sudiwala, R.

    2015-12-01

    The cold head on mechanical Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTCs) is subject to substantially less mechanical vibration and electromagnetic interference compared to that typically found in Gifford MacMahon coolers. However, thermal fluctuations at the PTC frequency are still present at the cold-head, typically at a level of 200 mK peak-to-peak at 1.4 Hz for a Cryomech Model PT405 cooler running at 4 K. It is highly desirable to damp out these fluctuations if PTCs are to be used successfully for running systems sensitive to such thermal fluctuations, for example, bolometeric detectors. We report here the characterization over the temperature range 2.5 K to 6 K of two materials, GOS (Gd2O2S) and GAP (GdAlO3), for use as low-pass thermal filters. These materials have antiferromagnetic transitions at around 4 K giving rise to an enhanced heat capacity and have a high thermal conductance. These are two highly desirable properties for thermal dampers in this application. Those materials were fired as ceramic discs to be tested as thermal dumpers. Thermal filter assemblies with discs of diameter 75 mm and thickness 2.5 mm and 1.6 mm (GOS and GAP, respectively) mounted in a PTC show thermal attenuation levels of x0.12 (GOS) and x0.11 (GAP) at 0.01Hz with a clean-side temperature of 4 K; the PTC induced fluctuations at 1.48 Hz are damped completely to within the noise limits (0.2 mK) of the thermometers. Experimentally determined thermal conductance and heat capacity data are reported. For this system, with a PTC cold-head (dirty-side) temperature of 3.3 K, a clean-side power dissipation of up to 30 mW is realized before its temperature rises above 4.2 K.

  2. Case report of cold-weather-induced radiation recall dermatitis after chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindts, Isabelle; Stellamans, Karin; Planckaert, Nikie; Goethals, Laurence [AZ Groeninge Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kortrijk (Belgium); Bonny, Michiel [AZ Groeninge Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    The radiation recall reaction (RRR) is an inflammatory reaction that occurs in previously irradiated areas. The phenomenon is probably due to an idiosyncratic hypersensitivity reaction, in which a second agent can recall the inflammatory reaction. This case report documents a cold-weather-induced radiation recall dermatitis (RRD). We observed a severe RRD in a patient after chemoradiotherapy treatment with cisplatin for a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, precipitated by cold temperatures, which developed 9 days after completion of therapy. In the medical literature, RRD following extreme cold temperatures seems to be a peculiar event. Until further information on the interaction is available, future studies on combined chemotherapy with cisplatin should be carefully monitored and any side effects clearly documented. This case suggests that environmental conditions may play a contributing role in the development of RRD. This case also implies that neither fraction size nor total radiation dose is a determining factor in the development of the dermatologic reaction. (orig.) [German] Die ''Radiation-Recall-Reaktion'' (RRR) ist eine Entzuendungsreaktion, die in zuvor bestrahlten Bereichen auftritt. Das Phaenomen wird wahrscheinlich durch eine spezifische Ueberempfindlichkeitsreaktion verursacht, bei der ein zweites Agens die Entzuendungsreaktion hervorruft. Dieser Fallbericht beschreibt eine kaltwetterinduzierte RR-Hautentzuendung. Wir beobachteten bei dem Patienten nach einer Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin aufgrund eines Nasopharynxkarzinoms eine heftige RR-Dermatitis (RRD) aufgrund kalter Temperaturen, die sich 9 Tage nach Therapiebeendigung entwickelte. In der medizinischen Literatur scheint eine RRD infolge extrem kalter Temperaturen ein besonderes Ereignis. Bis weitere Informationen zu der Interaktion verfuegbar sind, sollten zukuenftige Studien zur Kombinationstherapie mit Cisplatin sorgfaeltig ueberwacht und Nebenwirkungen eindeutig dokumentiert

  3. Impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation induces adaptive remodeling of muscle metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Shawna E; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Haynie, Kimberly R; Fuller, Scott E; Warfel, Jaycob D; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Zhang, Jingying; Noland, Robert C; Mynatt, Randall L

    2015-06-23

    The correlations between intramyocellular lipid (IMCL), decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and insulin resistance have led to the hypothesis that impaired FAO causes accumulation of lipotoxic intermediates that inhibit muscle insulin signaling. Using a skeletal muscle-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 KO model, we show that prolonged and severe mitochondrial FAO inhibition results in increased carbohydrate utilization, along with reduced physical activity; increased circulating nonesterified fatty acids; and increased IMCLs, diacylglycerols, and ceramides. Perhaps more importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial FAO also initiates a local, adaptive response in muscle that invokes mitochondrial biogenesis, compensatory peroxisomal fat oxidation, and amino acid catabolism. Loss of its major fuel source (lipid) induces an energy deprivation response in muscle coordinated by signaling through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) to maintain energy supply for locomotion and survival. At the whole-body level, these adaptations result in resistance to obesity.

  4. Extracellular enzymatic activities of cold-adapted bacteria from polar oceans and effect of temperature and salinity on cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Yinxin; Yu Yong; Chen Bo; Li Huirong

    2004-01-01

    The potential of 324 bacteria isolated from different habitats in polar oceans to produce a variety of extracellular enzymatic activities at low temperature was investigated. By plate assay, lipase, protease, amylase, gelatinase, agarase, chitinase or cellulase were detected. Lipases were generally present by bacteria living in polar oceans. Protease-producing bacteria held the second highest proportion in culturable isolates. Strains producing amylase kept a relative stable proportion of around 30% in different polar marine habitats. All 50 Arctic sea-ice bacteria producing proteases were cold-adapted strains, however, only 20% were psychrophilic. 98% of them could grow at 3% NaCl, and 56% could grow without NaCl. On the other hand, 98% of these sea-ice bacteria produced extracellular proteases with optimum temperature at or higher than 35℃, well above the upper temperature limit of cell growth. Extracellular enzymes including amylase, agarase, cellulase and lipase released by bacteria from seawater or sediment in polar oceans, most expressed maximum activities between 25 and 35℃. Among extracellular enzymes released by bacterial strain BSw20308, protease expressed maximum activity at 40℃, higher than 35℃ of polysaccharide hydrolases and 25℃ of lipase.

  5. Post-exercise cold water immersion attenuates acute anabolic signalling and long-term adaptations in muscle to strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Llion A; Raastad, Truls; Markworth, James F; Figueiredo, Vandre C; Egner, Ingrid M; Shield, Anthony; Cameron-Smith, David; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2015-09-15

    We investigated functional, morphological and molecular adaptations to strength training exercise and cold water immersion (CWI) through two separate studies. In one study, 21 physically active men strength trained for 12 weeks (2 days per week), with either 10 min of CWI or active recovery (ACT) after each training session. Strength and muscle mass increased more in the ACT group than in the CWI group (P muscle fibre cross-sectional area (17%) and the number of myonuclei per fibre (26%) increased in the ACT group (all P Muscle biopsies were collected before and 2, 24 and 48 h after exercise. The number of satellite cells expressing neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (10-30%) and paired box protein (Pax7) (20-50%) increased 24-48 h after exercise with ACT. The number of NCAM(+) satellite cells increased 48 h after exercise with CWI. NCAM(+) - and Pax7(+) -positive satellite cell numbers were greater after ACT than after CWI (P muscle hypertrophy, which may translate to smaller long-term training gains in muscle strength and hypertrophy. The use of CWI as a regular post-exercise recovery strategy should be reconsidered. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  6. Diversity and cold adaptation of culturable endophytic fungi from bryophytes in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Liu, Hong-Yu; Wei, Yu-Zhen; Li, Hai-Long; Su, Jing; Zhao, Li-Xun; Yu, Li-Yan

    2013-04-01

    Endophytic fungi associated with three bryophyte species in the Fildes Region, King George Island, maritime Antarctica, that is, the liverwort Barbilophozia hatcheri, the mosses Chorisodontium aciphyllum and Sanionia uncinata, were studied by culture-dependent method. A total of 128 endophytic fungi were isolated from 1329 tissue segments of 14 samples. The colonization rate of endophytic fungi in three bryophytes species were 12.3%, 12.1%, and 8.7%, respectively. These isolates were identified to 21 taxa, with 15 Ascomycota, 5 Basidiomycota, and 1 unidentified fungus, based on morphological characteristics and sequence analyses of ITS region and D1/D2 domain. The dominant fungal endophyte was Hyaloscyphaceae sp. in B. hatcheri, Rhizoscyphus sp. in C. aciphyllum, and one unidentified fungus in S. uncinata; and their relative frequencies were 33.3%, 32.1%, and 80.0%, respectively. Furthermore, different Shannon-Weiner diversity indices (0.91-1.99) for endophytic fungi and low endophytic fungal composition similarities (0.19-0.40) were found in three bryophyte species. Growth temperature tests indicated that 21 taxa belong to psychrophiles (9), psychrotrophs (11), and mesophile (1). The results herein demonstrate that the Antarctic bryophytes are an interesting source of fungal endophytes and the endophytic fungal composition is different among the bryophyte species, and suggest that these fungal endophytes are adapted to cold stress in Antarctica.

  7. Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase from the Cold Adapted Microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: A Low Temperature Active Enzyme with Broad Substrate Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Pascarella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  8. Gene cloning and sequence analysis of the cold-adapted chaperones DnaK and DnaJ from deep-sea psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM9913

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM9913 is a phychrotrophic bacterium isolated from the deep-sea sediment. The genes encoding chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of P. sp. SM9913 were cloned by normal PCR and TAIL-PCR (GenBank accession Nos DQ640312, DQ504163). The chaperones DnaJ and DnaK from the strain SM9913 contain such conserved domains as those of many other bacteria, and show some cold-adapted characteristics in their structures when compared with those from psychro-, meso-and themophilic bacteria. It is indicated that chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of P. sp. SM9913 may be adapted to low temperature in deep-sea and function well in assisting folding, assembling and translocation of proteins at low temperature. This research lays a foundation for the further study on the cold-adapted mechanism of chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of cold-adapted microorganisms.

  9. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in cold-induced diuresis (CID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnew, J.W.; Freund, B.J.; DuBose, D.A.; McKay, J.M.; Hashiro, G.M. (Army Research Inst. of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA (United States) Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The hormonal control of cold-induced diuresis (CID) remains unresolved. This study investigated the role of ANP, plasma vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone (ALDO) on CID. Four semi-nude men participated in a 210 min exposure to 15C and 29C air, on separate days. These subjects drank 300 mL of water and had an intravenous saline drip throughout both exposures to replace blood and insensible fluid losses. CID was observed in 15C but not in the 29C experiment, as indicated by a greater urine output. In 15C, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased after 90 min by 41% and remained elevated for 2 h relative to 29C. No differences were observed in AVP between 15C and 29C. In the 15C versus the 29C experiment, ALDO was approximately 37% lower at the pre, 15 and 90 min time periods. Mean arterial blood pressure was generally greater but only significant at 60 min during the 15C versus the 29C experiment. Urinary NA{sup +} excretion was elevated in 15C relative to 29C while no difference in K{sup +} excretion was observed. Although pressure effects may contribute, the observed natriuresis in the absence of a kaliuresis in the cold suggests a physiological role of ANP in CID.

  10. Cold adaptive traits revealed by comparative genomic analysis of the eurypsychrophile Rhodococcus sp. JG3 isolated from high elevation McMurdo Dry Valley permafrost, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goordial, Jacqueline; Raymond-Bouchard, Isabelle; Zolotarov, Yevgen; de Bethencourt, Luis; Ronholm, Jennifer; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Stromvik, Martina; Greer, Charles W; Bakermans, Corien; Whyte, Lyle

    2016-02-01

    The permafrost soils of the high elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys are the most cold, desiccating and oligotrophic on Earth. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is one of very few bacterial isolates from Antarctic Dry Valley permafrost, and displays subzero growth down to -5°C. To understand how Rhodococcus sp. JG3 is able to survive extreme permafrost conditions and be metabolically active at subzero temperatures, we sequenced its genome and compared it to the genomes of 14 mesophilic rhodococci. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possessed a higher copy number of genes for general stress response, UV protection and protection from cold shock, osmotic stress and oxidative stress. We characterized genome wide molecular adaptations to cold, and identified genes that had amino acid compositions favourable for increased flexibility and functionality at low temperatures. Rhodococcus sp. JG3 possesses multiple complimentary strategies which may enable its survival in some of the harshest permafrost on Earth.

  11. Cytophysiological and ultrastructural modifications induced by cold in the microsporocytes and tapetum of Rhoeo discolor Hance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Souvré

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The exposition of Rhoeo discolor to cold induces an alteration of the microsporocytes (PMC and tapetum ultrastructure. In the young cooled PMC, the mitochondria present short and vesiculate cristae, the stroma of proplasts is clearer and the polyrilbasomes are deteriorated. During the phase tetrads-microspores, the alterations are more important: the chromatin coagulates, the nucleus swells while the nuclear membrane is modified; some large vesicules appear outside of the plasmalemma. In the cooled periplasmodium we can observe many groups of vesicules, mitochondria with dilated cristae, rough endoplasmic reticulum without their ribosomes and a breaking up of inueleoli. Our observations are in correlation with the previous results obtained by autoradiography and photometry, and are discussed with the bibliographical results.

  12. Trichostatin A selectively suppresses the cold-induced transcription of the ZmDREB1 gene in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hu

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of histone proteins play a crucial role in responding to environmental stresses. Histone deacetylases (HDACs catalyze the removal of an acetyl group from histones and are generally believed to be a transcriptional repressor. In this paper, we report that cold treatment highly induces the up-regulation of HDACs, leading to global deacetylation of histones H3 and H4. Treatment of maize with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA under cold stress conditions strongly inhibits induction of the maize cold-responsive genes ZmDREB1 and ZmCOR413. However, up-regulation of the ZmICE1 gene in response to cold stress is less affected. The expression of drought and salt induced genes, ZmDBF1 and rab17, is almost unaffected by TSA treatment. Thus, these observations show that HDACs may selectively activate transcription. The time course of TSA effects on the expression of ZmDREB1 and ZmCOR413 genes indicates that HDACs appear to directly activate the ZmDREB1 gene, which in turn modulates ZmCOR413 expression. After cold treatment, histone hyperacetylation and DNA demethylation occurs in the ICE1 binding region, accompanied by an increase in accessibility to micrococcal nuclease (MNase. The two regions adjacent to the ICE1 binding site remain hypoacetylated and methylated. However, during cold acclimation, TSA treatment increases the acetylation status and accessibility of MNase and decreases DNA methylation at these two regions. However, TSA treatment does not affect histone hyperacetylation and DNA methylation levels at the ICE1 binding regions of the ZmDREB1 gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that HDACs positively regulate the expression of the cold-induced ZmDREB1 gene through histone modification and chromatin conformational changes and that this activation is both gene and site selective.

  13. Mixing behaviors in Cu/Ni and Ni/V multilayers induced by cold rolling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1509 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Perepezko, J.H., E-mail: perepezk@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1509 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Larson, D.; Reinhard, D. [CAMECA Instruments Inc., 5500 Nobel Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The composition profiles of Cu/Ni and Ni/V multilayers were investigated. • A compositional oscillation was observed in the Cu/Ni composition profile. • The Ni/V composition profile varies smoothly and continuously between end members. • The effective diffusion coefficients were enhanced by about 30 order of magnitudes. • The effective temperature were estimated as 946 K for Cu/Ni and 936 K for Ni/V. - Abstract: Multilayers of Cu60/Ni40 and Ni70/V30 foil arrays were cold rolled in order to study the transformation reactions and mixing behaviors induced by deformation. Upon cold rolling, the layer thicknesses were refined to about 20 nm and solid solution phases were induced from pure end members (i.e. Cu, Ni and V) in both cases. The composition profiles for Cu/Ni and Ni/V multilayer samples at the deformation level where the solid solution phases coexist with end members were investigated by means of atom probe tomography and electron energy loss spectrum, respectively. An oscillation in the composition of Cu–Ni solid solution phase was observed, however the composition profile of Ni/V shows a smoothly varying curve between the end members. The effective diffusion coefficients were promoted by about 30 orders of magnitude for both Cu/Ni and Ni/V compared to room temperature diffusion. The effective temperature for Cu/Ni multilayers after 36 passes and Ni/V after 60 passes are estimated as 946 K and 936 K respectively.

  14. Aneuploidy as a mechanism for stress-induced liver adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Andrew W; Hanlon Newell, Amy E; Bi, Weimin; Finegold, Milton J; Olson, Susan B; Beaudet, Arthur L; Grompe, Markus

    2012-09-01

    Over half of the mature hepatocytes in mice and humans are aneuploid and yet retain full ability to undergo mitosis. This observation has raised the question of whether this unusual somatic genetic variation evolved as an adaptive mechanism in response to hepatic injury. According to this model, hepatotoxic insults select for hepatocytes with specific numerical chromosome abnormalities, rendering them differentially resistant to injury. To test this hypothesis, we utilized a strain of mice heterozygous for a mutation in the homogentisic acid dioxygenase (Hgd) gene located on chromosome 16. Loss of the remaining Hgd allele protects from fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah) deficiency, a genetic liver disease model. When adult mice heterozygous for Hgd and lacking Fah were exposed to chronic liver damage, injury-resistant nodules consisting of Hgd-null hepatocytes rapidly emerged. To determine whether aneuploidy played a role in this phenomenon, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and metaphase karyotyping were performed. Strikingly, loss of chromosome 16 was dramatically enriched in all mice that became completely resistant to tyrosinemia-induced hepatic injury. The frequency of chromosome 16-specific aneuploidy was approximately 50%. This result indicates that selection of a specific aneuploid karyotype can result in the adaptation of hepatocytes to chronic liver injury. The extent to which aneuploidy promotes hepatic adaptation in humans remains under investigation.

  15. Adaptation-Induced Compression of Event Time Occurs Only for Translational Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaciai, Michele; Arrighi, Roberto; Burr, David C

    2016-03-22

    Adaptation to fast motion reduces the perceived duration of stimuli displayed at the same location as the adapting stimuli. Here we show that the adaptation-induced compression of time is specific for translational motion. Adaptation to complex motion, either circular or radial, did not affect perceived duration of subsequently viewed stimuli. Adaptation with multiple patches of translating motion caused compression of duration only when the motion of all patches was in the same direction. These results show that adaptation-induced compression of event-time occurs only for uni-directional translational motion, ruling out the possibility that the neural mechanisms of the adaptation occur at early levels of visual processing.

  16. Biodiversity and cold adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles%低温细菌与古菌的生物多样性及其冷适应机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛玉华; 周宇光; 东秀珠

    2013-01-01

    Cold-adapted bacteria and archaea are widely distributed in cold environments on Earth,such as permafrost,cold soils and deserts,glaciers,lakes,sea ice in the Arctic,Antarctic and high mountains,as well as the deep sea,ice caves and the atmospheric stratosphere etc.Cold-adapted organisms inhabiting these environments exhibit rich diversity.Studies on the biogeography of psychrophiles will enable us to understand their biodiversity,distribution and origins.Due to long-term living in cold regions,cold-adapted bacteria and archeae have developed specific physiological mechanisms of adaptation to cold environments.These mechanisms include:regulating the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane through adjusting the composition of membrane lipids; achieving low-temperature protection through compatibility solute,antifreeze proteins,ice-binding proteins,ice-nucleation proteins and anti-nucleating proteins; production of heat-shock and coldshock proteins,cold acclimation protein and DEAD-box RNA helicase at low temperatures; production of cold-active enzymes; increasing energy generation and conservation.With the rapid development of sequencing technology,various omics-based approaches have been used to reveal cold-adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles at the genomic level.%低温细菌与古菌广泛分布于地球的低温环境,包括南极、北极及高山地带的冻土、低温土壤和荒漠、冰川、湖泊、海冰,以及深海、冰洞和大气平流层等.栖息在这些低温环境中的细菌与古菌具有丰富的多样性,主要为α,p和γ-Proteobacteria分支、CFB类群分支和革兰氏阳性细菌分支等.由于低温环境中的微生物流动性低,因而是研究微生物地理学理想的生态系统,有助于理解地球微生物的多样性、分布规律乃至形成机制.由于长期生活在冰冻环境中,低温细菌与古菌形成了多种适应低温环境的生理机制,如它们通过细胞膜脂类的组成来调节膜的流动性以维

  17. Daily rhythms of core temperature and locomotor activity indicate different adaptive strategies to cold exposure in adult and aged mouse lemurs acclimated to a summer-like photoperiod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrien, Jeremy; Zizzari, Philippe; Epelbaum, Jacques; Perret, Martine; Aujard, Fabienne

    2009-07-01

    , aging was associated with lower LA and Tc during the night and delayed decrease in IGF-1. This might reflect that adaptive strategies to cold exposure differ with age in mouse lemurs acclimated to a summer-like photoperiod.

  18. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelin Liu

    Full Text Available DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3, which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C, both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold.

  19. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuelin; Tabata, Daisuke; Imai, Ryozo

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3), which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C), both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold.

  20. Exploring the Antarctic soil metagenome as a source of novel cold-adapted enzymes and genetic mobile elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Berlemont

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic library PP1 was obtained from Antarctic soil samples. Both functional and genotypic metagenomic screening were used for the isolation of novel cold-adapted enzymes with potential applications, and for the detection of genetic elements associated with gene mobilization, respectively. Fourteen lipase/esterase-, 14 amylase-, 3 protease-, and 11 cellulase-producing clones were detected by activity-driven screening, with apparent maximum activities around 35 °C for both amylolytic and lipolytic enzymes, and 35-55 °C for cellulases, as observed for other cold-adapted enzymes. However, the behavior of at least one of the studied cellulases is more compatible to that observed for mesophilic enzymes. These enzymes are usually still active at temperatures above 60 °C, probably resulting in a psychrotolerant behavior in Antarctic soils. Metagenomics allows to access novel genes encoding for enzymatic and biophysic properties from almost every environment with potential benefits for biotechnological and industrial applications. Only intI- and tnp-like genes were detected by PCR, encoding for proteins with 58-86 %, and 58-73 % amino acid identity with known entries, respectively. Two clones, BAC 27A-9 and BAC 14A-5, seem to present unique syntenic organizations, suggesting the occurrence of gene rearrangements that were probably due to evolutionary divergences within the genus or facilitated by the association with transposable elements. The evidence for genetic elements related to recruitment and mobilization of genes (transposons/integrons in an extreme environment like Antarctica reinforces the hypothesis of the origin of some of the genes disseminated by mobile elements among "human-associated" microorganisms.A partir de muestras de suelo antártico se obtuvo la metagenoteca PP1. Esta fue sometida a análisis funcionales y genotípicos para el aislamiento de nuevas enzimas adaptadas al frío con potenciales aplicaciones, y para la detecci

  1. Purification and characterization of a novel cold-adapted phytase from Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain JMUY14 isolated from Antarctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng; Wang, Xue-Ting; Liu, Jing-Wen

    2015-08-01

    A yeast producing a cold-adapted phytase was isolated from Antarctic deep-sea sediment and identified as a Rhodotorula mucilaginosa strain JMUY14 of basidiomycetous yeasts. It was cultured in fermentation optimized by a response surface methodology based on the Box-Behnken design. The maximum activity of phytase reached 205.447 U ml(-1), which was close to the predicted value of 201.948 U ml(-1) and approximately 3.4 times higher than its initial activity. The extracellular phytase was purified by 15.2-fold to homogeneity with a specific activity of 31,635 U mg(-1) by (NH4 )2 SO4 precipitation, and a combination of DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow, SP Sepharose Fast Flow, and Sephadex G-100. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 63 kDa and its pI was 4.33. Its optimal temperature and pH were 50 °C and 5.0, respectively. Its activity was 85% at 37 °C, and showed good stability at pH 3.0 ∼ 7.0. When compared with mesophilic counterparts, the phytase not only exhibited a higher activity during 20 ∼ 30 °C but also had a low Km (247 µM) and high kcat (1394 s(-1)). The phytase activity was slightly stimulated in the presence of Mg(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), EDTA, and EGTA and moderately inhibited by Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), Ag(+), PMSF, SDS, and phenylgloxal hydrate. It was resistant to both pepsin and trypsin. Since the phytase produced by the R. mucilaginosa JMUY14 showed a high specific activity, good pH stability, strong protease resistance, and high activity at low temperature, it has great potential for feed applications, especially in aquaculture.

  2. Role of IL-6 in exercise training- and cold-induced UCP1 expression in subcutaneous white adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob Grunnet; Murholm, Maria; Carey, Andrew L.;

    2014-01-01

    Expression of brown adipose tissue (BAT) associated proteins like uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in inguinal WAT (iWAT) has been suggested to alter iWAT metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in exercise training and cold exposure-induced iWAT UCP1 expr...

  3. Exogenous 5-aminolevulenic acid promotes seed germination in Elymus nutans against oxidative damage induced by cold stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Fu

    Full Text Available The protective effects of 5-aminolevulenic acid (ALA on germination of Elymus nutans Griseb. seeds under cold stress were investigated. Seeds of E. nutans (Damxung, DX and Zhengdao, ZD were pre-soaked with various concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5, 10 and 25 mg l(-1 of ALA for 24 h before germination under cold stress (5°C. Seeds of ZD were more susceptible to cold stress than DX seeds. Both seeds treated with ALA at low concentrations (0.1-1 mg l(-1 had higher final germination percentage (FGP and dry weight at 5°C than non-ALA-treated seeds, whereas exposure to higher ALA concentrations (5-25 mg l(-1 brought about a dose dependent decrease. The highest FGP and dry weight of germinating seeds were obtained from seeds pre-soaked with 1 mg l(-1 ALA. After 5 d of cold stress, pretreatment with ALA provided significant protection against cold stress in the germinating seeds, significantly enhancing seed respiration rate and ATP synthesis. ALA pre-treatment also increased reduced glutathione (GSH, ascorbic acid (AsA, total glutathione, and total ascorbate concentrations, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX and glutathione reductase (GR, whereas decreased the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and superoxide radical (O2•- release in both germinating seeds under cold stress. In addition, application of ALA increased H+-ATPase activity and endogenous ALA concentration compared with cold stress alone. Results indicate that ALA considered as an endogenous plant growth regulator could effectively protect E. nutans seeds from cold-induced oxidative damage during germination without any adverse effect.

  4. Ptcorp gene induced by cold stress was identified by proteomic analysis in leaves of Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Guiyou; Song, Jinyu; Deng, Ziniu; Liu, Jie; Rao, Liqun

    2012-05-01

    A proteomic approach was employed to investigate the cold stress-responsive proteins in trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.), which is a well-known cold tolerant citrus relative and widely used as rootstock in China. Two-year-old potted seedlings were exposed to freezing temperature (-6°C) for 50 min (nonlethal) and 80 min (lethal), and the total proteins were isolated from leaves of the treated plants. Nine differentially accumulated proteins over 2-fold changes in abundance were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Among these proteins, a resistance protein induced by the nonlethal cold treatment (protein spot #2 from P. trifoliata) was selected as target sequence for degenerated primer design. By using the designed primers, a PCR product of about 700 bp size was amplified from P. trifoliata genomic DNA, which was further cloned and sequenced. A nucleotide sequence of 676 bp was obtained and named Ptcorp. Blast retrieval showed that Ptcorp shared 88% homology with an EST of cold acclimated Bluecrop (Vaccinium corymbosum) library (Accession number: CF811080), indicating that Ptcorp had association with cold acclimation. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that Ptcorp gene was up-regulated by cold stress which was consistent with the former result of protein expression profile. As the resistance protein (NBS-LRR disease resistance protein family) gene was up-regulated by cold stress in trifoliate orange and satsuma mandarin, it may imply that NBS-LRR genes might be associated with cold resistance in citrus.

  5. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein is an important mediator of alcohol-induced brain inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil R Rajayer

    Full Text Available Binge drinking has been associated with cerebral dysfunction. Ethanol induced microglial activation initiates an inflammatory process that causes upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines which in turn creates neuronal inflammation and damage. However, the molecular mechanism is not fully understood. We postulate that cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP, a novel proinflammatory molecule, can contribute to alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. To test this theory male wild-type (WT mice were exposed to alcohol at concentrations consistent to binge drinking and blood and brain tissues were collected. At 5 h after alcohol, a significant increase of 53% in the brain of CIRP mRNA was observed and its expression remained elevated at 10 h and 15 h. Brain CIRP protein levels were increased by 184% at 10 h and remained high at 15 h. We then exposed male WT and CIRP knockout (CIRP(-/- mice to alcohol, and blood and brain tissues were collected at 15 h post-alcohol infusion. Serum levels of tissue injury markers (AST, ALT and LDH were significantly elevated in alcohol-exposed WT mice while they were less increased in the CIRP(-/- mice. Brain TNF-α mRNA and protein expressions along with IL-1β protein levels were significantly increased in WT mice, which was not seen in the CIRP(-/- mice. In cultured BV2 cells (mouse microglia, ethanol at 100 mM showed an increase of CIRP mRNA by 274% and 408% at 24 h and 48 h respectively. Corresponding increases in TNF-α and IL-1β were also observed. CIRP protein levels were markedly increased in the medium, suggesting that CIRP was secreted by the BV2 cells. From this we conclude that alcohol exposure activates microglia to produce and secrete CIRP and possibly induce pro-inflammatory response and thereby causing neuroinflammation. CIRP could be a novel mediator of alcohol-induced brain inflammation.

  6. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein inhibits neuron apoptosis through the suppression of mitochondrial apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Tao; Xue, Jing-Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Kong, Hai-Bo; Liu, Ai-Jun; Li, Shou-Chun; Xu, Dong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is induced by mild hypothermia in several mammals, but the precise mechanism by which CIRP mediates hypothermia-induced neuroprotection remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which CIRP protects the nervous system during mild hypothermia. Rat cortical neurons were isolated and cultured in vitro under mild hypothermia (32°C). Apoptosis was measured by annexin V and propidium iodide staining, visualized by flow cytometry. Neuron ultrastructure was visualized by transmission electron microscopy. CIRP overexpression and knockdown were achieved via infection with pL/IRES/GFP-CIRP and pL/shRNA/F-CIRP-A lentivirus. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis and western blotting were used to evaluate the effects of CIRP overexpresion/knockdown on the neurons׳ transcriptome. Neuron late apoptosis was significantly reduced at day 7 of culture by 12h hypothermia, but neuron ultrastructure remained relatively intact. RT(2) Profiler PCR Array Pathway Analysis of 84 apoptosis pathway-associated factors revealed that mild hypothermia and CIRP overexpression induce similar gene expression profiles, specifically alterations of genes implicated in the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Mild hypothermia-treated neurons up-regulated 12 and down-regulated 38 apoptosis pathway-associated genes. CIRP-overexpressing neurons up-regulated 15 and down-regulated 46 genes. CIRP-knocked-down hypothermia-treated cells up-regulated 9 and down-regulated 40 genes. Similar results were obtained at the protein level. In conclusion, CIRP may inhibit neuron apoptosis through the suppression of the mitochondria apoptosis pathway during mild hypothermia.

  7. Abscisic acid, H2O2 and nitric oxide interactions mediated cold-induced S-adenosylmethionine synthetase in Medicago sativa subsp. falcata that confers cold tolerance through up-regulating polyamine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenfei; Tan, Jiali; Zhuo, Chunliu; Wang, Congying; Xiang, Bin; Wang, Zengyu

    2014-06-01

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SAMS) is the key enzyme catalysing the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a precursor of polyamines and ethylene. To investigate the potential role of SAMS in cold tolerance, we isolated MfSAMS1 from the cold-tolerant germplasm Medicago sativa subsp. falcata and analysed the association of SAM-derived polyamines with cold tolerance. The expression of MfSAMS1 in leaves was greatly induced by cold, abscisic acid (ABA), H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). Our data revealed that ABA, H2O2 and NO interactions mediated the cold-induced MfSAMS1 expression and cold acclimation in falcata. SAM, putrescine, spermidine and spermine levels, ethylene production and polyamine oxidation were sequentially altered in response to cold, indicating that SAMS-derived SAM is preferentially used in polyamine synthesis and homeostasis during cold acclimation. Antioxidant enzyme activities were also induced in response to cold and showed correlation with polyamine oxidation. Overexpression of MfSAMS1 in tobacco resulted in elevated SAM levels, but polyamine levels and ethylene production in the transgenic plants were not significantly changed. Compared to the wild type, transgenic plants had increased levels of apoplastic H2O2, higher transcript levels of genes involved in polyamine synthesis and oxidation, and higher activities of polyamine oxidation and antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that overexpression of MfSAMS1 promoted polyamine synthesis and oxidation, which in turn improved H2 O2 -induced antioxidant protection, as a result enhanced tolerance to freezing and chilling stress in transgenic plants. This is the first report demonstrating that SAMS plays an important role in plant tolerance to cold via up-regulating polyamine oxidation. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Akt and MAPK signaling mediate pregnancy-induced cardiac adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eunhee; Yeung, Fan; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2012-05-01

    Although the signaling pathways underlying exercise-induced cardiac adaptation have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that result in the response of the heart to pregnancy. The objective of this study was to define the morphological, functional, and gene expression patterns that define the hearts of pregnant mice, and to identify the signaling pathways that mediate this response. Mice were divided into three groups: nonpregnant diestrus control, midpregnancy, and late pregnancy. Both time points of pregnancy were associated with significant cardiac hypertrophy. The prosurvival signaling cascades of Akt and ERK1/2 were activated in the hearts of pregnant mice, while the stress kinase, p38, was decreased. Given the activation of Akt in pregnancy and its known role in cardiac hypertrophy, the hypertrophic response to pregnancy was tested in mice expressing a cardiac-specific activated (myristoylated) form of Akt (myrAkt) or a cardiac-specific constitutively active (antipathologic hypertrophic) form of its downstream target, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (caGSK3β). The pregnancy-induced hypertrophic responses of hearts from these mice were significantly attenuated. Finally, we tested whether pregnancy-associated sex hormones could induce hypertrophy and alter signaling pathways in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). In fact, progesterone, but not estradiol treatment increased NRVM cell size via phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Inhibition of MEK1 effectively blocked progesterone-induced cellular hypertrophy. Taken together, our study demonstrates that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy is mediated by activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways.

  9. Hydrogen induced cold cracking studies on armour grade high strength, quenched and tempered steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V. [Centre for Materials Joining Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh (P.O.) Hyderabad 560 058 Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2008-04-15

    Quenched and tempered (Q and T) steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) in the heat affected zone after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q and T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic (LHF) steel consumables can be used to weld Q and T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on hydrogen induced cold cracking of armour grade Q and T steel welds by implant testing. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes were used for making welds using ASS and LHF welding consumables. ASS welds made using FCAW process offered a higher resistance to HIC than all other welds considered in this investigation. (author)

  10. First measurement of proton-induced low-momentum dielectron radiation off cold nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    HADES Collaboration; Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Díaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Mishra, D.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2012-09-01

    We present data on dielectron emission in proton induced reactions on a Nb target at 3.5 GeV kinetic beam energy measured with HADES installed at GSI. The data represent the first high statistics measurement of proton-induced dielectron radiation from cold nuclear matter in a kinematic regime, where strong medium effects are expected. Combined with the good mass resolution of 2%, it is the first measurement sensitive to changes of the spectral functions of vector mesons, as predicted by models for hadrons at rest or small relative momenta. Comparing the e+e- invariant mass spectra to elementary p + p data, we observe for e+e- momenta Pee<0.8 GeV/c a strong modification of the shape of the spectrum, which we attribute to an additional ρ-like contribution and a decrease of ω yield. These opposite trends are tentatively interpreted as a strong coupling of the ρ meson to baryonic resonances and an absorption of the ω meson, which are two aspects of in-medium modification of vector mesons.

  11. Establishment of a model for pregnancy-induced hypertension syndrome resuiting from cold-stress in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞丽丽; 李力; 陈鸣; 吴国萍; 史景泉; 祝之明

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To establish a model for pregnancy-induced hypertension syndrome in rats. Methods: Adult female Wistar rats were randomized into non-pregnant control (NN), non-pregnant cold-stress control (NC), pregnant control (PN) and pregnant cold-stress (PC) groups. The rats of NN and PN groups were put under 25 ℃ and those of NC and PC groups under (4±2) ℃ for 4 h every morning respectively in the whole experimental period. The blood pressure, urine protein, body weight, haematocrit, weight of the placenta and weight and length of the fetus were recorded and the histological changes of the placenta and the kidneys were also studied. Results: The blood pressure and urine protein of the rats of the NC and PC groups after 2 weeks of cold-stress were more significantly increased than the rats of the NN and PN groups. In addition, the weight of the placenta and the weight and length of the fetus were more significantly lower in the former than the latter. Obvious changes of anoxia and ischemia were observed in the tissues of the kidneys and every layer of the placenta.Conclusion: Our findings of hypertension syndrome induced with repeated cold-stress in pregnant rats can be applied to illustrate the pathogenesis of pregnancy-induced hypertension syndrome in human beings.

  12. Alternative scenarios of starvation-induced adaptation in Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Olga; Gorshkov, Vladimir; Sergeeva, Iuliia; Daminova, Amina; Ageeva, Marina; Gogolev, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria have high adaptive potential that ensures their survival during various environmental challenges. To adapt, bacteria activate a physiological program of stress response that makes them able to persist under adverse conditions. The present study sought to examine the ability of a particular bacterial species to induce a stress response in alternative scenarios. Cells of the phytopathogenic microorganism Pectobacterium atrosepticum were taken as a model. The cells were exposed to starvation in different physiological states (actively growing exponential phase and stationary phase cells), and the resulting starving cultures were monitored using CFU counting, quantitative PCR and electron microscopy. When exponential phase cells were subjected to starvation, the nucleoids of the cells became condensed and their DNA was detected by qPCR less effectively than that of cells growing in nutrient-rich medium, or stationary phase cells after starvation. Exponential phase cells subjected to starvation showed increased expression of genes encoding DNA binding histone-like proteins, whereas, in cultures inoculated by stationary phase cells, cell-wall-deficient forms that were inefficient at colony forming and that had a non-culturable phenotype were formed. The cell-wall-deficient forms displayed reduced expression of genes encoding synthases of cell wall components.

  13. Climate adaption and post-fire restoration of a foundational perennial in cold desert: Insights from intraspecific variation in response to weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, Martha M.; Germino, Matthew; Richardson, Bryce A.

    2017-01-01

    1.The loss of foundational but fire-intolerant perennials such as sagebrush due to increases in fire size and frequency in semiarid regions has motivated efforts to restore them, often with mixed or even no success. Seeds of sagebrush Artemisia tridentata and related species must be moved considerable distances from seed source to planting sites, but such transfers have not been guided by an understanding of local climate adaptation. Initial seedling establishment and its response to weather are a key demographic bottleneck that likely varies among subspecies and populations of sagebrush. 2.We assessed differences in survival, growth, and physiological responses of sagebrush to weather among eleven seed sources that varied in subspecies, cytotype, and climates-of-origin over 18 months following outplanting. Diploid or polyploid populations of mountain, Wyoming, and basin big sagebrush (A.tridentata ssp. vaseyana, A.tridentata ssp. wyomingensis, and A.tridentata ssp. tridentata, respectively) were planted onto five burned sites that normally support A.t.wyomingensis with some A.t.tridentata. 3.A.t.wyomingensis had the most growth and survival, and tetraploid populations had greater survival and height than diploids. Seasonal timing of mortality varied among the subspecies/cytotypes and was more closely related to minimum temperatures than water deficit. 4.Temperatures required to induce ice formation were up to 6°C more negative in 4n-A.t.tridentata and A.t.wyomingensis than other subspecies/cytotypes, indicating greater freezing avoidance. In contrast, freezing resistance of photosynthesis varied only 1°C among subspecies/cytotypes, being greatest in A.t.wyomingensis and least in the subspecies normally considered most cold-adapted,A.t.vaseyana. A large spectrum of reliance on freezing-avoidance vs. freezing-tolerance was observed and corresponded to differences in post-fire survivorship among subspecies/cytotypes. Differences in water deficit

  14. Transient receptor potential A1 is involved in cold-induced contraction in the isolated rat colon smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yang; Shi, Hai-Lian; Shi, Jian-Rong; Wu, Da-Zheng

    2010-08-25

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) A1, a member of TRP channel family, is activated by noxious cold. The aims of this study were to determine if TRPA1 contributed to cold-induced contractions in the isolated rat colon preparations and explore the potential mechanisms. The colon smooth muscle layers were surgically isolated from the male Wistar rats and changes in isotonic tension of longitudinal muscle under various treatments were recorded as colonic motilities. Cold stimuli were obtained by the reperfusion with Krebs-Henseleit solution at given temperature using Constant Flow Pump. The mRNA expressions of TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPM8 in rat colon smooth muscle layer were examined by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques. The results showed that the contractions induced by cold stimuli (from 37 degrees C to 12 degrees C stepwise) were inversely proportional to the temperature with a maximum contraction at 17 degrees C in both proximal and distal colons (Pcolon smooth muscle layers. Cold-induced colonic contractions were specially inhibited by TRPA1 blocker, ruthenium red (30 μmol/L), in the proximal and distal colon (Pcolons (both PCA, 1 mmol/L). Extracellular calcium removal (EGTA, 1 mmol/L), PLC blocker (U73122, 10 μmol/L) and IP(3) receptor blocker (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, 2-APB, 30 μmol/L) all decreased the contractions evoked by the cooling at 17 degrees C in the proximal and distal colon (PCa(2+) channels blocker nifedipine (1 μmol/L) and neurotoxin tetrodotoxin (TTX, 2 μmol/L) decreased the contractile response in the distal colon (Pcolon. In conclusion, TRPA1 contributes to cold-induced contractions of the rat colon smooth muscle, and the mechanism of TRPA1 activation involves PLC/IP(3)/Ca(2+) pathway. L-type Ca(2+) channel and neurogenic mechanism other than muscarinic receptor might be partially involved in cold-induced contraction of the distal colon, which probably resulted in higher contraction of distal colon

  15. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-07-27

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants.

  16. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshavardhanan Vijayakumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18 are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS. Currently, understanding of their function(s during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT and cold susceptible (CS lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycerol/H+ symporter Stl1p is essential for cold/near-freeze and freeze stress adaptation. A simple recipe with high biotechnological potential is given

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Célia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freezing is an increasingly important means of preservation and storage of microbial strains used for many types of industrial applications including food processing. However, the yeast mechanisms of tolerance and sensitivity to freeze or near-freeze stress are still poorly understood. More knowledge on this regard would improve their biotechnological potential. Glycerol, in particular intracellular glycerol, has been assigned as a cryoprotectant, also important for cold/near-freeze stress adaptation. The S. cerevisiae glycerol active transporter Stl1p plays an important role on the fast accumulation of glycerol. This gene is expressed under gluconeogenic conditions, under osmotic shock and stress, as well as under high temperatures. Results We found that cells grown on STL1 induction medium (YPGE and subjected to cold/near-freeze stress, displayed an extremely high expression of this gene, also visible at glycerol/H+ symporter activity level. Under the same conditions, the strains harbouring this transporter accumulated more than 400 mM glycerol, whereas the glycerol/H+ symporter mutant presented less than 1 mM. Consistently, the strains able to accumulate glycerol survive 25-50% more than the stl1Δ mutant. Conclusions In this work, we report the contribution of the glycerol/H+ symporter Stl1p for the accumulation and maintenance of glycerol intracellular levels, and consequently cell survival at cold/near-freeze and freeze temperatures. These findings have a high biotechnological impact, as they show that any S. cerevisiae strain already in use can become more resistant to cold/freeze-thaw stress just by simply adding glycerol to the broth. The combination of low temperatures with extracellular glycerol will induce the transporter Stl1p. This solution avoids the use of transgenic strains, in particular in food industry.

  18. Examination of food chain-derived Listeria monocytogenes strains of different serotypes reveals considerable diversity in inlA genotypes, mutability, and adaptation to cold temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Jovana; Arguedas-Villa, Carolina; Wozniak, Anna; Tasara, Taurai; Allen, Kevin J

    2013-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes strains belonging to serotypes 1/2a and 4b are frequently linked to listeriosis. While inlA mutations leading to premature stop codons (PMSCs) and attenuated virulence are common in 1/2a, they are rare in serotype 4b. We observed PMSCs in 35% of L. monocytogenes isolates (n = 54) recovered from the British Columbia food supply, including serotypes 1/2a (30%), 1/2c (100%), and 3a (100%), and a 3-codon deletion (amino acid positions 738 to 740) seen in 57% of 4b isolates from fish-processing facilities. Caco-2 invasion assays showed that two isolates with the deletion were significantly more invasive than EGD-SmR (P cold temperature following a downshift from 37°C to 4°C. Overall, three distinct cold-adapting groups (CAG) were observed: 46% were fast (200 h) adaptors. Intermediate CAG strains (70%) more frequently possessed inlA PMSCs than did fast (20%) and slow (10%) CAGs; in contrast, 87% of fast adaptors lacked inlA PMSCs. In conclusion, we report food chain-derived 1/2a and 4b serotypes with a 3-codon deletion possessing invasive behavior and the novel association of inlA genotypes encoding a full-length InlA with fast cold-adaptation phenotypes.

  19. Cold-induced vasodilatation of finger and maximal oxygen consumption of young female athletes born in Hokkaido

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Koya

    1990-03-01

    To determine whether there is a direct correlation between endurance capacity and cold tolerance, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), and cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD), we measured these factors in 14 young female athletes born in Hokkaido, Japan's northernmost island. We determined the VO2max by a standard incremental test on a cycle ergometer and measured the oxygen consumption (VO2) by means of the Douglas-bag method. We determined the CIVD reaction by measuring the skin temperature of the left middle finger during immersion in cold water at 0°C for 20 min. The athletes showed significant positive correlations between VO2max, expressed as l/min, and CIVD as well as other peripheral cold tolerance indexes (resistance index against frostbite and CIVD index). The body weight VO2max (VO2max/kg body weight) failed to correlate significantly with either the CIVD or with other cold tolerance indexes. These results suggest that CIVD in females may depend on factors other than those determined in this study, in addition to the functional spread of the vascular beds in peripheral tissues, including striated muscle; it is known that the size and the vascular bed in this tissue are affected by exercise training and that this results in the elevation of VO2max and VO2max/kg body weight.

  20. Therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced changes in the hippocampus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saravana Kumar Sampath Kumar; Saraswathi Perumal; Vijayaraghavan Rajagopalan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced neuronal changes in hippocampal CA1 region of Wistar rats. Bone marrow mes-enchymal stem cells were isolated from a 6-week-old Wistar rat. Bone marrow from adult femora and tibia was collected and mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in minimal essential medium containing 10% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum and were sub-cultured. Passage 3 cells were analyzed by lfow cytometry for positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD45. Once CD44 and CD90 positive expression was achieved, the cells were cultured again to 90% conlfuence for later experiments. Twenty-four rats aged 8 weeks old were randomly and evenly divided into normal control, cold water swim stress (cold stress), cold stress + PBS (intra-venous infusion), and cold stress + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 106; intravenous infusion) groups. The total period of study was 60 days which included 1 month stress period followed by 1 month treatment. Behavioral functional test was performed during the entire study period. After treatment, rats were sacriifced for histological studies. Treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells signiifcantly increased the number of neuronal cells in hippocampal CA1 region. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells injected by intravenous administration show potential therapeutic effects in cognitive decline associated with stress-related lesions.

  1. Suppression of the Vacuolar Invertase Gene Prevents Cold-Induced Sweetening in Potato12[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Pudota B.; Wu, Lei; Busse, James S.; Whitty, Brett R.; Hamernik, Andy J.; Jansky, Shelley H.; Buell, C. Robin; Bethke, Paul C.; Jiang, Jiming

    2010-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is the third most important food crop in the world. Potato tubers must be stored at cold temperatures to prevent sprouting, minimize disease losses, and supply consumers and the processing industry with high-quality tubers throughout the year. Unfortunately, cold storage triggers an accumulation of reducing sugars in tubers. High-temperature processing of these tubers results in dark-colored, bitter-tasting products. Such products also have elevated amounts of acrylamide, a neurotoxin and potential carcinogen. We demonstrate that silencing the potato vacuolar acid invertase gene VInv prevents reducing sugar accumulation in cold-stored tubers. Potato chips processed from VInv silencing lines showed a 15-fold acrylamide reduction and were light in color even when tubers were stored at 4°C. Comparable, low levels of VInv gene expression were observed in cold-stored tubers from wild potato germplasm stocks that are resistant to cold-induced sweetening. Thus, both processing quality and acrylamide problems in potato can be controlled effectively by suppression of the VInv gene through biotechnology or targeted breeding. PMID:20736383

  2. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Pathway Regulation in T-Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells

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    Eleonora Turrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has shown its antitumor activity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. However, the mechanisms at the basis of CAP-cell interaction are not yet completely understood. The aim of this study is to investigate CAP proapoptotic effect and identify some of the molecular mechanisms triggered by CAP in human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells. CAP treatment was performed by means of a wand electrode DBD source driven by nanosecond high-voltage pulses under different operating conditions. The biological endpoints were assessed through flow cytometry and real-time PCR. CAP caused apoptosis in Jurkat cells mediated by p53 upregulation. To test the involvement of intrinsic and/or extrinsic pathway, the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-8 was analyzed. The activation of caspase-8 and the upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 were observed. Moreover, CAP treatment increased ROS intracellular level. The situation reverts after a longer time of treatment. This is probably due to compensatory cellular mechanisms such as the posttranscriptional upregulation of SOD1, CAT, and GSR2. According to ROS increase, CAP induced a significant increase in DNA damage at all treatment conditions. In conclusion, our results provide a deeper understanding of CAP potential in the oncological field and pose the basis for the evaluation of its toxicological profile.

  3. Cold denaturation induces inversion of dipole and spin transfer in chiral peptide monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckshtain-Levi, Meital; Capua, Eyal; Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Sarkar, Soumyajit; Gavrilov, Yulian; Mathew, Shinto P.; Paltiel, Yossi; Levy, Yaakov; Kronik, Leeor; Naaman, Ron

    2016-02-01

    Chirality-induced spin selectivity is a recently-discovered effect, which results in spin selectivity for electrons transmitted through chiral peptide monolayers. Here, we use this spin selectivity to probe the organization of self-assembled α-helix peptide monolayers and examine the relation between structural and spin transfer phenomena. We show that the α-helix structure of oligopeptides based on alanine and aminoisobutyric acid is transformed to a more linear one upon cooling. This process is similar to the known cold denaturation in peptides, but here the self-assembled monolayer plays the role of the solvent. The structural change results in a flip in the direction of the electrical dipole moment of the adsorbed molecules. The dipole flip is accompanied by a concomitant change in the spin that is preferred in electron transfer through the molecules, observed via a new solid-state hybrid organic-inorganic device that is based on the Hall effect, but operates with no external magnetic field or magnetic material.

  4. DYNAMICAL HEATING INDUCED BY DWARF PLANETS ON COLD KUIPER BELT–LIKE DEBRIS DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, M. A.; Pichardo, B.; Peimbert, A. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264 Ciudad Universitaria, México (Mexico); Reyes-Ruiz, M., E-mail: mmunoz@astro.unam.mx [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 877, 22800 Ensenada, México (Mexico)

    2015-10-01

    With the use of long-term numerical simulations, we study the evolution and orbital behavior of cometary nuclei in cold Kuiper belt–like debris disks under the gravitational influence of dwarf planets (DPs); we carry out these simulations with and without the presence of a Neptune-like giant planet. This exploratory study shows that in the absence of a giant planet, 10 DPs are enough to induce strong radial and vertical heating on the orbits of belt particles. On the other hand, the presence of a giant planet close to the debris disk, acts as a stability agent reducing the radial and vertical heating. With enough DPs, even in the presence of a Neptune-like giant planet some radial heating remains; this heating grows steadily, re-filling resonances otherwise empty of cometary nuclei. Specifically for the solar system, this secular process seems to be able to provide material that, through resonant chaotic diffusion, increase the rate of new comets spiraling into the inner planetary system, but only if more than the ∼10 known DP sized objects exist in the trans-Neptunian region.

  5. A cold-induced phytosulfokine peptide is related to the improvement of loquat fruit chilling tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huwei; Wang, Xinfeng; Hu, Weicheng; Yang, Xianghui; Diao, Enjie; Shen, Ting; Qiang, Qian

    2017-10-01

    A novel peptidomics approach was used to discover cold-induced peptides in loquat fruit. Twenty unique peptides derived from 18 proproteins were identified, and they were involved in sugar signalling, protein metabolism and stress response. The quantitative analysis revealed 7 peptides with more than 2-fold upregulation, especially a 4.96-fold increase detected in the phytosulfokine (PSK) peptide. To further evaluate effects of PSK1 on fruit chilling tolerance, weight loss, firmness and internal browning were investigated in PSK1-treated loquat fruit at 0°C. By contrast, these chilling injury symptoms were effectively reduced by PSK1. PSK1 markedly delayed decreases of ATP content and energy charge. The PSK1-treated fruit exhibited significantly lower activities of cell-wall degrading enzymes and transcripts of genes related to lignin synthesis. Our results demonstrated that PSK1 improves chilling tolerance of loquat fruit by maintaining high energy status and cell integrity. Peptidomics analysis provides a promising tool to discover some key peptides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of IL-6 in exercise training- and cold-induced UCP1 expression in subcutaneous white adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob G Knudsen

    Full Text Available Expression of brown adipose tissue (BAT associated proteins like uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 in inguinal WAT (iWAT has been suggested to alter iWAT metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6 in exercise training and cold exposure-induced iWAT UCP1 expression. The effect of daily intraperitoneal injections of IL-6 (3 ng/g in C57BL/6 mice for 7 days on iWAT UCP1 expression was examined. In addition, the expression of UCP1 in iWAT was determined in response to 3 days of cold exposure (4°C and 5 weeks of exercise training in wild type (WT and whole body IL-6 knockout (KO mice. Repeated injections of IL-6 in C57BL/6 mice increased UCP1 mRNA but not UCP1 protein content in iWAT. Cold exposure increased iWAT UCP1 mRNA content similarly in IL-6 KO and WT mice, while exercise training increased iWAT UCP1 mRNA in WT mice but not in IL-6 KO mice. Additionally, a cold exposure-induced increase in iWAT UCP1 protein content was blunted in IL-6 KO mice, while UCP1 protein content in iWAT was lower in both untrained and exercise trained IL-6 KO mice than in WT mice. In conclusion, repeated daily increases in plasma IL-6 can increase iWAT UCP1 mRNA content and IL-6 is required for an exercise training-induced increase in iWAT UCP1 mRNA content. In addition IL-6 is required for a full induction of UCP1 protein expression in response to cold exposure and influences the UCP1 protein content iWAT of both untrained and exercise trained animals.

  7. A cold inducible multidomain cystatin from winter wheat inhibits growth of the snow mold fungus, Microdochium nivale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, Petya Koeva; Christov, Nikolai Kirilov; Imai, Ryozo

    2006-05-01

    A novel cold-induced cystatin cDNA clone (TaMDC1) was isolated from cold acclimated winter wheat crown tissue by using a macroarray-based differential screening method. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of a putative N-terminal secretory signal peptide of 37 amino acids and a mature protein (mTaMDC1) with a molecular mass of 23 kDa. The mTaMDC1 had a highly conserved N-terminal cystatin domain and a long C-terminal extension containing a second region, which exhibited partial similarity to the cystatin domain. The recombinant mTaMDC1 was purified from Escherichia coli and its cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity against papain was analyzed. The calculated Ki value of 5.8 x 10(-7) M is comparable to those reported for other phytocystatins. Northern and western blot analyses showed elevated expression of TaMDC1 mRNA and protein during cold acclimation of wheat. In addition to cold, accumulation of the TaMDC1 message was induced by other abiotic stresses including drought, salt and ABA treatment. Investigation of in vitro antifungal activity of mTaMDC1 showed strong inhibition on the mycelium growth of the snow mold fungus Microdochium nivale. Hyphae growth was totally inhibited in the presence of 50 mug/ml mTaMDC1 and morphological changes such as swelling, fragmentation and sporulation of the fungus were observed. The mechanisms of the in vitro antifungal effects and the possible involvement of TaMDC1 in cold induced snow mold resistance of winter wheat are discussed.

  8. Cold induced changes in lipid, protein and carbohydrate levels in the tropical insect Gromphadorhina coquereliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Lubawy, Jan; Spochacz, Marta; Ewelina, Paluch; Grzegorz, Smykalla; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Slocinska, Malgorzata

    2015-05-01

    Insects cope with thermal stressors using mechanisms such as rapid cold hardening and acclimation. These mechanisms have been studied in temperate insects, but little is known about their use by tropical insects in response to cold stress. Here, we investigated whether cold stress (1×8 h and 3×8 h at 4°C) triggers a metabolic response in the Madagascar cockroach Gromphadorhina coquereliana. We examined the effects of cold on the levels of selected metabolites in the fat body tissue of G. coquereliana. After cold exposure, we found that the quantity of total protein increased significantly in the insect fat body, whereas glycogen decreased slightly. Using antibodies, we observed upregulation of AQP-like proteins and changes in the HSP70 levels in the fat body of G. coquereliana when exposed to cold. We also examined the content and nature of the free sugars in the G. coquereliana hemolymph and discovered an increase in the levels of polyols and glucose in response to cold stress. These results suggest an important role of the fat body tissue of tropical insects upon cold exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cold- and exercise-induced peak metabolic rates in tropical birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Popko; Chappell, Mark A; Williams, Joseph B

    2007-12-26

    Compared with temperate birds, tropical birds have low reproductive rates, slow development as nestlings, and long lifespans. These "slow" life history traits are thought to be associated with reduced energy expenditure, or a slow "pace of life." To test predictions from this hypothesis, we measured exercise-induced peak metabolic rates (PMR(E)) in 45 species of tropical lowland forest birds and compared these data with PMR(E) for three temperate species. We also compared cold-induced PMR (PMR(C)) with PMR(E) in the same individuals of 19 tropical species. Tropical birds had a 39% lower PMR(E) than did the temperate species. In tropical birds, PMR(C) and PMR(E) scaled similarly with body mass (M(b)), but PMR(E) was 47% higher than PMR(C). PMR(E) averaged 6.44 x basal metabolic rate (BMR) and PMR(C) averaged 4.52 x BMR. The slope of the equation relating PMR(E) to M(b) exceeded the slope for the equation for BMR vs. M(b), whereas slopes for the equations of PMR(C) and BMR vs. M(b) did not differ. M(b)-adjusted residuals of PMR(E) were positively correlated with residual BMR, whereas residual PMR(C) and residual BMR were not correlated. PMR(E) and PMR(C) were not correlated after we corrected for M(b). Temperate birds maintained their body temperature at an 8.6 degrees C lower average air temperature than did tropical species. The lower PMR(E) values in tropical species suggest that their suite of life history traits on the slow end of the life history continuum are associated with reduced metabolic rates.

  10. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide against cold restraint stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, Esam M; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Magdy K

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator plays a potential role in modulating gastric inflammatory responses. However, its putative protective role remains to be defined. The present study aimed to evaluate role of the exogenously released and endogenously synthesized H2S in cold restraint stress (CRS)-induced oxidative gastric damage in rats. Rats were restrained, and maintained at 4 °C for 3 h. The H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (60 μmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) before CRS. Our results revealed that NaHS pretreatment significantly attenuated ulcer index, free and total acid output, and pepsin activity in gastric juice along with decreased gastric mucosal carbonyl content and reactive oxygen species production. This was accompanied by increased gastric juice pH and mucin concentration in addition to restoring the deficits in the gastric reduced glutathione, catalase as well as superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. NaHS pretreatment markedly reduced the serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase activity compared to CRS-non-treated. Moreover, NaHS preadministration significantly abrogated the inflammatory and the deleterious responses of gastric mucosa in CRS. The protective effects of H2S were confirmed by gastric histopathological examination. However, pretreatment with the H2S-synthesizing enzyme, cystathionine-gamma-lyase inhibitor, beta-cyano-L-alanine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the gastroprotection afforded by the endogenous H2S. Collectively, our results suggest that H2S can protect rat gastric mucosa against CRS-induced gastric ulceration possibly through mechanisms that involve anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions alongside enhancement of gastric mucosal barrier and reduction in acid secretory parameters.

  11. Physiologic and Perceptual Responses to Cold-Shower Cooling After Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Cory L; McDermott, Brendon P; Buening, Brian J; Bonacci, Jeffrey A; Ganio, Matthew S; Adams, J D; Tucker, Matthew A; Kavouras, Stavros A

    2016-03-01

    Exercise conducted in hot, humid environments increases the risk for exertional heat stroke (EHS). The current recommended treatment of EHS is cold-water immersion; however, limitations may require the use of alternative resources such as a cold shower (CS) or dousing with a hose to cool EHS patients. To investigate the cooling effectiveness of a CS after exercise-induced hyperthermia. Randomized, crossover controlled study. Environmental chamber (temperature = 33.4°C ± 2.1°C; relative humidity = 27.1% ± 1.4%). Seventeen participants (10 male, 7 female; height = 1.75 ± 0.07 m, body mass = 70.4 ± 8.7 kg, body surface area = 1.85 ± 0.13 m(2), age range = 19-35 years) volunteered. On 2 occasions, participants completed matched-intensity volitional exercise on an ergometer or treadmill to elevate rectal temperature to ≥39°C or until participant fatigue prevented continuation (reaching at least 38.5°C). They were then either treated with a CS (20.8°C ± 0.80°C) or seated in the chamber (control [CON] condition) for 15 minutes. Rectal temperature, calculated cooling rate, heart rate, and perceptual measures (thermal sensation and perceived muscle pain). The rectal temperature (P = .98), heart rate (P = .85), thermal sensation (P = .69), and muscle pain (P = .31) were not different during exercise for the CS and CON trials (P > .05). Overall, the cooling rate was faster during CS (0.07°C/min ± 0.03°C/min) than during CON (0.04°C/min ± 0.03°C/min; t16 = 2.77, P = .01). Heart-rate changes were greater during CS (45 ± 20 beats per minute) compared with CON (27 ± 10 beats per minute; t16 = 3.32, P = .004). Thermal sensation was reduced to a greater extent with CS than with CON (F3,45 = 41.12, P < .001). Although the CS facilitated cooling rates faster than no treatment, clinicians should continue to advocate for accepted cooling modalities and use CS only if no other validated means of cooling are available.

  12. EXERCISE-INDUCED ARTERIAL ADAPTATIONS IN ELITE JUDO ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Karagounis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine exercise-induced arterial adaptations in elite Judo male and female athletes. 27 male Judo athletes (age 24.06 ± 2 years, 11 female Judoka (age 24.27 ± 1 years, 27 sedentary healthy men (age 24.01 ± 2 years and 11 women (age 24.21 ± 1 years participated in the current study. The examined vessels included brachial, radial, ulnar, popliteal, anterior and posterior tibial arteries. The experimental parameters were recorded with the use of Duplex ultrasound at rest. Diastolic diameter and blood mean flow velocity of the examined arteries in Judo athletes were found to be both significantly increased (p < 0.05 compared to the findings of the control groups. In male Judo athletes the brachial (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and anterior tibial artery (p < 0.001 presented the highest difference on the diastolic diameter, compared with the control male group. In female Judo athletes, ulnar (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and brachial (p < 0.001 arteries illustrated the highest diastolic diameter. The highest blood mean flow velocity was recorded in ulnar (p < 0.001 and popliteal arteries (p < 0.001 of the Judo athletes groups. Recording differences between the two genders, male participants presented larger arteries than females. Conclusively, Judo has been found to be a highly demanding physical sport, involving upper and lower limbs leading to significant arterial adaptations. Obtaining vascular parameters provide a useful tool to the medical team, not only in the direction of enhancement of the efficacy of physical training, but in unknown so far parameters that may influence athletic performance of both male and female elite Judokas

  13. Oxidized DNA induces an adaptive response in human fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyuk, Svetlana V., E-mail: svet.kostyuk@gmail.com [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tabakov, Viacheslav J.; Chestkov, Valerij V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Glebova, Kristina V.; Baydakova, Galina V.; Ershova, Elizaveta S.; Izhevskaya, Vera L. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baranova, Ancha, E-mail: abaranov@gmu.edu [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Center for the Study of Chronic Metabolic Diseases, School of System Biology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Veiko, Natalia N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • We describe the effects of gDNAOX on human fibroblasts cultivated in serum withdrawal conditions. • gDNAOX evokes an adaptive response in human fibroblasts. • gDNAOX increases the survival rates in serum starving cell populations. • gDNAOX enhances the survival rates in cell populations irradiated at 1.2 Gy dose. • gDNAOX up-regulates NRF2 and inhibits NF-kappaB-signaling. - Abstract: Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells contains a substantial proportion of oxidized nucleotides, thus, forming cfDNA{sup OX}. The levels of cfDNA{sup OX} are increased in the serum of patients with chronic diseases. Oxidation of DNA turns it into a stress signal. The samples of genomic DNA (gDNA) oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}in vitro (gDNA{sup OX}) induce effects similar to that of DNA released from damaged cells. Here we describe the effects of gDNA{sup OX} on human fibroblasts cultivated in the stressful conditions of serum withdrawal. In these cells, gDNA{sup OX} evokes an adaptive response that leads to an increase in the rates of survival in serum starving cell populations as well as in populations irradiated at the dose of 1.2 Gy. These effects are not seen in control populations of fibroblasts treated with non-modified gDNA. In particular, the exposure to gDNA{sup OX} leads to a decrease in the expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 and an increase in levels of PSNA, a decrease in the proportion of subG1- and G2/M cells, a decrease in proportion of cells with double strand breaks (DSBs). Both gDNA{sup OX} and gDNA suppress the expression of DNA sensors TLR9 and AIM2 and up-regulate nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (NRF2), while only gDNA{sup OX} inhibits NF-κB signaling. gDNA{sup OX} is a model for oxidized cfDNA{sup OX} that is released from the dying tumor cells and being carried to the distant organs. The systemic effects of oxidized DNA have to be taken into account when treating tumors. In particular, the damaged DNA

  14. Cold-Induced Thermogenesis and Inflammation-Associated Cold-Seeking Behavior Are Represented by Different Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Sites: A Three-Dimensional Functional Topography Study in Conscious Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Samuel P; Almeida, M Camila; Shimansky, Yury P; Oliveira, Daniela L; Eales, Justin R; Coimbra, Cândido C; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2017-07-19

    In the past, we showed that large electrolytic lesions of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) promoted hypothermia in cold-exposed restrained rats, but attenuated hypothermia in rats challenged with a high dose of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a thermogradient apparatus. The goal of this study was to identify the thermoeffector mechanisms and DMH representation of the two phenomena and thus to understand how the same lesion could produce two opposite effects on body temperature. We found that the permissive effect of large electrolytic DMH lesions on cold-induced hypothermia was due to suppressed thermogenesis. DMH-lesioned rats also could not develop fever autonomically: they did not increase thermogenesis in response to a low, pyrogenic dose of LPS (10 μg/kg, i.v.). In contrast, changes in thermogenesis were uninvolved in the attenuation of the hypothermic response to a high, shock-inducing dose of LPS (5000 μg/kg, i.v.); this attenuation was due to a blockade of cold-seeking behavior. To compile DMH maps for the autonomic cold defense and for the cold-seeking response to LPS, we studied rats with small thermal lesions in different parts of the DMH. Cold thermogenesis had the highest representation in the dorsal hypothalamic area. Cold seeking was represented by a site at the ventral border of the dorsomedial nucleus. Because LPS causes both fever and hypothermia, we originally thought that the DMH contained a single thermoregulatory site that worked as a fever-hypothermia switch. Instead, we have found two separate sites: one that drives thermogenesis and the other, previously unknown, that drives inflammation-associated cold seeking.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cold-seeking behavior is a life-saving response that occurs in severe systemic inflammation. We studied this behavior in rats with lesions in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) challenged with a shock-inducing dose of bacterial endotoxin. We built functional maps of the DMH and found the strongest

  15. Acute cold hypersensitivity characteristically induced by oxaliplatin is caused by the enhanced responsiveness of TRPA1 in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Meng

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxaliplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, causes an unusual acute peripheral neuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced acute peripheral neuropathy appears in almost all patients rapidly after infusion, and is triggered or exacerbated by cold, while its mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, the involvement of thermosensitive transient receptor potential channels (TRPA1, TRPM8 and TRPV1 in oxaliplatin-induced acute hypersensitivity was investigated in mice. Results A single intraperitoneal administration of oxaliplatin (1–10 mg/kg induced cold but not mechanical hypersensitivity within 2 h in a dose-dependent manner. Infusion of the oxaliplatin metabolite, oxalate (1.7 mg/kg, also induced acute cold hypersensitivity, while another platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin (5 mg/kg, or the non-platinum-containing chemotherapeutic agent, paclitaxel (6 mg/kg failed to induce mechanical or cold hypersensitivity. The oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity was abolished by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 (100 mg/kg and by TRPA1 deficiency. The nocifensive behaviors evoked by intraplantar injections of allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC; TRPA1 agonist were significantly enhanced in mice treated for 2 h with oxaliplatin (1–10 mg/kg in a dose-dependent manner, while capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist-evoked nocifensive behaviors were not affected. Menthol (TRPM8/TRPA1 agonist-evoked nocifensive-like behaviors were also enhanced by oxaliplatin pretreatment, which were inhibited by TRPA1 deficiency. Similarly, oxalate enhanced, but neither cisplatin nor paclitaxel affected AITC-evoked nocifensive behaviors. Pretreatment of cultured mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons with oxaliplatin (30–300 μM for 1, 2, or 4 h significantly increased the number of AITC-sensitive neurons in a concentration-dependent manner whereas there was no change in the number of menthol- or capsaicin-sensitive neurons

  16. Cloning, expression and characterization of a cold-adapted endo-1, 4-β-glucanase from Citrobacter farmeri A1, a symbiotic bacterium of Reticulitermes labralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Bai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Many biotechnological and industrial applications can benefit from cold-adapted EglCs through increased efficiency of catalytic processes at low temperature. In our previous study, Citrobacter farmeri A1 which was isolated from a wood-inhabiting termite Reticulitermes labralis could secrete a cold-adapted EglC. However, its EglC was difficult to purify for enzymatic properties detection because of its low activity (0.8 U/ml. The objective of the present study was to clone and express the C. farmeri EglC gene in Escherichia coli to improve production level and determine the enzymatic properties of the recombinant enzyme. Methods The EglC gene was cloned from C. farmeri A1 by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR. EglC was transformed into vector pET22b and functionally expressed in E. coli. The recombination protein EglC22b was purified for properties detection. Results SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular mass of the recombinant endoglucanase was approximately 42 kDa. The activity of the E. coli pET22b-EglC crude extract was 9.5 U/ml. Additionally, it was active at pH 6.5–8.0 with an optimum pH of 7.0. The recombinant enzyme had an optimal temperature of 30–40 °C and exhibited >50% relative activity even at 5 °C, whereas it lost approximately 90% of its activity after incubation at 60 °C for 30 min. Its activity was enhanced by Co2+ and Fe3+, but inhibited by Cd2+, Zn2+, Li+, Triton X-100, DMSO, acetonitrile, Tween 80, SDS, and EDTA. Conclusion These biochemical properties indicate that the recombinant enzyme is a cold-adapted endoglucanase that can be used for various industrial applications.

  17. Oxidant and enzymatic antioxidant status (gene expression and activity) in the brain of chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Hossein; Khalaji-Pirbalouty, Valiallah; Nasiri, Leila; Mohebbi, Abdonnaser; Bahadoran, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain (hindbrain, midbrain, and forebrain) in chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension, the measurements of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, antioxidant capacity, enzymatic activity, and gene expression (for catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutases) were done. There were high lipid peroxidation/protein oxidation and low antioxidant capacity in the hindbrain of cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens compared to control ( P hypertensive chickens, superoxide dismutase activity was decreased (forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain), while catalase activity was increased (forebrain and midbrain) ( P hypertensive chickens. Probably, these situations in the oxidant and antioxidant status of the brain especially hindbrain may change its function at cardiovascular center and sympathetic nervous system to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension.

  18. Inhibiting effect of cetirizine on histamine-induced and 48/80-induced wheals and flares, experimental dermographism, and cold-induced urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhlin, L; de Vos, C; Rihoux, J P

    1987-10-01

    A single oral dose of cetirizine, 10 mg, a new H1 antagonist with minimal sedative effects and devoid of anticholinergic activities, was administered to eight healthy subjects. It markedly inhibited the wheal and flare induced 4 hours later by intracutaneously injected histamine and compound 48/80. Dermographism was produced by different pressures (100 to 500 gm/15 mm2) in 10 patients with factitial urticaria. Four hours after 10 mg of cetirizine, the whealing was absent in eight patients and markedly reduced in the other two subjects. In 12 patients with cold urticaria, wheals were induced by 30 seconds to 12 minutes application of an ice cube. Four hours after 10 mg of cetirizine, the urticarial reaction had disappeared in five patients and was decreased in the other patients. No itching was experienced in any of the patients after cetirizine, but the tested areas had an erythema lasting for 20 to 60 minutes.

  19. Predictive modeling for growth of non- and cold-adapted Listeria monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupe at different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yoon-Ki; Yoon, Won Byong; Huang, Lihan; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes, with and without cold-adaption, on fresh-cut cantaloupe under different storage temperatures. Fresh-cut samples, spot inoculated with a 4-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (∼3.2 log CFU/g), were exposed to constant storage temperatures held at 10, 15, 20, 25, or 30 °C. All growth curves of L. monocytogenes were fitted to the Baranyi, modified Gompertz, and Huang models. Regardless of conditions under which cells grew, the time needed to reach 5 log CFU/g decreased with the elevated storage temperature. Experimental results showed that there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in the maximum growth rate k (log CFU/g h(-1) ) and lag phase duration λ (h) between the cultures of L. monocytogenes with or without previous cold-adaption treatments. No distinct difference was observed in the growth pattern among 3 primary models at various storage temperatures. The growth curves of secondary modeling were fitted on an Arrhenius-type model for describing the relationship between k and temperature of the L. monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupe from 10 to 30 °C. The root mean square error values of secondary models for non- and cold-adapted cells were 0.018, 0.021, and 0.024, and 0.039, 0.026, and 0.017 at the modified Gompertz, Baranyi, and Huang model, respectively, indicating that these 3 models presented the good statistical fit. This study may provide valuable information to predict the growth of L. monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupes at different storage conditions. Listeriosis has occurred and increased along with the increased demand of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. This study was conducted to predict the growth of non- and cold-adapted L. monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupe at different temperature using mathematical model. These results can be helpful for risk assessments of L. monocytogenes in fresh-cut cantaloupe. This study provides valuable

  20. Adapting to the new world: Mexico’s International Strategy of Economic Development at the outset of the Cold War, 1946-1952

    OpenAIRE

    Pettinà, Vanni

    2015-01-01

    This article is aimed at analyzing Mexico’s attempts to overcome the obstacles that the new international context, shaped by the end of World War II (WWII) and the beginning of the Cold War, posed for the country’s economic development plans. Drawing largely on new Mexican primary sources along with American, British, and multilateral organizations’ documents, this work will focus on the strategy that the Miguel Alemán administration (1946-1952) designed in order to adapt to the adverse condi...

  1. Cold-shock eliminates female nucleus in fertilized eggs to induce androgenesis in the loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, a teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morishima Kagayaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgenesis (all-male inheritance is generally induced by means of irradiating the eggs to inactivate the maternal genome, followed by fertilization with normal sperm. In fish, the conventional technique for induced androgenesis has been applied for rapid fixation to traits, recovery of cryopreserved genotypes, sex-control, etc. A new method of androgenesis that eliminates the need to irradiate the egg was proposed using the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (a teleost fish. Results When the eggs of wild-type females were fertilized with sperm of albino or orange phenotype males and cold-shocked at 0 to 3°C for 60 min duration just after fertilization, generally more than 30% (with a peak of 100% of the hatched progeny were androgenotes. While a few of them were the normal diploid, most of them turned out to be abnormal haploid. All-male inheritance was verified by the expression of the recessive color trait (albino or orange and microsatellite genotypes comprising only paternally derived alleles. Nuclear behavior after the cold-shock treatment was traced by microscopic observation of DAPI (4'6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained samples and hematoxylin-eosin stained histological sections, and the extrusion of egg (maternal nucleus was observed in eggs treated in the optimum timing. Conclusion In this paper, we demonstrate that cold-shock treatment (at 0 and 3°C of loach eggs for 60 min just after fertilization successfully induces androgenetic haploid development. The most likely mechanism of cold-shock induced androgenesis is an elimination of the egg nucleus together along with the second polar body and subsequent development of a decondensed sperm nucleus or male pronucleus.

  2. Neuropeptide FF and related peptides attenuates warm-, but not cold-water swim stress-induced analgesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Han, Zheng-lan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Zi-long; Tang, Hong-zhu; Ren, Hui; Wang, Rui

    2012-08-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) belongs to a neuropeptide family including two receptors (NPFF(1) and NPFF(2)). NPFF system has been reported to play important roles in pain transmission. The aim of the present study was to investigate the roles of NPFF related peptides and their receptors in swim stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Nociceptive test was performed in mice stressed by forced swimming in water at 15 °C (cold water swimming) or 32 °C (warm water swimming). Warm water swimming produced a naloxone-mediated antinociceptive effect. This warm water swim SIA was dose-dependently antagonized by i.c.v. injection of NPFF and two related peptides (3-30 nmol), NPVF and dNPA, which exhibited the highest selectivities for NPFF(1) and NPFF(2) receptors, respectively. Moreover, the selective NPFF receptor antagonist RF9 (30 nmol) was inactive by itself, but prevented the effects of NPFF and related peptides. Cold-water swimming produced a wilder analgesic effect that was blocked by MK-801, but not naloxone. However, NPFF system failed to modify the cold water swim stress-induced analgesia. These findings demonstrated that NPFF and related peptides attenuated opioid-mediated form of SIA via NPFF receptors in the brain, but not non-opioid swim stress-induced analgesia. These data further support an anti-opioid character of NPFF system.

  3. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces a Predominantly Necrotic Cell Death via the Microenvironment: e0133120

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    François Virard; Sarah Cousty; Jean-Pierre Cambus; Alexis Valentin; Philippe Kémoun; Franck Clément

    2015-01-01

      Introduction Cold plasma is a partially ionized gas generated by an electric field at atmospheric pressure that was initially used in medicine for decontamination and sterilization of inert surfaces...

  4. Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma Induces Transcriptional Changes in Ex Vivo Human Corneas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rosani

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP might be considered a novel tool for tissue disinfection in medicine since the active chemical species produced by low plasma doses, generated by ionizing helium gas in air, induces reactive oxygen species (ROS that kill microorganisms without substantially affecting human cells.In this study, we evaluated morphological and functional changes in human corneas exposed for 2 minutes (min to APCP and tested if the antioxidant n-acetyl l-cysteine (NAC was able to inhibit or prevent damage and cell death.Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analyses of corneal tissues collected at 6 hours (h post-APCP treatment demonstrated no morphological tissue changes, but a transient increased expression of OGG1 glycosylase that returned to control levels in 24 h. Transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real time PCR performed on different corneas revealed in the treated corneas many differentially expressed genes: namely, 256 and 304 genes showing expression changes greater than ± 2 folds in the absence and presence of NAC, respectively. At 6 h post-treatment, the most over-expressed gene categories suggested an active or enhanced cell functioning, with only a minority of genes specifically concerning oxidative DNA damage and repair showing slight over-expression values (<2 folds. Moreover, time-related expression analysis of eight genes up-regulated in the APCP-treated corneas overall demonstrated the return to control expression levels after 24 h.These findings of transient oxidative stress accompanied by wide-range transcriptome adjustments support the further development of APCP as an ocular disinfectant.

  5. The Effect of Water Temperature during Cold-Water Immersion on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A; Siqueira, A F; Ferreira-Junior, J B; do Carmo, J; Durigan, J L Q; Blazevich, A; Bottaro, M

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of 5 and 15°C cold-water immersion on recovery from exercise resulting in exercise-induced muscle damage. 42 college-aged men performed 5×20 drop-jumps and were randomly allocated into one of 3 groups: (1) 5°C; (2) 15°C; or (3) control. After exercise, individuals from the cold-water immersion groups had their lower limbs immerged in iced water for 20 min. Isometric knee extensor torque, countermovement jump, muscle soreness, and creatine kinase were measured before, immediately after, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h post-exercise. There was no between-group difference in isometric strength recovery (p=0.73). However, countermovement jump recovered quicker in cold-water immersion groups compared to control group (pmuscle soreness (p=0.06) in 15°C group compared to control at 24 h post-exercise. The result suggests that cold-water immersion promote recovery of stretch-shortening cycle performance, but not influence the recovery of maximal contractile force. Immersion at warmer temperature may be more effective than colder temperatures promoting recovery from strenuous exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Analysis of Mixing and Dynamics Associated with the Dissolution of Hurricane-Induced Cold Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    recovery of the ocean from a cold wake formation , and to provide additional value and insight to the observations already being undertaken by the...involved in the recovery of the ocean from a cold wake formation , and to provide additional value and insight to the observations already being... scales very tightly to the approach and decay of the storm (Figure 8), and a dropoff begins immediately after the storm, which approaches a decay of

  7. Cold-induced changes in gene expression in brown adipose tissue, white adipose tissue and liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Shore

    Full Text Available Cold exposure imposes a metabolic challenge to mammals that is met by a coordinated response in different tissues to prevent hypothermia. This study reports a transcriptomic analysis in brown adipose tissue (BAT, white adipose (WAT and liver of mice in response to 24 h cold exposure at 8°C. Expression of 1895 genes were significantly (P<0.05 up- or down-regulated more than two fold by cold exposure in all tissues but only 5 of these genes were shared by all three tissues, and only 19, 14 and 134 genes were common between WAT and BAT, WAT and liver, and BAT and liver, respectively. We confirmed using qRT-PCR, the increased expression of a number of characteristic BAT genes during cold exposure. In both BAT and the liver, the most common direction of change in gene expression was suppression (496 genes in BAT and 590 genes in liver. Gene ontology analysis revealed for the first time significant (P<0.05 down regulation in response to cold, of genes involved in oxidoreductase activity, lipid metabolic processes and protease inhibitor activity, in both BAT and liver, but not WAT. The results reveal an unexpected importance of down regulation of cytochrome P450 gene expression and apolipoprotein, in both BAT and liver, but not WAT, in response to cold exposure. Pathway analysis suggests a model in which down regulation of the nuclear transcription factors HNF4α and PPARα in both BAT and liver may orchestrate the down regulation of genes involved in lipoprotein and steroid metabolism as well as Phase I enzymes belonging to the cytochrome P450 group in response to cold stress in mice. We propose that the response to cold stress involves decreased gene expression in a range of cellular processes in order to maximise pathways involved in heat production.

  8. A Comparison of the Mechanisms of Cold- and Microgravity-Induced Fluid Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-10

    endpoint of fluid and electrolyte loss through diuresis and natriuresis . Differences in the responses were also noted, although the data necessary to...SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessarynd..iien.nti., by c blo i("nunber ,. FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP cold, diuresis , microgravity,-w•_ightlessness...rff’dentify by block number)cC The physiological mechanisms involved in the diuresis and overall fluid loss associated with exposure to cold or microgravity

  9. Radio-Frequency Field-Induced Quantum Interference Effects in Cold Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙全; 周蜀渝; 周善钰; 王育竹

    2001-01-01

    We propose constructing a quantum interference configuration for cold atoms in a magneto-optical trap by applying a radio frequency field, which coherently couples adjacent Zeeman sublevels, in combination with a repumping laser field. One effect of this interference is that a dip exists in the absorption of the repumping light when the radio frequency is scanned. Our prediction has been indirectly detected through the fluorescence of cold atoms in a preliminary experiment.

  10. Minor Merger-induced Cold Fronts in Abell 2142 and RXJ1720.1+2638

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owers, Matt S.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Couch, Warrick J.

    2011-11-01

    We present evidence for the existence of substructure in the "relaxed appearing" cold front clusters Abell 2142 and RXJ1720.1+2638. The detection of these substructures was made possible by comprehensive multi-object optical spectroscopy obtained with the Hectospec and DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph instruments on the 6.5 m MMT and 10 m Keck II telescope, respectively. These observations produced 956 and 400 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members within a projected radius of 3 Mpc from the centers of A2142 and RXJ1720.1+2638, respectively. The substructure manifests itself as local peaks in the spatial distribution of member galaxies and also as regions of localized velocity substructure. For both Abell 2142 and RXJ1720.1+2638, we identify group-scale substructures which, when considering the morphology of the cold fronts and the time since pericentric passage of a perturber estimated from the cold front radii, could plausibly have perturbed the cluster cores and generated the cold fronts observed in Chandra images. The results presented here are consistent with cold fronts being the result of merger activity and with cold fronts in relaxed appearing clusters being due to minor merger activity. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  11. "I know, therefore I adapt?" Complexities of individual adaptation to climate-induced forest dieback in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. Oakes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Individual actions to avoid, benefit from, or cope with climate change impacts partly shape adaptation; much research on adaptation has focused at the systems level, overlooking drivers of individual responses. Theoretical frameworks and empirical studies of environmental behavior identify a complex web of cognitive, affective, and evaluative factors that motivate stewardship. We explore the relationship between knowledge of, and adaptation to, widespread, climate-induced tree mortality to understand the cognitive (i.e., knowledge and learning, affective (i.e., attitudes and place attachment, and evaluative (i.e., use values factors that influence how individuals respond to climate-change impacts. From 43 semistructured interviews with forest managers and users in a temperate forest, we identified distinct responses to local, climate-induced environmental changes that we then categorized as either behavioral or psychological adaptations. Interviewees developed a depth of knowledge about the dieback through a combination of direct, place-based experiences and indirect, mediated learning through social interactions. Knowing that the dieback was associated with climate change led to different adaptive responses among the interviewees, although knowledge alone did not explain this variation. Forest users reported psychological adaptations to process negative attitudes; these adaptations were spurred by knowledge of the causes, losses of intangible values, and impacts to a species to which they held attachment. Behavioral adaptations exclusive to a high level of knowledge included actions such as using the forests to educate others or changing transportation behaviors to reduce personal energy consumption. Managers integrated awareness of the dieback and its dynamics across spatial scales into current management objectives. Our findings suggest that adaptive management may occur from the bottom up, as individual managers implement new practices in

  12. Functional annotation of the mesophilic-like character of mutants in a cold-adapted enzyme by self-organising map analysis of their molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Tiberti, Matteo; Pandini, Alessandro; Bonati, Laura; Papaleo, Elena

    2012-10-01

    Multiple comparison of the Molecular Dynamics (MD) trajectories of mutants in a cold-adapted α-amylase (AHA) could be used to elucidate functional features required to restore mesophilic-like activity. Unfortunately it is challenging to identify the different dynamic behaviors and correctly relate them to functional activity by routine analysis. We here employed a previously developed and robust two-stage approach that combines Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) and hierarchical clustering to compare conformational ensembles of proteins. Moreover, we designed a novel strategy to identify the specific mutations that more efficiently convert the dynamic signature of the psychrophilic enzyme (AHA) to that of the mesophilic counterpart (PPA). The SOM trained on AHA and its variants was used to classify a PPA MD ensemble and successfully highlighted the relationships between the flexibilities of the target enzyme and of the different mutants. Moreover the local features of the mutants that mostly influence their global flexibility in a mesophilic-like direction were detected. It turns out that mutations of the cold-adapted enzyme to hydrophobic and aromatic residues are the most effective in restoring the PPA dynamic features and could guide the design of more mesophilic-like mutants. In conclusion, our strategy can efficiently extract specific dynamic signatures related to function from multiple comparisons of MD conformational ensembles. Therefore, it can be a promising tool for protein engineering.

  13. Citric acid production from partly deproteinized whey under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of lactose-positive and cold-adapted Yarrowia lipolytica B9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut

    2016-08-10

    The present study was performed to produce citric acid (CA) from partly deproteinized cheese whey (DPCW) under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of the cold-adapted and lactose-positive yeast Yarrowia lipolytica B9. DPCW was prepared using the temperature treatment of 90°C for 15min. Sodium alginate was used as entrapping agent for cell immobilization. Optimum conditions for the maximum CA production (33.3g/L) in non-sterile DPCW medium were the temperature of 20°C, pH 5.5, additional lactose concentration of 20g/L, sodium alginate concentration of 2%, number of 150 beads/100mL and incubation time of 120h. Similarly, maximum citric acid/isocitric acid (CA/ICA) ratio (6.79) could be reached under these optimal conditions. Additional nitrogen and phosphorus sources decreased CA concentration and CA/ICA ratio. Immobilized cells were reused in three continuous reaction cycles without any loss in the maximum CA concentration. The unique combination of low pH and temperature values as well as cell immobilization procedure could prevent undesired microbial contaminants during CA production. This is the first work on CA production by cold-adapted microorganisms under non-sterile culture conditions. Besides, CA production using a lactose-positive strain of the yeast Y. lipolytica was investigated for the first time in the present study.

  14. Activation of Zoosporogenesis-Specific Genes in Phytophthora infestans Involves a 7-Nucleotide Promoter Motif and Cold-Induced Membrane Rigidity

    OpenAIRE

    Tani, Shuji; Judelson, Howard

    2006-01-01

    Infections of plants by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans typically result from zoospores, which develop from sporangia at cold temperatures. To help understand the relevant cold-induced signaling pathway, factors regulating the transcription of the zoosporogenesis-specific NIF (nuclear LIM-interactor-interacting factor) gene family were examined. Sequences required for inducing PinifC3 were identified by analyzing truncated and mutated promoters using the β-glucuronidase reporter in stable...

  15. Structure Prediction of a Novel Exo-β-1,3-Glucanase: Insights into the Cold Adaptation of Psychrophilic Yeast Glaciozyma antarctica PI12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Salimeh; Parvizpour, Sepideh; Razmara, Jafar; Abu Bakar, Farah Diba; Illias, Rosli Md; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Murad, Abdul MunirAbdul

    2016-07-30

    We report a detailed structural analysis of the psychrophilic exo-β-1,3-glucanase (GaExg55) from Glaciozyma antarctica PI12. This study elucidates the structural basis of exo-1,3-β-1,3-glucanase from this psychrophilic yeast. The structural prediction of GaExg55 remains a challenge because of its low sequence identity (37 %). A 3D model was constructed for GaExg55. Threading approach was employed to determine a suitable template and generate optimal target-template alignment for establishing the model using MODELLER9v15. The primary sequence analysis of GaExg55 with other mesophilic exo-1,3-β-glucanases indicated that an increased flexibility conferred to the enzyme by a set of amino acids substitutions in the surface and loop regions of GaExg55, thereby facilitating its structure to cold adaptation. A comparison of GaExg55 with other mesophilic exo-β-1,3-glucanases proposed that the catalytic activity and structural flexibility at cold environment were attained through a reduced amount of hydrogen bonds and salt bridges, as well as an increased exposure of the hydrophobic side chains to the solvent. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed using GROMACS software to evaluate the stability of the GaExg55 structure at varying low temperatures. The simulation result confirmed the above findings for cold adaptation of the psychrophilic GaExg55. Furthermore, the structural analysis of GaExg55 with large catalytic cleft and wide active site pocket confirmed the high activity of GaExg55 to hydrolyze polysaccharide substrates.

  16. Role of IL-6 in exercise training- and cold-induced UCP1 expression in subcutaneous white adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jakob Grunnet; Murholm, Maria; Carey, Andrew L.

    2014-01-01

    . Additionally, a cold exposure-induced increase in iWAT UCP1 protein content was blunted in IL-6 KO mice, while UCP1 protein content in iWAT was lower in both untrained and exercise trained IL-6 KO mice than in WT mice. In conclusion, repeated daily increases in plasma IL-6 can increase iWAT UCP1 mRNA content......Expression of brown adipose tissue (BAT) associated proteins like uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in inguinal WAT (iWAT) has been suggested to alter iWAT metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in exercise training and cold exposure-induced iWAT UCP1...... expression. The effect of daily intraperitoneal injections of IL-6 (3 ng/g) in C57BL/6 mice for 7 days on iWAT UCP1 expression was examined. In addition, the expression of UCP1 in iWAT was determined in response to 3 days of cold exposure (4°C) and 5 weeks of exercise training in wild type (WT) and whole...

  17. Cold-Induced Browning Dynamically Alters the Expression Profiles of Inflammatory Adipokines with Tissue Specificity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Luo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cold exposure or β3-adrenoceptor agonist treatment induces the adipose tissues remodeling, relevant for beige adipogenesis within white adipose tissue (WAT. It remains unclear whether this process influences inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues. We determine the temporal profile of cold or β3-adrenoceptor agonist (CL316,243-induced changes in the expression of inflammatory adipokines in adipose tissues in mice or primary mice adipocytes. Male C57BL/6J mice at eight weeks old were exposed to 4 °C for 1–5 days. Interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT, inguinal subcutaneous WAT (sWAT and epididymal WAT (eWAT were harvested for gene and protein expression analysis. In addition, cultured primary mice brown adipocyte (BA and white adipocyte (WA treated with or without CL316,243 were harvested for gene expression analysis. The inflammatory adipokines expressed significantly higher in WAT than BAT at baseline. They were rapidly changed in iBAT, while down-regulated in sWAT and up-regulated in eWAT during the cold acclimation. Upon CL316,243 treatment, detected inflammatory adipokines except Leptin were transiently increased in both BA and WA. Our in vivo and in vitro data demonstrate that the browning process alters the inflammatory adipokines expression in adipose tissues, which is acutely responded to in iBAT, dynamically decreased in sWAT whilst increased in eWAT for compensation.

  18. The cold-induced lipokine 12,13-diHOME promotes fatty acid transport into brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynes, Matthew D; Leiria, Luiz O; Lundh, Morten; Bartelt, Alexander; Shamsi, Farnaz; Huang, Tian Lian; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Hirshman, Michael F; Schlein, Christian; Lee, Alexandra; Baer, Lisa A; May, Francis J; Gao, Fei; Narain, Niven R; Chen, Emily Y; Kiebish, Michael A; Cypess, Aaron M; Blüher, Matthias; Goodyear, Laurie J; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Stanford, Kristin I; Tseng, Yu-Hua

    2017-05-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) and beige adipose tissue combust fuels for heat production in adult humans, and so constitute an appealing target for the treatment of metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Cold exposure can enhance energy expenditure by activating BAT, and it has been shown to improve nutrient metabolism. These therapies, however, are time consuming and uncomfortable, demonstrating the need for pharmacological interventions. Recently, lipids have been identified that are released from tissues and act locally or systemically to promote insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance; as a class, these lipids are referred to as 'lipokines'. Because BAT is a specialized metabolic tissue that takes up and burns lipids and is linked to systemic metabolic homeostasis, we hypothesized that there might be thermogenic lipokines that activate BAT in response to cold. Here we show that the lipid 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (12,13-diHOME) is a stimulator of BAT activity, and that its levels are negatively correlated with body-mass index and insulin sensitivity. Using a global lipidomic analysis, we found that 12,13-diHOME was increased in the circulation of humans and mice exposed to cold. Furthermore, we found that the enzymes that produce 12,13-diHOME were uniquely induced in BAT by cold stimulation. The injection of 12,13-diHOME acutely activated BAT fuel uptake and enhanced cold tolerance, which resulted in decreased levels of serum triglycerides. Mechanistically, 12,13-diHOME increased fatty acid (FA) uptake into brown adipocytes by promoting the translocation of the FA transporters FATP1 and CD36 to the cell membrane. These data suggest that 12,13-diHOME, or a functional analog, could be developed as a treatment for metabolic disorders.

  19. Lacosamide diminishes dryness-induced hyperexcitability of corneal cold sensitive nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Illés; Dienes, Lóránt; Perényi, Kristóf; Quirce, Susana; Luna, Carolina; Mizerska, Kamila; Acosta, M Carmen; Belmonte, Carlos; Gallar, Juana

    2016-09-15

    Lacosamide is an anti-epileptic drug that is also used for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy acting through voltage-gated sodium channels. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of acute application of lacosamide on the electrical activity of corneal cold nerve terminals in lacrimo-deficient guinea pigs. Four weeks after unilateral surgical removal of the main lachrimal gland in guinea pigs, corneas were excised and superfused in vitro at 34°C for extracellular electrophysiological recording of nerve terminal impulse activity of cold thermosensitive nerve terminals. The characteristics of the spontaneous and the stimulus-evoked (cooling ramps from 34°C to 15°C) activity before and in presence of lacosamide 100µM and lidocaine 100µM were compared. Cold nerve terminals (n=34) recorded from dry eye corneas showed significantly enhanced spontaneous activity (8.0±1.1 vs. 5.2±0.7imp/s; Placosamide and lidocaine decreased spontaneous activity and peak response to cooling ramps significantly (Placosamide (P>0.05) to the irrigation fluid. In summary, the application of lacosamide results in a significant decrease of the augmented spontaneous activity and responsiveness to cold of corneal sensory nerves from tear-deficient animals. Based on these promising results we speculate that lacosamide might be used to reduce the hyperexcitability of corneal cold receptors caused by prolonged ocular surface dryness due to hyposecretory or evaporative dry eye disease.

  20. Cold plasma interactions with plants: Morphing and movements of Venus flytrap and Mimosa pudica induced by argon plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Xu, Kunning G; Kolobov, Vladimir I

    2017-12-01

    Low temperature (cold) plasma finds an increasing number of applications in biology, medicine and agriculture. In this paper, we report a new effect of plasma induced morphing and movements of Venus flytrap and Mimosa pudica. We have experimentally observed plasma activation of sensitive plant movements and morphing structures in these plants similar to stimulation of their mechanosensors in vivo. Application of an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet to the inside or outside of a lobe, midrib, or cilia in Dionaea muscipula Ellis induces trap closing. Treatment of Mimosa pudica by plasma induces movements of pinnules and petioles similar to the effects of mechanical stimulation. We have conducted control experiments and simulations to illustrate that gas flow and UV radiation associated with plasma are not the primary reasons for the observed effects. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) produced by cold plasma in atmospheric air appear to be the primary reason of plasma-induced activation of phytoactuators in plants. Some of these RONS are known to be signaling molecules, which control plants' developmental processes. Understanding these mechanisms could promote plasma-based technology for plant developmental control and future use for plant protection from pathogens. Our work offers new insight into mechanisms which trigger plant morphing and movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cold Exposure Can Induce an Exaggerated Early-Morning Blood Pressure Surge in Young Prehypertensives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian-Hui Hong

    Full Text Available Prehypertension is related to a higher risk of cardiovascular events than normotension. Our previous study reported that cold exposure elevates the amplitude of the morning blood pressure surge (MBPS and is associated with a sympathetic increase during the final sleep transition, which might be critical for sleep-related cardiovascular events in normotensives. However, few studies have explored the effects of cold exposure on autonomic function during sleep transitions and changes of autonomic function among prehypertensives. Therefore, we conducted an experiment for testing the effects of cold exposure on changes of autonomic function during sleep and the MBPS among young prehypertensives are more exaggerate than among young normotensives. The study groups consisted of 12 normotensive and 12 prehypertensive male adults with mean ages of 23.67 ± 0.70 and 25.25 ± 0.76 years, respectively. The subjects underwent cold (16°C and warm (23°C conditions randomly. The room temperature was maintained at either 23°C or 16°C by central air conditioning and recorded by a heat-sensitive sensor placed on the forehead and extended into the air. BP was measured every 30 minutes by using an autonomic BP monitor. Electroencephalograms, electrooculograms, electromyograms, electrocardiograms, and near body temperature were recorded by miniature polysomnography. Under cold exposure, a significantly higher amplitude of MBPS than under the warm condition among normotensives; however, this change was more exaggerated in prehypertensives. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in parasympathetic-related RR and HF during the final sleep transition and a higher early-morning surge in BP and in LF% among prehypertensives, but no such change was found in normotensives. Our study supports that cold exposure might increase the risk of sleep-related cardiovascular events in prehypertensives.

  2. Overexpression of pigeonpea stress-induced cold and drought regulatory gene (CcCDR) confers drought, salt, and cold tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-09-01

    A potent cold and drought regulatory protein-encoding gene (CcCDR) was isolated from the subtractive cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. CcCDR was induced by different abiotic stress conditions in pigeonpea. Overexpression of CcCDR in Arabidopsis thaliana imparted enhanced tolerance against major abiotic stresses, namely drought, salinity, and low temperature, as evidenced by increased biomass, root length, and chlorophyll content. Transgenic plants also showed increased levels of antioxidant enzymes, proline, and reducing sugars under stress conditions. Furthermore, CcCDR-transgenic plants showed enhanced relative water content, osmotic potential, and cell membrane stability, as well as hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) as compared with control plants. Localization studies confirmed that CcCDR could enter the nucleus, as revealed by intense fluorescence, indicating its possible interaction with various nuclear proteins. Microarray analysis revealed that 1780 genes were up-regulated in CcCDR-transgenics compared with wild-type plants. Real-time PCR analysis on selected stress-responsive genes, involved in ABA-dependent and -independent signalling networks, revealed higher expression levels in transgenic plants, suggesting that CcCDR acts upstream of these genes. The overall results demonstrate the explicit role of CcCDR in conferring multiple abiotic stress tolerance at the whole-plant level. The multifunctional CcCDR seems promising as a prime candidate gene for enhancing abiotic stress tolerance in diverse plants.

  3. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  4. The cold-induced basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor gene MdCIbHLH1 encodes an ICE-like protein in apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant growth is greatly affected by low temperatures, and the expression of a number of genes is induced by cold stress. Although many genes in the cold signaling pathway have been identified in Arabidopsis, little is known about the transcription factors involved in the cold stress response in apple. Results Here, we show that the apple bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix) gene MdCIbHLH1 (Cold-Induced bHLH1), which encodes an ICE-like protein, was noticeably induced in response to cold stress. The MdCIbHLH1 protein specifically bound to the MYC recognition sequences in the AtCBF3 promoter, and MdCIbHLH1 overexpression enhanced cold tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. In addition, the MdCIbHLH1 protein bound to the promoters of MdCBF2 and favorably contributed to cold tolerance in transgenic apple plants by upregulating the expression of MdCBF2 through the CBF (C-repeat-binding factor) pathway. Our findings indicate that MdCIbHLH1 functions in stress tolerance in different species. For example, ectopic MdCIbHLH1 expression conferred enhanced chilling tolerance in transgenic tobacco. Finally, we observed that cold induces the degradation of the MdCIbHLH1 protein in apple and that this degradation was potentially mediated by ubiquitination and sumoylation. Conclusions Based on these findings, MdCIbHLH1 encodes a transcription factor that is important for the cold tolerance response in apple. PMID:22336381

  5. Typhoon induced summer cold shock advected by Kuroshio off eastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Chun; Zheng, Zhe-Wen; Zheng, Quanan; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Lee, Chia-Ying; Chern, Shi-We; Chao, Yan-Hao

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we used satellite observations, in-situ measurements, and numerical modelling to investigate an extreme temperature change triggered by a typhoon in the ocean near the Kuroshio region off eastern Taiwan. With the westward passage of Typhoon Morakot in 2009 through Taiwan, a distinct cool wake was generated at the southeastern corner of Taiwan (CWSET) and moved towards the downstream Kuroshio region; it involved a precipitous cooling of at least 4 °C within 10-20 km of the coast. Rapid and drastic temperature drops triggered by the CWSET and advected by the strong conveyor belt effect of the Kuroshio Current are highly probable sources of cold shocks in summer. We clarified the mechanism that generated the CWSET through a series of sensitivity experiments using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System. The cold shock was mainly triggered by local wind stress associated with the typhoon. In addition, the Kuroshio Current was demonstrated to have played a crucial role in both the generation of upwelling off the southeastern coast of Taiwan during the passage of the typhoon and the transporting of this impact downstream. This process was verified through a systematic analysis of all typhoons moving westward through Taiwan from 2005 to 2013. Cold-shock stress is thought to be linked with naturally occurring 'fish kills', and obtaining a more thorough understanding of the CWSET will be helpful for protecting aquaculture off the eastern coast of Taiwan from the impacts of cold shocks triggered by typhoons moving westward through Taiwan in summer.

  6. Effects of Cold Rolling and Strain-Induced Martensite Formation in a SAF 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Marco; Brunelli, Katya; Grazzi, Francesco; Scherillo, Antonella; Calliari, Irene

    2015-02-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) are biphasic steels having a ferritic-austenitic microstructure that allows them to combine good mechanical and corrosion-resistance properties. However, these steels are sensitive to microstructural modifications, such as ferrite decomposition at high temperatures and the possibility of strain-induced martensite (SIM) formation from cold-worked austenite, which can significantly alter their interesting features. In the present work, the effects of cold rolling on the developed microstructural features in a cold-rolled SAF 2205 DSS and the onset of martensitic transformation are discussed. The material was deformed at room temperature from 3 to 85 pct thickness reduction, and several characterization techniques (scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, hardness measurements, and time-of-flight-neutron diffraction) were employed in order to fully describe the microstructural behavior of the steel. Despite the low stacking fault energy of DSS austenite, which contributed to SIM formation, the steel was found to be more stable than other stainless steel grades, such as AISI 304L. Rolling textures were similar to those pertaining to single-phase materials, but the presence of the biphasic (Duplex) microstructure imposed deformation constraints that affected the developed microstructural features, owing to phases interactions. Moreover, even if an intensification of the strain field in austenite was revealed, retarded SIM transformation kinetics and lower martensite amounts with respect to AISI 304L were observed.

  7. The potato amylase inhibitor gene SbAI regulates cold-induced sweetening in potato tubers by modulating amylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiling; Liu, Jun; Hou, Juan; Yao, Ying; Lin, Yuan; Ou, Yongbin; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2014-09-01

    Potato cold-induced sweetening (CIS) is critical for the postharvest quality of potato tubers. Starch degradation is considered to be one of the key pathways in the CIS process. However, the functions of the genes that encode enzymes related to starch degradation in CIS and the activity regulation of these enzymes have received less attention. A potato amylase inhibitor gene known as SbAI was cloned from the wild potato species Solanum berthaultii. This genetic transformation confirmed that in contrast to the SbAI suppression in CIS-resistant potatoes, overexpressing SbAI in CIS-sensitive potatoes resulted in less amylase activity and a lower rate of starch degradation accompanied by a lower reducing sugar (RS) content in cold-stored tubers. This finding suggested that the SbAI gene may play crucial roles in potato CIS by modulating the amylase activity. Further investigations indicated that pairwise protein-protein interactions occurred between SbAI and α-amylase StAmy23, β-amylases StBAM1 and StBAM9. SbAI could inhibit the activities of both α-amylase and β-amylase in potato tubers primarily by repressing StAmy23 and StBAM1, respectively. These findings provide the first evidence that SbAI is a key regulator of the amylases that confer starch degradation and RS accumulation in cold-stored potato tubers.

  8. Effect of brief mindfulness intervention on tolerance and distress of pain induced by cold-pressor task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghua; Wang, Sisi; Chang, Shaochen; Chen, Wenjun; Si, Mei

    2013-08-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that short-term meditation intervention can lead to greater tolerance and lower pain or distress ratings of experimentally induced pain. However, few attempts have been made to examine the effects of short-term mindfulness-based intervention on the tolerance and distress of pain, when delivered in a therapist-free form. The present research explored the effect of brief mindfulness intervention using pre-recorded instruction on pain experimentally induced by the cold-pressor task. The effects of the mindfulness strategy, the distraction strategy and spontaneous strategy, all through the instructions of pre-recorded voices, were compared. The subjects were drawn from healthy college students and randomly assigned to the aforementioned three groups. Our results showed that compared with using spontaneous strategies, the mindfulness intervention significantly improved the participants' pain tolerance and reduced their immersion distress. The distraction strategy also significantly improved the participants' pain tolerance. However, it did not have a significant effect on the participants' level of distress during the immersion period. Our results suggest that brief mindfulness intervention without a therapist's personal involvement is capable of helping people cope with pain induced by the cold-pressor task.

  9. Cold pressor-induced pain does not impair WAIS-IV processing speed index or working memory index performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherton, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain frequently involves cognitive complaints such as concentration and memory deficits, but studies of the effects of pain on cognition have not consistently demonstrated deficits and have not typically utilized standard neuropsychological instruments. Effects of cold pressor-induced pain on Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition Processing Speed Index (PSI) and Working Memory Index (WMI) performance was examined in nonclinical volunteers (n = 40). All took one PSI subtest and one WMI subtest normally, and then took different PSI and WMI subtests during cold pressor-induced pain or painless warm-water immersion. Scaled scores for normal administration versus pain or painless water immersion did not differ and there was no interaction between group (control vs. pain) and manner of administration, despite moderately severe mean pain ratings (M = 6.8 on a 0-10 pain-rating scale). Results indicate that induced pain in nonclinical volunteers does not impair PSI or WMI performance, and they suggest that chronic pain per se should not be expected to substantially affect these cognitive functions. However, patients with chronic pain may differ from nonclinical volunteers in their experience of pain, potentially limiting generalizability.

  10. Spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei using cold neutron induced fission of actinide targets at the ILL: The EXILL campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanc A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One way to explore exotic nuclei is to study their structure by performing γ-ray spectroscopy. At the ILL, we exploit a high neutron flux reactor to induce the cold fission of actinide targets. In this process, fission products that cannot be accessed using standard spontaneous fission sources are produced with a yield allowing their detailed study using high resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. This is what was pursued at the ILL with the EXILL (for EXOGAM at the ILL campaign. In the present work, the EXILL setup and performance will be presented.

  11. Experimental evidence of twin fast metastable H(2S) atoms from dissociation of cold H_2 induced by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Robert, J; Carvalho, C R; Jalbert, Ginette; Nascimento, R F; Trimeche, A; Dulieu, O; Medina, Aline; Carvalho, Carla; Faria, N V de Castro

    2013-01-01

    We report the direct detection of two metastable H(2S) atoms coming from the dissociation of a single cold H_2 molecule, in coincidence measurements. The molecular dissociation was induced by electron impact in order to avoid limitations by the selection rules governing radiative transitions. Two detectors, placed close from the collision center, measure the neutral metastable H(2S) through a localized quenching process, which mixes the H(2S) state with the H(2P), leading to a Lyman-\\alpha detection. Our data show the accomplishment of a coincidence measurement which proves for the first time the existence of the H(2S)-H(2S) dissociation channel.

  12. Ceramide-Enriched Membrane Domains in Red Blood Cells and the Mechanism ofSphingomyelinase-Induced Hot-Cold Hemolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes, Ruth; Lopez, David; Sot, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    ) but also in goat erythrocytes, which lack PC. However, in horse erythrocytes, with a large proportion of PC and almost no SM, hot-cold hemolysis induced by PlcHR2 is not observed. Fluorescence microscopy observations confirm the formation of ceramide-enriched domains as a result of PlcHR2 activity. After...... cooling down to 4 °C, the erythrocyte ghost membranes arising from hemolysis contain large, ceramide-rich domains. We suggest that formation of these rigid domains in the originally flexible cell makes it fragile, thus highly susceptible to hemolysis. We also interpret the slow hemolysis observed at 37 °C...

  13. cDNA-AFLP analysis of transcripts induced in chickpea plants by TiO2 nanoparticles during cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Saeed; Maali-Amiri, Reza; Mohammadi, Rahmat; Kazemi-Shahandashti, Seyyedeh-Sanam

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on cold tolerance (CT) development in two chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes (Sel96Th11439, cold tolerant, and ILC533, cold susceptible) by using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique during the first and sixth days of cold stress (CS) at 4 °C. Selective amplification by primer combinations generated 4200 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) while 100 of them (2.62%) were differentially expressed. During CS, 60 differentially expressed TDFs of TiO2 NPs-treated plants were cloned and 10 of them produced successfully readable sequences. These data represented different groups of genes involved in metabolism pathways, cellular defense, cell connections and signaling, transcriptional regulation and chromatin architecture. Two out of 10 TDFs were unknown genes with uncharacterized functions or sequences without homology to known ones. The network-based analysis showed a gene-gene relationship in response to CS. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) confirmed differential expression of identified genes (six out of 10 TDFs) with potential functions in CT and showed similar patterns with cDNA-AFLP results. An increase in transcription level of these TDFs, particularly on the first day of CS, was crucial for developing CT through decreasing electrolyte leakage index (ELI) content in tolerant plants compared to susceptible ones, as well as in TiO2 NPs-treated plants compared to control ones. It could also indicate probable role of TiO2 NPs against CS-induced oxidative stress. Therefore, a new application of TiO2 NPs in CT development is suggested for preventing or controlling the damages in field conditions and increasing crop productivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Heat stress affects carbohydrate metabolism during cold-induced sweetening of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Derek J; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2017-03-01

    Tolerance to heat stress for retention of low-temperature sweetening-resistant phenotype in potato is conferred by insensitivity of acid invertase activity to cold induction. Heat stress exacerbated cold sweetening (buildup of reducing sugars) of the LTS (low-temperature sweetening)-susceptible potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars, Ranger Russet and Russet Burbank, and completely abolished the resistance to cold sweetening in the LTS-resistant cultivars/clones, Sage Russet, GemStar Russet, POR06V12-3 and A02138-2. Payette Russet and EGA09702-2, however, demonstrated considerable tolerance to heat stress for retention of their LTS-resistant phenotype. Heat-primed Payette Russet and EGA09702-2 tubers accumulated fourfold more sucrose when subsequently stored at 4 °C, while reducing sugar concentrations also increased marginally but remained low relative to the non-heat-tolerant LTS-resistant clones, resulting in light-colored fries. By contrast, sucrose concentrations in heat-primed tubers of the non-heat-tolerant clones remained unchanged during LTS, but reducing sugars increased fivefold, resulting in darkening of processed fries. Acid invertase activity increased in the LTS-susceptible and non-heat-tolerant LTS-resistant cultivars/clones during cold storage. However, Payette Russet tubers maintained very low invertase activity regardless of heat stress and cold storage treatments, as was the case for Innate(®) Russet Burbank (W8) tubers, where silenced invertase conferred robust tolerance to heat stress for retention of LTS-resistant phenotype. Importantly, heat-stressed tubers of Payette Russet, EGA09702-2 and Innate(®) Russet Burbank (W8) demonstrated similar low reducing sugar and high sucrose-accumulating phenotypes when stored at 4 °C. Tolerance to heat stress for retention of LTS-resistant phenotype in Payette Russet and likely its maternal parent, EGA09702-2, is, therefore, conferred by the ability to maintain low invertase activity during cold

  15. Evolution of stability in a cold-active enzyme elicits specificity relaxation and highlights substrate-related effects on temperature adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti-Lafranconi, Pietro; Natalello, Antonino; Rehm, Sascha; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Pleiss, Jürgen; Lotti, Marina

    2010-01-08

    Molecular aspects of thermal adaptation of proteins were studied by following the co-evolution of temperature dependence, conformational stability, and substrate specificity in a cold-active lipase modified via directed evolution. We found that the evolution of kinetic stability was accompanied by a relaxation in substrate specificity. Moreover, temperature dependence and selectivity turned out to be mutually dependent. While the wild-type protein was strictly specific for short-chain triglycerides (C4) in the temperature range 10-50 degrees C and displayed highest activity in the cold, its stabilized variant was able to accept C8 and C12 molecules and its selectivity was temperature dependent. We could not detect any improvement in the overall structural robustness of the mutant when the structure was challenged by temperature or chemical denaturants. There is, however, strong evidence for local stabilization effects in the active-site region provided by two independent approaches. Differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that the exposure of hydrophobic patches (as the active site is) precedes denaturation, and molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that stability was obtained by restriction of the mobility of the lid, a flexible structure that regulates the access to the enzyme active site and influences its stability. This reduction of lid movements is suggested to be accompanied by a concomitant increase in the mobility of other protein regions, thus accounting for the observed broadening of substrate specificity.

  16. Adaptive changes in the plasticity of body melanisation in generalist, cold and warm adapted Drosophila species%不同气候适应类型果蝇体色黑化可塑性的适应性变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravi PARKASH; Seema RAMNIWAS; Chanderkala LAMBHOD; Babita KAJLA

    2011-01-01

    变温昆虫果蝇Drosophila深受热选择(即遗传效应)或表型诱导效应(即可塑性)的影响.表型可塑性是不同生物进行适应的有效方法,但是它在不同的果蝇种中较少受到关注.我们分析了不同发育温度范围和地理分布的果蝇的黑化反应模式.嗜凤梨果蝇D.ananassae和蒲桃果蝇D.jambulina对低温敏感,这些物种可在18 ~ 32℃下饲育.相反,D.nepalensis为耐冷且对热敏感的物种,可在12 ~ 25℃下饲育.世界广为分布的黑腹果蝇D.melanogaster的温度范围宽(13~31℃),该物种前3个腹节和后3个腹节的黑化反应模式未见明显差异.D.nepalensis的全部6个腹节(第2~7节)均具有高度的可塑性.不过,黑腹果蝇D.melanogaster只有后3个腹节具有可塑性.相反,热带物种嗜凤梨果蝇D.ananassae的所有腹节均不具有可塑性.世界广为分布的黑腹果蝇,即使来自冷得多的气候环境,其体色也不加深,与D.nepalensis中观察到的体色接近.本研究的目的旨在认识引起体色的形态多样性的过程以及果蝇对不同地理区域的适应性.最后,将体色黑化与物种系统发育谱系的比较表明,在不同的演化谱系中不断发生遗传多态性或表型可塑性两种不同模式的适应.%Ectothermic drosophilids are profoundly affected by thermal selection (i.e.,genetic effects) or through induced effects on phenotype (i.e.,plasticity).Phenotypic plasticity is a powerful means of adaptation in diverse organisms but has received less attention for different drosophilids. We analyzed reaction norms of melanisation in Drosophila species which differ in developmental thermal range and geographical distribution.D.ananassae and D.jambulina are cold sensitive,and these species can be cultured between 18 to 32℃.By contrast,D.nepalensis is cold-tolerant and heat-sensitive species which can be raised between 12 and 25℃.The cosmopolitan species D. melanogaster has a broader thermal range ( 13

  17. Antipruritic effect of cold-induced and transient receptor potential-agonist-induced counter-irritation on histaminergic itch in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hjalte H.; Melholt, Camilla; Hilborg, Sigurd D.;

    2017-01-01

    (trans-cinnamaldehyde/L-menthol, respectively), on histamine-induced itch, wheal and neurogenic inflammation in 13 healthy volunteers. Histamine 1% was applied to the volar forearms using skin prick-testing lancets. Recorded outcome-parameters were itch intensity, wheal reactions and neurogenic...... inflammation (measured by laser-speckle perfusion-imaging). Homotopic thermal counter-irritation was performed with 6 temperatures, ranging from 4°C to 37°C, using a 3 × 3-cm thermal stimulator. Chemical "cold-like" counter-irritation was conducted with 40% L-menthol and 10% trans-cinnamaldehyde, while 5......% doxepin was used as a positive antipruritic control/comparator. Cold counter-irritation stimuli from 4°C to 22°C inhibited itch in a stimulus-intensity-dependent manner (p menthol...

  18. Novel Effect of Berberine on Thermoregulation in Mice Model Induced by Hot and Cold Environmental Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Fan; Kheir, Michael M.; Wang, Xin-Pei; Chai, Yu-Shuang; Yuan, Zhi-Yi; Lu, Xi; Xing, Dong-Ming; Du, Feng; Du, Li-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of berberine (BBR) on thermoregulation in mice exposed to hot (40°C) and cold (4°C) environmental conditions. Four groups of mice were assembled with three different dosages of BBR (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/kg) and normal saline (control). In room temperature, our largest dosage of BBR (0.8 mg/kg) can reduce rectal temperatures (Tc) of normal mice. In hot conditions, BBR can antagonize the increasing core body temperature and inhibit the expression of HSP70 and TNFα in mice; conversely, in cold conditions, BBR can antagonize the decreasing core body temperature and enhance the expression of TRPM8. This study demonstrates the dual ability of BBR in maintaining thermal balance, which is of great relevance to the regulation of HSP70, TNFα and TRPM8. PMID:23335996

  19. Roller Burnishing - A Cold Working Tool to Reduce Weld Induced Residual Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Martin

    2002-02-19

    The possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in regions of tensile residual stress introduced by weld deposited material has been a concern where environmental effects can reduce component life. Roller burnishing, a form of mechanical cold-working, has been considered as a means of providing for residual stress state improvements. This paper provides a computational evaluation of the roller burnishing process to address the permanent deformation needed to introduce a desirable residual stress state. The analysis uses a series of incrementally applied pressure loadings and finite element methodology to simulate the behavior of a roller burnishing tool. Various magnitudes of applied pressure loadings coupled with different size plates and boundary conditions are examined to assess the degree and depth of the residual compressive stress state after cold working. Both kinematic and isotropic hardening laws are evaluated.

  20. A cold-adapted carbohydrate esterase from the oil-degrading marine Bacterium Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221: gene cloning, purification, and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Suk; Heo, Jae Bok; Lee, Je-Hoon; Choi, Yong-Lark

    2014-07-01

    A cold-adapted carbohydrate esterase, CEST, belonging to the carbohydrate esterase family 6, was cloned from Microbulbifer thermotolerans DAU221. CEST was composed of 307 amino acids with the first 22 serving as a secretion signal peptide. The calculated molecular mass and isoelectric point of the mature enzyme were 31,244 Da and pH 5.89, respectively. The catalytic triad consisted of residues Ser37, Glu192, and His281 in the conserved regions: GQSNMXG, QGEX(D/N), and DXXH. The three-dimensional structure of CEST revealed that CEST belongs to the α/β-class of protein consisted of a central six-stranded β-sheet flanked by eight α-helices. The recombinant CEST was purified by His-tag affinity chromatography and the characterization showed its optimal temperature and pH were 15°C and 8.0, respectively. Specifically, CEST maintained up to 70% of its enzyme activity when preincubated at 50°C or 60°C for 6 h, and 89% of its enzyme activity when preincubated at 70°C for 1h . The results suggest CEST belongs to group 3 of the cold-adapted enzymes. The enzyme activity was increased by Na(+) and Mg(2+) ions but was strongly inhibited by Cu(+) and Hg(2+) ions, at all ion concentrations. Using p-nitrophenyl acetate as a substrate, the enzyme had a Km of 0.278 mM and a kcat of 1.9 s(-1). Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the catalytic triad (Ser37, Glu192, and His281) and Asp278 were essential for the enzyme activity.

  1. Assessment study of the stresses induced by corrosion in the Advanced Cold Process Canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoch, A.R.; Sharland, S.M. [Chemical Studies Department, Radwaste Disposal Division, AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell Laboratory, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1993-10-01

    The Advanced Cold Process Canister (ACPC) is a concept for the encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel for geological disposal. The basic design of the ACPC consists of an outer oxygen free copper overpack covering a carbon steel inner container. In this report the stresses exerted on the copper overpack as a result of an early failure of the canister and the subsequent corrosion of the steel are calculated. 4 figs, 8 refs, 2 tabs.

  2. T Cell Adaptive Immunity Proceeds through Environment-Induced Adaptation from the Exposure of Cryptic Genetic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, James M.; Lin, Joseph; Harding, Angus

    2011-01-01

    Evolution is often characterized as a process involving incremental genetic changes that are slowly discovered and fixed in a population through genetic drift and selection. However, a growing body of evidence is finding that changes in the environment frequently induce adaptations that are much too rapid to occur by an incremental genetic search process. Rapid evolution is hypothesized to be facilitated by mutations present within the population that are silent or “cryptic” within the first environment but are co-opted or “exapted” to the new environment, providing a selective advantage once revealed. Although cryptic mutations have recently been shown to facilitate evolution in RNA enzymes, their role in the evolution of complex phenotypes has not been proven. In support of this wider role, this paper describes an unambiguous relationship between cryptic genetic variation and complex phenotypic responses within the immune system. By reviewing the biology of the adaptive immune system through the lens of evolution, we show that T cell adaptive immunity constitutes an exemplary model system where cryptic alleles drive rapid adaptation of complex traits. In naive T cells, normally cryptic differences in T cell receptor reveal diversity in activation responses when the cellular population is presented with a novel environment during infection. We summarize how the adaptive immune response presents a well studied and appropriate experimental system that can be used to confirm and expand upon theoretical evolutionary models describing how seemingly small and innocuous mutations can drive rapid cellular evolution. PMID:22363338

  3. The emergence of cold-induced brown adipocytes in mouse white fat depots is determined predominantly by white to brown adipocyte transdifferentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbatelli, G.; Murano, I.; Madsen, Lise;

    2010-01-01

    The origin of brown adipocytes arising in white adipose tissue (WAT) after cold acclimatization is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that several UCP1-immunoreactive brown adipocytes occurring in WAT after cold acclimatization have a mixed morphology (paucilocular adipocytes). These cells also had a ...... for C/EBP (an antimitotic protein), whereas Ccna1 expression (related to cell proliferation) was unchanged. Overall, our data strongly suggest that the cold-induced emergence of brown adipocytes in WAT predominantly reflects ß3-adrenoceptor-mediated transdifferentiation....

  4. Cold acclimation induced accumulation of phenolic compounds and freezing tolerance in Ammopiptanthus mongolicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Mei-qin; Chen Yi-yin; Lu Cun-fu; Zhang Hui; Yin Wei-lun

    2007-01-01

    Ammopiptanthus mongolicus, the only freezing tolerant evergreen broad-leaved shrub, local species of the Alashan desert,northwest sand area of China, can survive -30℃ or even lower temperature in winter. In the present study, the secondary products phenolics in A. mongolicus cotyledons were determined to study the effects ofphenolics on cold tolerance. Cytochemical localization of phenolics in cotyledon cells was observed by electron microscopy and the content of phenolic compounds was assayed by spectrophotometric measurement. The results showed that the freezing tolerance of A. mongolicus seedlings increased after acclimation at 2-6℃ for 14 days, which accompanied the increase of the content of phenolic compounds in cotyledons. Cytochemical observation showed that phenolic deposits were mainly localized in vacuoles and in close proximity to tonoplast, and also in the cytoplasm. The amount and the size of phenolics droplets increased obviously in cytoplasm and vacuoles after cold acclimation, predominantly aggregated along membranes of vacuoles and tonoplast. No phenolic deposits were found in cell walls. As hydrogen- or electron-donating agents, phenolics may protect plant cells against reactive oxygen species formed during chilling or freezing stress and improve the freezing tolerance of cold-acclimated A. mongolicus seedlings.

  5. Evaluation of effect of highly standardized aqueous extract of roots and leaves of Withania somnifera on cold pressor test induced cardiovascular changes in healthy human subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendranath Pilli

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Withania somnifera extract showed a significant decrease in cold pressor stress test induced changes on aortic wave reflections, suggesting its beneficial effects in reducing stress induced cardiovascular changes. However, further clinical studies are warranted to evaluate these effects in patients with cardiovascular and other associated diseases. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 873-878

  6. Cold fluorescent light as major inducer of lipid oxidation in soybean oil stored at household conditions for eight weeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignitter, Marc; Stolze, Klaus; Gartner, Stephanie; Dumhart, Bettina; Stoll, Christiane; Steiger, Georg; Kraemer, Klaus; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-03-12

    Light, temperature, and oxygen availability has been shown to promote rancidity in vegetable oils. However, the contribution of each of these environmental factors to lipid oxidation in oil stored under household conditions is not known. We aimed to identify the major inducer of oxidative deterioration of soybean oil stored at constant (67.0 mL) or increasing (67.0-283 mL) headspace volume, 22 or 32 °C, with or without illumination by cold fluorescent light for 56 days by means of fatty acid composition, peroxide value, formation of conjugated dienes, lipid radicals, hexanal, and the decrease in the contents of tocopherols. Soybean oil stored in the dark for 56 days showed an increase of the peroxide value by 124 ± 0.62% (p = 0.006), whereas exposure of the oil to light in a cycle of 12 h light alternating with 12 h darkness for 56 days led to a rise of the peroxide value by 1473 ± 1.79% (p ≤ 0.001). Little effects on the oxidative status of the oil were observed after elevating the temperature from 22 to 32 °C and the headspace volume from 67.0 to 283 mL during 56 days of storage. We conclude that storing soybean oil in transparent bottles under household conditions might pose an increased risk for accelerated lipid oxidation induced by exposure to cold fluorescent light.

  7. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Weiss

    Full Text Available One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP, is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS. In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH. Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

  8. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Martin; Gümbel, Denis; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Robert; Gelbrich, Nadine; Zimmermann, Uwe; Walther, Reinhard; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Sckell, Axel; Kramer, Axel; Burchardt, Martin; Lillig, Christopher H; Stope, Matthias B

    2015-01-01

    One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS). In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC) cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH). Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment.

  9. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christine Preston

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve.

  10. The Tebuconazole-based Protectant of Seeds “Bunker” Induces the Synthesis of Dehydrins During Cold Hardening and Increases the Frost Resistance of Wheat Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Korsukova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Triazole derivatives are widely used in agriculture for seed protectant of cereals against seed and soil infection. Triazole derivatives can have an effect on the biochemical and physiological functions of plants. The tebuconazole-based protectant of seeds «Bunker» (content of tebuconazole 60 grams per liter, g/L is a systemic fungicide of preventive and therapeutic action. The effect of the seed treatment by «Bunker» preparation on the shoot growth and cell viability coleoptile, synthesis of dehydrins in shoots and frost resistance etiolated winter and spring wheat seedlings has been studied. It has been shown that treatment of winter and spring wheat seed by «Bunker» preparation induces similar concentration-dependent inhibition of the coleoptiles length. At the recommended dose (0,5 liter per tonne of seeds, L/t growth inhibition was 28 - 30%, at a concentration of 1 L/t – 33 - 36%, at a concentration of 1,5 L/t – 40 - 42%, at a concentration of 3 L/t – 43 - 47%, at a concentration of 4 L/t – 48 - 51% and at 5 L/t – 53 - 56%. The treatment of wheat seed by «Bunker» preparation had no phytotoxic effect on coleoptile cells in any of the studied concentrations, on the contrary, with increasing concentration of preparation observed the increase in cell viability, as measured by recovery of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. We can assume that having retardant properties, tebuconazole not only inhibits the growth of plants, but also delays their aging. The treatment of seed protectant at a concentration of 1.5 L/t induced synthesis of the dehydrins with molecular masses about 19, 21, 22, 25 and 27 kD in winter wheat shoots and 18,6, 27 and 28,5 kD in spring wheat shoots during cold hardening. Among identified dehydrins the dehydrin of 27 kD is most significantly induced both in winter and spring wheat. The treatment of seed protectant «Bunker» in the same concentration increased the frost resistance of winter and spring wheat

  11. Cold Urticaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Cold urticaria By Mayo Clinic Staff Cold urticaria (ur-tih-KAR-e-uh) is a skin reaction to cold. Skin that has ... in contact with cold develops reddish, itchy welts (hives). The severity of cold urticaria symptoms varies widely. ...

  12. Effect of Increased Plasma Osmolality on Cold-Induced Thirst Attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Physiol 99:1972–1976. doi:10.1152/jappl- physiol.00329.2005 Costill DL, Fox EL (1969) Energetics of marathon running. Med Sci Sports 1(2):81–86 Edwards...human Xuid balance. In: Marriott BM, Carlson SJ (eds) Nutritional needs in cold and high altitude environments. National Academy Press, Washington DC, pp... Nutrition 9:480–491 Sobocinska J, Kozlowski S (1987) Osmotic thirst suppression in dogs exposed to low ambient temperature. Physiol Behav 40:171–175

  13. High fructose intake fails to induce symptomatic adaptation but may induce intestinal carriers

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    Debra Heilpern

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructose has several interactions in man, including intolerance and promotion of some diseases. However, fructose in fruits and in prebiotics may be associated with benefits. Adaptation to regular fructose ingestion as defined for lactose could support a beneficial rather than a deleterious effect. This study was undertaken to evaluate symptomatic response and potential underlying mechanisms of fecal bacterial change and breath hydrogen response to short term regular fructose supplementation. Forty-five participants were recruited for a 3 day recall diet questionnaire and a 50 g fructose challenge. Breath hydrogen was measured for 4.5 hrs and symptoms were recorded. Thirty-eight subjects provided stool samples for analysis by selective culture of 4 groups of bacteria, including bifidobacteria and lactobacilli. Intolerant subjects returned a second time 15 days later. Ten of these served as controls and 16 received 30 g fructose twice a day. Ten of the latter returned 27 days later, after stopping fructose for a third challenge test. Student’s paired, unpaired t-tests and Pearson correlations were used. Significance was accepted at P<0.05. After fructose rechallenge there were no significant reductions in symptoms scores in volunteers in either the fructose supplemented or non supplemented groups. However, total breath hydrogen was reduced between test 1 and test 2 (P=0.03 or test 3 (P=0.04 in the group given fructose then discontinued, compared with controls. There were no statistically significant changes in bacterial numbers between test 2 and 1. This study shows that regular consumption of high dose fructose does not follow the lactose model of adaptation. Observed changes in hydrogen breath tests raise the possibility that intestinal carriers of fructose may be induced potentially aggravating medical problems attributed to fructose.

  14. Neural substrate of cold-seeking behavior in endotoxin shock.

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    Maria C Almeida

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammation is a leading cause of hospital death. Mild systemic inflammation is accompanied by warmth-seeking behavior (and fever, whereas severe inflammation is associated with cold-seeking behavior (and hypothermia. Both behaviors are adaptive. Which brain structures mediate which behavior is unknown. The involvement of hypothalamic structures, namely, the preoptic area (POA, paraventricular nucleus (PVH, or dorsomedial nucleus (DMH, in thermoregulatory behaviors associated with endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]-induced systemic inflammation was studied in rats. The rats were allowed to select their thermal environment by freely moving in a thermogradient apparatus. A low intravenous dose of Escherichia coli LPS (10 microg/kg caused warmth-seeking behavior, whereas a high, shock-inducing dose (5,000 microg/kg caused cold-seeking behavior. Bilateral electrocoagulation of the PVH or DMH, but not of the POA, prevented this cold-seeking response. Lesioning the DMH with ibotenic acid, an excitotoxin that destroys neuronal bodies but spares fibers of passage, also prevented LPS-induced cold-seeking behavior; lesioning the PVH with ibotenate did not affect it. Lesion of no structure affected cold-seeking behavior induced by heat exposure or by pharmacological stimulation of the transient receptor potential (TRP vanilloid-1 channel ("warmth receptor". Nor did any lesion affect warmth-seeking behavior induced by a low dose of LPS, cold exposure, or pharmacological stimulation of the TRP melastatin-8 ("cold receptor". We conclude that LPS-induced cold-seeking response is mediated by neuronal bodies located in the DMH and neural fibers passing through the PVH. These are the first two landmarks on the map of the circuitry of cold-seeking behavior associated with endotoxin shock.

  15. Exercise-induced metacarpophalangeal joint adaptation in the Thoroughbred racehorse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, P; Peterson, A L; Sample, S J; Scollay, M C; Markel, M D; Kalscheur, V L

    2008-12-01

    Repetitive bone injury and development of stress fracture is a common problem in humans and animals. The Thoroughbred racehorse is a model in which adaptive failure and associated development of stress fracture is common. We performed a histologic study of the distal end of the third metacarpal bone in two groups of horses: young Thoroughbreds that were actively racing (n = 10) and a group of non-athletic horses (n = 8). The purpose of this study was to determine whether development of articular microcracks was associated with specific alterations to subchondral plate osteocytes. Morphometric measurements were made in five regions of the joint surface: lateral condyle, lateral condylar groove, sagittal ridge, medial condylar groove, and medial condyle. The following variables were quantified: hyaline cartilage width; calcified cartilage width; the number of tidemarks; microcrack density at the articular surface; blood vessel density entering articular cartilage; the presence of atypical bone matrix in the subchondral plate; bone volume fraction; and osteocyte density. Adaptation of articular cartilage was similar in both groups of horses. Vascularization of articular cartilage was increased in the group of non-athletic horses. Microcracks, which typically had an oblique orientation to the joint surface, were co-localized with blood vessels, and resorption spaces. Microcracking was increased in the condylar grooves of athletic horses compared with the other joint regions and was also increased compared with the condylar groove regions of non-athletic horses. Coalescence of microcracks also led to development of an intracortical articular condylar stress fracture in some joints and targeted remodeling of affected subchondral plate. The subchondral plate of the condyles in athletic horses was sclerotic, and contained atypically stained bone matrix with increased numbers of osteocytes with atypical morphology. However, osteocyte numbers were not significantly different

  16. A detailed view of Listeria monocytogenes’ adaptation and survival under cold temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hingston, P.; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Wang, S.

    The human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) continues to be a challenge for the food industry where it is known to contaminate ready-to-eat foods and grow during refrigerated storage. In order to gain increased control of Lm in the food-supply-chain, an improved understanding of low temperature...... stress adaptation methods is needed. In this study, RNA-seq (strand specific Illumina libraries;22-39 million 2x100bp reads) and cell membrane fatty acid profiling were used to analyze adaptation mechanisms used by a fast growing, serotype 1/2a, Lm food plant isolate at 4°C. Brain heart infusion (BHI...... expression occured in Lm cells during late SP at 4°C, the most relevant physiological state to Lm’s survival in chilled food products. Common among all time points was the upregulation of nine genes required for branched-chain fatty acid (BCFA) synthesis, which was supported by an increase in membrane BCFAs...

  17. Permanent relief from intermittent cold stress-induced fibromyalgia-like abnormal pain by repeated intrathecal administration of antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukae Takehiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia (FM is characterized by chronic widespread pain, which is often refractory to conventional painkillers. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that antidepressants are effective in treating FM pain. We previously established a mouse model of FM-like pain, induced by intermittent cold stress (ICS. Results In this study, we find that ICS exposure causes a transient increase in plasma corticosterone concentration, but not in anxiety or depression-like behaviors. A single intrathecal injection of an antidepressant, such as milnacipran, amitriptyline, mianserin or paroxetine, had an acute analgesic effect on ICS-induced thermal hyperalgesia at post-stress day 1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, repeated daily antidepressant treatments during post-stress days 1-5 gradually reversed the reduction in thermal pain threshold, and this recovery was maintained for at least 7 days after the final treatment. In addition, relief from mechanical allodynia, induced by ICS exposure, was also observed at day 9 after the cessation of antidepressant treatment. In contrast, the intravenous administration of these antidepressants at conventional doses failed to provide relief. Conclusions These results suggest that the repetitive intrathecal administration of antidepressants permanently cures ICS-induced FM pain in mice.

  18. Cold-active and NaCl-tolerant exo-inulinase from a cold-adapted Arthrobacter sp. MN8 and its potential for use in the production of fructose at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junpei; Lu, Qian; Peng, Mozhen; Zhang, Rui; Mo, Minghe; Tang, Xianghua; Li, Junjun; Xu, Bo; Ding, Junmei; Huang, Zunxi

    2015-03-01

    An exo-inulinase gene was cloned from Arthrobacter sp. MN8, a cold-adapted bacterium isolated from lead-zinc-rich soil. The gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The resultant 505-residue polypeptide (InuAMN8) showed the highest identity (81.1%) with the putative levanase from Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans Sphe3 (ADX73279) and shared 57.8% identity with the exo-inulinase from Bacillus sp. snu-7 (AAK00768). The purified recombinant InuAMN8 (rInuAMN8) showed an apparently optimal activity at 35°C, and 75.3%, 39.4%, and 15.8% of its maximum activity at 20°C, 10°C, and 0°C, respectively. After pre-incubation for 60 min at 50°C and 55°C, the rInuAMN8 exhibited 69.8% and 17.7% of its initial activity, respectively. The apparent Km values of rInuAMN8 towards inulin were 2.8, 1.5, 1.2, 5.3, and 8.2 mM at 0°C, 10°C, 20°C, 30°C, and 35°C, respectively. Inulin and Jerusalem artichoke tubers were effectively hydrolyzed to release fructose by rInuAMN8 at 0°C, 10°C, and 35°C. Compared with its hyperthermophilic and thermophilic counterparts, the exo-inulinase had less aromatic amino acid F and more hydrophobic amino acid A. In addition, the purified rInuAMN8 retained 127.9%-88.4% inulinase activity at 3.5%-15.0% (w/v) NaCl concentrations. Zn(2+) and Pb(2+) at 10 mM exhibited little or no effect on the enzyme activity. This paper is the first to report a cold-active and/or NaCl-tolerant exo-inulinase from the genus Arthrobacter. The exo-inulinase rInuAMN8 shows a potential for use in the production of fructose at low temperatures. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Repeated applications of cold atmospheric pressure plasma does not induce resistance in Staphylococcus aureus embedded in biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthes, Rutger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: The increasing microbial resistance against antibiotics complicates the therapy of bacterial infections. Therefore new therapeutic options, particularly those causing no resistance, are of high interest. Cold atmospheric plasma is one possible option to eradicate multidrug resistant microorganisms, and so far no resistance development against physical plasma is known.Method: We tested 6-fold repeated plasma applications on a strain embedded in biofilm and compared the reduction of the colony forming units between the different treatment periods to asses a possible development of resistance.Result: For all treatment periods, the control biofilms were reduced by plasma in average by 1.7 log CFU, and decreased from 7.6 to 5.8 log (CFU/cm within 5 hours. The results demonstrated that repeated plasma doses not induce resistance or habituation against plasma applied within short time periods.Conclusion: The repeated application of cold plasma is a promising option for the treatment of infected wounds without the risk of development of resistance against plasma.

  20. Cold exposure affects carbohydrates and lipid metabolism, and induces Hog1p phosphorylation in Dekkera bruxellensis strain CBS 2499.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galafassi, Silvia; Toscano, Marco; Vigentini, Ileana; Zambelli, Paolo; Simonetti, Paolo; Foschino, Roberto; Compagno, Concetta

    2015-05-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a yeast known to affect the quality of wine and beer. This species, due to its high ethanol and acid tolerance, has been reported also to compete with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in distilleries producing fuel ethanol. In order to understand how this species responds when exposed to low temperatures, some mechanisms like synthesis and accumulation of intracellular metabolites, changes in lipid composition and activation of the HOG-MAPK pathway were investigated in the genome sequenced strain CBS 2499. We show that cold stress caused intracellular accumulation of glycogen, but did not induce accumulation of trehalose and glycerol. The cellular fatty acid composition changed after the temperature downshift, and a significant increase of palmitoleic acid was observed. RT-PCR analysis revealed that OLE1 encoding for Δ9-fatty acid desaturase was up-regulated, whereas TPS1 and INO1 didn't show changes in their expression. In D. bruxellensis Hog1p was activated by phosphorylation, as described in S. cerevisiae, highlighting a conserved role of the HOG-MAP kinase signaling pathway in cold stress response.

  1. Direct Adaptive Rejection of Vortex-Induced Disturbances for a Powered SPAR Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Balas, Mark J.; VanZwieten, James H.; Driscoll, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    The Rapidly Deployable Stable Platform (RDSP) is a novel vessel designed to be a reconfigurable, stable at-sea platform. It consists of a detachable catamaran and spar, performing missions with the spar extending vertically below the catamaran and hoisting it completely out of the water. Multiple thrusters located along the spar allow it to be actively controlled in this configuration. A controller is presented in this work that uses an adaptive feedback algorithm in conjunction with Direct Adaptive Disturbance Rejection (DADR) to mitigate persistent, vortex-induced disturbances. Given the frequency of a disturbance, the nominal DADR scheme adaptively compensates for its unknown amplitude and phase. This algorithm is extended to adapt to a disturbance frequency that is only coarsely known by including a Phase Locked Loop (PLL). The PLL improves the frequency estimate on-line, allowing the modified controller to reduce vortex-induced motions by more than 95% using achievable thrust inputs.

  2. Induced mutations in yeast cell populations adapting to an unforeseen challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lindsay S; Wei, Wu; Stolovicki, Elad; Benbenishty, Tamar; Wilkening, Stefan; Steinmetz, Lars M; Braun, Erez; David, Lior

    2014-01-01

    The modern evolutionary synthesis assumes that mutations occur at random, independently of the environment in which they confer an advantage. However, there are indications that cells facing challenging conditions can adapt rapidly, utilizing processes beyond selection of pre-existing genetic variation. Here, we show that a strong regulatory challenge can induce mutations in many independent yeast cells, in the absence of general mutagenesis. Whole genome sequencing of cell lineages reveals a repertoire of independent mutations within a single lineage that arose only after the cells were exposed to the challenging environment, while other cells in the same lineage adapted without any mutation in their genomes. Thus, our experiments uncovered multiple alternative routes for heritable adaptation that were all induced in the same lineage during a short time period. Our results demonstrate the existence of adaptation mechanisms beyond random mutation, suggesting a tight connection between physiological and genetic processes.

  3. Adaptive BP-Dock: An Induced Fit Docking Approach for Full Receptor Flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolia, Ashini; Ozkan, S Banu

    2016-04-25

    We present an induced fit docking approach called Adaptive BP-Dock that integrates perturbation response scanning (PRS) with the flexible docking protocol of RosettaLigand in an adaptive manner. We first perturb the binding pocket residues of a receptor and obtain a new conformation based on the residue response fluctuation profile using PRS. Next, we dock a ligand to this new conformation by RosettaLigand, where we repeat these steps for several iterations. We test this approach on several protein test sets including difficult unbound docking cases such as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and HIV-1 protease. Adaptive BP-Dock results show better correlation with experimental binding affinities compared to other docking protocols. Overall, the results imply that Adaptive BP-Dock can easily capture binding induced conformational changes by simultaneous sampling of protein and ligand conformations. This can provide faster and efficient docking of novel targets for rational drug design.

  4. Altered Microbiota Contributes to Reduced Diet-Induced Obesity upon Cold Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziętak, Marika; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Markiewicz, Lidia H

    2016-01-01

    similar to that of germ-free mice. We observed a marked shift in the microbiome composition at the phylum and family levels within 1 day of acute cold exposure and after 4 weeks at 12°C. Gut microbiota was characterized by increased levels of Adlercreutzia, Mogibacteriaceae, Ruminococcaceae......, and Desulfovibrio and reduced levels of Bacilli, Erysipelotrichaceae, and the genus rc4-4. These genera have been associated with leanness and obesity, respectively. Germ-free mice fed a high-fat diet at room temperature gained less adiposity and improved glucose tolerance when transplanted with caecal microbiota...... of mice housed at 12°C compared to mice transplanted with microbiota from 29°C. Thus, a microbiota-liver-BAT axis may mediate protection against obesity at reduced temperature....

  5. Spatial distribution of optically induced atomic excitation in a dense and cold atomic ensemble

    CERN Document Server

    Fofanov, Ya A; Sokolov, I M; Havey, M D

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of our general theoretical results developed previously in JETP 112, 246 (2011), we calculate the spatial distribution of atoms excited in a dense and cold atomic cloud by weak monochromatic light. We also study the atomic distribution over different Zeeman sublevels of the excited state in different parts of the cloud. The dependence of this distribution of atomic excitation on the density of the atomic ensemble and the frequency of external emission is investigated. We show that in the boundary regions of the cloud the orientation and alignment of atomic angular momentum takes place. Analysis of the spatial distribution of atomic excitation shows no noticeable signs of light localization effects even in those parameter regimes where the Ioffe-Regel criterium of strong localization is satisfied. However, comparative calculations performed in the framework of the scalar approximation to the dipole-dipole interaction reveals explicit manifestation of strong localization under some conditions.

  6. Cold induced mortality of the Burmese Python: An explanation via stochastic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quansah, Emmanuel; Parshad, Rana D.; Mondal, Sumona

    2017-02-01

    The Burmese python (Python bivitatus) is an invasive species, wreaking havoc on indigenous species in the Florida everglades. Data suggests an exponential growth in their population from 1995 to 2009, with a sharp decline however in 2010-2012 (Dorcas et al., 2012). In Mazzotti et al. (2011) an explanation is provided, citing the unusually cold winter that year, as the primary reason for this decline. We provide a first mathematical model, in the form of a system of stochastic differential equations, that supports the explanation in Mazzotti et al. (2011), by accurately matching the field data presented in Dorcas et al. (2012). More generally, our model provides a tool to predict the population dynamics of rapidly growing alien species, in the advent of climate change.

  7. COLD AGGLUTININ INDUCED HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA IN A PATIENT WITH PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohmror Anurag, Choudhary Richa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hemolytic anemias (AIHA are an uncommon group of disorders characterized by red cell destruction due to autoantibodies. Though usually idiopathic, AIHA is commonly associated with lymphoproliferative disorders, infections, autoimmune disease, and some drugs. This report describes a case of 25 year old female presenting history of fever associated with cough and fatigue. There was a past history of receiving blood transfusion on four occasions. The HRCT thorax demonstrated fine nodular densities in right upper lobe, suggestive of tuberculosis. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed mild splenomegaly. A bone marrow biopsy performed on the patient revealed erythroid hyperplasia. There was no evidence of any malignancy. Diagnosis of cold autoantibody hemolytic anemia complicated by pulmonary tuberculosis was made. The patient was managed with blood transfusions and treated with anti-tubercular agents. The occurrence of AIHA in pulmonary tuberculosis is rare.

  8. AMPKα in Exercise-Induced Substrate Metabolism and Exercise Training-Induced Metabolic and Mitochondrial Adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim

    and profile. In most AMPK deficient models only a single isoform of the two aatalytic α-subunits has been targeted for inactivation. But turning to other models of disrupted AMPK-function such as the AMPKβ1β2M-KO mouse or the LKB1 KO mouse (indirect effect on AMPK-function), it has been found that exercise......-regulated metabolism and exercise training-induced adaptations are abnormal. This could be due to a more complete ablation of AMPK function and perhaps related to the catalytic properires of the α-subunits. In study 1 we show that deletion of both AMPKα subunits in skeletal muscle of mice decreases exerciseinduced......A bout of exercise potently stimulates skeletal muscle energy metabolism. The ATP turnover may rise up to0 ~100 fold compared to the resting state and this presents a substantial stress on skeletal muscle ATP regeneration. To prepare for future events of metabolic stress, the muscle increases its...

  9. PD-1 blockade induces responses by inhibiting adaptive immune resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumeh, Paul C.; Harview, Christina L.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Shintaku, I. Peter; Taylor, Emma J. M.; Robert, Lidia; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Spasic, Marko; Henry, Gina; Ciobanu, Voicu; West, Alisha N.; Carmona, Manuel; Kivork, Christine; Seja, Elizabeth; Cherry, Grace; Gutierrez, Antonio; Grogan, Tristan R.; Mateus, Christine; Tomasic, Gorana; Glaspy, John A.; Emerson, Ryan O.; Robins, Harlan; Pierce, Robert H.; Elashoff, David A.; Robert, Caroline; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Therapies that target the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor have shown unprecedented rates of durable clinical responses in patients with various cancer types.1–5 One mechanism by which cancer tissues limit the host immune response is via upregulation of PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) and its ligation to PD-1 on antigen-specific CD8 T-cells (termed adaptive immune resistance).6,7 Here we show that pre-existing CD8 T-cells distinctly located at the invasive tumour margin are associated with expression of the PD-1/PD-L1 immune inhibitory axis and may predict response to therapy. We analyzed samples from 46 patients with metastatic melanoma obtained before and during anti-PD1 therapy (pembrolizumab) using quantitative immunohistochemistry, quantitative multiplex immunofluorescence, and next generation sequencing for T-cell receptors (TCR). In serially sampled tumours, responding patients showed proliferation of intratumoural CD8+ T-cells that directly correlated with radiographic reduction in tumour size. Pre-treatment samples obtained from responding patients showed higher numbers of CD8, PD1, and PD-L1 expressing cells at the invasive tumour margin and inside tumours, with close proximity between PD-1 and PD-L1, and a more clonal TCR repertoire. Using multivariate analysis, we established a predictive model based on CD8 expression at the invasive margin and validated the model in an independent cohort of 15 patients. Our findings indicate that tumour regression following therapeutic PD-1 blockade requires pre-existing CD8+ T cells that are negatively regulated by PD-1/PD-L1 mediated adaptive immune resistance. PMID:25428505

  10. Weak-light rogue waves, breathers, and their active control in a cold atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyang; Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to demonstrate the existence of optical Peregrine rogue waves and Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers and realize their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The system we suggest is a cold, Λ -type three-level atomic gas interacting with a probe and a control laser fields and working under EIT condition. We show that, based on EIT with an incoherent optical pumping, which can be used to cancel optical absorption, (1+1)-dimensional optical Peregrine rogue waves, Akhmediev breathers, and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers can be generated with very low light power. In addition, we demonstrate that the Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers in (2+1)-dimensions obtained can be actively manipulated by using an external magnetic field. As a result, these breathers can display trajectory deflections and bypass obstacles during propagation.

  11. γ-ray spectroscopy of fission fragments from the cold-neutron 235U induced fission with EXILL

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    Konstantinopoulos T.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A cold neutron induced fission experiment recently took place at the Institute Laue-Langevin (ILL in Grenoble. The neutron beam was provided by the nuclear reactor facility at ILL and the detector setup that was used for the γ-spectroscopy of the fission products consisted mainly of the detectors of the EXOGAM array [1], thereby the name of the campaign is EXILL. The main purpose of our measurement was to investigate the nuclei in the region with N = 50 close to 78Ni as well as the nuclei close to the N = 82 shell closure. In this paper, the motivation of the experiment is described as well as the experimental setup and the status of the ongoing data analysis.

  12. The cold-induced defensin TAD1 confers resistance against snow mold and Fusarium head blight in transgenic wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kuwabara, Chikako; Umeki, Natsuki; Fujioka, Mari; Saburi, Wataru; Matsui, Hirokazu; Abe, Fumitaka; Imai, Ryozo

    2016-06-20

    TAD1 (Triticum aestivum defensin 1) is induced during cold acclimation in winter wheat and encodes a plant defensin with antimicrobial activity. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant TAD1 protein inhibits hyphal growth of the snow mold fungus, Typhula ishikariensis in vitro. Transgenic wheat plants overexpressing TAD1 were created and tested for resistance against T. ishikariensis. Leaf inoculation assays revealed that overexpression of TAD1 confers resistance against the snow mold. In addition, the TAD1-overexpressors showed resistance against Fusarium graminearum, which causes Fusarium head blight, a devastating disease in wheat and barley. These results indicate that TAD1 is a candidate gene to improve resistance against multiple fungal diseases in cereal crops.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein during mild hypothermia on traumatic brain injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Wang; Jian-ning Zhang; Jia-kui Guo; Ying Cai; Hong-sheng Sun; Kun Dong; Cheng-gang Wu

    2016-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), a key regulatory protein, could be facilitated by mild hypothermia in the brain, heart and liver. This study observed the effects of mild hypothermia at 31 ± 0.5°C on traumatic brain injury in rats. Results demonstrated that mild hypothermia suppressed apoptosis in the cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus, facilitated CIRP mRNA and protein expression in these regions, especially in the hypothalamus. The anti-apoptotic effect of mild hypothermia disappeared after CIRP silencing. There was no correlation between mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and CIRP silencing. CIRP silencing inhibited extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 activation. These indicate that CIRP inhibits apoptosis by affecting extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 activation, and exerts a neuroprotective effect during mild hypothermia for traumatic brain injury.

  14. Biochemical characterization of a novel cold-adapted GH39 β-agarase, AgaJ9, from an agar-degrading marine bacterium Gayadomonas joobiniege G7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Subin; Lee, Chang-Ro; Chi, Won-Jae; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Hong, Soon-Kwang

    2017-03-01

    Gayadomonas joobiniege G7 is an agar-degrading marine bacterium belonging to a novel genus. Genomic sequencing of G. joobiniege revealed that AgaJ9 (formerly YjdB) belonging to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) 39 family. It showed the highest similarity (47% identity) to a putative β-agarase from Catenovulum agarivorans DS-2, an agar-degrading marine bacterium sharing the highest similarity in the nucleotide sequence of 16s rRNA gene with G. joobiniege G7. The agaJ9 gene encodes a protein (134 kDa) of 1205 amino acids, including a 23-amino acid signal peptide. The agarase activity of purified AgaJ9 was confirmed by zymogram analysis. The optimum pH and temperature for AgaJ9 activity were determined as 5 and 25 °C, respectively. Notably, AgaJ9 is a cold-adapted β-agarase retaining more than 80% of its activity even at a temperature of 5 °C. In addition, gel filtration chromatography revealed that AgaJ9 exists as two forms, dimer and monomer. Although the two forms had similar enzymatic properties, their kinetic parameters were different. The K m and V max of dimeric AgaJ9 for agarose was 0.68 mg/ml (5.7 × 10(-6) M) and 17.2 U/mg, respectively, whereas the monomeric form had a K m of 1.43 mg/ml (1.2 × 10(-5) M) and V max of 10.7 U/mg. Thin-layer chromatography and agarose-liquefying analyses revealed that AgaJ9 is an endo-type β-agarase that hydrolyzes agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarobiose. This study is the first report of a GH39 β-agarase with a cold-adapted enzymatic feature, a unique attribute, which may be useful for industrial applications.

  15. Influence of Cyclodextrin Complexation with NSAIDs on NSAID/Cold Stress-Induced Gastric Ulceration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim A. Alsarra, Mahrous O. Ahmed, Fars K. Alanazi, Kamal Eldin Hussein ElTahir, Abdulmalik M. Alsheikh, Steven H. Neau

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the ability of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD or hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD to ameliorate the induction of gastric ulcers by a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, indomethacin or piroxicam, in rats exposed to restraint and hypothermic stress at 4 °C. Using oral gavage, rats fasted for 72 h were administered the equivalent of a 100 mg/kg dose of the assigned drug, alone or with the designated cyclodextrin (CD. The rats were placed in suitable rodent restrainers and then placed inside a ventilated refrigerator maintained at a temperature of 4 °C. Six hours later, each animal was removed, anaesthetized with ether, and the abdomen opened. Each stomach was removed, opened along the greater curvature and gently rinsed with isotonic saline solution. The induced gastric ulcers were examined and assessed with the help of a 10x binocular magnifier. Pronounced and marked gastric ulceration with complete loss of the mucosa, extensive deposition of fibrin and dense neutrophilic infiltrate were observed in rats treated with each of the drugs alone. Treatment with indomethacin or piroxicam alone induced ulcer indices of 26 ± 2.3 or 14 ± 1.8, respectively. However, β-CD and HP-β-CD each significantly suppressed ulceration due to restraint and cold stress. Rats treated with indomethacin or piroxicam in the presence of either β-CD or HP-β-CD exhibited normal tissues. Therefore, β-CD and HP-β-CD act as protective agents against gastrointestinal disorders produced by restraint and cold stress, even with the added stress from administration of either indomethacin or piroxicam.

  16. Transcriptome analysis reveals genes commonly induced by Botrytis cinerea infection, cold, drought and oxidative stresses in Arabidopsis.

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    Arjun Sham

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact synergistically or antagonistically. To identify the similarities and differences among responses to diverse stresses, we analyzed previously published microarray data on the transcriptomic responses of Arabidopsis to infection with Botrytis cinerea (a biotic stress, and to cold, drought, and oxidative stresses (abiotic stresses. Our analyses showed that at early stages after B. cinerea inoculation, 1498 genes were up-regulated (B. cinerea up-regulated genes; BUGs and 1138 genes were down-regulated (B. cinerea down-regulated genes; BDGs. We showed a unique program of gene expression was activated in response each biotic and abiotic stress, but that some genes were similarly induced or repressed by all of the tested stresses. Of the identified BUGs, 25%, 6% and 12% were also induced by cold, drought and oxidative stress, respectively; whereas 33%, 7% and 5.5% of the BDGs were also down-regulated by the same abiotic stresses. Coexpression and protein-protein interaction network analyses revealed a dynamic range in the expression levels of genes encoding regulatory proteins. Analysis of gene expression in response to electrophilic oxylipins suggested that these compounds are involved in mediating responses to B. cinerea infection and abiotic stress through TGA transcription factors. Our results suggest an overlap among genes involved in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding components of the cyclopentenone signaling pathway in response to biotic and abiotic stresses suggest that the oxylipin signal transduction pathway plays a role in plant defense. Identifying genes that are commonly expressed in response to environmental stresses, and further analyzing the functions of their encoded products, will increase our understanding of the plant stress response. This information could identify targets

  17. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  18. Helium-based cold atmospheric plasma-induced reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptotic pathway attenuated by platinum nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawaid, Paras; Rehman, Mati Ur; Zhao, Qing Li; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Kondo, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Plasma is generated by ionizing gas molecules. Helium (He)-based cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) was generated using a high-voltage power supply with low-frequency excitation (60 Hz at 7 kV) and He flow at 2 l/min. Platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) are potent antioxidants due to their unique ability to scavenge superoxides and peroxides. These features make them useful for the protection against oxidative stress-associated pathologies. Here, the effects of Pt-NPs on He-CAP-induced apoptosis and the underlying mechanism were examined in human lymphoma U937 cells. Apoptosis was measured after cells were exposed to He-CAP in the presence or absence of Pt-NPs. The effects of combined treatment were determined by observing the changes in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and both mitochondrial and Fas dependent pathway. The results indicate that Pt-NPs substantially scavenge He-CAP-induced superoxides and peroxides and inhibit all the pathways involved in apoptosis execution. This might be because of the SOD/catalase mimetic effects of Pt-NPs. These results showed that the Pt-NPs can induce He-CAP desensitization in human lymphoma U937 cells.

  19. Cold water stress attenuates dopaminergic neurotoxicity induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingfeng Xia; Minjuan Bian; Qian Yu; Jie Liu; Yufang Huang; Xueting Jin; Shiduo Lu; Mei Yu; Fang Huang

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we tested the effect of cold water stress (CWS) on dopaminergic neurons in 1-methyl4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced Parkinsou's disease (PD) mouse model, and found that CWS pretreatment elicited less MPTP neurotoxicity.To understand the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon, we detected the expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the striatum of the experimental mice, and found that CWS pretreatment could significantly increase striatal Hsp70 in MPTP-treated mice.Furthermore, in parallel with the induction of Hsp70, the MPTP-induced increase of striatal o-synuclein was inhibited in the CWS + MPTP-treated mice.CWS pretreatment also significantly inhibited the reduction of anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-2 expression in the striatum and enhanced Bcl-2 transcription in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice.Taken together, these data indicated that Hsp70 might be an important intermediate for the neuroprotective effect of CWS against MPTP-induced dopaminergic toxicity.

  20. Food restriction-induced hyperactivity: addiction or adaptation to famine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Martine; Ouerdani, Amel; Mormède, Pierre; Konsman, Jan Pieter

    2013-06-01

    Increased physical activity is present in 30-80% of anorexia nervosa patients. To explain the paradox of low food intake and excessive exercise in humans and other animals, it has been proposed that increased physical activity along with food restriction activates brain reward circuits and is addictive. Alternatively, the fleeing-famine hypothesis postulates that refusal of known scarce energy-low food sources and hyperactivity facilitate migration towards new habitats that potentially contain new energy-rich foodstuffs. The use of rewarding compounds that differ in energy density, such as the energy-free sweetener saccharin and the energy rich sucrose makes it possible to critically test the reward-addiction and fleeing-famine hypotheses. The aims of the present work were to study if sucrose and/or saccharin could attenuate food restriction-induced hyperactivity, weight loss, increased plasma corticosterone, and activation of brain structures involved in neuroendocrine control, energy balance, physical activity, and reward signaling in rats. Its major findings are that access to sucrose, but not to saccharin, attenuated food restriction-induced running wheel activity, weight loss, rises in plasma corticosterone, and expression of the cellular activation marker c-Fos in the paraventricular and arcuate hypothalamus and in the nucleus accumbens. These findings suggest that the energy-richness and easy availability of sucrose interrupted a fleeing-famine-like hyperactivity response. Since corticosterone mediates food restriction-induced wheel running (Duclos et al., 2009), we propose that the attenuating effect of sucrose consumption on plasma corticosterone plays a role in reduced wheel running and weight loss by lowering activation of the nucleus accumbens and arcuate hypothalamus in these animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. NF-κB-dependent role for cold-inducible RNA binding protein in regulating interleukin 1β.

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    Christian Brochu

    Full Text Available The cold inducible RNA binding protein (CIRBP responds to a wide array of cellular stresses, including short wavelength ultraviolet light (UVC, at the transcriptional and post-translational level. CIRBP can bind the 3'untranslated region of specific transcripts to stabilize them and facilitate their transport to ribosomes for translation. Here we used RNA interference and oligonucleotide microarrays to identify potential downstream targets of CIRBP induced in response to UVC. Twenty eight transcripts were statistically increased in response to UVC and these exhibited a typical UVC response. Only 5 of the 28 UVC-induced transcripts exhibited a CIRBP-dependent pattern of expression. Surprisingly, 3 of the 5 transcripts (IL1B, IL8 and TNFAIP6 encoded proteins important in inflammation with IL-1β apparently contributing to IL8 and TNFAIP6 expression in an autocrine fashion. UVC-induced IL1B expression could be inhibited by pharmacological inhibition of NFκB suggesting that CIRBP was affecting NF-κB signaling as opposed to IL1B mRNA stability directly. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS was used as an activator of NF-κB to further study the potential link between CIRBP and NFκB. Transfection of siRNAs against CIRBP reduced the extent of the LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB DNA binding activity and IL-1β expression. The present work firmly establishes a novel link between CIRBP and NF-κB signaling in response to agents with diverse modes of action. These results have potential implications for disease states associated with inflammation.

  2. NF-κB-dependent role for cold-inducible RNA binding protein in regulating interleukin 1β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochu, Christian; Cabrita, Miguel A; Melanson, Brian D; Hamill, Jeffrey D; Lau, Rosanna; Pratt, M A Christine; McKay, Bruce C

    2013-01-01

    The cold inducible RNA binding protein (CIRBP) responds to a wide array of cellular stresses, including short wavelength ultraviolet light (UVC), at the transcriptional and post-translational level. CIRBP can bind the 3'untranslated region of specific transcripts to stabilize them and facilitate their transport to ribosomes for translation. Here we used RNA interference and oligonucleotide microarrays to identify potential downstream targets of CIRBP induced in response to UVC. Twenty eight transcripts were statistically increased in response to UVC and these exhibited a typical UVC response. Only 5 of the 28 UVC-induced transcripts exhibited a CIRBP-dependent pattern of expression. Surprisingly, 3 of the 5 transcripts (IL1B, IL8 and TNFAIP6) encoded proteins important in inflammation with IL-1β apparently contributing to IL8 and TNFAIP6 expression in an autocrine fashion. UVC-induced IL1B expression could be inhibited by pharmacological inhibition of NFκB suggesting that CIRBP was affecting NF-κB signaling as opposed to IL1B mRNA stability directly. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used as an activator of NF-κB to further study the potential link between CIRBP and NFκB. Transfection of siRNAs against CIRBP reduced the extent of the LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB DNA binding activity and IL-1β expression. The present work firmly establishes a novel link between CIRBP and NF-κB signaling in response to agents with diverse modes of action. These results have potential implications for disease states associated with inflammation.

  3. Transient cold pain has no effect on cutaneous vasodilatation induced by capsaicin: a randomized-control-crossover study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pud, Dorit; Andersen, Ole Kaeseler; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Yarnitsky, David

    2006-05-01

    Cooling the skin induces sympathetically driven vasoconstriction, along with some vasoparalytic dilatation at lowermost temperatures. Neurogenic inflammation, on the other hand, entails vasodilatation. In the present study, we examined the dynamic vasomotor balance of capsaicin-induced vasodilatation within the area of the induced neurogenic inflammation, with and without superimposed cooling. In a randomized-control-crossover fashion, a sample of 14 healthy volunteers participated in three experiments: (1) exposure to each 0 degrees C cold pain stimulus and a neutral 30 degrees C stimulus (control) for 30 s to the volar forearms by contact thermal thermode (1.6x1.6 cm(2)), (2) injection of 50 microg intradermal capsaicin without cooling and (3) injection of capsaicin followed by application of 0 degrees C cold pain stimulation for 30 s within the area of the secondary hyperalgesia. Repetitive vascular measurements over skin area of 4.0x4.0 cm(2) of blood flux (BF) were acquired before and during the 5 min after stimulation. A marked increase in BF (i.e. vasodilatation) at the location of the cold stimulus in comparison to control (30 degrees C) (F=11.97, p=0.004) within the first 3 min was demonstrated. Two-way repeated-measures ANOVA indicated no interaction between the experimental conditions (capsaicin with or without cold) and time (F=0.934, p=0.454). The cold pain stimulation was found to be insignificant in its influence on BF evoked by capsaicin (F=0.018, p=0.894). The results of our study indicate that (1) transient cooling causes significant vasodilatation, (2) intradermal injection of capsaicin is dominant in inducing vasodilatation, and (3) the cold-pain-evoked vasodilatation has no modulative effect on the capsaicin-evoked cutaneous vasodilatation.

  4. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Edward L; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A

    2013-08-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than what the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the subpopulation that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, that is, increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors and to develop strategies to minimize their effect.

  5. Hyperpolarization-Activated Current Induces Period-Doubling Cascades and Chaos in a Cold Thermoreceptor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kesheng; Maidana, Jean P.; Caviedes, Mauricio; Quero, Daniel; Aguirre, Pablo; Orio, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe and analyze the chaotic behavior of a conductance-based neuronal bursting model. This is a model with a reduced number of variables, yet it retains biophysical plausibility. Inspired by the activity of cold thermoreceptors, the model contains a persistent Sodium current, a Calcium-activated Potassium current and a hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) that drive a slow subthreshold oscillation. Driven by this oscillation, a fast subsystem (fast Sodium and Potassium currents) fires action potentials in a periodic fashion. Depending on the parameters, this model can generate a variety of firing patterns that includes bursting, regular tonic and polymodal firing. Here we show that the transitions between different firing patterns are often accompanied by a range of chaotic firing, as suggested by an irregular, non-periodic firing pattern. To confirm this, we measure the maximum Lyapunov exponent of the voltage trajectories, and the Lyapunov exponent and Lempel-Ziv's complexity of the ISI time series. The four-variable slow system (without spiking) also generates chaotic behavior, and bifurcation analysis shows that this is often originated by period doubling cascades. Either with or without spikes, chaos is no longer generated when the Ih is removed from the system. As the model is biologically plausible with biophysically meaningful parameters, we propose it as a useful tool to understand chaotic dynamics in neurons. PMID:28344550

  6. Cloning, Sequencing and Expression Analysis of the First Cellulase Gene Encoding Cellobiohydrolase 1 from a Cold-adaptive Penicillium chrysogenum FS010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunhua HOU; Tianhong WANG; Hao LONG; Huiyuan ZHU

    2007-01-01

    A cellobiohydrolase 1 gene (cbh1) was cloned from Penicillium chrysogenum FS010 by a modified thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction (TAIL-PCR). DNA sequencing shows that cbh1 has an open reading frame of 1590 bp, encoding a putative protein of 529 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed that CBHI has a modular structure with a predicted molecular mass of 56 kDa and consists of a fungal type carbohydrate binding module separated from a catalytic domain by a threonine rich linker region. The putative gene product is homologous to fungal cellobiohydrolases in Family 7 of the glycosyl hydrolases. A novel cbh1 promoter (1.3 kb) was also cloned and sequenced, which contains seven putative binding sites (5'-SYGGRG-3') for the carbon catabolite repressor CRE1. Effect of various carbon sources to the cbh1 transcription of P. chrysogenum was examined by Northern analysis,suggesting that the expression of cbh1 is regulated at transcriptional level. The cbh1 gene in cold-adaptive fungus P. chysogenum was expressed as an active enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae H158. The recombinant CBHI accumulated intracellularly and could not be secreted into the medium.

  7. Differential adaptations between cold-stenothermal environments in the bivalve Lissarca cf. miliaris (Philobryidae) from the Scotia Sea islands and Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Adam J.; Linse, Katrin; Thatje, Sven

    2014-04-01

    The cold stenothermal nature of the Southern Ocean, and highly adapted fauna living within, raises the question of how much intra-specific variation there is among invertebrate populations, and how variation may have a role in speciation processes through ecological divergence, natural selection, and reproductive isolation. Despite decades of collecting biological material, this question remains largely unanswered, and many studies compare ‘populations' of pooled material from wide geographic ranges to compensate for sampling constraints. In this study, variations in ecophysiological traits are explored by measuring growth, reproduction, and shell morphology among six populations of the small bivalve Lissarca cf. miliaris (Philippi, 1845) from the Southern Ocean, which experience subtle differences in temperature, disturbance, and food availability. There are significant differences in shell morphology and growth among different populations and slower growth rates at higher latitude populations. Prodissoconch sizes show an inverse ‘U' shaped relationship with latitude, and are correlated with egg size at South Georgia and King George Island's Potter Cove. Higher brood sizes at the South Georgia population represent a trade-off with lower egg size, and correlate with shell morphology by offering lower internal capacity to brood young. Lower investment into offspring and morphological variations in L. cf. miliaris highlight the importance of local scale environmental variations on species' ecology. These variations in physical traits appear to be underestimated in the Southern Ocean, but may be important drivers of ecological divergence and speciation, which should be considered in future genetic investigations on different invertebrate populations.

  8. Cold-induced sweetening, sugar ends, stem-end chip defect and acrylamide can be controlled effectively by silencing of the potato vacuolar invertase gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) is the third most important food crop in the world. Processing quality is one of the most important traits for many potato cultivars. Accumulations of reducing sugars in whole tubers as a result of cold-induced sweetening during low temperature storage, or at the tuber ste...

  9. The role of the gut in insect chilling injury: cold-induced disruption of osmoregulation in the fall field cricket, Gryllus pennsylvanicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Heath A; Sinclair, Brent J

    2011-03-01

    To predict the effects of changing climates on insect distribution and abundance, a clear understanding of the mechanisms that underlie critical thermal limits is required. In insects, the loss of muscle function and onset of cold-induced injury has previously been correlated with a loss of muscle resting potential. To determine the cause of this loss of function, we measured the effects of cold exposure on ion and water homeostasis in muscle tissue, hemolymph and the alimentary canal of the fall field cricket, Gryllus pennsylvanicus, during an exposure to 0°C that caused chilling injury and death. Low temperature exposure had little effect on muscle osmotic balance but it dissipated muscle ion equilibrium potentials through interactions between the hemolymph and gut. Hemolymph volume declined by 84% during cold exposure whereas gut water content rose in a comparable manner. This rise in water content was driven by a failure to maintain osmotic equilibrium across the gut wall, which resulted in considerable migration of Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) into the alimentary canal during cold exposure. This loss of homeostasis is likely to be a primary mechanism driving the cold-induced loss of muscle excitability and progression of chilling injury in chill-susceptible insect species.

  10. Effects of binders combined with glucono-δ-lactone on the quality characteristics of pressure-induced cold-set restructured pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Mi-Jung; Min, Sang-Gi; Hong, Geun-Pyo

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of binders and glucono-δ-lactone (GdL) on characteristics of pressure-induced (450MPA for 3min) cold-set restructured pork. Isolated soy protein (SP), wheat flour (WF), and κ-carrageenan (CG) were adopted as binders. The addition of binders improved water-binding properties of restructured pork, and the binders diminished the decrease in water binding properties caused by GdL-induced acidification. Pressure-induced restructured pork prepared with binders showed less harder and more cohesive texture than those of the thermal-treated control (TC). The results indicate that pressure-induced cold-set meat restructuring could be achieved when binders and GdL were used in the formulation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Adaptation-induced Tourism for Consumers of Literature on Screen: the Experience of Jane Austen Fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Pennacchia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available My aim in this article is that of starting to relate the expanding research field of adaptation studies to the subject area of film-induced tourism. Adaptations are a specific typology of films: that is, films whose story was not originally intended for the screen but, more often than not, for the written page, and has, therefore, been ‘translated’ into a new medium. The phenomenon of adaptation has been at the center of a heated debate for a few years now, but the specific link between adaptation and tourism has not yet been studied in its own right. In my article I question why and how adaptations of literary texts for the screen can induce a desire to visit film locations (actual geographical places in readers who are also inclined to enjoy the experience of “literature on screen”. In order to do this, I focus on the case study of adaptations from Jane Austen’s novels and on a specific kind of tourists, the so called ‘Janeites’, or Austen fans.

  12. Remote Effects of Electromagnetic Millimeter Waves on Experimentally Induced Cold Pain: A Double-Blinded Crossover Investigation in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyla, Tomasz; Hacker, Henriette; Edinger, Hardy; Leutzow, Bianca; Lange, Joern; Usichenko, Taras

    2017-03-01

    The hypoalgesic effect of electromagnetic millimeter waves (MW) is well studied in animal model; however, the results of human research are controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various frequency ranges of MW on hypoalgesia using the cold pressor test (CPT). Experimental pain was induced using standardized CPT protocols in 20 healthy male volunteers. The skin of the lower part of sternum was exposed to MW with a frequency of 42.25 GHz (active generator); MW within 50-75 GHz frequency range (noise generator); or an inactive MW device (placebo generator) in a random crossover double-blinded manner. Pain threshold, measured using the CPT, was the primary outcome. Other CPT parameters, heart rate, blood pressure, incidence of subjective sensations (paresthesia) during exposure, as well as quality of volunteers' blinding were also recorded. The end points of the condition with exposure to 42.25 GHz, were compared with baseline; exposure to noise 50-75 GHz; and placebo generators. Pain threshold increased during exposure to the 42.25 GHz generator when compared with baseline: median difference (MD), 1.97 seconds (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35-3.73) and noise generator: MD, 1.27 seconds (95% CI, 0.05-2.33) but not compared with the placebo generator. Time to onset of cold and increasing pain sensations as well as diastolic blood pressure increased under the exposure to the 42.25 GHz generator when compared with baseline and noise generator. Other outcome measures were comparable among the study conditions. We were able to partially confirm the previously suggested hypoalgesic effects of low-intensity electromagnetic MW. However, the effect was indistinguishable from the placebo condition in our investigation.

  13. Starch-related alpha-glucan/water dikinase is involved in the cold-induced development of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Masanobu; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Nishida, Ikuo

    2005-06-01

    Cold-induced soluble sugar accumulation enhances the degree of freezing tolerance in various cold-hardy plants including Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), where soluble sugars accumulate in only a few hours at 2 degrees C. Hence, along with photosynthesis, starch degradation might play a significant role in cold-induced sugar accumulation and enhanced freezing tolerance. Starch-related alpha-glucan/water dikinase (EC 2.7.9.4), encoded by Arabidopsis STARCH EXCESS 1 (SEX1), is hypothesized to regulate starch degradation in plastids by phosphorylating starch, thereby ensuring better accessibility by starch-degrading enzymes. Here, we show that Arabidopsis sex1 mutants, when incubated at 2 degrees C for 1 d, were unable to accumulate maltooligosaccharides or normal glucose and fructose levels. In addition, they displayed impaired freezing tolerance. After 7 d at 2 degrees C, sex1 mutants did not show any of the above abnormal phenotypes but displayed slightly higher leaf starch contents. The impaired freezing tolerance of sex1 mutants was restored by overexpression of wild-type SEX1 cDNA using the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The results demonstrate a genetic link between the SEX1 locus and plant freezing tolerance, and show that starch degradation is important for enhanced freezing tolerance during an early phase of cold acclimation. However, induction of starch degradation was not accompanied by significant changes in alpha-glucan/water dikinase activity in leaf extracts and preceded cold-induced augmentation of SEX1 transcripts. Therefore, we conclude that augmentation of SEX1 transcripts might be a homeostatic response to low temperature, and that starch degradation during an early phase of cold acclimation could be regulated by a component(s) of a starch degradation pathway(s) downstream of SEX1.

  14. [Role of phosphorylation of MARCKS-PSD in the secretion of MUC5AC induced by cold temperatures in human airway epithelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minchao; Perelman, Juliy M; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2012-05-01

    To construct phosphorylation sites domain (PSD) mutant of myristoylated alaninerich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) and explore the role of transient receptor potential melastatin 8 cation channels (TRPM8) and MARCKS in cold-induced synthesis and exocytosis of mucin (MUC) 5AC. Human placental cDNA was used as a template to amplify the full coding region of MARCKS cDNA by PCR. Ser159, Ser 163, Ser 167, Ser 170 in the PSD were mutated to aspartic acids by an overlap PCR method. The resultant PSD mutant cDNA and the wild-type MARCKS cDNA were each subcloned into a mammalian expression vector pcDNA3.0. Recombinant constructs were confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing. In intervention experiments, cells were pretreated with the TRPM8 channel antagonist BCTC and transfected with MARCKS-PSD mutant cDNA, and thereafter cold stimulation was applied. The levels of MUC5AC were measured by immunofluorescence and ELISA to clarify the roles of TRPM8 and PSD mutant on the synthesis and secretion of MUC5AC induced by cold, respectively. Restriction enzyme digestion analysis and DNA sequencing revealed that the pcDNA3.0- MARCKS and pcDNA3.0-MARCKS-PSD mutants were successfully constructed. The levels of intracellular and secreted MUC5AC of cold treated group were significantly higher than those of control group (PPSD mutant cDNA resulted in significant inhibition of mucin secretion in response to cold, and significantly higher level of intracellular MUC5AC than that of control group (P0.05). TRPM8 and phosphorylation of MARCKS-PSD mediates the cold-induced exocytosis of MUC5AC by airway epithelial cells.

  15. Characterization of FeDREB1 promoter involved in cold- and drought-inducible expression from common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z W; Xu, X Y; Gao, J F; Wang, P K; Liu, Z X; Feng, B L

    2015-07-17

    C-repeat-binding factor (CBF)/dehydration-responsive element (DREB) transcription factors play key roles in plant stress responses. However, little information is available on the regulation of CBF/DREB expression. In this study, we isolated and characterized the FeDREB1 promoter sequence from the common buckwheat accession Xinong 9976. To identify the upstream region of the FeDREB1 gene required for promoter activity, we constructed a series of FeDREB1 promoter deletion derivatives. Each deletion construct was analyzed through Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation in tobacco leaves treated with 4°C cold or drought stress. Promoter-beta-glucuronidase fusion assays revealed that the pCD1 (-270 bp) deletion in the upstream region of FeDREB1 could activate expression of the GUS gene at 4°C. The pCD1 (-270 bp), pCD2 (-530 bp), and pCD3 (-904 bp) deletion induced low-level GUS expression under drought stress. However, the pCD4 (-1278 bp) deletion clearly activated GUS gene expression. Our results suggest that sections pCD1 (-270 bp) and pCD4 (-1278 bp) in the FeDREB1 gene promoter are new sources of induced promoters for adversity-resistance breeding in plant genetic engineering.

  16. Isolation and Identification of Psychrotrophic Bacteria in Normal Temperature Soils and Their Properties of Cold-Adapted Enzymes Production%常温土壤中耐冷茵的分离、鉴定及产酶分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易浪波; 舒琅; 唐云涛; 朱越; 杜次; 彭清忠

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To screen cold-adapted microorganisms from normal temperature soils,and identify the isolated strains preliminarily and assay their cold-active enzyme production. Methods: Cold-adapted microorganisms were isolated from normal temperature soils at the campus of Jishou university by enrichment culture at 2℃. The isolated strains were identified by bacterial morphological,physiological and biochemical characteristics,and using phylogenetic relationships based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. The cold-adapted enzyme production of these bacteria was analyzed by substrate hydrolysis experiments. Results: Six strains of psychrotrophic bacteria,named afterJSBP-1~JSBP-6,were isolated from the normal temperature soil samples,and identified as Pseudomonas sp.,Jan-thinobacterium sp. And Arthrobacter sp. Respectively by morphological,physiological and biochemical characteristics,and the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene. JSBP-1 had the capability of producing more cold-adapted protease,JSBP-2 and JSBP-6 had the capability of producing more cold-adapted amylase at 5℃ and \\5℃ respectively,and JSBP-5 could produce more cold-active lipase only at 5℃. Conclusion: There are a certain amount of cold-adapted microorganisms in normal temperature soils,of which Pseudomonas sp. Is one of predominant populations. These microorganisms are potential resources of producing cold-adapted enzymes.%目的:从常温土壤中筛选冷适应微生物,并进行初步鉴定和产低温酶分析.方法:采集吉首大学校园内土壤样品,通过低温富集培养筛选冷适应微生物;通过形态观察、生理生化特性检测和基于16S rRNA基因序列的系统发育分析,对分离的菌株进行初步鉴定;利用平板筛选法检测其产低温酶特性.结果:分离获得6株耐冷细菌JSBP-1~JSBP-6,初步鉴定其分属假单胞菌属(Pseudomonas)、紫色杆菌属(Janthinobacterium)和节杆菌属(Arthrobacter);在5℃和15C培养条件下,菌株JSBP-1

  17. Finger and toe temperature response to cold water and cold air exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijs, N.R. van der; Es, E.M. van; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Subjects with a weak cold-induced vasodilatation response (CIVD) to experimental cold-water immersion of the fingers in a laboratory setting have been shown to have a higher risk for local cold injuries when exposed to cold in real life. Most of the cold injuries in real life, however,

  18. The cold-induced two-component system CBO0366/CBO0365 regulates metabolic pathways with novel roles in group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 cold tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsten, Elias; Zhang, Zhen; Somervuo, Panu; Minton, Nigel P; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    The two-component system CBO0366/CBO0365 was recently demonstrated to have a role in cold tolerance of group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502. The mechanisms under its control, ultimately resulting in increased sensitivity to low temperature, are unknown. A transcriptomic analysis with DNA microarrays was performed to identify the differences in global gene expression patterns of the wild-type ATCC 3502 and a derivative mutant with insertionally inactivated cbo0365 at 37 and 15°C. Altogether, 150 or 141 chromosomal coding sequences (CDSs) were found to be differently expressed in the cbo0365 mutant at 37 or 15°C, respectively, and thus considered to be under the direct or indirect transcriptional control of the response regulator CBO0365. Of the differentially expressed CDSs, expression of 141 CDSs was similarly affected at both temperatures investigated, suggesting that the putative CBO0365 regulon was practically not affected by temperature. The regulon involved genes related to acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation, motility, arsenic resistance, and phosphate uptake and transport. Deteriorated growth at 17°C was observed for mutants with disrupted ABE fermentation pathway components (crt, bcd, bdh, and ctfA), arsenic detoxifying machinery components (arsC and arsR), or phosphate uptake mechanism components (phoT), suggesting roles for these mechanisms in cold tolerance of group I C. botulinum. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed recombinant CBO0365 to bind to the promoter regions of crt, arsR, and phoT, as well as to the promoter region of its own operon, suggesting direct DNA-binding transcriptional activation or repression as a means for CBO0365 in regulating these operons. The results provide insight to the mechanisms group I C. botulinum utilizes in coping with cold.

  19. Hydrogen-Induced Cold Cracking in High-Frequency Induction Welded Steel Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kumkum

    2016-04-01

    Detailed investigation was carried out on 0.4C steel tubes used for the telescopic front fork of two-wheelers to establish the root cause for the occurrence of transverse cracks at the weld heat-affected zone of the tubes. Fractographic and microstructural observations provide evidences of delayed hydrogen-induced cracking. The beneficial microstructure for avoiding the transverse cracks was found to be the bainitic-martensitic, while martensitic structure was noted to be deleterious.

  20. Transcriptional and translational regulation by RNA thermometers, riboswitches and the sRNA DsrA in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai under combined cold and osmotic stress adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hücker, Sarah Maria; Simon, Svenja; Scherer, Siegfried; Neuhaus, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The enteric pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai (EHEC) is able to grow at lower temperatures compared to commensal E. coli Growth at environmental conditions displays complex challenges different to those in a host. EHEC was grown at 37°C and at 14°C with 4% NaCl, a combination of cold and osmotic stress as present in the food chain. Comparison of RNAseq and RIBOseq data provided a snap shot of ongoing transcription and translation, differentiating transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulation, respectively. Indeed, cold and osmotic stress related genes are simultaneously regulated at both levels, but translational regulation clearly dominates. Special emphasis was given to genes regulated by RNA secondary structures in their 5(')UTRs, such as RNA thermometers and riboswitches, or genes controlled by small RNAs encoded in trans The results reveal large differences in gene expression between short-time shock compared to adaptation in combined cold and osmotic stress. Whereas the majority of cold shock proteins, such as CspA, are translationally downregulated after adaptation, many osmotic stress genes are still significantly upregulated mainly translationally, but several also transcriptionally. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. [Cold induced cDNA library construction of highland barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. nudum Hk. f.) using suppression subtractive hybridization technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Jia, Jing Fen

    2008-12-01

    Cold-induced genes of highland barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var. nudum Hk. f.) were studied using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique. The cDNA from the materials treated with 4 degrees C was used as "tester", and that from the materials growing in green house (20+/-2 degrees C) as "driver". A subtractive library of highland barley including 640 cDNA clones was constructed in this study. Enzyme digestion of 32 clones chosen randomly from the library indicated that 87.5% of them contained inserts. The cDNA inserts of 16 clones were sequenced. Blast search analyses showed that these cDNAs were homologies to genes encoding the following proteins: metallothionein, protein kinase, ethylene signal transcription factor, bZIP transcription factor, zing finger transcription factor, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, ribosomal protein, sodium: hydrogen antiporter, catalase, NADPH-cytochrome reductase, ascorbate peroxidase, DNA binding protein, and sugar transporter-like protein. These results indicated that the cDNA clones in the library were related to cold-induced genes, and suggested that the cold-tolerant mechanism of highland barley might be a complicated, interactive system involving multiple approaches and genes. Construction of subtractive cDNA library provided an advantage for further studies to isolate and clone cold-induced genes in highland barley.

  2. The Co-chaperone BAG2 Mediates Cold-Induced Accumulation of Phosphorylated Tau in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Cesar Augusto Dias; Santiago, Fernando Enrique; de Oliveira, Adriele Silva Alves; Oliveira, Fernando Augusto; Almeida, Maria Camila; Carrettiero, Daniel Carneiro

    2016-05-01

    Inclusions of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) are a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders classified as "tauopathy," of which Alzheimer's disease is the most prevalent form. Dysregulation of tau phosphorylation disrupts neuron structure and function, and hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates to form neurotoxic inclusions. The abundance of ubiquitin in tau inclusions suggests a defect in ubiquitin-mediated tau protein degradation by the proteasome. Under the temperature of 37 °C, the co-chaperone BAG2 protein targets phosphorylated tau for degradation via by a more-efficient, ubiquitin-independent pathway. In both in vivo and in vitro studies, cold exposure induces the accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. The SH-SY5Y cell line differentiates into neuron-like cells on treatment with retinoic acid and is an established model for research on the effects of cold on tau phosphorylation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether BAG2 mediates the cold-induced accumulation of phosphorylated tau protein. Our findings show that cold exposure causes a decrease in BAG2 expression in undifferentiated cells. Conversely, BAG2 expression is increased in differentiated cells exposed to cold. Further, undifferentiated cells exposed to cold had an increased proportion of p-tau to total tau, suggesting an accumulation of p-tau that is consistent with decreased levels of BAG2. Overexpression of BAG2 in cold-exposed undifferentiated cells restored levels of p-tau to those of 37 °C undifferentiated control. Interestingly, although BAG2 expression increased in differentiated cells, this increase was not accompanied by a decrease in the proportion of p-tau to total tau. Further, overexpression of BAG2 in cold exposed differentiated cells showed no significant difference in p-tau levels compared to 37 °C controls. Taken together, these data show that expression of BAG2 is differently regulated in a differentiation-dependent context. Our results suggest that

  3. Effects of nitric oxide on gastric ulceration induced by nicotine and cold-restraint stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo-Sheng Qui; Qi-Bing Mei; Li Liu; Kam-Meng Tchou-Wong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Stress induces gastric ulceration in human and experimental animals. People tend to smoke more cigarettes when under stress. Nitric oxide (NO) and nicotine have opposing effects on gastric integrity. The present study examined the possible therapeutic benefit of NO in nicotinetreated rats with stress-induced gastric ulceration.METHODS: Rats drank a nicotine solution while control rats drank tap water for 20 days. The alkoloid was then replaced by water with or without supplementation of isosorbide dinitrate (NO donor) for an additional 10 days. Isosorbide dinitrate was given twice shortly before experiments (acute)or three times daily by oral gavages for 10 days after the rats stopped drinking nicotine solution. At the end of experiments,ulcer index, gastric adhesion mucus content and MPO activity were measured and analysed.RESULTS: Nicotine treatment decreased gastric mucus content and intensified stress-induced gastric ulcer. A higher ulcer index persisted even after the rats stopped drinking nicotine solution for 10 days. Acute NO donor showed no benefit on both mucus and ulcer index in nicotine treatment or/and stress condition. Chronic NO donor treatment reversed the worsening action of nicotine in stomach. Stress increased gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, which was antagonized by chronic NO treatment. However, nicotine was unlikely to change mucosal MPO activity.CONCLUSION: The intensifying action of nicotine on stressinduced gastric ulceration persists for 10 days after cessation.Nicotine treatment significantly decreases gastric mucus content that can be restored by chronic NO donor treatment.The present study suggests that NO antagonizes the ulcerogenic action of nicotine through a cytoprotective way.

  4. Correlation spectroscopy in cold atoms: Light sideband resonances in electromagnetically-induced-transparency condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, H. M.; Kumar, A.; Theophilo, K.; Nussenzveig, P.; Martinelli, M.

    2016-07-01

    The correlation spectroscopy has been successfully employed in the measurement of the intrinsic linewidth of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in time and frequency domain. We study the role of the sidebands of the intense fields in the measured spectra, analyzing the information that can be recovered working with different analysis frequencies. In this case, the nonzero one-photon detuning appears as a necessary condition for spectrally resolving the sideband resonances in the correlation coefficient. Our experimental findings are supported by the perturbative model defined in the frequency domain.

  5. Correlation spectroscopy in cold atoms: light sidebands resonances in electromagnetically induced transparency condition

    CERN Document Server

    Florez, H M; Theophilo, K; Nussenzveig, P; Martinelli, M

    2015-01-01

    The correlation spectroscopy has been successfully employed in the measurement of the intrinsic linewidth of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in time and frequency domain. We study the role of the sidebands of the intense fields in the measured spectra, analyzing the information that can be recovered working with different analysis frequencies. In this case, the non-zero one-photon detuning appears as a necessary condition for spectrally resolving the sideband resonances in the correlation coefficient. Our experimental findings are supported by the perturbative model defined in the frequency domain.

  6. Cold-atom induced control of an opto-mechanical device

    CERN Document Server

    Paternostro, M; Palma, G M

    2010-01-01

    We consider an optical cavity with a light vibrating end-mirror and containing a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The mediation of the cavity field induces a non-trivial interplay between the mirror and the collective oscillations of the intra-cavity atomic density. We explore the thermodynamical implications of this dynamics and highlight the possibilities for indirect diagnostic. The effects we discuss can be observed in a set-up that is well within reach of current experimental capabilities and is central in the quest for mesoscopic quantumness.

  7. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1–1% O2, physioxia or physoxia (∼1–13%, and normoxia (∼20% are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia or excess oxygen (hyperoxia could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction. Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s (HIFs are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise.

  8. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1-1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1-13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction). Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s) (HIFs) are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise.

  9. Temporal recalibration in vocalization induced by adaptation of delayed auditory feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Participants produced a single voice sound repeatedly with specific delay times of DAF (0, 66, 133 ms during three minutes to induce 'Lag Adaptation'. They then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback. We found that lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. Furthermore, we found that the temporal recalibration in vocalization can be affected by averaging delay times in the adaptation phase. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  10. Adaptations to exercise training and contraction-induced muscle injury in animal models of muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Gregory T; Abresch, R Ted; Fowler, William M

    2002-11-01

    This article reviews the current status of exercise training and contraction-induced muscle-injury investigations in animal models of muscular dystrophy. Most exercise-training studies have compared the adaptations of normal and dystrophic muscles with exercise. Adaptation of diseased muscle to exercise occurs at many levels, starting with the extracellular matrix, but also involves cytoskeletal architecture, muscle contractility, repair mechanisms, and gene regulation. The majority of exercise-injury investigations have attempted to determine the susceptibility of dystrophin-deficient muscles to contraction-induced injury. There is some evidence in animal models that diseased muscle can adapt and respond to mechanical stress. However, exercise-injury studies show that dystrophic muscles have an increased susceptibility to high mechanical forces. Most of the studies involving exercise training have shown that muscle adaptations in dystrophic animals were qualitatively similar to the adaptations observed in control muscle. Deleterious effects of the dystrophy usually occur only in older animals with advanced muscle fiber degeneration or after high-resistive eccentric training. The main limitations in applying these conclusions to humans are the differences in phenotypic expression between humans and genetically homologous animal models and in the significant biomechanical differences between humans and these animal models.

  11. Acute cold exposure-induced down-regulation of CIDEA, cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A, in rat interscapular brown adipose tissue by sympathetically activated beta3-adrenoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2009-09-18

    The thermogenic activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) largely depends on the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), which is up-regulated by environmental alterations such as cold. Recently, CIDEA (cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector A) has also been shown to be expressed at high levels in the mitochondria of BAT. Here we examined the effect of cold on the mRNA and protein levels of CIDEA in interscapular BAT of conscious rats with regard to the sympathetic nervous system. Cold exposure (4 degrees C for 3h) elevated the plasma norepinephrine level and increased norepinephrine turnover in BAT. Cold exposure resulted in down-regulation of the mRNA and protein levels of CIDEA in BAT, accompanied by up-regulation of mRNA and protein levels of UCP1. The cold exposure-induced changes of CIDEA and UCP1 were attenuated by intraperitoneal pretreatment with propranolol (a non-selective beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist) (2mg/animal) or SR59230A (a selective beta(3)-adrenoreceptor antagonist) (2mg/animal), respectively. These results suggest that acute cold exposure resulted in down-regulation of CIDEA in interscapular BAT by sympathetically activated beta(3)-adrenoreceptor-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  12. Characterization of a New Cold-Adapted and Salt-Activated Polysaccharide Lyase Family 7 Alginate Lyase from Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM0524

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiu-Lan; Dong, Sheng; Xu, Fei; Dong, Fang; Li, Ping-Yi; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Xie, Bin-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Marine bacterial alginate lyases play a role in marine alginate degradation and carbon cycling. Although a large number of alginate lyases have been characterized, reports on alginate lyases with special characteristics are still rather less. Here, a gene alyPM encoding an alginate lyase of polysaccharide lyase family 7 (PL7) was cloned from marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM0524 and expressed in Escherichia coli. AlyPM shows 41% sequence identity to characterized alginate lyases, indicating that AlyPM is a new PL7 enzyme. The optimal pH for AlyPM activity was 8.5. AlyPM showed the highest activity at 30°C and remained 19% of the highest activity at 5°C. AlyPM was unstable at temperatures above 30°C and had a low Tm of 37°C. These data indicate that AlyPM is a cold-adapted enzyme. Moreover, AlyPM is a salt-activated enzyme. AlyPM activity in 0.5–1.2 M NaCl was sixfolds higher than that in 0 M NaCl, probably caused by a significant increase in substrate affinity, because the Km of AlyPM in 0.5 M NaCl decreased more than 20-folds than that in 0 M NaCl. AlyPM preferably degraded polymannuronate and mainly released dimers and trimers. These data indicate that AlyPM is a new PL7 endo-alginate lyase with special characteristics. PMID:27486451

  13. Globin's structure and function in vesicomyid bivalves from the Gulf of Guinea cold seeps as an adaptation to life in reduced sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, C; Zorn, N; Potier, N; Leize-Wagner, E; Lallier, F H; Olu, K; Andersen, A C

    2014-01-01

    Vesicomyid bivalves form dense clam beds in both deep-sea cold seeps and hydrothermal vents. The species diversity within this family raises questions about niche separation and specific adaptations. To compare their abilities to withstand hypoxia, we have studied the structure and function of erythrocyte hemoglobin (Hb) and foot myoglobin (Mb) from two vesicomyid species, Christineconcha regab and Laubiericoncha chuni, collected from the Regab pockmark in the Gulf of Guinea at a depth of 3,000 m. Laubiericoncha chuni possesses three monomeric globins, G1 (15,361 Da), G2 (15,668 Da), and G3 (15,682 Da) in circulating erythrocytes (Hb), and also three globins, G1, G3, and G4 (14,786 Da) in foot muscle (Mb). Therefore, globins G2 and G4 appear to be specific for erythrocytes and muscle, respectively, but globins G1 and G3 are common. In contrast, C. regab lacks erythrocyte Hb completely and possesses only globin monomers G1' (14,941 Da), G2' (15,169 Da), and G3' (15,683 Da) in foot muscle. Thus, these two vesicomyid species, C. regab and L. chuni, show a remarkable diversity in globin expression when examined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Oxygen-binding affinities reveal extremely high oxygen affinities (P50 < 1 Torr, from 5° to 15°C at pH 7.5), in particular L. chuni globins, which might be an advantage allowing L. chuni to dig deeply for sulfides and remain buried for long periods in reduced sediments.

  14. Sliding mode control of wind-induced vibrations using fuzzy sliding surface and gain adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenozhi, Suresh; Yu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Although fuzzy/adaptive sliding mode control can reduce the chattering problem in structural vibration control applications, they require the equivalent control and the upper bounds of the system uncertainties. In this paper, we used fuzzy logic to approximate the standard sliding surface and designed a dead-zone adaptive law for tuning the switching gain of the sliding mode control. The stability of the proposed controller is established using Lyapunov stability theory. A six-storey building prototype equipped with an active mass damper has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller towards the wind-induced vibrations.

  15. PGC-1alpha in exercise- and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm

    and interferes with the exercise-induced adaptive response in human skeletal muscle. Study II demonstrates that mouse liver glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) mRNA content increased in recovery from acute exercise in both wildtype (WT) and PGC-1α knockout (KO) mice, while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK...... content in WT, but not in PGC-1α KO mice. This shows that exercise training increases UCP1, COXIV and CD31 protein in mouse iWAT, likely as a cumulative effect of transient increases in mRNA expression after each exercise bout, and that PGC-1α is required for these adaptations. Study IV demonstrates...

  16. Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In the course of a year, people ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest ...

  17. Detection of cold pain, cold allodynia and cold hyperalgesia in freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Clifford J

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is elicited by cold, and a major feature of many neuropathic pain states is that normally innocuous cool stimuli begin to produce pain (cold allodynia. To expand our understanding of cold induced pain states we have studied cold pain behaviors over a range of temperatures in several animal models of chronic pain. Results We demonstrate that a Peltier-cooled cold plate with ± 1°C sensitivity enables quantitative measurement of a detection withdrawal response to cold stimuli in unrestrained rats. In naïve rats the threshold for eliciting cold pain behavior is 5°C. The withdrawal threshold for cold allodynia is 15°C in both the spared nerve injury and spinal nerve ligation models of neuropathic pain. Cold hyperalgesia is present in the spared nerve injury model animals, manifesting as a reduced latency of withdrawal response threshold at temperatures that elicit cold pain in naïve rats. We also show that following the peripheral inflammation produced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, a hypersensitivity to cold occurs. Conclusion The peltier-cooled provides an effective means of assaying cold sensitivity in unrestrained rats. Behavioral testing of cold allodynia, hyperalgesia and pain will greatly facilitate the study of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in cold/cool sensations and enable measurement of the efficacy of pharmacological treatments to reduce these symptoms.

  18. Cold-induced responses in annual bluegrass genotypes with differential resistance to pink snow mold (Microdochium nivale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Annick; Castonguay, Yves; Azaiez, Aïda; Hsiang, Tom; Dionne, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Greens-type annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) is susceptible to winter stresses including subfreezing temperatures and pink snow mold (SM). To better understand the mechanisms of SM resistance in annual bluegrass, four SM-resistant and four SM-sensitive genotypes were incubated at low temperature with Microdochium nivale (Fries) Samuels & Hallett, the causal agent of pink snow mold. We assessed the impact of a 6-week incubation period with SM at 2 °C under high humidity (≥ 98%) on the accumulation of cold-induced metabolites and on freezing tolerance. Incubation of annual bluegrass inoculated with SM lead to a major decrease in concentration of cryoprotective sugars such as sucrose and HDP (high degree of polymerization) fructans. Conversely, major amino acids linked to stress resistance such as glutamine and arginine increased in crowns of annual bluegrass in response to SM inoculation. One of the major differences between resistant and sensitive genotypes was found in the concentration of HDP fructans, which remained higher in SM-resistant genotypes throughout the incubation period. HDP fructans were also more abundant in freeze-tolerant genotypes, reinforcing their positive impact on winter survival of annual bluegrass. The identification of genotypes that are resistant to both SM and freezing shows the possibility of being able to improve both traits concomitantly.

  19. Cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP, a novel XTcf-3 specific target gene regulates neural development in Xenopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedlich Doris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As nuclear mediators of wnt/β-catenin signaling, Lef/Tcf transcription factors play important roles in development and disease. Although it is well established, that the four vertebrate Lef/Tcfs have unique functional properties, most studies unite Lef-1, Tcf-1, Tcf-3 and Tcf-4 and reduce their function to uniformly transduce wnt/β-catenin signaling for activating wnt target genes. In order to discriminate target genes regulated by XTcf-3 from those regulated by XTcf-4 or Lef/Tcfs in general, we performed a subtractive screen, using neuralized Xenopus animal cap explants. Results We identified cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP as novel XTcf-3 specific target gene. Furthermore, we show that knockdown of XTcf-3 by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide results in a general broadening of the anterior neural tissue. Depletion of XCIRP by antisense morpholino oligonucleotide injection leads to a reduced stability of mRNA and an enlargement of the anterior neural plate similar to the depletion of XTcf-3. Conclusion Distinct steps in neural development are differentially regulated by individual Lef/Tcfs. For proper development of the anterior brain XTcf-3 and the Tcf-subtype specific target XCIRP appear indispensable. Thus, regulation of anterior neural development, at least in part, depends on mRNA stabilization by the novel XTcf-3 target gene XCIRP.

  20. Strength comparison between cold-inducible promoters of Arabidopsis cor15a and cor15b genes in potato and tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Wang, Xiaohuan; Cao, Yang; Liu, Xun; Lin, Yuan; Ou, Yongbin; Zhang, Huiling; Liu, Jun

    2013-10-01

    The cold-inducible promoter is ideal for regulating ectopic gene expression in plants to cope with the cold stress. The promoters of two cold-regulated genes, cor15a and cor15b, were cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana and their strengths were assayed in potato and tobacco. Although the cis-element composition and cold-inducible property were similar between the two promoters, the cor15b promoter showed significantly higher activity than the cor15a promoter in both potato and tobacco. In order to elucidate the factors determining this discrepancy, cor15a and cor15b promoters were separately truncated from 5'-end to construct short promoters with similar size containing a single C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element (CRT/DRE). Subsequently, two synthetic promoters were constructed by swapping the flanking sequences of CRT/DRE in the truncated promoters. The promoter strength comparison demonstrated that the flanking sequence could affect the promoter strength. These findings provide a potential regulatory mechanism to control the promoter strength without impact on other properties.

  1. A cold-induced myo-inositol transporter-like gene confers tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambe, Mame Abdou Nahr; He, Xueying; Tu, Qinghua; Guo, Zhenfei

    2015-03-01

    A full length cDNA encoding a myo-inositol transporter-like protein, named as MfINT-like, was cloned from Medicago sativa subsp. falcata (herein falcata), a species with greater cold tolerance than alfalfa (M. sativa subsp. sativa). MfINT-like is located on plasma membranes. MfINT-like transcript was induced 2-4 h after exogenous myo-inositol treatment, 24-96 h with cold, and 96 h by salinity. Given that myo-inositol accumulates higher in falcata after 24 h of cold treatment, myo-inositol is proposed to be involved in cold-induced expression of MfINT-like. Higher levels of myo-inositol was observed in leaves of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing MfINT-like than the wild-type but not in the roots of plants grown on myo-inositol containing medium, suggesting that transgenic plants had higher myo-inositol transport activity than the wild-type. Transgenic plants survived better to freezing temperature, and had lower ion leakage and higher maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv /Fm ) after chilling treatment. In addition, greater plant fresh weight was observed in transgenic plants as compared with the wild-type when plants were grown under drought or salinity stress. The results suggest that MfINT-like mediated transport of myo-inositol is associated with plant tolerance to abiotic stresses.

  2. Adaptive response of the heart to long-term anemia induced by iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yoshiro; Tsujino, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Mika; Sakoda, Tsuyoshi; Ohyanagi, Mitsumasa; Masuyama, Tohru

    2009-03-01

    Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure and an independent predictor of poor prognosis. Chronic anemia leads to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and heart failure, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We investigated the mechanisms, including the molecular signaling pathway, of cardiac remodeling induced by iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an iron-deficient diet for 20 wk to induce IDA, and the molecular mechanisms of cardiac remodeling were evaluated. The iron-deficient diet initially induced severe anemia, which resulted in LV hypertrophy and dilation with preserved systolic function associated with increased serum erythropoietin (Epo) concentration. Cardiac STAT3 phosphorylation and VEGF gene expression increased by 12 wk of IDA, causing angiogenesis in the heart. Thereafter, sustained IDA induced upregulation of cardiac hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha gene expression and maintained upregulation of cardiac VEGF gene expression and cardiac angiogenesis; however, sustained IDA promoted cardiac fibrosis and lung congestion, with decreased serum Epo concentration and cardiac STAT3 phosphorylation after 20 wk of IDA compared with 12 wk. Upregulation of serum Epo concentration and cardiac STAT3 phosphorylation is associated with a beneficial adaptive mechanism of anemia-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and later decreased levels of these molecules may be critical for the transition from adaptive cardiac hypertrophy to cardiac dysfunction in long-term anemia. Understanding the mechanism of cardiac maladaptation to anemia may lead to a new strategy for treatment of chronic heart failure with anemia.

  3. Acid-Induced Cold Gelation of Globular Proteins: Effects of Protein Aggregate Characteristics and Disulfide Bonding on Rheological Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.; Weijers, M.; Hoog, E.H.A. de; Pijpekamp, A.M. van de; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Hamer, R.J.; Kruif, C.G. de; Visschers, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    The process of cold gelation of ovalbumin and the properties of the resulting cold-set gels were compared to those of whey protein isolate. Under the chosen heating conditions, most protein was organized in aggregates. For both protein preparations, the aggregates consisted of covalently linked mono

  4. Acid-induced cold gelation of globular proteins: effects of protein aggregate characteristics ans disulfide bonding on Rheological properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.; Weijers, M.; Hoog, de E.H.A.; Pijpekamp, A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Hamer, R.J.; Kruif, de C.G.; Visschers, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    The process of cold gelation of ovalbumin and the properties of the resulting cold-set gels were compared to those of whey protein isolate. Under the chosen heating conditions, most protein was organized in aggregates. For both protein preparations, the aggregates consisted of covalently linked mono

  5. Acid-Induced Cold Gelation of Globular Proteins: Effects of Protein Aggregate Characteristics and Disulfide Bonding on Rheological Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alting, A.C.; Weijers, M.; Hoog, E.H.A. de; Pijpekamp, A.M. van de; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Hamer, R.J.; Kruif, C.G. de; Visschers, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    The process of cold gelation of ovalbumin and the properties of the resulting cold-set gels were compared to those of whey protein isolate. Under the chosen heating conditions, most protein was organized in aggregates. For both protein preparations, the aggregates consisted of covalently linked mono

  6. Laser Induced Emission Spectroscopy of Cold and Isolated Neutral PAHs and PANH: Implications for the red rectangle emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella

    2016-06-01

    Blue luminescence (BL) in the emission spectra of the red rectangle centered on the bright star HD44179 is recently reported by Vijh et al [1]. This results is consistent with the broad band polarization measurements obtained in 1980 by Schmidt et al. Both experimental and theoretical studies support that BL emission could be attributed the luminescence of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) excited with ultraviolet light from the center of the star [4 and reference therein]. The abundance on N to C in the interstellar medium suggest also that nitrogen substituted PAH (PANH) are likely abundant in the interstellar medium [3]. They exhibit similar features as PAHs and could contribute to the unidentified spectral bands. Comparing the BL to laboratory spectra obtained on similar environment is crucial for the identification of interstellar molecules. We present in this works the absorption and the laser induced emission spectra of several isolated and cold PAHs and PANHs. Laser induced emission was performed first to PAHs and PANHs isolated in Argon matrix at 10 K. Then, measurements are performed with the supersonic jet technique of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames. We focus, here, on the emission spectra (fluorescence and (or) phosphorescence) of these molecules and we discuss their contributions to the blue luminescence emission in the Red Rectangle nebula.[1] Vijh,U.P., Witt. A.N. & Gordon,K.D, APJ, 606, L69 (2004)[2] Schmidt, G. D., Cohen, M. & Margon, B., ApJ, 239L.133S (1980)[3] Spitzer, L., Physical Processes in the Interstellar Medium (New York Wiley-Interscience) (1978)[4] Salama, F., Galazutdinov, G. A., Kre lowski, J., Allamandola, L. J., & Musaev, F. A. ApJ, 526,(1999)

  7. Environmental cold exposure increases blood flow and affects pain sensitivity in the knee joints of CFA-induced arthritic mice in a TRPA1-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Russell, Fiona A; Alawi, Khadija M; Sand, Claire; Liang, Lihuan; Salamon, Robin; Bodkin, Jennifer V; Aubdool, Aisah A; Arno, Matthew; Gentry, Clive; Smillie, Sarah-Jane; Bevan, Stuart; Keeble, Julie E; Malcangio, Marzia; Brain, Susan D

    2016-01-11

    The effect of cold temperature on arthritis symptoms is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate how environmental cold affects pain and blood flow in mono-arthritic mice, and examine a role for transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a ligand-gated cation channel that can act as a cold sensor. Mono-arthritis was induced by unilateral intra-articular injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in CD1 mice, and in mice either lacking TRPA1 (TRPA1 KO) or respective wildtypes (WT). Two weeks later, nociception and joint blood flow were measured following exposure to 10 °C (1 h) or room temperature (RT). Primary mechanical hyperalgesia in the knee was measured by pressure application apparatus; secondary mechanical hyperalgesia by automated von Frey system; thermal hyperalgesia by Hargreaves technique, and weight bearing by the incapacitance test. Joint blood flow was recorded by full-field laser perfusion imager (FLPI) and using clearance of (99m)Technetium. Blood flow was assessed after pretreatment with antagonists of either TRPA1 (HC-030031), substance P neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors (SR140333) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) (CGRP8-37). TRPA1, TAC-1 and CGRP mRNA levels were examined in dorsal root ganglia, synovial membrane and patellar cartilage samples. Cold exposure caused bilateral primary mechanical hyperalgesia 2 weeks after CFA injection, in a TRPA1-dependent manner. In animals maintained at RT, clearance techniques and FLPI showed that CFA-treated joints exhibited lower blood flow than saline-treated joints. In cold-exposed animals, this reduction in blood flow disappears, and increased blood flow in the CFA-treated joint is observed using FLPI. Cold-induced increased blood flow in CFA-treated joints was blocked by HC-030031 and not observed in TRPA1 KOs. Cold exposure increased TRPA1 mRNA levels in patellar cartilage, whilst reducing it in synovial membranes from CFA-treated joints. We provide evidence that environmental

  8. Stress-induced cellular adaptive strategies: ancient evolutionarily conserved programs as new anticancer therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipponi, Arcadi; Thomas, David M

    2014-06-01

    Despite the remarkable achievements of novel targeted anti-cancer drugs, most therapies only produce remission for a limited time, resistance to treatment, and relapse, often being the ultimate outcome. Drug resistance is due to highly efficient adaptive strategies utilized by cancer cells. Exogenous and endogenous stress stimuli are known to induce first-line responses, capable of re-establishing cellular homeostasis and determining cell fate decisions. Cancer cells may also mount second-line adaptive strategies, such as the mutator response. Hypermutable subpopulations of cells may expand under severe selective stress, thereby accelerating the emergence of adapted clones. As with first-line protective responses, these strategies appear highly conserved, and are found in yeasts and bacteria. We hypothesize that evolutionarily conserved programs rheostatically regulate mutability in fluctuating environments, and contribute to drug resistance in cancer cells. Elucidating the conserved genetic and molecular mechanisms may present novel opportunities to increase the effectiveness of cancer therapies. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Noise-induced interspike interval correlations and spike train regularization in spike-triggered adapting neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Spike generation in neurons produces a temporal point process, whose statistics is governed by intrinsic phenomena and the external incoming inputs to be coded. In particular, spike-evoked adaptation currents support a slow temporal process that conditions spiking probability at the present time according to past activity. In this work, we study the statistics of interspike interval correlations arising in such non-renewal spike trains, for a neuron model that reproduces different spike modes in a small adaptation scenario. We found that correlations are stronger as the neuron fires at a particular firing rate, which is defined by the adaptation process. When set in a subthreshold regime, the neuron may sustain this particular firing rate, and thus induce correlations, by noise. Given that, in this regime, interspike intervals are negatively correlated at any lag, this effect surprisingly implies a reduction in the variability of the spike count statistics at a finite noise intensity.

  10. Lactate as a Signaling Molecule That Regulates Exercise-Induced Adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minas Nalbandian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lactate (or its protonated form: lactic acid has been studied by many exercise scientists. The lactate paradigm has been in constant change since lactate was first discovered in 1780. For many years, it was unfairly seen as primarily responsible for muscular fatigue during exercise and a waste product of glycolysis. The status of lactate has slowly changed to an energy source, and in the last two decades new evidence suggests that lactate may play a much bigger role than was previously believed: many adaptations to exercise may be mediated in some way by lactate. The mechanisms behind these adaptations are yet to be understood. The aim of this review is to present the state of lactate science, focusing on how this molecule may mediate exercise-induced adaptations.

  11. Noise-induced interspike interval correlations and spike train regularization in spike-triggered adapting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio

    2016-09-01

    Spike generation in neurons produces a temporal point process, whose statistics is governed by intrinsic phenomena and the external incoming inputs to be coded. In particular, spike-evoked adaptation currents support a slow temporal process that conditions spiking probability at the present time according to past activity. In this work, we study the statistics of interspike interval correlations arising in such non-renewal spike trains, for a neuron model that reproduces different spike modes in a small adaptation scenario. We found that correlations are stronger as the neuron fires at a particular firing rate, which is defined by the adaptation process. When set in a subthreshold regime, the neuron may sustain this particular firing rate, and thus induce correlations, by noise. Given that, in this regime, interspike intervals are negatively correlated at any lag, this effect surprisingly implies a reduction in the variability of the spike count statistics at a finite noise intensity.

  12. A deficiency in cold-inducible RNA-binding protein accelerates the inflammation phase and improves wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo, Juan Pablo; Jacob, Asha; Yang, Weng Lang; Wang, Zhimin; Yen, Hao Ting; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Chronic or non-healing wounds are a major concern in clinical practice and these wounds are mostly associated with diabetes, and venous and pressure ulcers. Wound healing is a complex process involving overlapping phases and the primary phase in this complex cascade is the inflammatory state. While inflammation is necessary for wound healing, a prolonged inflammatory phase leads to impaired healing. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) belongs to a family of cold-shock proteins that are expressed in high levels under stress conditions. Recently, we demonstrated that a deficiency in CIRP led to decreased inflammation and mortality in an experimental model of hemorrhagic shock. Thus, we hypothesized that a deficiency in CIRP would accelerate the inflammatory phase and lead to an improvement in cutaneous wound healing. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, a full-thickness wound was created on the dorsum of wild-type (WT) and CIRP-/- mice. The wound size was measured every other day for 14 days. The wound area was significantly decreased in the CIRP-/- mice by day 9 and continued to decrease until day 14 compared to the WT mice. In a separate cohort, mice were sacrificed on days 3 and 7 after wounding and the skin tissues were harvested for histological analysis and RNA measurements. On day 3, the mRNA expression of tumor necrossis factor (TNF)-α in the skin tissues was increased by 16-fold in the WT mice, whereas these levels were increased by 65-fold in the CIRP-/- mice. Of note on day 7, while the levels of TNF-α remained high in the WT mice, these levels were significantly decreased in the CIRP-/- mice. The histological analysis of the wounded skin tissue indicated an improvement as early as day 3 in the CIRP-/- mice, whereas in the WT mice, infiltrated immune cells were still present on day 7. On day 7 in the CIRP-/- mice, Gr-1 expression was low and CD31 expression was high, whereas in the WT mice, Gr-1 expression was high and CD31 expression was low

  13. Hydrogen peroxide induces adaptive response and differential gene expression in human embryo lung fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qinzhi; Huang, Haiyan; Yang, Linqing; Yuan, Jianhui; Yang, Xiaohua; Liu, Yungang; Zhuang, Zhixiong

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), a substance involved in cellular oxidative stress, has been observed to induce an adaptive response, which is characterized by a protection against the toxic effect of H2 O2 at higher concentrations. However, the molecular mechanism for the adaptive response remains unclear. In particular, the existing reports on H2 O2 -induced adaptive response are limited to animal cells and human tumor cells, and relatively normal human cells have never been observed for an adaptive response to H2 O2 . In this study, a human embryo lung fibroblast (MRC-5) cell line was used to model an adaptive response to H2 O2 , and the relevant differential gene expressions by using fluoro mRNA differential display RT-PCR. The results showed significant suppression of cytotoxicity of H2 O2 (1100 μM, 1 h) after pretreatment of the cells with H2 O2 at lower concentrations (0.088-8.8 μM, 24 h), as indicated by cell survival, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the rate of apoptotic cells. Totally 60 mRNA components were differentially expressed compared to untreated cells, and five of them (sizing 400-600 bp) which demonstrated the greatest increase in expression were cloned and sequenced. They showed identity with known genes, such as BCL-2, eIF3S5, NDUFS4, and RPS10. Real time RT-PCR analysis of the five genes displayed a pattern of differential expression consistent with that by the last method. These five genes may be involved in the induction of adaptive response by H2 O2 in human cells, at least in this particular cell type. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. PGC-1alpha in exercise- and exercise training-induced metabolic adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm

    . Furthermore the physical inactivity abolished the exercise-induced mRNA response of PGC-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in skeletal muscle that was present before bed rest. This indicates that just 7 days of physical inactivity reduces the metabolic capacity of human skeletal muscle...... and interferes with the exercise-induced adaptive response in human skeletal muscle. Study II demonstrates that mouse liver glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) mRNA content increased in recovery from acute exercise in both wildtype (WT) and PGC-1α knockout (KO) mice, while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK...... content in WT, but not in PGC-1α KO mice. This shows that exercise training increases UCP1, COXIV and CD31 protein in mouse iWAT, likely as a cumulative effect of transient increases in mRNA expression after each exercise bout, and that PGC-1α is required for these adaptations. Study IV demonstrates...

  15. Adaptation to Delayed Speech Feedback Induces Temporal Recalibration between Vocal Sensory and Auditory Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yamamoto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We ordinarily perceive our voice sound as occurring simultaneously with vocal production, but the sense of simultaneity in vocalization can be easily interrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF. DAF causes normal people to have difficulty speaking fluently but helps people with stuttering to improve speech fluency. However, the underlying temporal mechanism for integrating the motor production of voice and the auditory perception of vocal sound remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the temporal tuning mechanism integrating vocal sensory and voice sounds under DAF with an adaptation technique. Participants read some sentences with specific delay times of DAF (0, 30, 75, 120 ms during three minutes to induce ‘Lag Adaptation’. After the adaptation, they then judged the simultaneity between motor sensation and vocal sound given feedback in producing simple voice but not speech. We found that speech production with lag adaptation induced a shift in simultaneity responses toward the adapted auditory delays. This indicates that the temporal tuning mechanism in vocalization can be temporally recalibrated after prolonged exposure to delayed vocal sounds. These findings suggest vocalization is finely tuned by the temporal recalibration mechanism, which acutely monitors the integration of temporal delays between motor sensation and vocal sound.

  16. Low-Dose UVA Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultured Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongrong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the mechanism of the adaptive response induced by low-dose ultraviolet A (UVA radiation. Methods. Cultured dermal fibroblasts were irradiated by a lethal dose of UVA (86.4 J/cm2 with preirradiation of single or repetitive low dose of UVA (7.2 J/cm2. Alterations of cellular morphology were observed by light microscope and electron microscope. Cell cycle and cellular apoptosis were assayed by flow cytometer. The extent of DNA damage was determined by single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE. Results. The cultured dermal fibroblasts, with pretreatment of single or repetitive irradiation of 7.2 J/cm2 UVA relieved toxic reaction of cellular morphology and arrest of cell cycle, decreased apoptosis ratio, reduced DNA chain breakage, and accelerated DNA repair caused by subsequent 86.4 J/cm2 UVA irradiation. Compared with nonpretreatment groups, all those differences were significant (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Conclusions. The adaptation reaction might depend on the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA irradiation. Low-dose UVA radiation might induce adaptive response that may protect cultured dermal fibroblasts from the subsequent challenged dose of UVA damage. The duration and protective capability of the adaptive reaction might be related to the accumulated dose of low-dose UVA Irradiation.

  17. Artificial cold exposure induced stroke in renovascular hypertensive rats and its association with cold-inducible RNA binding protein mRNA expression in brain tissue and blood pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High incidence of stroke at interchange period of autumn and winter was demonstrated by epidemiological survey, and the specific causes should be further investigated.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of artificial cold exposure on the incidence of stroke in renovascular hypertensive rats (RHR), and analyze the association with blood pressure and cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP) mRNA expression in brain tissue.DESIGN: A completely randomized grouping design, a randomized control animal trial.SETTINGS: Lab of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University; Department of Chemistry, Open laboratory of Chemical Biology, Institute of Molecular Technology for Drug Discovery and Synthesis, University of Hong Kong.MATERIALS: Male SD rats (n =460), weighing 80- 100 g were obtained from Guangdong Province Health Animal Unit. A modified RXZ-300A intelligent artificial climate cabinet (Ningbo Jiangnan Instrument Co.,Ltd., China).METHODS: The experiment were processed in the Lab of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University and the Open Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Institute of Molecular Technology for Drug Discovery and Synthesis, University of Hong Kong from October 2004 to November 2005. Rats (n =400) were operated to establish 2-kidney 2-clip RHR model as described previously. The sham-operated rats (n =60) served as normotensive controls. Eight weeks later, 300 of RHR were randomly selected according to their systolic blood pressure (SBP) and divided into 3 sub-groups (n =100 per group): mild hypertensive group (SBP of 160 - 200 mm Hg), moderate hypertensive group (SBP of 200 - 220 mm Hg) and severe hypertensive group (SBP > 220 mm Hg). Each group was further divided into two groups (n =50) under ACE and non-ACE. Normal sham-operated SD rats (n =60), SBP < 140 mm Hg, were randomly divided into two groups: Sham-operated control group (n =30) under ACE and non-ACE. To establish the ACE and non

  18. The Role of Exercise-Induced Cardiovascular Adaptation in Brain Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, Takashi; Zhang, Rong

    2015-10-01

    Regular aerobic exercise improves brain health; however, a potential dose-response relationship and the underling physiological mechanisms remain unclear. Existing data support the following hypotheses: 1) exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation plays an important role in improving brain perfusion, structure, and function, and 2) a hormetic relation seems to exist between the intensity of exercise and brain health, which needs to be further elucidated.

  19. Recurrent restriction of sleep and inadequate recuperation induce both adaptive changes and pathological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Carol A; Szabo, Aniko

    2009-11-01

    Chronic restriction of a basic biological need induces adaptations to help meet requisites for survival. The adaptations to chronic restriction of sleep are unknown. A single episode of 10 days of partial sleep loss in rats previously was shown to be tolerated and to result in increased food intake and loss of body weight as principal signs. The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate the extent to which adaptation to chronic sleep restriction would ameliorate short-term effects and result in a changed internal phenotype. Rats were studied during 10 wk of multiple periods of restricted and unrestricted sleep to allow adaptive changes to develop. Control rats received the same ambulatory requirements only consolidated into periods that lessened interruptions of their sleep. The results indicate a latent period of relatively stable food and water intake without weight gain, followed by a dynamic phase marked by enormous increases in food and water intake and progressive loss of body weight, without malabsorption of calories. Severe consequences ensued, marked especially by changes to the connective tissues, and became fatal for two individuals. The most striking changes to internal organs in sleep-restricted rats included lengthening of the small intestine, decreased size of adipocytes, and increased incidence of multilocular adipocytes. Major organs accounted for an increased proportion of total body mass. These changes to internal tissues appear adaptive in response to high energy production, decomposition of lipids, and increased need to absorb nutrients, but ultimately insufficient to compensate for inadequate sleep.

  20. Effects of Copper-phenanthroline on Pentschlorophenol-induced Adaptation and Cell Death of Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE-WEN ZHANG; RONG-GUI LI; XIN WANG; SHUAN-HU ZHOU

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of copper-phenanthroline (CuOP) on pentachlorophenol (PCP)-induced adaptation and cell death of Escherichia coli. Methods Bacterial growth and adaptation to PCP were monitored spectrophotometrically at 600 nm. Inactivation of bacterial cells was determined from colony count on agar dishes. Cellular ATP content and accumulation of PCP were assessed by chemiluminescence and HPLC analysis respectively. The formation of PCP-Cu-OP complex was shown by UV-visible spectra. Results Escherichia coli (E. coli) could adapt to PCP, a wood preservative and insecticide used in agriculture. The adaptation of E. coli to PCP prevented its death to the synergistic cytotoxicity of CuOP plus PCP and declined cellular accumulation and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylafion of PCP. Furthermore, CuOP and PCP neither produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) nor had a synergistic effect on uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in E.coli. The synergistic cytotoxicity of CuOP and PCP in E. coli might be due to the formation of lipophillc PCP-Cu-OP complex.Conclsion Our data suggested that adaptation of E. coli to PCP decreased the synergistic effects of CuOP and PCP on prokaryotic cell death due to the formation of lipophilic PCP-Cu-OP complex, but it had no effect on the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and production of reactive oxygen species in E. coli.

  1. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses reveal a response mechanism to cold stress in Santalum album L. leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinhua; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.; Niu, Meiyun; Li, Mingzhi; He, Chunmei; Zhao, Jinhui; Zeng, Songjun; Duan, Jun; Ma, Guohua

    2017-01-01

    Santalum album L. (Indian sandalwood) is an economically important plant species because of its ability to produce highly valued perfume oils. Little is known about the mechanisms by which S. album adapts to low temperatures. In this study, we obtained 100,445,724 raw reads by paired-end sequencing from S. album leaves. Physiological and transcriptomic changes in sandalwood seedlings exposed to 4 °C for 0–48 h were characterized. Cold stress induced the accumulation of malondialdehyde, proline and soluble carbohydrates, and increased the levels of antioxidants. A total of 4,424 differentially expressed genes were responsive to cold, including 3,075 cold-induced and 1,349 cold-repressed genes. When cold stress was prolonged, there was an increase in the expression of cold-responsive genes coding for transporters, responses to stimuli and stress, regulation of defense response, as well as genes related to signal transduction of all phytohormones. Candidate genes in the terpenoid biosynthetic pathway were identified, eight of which were significantly involved in the cold stress response. Gene expression analyses using qRT-PCR showed a peak in the accumulation of SaCBF2 to 4, 50-fold more than control leaves and roots following 12 h and 24 h of cold stress, respectively. The CBF-dependent pathway may play a crucial role in increasing cold tolerance. PMID:28169358

  2. Adapting to the new world: Mexico’s International Strategy of Economic Development at the outset of the Cold War, 1946-1952

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pettinà, Vanni

    2015-01-01

    ...) and the beginning of the Cold War, posed for the country’s economic development plans. Drawing largely on new Mexican primary sources along with American, British, and multilateral organizations...

  3. Intracerebroventricular administration of leptin increase physical activity but has no effect on thermogenesis in cold-acclimated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Gang-Bin; Tang, Xiang-Fang; Li, Kui; Wang, De-Hua

    2015-06-08

    Most small homotherms display low leptin level in response to chronic cold exposure. Cold-induced hypoleptinemia was proved to induce hyperphagia. However, it is still not clear whether hypoleptinemia regulates energy expenditure in cold condition. We try to answer this question in chronic cold-acclimated rats. Results showed that 5-day intracerebroventricular(ICV) infusion of leptin (5 μg/day) had no effects on basal and adaptive thermogenesis and uncoupling protein 1 expression. Physical activity was increased by leptin treatment. We further determined whether ghrelin could reverse the increasing effect of leptin on physical activity. Coadministration of ghrelin (1.2 μg/day) completely reversed the effect of leptin on physical activity. Collectively, this study indicated the regulation of leptin on energy expenditure during cold acclimation may be mainly mediated by physical activity but not by thermogenesis. Our study outlined behavioral role of leptin during the adaptation to cold, which adds some new knowledge to promote our understanding of cold-induced metabolic adaptation.

  4. Vagal afferents are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptive growth in orally fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David W; Liu, Xiaowen; Holst, Jens J; Raybould, Helen E; Ney, Denise M

    2006-11-01

    Small bowel resection stimulates intestinal adaptive growth by a neuroendocrine process thought to involve both sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation and enterotrophic hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). We investigated whether capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal growth. Rats received systemic or perivagal capsaicin or ganglionectomy before 70% midjejunoileal resection or transection and were fed orally or by total parenteral nutrition (TPN) for 7 days after surgery. Growth of residual bowel was assessed by changes in mucosal mass, protein, DNA, and histology. Both systemic and perivagal capsaicin significantly attenuated by 48-100% resection-induced increases in ileal mucosal mass, protein, and DNA in rats fed orally. Villus height was significantly reduced in resected rats given capsaicin compared with vehicle. Sucrase specific activity in jejunal mucosa was not significantly different; ileal mucosal sucrase specific activity was significantly increased by resection in capsaicin-treated rats. Capsaicin did not alter the 57% increase in ileal proglucagon mRNA or the 150% increase in plasma concentration of bioactive GLP-2 resulting from resection in orally fed rats. Ablation of spinal/splanchnic innervation by ganglionectomy failed to attenuate resection-induced adaptive growth. In TPN rats, capsaicin did not attenuate resection-induced mucosal growth. We conclude that vagal afferents are not essential for GLP-2 secretion when the ileum has direct contact with luminal nutrients after resection. In summary, vagal afferent neurons are essential for maximal resection-induced intestinal adaptation through a mechanism that appears to involve stimulation by luminal nutrients.

  5. GhCAX3 gene, a novel Ca(2+/H(+ exchanger from cotton, confers regulation of cold response and ABA induced signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian Xu

    Full Text Available As a second messenger, Ca(2+ plays a major role in cold induced transduction via stimulus-specific increases in [Ca(2+]cyt, which is called calcium signature. During this process, CAXs (Ca(2+/H(+ exchangers play critical role. For the first time, a putative Ca(2+/H(+ exchanger GhCAX3 gene from upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum cv. 'YZ-1' was isolated and characterized. It was highly expressed in all tissues of cotton except roots and fibers. This gene may act as a regulator in cotton's response to abiotic stresses as it could be up-regulated by Ca(2+, NaCl, ABA and cold stress. Similar to other CAXs, it was proved that GhCAX3 also had Ca(2+ transport activity and the N-terminal regulatory region (NRR through yeast complementation assay. Over-expression of GhCAX3 in tobacco showed less sensitivity to ABA during seed germination and seedling stages, and the phenotypic difference between wild type (WT and transgenic plants was more significant when the NRR was truncated. Furthermore, GhCAX3 conferred cold tolerance in yeast as well as in tobacco seedlings based on physiological and molecular studies. However, transgenic plant seeds showed more sensitivity to cold stress compared to WT during seed germination, especially when expressed in N-terminal truncated version. Finally, the extent of sensitivity in transgenic lines was more severe than that in WT line under sodium tungstate treatment (an ABA repressor, indicating that ABA could alleviate cold sensitivity of GhCAX3 seeds, especially in short of its NRR. Meanwhile, we also found that overexpression of GhCAX3 could enhance some cold and ABA responsive marker genes. Taken together, these results suggested that GhCAX3 plays important roles in the cross-talk of ABA and cold signal transduction, and compared to full-length of GhCAX3, the absence of NRR could enhance the tolerance or sensitivity to cold stress, depending on seedling's developmental stages.

  6. Response of the Adriatic Sea to an intense cold air outbreak: Dense water dynamics and wave-induced transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetazzo, A.; Bergamasco, A.; Bonaldo, D.; Falcieri, F. M.; Sclavo, M.; Langone, L.; Carniel, S.

    2014-11-01

    The paper describes formation and spreading of dense shelf waters in the Adriatic Sea (North Adriatic Dense Water, NAdDW) during the winter of 2012 as a consequence of an intense and long cold air outbreak of northeasterly Bora winds. As a result, during February 2012 northern Adriatic Sea water temperature dropped to about 6 °C and density exceeded 1030 kg/m3, most likely the maximum value since 1929. NAdDW dynamics has been investigated by means of a 3-D ocean-wave coupled model running on a high resolution and eddy-permitting grid. The numerical experiments have relied on the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment-Transport (COAWST) system forced one-way with atmospheric forcings provided by the model COSMO-I7. A suite of observational data has been used to characterize the Bora event and evaluate numerical model performance. At sub-basin scales, the newly formed waters flowing southerly have produced a water renewal of the northern Adriatic, as more than 50% of water volumes have left the basin. Dense waters volume transports, evaluated through different Adriatic cross-sections, have been modulated by tides (damped for the densest water masses) and reached about 1 Sv. The contribution of wave-induced forcings has been quantified and examined, indicating that these represent a major driving mechanism during NAdDW production and spreading phases. This work provides evidence that NAdDW is spread accordingly with two different mechanisms: at early stages of its formation, the wind-driven ocean circulation pushes newly formed waters to leave the northern basin with relatively high speeds (about 0.30 m/s). Later on, remaining NAdDW leaks slowly out (0.09 m/s as average) from the production site. Residence times of dense waters in the north, middle, and south Adriatic Sea are also documented.

  7. Electron spectroscopic analysis of the human lipid skin barrier: cold atmospheric plasma-induced changes in lipid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschewski, Marcel; Hirschberg, Joanna; Omairi, Tarek; Höfft, Oliver; Viöl, Wolfgang; Emmert, Steffen; Maus-Friedrichs, Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    The lipids of the stratum corneum comprise the most important components of the skin barrier. In patients with ichthyoses or atopic dermatitis, the composition of the skin barrier lipids is disturbed resulting in dry, scaly, itching erythematous skin. Using the latest X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) technology, we investigated the physiological skin lipid composition of human skin and the effects of cold atmospheric plasma treatment on the lipid composition. Skin lipids were stripped off forearms of six healthy volunteers using the cyanoacrylate glue technique, plasma treated or not and then subjected to detailed XPS analysis. We found that the human lipid skin barrier consisted of 84.4% carbon (+1.3 SEM%), 10.8% oxygen (+1.0 SEM%) and 4.8% nitrogen (+0.3 SEM%). The composition of physiological skin lipids was not different in males and females. Plasma treatment resulted in significant changes in skin barrier lipid stoichiometry. The total carbon amount was reduced to 76.7%, and the oxygen amount increased to 16.5%. There was also a slight increase in nitrogen to 6.8%. These changes could be attributed to reduced C-C bonds and increased C-O, C=O, C-N and N-C-O bonds. The moderate increase in nitrogen was caused by an increase in C-N and N-C-O bonds. Our results show for the first time that plasma treatment leads to considerable changes in the human skin lipid barrier. Our proof of principle investigations established the technical means to analyse, if plasma-induced skin lipid barrier changes may be beneficial in the treatment of ichthyotic or eczematous skin.

  8. Automated quantitation of cold-inducible human brown adipose tissue with FDG PET/CT with application to fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, José V; Lee, Joel T; Larson, Robert C; Thuras, Paul; Larson, Alice A

    2017-01-01

    Increasing recognition of the importance of brown adipose tissue (BAT) motivates the development of reproducible and quantitative methods for measuring it. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computerized tomography (CT) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has become the principal method to non-invasively detect brown adipose tissue (BAT) in humans. Improvements in quantitation and standardization will drive further clinical application. One disorder hypothesized to involve dysregulation in thermoregulation and the processing of pain involving BAT is fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). This report describes an approach with additional technical standardization to measure cold-inducible, BAT activity (ci-BAT) semi-quantitatively and reliably with minimal operator intervention with the FDG PET/CT technique. Ci-BAT was measured to test whether FMS patients have decreased BAT activation compared to normal controls. Threshold parameters to optimally separate ci-BAT from non-ci-BAT were developed based on the distribution of the pixel-wise parametric data from each merged PET/CT scan for each study session occurring on different days. BAT activity was the same under warm conditions in both control and FMS subjects attesting to reproducibility and reliability. However, considerable variability arose between groups at cool temperatures consistent with other literature. Increases in ci-BAT activity were significantly less in FMS patients than in controls, as hypothesized. Ci-BAT recruitment can be quantified non-invasively using FDG PET/CT using semi-automated techniques in human subjects across different diagnostic groups or within groups undergoing manipulations of interest. PMID:28123865

  9. Radio-adaptive Response in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging Induced by Technetium-99m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mohammad Mehdi; Shabestani-Monfared, Ali; Shahidi, Maryam; Amiri, Mehrangiz; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Borzoueisileh, Sajad; Gorji, Kourosh Ebrahim Nejad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Low dose radiation will induce adaptation and following exposure to an adaptive dose, the cells are more resistance to following challenging doses. This phenomenon is known as radio-adaptive response. The aim of this study was to investigate the percentage of apoptotic cells in the peripheral blood samples of the patients which undergo myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) before thallium scan to assess the induction of radio-adaptive response. Materials and Methods: In this study, 97 samples from 74 patients, referred to nuclear medicine center of Mazandaran Heart Hospital for MPI, which had no history of diagnostic, therapeutic, occupational, and radioactive exposures during past 2 years, were provided. The participants were classified into four groups including control, patients which were scanned solely with technetium, the patients which examined by thallium and the last group were the patients that examined by technetium followed by thallium. Then 2 ml Peripheral blood samples were obtained, and after 24 h incubating, the samples were studied by neutral comet assay. Statistical analysis was carried out using Student's t-test along with one-way analysis of variance. Results: The mean percentage of apoptotic cells in the exposed groups were higher than the control. Furthermore, among exposed groups, the apoptotic cells in thallium group were more than others and this index was significantly lower in the group which was undergone technetium administration before thallium scan. Conclusions: These findings suggest that exposure to Tc-99m could induce a radio-adaptive response against the exposure of thallium-201.

  10. Bystander effects, adaptive response and genomic instability induced by prenatal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, Christian [Institute for Science and Ethics, University Duisburg-Essen, Auf dem Sutan 12, D-45239 Essen (Germany)]. E-mail: streffer.essen@t-online.de

    2004-12-02

    The developing human embryo and fetus undergo very radiosensitive stages during the prenatal development. It is likely that the induction of low dose related effects such as bystander effects, the adaptive response, and genomic instability would have profound effects on embryonic and fetal development. In this paper, I review what has been reported on the induction of these three phenomena in exposed embryos and fetuses. All three phenomena have been shown to occur in murine embryonic or fetal cells and structures, although the induction of an adaptive response (and also likely the induction of bystander effects) are limited in terms of when during development they can be induced and the dose or dose-rate used to treat animals in utero. In contrast, genomic instability can be induced throughout development, and the effects of radiation exposure on genome instability can be observed for long times after irradiation including through pre- and postnatal development and into the next generation of mice. There are clearly strain-specific differences in the induction of these phenomena and all three can lead to long-term detrimental effects. This is true for the adaptive response as well. While induction of an adaptive response can make fetuses more resistant to some gross developmental defects induced by a subsequent high dose challenge with ionizing radiation, the long-term effects of this low dose exposure are detrimental. The negative effects of all three phenomena reflect the complexity of fetal development, a process where even small changes in the timing of gene expression or suppression can have dramatic effects on the pattern of biological events and the subsequent development of the mammalian organism.

  11. Ionizing radiation-induced adaptive response in fibroblasts under both monolayer and 3-dimensional conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinlong; Zhong, Rui; Sun, Liguang; Jia, Jie; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    To observe the adaptive response (AR) induced by ionizing radiation in human fibroblasts under monolayer and 3-dimensional (3-D) condition. Three kinds of fibroblasts were cultured under both monolayer and 3-D condition. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect the γ-H2AX foci and the morphological texture. Trypan blue staining was used to detect the cell death. Western blot was used to detect the expressions of γ-H2AX, p53 and CDKN1A/p21 (p21). We found that DNA damage increased in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner after high doses of radiation. When cells were pretreated with a priming low dose of radiation followed by high dose radiation, DNA damage was attenuated under both monolayer and 3-D condition, and the adaptive response (AR) was induced. Additionally, the morphology of cells under monolayer and 3-D conditions were different, and radiation also induced AR according to morphological texture analysis. Priming low dose radiation induced AR both under monolayer and 3-D condition. Interestingly, 3-D microenvironment made cells more sensitive to radiation. The expression of p53 and p21 was changed and indicated that they might participate in the regulation of AR.

  12. Cold-induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Heus, R.

    1995-01-01

    Handen van mensen met een koude of warme lichaamskern werden blootgesteld aan koude. Na een aanvankelijke daling van de handtemperatuur als gevolg van de koude steeg de handtemperatuur. Met een warme kern trad het verschijnsel eerder op en de uiteindelijke handtemperatuur bereikte hogere waarden.

  13. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J M; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4(+) central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target.

  14. AMPKα in Exercise-Induced Substrate Metabolism and Exercise Training-Induced Metabolic and Mitochondrial Adaptations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Joachim

    in response to 4 weeks of voluntary running wheel exercise training. However, the acute exercise-induced increase in mRNA expression of several metabolic and mitochondrial marker genes is impaired in the mice lacking AMPKα1 and α2. In addition to the two studies and some currently unpublished data this thesis...

  15. Cold Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Previous Next Related Articles: Canker and Cold Sores Aloe Vera May Help Relieve Mouth Sores Canker Sore or Cold Sore? Mouth Sores: Caused By Student Stress? games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's Oral Health | Newsroom | RSS About AGD | Contact AGD | Site Map | ...

  16. Direct investigations on strain-induced cold crystallization behavior and structure evolutions in amorphous poly(lactic acid) with SAXS and WAXS measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Li, Hongfei; Zhang, Wenyang

    2016-01-01

    Strain-induced cold crystallization behavior and structure evolution of amorphous poly(lactic acid) (PLA) stretched within 70-90 degrees C were investigated via in situ synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements as well as differential...... first then forms crystal with strain increasing. The stacked structure consisting of less perfect crystalline phase, mesocrystal and oriented amorphous phase emerges at the final stage of stretching. Drawing at 80 degrees C, only the crystal can be induced at lower strain with higher crystallization...... in strain-induced crystallization behavior of amorphous PLA within 70-90 degrees C can be attributed to the competition between chain orientation caused by stretching and chain relaxation. It was proposed that the strain-induced mesocrystal/crystal and the lamellae are formed from the mesophase originally...

  17. Wind energy under cold climate conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B.

    1999-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in wind energy production under different climatic conditions, among them cold climate and icing conditions. More and more wind turbines are being installed in cold climates and even adapted technology has been developed for that environment. Various national activities are going on in at least Finland, Canada, Italy, Sweden, etc. and international collaboration has been carried out within the European Union's Non-nuclear energy programme. Wind turbine operation is affected by both the cold temperatures and the formation of ice on the blades and the supporting structure. Cold temperatures can be handled by material selections known in other technical fields but to prevent icing, new techniques have to be - and have been - developed. Icing affects the reliability of anemometers, which concerns both turbine control and resource estimation, and changes the aerodynamics of the blades, which eventually stops the turbine. In addition, occasional icing events can locally affect public safety. The development of applied technology has entered some different paths and different solutions are tried out. As the applications are entering a commercial phase, these is a request to gather the experiences and monitor the reliability in a form that can be utilised by developers, manufactureres, consultants and other tenderers. The Topical Experts Meeting will focus on site classification, operational experiences, modelling and mesurements of ice induced loads and safety aspects. (EHS)

  18. Cold induces acute stress but heat is ultimately more deleterious for the reef-building coral Acropora yongei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Melissa S; Goericke, Ralf; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2012-01-01

    Climate change driven increases in intensity and frequency of both hot and cold extreme events contribute to coral reef decline by causing widespread coral bleaching and mortality. Here, we show that hot and cold temperature changes cause distinct physiological responses on different time scales in reef-building corals. We exposed the branching coral Acropora yongei in individual aquaria to a ± 5°C temperature change. Compared to heat-treated corals, cold-treated corals initially show greater declines in growth and increases in photosynthetic pressure. However, after 2-3 weeks, cold-treated corals acclimate and show improvements in physiological state. In contrast, heat did not initially harm photochemical efficiency, but after a delay, photosynthetic pressure increased rapidly and corals experienced severe bleaching and cessation of growth. These results suggest that short-term cold temperature is more damaging for branching corals than short-term warm temperature, whereas long-term elevated temperature is more harmful than long-term depressed temperature.

  19. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils by cold-adapted microorganisms:Research advance%低温微生物修复石油烃类污染土壤研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世杰; 王翔; 卢桂兰; 汪群慧; 李发生; 郭观林

    2011-01-01

    Cold-adapted microorganisms such as psychrotrophs and psychrophiles widely exist in the soils of sub-Arctic, Arctic, Antarctic, alpine, and high mountains, being the important microbial resources for the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at low temperature. Using the unique advantage of cold-adapted microorganisms to the bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in low temperature region has become a research hotspot. This paper summarized the category and cold-adaptation mechanisms of the microorganisms able to degrade petroleum hydrocarbon at low temperature, biodegradation characteristics and mechanisms of different petroleum fractions under the action of cold-adapted microorganisms. bio-stimulation techniques for improving biodegradation efficiency, e. g. , inoculating petroleum-degrading microorganisms and adding nutrients or bio-surfactants. and the present status of applying molecular biotechnology in this research field,aimed to provide references to the development of bioremediation techniques for petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soils.%耐冷菌、嗜冷菌等低温微生物广泛存在于极地、高山以及高纬度等土壤环境中,是石油烃类污染物在低温条件下降解与转化的重要微生物资源.利用低温微生物的独特优势,石油污染土壤的低温生物修复技术的研究成为当前热点领域.本文系统综述了低温石油烃降解菌的分类及冷适机制,低温微生物对不同类型石油烃组分的降解特征和降解机理,低温环境中接种降解菌、添加营养物质和表面活性剂等强化技术在石油污染土壤中生物修复的应用.以及微生物分子生物学技术在低温微生物降解石油烃的研究现状,为拓展我国石油污染土壤生物修复技术提供参考.

  20. Differentiating maturational influence on training-induced strength and endurance adaptations in prepubescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marta, Carlos C; Marinho, Daniel A; Izquierdo, Mikel; Marques, Mário C

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of biological maturation on training-induced strength and endurance adaptations in the prepubertal growth spurt. One hundred and twenty-five healthy children (58 boys, 67 girls), aged 10-11 years old (10.8 ± 0.4 years), who were self-assessed as belonging to Tanner stages I and II, were randomly divided into two experimental groups, a strength training group (19 boys, 22 girls) and an endurance training group (21 boys, 24 girls) that would train twice a week for 8 weeks, as well as a control group (18 boys, 21 girls; no training program). After 8 weeks of training, there were improvements in all strength and endurance measures (P children. No significant differences in training response were observed relative to biological maturity or gender (P > 0.05). These data suggest that more biologically mature prepubescent children seem to have no advantage in training-induced strength and endurance adaptations compared with their less mature peers. Additionally, gender did not affect the training-induced changes in strength or aerobic fitness. These results are meaningful for the development of optimized well-rounded training programs in prepubertal children. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 26:469-475, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Acetobacter pasteurianus metabolic change induced by initial acetic acid to adapt to acetic acid fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Renkuan; Yin, Haisong; Bai, Xiaolei; Chang, Yangang; Xia, Menglei; Wang, Min

    2017-08-02

    Initial acetic acid can improve the ethanol oxidation rate of acetic acid bacteria for acetic acid fermentation. In this work, Acetobacter pasteurianus was cultured in ethanol-free medium, and energy production was found to increase by 150% through glucose consumption induced by initial acetic acid. However, oxidation of ethanol, instead of glucose, became the main energy production pathway when upon culturing ethanol containing medium. Proteome assay was used to analyze the metabolism change induced by initial acetic acid, which provided insight into carbon metabolic and energy regulation of A. pasteurianus to adapt to acetic acid fermentation conditions. Results were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. In summary, decreased intracellular ATP as a result of initial acetic acid inhibition improved the energy metabolism to produce more energy and thus adapt to the acetic acid fermentation conditions. A. pasteurianus upregulated the expression of enzymes related to TCA and ethanol oxidation to improve the energy metabolism pathway upon the addition of initial acetic acid. However, enzymes involved in the pentose phosphate pathway, the main pathway of glucose metabolism, were downregulated to induce a change in carbon metabolism. Additionally, the enhancement of alcohol dehydrogenase expression promoted ethanol oxidation and strengthened the acetification rate, thereby producing a strong proton motive force that was necessary for energy production and cell tolerance to acetic acid.

  2. Isolation and Expression Analysis of Two Cold-Inducible Genes Encoding Putative CBF Transcription Factors from Chinese Cabbage (Brassica pekinensis Rupr.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Two homologous genes of the Arabidopsis C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding factors (CBF/DREB1) transcriptional activator were isolated by RT-PCR from Chinese cabbage (Brassica pekinensis Rupr.cv. Qinbai 5) and were designated as BcCBF1 and BcCBF2. Each encodes a putative CBF/DREB1 protein with an AP2 (Apetal2) DNA-binding domain, a putative nuclear localization signal, and a possible acidic activation domain. Deduced amino acid sequences show that BcCBF1 is very similar to the Arabidopsis CBF1, whereas BcCBF2 is different in that it contains two extra regions of 24 and 20 amino acids in the acidic domain. The mRNA accumulation profiles indicated that the expression of BcCBF1 and BcCBF2 is strongly induced by cold treatment, but does not respond similarly to dehydration or abscisic acid (ABA) treatment. However,the cold-induced accumulation of BcCBF2 mRNA was rapid but short-lived compared with that of BcCBF1.The mRNA levels of both BcCBF1 and BcCBF2 were higher in leaves than in roots when plants were exposed to cold, whereas, salt stress caused higher accumulation of BcCBF2 mRNA in roots than in leaves,suggesting that the organ specificity of the gene expression of the BcCBFs is probably stress dependent.In addition, the accumulation of BcCBF1 and BcCBF2 mRNAs was greatly enhanced by light compared with darkness when seedlings were exposed to cold. It is concluded that the two BcCBF proteins may be involved in the process of plant response to cold stress through an ABA-independent pathway and that there is also a cross-talk between the light signaling conduction pathway and the cold response pathway in B. pekinensis as In Arabidopsis.

  3. Climate-induced community relocations: using integrated social-ecological assessments to foster adaptation and resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Bronen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Extreme weather events coupled with sea level rise and erosion will cause coastal and riverine areas where people live and maintain livelihoods to disappear permanently. Adaptation to these environmental changes, including the permanent relocation of millions of people, requires new governance tools. In the USA, local governments, often with state-level and national-level support, will be primarily responsible for protecting residents from climate-change impacts and implementing policies needed to protect their welfare. Government agencies have a variety of tools to facilitate protection in place and managed coastal retreat but have very limited tools to facilitate community relocation. In addition, no institutional mechanism currently exists to determine whether and when preventive relocation needs to occur to protect people from climate change impacts. Based on research involving four Alaska Native communities threatened by climate-induced environmental impacts, I propose the design and implementation of an adaptive governance framework to respond to the need to relocate populations. In this context, adaptive governance means the ability of institutions to dynamically respond to climate change impacts. A component of this adaptive governance framework is a social-ecological monitoring and assessment tool that can facilitate collaborative knowledge production by community residents and governance institutions to guide sustainable adaptation strategies and determine whether and when relocation needs to occur. The framework, including the monitoring and assessment tool, has not been systematically tested. However, the potential use of this tool is discussed by drawing on empirical examples of Alaskan communities faced with accelerating rates of erosion.

  4. Reduction of skin stretch induced motion artifacts in electrocardiogram monitoring using adaptive filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Pecht, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of electrocardiogram (ECG) monitors can be significantly impaired by motion artifacts which can cause misdiagnoses, lead to inappropriate treatment decisions, and trigger false alarms. Skin stretch associated with patient motion is a significant source of motion artifacts in current ECG monitoring. In this study, motion artifacts are adaptively filtered by using skin strain as the reference variable. Skin strain is measured non-invasively using a light emitting diode (LED) and an optical sensor incorporated in an ECG electrode. The results demonstrate that this device and method can significantly reduce skin strain induced ECG artifacts.

  5. Adapting to the new world: Mexico’s International Strategy of Economic Development at the outset of the Cold War, 1946-1952

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pettinà, Vanni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed at analyzing Mexico’s attempts to overcome the obstacles that the new international context, shaped by the end of World War II (WWII and the beginning of the Cold War, posed for the country’s economic development plans. Drawing largely on new Mexican primary sources along with American, British, and multilateral organizations’ documents, this work will focus on the strategy that the Miguel Alemán administration (1946-1952 designed in order to adapt to the adverse conditions that the bipolar conflict generated for Latin America’s industrial developmental projects. This article will show that in spite of the adverse setting, the Alemán government was able to create and launch an ambitious plan for economic industrialization that implemented developmental measures on a large scale. In addition, this work will also show that a crucial ingredient for the initial success of Mexico’s economic strategy was the country’s capacity to attract economic aid and political support from Washington. Paradoxically, this happened at a time when the United States’ (US economic and political backing of Latin American developmental projects had become a scarce currency in the Western Hemisphere.Este artículo tiene como objetivo analizar los intentos de México para superar los obstáculos que el nuevo contexto internacional, dibujado por el final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial y por el comienzo de la Guerra Fría, planteó para los planes de desarrollo económico del país. Basado en gran parte sobre nuevas fuentes documentales mexicanas, además de estadounidenses, británicas y de organizaciones internacionales multilaterales, este trabajo se centra en la estrategia que la administración de Miguel Alemán (1946-1952 puso en marcha para adaptarse a las condiciones adversas que el conflicto bipolar generó para los proyectos de desarrollo industrial de América Latina. Este artículo muestra que, a pesar del escenario adverso, la

  6. Transcriptomic analysis of (group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 cold shock response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Dahlsten

    Full Text Available Profound understanding of the mechanisms foodborne pathogenic bacteria utilize in adaptation to the environmental stress they encounter during food processing and storage is of paramount importance in design of control measures. Chill temperature is a central control measure applied in minimally processed foods; however, data on the mechanisms the foodborne pathogen Clostridium botulinum activates upon cold stress are scarce. Transcriptomic analysis on the C. botulinum ATCC 3502 strain upon temperature downshift from 37°C to 15°C was performed to identify the cold-responsive gene set of this organism. Significant up- or down-regulation of 16 and 11 genes, respectively, was observed 1 h after the cold shock. At 5 h after the temperature downshift, 199 and 210 genes were up- or down-regulated, respectively. Thus, the relatively small gene set affected initially indicated a targeted acute response to cold shock, whereas extensive metabolic remodeling appeared to take place after prolonged exposure to cold. Genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis, oxidative stress response, and iron uptake and storage were induced, in addition to mechanisms previously characterized as cold-tolerance related in bacteria. Furthermore, several uncharacterized DNA-binding transcriptional regulator-encoding genes were induced, suggesting involvement of novel regulatory mechanisms in the cold shock response of C. botulinum. The role of such regulators, CBO0477 and CBO0558A, in cold tolerance of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was demonstrated by deteriorated growth of related mutants at 17°C.

  7. Transcriptomic analysis of (group I) Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 cold shock response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsten, Elias; Isokallio, Marita; Somervuo, Panu; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Profound understanding of the mechanisms foodborne pathogenic bacteria utilize in adaptation to the environmental stress they encounter during food processing and storage is of paramount importance in design of control measures. Chill temperature is a central control measure applied in minimally processed foods; however, data on the mechanisms the foodborne pathogen Clostridium botulinum activates upon cold stress are scarce. Transcriptomic analysis on the C. botulinum ATCC 3502 strain upon temperature downshift from 37°C to 15°C was performed to identify the cold-responsive gene set of this organism. Significant up- or down-regulation of 16 and 11 genes, respectively, was observed 1 h after the cold shock. At 5 h after the temperature downshift, 199 and 210 genes were up- or down-regulated, respectively. Thus, the relatively small gene set affected initially indicated a targeted acute response to cold shock, whereas extensive metabolic remodeling appeared to take place after prolonged exposure to cold. Genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis, oxidative stress response, and iron uptake and storage were induced, in addition to mechanisms previously characterized as cold-tolerance related in bacteria. Furthermore, several uncharacterized DNA-binding transcriptional regulator-encoding genes were induced, suggesting involvement of novel regulatory mechanisms in the cold shock response of C. botulinum. The role of such regulators, CBO0477 and CBO0558A, in cold tolerance of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was demonstrated by deteriorated growth of related mutants at 17°C.

  8. Effects of Adrenergic Blockade on Postpartum Adaptive Responses Induced by Labor Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, April E.; Mills, N. A.; Lam, K. P.; Hayes, L. E.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to labor contractions augments the expression of postnatal adaptive responses in newborn rats. Near-term rat fetuses exposed prenatally to simulated labor contractions and delivered by cesarean section breath and attach to nipples at greater frequencies than non-stimulated fetuses. Plasma NE (norepinephrine) and EPI (epinephrine) was significantly elevated in newborn rats exposed to vaginal birth or simulated labor contractions (compressions) with cesarean delivery as compared to non-compressed fetuses. In the present study, we investigated adrenergic mechanisms underlying labor-induced postnatal adaptive responses. Following spinal transection of late pregnant rat dams, fetuses were administered neurogenic or non-neurogenic adrenergic blockade: 1) bretylium (10 mg/kg sc) to prevent sympathetic neuronal release, 2) hexamethonium (30 mg/kg) to produce ganglionic blockade, 3) phenoxybenzanune (10mg/kg sc), an a- adrenergic receptor antagonist, 4) ICI-118551, 10 mg/kg sc), a b receptor antagonist, or 5) vehicle alone. Fetuses were either compressed (C) or non-compressed (NC) prior to cesarean delivery. a- and b- adrenergic antagonists reduced respiration and nipple attachment rates while sympathetic and vehicle alone did not. These results provide additional support for the hypothesis that adaptive neonatal effects of labor contractions are mediated by adrenal and extra-adrenal catecholamines.

  9. Adaptive response to ionising radiation induced by cadmium in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, V W Y; Ng, C Y P; Kong, M K Y; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2013-03-01

    An adaptive response is a biological response where the exposure of cells or animals to a low priming exposure induces mechanisms that protect the cells or animals against the detrimental effects of a subsequent larger challenging exposure. In realistic environmental situations, living organisms can be exposed to a mixture of stressors, and the resultant effects due to such exposures are referred to as multiple stressor effects. In the present work we demonstrated, via quantification of apoptosis in the embryos, that embryos of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) subjected to a priming exposure provided by one environmental stressor (cadmium in micromolar concentrations) could undergo an adaptive response against a subsequent challenging exposure provided by another environmental stressor (alpha particles). We concluded that zebrafish embryos treated with 1 to 10 μM Cd at 5 h postfertilisation (hpf) for both 1 and 5 h could undergo an adaptive response against subsequent ~4.4 mGy alpha-particle irradiation at 10 hpf, which could be interpreted as an antagonistic multiple stressor effect between Cd and ionising radiation. The zebrafish has become a popular vertebrate model for studying the in vivo response to ionising radiation. As such, our results suggested that multiple stressor effects should be carefully considered for human radiation risk assessment since the risk may be perturbed by another environmental stressor such as a heavy metal.

  10. Adaptive radiation of gall-inducing insects within a single host-plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Jeffrey B; Crespi, Bernard J

    2007-04-01

    Speciation of plant-feeding insects is typically associated with host-plant shifts, with subsequent divergent selection and adaptation to the ecological conditions associated with the new plant. However, a few insect groups have apparently undergone speciation while remaining on the same host-plant species, and such radiations may provide novel insights into the causes of adaptive radiation. We used mitochondrial and nuclear DNA to infer a phylogeny for 14 species of gall-inducing Asphondylia flies (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) found on Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), which have been considered to be monophyletic based on morphological evidence. Our phylogenetic analyses provide strong support for extensive within-host plant speciation in this group, and it demonstrates that diversification has involved numerous shifts between different plant organs (leaves, buds, flowers, and stems) of the same host-plant species. Within-plant speciation of Asphondylia is thus apparently facilitated by the opportunity to partition the plant ecologically. One clade exhibits temporal isolation among species, which may have facilitated divergence via allochronic shifts. Using a novel method based on Bayesian reconstruction, we show that the rate of change in an ecomorphological trait, ovipositor length, was significantly higher along branches with inferred shifts between host-plant organs than along branches without such shifts. This finding suggests that Larrea gall midges exhibit close morphological adaptation to specific host-plant parts, which may mediate ecological transitions via disruptive selection.

  11. Adaptation to delayed auditory feedback induces the temporal recalibration effect in both speech perception and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kosuke; Kawabata, Hideaki

    2014-12-01

    We ordinarily speak fluently, even though our perceptions of our own voices are disrupted by various environmental acoustic properties. The underlying mechanism of speech is supposed to monitor the temporal relationship between speech production and the perception of auditory feedback, as suggested by a reduction in speech fluency when the speaker is exposed to delayed auditory feedback (DAF). While many studies have reported that DAF influences speech motor processing, its relationship to the temporal tuning effect on multimodal integration, or temporal recalibration, remains unclear. We investigated whether the temporal aspects of both speech perception and production change due to adaptation to the delay between the motor sensation and the auditory feedback. This is a well-used method of inducing temporal recalibration. Participants continually read texts with specific DAF times in order to adapt to the delay. Then, they judged the simultaneity between the motor sensation and the vocal feedback. We measured the rates of speech with which participants read the texts in both the exposure and re-exposure phases. We found that exposure to DAF changed both the rate of speech and the simultaneity judgment, that is, participants' speech gained fluency. Although we also found that a delay of 200 ms appeared to be most effective in decreasing the rates of speech and shifting the distribution on the simultaneity judgment, there was no correlation between these measurements. These findings suggest that both speech motor production and multimodal perception are adaptive to temporal lag but are processed in distinct ways.

  12. [Radiation-induced "bystander effect" revealed by means of adaptive response in cocultured lymphocytes from humans of different genders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, I S; Vorobtsova, I E

    2011-01-01

    The "bystander effect" was investigated in mixed cultures of lymphocytes from humans of opposite genders. Development of the adaptive response (AR) in non-irradiated female/male cells was estimated after adaptive pretreatment of opposite gender lymphocytes, chromosome aberrations being evaluated. Experiments were performed using two schedules of adaptive (0.05 Gy) and challenging (1 Gy) irradiations: G0-G1 and G1-G1. The results obtained indicate the development of a mediated adaptive response ("bystander effect") in the lymphocytes neighboring pre-irradiated cells, as well as the influence of a time scheme of adapting and challenging irradiations on the amount of induced chromosome aberrations in mixed cultures and a possible dependence of the adaptive response intensity on the donor gender.

  13. Observation and measurement of interaction-induced dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parigi, V.; Bimbard, E.; Stanojevic, J.

    2012-01-01

    We observe and measure dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental results are in agreement with a simple model where the optical nonlinearities are due to the progressive appearance of a Rydberg blockaded volume within ...

  14. Observation and measurement of interaction-induced dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parigi, Valentina; Bimbard, Erwan; Stanojevic, Jovica; Hilliard, Andrew J; Nogrette, Florence; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Grangier, Philippe

    2012-12-07

    We observe and measure dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental results are in agreement with a simple model where the optical nonlinearities are due to the progressive appearance of a Rydberg blockaded volume within the medium. The measurements allow a direct estimation of the "blockaded fraction" of atoms within the atomic ensemble.

  15. Effect of hardening induced by cold expansion on damage fatigue accumulation and life assessment of Aluminum alloy 6082 T6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendouba Mostefa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hole cold expansion (HCE is an effective method to extend the fatigue life of mechanical structures. During cold expansion process compressive residual stresses around the expanded hole are generated. The enhancement of fatigue life and the crack initiation and growth behavior of a holed specimen were investigated by using the 6082 Aluminum alloy. The present study suggests a simple technical method for enhancement of fatigue life by a cold expansion hole of pre-cracked specimen. Fatigue damage accumulation of cold expanded hole in aluminum alloy which is widely used in transportation and in aeronautics was analyzed. Experimental tests were carried out using pre-cracked SENT specimens. Tests were performed in two and four block loading under constant amplitude. These tests were performed by using two and four blocks under uniaxial constant amplitude loading. The increasing and decreasing loading were carried. The experimental results were compared to the damage calculated by the Miner's rule and a new simple fatigue damage indicator. This comparison shows that the 'damaged stress model', which takes into account the loading history, yields a good estimation according to the experimental results. Moreover, the error is minimized in comparison to the Miner's model.

  16. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hwan Lee

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals.

  17. Selective Killing Effects of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with NO Induced Dysfunction of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Om, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun-Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP)-induced radicals on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed by oral squamous cell carcinoma, to determine the underlying mechanism of selective killing. CAP-induced highly reactive radicals were observed in both plasma plume and cell culture media. The selective killing effect was observed in oral squamous cell carcinoma compared with normal human gingival fibroblast. Degradation and dysfunction of EGFRs were observed only in the EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma and not in the normal cell. Nitric oxide scavenger pretreatment in cell culture media before CAP treatment rescued above degradation and dysfunction of the EGFR as well as the killing effect in oral squamous cell carcinoma. CAP may be a promising cancer treatment method by inducing EGFR dysfunction in EGFR-overexpressing oral squamous cell carcinoma via nitric oxide radicals.

  18. Ultraviolet-B radiation induced cross-linking improves physical properties of cold- and warm-water fish gelatin gels and films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoni, Caio G; Avena-Bustillos, Roberto J; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Bilbao-Sainz, Cristina; Bechtel, Peter J; McHugh, Tara H

    2012-09-01

    Cold- and warm-water fish gelatin granules were exposed to ultraviolet-B radiation for doses up to 29.7 J/cm(2). Solutions and films were prepared from the granules. Gel electrophoresis and refractive index were used to examine changes in molecular weight of the samples. Also, the gel strength and rheological properties of the solutions as well as the tensile and water vapor barrier properties of the films were characterized. SDS-PAGE and refractive index results indicated cross-linking of gelatin chains after exposure to radiation. Interestingly, UV-B treated samples displayed higher gel strengths, with cold- and warm-water fish gelatin having gel strength increases from 1.39 to 2.11 N and from 7.15 to 8.34 N, respectively. In addition, both gelatin samples exhibited an increase in viscosity for higher UV doses. For gelatin films, the cold-water fish gelatin samples made from irradiated granules showed greater tensile strength. In comparison, the warm-water gelatin films made from irradiated granules had lower tensile strength, but better water vapor barrier properties. This might be due to the UV induced cross-linking in warm-water gelatin that disrupted helical structures.

  19. Bioanalytical evidence that chemicals in tattoo ink can induce adaptive stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Peta A; Stalter, Daniel; Tang, Janet Y M; Escher, Beate I

    2015-10-15

    Tattooing is becoming increasingly popular, particularly amongst young people. However, tattoo inks contain a complex mixture of chemical impurities that may pose a long-term risk for human health. As a first step towards the risk assessment of these complex mixtures we propose to assess the toxicological hazard potential of tattoo ink chemicals with cell-based bioassays. Targeted modes of toxic action and cellular endpoints included cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and adaptive stress response pathways. The studied tattoo inks, which were extracted with hexane as a proxy for the bioavailable fraction, caused effects in all bioassays, with the red and yellow tattoo inks having the greatest response, particularly inducing genotoxicity and oxidative stress response endpoints. Chemical analysis revealed the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the tested black tattoo ink at concentrations twice the recommended level. The detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons only explained 0.06% of the oxidative stress response of the black tattoo ink, thus the majority of the effect was caused by unidentified components. The study indicates that currently available tattoo inks contain components that induce adaptive stress response pathways, but to evaluate the risk to human health further work is required to understand the toxicokinetics of tattoo ink chemicals in the body.

  20. Cold-inducible expression of AZI1 and its function in improvement of freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Yan; Zhang, Xin; Schläppi, Michael; Xu, Zi-Qin

    2011-09-01

    AZI1 (AZELAIC ACID INDUCED 1) of Arabidopsis thaliana could be induced by azelaic acid and was involved in priming of systemic plant immunity. In the present work, expression of AZI1 in response to low temperature was investigated via RNA gel blot analysis. AZI1 could be induced slowly by cold stress and more than 6h treatment at 4°C was required to detect an increase in mRNA abundance. However, the high expression state could not be maintained stably and would decline to basal level when the plants were transferred to room temperature. In order to clarify the function of AZI1 in resistance to abiotic stresses, overexpressing, RNA interference and T-DNA knockout lines of this gene were used in electrolyte leakage assays. Overexpression of AZI1 resulted in reduced electrolyte leakage during freezing damage. In contrast, AZI1 knockdown and knockout lines showed increased tendencies in cellular damage after freezing treatment. To further validate the potential resistance of AZI1 to low-temperature stress, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were transformed with pESC-AZI1 in which AZI1 was under the control of GAL1 promoter. Compared to yeast cells containing empty pESC-URA, the survival rate of yeast cells harboring AZI1 increased obviously after freezing treatment. All these results suggested that AZI1 might be multifunctional and associated with cold tolerance of Arabidopsis.

  1. Delayed adaptive immunity is related to higher MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömbeck, Anna; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Nordström, Inger; Andersson, Kerstin; Adlerberth, Ingegerd; Wold, Agnes E; Rudin, Anna

    2016-04-01

    There are notable inter-individual variations in vaccine-specific antibody responses in vaccinated children. The aim of our study was to investigate whether early-life environmental factors and adaptive immune maturation prior and close to measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) immunization relate to magnitudes of vaccine-specific antibody titers. In the FARMFLORA birth cohort, including both farming and non-farming families, children were immunized with the MMR vaccine at 18 months of age. MMR vaccine-induced antibody titers were measured in plasma samples obtained at 36 months of age. Infants' blood samples obtained at birth, 3-5 days and at 4 and 18 months of age were analyzed for T- and B-cell numbers, proportions of naive and memory T and B cells, and fractions of putative regulatory T cells. Multivariate factor analyses show that higher anti-MMR antibody titers were associated with a lower degree of adaptive immune maturation, that is, lower proportions of memory T cells and a lower capacity of mononuclear cells to produce cytokines, but with higher proportions of putative regulatory T cells. Further, children born by cesarean section (CS) had significantly higher anti-measles titers than vaginally-born children; and CS was found to be associated with delayed adaptive immunity. Also, girls presented with significantly higher anti-mumps and anti-rubella antibody levels than boys at 36 months of age. These results indicate that delayed adaptive immune maturation before and in close proximity to immunization seems to be advantageous for the ability of children to respond with higher anti-MMR antibody levels after vaccination.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of low dose ionizing radiation-induced hormesis, adaptive responses, radioresistance, bystander effects, and genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong

    2015-01-01

    To review research progress on the molecular mechanisms of low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR)-induced hormesis, adaptive responses, radioresistance, bystander effects, and genomic instability in order to provide clues for therapeutic approaches to enhance biopositive effects (defined as radiation-induced beneficial effects to the organism), and control bionegative effects (defined as radiation-induced harmful effects to the organism) and related human diseases. Experimental studies have indicated that Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phospho-c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and protein 53 (P53)-related signal transduction pathways may be involved in LDIR-induced hormesis; MAPK, P53 may be important for adaptive response; ATM, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), ERK, JNK, reactive oxygen species (ROS), P53 for radioresistance; COX-2, ERK, MAPK, ROS, tumor necrosis factor receptor alpha (TNFα) for LDIR-induced bystander effect; whereas ATM, ERK, MAPK, P53, ROS, TNFα-related signal transduction pathways are involved in LDIR-induced genomic instability. These results suggest that different manifestations of LDIR-induced cellular responses may have different signal transduction pathways. On the other hand, LDIR-induced different responses may also share the same signal transduction pathways. For instance, P53 has been involved in LDIR-induced hormesis, adaptive response, radioresistance and genomic instability. Current data therefore suggest that caution should be taken when designing therapeutic approaches using LDIR to induce beneficial effects in humans.

  3. Cold-induced modulation and functional analyses of the DRE-binding transcription factor gene, GmDREB3, in soybean (Glycine max L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Zhaoshi; Xia, Lanqin; Li, Liancheng; Cheng, Xianguo; Dong, Jianhui; Wang, Qiaoyan; Ma, Youzhi

    2008-01-01

    DREB (dehydration-responsive element-binding protein) transcription factors have important roles in the stress-related regulation network in plants. A DREB orthologue, GmDREB3, belonging to the A-5 subgroup of the DREB subfamily, was isolated from soybean using the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method. Northern blot analysis showed that expression of GmDREB3 in soybean seedlings was induced following cold stress treatment for 0.5 h and was not detected after 3 h. However, it was not...

  4. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-08-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses.

  5. Subversion of innate and adaptive immune activation induced by structurally modified lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Gil-Cruz, Cristina; Pérez-Shibayama, Christian I; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Cervantes-Barragán, Luisa; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Ludewig, Burkhard; Cunningham, Adam F; García-Zepeda, Eduardo A; Becker, Ingeborg; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Bonifaz, Laura; Gunn, John S; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella are successful pathogens that infect millions of people every year. During infection, Salmonella typhimurium changes the structure of its lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to the host environment, rendering bacteria resistant to cationic peptide lysis in vitro. However, the role of these structural changes in LPS as in vivo virulence factors and their effects on immune responses and the generation of immunity are largely unknown. We report that modified LPS are less efficient than wild-type LPS at inducing pro-inflammatory responses. The impact of this LPS-mediated subversion of innate immune responses was demonstrated by increased mortality in mice infected with a non-lethal dose of an attenuated S. typhimurium strain mixed with the modified LPS moieties. Up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules on antigen-presenting cells and CD4+ T-cell activation were affected by these modified LPS. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing specific antibody responses. Immunization with modified LPS moiety preparations combined with experimental antigens, induced an impaired Toll-like receptor 4-mediated adjuvant effect. Strains of S. typhimurium carrying structurally modified LPS are markedly less efficient at inducing immunity against challenge with virulent S. typhimurium. Hence, changes in S. typhimurium LPS structure impact not only on innate immune responses but also on both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses. PMID:21631497

  6. Rapid stalk elongation in tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L. cv. Apeldoorn) and the combined action of cold-induced invertase and the water-channel protein gammaTIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, P A; de Boer, A D

    1999-09-01

    Many bulbous plants need a low-temperature treatment for flowering. Cold, for example, affects the elongation of the stalk, thereby influencing the quality of the cut flower. How the elongation of the stalk is promoted by cold and which physiological and biochemical mechanisms are involved have remained obscure. As invertase has been shown to be involved in the cold-induced elongation of the flower stalks of tulips (Lambrechts et al., 1994, Plant Physiol 104: 515-520), we further characterized this enzyme by cloning the cDNA and analysing its expression in various tissues of the tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L. cv. Apeldoorn) stalk. In addition, the role of sucrose synthase was investigated. Since turgor pressure is an important force driving cell elongation, the role of a water-channel protein (gammaTIP) was studied in relation to these two enzymes. The mRNA level of the invertase found was substantially up-regulated as a result of cold treatment. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of this invertase revealed the presence of a vacuolar targeting signal. Two different forms of sucrose synthase were found, the expression of one of them appeared to be restricted to the vascular tissue while the other form was present in the surrounding tissue. Both sucrose synthases were present in the stalk during the entire period of bulb storage and after planting, but their activities declined during stalk elongation. The expression of the gammaTIP gene was restricted mainly to the vascular tissue and its expression profile was identical to that of invertase. Simultaneous expression of invertase and gammaTIP possibly leads to an increase in osmotic potential and vacuolar water uptake, thus providing a driving force for stretching the stalk cells.

  7. Genome Reduction and Microbe-Host Interactions Drive Adaptation of a Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacterium Associated with a Cold Seep Sponge

    OpenAIRE

    Ren-Mao Tian; Weipeng Zhang; Lin Cai; Yue-Him Wong; Wei Ding; Pei-Yuan Qian; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the most ancient metazoan, sponges have established close relationships with particular microbial symbionts. However, the characteristics and physiology of thioautotrophic symbionts in deep-sea sponges are largely unknown. Using a tailored ?differential coverage binning? method on 22-Gb metagenomic sequences, we recovered the nearly complete genome of a sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) that dominates the microbiota of the cold seep sponge Suberites sp. Phylogenetic analyses sugges...

  8. Cell Cycle Regulators Guide Mitochondrial Activity in Radiation-Induced Adaptive Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrou, Aris T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: There are accruing concerns on potential genotoxic agents present in the environment including low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) that naturally exists on earth's surface and atmosphere and is frequently used in medical diagnosis and nuclear industry. Although its long-term health risk is being evaluated and remains controversial, LDIR is shown to induce temporary but significant adaptive responses in mammalian cells and animals. The mechanisms guiding the mitochondrial function in LDIR-induced adaptive response represent a unique communication between DNA damage and cellular metabolism. Elucidation of the LDIR-regulated mitochondrial activity may reveal new mechanisms adjusting cellular function to cope with hazardous environmental stress. Recent Advances: Key cell cycle regulators, including Cyclin D1/CDK4 and Cyclin B1/cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) complexes, are actively involved in the regulation of mitochondrial functions via phosphorylation of their mitochondrial targets. Accumulating new evidence supports a concept that the Cyclin B1/CDK1 complex acts as a mediator in the cross talk between radiation-induced DNA damage and mitochondrial functions to coordinate cellular responses to low-level genotoxic stresses. Critical Issues: The LDIR-mediated mitochondrial activity via Cyclin B1/CDK1 regulation is an irreplaceable network that is able to harmonize vital cellular functions with adjusted mitochondrial metabolism to enhance cellular homeostasis. Future Directions: Further investigation of the coordinative mechanism that regulates mitochondrial activities in sublethal stress conditions, including LDIR, will reveal new insights of how cells cope with genotoxic injury and will be vital for future targeted therapeutic interventions that reduce environmental injury and cancer risk. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1463–1480. PMID:24180340

  9. Cell cycle regulators guide mitochondrial activity in radiation-induced adaptive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrou, Aris T; Li, Jian Jian

    2014-03-20

    There are accruing concerns on potential genotoxic agents present in the environment including low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) that naturally exists on earth's surface and atmosphere and is frequently used in medical diagnosis and nuclear industry. Although its long-term health risk is being evaluated and remains controversial, LDIR is shown to induce temporary but significant adaptive responses in mammalian cells and animals. The mechanisms guiding the mitochondrial function in LDIR-induced adaptive response represent a unique communication between DNA damage and cellular metabolism. Elucidation of the LDIR-regulated mitochondrial activity may reveal new mechanisms adjusting cellular function to cope with hazardous environmental stress. Key cell cycle regulators, including Cyclin D1/CDK4 and Cyclin B1/cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) complexes, are actively involved in the regulation of mitochondrial functions via phosphorylation of their mitochondrial targets. Accumulating new evidence supports a concept that the Cyclin B1/CDK1 complex acts as a mediator in the cross talk between radiation-induced DNA damage and mitochondrial functions to coordinate cellular responses to low-level genotoxic stresses. The LDIR-mediated mitochondrial activity via Cyclin B1/CDK1 regulation is an irreplaceable network that is able to harmonize vital cellular functions with adjusted mitochondrial metabolism to enhance cellular homeostasis. Further investigation of the coordinative mechanism that regulates mitochondrial activities in sublethal stress conditions, including LDIR, will reveal new insights of how cells cope with genotoxic injury and will be vital for future targeted therapeutic interventions that reduce environmental injury and cancer risk.

  10. Cold-acclimation limits low temperature induced photoinhibition by promoting a higher photochemical quantum yield and a more effective PSII restoration in darkness in the Antarctic rather than the Andean ecotype of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae

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    Bascuñán-Godoy Luisa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecotypes of Colobanthus quitensis Kunt Bartl (Cariophyllaceae from Andes Mountains and Maritime Antarctic grow under contrasting photoinhibitory conditions, reaching differential cold tolerance upon cold acclimation. Photoinhibition depends on the extent of photodamage and recovery capability. We propose that cold acclimation increases resistance to low-temperature-induced photoinhibition, limiting photodamage and promoting recovery under cold. Therefore, the Antarctic ecotype (cold hardiest should be less photoinhibited and have better recovery from low-temperature-induced photoinhibition than the Andean ecotype. Both ecotypes were exposed to cold induced photoinhibitory treatment (PhT. Photoinhibition and recovery of photosystem II (PSII was followed by fluorescence, CO2 exchange, and immunoblotting analyses. Results The same reduction (25% in maximum PSII efficiency (Fv/Fm was observed in both cold-acclimated (CA and non-acclimated (NA plants under PhT. A full recovery was observed in CA plants of both ecotypes under dark conditions, but CA Antarctic plants recover faster than the Andean ecotype. Under PhT, CA plants maintain their quantum yield of PSII, while NA plants reduced it strongly (50% and 73% for Andean and Antarctic plants respectively. Cold acclimation induced the maintenance of PsaA and Cyt b6/f and reduced a 41% the excitation pressure in Antarctic plants, exhibiting the lowest level under PhT. xCold acclimation decreased significantly NPQs in both ecotypes, and reduced chlorophylls and D1 degradation in Andean plants under PhT. NA and CA plants were able to fully restore their normal photosynthesis, while CA Antarctic plants reached 50% higher photosynthetic rates after recovery, which was a