WorldWideScience

Sample records for cold fusion production

  1. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koster, J.

    1989-01-01

    In this contribution the author the phenomenom of so-called cold fusion, inspired by the memorable lecture of Moshe Gai on his own search for this effect. Thus much of what follows was presented by Dr. Gai; the rest is from independent reading. What is referred to as cold fusion is of course the observation of possible products of deuteron-deuteron (d-d) fusion within deuterium-loaded (dentended) electrodes. The debate over the two vanguard cold fusion experiments has raged under far more public attention than usually accorded new scientific phenomena. The clamor commenced with the press conference of M. Fleishmann and S. Pons on March 23, 1989 and the nearly simultaneous wide circulation of a preprint of S. Jones and collaborators. The majority of work attempting to confirm these observations has at the time of this writing yet to appear in published form, but contributions to conferences and electronic mail over computer networks were certainly filled with preliminary results. To keep what follows to a reasonable length the author limit this discussion to the searches for neutron (suggested by ref. 2) or for excessive heat production (suggested by ref. 1), following a synopsis of the hypotheses of cold fusion

  2. Cold fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy

  3. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik

    1995-02-01

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4 He, 3 He, 3 H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4 He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  4. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  5. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Suk Yong; You, Jae Jun

    1996-01-01

    Nearly every technical information is chased in the world. All of them are reviewed and analyzed. Some of them are chosen to study further more to review every related documents. And a probable suggestion about the excitonic process in deuteron absorbed condensed matter is proposed a way to cold fusion. 8 refs. (Author)

  6. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The transmission resonance model (TRM) is combined with some electrochemistry of the cathode surface and found to provide a good fit to new data on excess heat. For the first time, a model for cold fusion not only fits calorimetric data but also predicts optimal trigger points. This suggests that the model is meaningful and that the excess heat phenomenon claimed by Fleischmann and Pons is genuine. A crucial role is suggested for the overpotential and, in particular, for the concentration overpotential, i.e., the hydrogen overvoltage. Self-similar geometry, or scale invariance, i.e., a fractal nature, is revealed by the relative excess power function. Heat bursts are predicted with a scale invariance in time, suggesting a possible link between the TRM and chaos theory. The model describes a near-surface phenomenon with an estimated excess power yield of ∼1 kW/cm 3 Pd, as compared to 50 W/cm 3 of reactor core for a good fission reactor. Transmission resonance-induced nuclear transmutation, a new type of nuclear reaction, is strongly suggested with two types emphasized: transmission resonance-induced neutron transfer reactions yielding essentially the same end result as Teller's hypothesized catalytic neutron transfer and a three-body reaction promoted by standing de Broglie waves. In this paper suggestions for the anomalous production of heat, particles, and radiation are given

  7. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D 2 molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D 2 fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into 4 He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; 3 He to 4 He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of 3 He/ 4 He

  8. Barrier for cold-fusion production of superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Iwamoto, Akira; Moeller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the fusion-barrier height B fu (two-body) for approaching ions in cold-fusion reactions in a model where the projectile deformation and quadrupole zero-point vibrational energy are taken into account. This barrier height is defined as the barrier energy at the target and projectile separation distance where an original oblate deformation of projectile and/or target caused by a repulsive Coulomb force turns into a large prolate deformation caused by the attractive nuclear force as the target and projectile come closer. The instability develops before touching because the attractive short-range nuclear force overcomes the repulsive Coulomb force and the shape-stabilizing effect of shell structure. The shell structure of the doubly magic 208 Pb target is sufficiently strong that its shape remains very close to spherical in all cases studied here. The fusion potential for approaching ions in the two-body channel is calculated in the macroscopic-microscopic model with the quadrupole vibrational zero-point energy obtained in the WKB approximation. We compare our results with data from 10 experimental cold-fusion reactions and with the Bass barriers. Differences and similarities between the Yukawa-plus-exponential model and the Bass model are discussed. We also calculate five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces for the single compound system and show that well-established fission and fusion valleys are both present. For heavy systems, B fu (two-body) becomes lower than the fission barrier just beyond the ground state of the compound system. In the vicinity of this transition, the optimum collision energy for formation of evaporation residues can be expected to depend in a delicate fashion on the interplay among B fu (two-body) , the fusion valley, the fission barrier of the compound system, and the one- and two-neutron separation energies S 1n and S 2n . We discuss these issues in detail and calculate fission-barrier heights. Except for reactions in which

  9. On the production of heavy elements by cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.

    1985-01-01

    After a short historical introduction (Section 1), this article presents new insights into the mechanism limiting the fusion of heavy nuclides (Section 2). Fusion is finally limited by the increasing Coulomb forces in the formation process of a compound system, as well as in its deexcitation. Moreover, nuclear structure effects in all stages of evaporation residue (EVR) formation are shown to be of importance. The wide field of fusion reaction studies and possible experimental techniques is projected onto the task of element synthesis, and only those aspects that are of relevance here are covered. The better understanding of EVR formation (Section 2) and the new experimental techniques (Section 3) that enabled the production of elements 107-109 (Section 4) are also discussed. In Section 5 ground-state properties and the nuclear structure of the heaviest isotopes, together with their production cross sections, are discussed. Finally, an outlook on how eventually to go beyond Z = 109 is given

  10. Hesitant birth of cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockris, J.O.

    1992-01-01

    John O'M. Bockris, a distinguished chemistry professor at Texas A ampersand M University, finds the reaction to the announcement of the discovery of cold fusion curious. Two years earlier, he notes, there had been a comparable announcement concerning the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity; it received favorable press coverage for months. The cold-fusion announcement, on the other hand, was met with dour skepticism. When other researchers failed in efforts to duplicate the findings of Martin Fleischmann and B. Stanley Pons, Bockris says, the two scientists were held up to ridicule. Bockris says he found a deep emotional opposition to cold fusion, even within his own department and university. This opposition is fueled in large part, he believes, by big science and the hot fusion lobby. A key indicator of cold fusion is the presence of tritium, Brockis claims. At Texas A ampersand M, large amounts of tritium have been found in some experiments; this also has occurred in experiments at more than 40 laboratories in nine countries, he says. Excess heat production is more difficult to attain, he acknowledges. The cold-fusion controversy has uncovered some unflattering characteristics of the scientific community, Bockris says. Among them are: scientists are no less driven by emotion that business people or politicians; research funding decisions serve to perpetuate the goals of politically powerful interest groups; and ideas have great inertia once planted in a scientist's mind

  11. Cold nuclear fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Shinji.

    1991-01-01

    Selection of cathode material is a key to the attainment of cold nuclear fusion. However, there are only few reports on the cathode material at present and an effective development has been demanded. The device comprises an anode and a cathode and an electrolytic bath having metal salts dissolved therein and containing heavy water in a glass container. The anode is made of gold or platinum and the cathode is made of metals of V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta, and a voltage of 3-25V is applied by way of a DC power source between them. The metal comprising V, Sr, Y, Nb, Hf or Ta absorbs deuterium formed by electrolysis of heavy water effectively to cause nuclear fusion reaction at substantially the same frequency and energy efficiency as palladium and titanium. Accordingly, a cold nuclear fusion device having high nuclear fusion generation frequency can be obtained. (N.H.)

  12. Cold fusion - todays situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmqvist, K.

    1993-01-01

    A brief review of the history of cold fusion is given. It is noted that it is not possible to draw any definite conclusions about all the experimental and theoretical details, but that some of the results presented do not seem to be reached according to the normal scientific methods. 6 figs

  13. Cold fusion in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, L.

    1989-01-01

    Since early April a great deal of excitement has been created over the Fleischmann/Pons cold fusion experiment, which if it performs as advertised, could turn out to be mankind's best hope of heading off the energy crisis scheduled for early in the next century. Dozens of groups around the world are now attempting to duplicate the experiment to see if Fleischmann and Pons' discovery is an experimental mistake, an unknown electrochemical effect or a new kind of fusion reaction. This article puts the experiment into the perspective of today and looks at how it might affect the energy scene tomorrow if it should turn out to be commercially exploitable. (author)

  14. Experiments in cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models

  15. The status of cold fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, E.

    This report attempts to update the status of the phenomenon of cold fusion. The new field is continuing to grow as a variety of nuclear reactions are discovered to occur in a variety of chemical environments at modest temperatures. However, it must be cautioned that most scientists consider cold fusion as something akin to UFO's, ESP, and numerology.

  16. Cold nuclear fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganov, E.N., E-mail: edward.tsyganov@coldfusion-power.com [Cold Fusion Power, International (United States); Bavizhev, M.D. [LLC “Radium”, Moscow (Russian Federation); Buryakov, M.G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Dabagov, S.B. [RAS P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky pr. 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe shosse 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Golovatyuk, V.M.; Lobastov, S.P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    If target deuterium atoms were implanted in a metal crystal in accelerator experiments, a sharp increase in the probability of DD-fusion reaction was clearly observed when compared with the reaction’s theoretical value. The electronic screening potential, which for a collision of free deuterium atoms is about 27 eV, reached 300–700 eV in the case of the DD-fusion in metallic crystals. These data leads to the conclusion that a ban must exist for deuterium atoms to be in the ground state 1s in a niche filled with free conduction electrons. At the same time, the state 2p whose energy level is only 10 eV above that of state 1s is allowed in these conditions. With anisotropy of 2p, 3p or above orbitals, their spatial positions are strictly determined in the lattice coordinate system. When filling out the same potential niches with two deuterium atoms in the states 2p, 3p or higher, the nuclei of these atoms can be permanently positioned without creating much Coulomb repulsion at a very short distance from each other. In this case, the transparency of the potential barrier increases dramatically compared to the ground state 1s for these atoms. The probability of the deuterium nuclei penetrating the Coulomb barrier by zero quantum vibration of the DD-system also increases dramatically. The so-called cold nuclear DD-fusion for a number of years was registered in many experiments, however, was still rejected by mainstream science for allegedly having no consistent scientific explanation. Finally, it received the validation. Below, we outline the concept of this explanation and give the necessary calculations. This paper also considers the further destiny of the formed intermediate state of {sup 4}He{sup ∗}.

  17. Cold fusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akihito.

    1994-01-01

    A Pt wire electrode is supported from the periphery relative to a Pd electrode by way of a polyethylene or teflon plate in heavy water, and electrolysis is applied while varying conditions successively in a sawteeth fashion at an initial stage, and after elapse of about one week, a pulse current is supplied to promote nuclear reaction and to generate excess heat greater than a charged electric power. That is, small amount of neutron emission is increased and electrolytic cell temperature is elevated by varying the electrolysis conditions successively in the sawteeth fashion at the initial stage. In addition, when the pulse electric current is supplied after elapse of about one week, the electrolytic cell temperature is abnormally elevated, so that the promotion of nuclear reaction phenomenon and the generation of excess heat greater than the charged electric power are recognized. Then, a way to control power level and time fluctuation of cold fusion is attained, thereby contributing to development of a further method for generating excess heat as desired. In addition, it contributes to a development for a method of obtaining such an excess heat that can be taken as a new energy. (N.H.)

  18. Cold versus hot fusion deuterium branching ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, H.; Bass, R.

    1995-01-01

    A major source of misunderstanding of the nature of cold nuclear fusion has been the expectation that the deuterium branching ratios occurring within a palladium lattice would be consistent with the gas-plasma branching ratios. This misunderstanding has led to the concept of the dead graduate student, the 1989's feverish but fruitless search for neutron emissions from cold fusion reactors, and the follow-on condemnation of the new science of cold fusion. The experimental facts are that in a properly loaded palladium lattice, the deuterium fusion produces neutrons at little above background, a greatly less-than-expected production of tritium (the tritium desert), and substantially more helium-4 than is observed in hot plasma physics. The experimental evidence is now compelling (800 reports of success from 30 countries) that cold nuclear fusion is a reality, that the branching ratios are unexpected, and that a new science is struggling to be recognized. Commercialization of some types of cold fusion devices has already begun

  19. Does cold nuclear fusion exist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudanin, V.B.; Bystritskij, V.M.; Egorov, V.G.; Shamsutdinov, S.G.; Shyshkin, A.L.; Stolupin, V.A.; Yutlandov, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    The results of investigation of cold nuclear fusion on palladium are given both for electrolysis of heavy water D 2 O and mixture D 2 O + H 2 O) (1:1) and for palladium saturation with gaseous deuterium. The possibility of existance of this phenomenon was examined by detection of neutrons and gamma quanta from reactions: d + d → 3 He + n + 3.27 MeV, p + d → 3 He + γ + 5.5 MeV. Besides these reactions were identified by measuring the characteristic X radiation of palladium due to effect of charged products 3 He, p, t. The upper limits of the intensities of hypothetical sources of neutrons and gamma quanta at the 95% confidence level were obtained to be Q n ≤ 2x10 -2 n/sxcm 3 Pd, Q γ ≤ 2x10 -3 γ/sxcm 3 Pd. 2 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  20. Outline of cold nuclear fusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Enzo

    1991-01-01

    In 2010, as the total supply capacity of primary energy, 666 million liter is anticipated under the measures of thorough energy conservation. The development of energy sources along the energy policy based on environment preservation, safety, the quantity of resources and economy is strongly demanded. The nuclear power generation utilizing nuclear fission has been successfully carried out. As the third means of energy production, the basic research and technical development have been actively advanced on the energy production utilizing nuclear fusion reaction. The main object of the nuclear fusion research being advanced now is D-D reaction and D-T reaction. In order to realize low temperature nuclear fusion reaction, muon nuclear fusion has been studied so far. The cold nuclear fusion reaction by the electrolysis of heavy water has been reported in 1989, and its outline is ixplained in this report. The trend of the research on cold nuclear fusion is described. But the possibility of cold nuclear fusion as an energy source is almost denied. (K.I.)

  1. Cold fusion and hot history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewenstein, B.

    1996-01-01

    The history of cold fusion research following the announcement of the Pons-Fleischmann experiment is described in detail, including all the confusion, responses of scientists, personal impressions, personal quotations, reactions of the media, references to contemporary sources, etc. (P.A.). 5 figs

  2. Cold fusion anomalies more perplexing than ever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagani, R.

    1989-01-01

    This article addresses the debate over research on cold fusion. Analysis is made of the research efforts that have taken place since cold fusion was first thought to have been discovered in Utah. Research in the Soviet Union on the cold fusion phenomenon is also discussed

  3. Mechanisms of cold fusion: comprehensive explanations by the Nattoh model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takaaki

    1995-01-01

    The phenomena of cold fusion seem to be very complicated; inconsistent data between the production rates of heat, neutrons, tritiums and heliums. Our thoughts need to drastically change in order to appropriately understand the mechanisms of cold fusion. Here, a review is described for the Nattoh model, that has been developed extensively to provide comprehensive explanations for the mechanisms of cold fusion. Important experimental findings that prove the model are described. Furthermore several subjects including impacts on other fields are also discussed. (author)

  4. The status of 'cold fusion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    1998-01-01

    The questions raised by reports of nuclear reactions at low energies, so called 'cold fusion', are not yet answered to the satisfaction of many scientists. Further experimental investigations of these and related questions seems desirable, at least for scientific if not practical reasons. Properly conducted, such investigations would be indistinguishable from normal research. They would yield information germane to accepted areas of scientific inquiry and technological utility

  5. Neutron measurements in search of cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Goulding, C.A.; Johnson, M.W.; Butterfield, K.B.; Gottesfeld, S.; Baker, D.A.; Springer, T.E.; Garzon, F.H.; Bolton, R.D.; Leonard, E.M.; Chancellor, T.

    1990-01-01

    We have conducted a research for neutron emission from cold fusion systems of the electrochemical type and, to a lesser extent, the high-pressure gas cell type. Using a high-efficiency well counter and an NE 213 scintillator, the experiments were conducted on the earth's surface and in a shielded cave approximately 50 ft underground. After approximately 6500 h of counting time, we have obtained no evidence for cold fusion processes leading to neutron production. However, we have observed all three types of neutron data that have been presented as evidence for cold fusion: large positive fluctuations in the neutron counting rate, weak peaks near 2.5 MeV in the neutron energy spectrum, and bursts of up to 145 neutrons in 500-μs intervals. The data were obtained under circumstances that clearly show our results to be data encountered as a part of naturally occurring neutron background, which is due primarily to cosmic rays. Thus, observing these types of data does not, of itself, provide evidence for the existence of cold fusion processes. Artifacts in the data that were due to counter misbehavior were also to lead to long-term ''neutron bursts'' whose time duration varied from several hours to several days. We conclude that any experiments which attempt to observe neutron emission must include strong steps to ensure that the experiments deal adequately with both cosmic-ray processes and counter misbehavior. 13 refs., 14 figs

  6. Current status of cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsarev, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the term cold fusion (CF) was known up to March 1989 as the synonym of muon-catalyzed fusion, suggested by A.D. Sakharov more than 40 years ago. Broad use of this term for the last two years is associated with other kind of phenomena: fusion at ambient room temperature of nuclei of hydrogen isotopes embedded into crystal lattice. Nowadays only few remember the unbelievable resonance in the whole world, caused by the first claims of CF from Utah and associated with hopes of a simple and ecologically safe solution to the energy problems confronting humanity. The range of the interest reflected also the receptivity of our society for scientific ideas and wide development of telecommunication media. Extraordinary simplicity of CF experiments (in sharp contrast with hug complexity and high cost of thermonuclear researches) stimulated fast involvement of a large number of specialists of various profiles. Participation of small groups and even individual enthusiasts disposing of only simplest physical and chemical equipment became possible. Figuratively speaking, everybody with a pair of strong hands and a spade had a chance to find his nugget of gold in this Klondike. As a result: passion, rush and a very nonuniform composition of participants in this race for cold fusion, far from being all property prepared and having sense of responsibility

  7. Warming up to cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storms, E.

    1994-01-01

    The idea that tabletop equipment at room temperature could produce nuclear fusion was widely rejected five years ago by the scientific community. Nevertheless, recent results from numerous labs show that a novel phenomena of some kind may indeed be occurring, though theorist are still groping for an explanation. Many aspects of the cold fusion effect are now reproducible if known procedures are used. Palladium, when reacted with enough deuterium, apparently converts to a special condition of matter in which various nuclear reactions--including deuterium-deuterium fusion--can occur despite the repulsive force of the two positive charged nuclei. These reactions can be made to proceed rapidly enough to produce measurable heat. Scientist have published several dozen models, ranging from highly analytical approaches to pictorial representations, to explain these events. Most theories address only the problem of overcoming the coulombic barrier--how it is possible for nuclei to overcome their natural repulsion for each other without an infusion of massive amounts of energy from the outside. None of the proposed explanations accounts for the full range of experimental observations. Nevertheless a workable theory is crucial if we ever hope to apply cold fusion

  8. Achievement of solid-state plasma fusion ('Cold-Fusion')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arata, Yoshiaki; Zhang, Yue-Chang

    1995-01-01

    Using a 'QMS' (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer), the authors detected a significantly large amount (10 20 -10 21 [cm -3 ]) of helium ( 2 4 He), which was concluded to have been produced by a deuterium nuclear reaction within a host solid. These results were found to be fully repeatable and supported the authors' proposition that solid state plasma fusion ('Cold Fusion') can be generated in energetic deuterium Strongly Coupled Plasma ('SC-plasma'). This fusion reaction is thought to be sustained by localized 'Latticequake' in a solid-state media with the deuterium density equivalent to that of the host solid. While exploring this basic proposition, the characteristic differences when compared with ultra high temperature-state plasma fusion ('Hot Fusion') are clarified. In general, the most essential reaction product in both types of the deuterium plasma fusion is considered to be helium, irrespective of the 'well-known and/or unknown reactions', which is stored within the solid-state medium in abundance as a 'Residual Product', but which generally can not enter into nor be released from host-solid at a room temperature. Even measuring instruments with relatively poor sensitivity should be able to easily detect such residual helium. An absence of residual helium means that no nuclear fusion reaction has occurred, whereas its presence provides crucial evidence that nuclear fusion has, in fact, occurred in the solid. (author)

  9. Observation of stars produced during cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.

    1992-01-01

    It has been indicated tht multiple-neutron nuclei such as quad-neutrons can be emitted during cold fusion. These multiple-neutrons might bombard the nuclei of materials outside a cold fusion cell to cause nuclear reactions. In this paper, observations of nuclear emulsions that were irradiated during a cold fusion experiment with heavy water and palladium foil are described. Various traces, like stars, showing nuclear reactions caused by the multiple-neutrons have been clearly observed

  10. Cold fusion: Need to keep door wide open

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.E.

    1992-01-01

    Steven E. Jones of Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, began work on cold fusion in 1986. Although insisting his work is markedly different from that of Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann at the nearby University of Utah, he nevertheless was tarred by the same brush that besmirched their sensational revelations in 1989. Whereas we were searching for tiny nuclear effects, they were looking for heat production, he explains. In no way, he insists, does his work substantiate the bold claims of heat generation by cold fusion in an electrochemical cell. In fact, Jones doublts Fleischmann and Pons' claims and sees evidence of either self-deception or hype in their actions. He adds, For useful energy production, thermonuclear (hot) fusion remains for more promising than that cold fusion claims of Pons and Fleischmann. But at the same time, Jones finds it necessary to appeal for tolerance for researchers brave enough to continue in the now unfashionable field of cold fusion

  11. Cold fusion produces more tritium than neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopalan, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the major cold fusion experiments performed in various laboratories of the world and attempts to explain them are reviewed in brief. Particular reference is made to the experiments carried out in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay. In BARC experiments, it is found that tritium is the primary product of cold fusion. Author has put forward two hypothetical pictures of D-D fusion. (1) When a metal like Pd or Ti is loaded with D 2 , a crack forms. Propogation of such a crack accelerates deuterons which bombard Pd D 2 /D held by Pd or Ti leading to neutron capture or tritium formation with the release of protons and energy. The released protons might transfer its energy to some other deuteron and a chain reaction is started. This chain reaction terminates when a substantial portion of D in the crack tip is transmuted. This picture explains fusion reaction bursts and the random distribution of reaction sites, but does not explain neutron emission. (2) The deuterons accelerated by a propogating crack may hit a Pd/Ti nucleus instead of a deuterium nucleus and may transmute Pd/Ti. (M.G.B.). 18 refs

  12. Cold fusion reactors and new modern physics

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    The author of the "modern physics classical particle quantization orbital motion model general solution", referred to as the “new modern physics” a book. “The nuclear force constraint inertial guidance cold nuclear fusion collides” patent of invention referred to as the “cold nuclear fusion reactor” detailed technical data. Now provide to you, hope you help spread and the mainstream of modern physics of academic and fusion engineering academic communication. We work together to promote the c...

  13. Cold fusion catalyzed by muons and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulsrud, R.M.

    1990-10-01

    Two alternative methods have been suggested to produce fusion power at low temperature. The first, muon catalyzed fusion or MCF, uses muons to spontaneously catalyze fusion through the muon mesomolecule formation. Unfortunately, this method fails to generate enough fusion energy to supply the muons, by a factor of about ten. The physics of MCF is discussed, and a possible approach to increasing the number of MCF fusions generated by each muon is mentioned. The second method, which has become known as ''Cold Fusion,'' involves catalysis by electrons in electrolytic cells. The physics of this process, if it exists, is more mysterious than MCF. However, it now appears to be an artifact, the claims for its reality resting largely on experimental errors occurring in rather delicate experiments. However, a very low level of such fusion claimed by Jones may be real. Experiments in cold fusion will also be discussed

  14. Thinking about the cold fusion fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsunezaki, Akio

    1989-01-01

    The excitement since March 23 on cold fusion seems to be unprecedented evidence that the people of the world are waiting for fusion power with much enthusiasm. Cold fusion is really a surprise because it does not need high temperature and because it seems to be easy to enlarge the test tube into a useful power source if the claim by Professors Pons and Fleischmann at the University of Utah are true. The second announcement of cold fusion came from the Brigham Young University, also in the state of Utah, by Professor Jones, but his report was totally different from that given by Pons and Fleischmann. From the beginning of the 'fever', physicists have been very skeptical about cold fusion. Most of the critics and criticisms are targeted on Pons and Fleischmann rather than Jones, because not only was their paper poor but also their statements have not been scientific. They insisted that the heat came from fusion reaction, but without any scientific proof. They had not carried out the basic control experiment by running the same test with ordinary water instead of heavy water. A meeting on cold fusion was held at JAERI on May 15. At the end of the meeting, the some 260 attendants knew that cold fusion was not conceivable with the current scientific knowledge. (N.K.)

  15. Verification of cold nuclear fusion reaction, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Zenko; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Hirabayashi, Takakuni

    1991-01-01

    Can cold nuclear fusion reaction occur as is expected? If it occurs, what extent is its reaction probability? At present after 2 years elapsed since its beginning, the clear solution of these questions is not yet obtained. In many reaction systems employing different means, the experiments to confirm the cold nuclear fusion reaction have been attempted. In order to confirm that the nuclear fusion reaction of deuterium mutually has occurred, the neutrons, He-3, protons, tritium or generated heat, which were formed by the reaction and released from the system, are measured. Since it is considered that the frequency of the occurrence at normal temperature of the reaction is very low, it is necessary to select the most suitable method upon evaluating the limit of detection peculiar to the measuring methods. The methods of measuring neutrons, protons, gamma ray and generated heat, and the reaction systems by electrolytic process and dry process are explained. The detection of plural kinds of the reaction products and the confirmation of synchronism of signals are important. (K.I.)

  16. Once more about cold nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brudanin, V.B.; Bystritsky, V.M.; Egorov, V.G.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the experiments on the search for cold nuclear d-d fusion in chemically pure titanium are given both for electrolysis of heavy water D 2 O and for titanium saturation with gaseous deuterium. The saturation took place at the temperature of 77K and pressure of 50 and 150 atm. A round of experiments with temperature varying from 1 to 600 atm was carried out. The limiting values of the partial rate of the nuclear reaction of d-d fusion with neutron production were obtained per deuteron (at the 95% confidence level): λ f ≤4x10 -25 s -1 (experiment with electrolysis), λ f ≤7x10 -28 s -1 (experiment with gaseous deuterium). 7 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. Cold fusion research in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaramuzzi, F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes cold fusion (CF) research in Italy. In Italy, many Agencies and Universities are moderately funding research in CF, and the scientists have made a few attempts to coordinate each other, organizing meetings and conferences. However, the activity has been mostly the fruit of the scientists' initiative, and never a coordinated proposal of Agencies and Universities. No position on the scientific validity of the subject has been officially taken and the funds for CF have been rather modest. The investments in Italy on CF, the figure referring to 1992 amounts to about 0.5 million dollars, not including expenses for personnel. A number of about 70 scientists, mostly working part-time, is committed all around the Country in research on CF. The lack of offical commitment and effective support by the Research Agencies and the Universities has not prevented scientists from being quite active in performing research. On the other side, it has to be acknowledged that no formal vetoes have been interposed to the free initiative of scientists in this field: on the contrary, some of the Agencies and Universities have moderately funded such an effort. The quality of the experiments in Italy has been increasingly good, and the results obtained are rather out standing in the general panorama of CF. But it is time to perform a more coordinated effort, keeping in mind that material science aspects, such as the characteristics of the materials used, play a very important role in the development of this topic. Thus, a much more intense effort is required to obtain a more substantial progress in the field. The increasingly convincing results obtained by the whole CF community, and the example of the Japanese Government and Industry, which appear to be determined to promoting CF research, have changed the panorama of CF. These are now signs that also the Italian scientific authorities could consider favouring research in this field in the near future. (J.P.N.)

  18. Cold fusion labeled fiasco of century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    The gamble of researchers B. Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann to go public with their announcement of excess power from nuclear fusion at room temperature before they had solid evidence of fusion products is the scientific fiasco of the century, charges John R. Huizenga of the University of Rochester. He describes the claims of Pons and Fleischmann as a delusion and as pathological science. It would require belief in miracle after miracle for one to accept their discovery, he charges. Huizenga criticizes the researchers on several counts: they failed to challenge their own findings with control experiments and presentations to colleagues; they rushed to publication with unchecked and inaccurate data; they chose an unconventional method, a public press conference, to release scientific findings; their claims were not easily reproduced by others; and they lobbied Congress for funds before their claims were confirmed by independent researchers. Cold fusion producing excess power is an example of bad science where the normal rules and procedures of the scientific process were violated, Huizenga says

  19. Cold nuclear fusion. Germany 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrescu, Florian Ion

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear fusion is the process by which two or more atomic nuclei join together, or ''fuse'', to form a single heavier nucleus. During this process, matter is not conserved because some of the mass of the fusing nuclei is converted to energy which is released. The binding energy of the resulting nucleus is greater than the binding energy of each of the nuclei that fused to produce it. Fusion is the process that powers active stars. Creating the required conditions for fusion on Earth is very difficult, to the point that it has not been accomplished at any scale for protium, the common light isotope of hydrogen that undergoes natural fusion in stars. In nuclear weapons, some of the energy released by an atomic bomb (fission bomb) is used for compressing and heating a fusion fuel containing heavier isotopes of hydrogen, and also sometimes lithium, to the point of ''ignition''. At this point, the energy released in the fusion reactions is enough to briefly maintain the reaction. Fusion-based nuclear power experiments attempt to create similar conditions using far lesser means, although to date these experiments have failed to maintain conditions needed for ignition long enough for fusion to be a viable commercial power source.

  20. Congress turns cold on fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, E.

    1984-01-01

    A 5% cut in fusion research budgets will force some programs to be dropped in order to keep the large machinery running unless US and European scientists collaborate instead of competing. Legislators became uneasy about the escalating costs of the new devices. The 1984 budget of $470 million for magnetic fusion research is only half the projected cost of the Tokomak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) planned to ignite, for the first time, a self-sustaining burn. Planning for the TCFX continued despite the message from Congress. Work at the large institutions at Princeton, MIT, etc. may survive at the expense of other programs, some of which will lose academic programs as well. Scientists point to the loss of new ideas and approaches when projects are cancelled. Enthusiasm is growing for international collaboration

  1. Cold valleys in fusion and fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misicu, S.

    2003-01-01

    The cold fission configuration after the preformation of the fragments resembles a short-lived dinuclear or quasi-molecular system. The most conceivable scission configuration is given by two fission fragments in touching with the symmetry axes aligned (pole-pole orientation). This conclusion was based on the simple argument that this configuration offers the optimal tunneling time, i.e. the difference between the Coulomb barrier and the decay energy Q is minimal. Other orientations are apparently precluded in cold spontaneous fission and should be regarded as quasi-fission doorways in the synthesis of superheavy elements by cold fusion. (orig.)

  2. Recent cold fusion claims: are they valid?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, Ludwik

    2006-01-01

    Cold fusion consists of nuclear reactions occurring in solid metals loaded with hydrogen. Considerable progress has been made in that area in the last ten years. This 2004 paper summarizes recent claims without attempting to evaluate their validity. The manuscript was submitted to seven physics journals. Unfortunately, the editors rejected it without the benefit of the usual peer-review process. (author)

  3. Some theories of cold nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparata, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a review is presented of the main theoretical attempts to describe the phenomenology of cold fusion, whose general structure begins to clearly unravel. The main conclusion is that the approaches that are likely to be of relevance must invoke processes where the elementary components (nuclei and electrons) of condensed matter act in a coherent fashion

  4. Cold fusion saga: Lesson in science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewenstein, B.V.

    1992-01-01

    A news conference at the University of Utah on March 23, 1989, ignited an explosion of scientific tempers almost as intense as the topic up for discussion - nuclear fusion. Two electrochemists, B. Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann, announced they had discovered a method for creating nuclear fusion at room temperature, using simple equipment available in any high school laboratory. This could mean unlimited supplies of cheap electricity in the future. The announcement set off a chain reaction involving the news media and scientists worldwide, notes Bruce V. Lewenstein of Cornell University. For the first six weeks of the saga, Lewenstein recalls, competing claims, counterclaims, and interpretations led to what many headline writers referred to as fusion confusion. Media attention faded gradually, but scientific attention didn't. Over the next two years, laboratory experiments, scientific reports, meetings, and panels kept the issue boiling. The cold-fusion saga, while more intense than some scientific research, followed familiar paths, Lewenstein believes. News coverage, political maneuvering, competition among scientists, parent rights, arguments about the interpretation of experiments - all points of contention - are normal, indeed, one might almost say integral, to modern science, he says. This is the stuff science is made of, he adds. And for those disturbed by the implications, Lewenstein cautions that cold-fusion may be the harbinger for other high-profile science, such as high-temperature superconductors

  5. Present knowledge of nuclear cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violante, V.; Tripodi, P.; Lombardi, C.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear cold fusion, disclosed with clamour in 1989, was successively deemed by most people a blunder. However, the research activities went on, even if softly, and they have been producing more convincing and reproducible results, as well as theoretical models capable of explaining the noticeable anomalies of this phenomenon with respect to the hot fusion. Then, now the demonstration of the phenomenon may be considered valid and accepted. More time is needed to know whether and how this new process may be exploitable to produce energy on an industrial scale [it

  6. Fusion - still out in the cold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsley, Mike.

    1989-01-01

    Scepticism over the claims made by Professors Martin Fleischman and Stanley Pons about cold fusion is expressed. The background to their experiment and announcement of their results is given. Other research teams have failed to repeat the experiment which claims that deuterium nuclei fused in a special electrochemical cell. If tritium is also produced, as is claimed, this would have important military implications as tritium is used in hydrogen bombs. Failing cold fusion, there is always the JET project but after 10 years and an expenditure of Pound 600 million that has failed to produce a net energy gain it would be better to spend the money developing renewable energy sources. (U.K.)

  7. Observation of tritium in cold fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, M.S.; Malhotra, S.K.; Gaonkar, D.G.; Sadhukhan, H.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the results of tritium measurements carried out during the electrolysis of heavy water in different electrolysers employing palladium and titanium as cathodes. The tritium level of electrolytes have been found to be many orders of magnitudes higher than what can be explained on the basis of isotope enrichment and evaporation during electrolysis. The neutron measurement results have also been included and these observations have been attributed to the phenomenon of cold fusion. (author). 6 refs., 1 tab

  8. Cold fusion - no end of discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    1991-01-01

    In March 1989, Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann from the University of Utah/USA reported that they had discovered sporadic heat releases of non-chemical character in electro-chemical cells using palladium electrodes and heavy water. In the meantime, a series of new papers have been published in which similar effects and various explanations were described, although a number of qualified international research instituts could not confirm these findings. The subject matter 'cold fusion' is analysed critically. (orig.) [de

  9. Cold Fusion Has Now Come Out of the Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Edmund

    2003-10-01

    The phenomenon called cold fusion or LENR (Low-Energy-Nuclear-Reaction) has now achieved a level of reproducibility and understanding that warrants re-examination of the claims. A summary of what is known and want is being done worldwide to obtain more knowledge will be given. Rather than disappearing as better data are obtained, the effects are becoming more reproducible and of greater magnitude. Justification for this claim can be obtained at www.LENR-CANR.org. The phenomenon is too important to ignore any longer even though it conflicts with conventional theory.

  10. Electrochemical 'cold fusion' trials at IPP Garching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, H.S.; Gernhardt, J.; Karger, F.; Perchermeier, J.; Wurden, G.A.

    1989-07-01

    Following the report of Fleischmann and Pons, we (The Bavarian Bubble Bottle Team) have attempted to reproduce their claims of cold nuclear fusion, and failed. We note that our measurements would not be able to detect neutrons at the level of Jones et al. Three electrolytic cell experiments were conducted using palladium cathodes and Platinum anodes, in a 0.1 Molar solution of LiD in heavy water, without any signs of neutrons, tritium or gammas above backgrounds, and within ±0.3 Watt accuracy calorimetry, no excess heating. Excess heating at the levels of F P would have been easily detected, if present. Intrinsic tritium, differing from each D 2 O bottle tested, was however observed. The longest duration experiment ran for 21 days, and was an attempt to duplicate the large 'melting incident' of F P . This was terminated on April 28, 1989, by throwing the vacuum-cast 22 gram, deuterium-loaded palladium cathode directly into liquid nitrogen, immediately next to a bare BF 3 counter (backed by 25 cm of moderator), in order to attempt one of the Italian ENEA neutron production variants. No neutrons above backgrounds were seen, while counting for one hour, and also none while the piece warmed to room temperature over the next hour. Post mortem analysis of the darkened, hardened Pd piece showed large crystal grains (up to 2 mmx2 mm), and continuing evolution of gas bubbles at the grain boundaries even four days after the experiment was ended. Eight weeks after loading, the catalytically active palladium piece continued to create heavy water (with exposure to oxygen in the air). (orig.)

  11. High temperature superconductivity and cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitz, M.

    1990-01-01

    There are numerous historical and scientific parallels between high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and the newly emerging field of cold fusion (CF). Just as the charge carrier effective mass plays an important role in SC, the deuteron effective mass may play a vital role in CF. A new theory including effects of proximity, electron shielding, and decreased effective mass of the fusing nuclei can account for the reported CF results. A quantum-gas model that covers the range from low temperature to superhigh temperature SC indicates an increased T c with reduced dimensionality. A reduced dimensionality effect may also enhance CF. A relation is shown between CF and the significant cluster-impact fusion experiments

  12. Biases in cold fusion data; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freedman, Stuart; Krakauer, Daniel; Jones, S.E.; Decker, D.L.; Tolley, H.D.

    1990-01-01

    These two letters represent a criticism of a claim to have observed ''cold'' nuclear fusion and the original scientists' rebuttal of the claims against them. The first authors suggest that data presented has a peculiar characteristic, which, they claim, indicates a systematic bias in the data collection process, and thus calls the claimed observation into dispute. In reply, the original workers list a huge range of checks they made, before and after receiving the criticism, making allowances for all sorts of external parameters capable of affecting their results. (UK)

  13. Cold fusion, mass media and actual science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orefice, A. (Milan Univ. (Italy))

    1990-03-01

    The peculiar affair of cold nuclear fusion, a recent and exemplary pattern of today's scientific and public habits, is considered. An overview is proposed on the contemporary approach to science and technology, both of the mass media and research worlds. It shows how mass media with its power of suggestion and ability to raise financial resources can lead many researchers into unpredictable - if not irresponsible behaviour. Yet, an eccess of empiricism may often induce researchers to rely rather on serendipity than on deeper meditation.

  14. Cold fusion reactions with 48Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeggeler, H.W.; Jost, D.T.; Tuerler, A.

    1989-04-01

    Cold fusion reactions with 48 Ca on the targets 208 Pb, 209 Bi, 197 Au, 184 W, 180 Hf are reported. The experiments were performed at the velocity filter SHIP of GSI. The maximum cross sections show a steep descent by about four orders of magnitude when going from 224 Th to 228 U as compound nuclei. Between uranium and einsteinium the cross sections stay rather low and increase by about two orders of magnitude for nobelium. For lawrencium the cross section decrease again. 7 figs., 1 tab., 38 refs

  15. LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) research on cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, K I; Holzrichter, J F [eds.

    1989-09-14

    With the appearance of reports on Cold Fusion,'' scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began a series of increasingly sophisticated experiments and calculations to explain these phenomena. These experiments can be categorized as follows: (a) simple experiments to replicate the Utah results, (b) more sophisticated experiments to place lower bounds on the generation of heat and production of nuclear products, (c) a collaboration with Texas A M University to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for fusion by-products in a cell producing 10% excess heat (we found no by-products), and (d) attempts to replicate the Frascati experiment that first found neutron bursts when high-pressure deuterium gas in a cylinder with Ti chips was temperature-cycled. We failed in categories (a) and (b) to replicate either the Pons/Fleischmann or the Jones phenomena. We have seen phenomena similar to the Frascati results, (d) but these low-level burst signals may not be coming from neutrons generated in the Ti chips. Summaries of our experiments are described in Section II, as is a theoretical effort based on cosmic ray muons to describe low-level neutron production. Details of the experimental groups' work are contained in the six appendices. At LLNL, independent teams were spontaneously formed in response to the early announcements on cold fusion. This report's format follows this organization.

  16. Synthesis of superheavy elements by cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, S [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Gmbh (Germany)

    2009-12-31

    The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell-closure beyond {sup 208}Pb is at the proton number Z=114, 120, or 126 and at the neutron number N=172 or 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical 'Super Heavy Elements' (SHEs). Using cold fusion reactions which are based on lead and bismuth targets, the new elements from 107 to 112 were synthesized at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. Some of these results were confirmed at RIKEN in Wako, Japan, where also a relatively neutron-deficient isotope of element 113 was synthesized. In hot fusion reactions of {sup 48}Ca projectiles with actinide targets, a more neutron-rich isotope of element 112 and the new elements from 113 to 116 and even 118 were produced at FLNR in Dubna, Russia. Recently, part of these hot fusion data, which represent the first identification of nuclei located on the predicted island of SHEs, were confirmed in two independent experiments. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is alpha emission rather than fission. The decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results of theoretical studies.

  17. Microscopic observations of palladium used for cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the microscopic structures of palladium metals used for cold fusion experiments. Tiny spot defects suggesting cold fusion have been observed in grain boundaries as the Nattoh model predicts. The relationship between these defects and a series of neutron busts and an indirect loop of hydrogen chain reactions are discussed

  18. Nuclear transmutation. The reality of cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Tadahiko

    1997-01-01

    The book is introducing the quest on the way to reality of cold fusion. Another point of author is interaction between the quest and social impacts. After the first report on cold fusion by M. Fleischmann and S. Pons on March 1989, the inspired author started a series of following experiments based on his own characteristic background of electrochemistry. The first experiment from March 25 to April 7, 1989 did not show any indications on neutrons, gamma rays, tritium, and heat. The second experiment was initiated at the underground experimental hall of the linear accelerator facilities. This means the shielding of noises coming from outsides. The neutron of about 2.45 MeV was observed after the 1-month continuation of the experiment. The intensity of neutron was nearly 10 to 20 times of the background noise. Furthermore, there were no changes of signals on heat and tritium before and after the experiments. The closed cell experiment was conducted to keep reliability of the experiment. The experiment started on June 1990. In this case, Tritium signals of 100 times of background noise were observed, however, no meaningful signal on neutrons. Anomalous heat was observed after March 24, 1991, where the electric current was increased up to 6 A. On the other hand, there were no appreciable change in neutron and tritium signals. The solid electrolysis was used in the experiment after May 1992, for its high temperature characteristics, where anomalous heat was observed with a certain probability. The experimental system was upgraded in diagnostic methods after 1994. As a result, particular isotopes related to fission reaction were detected. This fact indicates some kinds of transmutations at very local area of the solid surfaces. The author has also pointed out many reactions for a series of this scientific results responded by, for example, well known professors, scientific societies, mass media, and international conferences. Consequently the reactions had almost smeared

  19. A light water excess heat reaction suggests that cold fusion may be alkali-hydrogen fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Mills and Kneizys presented data in support of a light water excess heat reaction obtained with an electrolytic cell highly reminiscent of the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion cell. The claim of Mills and Kneizys that their excess heat reaction can be explained on the basis of a novel chemistry, which supposedly also explains cold fusion, is rejected in favor of their reaction being, instead, a light water cold fusion reaction. It is the first known light water cold fusion reaction to exhibit excess heat, it may serve as a prototype to expand our understanding of cold fusion. From this new reactions are deduced, including those common to past cold fusion studies. This broader pattern of nuclear reactions is typically seen to involve a fusion of the nuclides of the alkali atoms with the simplest of the alkali-type nuclides, namely, protons, deuterons, and tritons. Thus, the term alkali-hydrogen fusion seems appropriate for this new type of reaction with three subclasses: alkali-hydrogen fusion, alkali-deuterium fusion, and alkali-tritium fusion. A new three-dimensional transmission resonance model (TRM) is sketched. Finally, preliminary experimental evidence in support of the hypothesis of a light water nuclear reaction and alkali-hydrogen fusion is reported. Evidence is presented that appears to strongly implicate the transmission resonance phenomenon of the new TRM

  20. Social Aspects of Cold Fusion: 23 Years Later

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski L.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The field of Cold Fusion, now called Condensed Matter Nuclear Science (CMNS, re- mains controversial. The original 1989 claim made by M. Fleischmann and S. Pons was that a chemical process in an electrolytic cell could initiate a nuclear reaction–fusion of two deuterium nuclei. More recent CMNS claims, made by experimental scientists, are: emission of charged nuclear projectiles during electrolysis; accumulation of 4 He; production of radioactive isotopes; and transmutation of elements. In the US, CMNS claims have been evaluated in two Department of Energy (DOE investigations, in 1989 and 2004, as summarized in this article. These investigations did not lead to any resolu- tion of the controversy. Scientists and adminstrators are not ideal; competition among them, as among other groups of people, tends to have both positive and negative influ- ences.

  1. Sonoluminescence: an IRaser creating cold fusion neutrons?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevenslik, T.V.

    1996-01-01

    Sonoluminescence can be explained by treating the bubbles as IRasers with standing waves in resonance with the bubble dimensions. Since the IRaser resonant radiation is required to satisfy wave boundary conditions, the water molecules lining the bubble walls undergo a continuous population inversion as the bubble collapses. By stimulated processes, the Planck energy accumulates as the K b T energy of radiation photons is pumped from the surroundings through the rotational state of the water molecule. Bubble collapse occurs almost isothermally with the high IR absorptivity of the water molecule permitting the Planck energy to accumulate to 2∼6 eV only to be released by VIS-UV photon emission because of the low absorptivity of water at VIS-UV frequencies. As the IRaser cavity dimensions collapse to the spacing between water molecules at liquid density, soft x-rays at about 2 keV are predicted. But, this is less than 10 keV necessary for cold fusion so that no neutrons is directly expected yet. Therefore, it is suggested that UV laser enhancement is used to accumulate further bubble collapse energy

  2. Conventional sources of fast neutrons in 'cold fusion' experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cribier, M.; Spiro, M.; Favier, J.

    1989-04-01

    In 'cold fusion' experiments with heavy water a source of neutrons is the dissociation of deuterium induced by alpha particles emitted by natural occurring radioisotopes. We evaluate the rate of fast neutron emission as a function of the concentration of U, Th, Rn in contact with deuterium and discuss the possibility that the neutrons claimed to have been observed in 'cold fusion' experiments could be due to this conventional source

  3. Cold neutron production and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Noboru.

    1976-01-01

    The first part gives general introduction to cold neutrons, namely the definition and the role as a probe in basic science and technology. The second part reviews various methods of cold neutron production. Some physical characteristics required for cold moderators are presented, and a list summarizes a number of cold moderators and their reactor physics constants. The definition of flux gain factor and the measured values for liquid light- and heavy-hydrogen are also given. The cold neutron spectra in methane and liquid hydrogen measured by LINAC time-of-flight method are presented to show the advantage of solid methane. The cold neutron sources using experimental reactors or linear accelerators are explained along with the examples of existing facilities. Two Japanese programs, the one is the use of a high flux reactor and the other is the use of a LINAC, are also presented. The third part of this report reviews the application areas of cold neutrons. (Aoki, K.)

  4. Review for 'Nattoh' model and experimental findings during cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Takaaki

    1993-01-01

    A review is described for the Nattoh model that provides the framework of the mechanisms of cold fusion. The model classifies the reactions into two categories: fundamental and associated reactions. The former involves the new 'hydrogen-catalyzed' fusion reaction and the chain-reactions of hydrogens. And extremely exciting physics are involved in the latter. Furthermore experimental findings are described. (author)

  5. Introducing the book 'Cold fusion and the future'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, Jed

    2006-01-01

    Cold fusion will be the ideal source of energy, provided its introduction can be handled properly. A few cells have shown power density and temperatures suitable for real-world applications. Once these cells can be replicated on demand, commercial development will be straightforward. Manufacturing should not be too demanding, so thousands of companies will compete, and costs will fall quickly. The transition from fossil fuel to cold fusion will be rapid. Many extraordinary new applications will become possible, and seemingly intractable problems such as global warming may be fixed. Some examples will be presented. Public support is essential to funding research, and commercialization. 'Cold Fusion and the Future' is the title of a new book by this author. This paper discusses a few of the topics in the book

  6. The DD Cold Fusion-Transmutation Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Talbot A.

    2005-12-01

    LENR theory must explain dd fusion, alpha-addition transmutations, radiationless nuclear reactions, and three-body nuclear particle reactions. Reaction without radiation requires many-body D Bloch+ periodicity in both location and internal structure dependencies. Electron scattering leads to mixed quantum states. The radiationless dd fusion reaction is 2-D Bloch+ -> {}4 He Bloch2+. Overlap between {}4 He Bloch2+ and surface Cs leads to alpha absorption. In the Iwamura et al. studies active deuterium is created by scattering at diffusion barriers.

  7. Experimental studies on cold fusion and hydrogen-metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locou, P.

    2007-01-01

    . Indeed one of three geneses focusing for the obtaining of the Hydrogen - pure Metal with one thousand thousandth, and stable HTBT, uses this process of cold fusion (merger) above described. There is another process of Cold Fusion (Merger) which also gives, and in a more continuous way, the possibility to obtain from some Hydrogen - stable Metal and in bigger quantity by module of production: When a metal as the scandium is used in fusions with cold, he (it) goes out of it covered with eruptions looking like microphones (micro computing) volcanoes. This puts in evidence the waste of a very big quantity of heat pulling (entailing) the cast iron and the evaporation of the metal, but only in tiny points. Knowing the melting point of the scandium, we calculated the quantity of energy necessary for the fusion (merger) of these nano - points without provoking of fusion (merger) surrounding. Seen the unhoped-for figure which we found, the source of energy can be only nuclear. My spectrometer allows an exact measure of atoms and determined a broadcast (emission, issue) of helium (10 for 10.000). This got back heat allows the usage of an unlimited energy. What counts above all, is the conservation of Process and the acquisition of the results, their possible putting at disposition on the world plan(shot), under certain conditions, which (who) are not necessarily expensive. Hydrogen - Metal: Everybody knows that the common hydrogen is a flammable gas of density very tenue. However, if we compress very strongly the hydrogen, the theory predicts that it is transformed into metal, and it would be possible that this metal phase is stable in common temperature. In fact, quite as the antimatter, the metal hydrogen constitutes a subject of researches mattering within the military laboratories for a very long time. One of the concrete reasons of this interest lives in the fact that the metal hydrogen is probably the most powerful chemical explosive that it is possible to conceive. It is

  8. Radioisotope production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engholm, B.A.; Cheng, E.T.; Schultz, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    Radioisotope production in fusion reactors is being investigated as part of the Fusion Applications and Market Evaluation (FAME) study. /sup 60/Co is the most promising such product identified to date, since the /sup 60/Co demand for medical and food sterilization is strong and the potential output from a fusion reactor is high. Some of the other radioisotopes considered are /sup 99/Tc, /sup 131/l, several Eu isotopes, and /sup 210/Po. Among the stable isotopes of interest are /sup 197/Au, /sup 103/Rh and Os. In all cases, heat or electricity can be co-produced from the fusion reactor, with overall attractive economics

  9. Stockpile tritium production from fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokke, W.A.; Fowler, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    A fusion breeder holds the promise of a new capability - ''dialable'' reserve capacity at little additional cost - that offers stockpile planners a new way to deal with today's uncertainties in forecasting long range needs. Though still in the research stage, fusion can be developed in time to meet future military requirements. Much of the necessary technology will be developed by the ongoing magnetic fusion energy program. However, a specific program to develop the nuclear technology required for materials production is needed if fusion is to become a viable option for a new production complex around the turn of the century

  10. On fusion/fission chain reactions in the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.; Froelich, P.; Monkhorst, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of fusion/fission chain reactions following d-d source reactions in electrochemical cold fusion experiments have been investigated. The recycling factors for the charged particles in fusion reactions with consumable nuclei deuteron, 6 Li nd 7 Li, are estimated. It is concluded that, based on the established nuclear fusion cross sections and electronic stopping power, the recycling factor is four to five orders of magnitude less than required for close to critical conditions. It is argued that the cross generation of charged particles by neutrons does not play a significant role in this process, even if increased densities at the surface of electrodes do occur

  11. Advanced synfuel production with fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.R.; Fillo, J.

    1979-01-01

    An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers a nearly inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  12. Cold fusion valleys for the synthesis of Z=118 isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gherghescu, R.

    2005-01-01

    Cold fusion reactions are investigated with the goal to synthesize Z=118 isotopes with neutron numbers N=162, 168, 172, 176. Potential energy surfaces are calculated as the result of dynamic minimization with independent deformations of the target and projectile, small semi-axis of the projectile and distance between centers as degrees of freedom. An advanced binary macroscopic-microscopic method is used to obtain the deformation energy and the Werner-Wheeler approximation yield the mass tensor. Charge asymmetry is varied for the same mass asymmetry channel which belongs to a given energy valley. The highest penetrability values are obtained for cold fusion channels with Sn, Te and Xe isotopes as projectiles

  13. Experiments in order to reproduce cold fusion results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimbot, R.; Blain, G.; Boureau, G.; Cieur, M.

    1989-01-01

    Three experiments have been performed in order to try and reproduce the cold fusion experiments reported by FLEISCHMANN and PONS (D 2 O electrolysis) and by the Frascati Group (D 2 absorption in Ti at liquid nitrogen temperature). In the two electrolysis experiments, a Pd cathode was used together with a Pt anode and a Pd (D 2 ) reference electrode, in acid and basic media. The electrolysis cell was surrounded by four neutron counters filled with an organic scintillator (NE213). The electronics made it possible to discriminate neutrons from gamma rays. The global efficiency for neutron detection was 20%, and the detection threshold was equal to 1 neutron/s/4π. A germanium detector (efficiency 70%) and a NaI crystal were used to record gamma ray spectra. In one of the experiments, tritium was measured in the solution before and after electrolysis. None of the two experiments showed neutron, gamma, or tritium production above background. In the third experiment, deuterium was absorbed in titanium by cooling at liquid nitrogen temperature, and desorbed by warming up at room temperature; both neutron and gamma emissions were recorded during these operations. The results of this experiment were also negative [fr

  14. Ultra-cold molecule production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-01-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled

  15. Study of Cold Fusion Reactions Using Collective Clusterization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurjit; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-10-01

    Within the framework of the dynamical cluster decay model (DCM), the 1n evaporation cross-sections ({σ }1n) of cold fusion reactions (Pb and Bi targets) are calculated for {Z}{CN}=104-113 superheavy nuclei. The calculations are carried out in the fixed range of excitation energy {E}{CN}* =15+/- 1 {MeV}, so that the comparative analysis of reaction dynamics can be worked out. First of all, the fission barriers (B f ) and neutron separation energies ({S}1n) are estimated to account the decreasing cross-sections of cold fusion reactions. In addition to this, the importance of hot optimum orientations of β 2i-deformed nuclei over cold one is explored at fixed angular momentum and neck-length parameters. The hot optimum orientations support all the target-projectile (t,p) combinations, which are explored experimentally in the cold fusion reactions. Some new target-projectile combinations are also predicted for future exploration. Further, the 1n cross-sections are addressed for {Z}{CN}=104-113 superheavy nuclei at comparable excitation energies which show the decent agrement with experimental data upto {Z}{CN}=109 nuclei. Finally, to understand the dynamics of higher-Z superheavy nuclei, the cross-sections are also calculated at maximum available energies around the Coulomb barrier and the effect of non-sticking moment of inertia ({I}{NS}) is also investigated at these energies. Supported by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), in the Form of Research Project Grant No. 03(1341)/15/EMR-II, and to DST, New Delhi, for INSPIRE-Fellowship Grant No. DST/INSPIRE/03/2015/000199

  16. Cold fusion in symmetric 90Zr induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.G.; Schmidt, K.H.; Hessberger, F.P.; Muenzenberg, G.; Reisdorf, W.; Clerc, H.G.; Sahm, C.C.

    1985-08-01

    Excitation functions for evaporation residues were measured for the reactions 90 Zr+ 89 Y, 90 Zr, 92 Zr, 96 Zr, and 94 Mo. Deexcitation only by γ radiation was found for the compound nuclei 179 Au, 180 Hg, 182 Hg, and 184 Pb. The cross sections for this process were found to be considerably larger than predicted by a statistical-model calculation using standard parameters for the γ-strength function. Fusion probabilities as well as fusion-barrier distributions were deduced from the measured cross sections. There are strong nuclear structure effects in subbarrier fusion. For energies far below the fusion barrier the increase of the fusion probabilities with increasing energy is found to be much steeper than predicted by WKB calculations. As a by-product of this work new α-spectroscopic information could be obtained for neutron deficient isotopes between Ir and Pb. (orig.)

  17. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated. (author).

  18. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of the methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors (that do not include a conventional turbine-type generator), the efficient use of fusion-reactor radiation and semiconductors to supply clean fuel in the form of hydrogen gas is studied. Taking the reactor candidates such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a plant system concept are investigated.

  19. Hydrogen production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-11-01

    As one of methods of innovative energy production in fusion reactors without having a conventional turbine-type generator, an efficient use of radiation produced in a fusion reactor with utilizing semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas are studied. Taking the candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system for application of the new concepts, the expected efficiency and a concept of plant system are investigated. (author)

  20. Synfuels production from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  1. Fusion Energy for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J. A.; Powell, J. R.; Steinberg, M.; Salzano, F.; Benenati, R.; Dang, V.; Fogelson, S.; Isaacs, H.; Kouts, H.; Kushner, M.; Lazareth, O.; Majeski, S.; Makowitz, H.; Sheehan, T. V.

    1978-09-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approximately 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets.

  2. Cold fusion 1: the discovery that never was

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.

    1991-01-01

    In this first of two articles chronicalling the claims to have produced ''cold fusion'' in 1989, the author, a nuclear physicist, explores the evidence against the claim. A brief description is offered of the experimental work that led to the claim and a critique of research methods and lack of proper scientific procedures is offered. The work of many reputable scientific teams across the globe, especially that done at Harwell Laboratory, to replicate the results produced negative results. The author suggests that what positive results exist, subsequent to the original claim, are anecdotal and done by less professionally qualified workers, and can consequently be dismissed. (UK)

  3. Thermal, thermoelectric, and cathode poisoning effects in cold fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keesing, R.G.; Greenhow, R.C.; Cohler, M.D.; McQuillan, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an unsuccessful attempt to repeat the observations by Fleischmann and Pons of cold nuclear fusion in deuterium-charged palladium; no excess heat is found, nor is any gamma or neutron activity identified. Peltier heating at the palladium/platinum junction is investigated, but no effects are seen; the possibility remains, however, that a large Peltier coefficient may arise for deuterium concentrations that render the palladium-deuterium semiconducting. Finally, the effects of poisoning the palladium with cyanide were investigated

  4. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Boris V

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the 'acoustic CF' could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics.

  5. Nuclear structure in cold rearrangement processes in fission and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, P.

    1998-11-01

    In fission and fusion of heavy nuclei large numbers of nucleons are rearranged at a scale of excitation energy very small compared to the binding energy of the nuclei. The energies involved are less than 40 MeV at nuclear temperatures below 1.5 MeV. The shapes of the configurations in the rearrangement of a binary system into a monosystem in fusion, or vice versa in fission, change their elongations by as much as 8 fm, the radius of the monosystem. The dynamics of the reactions macroscopically described by a potential energy surface, inertia parameters, dissipation, and a collision energy is strongly modified by the nuclear structure of the participating nuclei. Experiments showing nuclear structure effects in fusion and fission of the heaviest nuclei are reviewed. The reaction kinematics and the multitude of isotopes involved are investigated by detector techniques and by recoil spectrometers. The advancement of the latter allows to find very small reaction branches in the range of 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -10}. The experiments reveal nuclear structure effects in all stages of the rearrangement processes. These are discussed pointing to analogies in fusion and fission on the microscopic scale, notwithstanding that both processes macroscopically are irreversible. Heavy clusters, as 132Sn, 208Pb, nuclei with closed shell configurations N=82,126, Z=50,82 survive in large parts of the nuclear rearrangement. They determine the asymmetry in the mass distribution of low energy fission, and they allow to synthesise superheavy elements, until now up to element 112. Experiments on the cold rearrangement in fission and fusion are presented. Here, in the range of excitation energies below 12 MeV the phenomena are observed most convincingly. (orig.)

  6. Role of the press in cold fusion saga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindley, D.

    1992-01-01

    Press reports of cold-fusion discoveries in Utah and the pending publication of them in Nature magazine caught the associate editor of Nature, David Lindley, by surprise. Like most people, he had never heard of cold fusion. He learned that two papers, one from Steven Jones at Brigham Young University and one from Stanley Pons and Martin Fleischmann of the University of Utah, had been submitted to Nature and were undergoing the magazine's peer-review process. For weeks, Lindley was bombarded by reporters wanting daily progress reports. Many of the reporters considered the peer review a fuddy-duddy procedure meant primarily to impose conformity and suppress revolutionary ideas. In the end, Nature decided to publish the paper by Jones but not the one by Pons and Fleischmann. Because of the doubts cast on Pons and Fleischmann's findings, Nature's decision created no great public stir, Lindley recalls. But it did help reinforce in the authors the belief that they were heretics whom the establishment was out to destroy. Like politicians struggling at the polls, they blamed everyone but themselves, Lindley says. Above all, they blaimed the two all-time favorites - the media and the establishment

  7. Products in fusion systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henke, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the notion of a product of a normal subsystem with a p-subgroup as defined by Aschbacher (2011) [Asc11, Chapter 8]. In particular, we give a previously unknown, more transparent construction....

  8. Conventional physics can explain cold fusion excess heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, S. R.

    In 1989, when Fleischmann, Pons and Hawkins (FP), claimed they had created room temperature, nuclear fusion in a solid, a firestorm of controversy erupted. Beginning in 1991, the Office of Naval Research began a decade-long study of the FP excess heat effect. This effort documented the fact that the excess heat that FP observed is the result of a form of nuclear fusion that can occur in solids at reduced temperature, dynamically, through a deuteron (d)+d□4He reaction, without high-energy particles or □ rays. A key reason this fact has not been accepted is the lack of a cogent argument, based on fundamental physical ideas, justifying it. In the paper, this question is re-examined, based on a generalization of conventional energy band theory that applies to finite, periodic solids, in which d's are allowed to occupy wave-like, ion band states, similar to the kinds of states that electrons occupy in ordinary metals. Prior to being experimentally observed, the Ion Band State Theory (IBST) of cold fusion predicted a potential d+d□4He reaction, without high energy particles, would explain the excess heat, the 4He would be found in an unexpected place (outside heat-producing electrodes), and high-loading, x□1, in PdDx, would be required.

  9. Inertial fusion and energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzrichter, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is a technology for releasing nuclear energy from the fusion of light nuclei. For energy production, the most reactive hydrogen isotopes (deuterium (D) and tritium (T)) are commonly considered. The energy aplication requires the compression of a few milligrams of a DT mixture to great density, approximately 1000 times its liquid-state density, and to a high temperature, nearly 100 million 0 K. Under these conditions, efficient nuclear-fusion reactions occur, which can result in over 30% burn-up of the fusion fuel. The high density and temperature can be achieved by focusing very powerful laser or ion beams onto the target. The resultant ablation of the outer layers of the target compresses the fuel in the target, DT ignition occurs, and burn-up of the fuel results as the thermonuclear burn wave propagates outward. The DT-fuel burn-up occurs in about 199 picoseconds. On this short time scale, inertial forces are sufficiently strong to prevent target disassembly before fuel burn-up occurs. The energy released by the DT fusion is projected to be several hundred times greater than the energy delivered by the driver. The present statuds of ICF technology is described

  10. The abundant excess heat production during low energy nuclear reaction in the nano scale solid state the cold fusion, 14 years' legacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Tae Ho; Miley, George H.; Lipson, Andrei; Kim, Sung O.; Luo, Nie; Castano, Carlos H.

    2002-01-01

    The quite abundant excess heat and radioactive materials are found during the solid state reaction. This phenomenon has done during the Low Energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR) in the nano scale molecular structure electrodes and Hydrogen compound electrolytes. The Palladium (or Nickel) and Platinum are incorporated as the electrode and the Light Water (H 2 O) as the electrolyte. The excess heat was produced up to 40% in year 2001. The Alpha particles are also detected. The computer code, Coherent Lattice Accelerator Inter-Ionic Reaction Enhancer (CLAIRE) Code System, is constructed for the simulation. The 0.1 A of the distance between two the Hydrogen ion (proton) and Palladium nucleus is the critical point for the nuclear fusion reaction

  11. The abundant excess heat production during low energy nuclear reaction in the nano scale solid state the cold fusion, 14 years' legacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho; Miley, George H.; Lipson, Andrei; Kim, Sung O.; Luo, Nie; Castano, Carlos H. [The University of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

    2002-05-01

    The quite abundant excess heat and radioactive materials are found during the solid state reaction. This phenomenon has done during the Low Energy Nuclear Reaction (LENR) in the nano scale molecular structure electrodes and Hydrogen compound electrolytes. The Palladium (or Nickel) and Platinum are incorporated as the electrode and the Light Water (H{sub 2}O) as the electrolyte. The excess heat was produced up to 40% in year 2001. The Alpha particles are also detected. The computer code, Coherent Lattice Accelerator Inter-Ionic Reaction Enhancer (CLAIRE) Code System, is constructed for the simulation. The 0.1 A of the distance between two the Hydrogen ion (proton) and Palladium nucleus is the critical point for the nuclear fusion reaction.

  12. Electron beam welding using fusion and cold wire fill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuncz, F.F.

    1977-01-01

    A straight-fusion (self-filler) welding technique generally poses no problem for electron beam welding. However, where control of penetration is a critical item and burn-through cannot be tolerated, this technique may not be satisfactory. To assure against beam-spike burn-through on a 1/4-inch deep weld joint, a low-power root-fusion pass, supplemented by numerous filler passes, was selected. However, this technique proved to have numerous problems. Voiding and porosity showed frequently in the first applications of this cold-wire filler process. Taper-out cratering, bead-edge undercutting, and spatter were also problems. These imperfections, however, were overcome. Employment of a circle generator provided the necessary heating of the joint walls to eliminate voids. The moving beam spot also provided a stirring action, lessening porosity. Taper-out cratering was eliminated by adjusting the timing of the current cutoff and wire-feed cutoff. Undercutting, bead height, and spatter were controlled by beam defocus

  13. A REALISTIC EXAMINATION OF COLD FUSION CLAIMS 24 YEARS LATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, K.

    2012-10-22

    On March 29, 1989, chemists Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced they had discovered an effect whose explanation was required to lie in the realm of nuclear reactions. Their claim, and those subsequent to it of roughly similar nature, became known as ‘cold fusion’. Research continues to this day on this effect, but what has become clear is that whatever it is, it is not a conventional fusion process. Thus the ‘cold fusion’ moniker is somewhat inappropriate and many current researchers in the field prefer the term “Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR)”, although other terms have been coined for it as well. the results developed out of the LENR research do in fact show something is happening to produce signals which might be interpreted as supporting nuclear reactions (which is what encourages and sustains LENR researchers), but which can also be interpreted via a set of unique and interesting conventional processes. The focus of this document is to describe and address recent objections to such processes so that subsequent LENR research can be guided to develop information that will determine whether either set of explanations has merit. It is hoped that criteria delineated herein will aid the USDOE and other agencies in determining if LENR proposals are meritorious and worthy of support or not.

  14. Heavy cluster in cold nuclear rearrangements in fusion and fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the appearance of cluster aspects in the dynamics of large rearrangements processes, as fusion and fission, is presented. Clusters in the sense as used in the following are strongly bound, doubly magic neutron rich nuclei as 48 Ca 28 , 78 Ni 50 , 132 Sn 82 , and 208 Pb 126 , the spherical nuclei Z=114 - 126 and N=184, and nuclei with closed shells N=28, 50, 82, and 126, and Z=28, 50, and 82. As with increasing nucleon numbers, the absolute shell corrections to the binding energies increase, the strongest effects are to be observed for the higher shells. The 132 cluster manifests itself in low energy fission (Faissner, H. and Wildermuth, K. Nucl. Phys., 58 (1964) 177). The 208 Pb cluster gave the new radioactivity (Rose, M.J. and Jones G.A., Nature, 307 (1984) 245) and the first superheavy elements (SHE) (Armbruster P., Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 35 (1985) 135-94; Munzenberg, G. Rep. Progr. Phys., 51 (1988) 57). The paper discuss experiments concerning the stability of clusters to intrinsic excitation energy in fusion and fission (Armbruster, P. Lect. Notes Phys., 158 (1982) 1). and the manifestation of clusters in the fusion entrance channel (Armbruster, P., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn., 58 (1989) 232). The importance of compactness of the clustering system seems to be equally decisive in fission and fusion. Finally, it s covered the importance of clusters for the production of SHEs)

  15. Some considerations of ''cold fusion'' including the calculation of fusion rates in molecules of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.

    1989-11-01

    We calculate the fusion reaction rates in molecules of hydrogen isotopes. The rates are calculated analytically (for the first time) as an asymptotic expansion in the ratio of the electron mass to the reduced mass of the nucleii. The fusion rates of the P-D, D-D, and D-T reactions are given for a variable electron mass by a simple analytic formula. However, we do not know any mechanism by which a sufficiently localized electron in solid can have an 'effective mass' large enough to explain the result of Fleischman and Pons (FP). This calculation indicates that P-D rates should exceed D-D rates for D-D fusion rates less than approximately 10 -23 per molecule per second. The D-D fusion rate is enhanced by a factor of 10 5 at 10,000 degree K if the excited vibrational states are populated with a Boltzmann distribution and the rotational excitations suppressed. The suggestion that experimental results could be explained by bombardment of cold deuterons by kilovolt deuterons is shown to be an unlikely from an energetic point of view. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  16. Cold Fusion Production and Decay of Neutron-Deficient Isotopes of Dubnium and Development of Extraction Systems for Group V Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, Jacklyn M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-07-31

    Excitation functions for the 1n and 2n exit channels of the 208Pb(51V,xn)259-xDb reaction were measured. A maximum cross section of the 1n exit channel of 2070$+1100\\atop{-760}$ pb was measured at an excitation energy of 16.0 ± 1.8 MeV. For the 2n exit channel, a maximum cross section of 1660$+450\\atop{-370}$ pb was measured at 22.0 ± 1.8 MeV excitation energy. The 1n excitation function for the 209Bi(50Ti,n)258Db reaction was remeasured, resulting in a cross section of 5480$+1730\\atop{-1370}$ pb at an excitation energy of 16.0 ± 1.6 MeV. Differences in cross section maxima are discussed in terms of the fusion probability below the barrier. The extraction of niobium (Nb) and tantalum (Ta) from hydrochloric acid and mixed hydrochloric acid/lithium chloride media by bis(2-ethylhexyl) hydrogen phosphate (HDEHP) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) hydrogen phosphite (BEHP) was studied. The goal of the experiments was to find a system that demonstrates selectivity among the members of group five of the Periodic Table and is also suitable for the study of dubnium (Db, Z = 105). Experiments with niobium and tantalum were performed with carrier (10-6 M), carrier free (10-10 M) and trace (10-16 M) concentrations of metal using hydrochloric acid solution with concentrations ranging from 1 - 11 M. The extraction of niobium and tantalum from mixed hydrochloric acid/lithium chloride media by HDEHP and BEHP as a function of hydrogen ion (H+) concentration was also investigated. The data obtained are used as the basis to discuss the speciation of niobium and tantalum under the conditions studied and to evaluate possible extraction mechanisms. The 74Se(18O,p3n)88gNb excitation function was measured to determine the best energy for producing the 88Nb used in chemistry experiments. A maximum cross section of 495 +- 5 mb was observed at an 18O energy of 74.0 Me

  17. Production of titanium alloy powders by vacuum fusion-centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decours, Jacques; Devillard, Jacques; Sainfort, G.

    1975-01-01

    This work presents a method of preparing powdered TA6V and TA6Z5D alloys by fusion-centrifugation under electron bombardment. An industrial capacity apparatus for the production of metallic powders is described and the characteristics of the powders obtained are presented. Solid parts were shaped by sintering and drawing at temperatures between 850 and 1100 deg C. The structure and mechanical properties of the cold densified products before and after heat treatment are compared [fr

  18. Concepts for fusion fuel production blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierszewski, P.

    1986-06-01

    The fusion blanket surrounds the burning hydrogen core of the fusion reactor. It is in this blanket that most of the energy released by the DT fusion reaction is converted into useable product, and where tritium fuel is produced to enable further operation of the reactor. Blankets will involve new materials, conditions and processes. Several recent fusion blanket concepts are presented to illustrate the range of ideas

  19. Highlights of papers presented at the workshop on cold fusion phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This report contains highlights of formal oral papers presented at the Workshop on Cold Fusion Phenomena, hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and held May 23--25, 1989, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. General topics covered are: physics of fusion reactions; neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy; colorimetry; and applicable condensed-matter physics, electrochemistry, and analytical chemistry

  20. Cold-fusion as safe and hazardless energy-source of the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.C.; Gupta, Sushant

    2012-01-01

    Out of the two processes for nuclear-energy; nuclear-fission is plagued with problem of nuclear-radiation hazard, whereas though nuclear-fusion is safe but almost impossible to be done on earth specially at room- temperature. In 1989, two scientists Fleischmann and Pons in USA proposed a table-top, room temperature electrolysis-experiment of heavy-water with palladium-electrode; this is commonly called cold-fusion wherein nuclear-fusion is said to be taking place. This created a big storm and controversy in the scientific community. Initially the cold-fusion was heavily criticized and several objections (such as: non-reproducibility, non-observation of telltale signature of nuclear-reaction) were raised. The research-work of McKubre and others have clarified the objections and have established that for cold-fusion to take place certain threshold conditions (such as purity of electrode, current-density, deuterium to palladium loading ratio) needs to be satisfied. In due course of time, the Truth prevailed and the cold-fusion got more and more support by many scientists in several countries including India (BARC historic role has been appreciated worldwide). Biggest objection, however, was lack of a proper theory for how Coulomb-repulsion is overcome in cold-fusion. A possible explanation for how the Coulomb-repulsion is overcome, is given in this paper; which is based on a new-found Gupta-Dinu effect, which is a natural outcome of special-relativity via modification in Lorentz force formula. The recent nuclear-accidents have raised international-opinion against nuclear-fission, whereas sin-like hot-fusion on earth is not possible. Now it seems that ultimately it is the cold-fusion which will provide hazardless neat and cheap energy for the 21 st century and India could play a leading role in this direction. (author)

  1. Synfuel (hydrogen) production from fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Cox, K.E.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Booth, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    A potential use of fusion energy for the production of synthetic fuel (hydrogen) is described. The hybrid-thermochemical bismuth-sulfate cycle is used as a vehicle to assess the technological and economic merits of this potential nonelectric application of fusion power

  2. Activation product transport in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. A computer code, RAPTOR, has been developed to determine the transport of these products in fusion reactor coolant/tritium breeding materials. Without special treatment, it is likely that fusion reactor power plant operators could experience dose rates as high as 8 rem per hour around a number of plant components after only a few years of operation. (orig.)

  3. Sustainable Algae Biodiesel Production in Cold Climates

    OpenAIRE

    Baliga, Rudras; Powers, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    This life cycle assessment aims to determine the most suitable operating conditions for algae biodiesel production in cold climates to minimize energy consumption and environmental impacts. Two hypothetical photobioreactor algae production and biodiesel plants located in Upstate New York (USA) are modeled. The photobioreactor is assumed to be housed within a greenhouse that is located adjacent to a fossil fuel or biomass power plant that can supply waste heat and flue gas containing CO2 as a ...

  4. Why You Should Believe Cold Fusion is Real

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Edmund K.

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear reactions are now claimed to be initiated in certain solid materials at an energy too low to overcome the Coulomb barrier. These reactions include fusion, accelerated radioactive decay, and transmutation involving heavy elements. Evidence is based on hundreds of measurements of anomalous energy using a variety of calorimeters at levels far in excess of error, measurement of nuclear products using many normally accepted techniques, observations of many patterns of behavior common to all studies, measurement of anomalous energetic emissions using accepted techniques, and an understanding of most variables that have hindered reproducibility in the past. This evidence can be found at www.LENR-CANR.orgwww.LENR-CANR.org. Except for an accepted theory, the claims have met all requirements normally required before a new idea is accepted by conventional science, yet rejection continues. How long can the US afford to reject a clean and potentially cheap source of energy, especially when other nations are attempting to develop this energy and the need for such an energy source is so great?

  5. Search for evidence of nuclear involvement in the fatal explosion of a 'cold fusion' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, P.M.; Whipple, R.E.; Andresen, B.D.; Russo, R.E.; Bazan, F.; Brunk, J.L.; Wong, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    Forensic analyses of debris from the fatal explosion of an electrochemical 'cold fusion' cell at SRI International were conducted at LLNL at the request of Cal-OSHA. One investigation focused on the possibility of conventional nuclear reaction mechanisms contributing to the total energy inventory of the incident. Selected metal components of the electrolysis apparatus were subjected to nondestructive γ-ray spectrometry with high-sensitivity, low-background Ge detector systems. The anticipated analytes in these studies were radioactivation products potentially induced in the explosion residue by either fast or thermal neutrons. The results of this investigation were negative within the temporal constraints of the incident and the analytical sensitivities of the instrumentation. (author) 5 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  6. Bibliography of fusion product physics in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1989-09-01

    Almost 700 citations have been compiled as the first step in reviewing the recent research on tokamak fusion product effects in tokamaks. The publications are listed alphabetically by the last name of the first author and by subject category

  7. The Cold Chain Logistics for Perishable Agricultural Products in China

    OpenAIRE

    Hou Yanfang; Xie Dong; Wang Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces concepts of the agricultural product cold chain logistics and domestic and international researches. Also, the study discusses issues of Chinese agricultural cold chain logistics in the development process as the following aspects: the dividing of cold chain logistics market, refrigeration hardware facilities, third-party cold chain logistics development, the level of cold chain technologies, cold chain logistics professionals and the legal system and the standard system...

  8. Basic study of cold fusion. 1. The development of excess heat measurement system in electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    We have an opportunity ripe to investigate the cold fusion phenomena. In order to declare the subjects to be examined, the precision calorimetry system was developed to try to reproduce the phenomena. The electrolysis of heavy water with palladium cathode was conducted based on the thought that it is important to confirm the cold fusion phenomena. For precision excess power measurement, the closed cell with recombiner and flow-calorimetry were adopted. The obtained accuracy for the excess power measurement of the system was ±0.2 W at up to 9 W of applied power. This is enough for the excess power reported as the cold fusion phenomena. For farther investigation, measurement of loading ratio of deuterium in the palladium cathode, maintenance of high deuterium loading and analysis of the palladium cathode are to be conducted. (author)

  9. Introducing the book 'Cold fusion and the future'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, Jed

    2006-07-01

    Cold fusion will be the ideal source of energy, provided its introduction can be handled properly. A few cells have shown power density and temperatures suitable for real-world applications. Once these cells can be replicated on demand, commercial development will be straightforward. Manufacturing should not be too demanding, so thousands of companies will compete, and costs will fall quickly. The transition from fossil fuel to cold fusion will be rapid. Many extraordinary new applications will become possible, and seemingly intractable problems such as global warming may be fixed. Some examples will be presented. Public support is essential to funding research, and commercialization. 'Cold Fusion and the Future' is the title of a new book by this author. This paper discusses a few of the topics in the book.

  10. Fusion reaction product diagnostics in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    A diagnostic method was developed to look for the charged fusion products from the D(D,p)T-reactions in the divertor tokamak ASDEX. With a semi-conductor detector it was possible to evaluate the ion temperature in thermal plasmas from the proton energy spectra as well as from the triton spectra. In lower-hybrid wave heated plasmas non-thermal (fast) ions were observed. These ions create fusion products with a characteristically different energy spectrum. (orig.)

  11. Some experiments on cold fusion by deuterium hydrogen gas infusion in titanium metal alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestnik Filho, J.; Geraldo, L.P.; Pugliese, R.; Saxena, R.N.; Morato, S.P.; Fulfaro, R.

    1990-05-01

    New results on cold fusion are reported where three different experimental situations have been tried: a) deuterium gas loaded titanium; b) deuterium gas loaded Ti 0.8 Zr 0.2 CrMn alloy and c) titanium and the Ti 0.8 Zr 0.2 CrMn alloy loaded with a mixture of deuterium and hydrogen gases. With these experiments, new thermodynamical non equilibrium conditions were achieved and the possibility of cold fusion between protons and deuterons was also tested. Three independent neutron detectors and one NaI(Tl) were utilized. Despite some large values reported in the literature for the fusion rate, an upper limit of only 8 x 10 -24 fusions/sper deuterium pair or per deuterium-hydrogen pair was determined within the attained accuracy. (author) [pt

  12. Window of cold nuclear fusion and biased-pulse electrolysis experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Jida, Toshiyuki; Maekawa, Fujio; Sugimoto, Hisashi; Yoshida, Shigeo

    1989-01-01

    Based on the electron screening effect and the excitation of deuteron harmonic oscillators in palladium lattice, theoretical aspects are given to explain the cold fusion phenomena and the possibility of nuclear heating. A narrow window is proposed to meet ≅ 10 watts per cubic centimeter for the nuclear heating, by the hypothetical excitation-screening model. A relatively wide window is feasible to meet a few fusion events per second per cc under the non-stationary conditions of deuteron-charging and discharging. For stationary lattice conditions, the probability of cold fusion is not feasible at all. To confirm the cold fusion phenomena, a heavy water electrolysis experiment was carried out using biased-pulse-electrolytic currents, expecting the enhancement of cold fusion events under charging and discharging of deuterons. For the neutron detection, a cross-checking system between a recoil-proton scintillation detector and a 3 He thermal neutron detector was employed to see coincident time-patterns of neutron emission from an electrolysis cell. To check the energy of emitted neutrons, pulse height spectrum of the recoil-proton detector was monitored. Up to the D-charging time of 300 hr, neutron yields of 1-2 n/s/cc were obtained for time-intervals of 60-200 hr. From the recoil-proton spectra, it was confirmed that 2.45 MeV neutrons by the D(d, n) 3 He fusion branch were emitted. The observed time-patterns of neutron emission suggest the existence of cold fusion under the charging and discharging conditions. (orig.)

  13. Cold fusion in symmetric 90Zr induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, J.G.

    1985-02-01

    At the velocity filter SHIP of the Society for Heavy Ion Research in Darmstadt cross sections for evaporation-residue-nucleus formation in the reactions 90 Zr+ 89 Y, sup(90,92,96)Zr, 94 Mo were measured. In four of the reactions leading to the compound nuclei 179 Au, 180 Hg, 182 Hg, and 184 Pb for the first time in reactions of two heavy partners with mass numbers >20 radiative capture, i.e. deexcitation only by emission of γ radiation, was observed. A comparison of the measured cross sections for radiative capture with evaporation calculations leads to the final conclusion that either the γ-strength in the different compound nuclei is very different, or that the energy or angular momentum dependence of the level-density is wrongly described by the Fermi gas model at energies between 5 and 20 MeV. From the cross sections for evaporation-residue-nucleus formation fusion probabilities for central collisions were derived. The fusion probabilities show a strong dependence of the sub-barrier fusion from the nuclear structure of the contributing reaction partners. The slope of the fusion probability below the classical fusion barrier cannot be consistently described even by newer models. Below the lowest fusion barrier the fusion probability decreases with decreasing energy remarkably faster that predicted by a WKB calculation. This indicates that either the shape of the barrier is different from that predicted by the potentials, or that the mass dependence of the tunnel effect is not correctly described by the WKB calculation. (orig.) [de

  14. Cold fusion in the context of a scientific revolution in physics: History and economic ramifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Scientific revolutions have occurred in an approximately 80 year periodicity since 1500. Economic depressions have occurred at an approximately 40-50 year periodicity since 1790, and the economic depressions are a result of the scientific revolutions. The field of cold fusion is a part of a scientific revolution in physics. Understanding cold fusion phenomena in the broader historical context is helpful for understanding the development of the field and the significance of the phenomena technologically and economically. This paper includes a short history of science and of the recent scientific revolution, and includes predictions about the economic consequences of the development of the paradigm. (author)

  15. Automated laser fusion target production concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1977-01-01

    A target production concept is described for the production of multilayered cryogenic spherical inertial confinement fusion targets. The facility is to deliver targets to the reactor chamber at rates up to 10 per second and at costs consistent with economic production of power

  16. Cold, muon-catalyzed fusion - just another swarm experiment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper briefly reviewed the muon-catalyzed fusion cycle and indicated how it may be likened to a swarm experiment. In particular, it has been pointed out that an external electric field can influence the properties of a muon swarm (and reactive derivatives), just as it can for ion and electron swarms. Since n 0 is typically around liquid hydrogen densities, very large fields, E≥10 9 V/m, would be required to achieve the desired outcome. This is presently achievable in small regions of intense laser focus, but it remains to be seen whether muon-catalyzed fusion experiments can actually be influenced in this way. 20 refs., 4 figs

  17. Mission to Mars by catalyzed nuclear reactions of the commercialized cold fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Tae Ho

    2016-01-01

    The chemical compound source is deficient to reach to the power as much as the journey to Mars, unless the massive equipment is installed like the nuclear fusion reactor. However, there is very significant limitations of making up the facility due to the propellant power. Therefore, the light and cheap energy source, Low energy nuclear reactions (LENRs), powered rocket has been proposed. In this paper, the power conditions by LENRs are analyzed. After the successful Apollo mission to Moon of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the U.S. government, the civilian companies have proposed for the manned mission to Mars for the commercial journey purposes. The nuclear power has been a critical issue for the energy source in the travel, especially, by the LENR of LENUCO, Champaign, USA. As the velocity of the rocket increases, the mass flow rate decreases. It could be imaginable to take the reasonable velocity of spacecraft. The energy of the travel system is and will be created for the better one in economical and safe method. There is the imagination of boarding pass for spacecraft ticket shows the selected companies of cold fusion products. In order to solve the limitations of the conventional power sources like the chemical and solar energies, it is reasonable to design LENR concept. Since the economical and safe spacecraft is very important in the long journey on and beyond the Mars orbit, a new energy source, LENR, should be studied much more

  18. Mission to Mars by catalyzed nuclear reactions of the commercialized cold fusion power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Tae Ho [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The chemical compound source is deficient to reach to the power as much as the journey to Mars, unless the massive equipment is installed like the nuclear fusion reactor. However, there is very significant limitations of making up the facility due to the propellant power. Therefore, the light and cheap energy source, Low energy nuclear reactions (LENRs), powered rocket has been proposed. In this paper, the power conditions by LENRs are analyzed. After the successful Apollo mission to Moon of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the U.S. government, the civilian companies have proposed for the manned mission to Mars for the commercial journey purposes. The nuclear power has been a critical issue for the energy source in the travel, especially, by the LENR of LENUCO, Champaign, USA. As the velocity of the rocket increases, the mass flow rate decreases. It could be imaginable to take the reasonable velocity of spacecraft. The energy of the travel system is and will be created for the better one in economical and safe method. There is the imagination of boarding pass for spacecraft ticket shows the selected companies of cold fusion products. In order to solve the limitations of the conventional power sources like the chemical and solar energies, it is reasonable to design LENR concept. Since the economical and safe spacecraft is very important in the long journey on and beyond the Mars orbit, a new energy source, LENR, should be studied much more.

  19. Tunnelling effect enhanced by lattice screening as main cold fusion mechanism: An brief theoretical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisone, F.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper are illustrated the main features of tunneling traveling between two deuterons within a lattice. Considering the screening effect due lattice electrons we compare the d-d fusion rate evaluated from different authors assuming different screening efficiency and different d-d potentials. Then, we propose a effective potential which describe very well the attractive contribute due to plasmon exchange between two deuterons and by means of it we will compute the d-d fusion rates for different energy values. Finally the good agreement between theoretical and experimental results proves the reality of cold fusion phenomena and the reliability of our model

  20. Bookshelf (John R. Huizenga, 'Cold Fusion: the Scientific Fiasco of the Century')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Douglas R.O.

    1994-01-01

    ''Cold fusion is dead, isn't it?'' is a question I am often asked. The reply is a strange one, ''Yes, scientifically it is dead, but not from a media point of view or from funding'' In 1989 two electrochemists, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons, claimed sustained nuclear fusion had been achieved in a test-tube with a palladium cathode and deuterium, observing excess heat, neutrons and tritium. A series of encouraging confirmations and successively greater excess heat claims were seized on by the world's media. The US Government set up a panel of some 20 world-class scientists from several disciplines under John Huizenga, distinguished professor of Chemistry and Physics at the University of Rochester. They concluded that there was no present evidence for the discovery of a new nuclear process termed cold fusion. It might be thought that would end cold fusion, but for interesting reasons, it did not entirely. John Huizenga has written a book describing the curious claims and evidence for cold fusion and has given an excellent explanation of the science involved. This was published as a hardback book of 236 pages, telling the story up to the end of June 1990. Again one might think it was the end of the cold fusion story. Now he has written about what happened in the next two years in a paperback book which contains an epilogue of 51 pages. If you thought the first year was extraordinary, the next two years described in the new edition were even more incredible! In the main part of the book, the basic science is simply and clearly explained. The number of ''miracles'' required for each results or theory is described - a ''miracle'' is a gross violation of previous knowledge and experimental results such as energy conservation. Thus some theories are classified as ''triple miracles''. It might be thought that people who claimed to have observed cold fusion

  1. Natural cold pressed oils as cosmetic products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Ligęza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. It seems that patients may ask general practitioners about natural cosmetics applied on the skin regarding their safety and suitability. Objectives. The aim of the study was to analyze natural cold pressed oils as potential cosmetic products. Material and methods. Cold pressed oils obtained from selected seeds and fruit stones were analyzed, including: chokeberry seed oil, blackcurrant seed oil, elderberry seed oil, raspberry seed oil, apricot seed oil, tomato seed oil, strawberry seed oil, broccoli seed oil, Nigella sativa seed oil, hemp oil, safflower seed oil, Silybum marianum seed oil and coconut oil. 80 adult volunteers assessed the cosmetic properties of the analyzed oils. Each of the volunteers tested 2 to 4 different oils, by applying them on the skin. In addition, patch tests with all analyzed oils were performed on 23 individuals. Results. The majority of tested oils were positively evaluated by the participants: in the opinion of the participants, oil extracted from safflower had the best appearance (100% positive opinions, coconut oil had the best smell (70% positive opinions, while black currant seed oil showed the best absorbency (85% positive opinions. No irritation was observed within the analyzed product group, albeit one allergic reaction to apricot seed oil was observed with patch testing. Conclusions . Based on the achieved results, it could be suggested that natural cold pressed oils can be applied to the skin as cosmetics. Our observations may be helpful for general practitioners when choosing natural cosmetics.

  2. Fusion reactors for hydrogen production via electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    1979-01-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  3. LENR/"Cold Fusion" and Modern Physics: A Crisis Within a Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallove, Eugene F. E.

    2004-03-01

    The primary theorists in the field of Cold Fusion/LENR have generally assumed that the excess heat phenomena is commensurate with nuclear ash (such as helium), whether already identified or presumed to be present but not yet found, and moreover that it can be explained by hydrided metal lattice structures acting coherently. Though this was an excellent initial hypothesis, the commensurate nuclear ash hypothesis has not been proved, and appears to be approximately correct in only a few experiments. At the same time, compelling evidence has also emerged for other microphysical sources of energy that were unexpected by accepted physics. The exemplars have been the work Dr. Randell Mills and his colleagues at BlackLight Power Corporation and Dr. Paulo and Alexandra Correa in Canada.This has led to a crisis within a crisis: Neither "cold fusion" nor "Modern Physics" will be able to explain the full range of experimental data now available---not even the data within "mainstream" cold fusion/LENR per se--- by insisting that the fundamental paradigms of Modern Physics are without significant flaw. The present crisis is of magnitude comparable to the Copernican Revolution. Neither Modern Physics nor Cold Fusion/LENR will survive in their present forms when this long delayed revolution has run its course.

  4. A theoretical study of cold nuclear fusion using barrier penetration approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, R.K.

    1989-06-01

    The cold nuclear fusion process is investigated in terms of barrier penetration calculations by considering both the deuteron-molecule and colliding deuteron-deuteron atoms. Atomic collisions with strongly screened interatomic potential and the resonant state formation can bring agreement with present experimental results. Analysis of the data in terms of the reaction rates is also discussed. (author). 13 refs, 1 tab

  5. Tritium production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1981-08-01

    The present analyses on the possibilities of extracting tritium from the liquid and solid fusion reactor blankets show up many problems. A consistent ensemble of materials and devices for extracting the heat and the tritium has not yet been integrated in a fusion reactor blanket project. The dimensioning of the many pipes required for shifting the tritium can only be done very approximately and the volume taken up by the blanket is difficult to evaluate, etc. The utilization of present data leads to over-dimensioning the installations by prudence and perhaps rejecting the best solutions. In order to measure the parameters of the most promising materials, work must be carried out on well defined samples and not only determine the base physical-chemical coefficients, such as thermal conductivity, scattering coefficients, Sievert parameters, but also the kinetic parameters conventional in chemical engineering, such as the hourly space rates of degassing. It is also necessary to perform long duration experiments under radiation and at operating temperatures, or above, in order to study the ageing of the bodies employed [fr

  6. Fusion rates for hydrogen isotopic molecules of relevance for ''cold fusion''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalewicz, K.; Morgan, J.D. III; Monkhorst, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    In response to the recent announcements of evidence for room-temperature fusion in the electrolysis of D 2 O, we have analyzed how the fusion rate depends on the reduced mass of the fusing nuclei, the effective mass of a ''heavy'' electron, and the degree of vibrational excitation. Our results have been obtained both by accurately solving the Schroedinger equation for the hydrogen molecule and by using the WKB approximation. We find that in light of the reported d-d fusion rate, the excess heat in the experiment by Fleischmann, Pons, and Hawkins [J. Electroanal. Chem. 261, 301 (1989)] is difficult to explain in terms of conventional nuclear processes

  7. Target production for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodworth, J.G.; Meier, W.

    1995-03-01

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will require the ignition and burn of 5-10 fusion fuel targets every second. The technology to economically mass produce high-quality, precision targets at this rate is beyond the current state of the art. Techniques that are scalable to high production rates, however, have been identified for all the necessary process steps, and many have been tested in laboratory experiments or are similar to current commercial manufacturing processes. In this paper, we describe a baseline target factory conceptual design and estimate its capital and operating costs. The result is a total production cost of ∼16 cents per target. At this level, target production represents about 6% of the estimated cost of electricity from a 1-GW e IFE power plant. Cost scaling relationships are presented and used to show the variation in target cost with production rate and plant power level

  8. Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms

    CERN Multimedia

    Amoretti, M; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Collier, M; Doser, Michael; Filippini, V; Fine, K S; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Holzscheiter, M H; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Landua, Rolf; Lindelöf, D; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Marchesotti, M; Montagna, P; Pruys, H S; Regenfus, C; Riedler, P; Rochet, J; Rotondi, A; Rouleau, G; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P; Variola, A; Watson, T L; CERN. Geneva

    2002-01-01

    A theoretical underpinning of the standard model of fundamental particles and interactions is CPT invariance, which requires that the laws of physics be invariant under the combined discrete operations of charge conjugation, parity and time reversal. Antimatter, the existence of which was predicted by Dirac, can be used to test the CPT theorem experimental investigations involving comparisons of particles with antiparticles are numerous. Cold atoms and anti-atoms, such as hydrogen and anti-hydrogen, could form the basis of a new precise test, as CPT invariance implies that they must have the same spectrum. Observations of antihydrogen in small quantities and at high energies have been reported at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and at Fermilab, but were not suited to precision comparison measurements. Here we demonstrate the production of antihydrogen atoms at very low energy by mixing trapped antiprotons and positrons in a cryogenic environment. The neutral anti-atoms have been detected...

  9. Concerning the modelling of systems in terms of Quantum Electrodynamics: the special case of 'Cold Fusion'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abyaneh, Morteza; Fleischmann, Martin; Del Giudice, Emilio; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    A question we are asked repeatedly is: 'what are the causes of the opposition to your belief in the reality of 'Cold Fusion?'. This question is normally asked in the context of the statement that Quantum Mechanics shows that this phenomenon is impossible (a view that we share). Our answer is always based on the statement 'but what about the modelling of such systems in terms of QED?' which is always met by the insistence that Quantum Mechanics shows that Cold Fusion is impossible. We conclude that scientists do not understand QED or, if they have some understanding of this subject, then this must be subject to some major misconceptions. This pointless dialogue (perhaps more correctly described as two monologues conducted in parallel) and the insistence on the primacy of Quantum Mechanics in the modelling of systems in the Natural Sciences is unfortunate because it obscures the outcome of the investigations in the more normal fields of the Natural Sciences (more normal than Cold Fusion). A brief outline of the work which has led to the formulation of the concept of coherence will therefore be given under the aegis of the revolutions in our understanding of the Natural Sciences which has taken place since the latter part of the 19. Century. The main illustration of the way we can demonstrate the applicability of these concepts will be based on the study of nucleation and phase growth. The development of micro-electrode substrates allows us to study the statistics of the formation of the first nucleus; it will be shown that these statistics are strictly in line with concepts developed from QED coherence. We conclude that QED coherence is not just a concept to be confined to sub-atomic physics, cosmology etc. but that it pervades the modelling of the whole of the Natural Sciences including that of 'Cold Fusion'. Some of the major steps which have taken place in the development of this subject area will be illustrated

  10. Relevance, Realization and stability of a cold layer at the plasma edge for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The workshop was dedicated to the realization and stability of a cold layer at the plasma edge for fusion reactors. The subjects of the communications presented were: impurity transport, and control, plasma boundary layers, power balance, radiation control and modifications, limiter discharges, tokamak density limit, Asdex divertor discharges, thermal stability of a radiating diverted plasma, plasma stability, auxiliary heating in Textor, detached plasma in Tore Supra, poloidal divertor tokamak, radiation cooling, neutral-particle transport, plasma scrape-off layer, edge turbulence

  11. Cold fusion reaction ignition at cavitation effect on deuterium-containing media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, A.G.; Deryagin, B.V.; Klyuev, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    A possibility to induce 'cold' nuclear fusion reactions in the process of ultrasound cavitation in heavy water is studied. Nonstationary neutron emission is detected under cavitation in D 2 O on titanium vibrator which has the tracks of cavitation erosion (the vibrator ran in D 2 O to 20 hours). Maximum excess over background (12σ) was recorded under cavitation impact on the suspension of LaNi 5 D x dispersed particle in D 2 O

  12. Sustainable Algae Biodiesel Production in Cold Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudras Baliga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This life cycle assessment aims to determine the most suitable operating conditions for algae biodiesel production in cold climates to minimize energy consumption and environmental impacts. Two hypothetical photobioreactor algae production and biodiesel plants located in Upstate New York (USA are modeled. The photobioreactor is assumed to be housed within a greenhouse that is located adjacent to a fossil fuel or biomass power plant that can supply waste heat and flue gas containing CO2 as a primary source of carbon. Model results show that the biodiesel areal productivity is high (19 to 25 L of BD/m2/yr. The total life cycle energy consumption was between 15 and 23 MJ/L of algae BD and 20 MJ/L of soy BD. Energy consumption and air emissions for algae biodiesel are substantially lower than soy biodiesel when waste heat was utilized. Algae's most substantial contribution is a significant decrease in the petroleum consumed to make the fuel.

  13. Recent theoretical and experimental evidence on the cold fusion of elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santilli, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown the apparent existence of the cold fusion/chemical synthesis of protons and electrons into neutrons (plus neutrinos), much along Rutherford's original conception. These findings have received indirect, yet significant experimental confirmations in Bose-Einstein correlations, superconductivity and other fields to warrant additional studies. In this paper we present a quantitative theoretical study of the apparent tendency of all massive particles to form a bound state at small distances which is enhanced at low energy. The study is centrally dependent on the isominkowskian geometrization of the expected nonlocal interactions due to total mutual penetrations, and their causal description via the isopoincare symmetry. The cold fusion considered is then made possible by isorenormalizations of the 'intrinsic' characteristics of particles originating from the contact-nonhamiltonian character of the internal nonlocal effects. This latter feature illustrates the reasons why the cold fusion considered is simply beyond the descriptive capacities of relativistic quantum mechanics, but it is fully predicted by its isotopic covering. 23 refs

  14. Thermochemical hydrogen production based on magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krikorian, O.H.; Brown, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Conceptual design studies have been carried out on an integrated fusion/chemical plant system using a Tandem Mirror Reactor fusion energy source to drive the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Water-Splitting Cycle and produce hydrogen as a future feedstock for synthetic fuels. Blanket design studies for the Tandem Mirror Reactor show that several design alternatives are available for providing heat at sufficiently high temperatures to drive the General Atomic Cycle. The concept of a Joule-boosted decomposer is introduced in one of the systems investigated to provide heat electrically for the highest temperature step in the cycle (the SO 3 decomposition step), and thus lower blanket design requirements and costs. Flowsheeting and conceptual process designs have been developed for a complete fusion-driven hydrogen plant, and the information has been used to develop a plot plan for the plant and to estimate hydrogen production costs. Both public and private utility financing approaches have been used to obtain hydrogen production costs of $12-14/GJ based on July 1980 dollars

  15. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    By magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/−0.06) MG · cm, a ∼ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. This is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux

  16. Production of cold antihydrogen in a nested trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    The ATHENA experiment at CERN produced and detected the first cold antihydrogen atoms. Antiprotons and positrons are mixed in a double Penning trap, known as a nested trap. The production of antihydrogen atoms was identified by detecting their annihilations signatures at trap wall. With the ATHENA results subsequently confirmed by another CERN experiment, ATRAP, cold antihydrogen research is entering an exciting era. (author)

  17. Performance evaluation on aquatic product cold-chain logistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbing Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The requirements for high quality and diversification aquatic products are increasing with the improvement of Chinese living standard. However, the distribution between place of production and place of consumption are uneven, which results in large cold-chain logistics demand for aquatic products. At present, the low-level development of cold chain logistics has a bad impact on the circulation of aquatic products in China. So it is very urgent to develop cold-chain logistics in China. Design/methodology/approach: In order to do this, we apply performance evaluation, a well-known management tool, to study Chinese aquatic product cold-chain logistics. In this paper we first propose SISP(Subjects, Indexes, Standards, and Phases of performance evaluation model and ACSSN model(Aquatic product, Customer, Supply Chain, Society, and Node enterprises of supply chain for aquatic products cold-chain logistics performance evaluation. Then an ANP-Fuzzy method is proposed to evaluate the operational performance of Shandong Oriental Ocean Sci-Tech Co., Ltd. Furthermore, a system dynamic model is built to simulate the impact of temperature on the profits in aquatic products cold-chain sales section. Findings: We find out within a reasonable temperature range, lower temperature brings higher profit level. Also, performance improvement methods are proposed and the simulation of performance evaluation system is developed. Practical implications: Our findings can help to improve the level of aquatic product cold-chain logistics in China. Originality/value: The paper proposes the SISP (Subjects, Indexes, Standards, and Phases of performance evaluation model and ACSSN model (Aquatic product, Customer, Supply Chain, Society, and Node enterprises of supply chain for aquatic products cold-chain logistics performance evaluation.

  18. Activation product transport in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products will enter the coolant and/or tritium breeding material of fusion reactor power plants and experiments and cause personnel access problems. Radiation levels around plant components due to these products will cause difficulties with maintenance and repair operations throughout the plant. Similar problems are experienced around fission reactor systems. The determination of the transport of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products through the system is achieved using the computer code RAPTOR. This code calculates the mass transfer of a number of activation products based on the corrosion and sputtering rates through the system, the deposition and release characteristics of various plant components, the neturon flux spectrum, as well as other plant parameters. RAPTOR assembles a system of first order linear differential equations into a matrix equation based upon the reactor system parameters. Included in the transfer matrix are the deposition and erosion coefficients, and the decay and activation data for the various plant nodes and radioactive isotopes. A source vector supplies the corrosion and neutron sputtering source rates. This matrix equation is then solved using a matrix operator technique to give the specific activity distribution of each radioactive species throughout the plant. Once the amount of mass transfer is determined, the photon transport due to the radioactive corrosion and sputtering product sources can be evaluated, and dose rates around the plant components of interest as a function of time can be determined. This method has been used to estimate the radiation hazards around a number of fusion reactor system designs

  19. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, J D

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered.

  20. Radiolytic production of chemical fuels in fusion reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, J.D.

    1977-06-01

    Miley's energy flow diagram for fusion reactor systems is extended to include radiolytic production of chemical fuel. Systematic study of the economics and the overall efficiencies of fusion reactor systems leads to a criterion for evaluating the potential of radiolytic production of chemical fuel as a means of enhancing the performance of a fusion reactor system. The ecumenicity of the schema is demonstrated by application to (1) tokamaks, (2) mirror machines, (3) theta-pinch reactors, (4) laser-heated solenoids, and (5) inertially confined, laser-pellet devices. Pure fusion reactors as well as fusion-fission hybrids are considered

  1. Fusion-product energy loss in inertial confinement fusion plasmas with applications to target burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.B.; Miley, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been proposed as a competitor to magnetic fusion in the drive towards energy production, but ICF target performance still contains many uncertainties. One such area is the energy-loss rate of fusion products. This situation is due in part to the unique plasma parameters encountered in ICF plasmas which are compressed to more than one-thousand times solid density. The work presented here investigates three aspects of this uncertainty

  2. Higgs production in gluon fusion beyond NNLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Richard D. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). Tait Inst.; Bonvini, Marco [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Forte, Stefano [Milano Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Sezione di Milano (Italy); Marzani, Simone [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ridolfi, Giovanni [Genova Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Sezione di Genova (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    We construct an approximate expression for the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N{sup 3}LO) in {alpha}{sub s} with finite top mass. We argue that an accurate approximation can be constructed by exploiting the analiticity of the Mellin space cross section, and the information on its singularity structure coming from large N (soft gluon, Sudakov) and small N (high energy, BFKL) all order resummation. We support our argument with an explicit comparison of the approximate and the exact expressions up to the highest (NNLO) order at which the latter are available. We find that the approximate N{sup 3}LO result amounts to a correction of 17% to the NNLO QCD cross section for production of a 125 GeV Higgs at the LHC (8 TeV), larger than previously estimated, and it significantly reduces the scale dependence of the NNLO result.

  3. Higgs production in gluon fusion beyond NNLO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Bonvini, Marco; Forte, Stefano; Marzani, Simone; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    We construct an approximate expression for the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N 3 LO) in α s with finite top mass. We argue that an accurate approximation can be constructed by exploiting the analyticity of the Mellin space cross section, and the information on its singularity structure coming from large N (soft gluon, Sudakov) and small N (high energy, BFKL) all order resummation. We support our argument with an explicit comparison of the approximate and the exact expressions up to the highest (NNLO) order at which the latter are available. We find that the approximate N 3 LO result amounts to a correction of 17% to the NNLO QCD cross section for production of a 125 GeV Higgs at the LHC (8 TeV), larger than previously estimated, and it significantly reduces the scale dependence of the NNLO result

  4. Higgs production in gluon fusion beyond NNLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Richard D. [Tait Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bonvini, Marco [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton, DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Forte, Stefano, E-mail: forte@mi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Marzani, Simone [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE, England (United Kingdom); Ridolfi, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Genova and INFN, Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy)

    2013-09-21

    We construct an approximate expression for the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N{sup 3}LO) in α{sub s} with finite top mass. We argue that an accurate approximation can be constructed by exploiting the analyticity of the Mellin space cross section, and the information on its singularity structure coming from large N (soft gluon, Sudakov) and small N (high energy, BFKL) all order resummation. We support our argument with an explicit comparison of the approximate and the exact expressions up to the highest (NNLO) order at which the latter are available. We find that the approximate N{sup 3}LO result amounts to a correction of 17% to the NNLO QCD cross section for production of a 125 GeV Higgs at the LHC (8 TeV), larger than previously estimated, and it significantly reduces the scale dependence of the NNLO result.

  5. Higgs production in gluon fusion beyond NNLO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Forte, Stefano; Marzani, Simone

    2013-03-01

    We construct an approximate expression for the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N 3 LO) in α s with finite top mass. We argue that an accurate approximation can be constructed by exploiting the analiticity of the Mellin space cross section, and the information on its singularity structure coming from large N (soft gluon, Sudakov) and small N (high energy, BFKL) all order resummation. We support our argument with an explicit comparison of the approximate and the exact expressions up to the highest (NNLO) order at which the latter are available. We find that the approximate N 3 LO result amounts to a correction of 17% to the NNLO QCD cross section for production of a 125 GeV Higgs at the LHC (8 TeV), larger than previously estimated, and it significantly reduces the scale dependence of the NNLO result.

  6. Observations on the biological cold fusion or the biological transmutation of elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, Hisatoki

    1993-01-01

    In previous paper, the author, with Prof. Dr. C. Louis KERVRAN, suggested the probable occurrence of the biological cold fusion or the biological transmutation of elements. In order to confirm the phenomena, under the more controlled condition, potassium, magnesium, iron and calcium were determined in cells of Aspergillus niger IFO 4066, Penicillium chrysogenum IFO 4689, Rhizopus nigricans IFO 5781, Mucor rouxii IFO 0396, Saccharomyces cerevisiae IFO 0308, Torulopsis utilis IFO 0396, Saccharomyces ellipsoideus IFO 0213 and Hansenula anomala IFO 0118 cultured in normal medium and media deficient in one of potassium, magnesium iron or calcium. Values of potassium 1890-2650 μg, magnesium 380-510 μg, iron 95-120 μg, and calcium 60-95 μg were obtained per g dried cells cultured in each deficient medium, while potassium 8650-11050 μg, magnesium 1920-2160 μg, iron 510-680 μg, and calcium 380-450 μg were found per g dried cells obtained by cultivation in the normal medium. The author would like to suggest the probable occurrence of the phenomena relevant to biological cold fusion. (author)

  7. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  8. Health physics aspects of activation products from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.; Poston, J.W.; Easterly, C.E.; Jacobs, D.G.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the activation products from fusion reactors and their attendant impacts is discussed. This includes a discussion on their production, expected inventories, and the status of metabolic data on these products

  9. Conventional Physics can Explain Excess Heat in the Fleischmann-Pons Cold Fusion Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott

    2011-03-01

    In 1989, when Fleischmann and Pons (FP) claimed they had created room temperature, nuclear fusion in a solid, a firestorm of controversy erupted. Beginning in 1991, the Office of Naval Research began a decade-long study of the FP excess heat effect. This effort documented the fact that the excess heat that FP observed is the result of a form of nuclear fusion that can occur in solids at reduced temperature, dynamically, through a deuteron (d)+d?helium-4 reaction, without high-energy particles or ? rays. This fact has been confirmed at SRI and at a number of other laboratories (most notably in the laboratory of Y. Arata, located at Osaka University, Japan). A key reason this fact has not been accepted is the lack of a cogent argument, based on fundamental physical ideas, justifying it. In the paper, this question is re-examined, based on a generalization of conventional energy band theory that applies to finite, periodic solids, in which d's are allowed to occupy wave-like, ion band states, similar to the kinds of states that electrons occupy in ordinary metals. Prior to being experimentally observed, the Ion Band State Theory of cold fusion predicted a potential d+d?helium-4 reaction, without high energy particles, would explain the excess heat, the helium-4 would be found in an unexpected place (outside heat- producing electrodes), and high-loading, x?1, in PdDx, would be required.

  10. Investigation of neutron emission in a cold fusion experiment in palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szustakowski, M.; Farny, J.; Muniak, M.; Nowak, A.; Parys, P.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Socha, R.; Teter, J.; Wolski, J.; Wolowski, J.; Woryna, E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the experiments dealing with performance of nuclear fusion at room temperature actually which create a great sensation and are carried out in various laboratories. This interest arises from the results achieved by Fleischmann and Pons, and it results from their paper that there exists a possibility of obtaining an ignition owing to nuclear fusion reactions during usual electrochemical process--namely the electrolysis of D O with use of the system of Pd-Pt electrodes. From this reason the measurements of the yield and behavior of neutron emission give the information about processes of interest. At the IPPLM the cold fusion experiments have been conducted from the beginning of April 1989. In the first experiment the reliable evidence of neutron emission was obtained. A number of irregularly repeated neutron pulses of the level of 10 5 per pulse was recorded. The measurements of the neutron emission, in this experiment, were performed with the use of three independent methods employing the 2.5 MeV neutron spectrometer, the scintillation neutron detector as well as the nuclear track detector. neutron emission had been first recorded after 106 hours of the electrolysis process of D 2 O

  11. Prediction of new tightly bound-states of H2+(d2+) and ''cold fusion''-experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barut, A.O.

    1989-06-01

    It is suggested that in the ''cold-fusion'' experiments of Fleischmann and Pons new tightly-bound molecular states of D 2 + are formed with binding energies predicted to be of the order of 50 keV accounting for the heat released without appreciable fusion. Other tests of the suggested mechanism are proposed and the derivation of the new energy levels is given. (author). 3 refs

  12. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  13. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.

    1994-01-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  14. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are: (1) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons; (2) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles; (3) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas; and (4) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising.

  15. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author).

  16. Condensed matter nuclear science: Proceedings of the 11. international conference on cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-01

    The tenth International Conference on Cold Fusion, ICCF 10, was held in Cambridge and then it appeared to the chairman Jean-Paul Biberian that the ideal choice for the venue of ICCF 11 would be Marseille. He considers that the field had matured and it was obvious that a scientific demonstration of Cold Fusion had been made. He realizes that a lot more is needed to be accomplished in the field of research and technology, but the answers to many of the questions of scientific community are available. It is known for sure that the phenomenon announced in 1989 by Martin Fleischmann and Stan Pons was real. Discoveries since their announcement, in particular the discovery that hydrogen, not only deuterium, may be nuclear active under certain conditions. It had been shown that the simple D + D producing helium reaction was not the only reaction channel. One had observed fission and transmutation beyond doubts, but there are probably more reactions than one currently knows. Several important new results were presented during the conference. The team headed by Irving Dardik confirmed that the super-waves they used in their electrolytic experiment help introducing more heat. Also Iwamura et al. showed new transmutation effects in their experiments of diffusion of deuterium gas through a complex structure of palladium and calcium oxide. A team of Russian scientists claimed that their experiments showed the existence of light monopoles. Czerski and Huke who were working in high-energy physics, discovered CMNS when they lowered the energy of the deuterium beam. They demonstrated that the cross section of the deuterium with deuterated metals was much higher than expected. They came to the conclusion that they were doing indeed cold fusion. Another important contribution was the one from the Vysotskii team from Ukraine, who confirmed their biological transmutation experiments. On the theory front there appears to be many problems. The initial idea of the necessity of high

  17. Cell fusion in tumor progression: the isolation of cell fusion products by physical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincitorio Massimo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell fusion induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG is an efficient but poorly controlled procedure for obtaining somatic cell hybrids used in gene mapping, monoclonal antibody production, and tumour immunotherapy. Genetic selection techniques and fluorescent cell sorting are usually employed to isolate cell fusion products, but both procedures have several drawbacks. Results Here we describe a simple improvement in PEG-mediated cell fusion that was obtained by modifying the standard single-step procedure. We found that the use of two PEG undertreatments obtains a better yield of cell fusion products than the standard method, and most of these products are bi- or trinucleated polykaryocytes. Fusion rate was quantified using fluorescent cell staining microscopy. We used this improved cell fusion and cell isolation method to compare giant cells obtained in vitro and giant cells obtained in vivo from patients with Hodgkin's disease and erythroleukemia. Conclusions In the present study we show how to improve PEG-mediated cell fusion and that cell separation by velocity sedimentation offers a simple alternative for the efficient purification of cell fusion products and to investigate giant cell formation in tumor development.

  18. Measurements of fusion product emission profiles in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hendel, H.W.; Lovberg, J.; Murphy, T.J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.; Tait, G.D.; Zweben, S.J.

    1986-11-01

    The techniques and results of fusion product emission profile measurements are reviewed. While neutron source strength profile measurements have been attempted by several methods, neutron scattering is a limitation to the results. Profile measurements using charged fusion products have recently provided an alternative since collimation is much easier for the charged particles

  19. Search for a nuclear signature of the electrolytically induced cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtkowska, J; Glowacki, S; Jaskola, M; Moroz, Z; Ratynski, W [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Kedzierzawski, P; Zoltowski, P [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1990-01-01

    The neutron flux from the Pd-Pt electrolytic cell filled with D{sub 2}O+D{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and D{sub 2}O+LiOD was measured to search for the ``cold fusion`` induced in the deuterium stored in the palladium electrode. The fast-neutron ``long counter``, the scintillation detector with the NE - 213 liquid scintillator and with the PSD gamma-neutron distinguishing system and the scintillation detector of fast-neutron and/or gamma-ray bursts were used. No direct correlation was observed between the neutron flux measured in the presence or absence of the electrolysis. The upper limit is given for the neutron flux induced by the process under study. (author).

  20. Dynamic response of thermal neutron measurements in electrochemically produced cold fusion subject to pulsed current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granada, Jose; Converti, Jose; Mayer, Roberto; Guido, German; Florido, Pablo; Patino, Nestor; Sobehart, Leonardo; Gomez, Silvia; Larreteguy, Axel

    1988-01-01

    The present work shows the results of measurements performed on electrolytic cells using a high efficiency (22%) neutron detection system in combination with a procedure involving a non-stationary current through the cell's circuit. Cold fusion was produced in electrolytic cells containing LiH dissolved in heavy water with a palladium cathode. The dynamic response to low frequency current pulses was measured. Characteristic patterns showing one or two bumps were obtained in a repeatable fashion. These patterns are strongly dependent on the previous charging history of the cathode. The technique employed seems to be very convenient as a research tool for a systematic study of the different variables governing the phenomenon. (Author)

  1. Search for a nuclear signature of the electrolytically induced cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtkowska, J.; Glowacki, S.; Jaskola, M.; Moroz, Z.; Ratynski, W.; Kedzierzawski, P.; Zoltowski, P.

    1990-01-01

    The neutron flux from the Pd-Pt electrolytic cell filled with D 2 O+D 2 SO 4 and D 2 O+LiOD was measured to search for the ''cold fusion'' induced in the deuterium stored in the palladium electrode. The fast-neutron ''long counter'', the scintillation detector with the NE - 213 liquid scintillator and with the PSD gamma-neutron distinguishing system and the scintillation detector of fast-neutron and/or gamma-ray bursts were used. No direct correlation was observed between the neutron flux measured in the presence or absence of the electrolysis. The upper limit is given for the neutron flux induced by the process under study. (author)

  2. Potential Fusion Market for Hydrogen Production Under Environmental Constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Potential future hydrogen market and possible applications of fusion were analyzed. Hydrogen is expected as a major energy and fuel mediun for the future, and various processes for hydrogen production can be considered as candidates for the use of fusion energy. In order to significantly contribute to reduction of CO 2 emission, fusion must be deployed in developing countries, and must substitute fossil based energy with synthetic fuel such as hydrogen. Hydrogen production processes will have to evaluated and compared from the aspects of energy efficiency and CO 2 emission. Fusion can provide high temperature heat that is suitable for vapor electrolysis, thermo-chemical water decomposition and steam reforming with biomass waste. That is a possible advantage of fusion over renewables and Light water power reactor. Despite of its technical difficulty, fusion is also expected to have less limitation for siting location in the developing countries. Under environmental constraints, fusion has a chance to be a major primary energy source, and production of hydrogen enhances its contribution, while in 'business as usual', fusion will not be selected in the market. Thus if fusion is to be largely used in the future, meeting socio-economic requirements would be important

  3. Study of Heating and Fusion Power Production in ITER Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Bateman, G.; Kessel, C.; McCune, D. C.; Budny, R. V.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2011-01-01

    ITER simulations, in which the temperatures, toroidal angular frequency and currents are evolved, are carried out using the PTRANSP code starting with initial profiles and boundary conditions obtained from TSC code studies. The dependence of heat deposition and current drive on ICRF frequency, number of poloidal modes, beam orientation, number of Monte Carlo particles and ECRH launch angles is studied in order to examine various possibilities and contingencies for ITER steady state and hybrid discharges. For the hybrid discharges, the fusion power production and fusion Q, computed using the Multi-Mode MMM v7.1 anomalous transport model, are compared with those predicted using the GLF23 model. The simulations of the hybrid scenario indicate that the fusion power production at 1000 sec will be approximately 500 MW corresponding to a fusion Q = 10.0. The discharge scenarios simulated aid in understanding the conditions for optimizing fusion power production and in examining measures of plasma performance.

  4. Study of charged fusion products in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblum, M.

    1981-07-01

    Charged reaction products play a central role in inertial confinement fusion. The investigation of the various processes these particles undergo in laser produced plasmas, their influence on the dynamics of the fusion and their utilization as a diagnostic tool are the main subjects of this thesis. (author)

  5. Hydrogen production from high temperature electrolysis and fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, J.F.; Issacs, H.S.; Lazareth, O.; Powell, J.R.; Salzano, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from high temperature electrolysis of steam coupled with a fusion reactor is studied. The process includes three major components: the fusion reactor, the high temperature electrolyzer and the power conversion cycle each of which is discussed in the paper. Detailed process design and analysis of the system is examined. A parametric study on the effect of process efficiency is presented

  6. Optimization of nonthermal fusion power consistent with channeling of charged fusion product energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, P.B.; Herrmann, M.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    If the energy of charged fusion products can be diverted directly to fuel ions, non-Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between species will result. To determine the importance of these nonthermal effects, the fusion power density is optimized at constant-β for non-thermal distributions that are self-consistently maintained by channeling of energy from charged fusion products. For D-T and D- 3 He reactors, with 75% of charged fusion product power diverted to fuel ions, temperature differences between electrons and ions increase the reactivity by 40-70%, while non-Maxwellian fuel ion distributions and temperature differences between ionic species increase the reactivity by an additional 3-15%

  7. Some thoughts on a simple mechanism for the 2H + 2H → 4He cold fusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    A speculative mechanism for the creation of 4 He using cold fusion is proposed. The nuclear transformation can be made by the fusion of two excited rotating ground states of deuterium into a highly excited rotating ground state of 4 He. Under compression and relatively stable conditions, the formation of such a bound, stretched-out pnnp state of 4 He would be favored (with respect to Coulomb repulsion) over other nuclear ground states without as much angular momentum. The reaction likely occurs at the surface of palladium. A more descriptive name for this reaction is compressed-rotational-shielded (CRS) fusion. Potential experimental conditions for enhancing the initiation of CRS fusion are discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs

  8. Impact of exposure to cold on layer production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FMS Alves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Infrared thermographic images were used to evaluate the effect of the exposure of layers to cold. In this trial, 540 Isa Brown® layers with an average age of 69 weeks were housed in a conventional layer house typically used in Brazil during a period of cold environmental temperatures. Environmental and heat-transference data were recorded between July 13-16, 2010. It was verified that layers under cold stress conditions lost four times more energy that the recommendations trying to maintain their body temperature. Due to their reduced feed intake capacity, hens are not capable of increasing the availability of the metabolic energy required to maintain their body temperature and egg production, consequently resulting in economic losses.

  9. MHD deceleration of fusion reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, S.; Bohachevsky, I.O.

    1979-04-01

    The feasibility of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) deceleration of fuel pellet debris ions exiting from an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor cavity is investigated using one-dimensional flow equations. For engineering reasons, induction-type devices are emphasized; their performance characteristics are similar to those of electrode-type decelerators. Results of the analysis presented in this report indicate that MHD decelerators can be designed within conventional magnet technology to not only decelerate the high-energy fusion pellet debris ions but also to produce some net electric power in the process

  10. Accountability in Science During the Information Era: Lessons Drawn from the "Cold Fusion Furor"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott

    2001-04-01

    As guest editor of a recent Ethics in Science publication(S. R. Chubb, Accountability in Research, v 8), #'s 1 and 2, 1 (2000). journals/149/149-top.htm>(http://www.gbhap us.com/journals/149/149-top.htm), I requested key players, from both sides of the Cold Fusion (CF) debate, to attempt to go beyond questions involving the merits of CF, by addressing a more basic issue: have CF claims been judged effectively. All participants agreed that this has not occurred. Three factors seem to have been responsible: 1. Errors in the initial neutron measurements, 2. Events immediately prior to and during a specific APS session, held 1 May 1989, and 3. Irresponsible use of FAX machines and the Internet. The resulting furor, fueled by these Information Era Technologies (IET's), has evolved into such a serious breakdown in communication that, even after 11 years, it is impossible to rule-out the possibility that a number of important new discoveries may have occurred. Regardless of the merits of the claims, two lessons can be drawn from the debate: 1. Individuals and groups must be held accountable for their actions and statements, 2. When IET users fail to respect each other, IET's can seriously impede communication.

  11. Feasibility study of a magnetic fusion production reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, R. W.

    1986-12-01

    A magnetic fusion reactor can produce 10.8 kg of tritium at a fusion power of only 400 MW —an order of magnitude lower power than that of a fission production reactor. Alternatively, the same fusion reactor can produce 995 kg of plutonium. Either a tokamak or a tandem mirror production plant can be used for this purpose; the cost is estimated at about 1.4 billion (1982 dollars) in either case. (The direct costs are estimated at 1.1 billion.) The production cost is calculated to be 22,000/g for tritium and 260/g for plutonium of quite high purity (1%240Pu). Because of the lack of demonstrated technology, such a plant could not be constructed today without significant risk. However, good progress is being made in fusion technology and, although success in magnetic fusion science and engineering is hard to predict with assurance, it seems possible that the physics basis and much of the needed technology could be demonstrated in facilities now under construction. Most of the remaining technology could be demonstrated in the early 1990s in a fusion test reactor of a few tens of megawatts. If the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program constructs a fusion test reactor of approximately 400 MW of fusion power as a next step in fusion power development, such a facility could be used later as a production reactor in a spinoff application. A construction decision in the late 1980s could result in an operating production reactor in the late 1990s. A magnetic fusion production reactor (MFPR) has four potential advantages over a fission production reactor: (1) no fissile material input is needed; (2) no fissioning exists in the tritium mode and very low fissioning exists in the plutonium mode thus avoiding the meltdown hazard; (3) the cost will probably be lower because of the smaller thermal power required; (4) and no reprocessing plant is needed in the tritium mode. The MFPR also has two disadvantages: (1) it will be more costly to operate because it consumes rather than sells

  12. Resonant production of $\\gamma$ rays in jolted cold neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kusenko, A

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic shock waves passing through colliding cold neutron stars can cause repetitive superconducting phase transitions in which the proton condensate relaxes to its equilibrium value via coherent oscillations. As a result, a resonant non-thermal production of gamma rays in the MeV energy range with power up to 10^(52) erg/s can take place during the short period of time before the nuclear matter is heated by the shock waves.

  13. Hydrogen production from fusion reactors coupled with high temperature electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.; Steinberg, M.

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and complement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Processes which may be considered for this purpose include electrolysis, thermochemical decomposition or thermochemical-electrochemical hybrid cycles. Preliminary studies at Brookhaven indicate that high temperature electrolysis has the highest potential efficiency for production of hydrogen from fusion. Depending on design electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  14. Pomeron fusion and central η and η' meson production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochelev, N.I.; Morii, T.; Vinnikov, A.V.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of pomeron fusion to the cross section of η and η ' productions in double-diffractive scattering has been calculated within the Donnachie-Landshoff model of pomeron. It is shown that the double pomeron exchange mechanism does not explain the full set of the recent data of WA102 Collaboration, though it might not be inconsistent with η ' productions

  15. Proliferation Risks of Fusion Energy: Clandestine Production, Covert Production, and Breakout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.; Glaser, A.; Ross, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear proliferation risks from fusion associated with access to weapon-usable material can be divided into three main categories: (1) clandestine production of fissile material in an undeclared facility, (2) covert production of such material in a declared and safeguarded facility, and (3) use of a declared facility in a breakout scenario, in which a state begins production of fissile material without concealing the effort. In this paper we address each of these categories of risk from fusion. For each case, we find that the proliferation risk from fusion systems can be much lower than the equivalent risk from fission systems, if commercial fusion systems are designed to accommodate appropriate safeguards

  16. Charged fusion product and fast ion loss in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Mynick, H.E.; White, R.B.; Biglari, H.; Bretz, N.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Chang, C.S.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Hammett, G.W.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Hosea, J.; Johnson, L.; Mansfield, D.; McGuire, K.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, J.; Phillips, C.K.; Schivell, J.; Stratton, B.C.; Ulrickson, M.; Wilson, R.; Young, K.M.; Fisher, R.; McChesney, J.; Fonck, R.; McKee, G.; Tuszewski, M.

    1993-03-01

    Several different fusion product and fast ion loss processes have been observed in TFTR using an array of pitch angle, energy and time resolved scintillator detectors located near the vessel wall. For D-D fusion products (3 MeV protons and 1 MeV tritons) the observed loss is generally consistent with expected first-orbit loss for Ip I MA. However, at higher currents, Ip = 1.4--2.5 MA, an NM induced D-D fusion product loss can be up to 3-4 times larger than the first-orbit loss, particularly at high beam powers, P ≥ 25 MW. The MHD induced loss of 100 KeV neutron beam ions and ∼0.5 MeV ICRF minority tail tons has also been measured ≤ 459 below the outer midplane. be potential implications of these results for D-T alpha particle experiments in TFTR and ITER are described

  17. Process Reengineering of Cold Chain Logistics of Agricultural Products Based on Low-carbon Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hong-xia; Shao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Through the process analysis of cold chain logistics of agricultural products, we find that cold chain logistics of agricultural products contradict the development model of low-carbon economy to some extent. We apply the development idea of low-carbon economy, introduce the third-party logistics companies, establish distribution center of cold chain logistics of agricultural products, and strengthen information sharing, to reengineer the process of cold chain logistics of agricultural produc...

  18. Fusion-product transport in axisymmetric tokamaks: losses and thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    High-energy fusion-product losses from an axisymmetric tokamak plasma are studied. Prompt-escape loss fluxes (i.e. prior to slowing down) are calculated including the non-separable dependence of flux as a function of poloidal angle and local angle-of-incidence at the first wall. Fusion-product (fp) thermalization and heating are calculated assuming classical slowing down. The present analytical model describes fast ion orbits and their distribution function in realistic, high-β, non-circular tokamak equilibria. First-orbit losses, trapping effects, and slowing-down drifts are also treated

  19. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  20. Cold matter effects and quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dos Santos, G. S.; Mariotto, C. B. [Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Caixa Postal 474, CEP 96203-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-090, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    In this work we investigate two cold matter effects in J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production in nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC, namely the shadowing effect and nuclear absorption. We characterize these effects by estimating the rapidity dependence of some nuclear ratios in pA and AA collisions at RHIC and LHC, R{sub pA} = d{sigma}{sub pA}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon})/Ad{sigma}{sub pp}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon}) and R{sub AA} = d{sigma}{sub AA}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon})/A{sup 2}d{sigma}{sub pp}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon}).

  1. Production of Cold Active Lipase from Bacillus sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Yasemin, Sara; Arabacı, Nihan; Korkmaz Güvenmez, Hatice

    2018-01-01

    A cold active lipase producing Bacillus sp. strains were isolated from sewage of oil. Bacillus sp. strain SY-7 was determined as the best lipase producing isolate. The highest enzyme production was found at 20°C and pH 8.0 on tributyrin media. Analyses of molecular mass of the partial purified lipase was carried out by SDS-PAGE which revealed a single band as 110.5 kDa. The enzyme activity and stability were determined by spectrophotometric and titrimetric methods. The enzyme was active betwe...

  2. Examination of a proposed phonon-coupling mechanism for cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, O.H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper the proposed nuclear energy in an atomic lattice (NEAL) mechanism for nuclear fusion in a cathode during electrolysis of D 2 O is examined. In this mechanism, coupled harmonic motion of deuterons is supposed to lead to a reduction in the width of the Coulomb barrier for proton-deuteron (p-d) fusion in palladium, thereby substantially increasing the fusion rate. Instead, it is argued that deuteron-deuteron coupling does not have an important effect and that interaction with phonons does not enhance the p-d fusion rate

  3. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, F.; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile 239 Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m 2 ) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate 239 Pu production rate. Produced 239 Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, 239 Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type

  4. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, F. [Research Center for Radiation Protection, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: faghihif@shirazu.ac.ir; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, 71348-51154 Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile {sup 239}Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m{sup 2}) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate {sup 239}Pu production rate. Produced {sup 239}Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, {sup 239}Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type.

  5. Nuclear hydrogen production: re-examining the fusion option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baindur, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a scheme for nuclear hydrogen production by fusion. The basic idea is to use nuclear energy of the fuel (hydrogen plasma) to produce molecular hydrogen fro carbon-free hydrogen compounds. The hydrogen is then stored and utilized electrochemically in fuel cells or chemically as molecular hydrogen in internal combustion engines

  6. Lenr and "cold Fusion" Excess Heat:. Their Relation to Other Anomalous Microphysical Energy Experiments and Emerging New Energy Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallove, Eugene F.

    2005-12-01

    During the past 15 years, indisputable experimental evidence has built up for substantial excess heat (far beyond ordinary chemical energy) and low-energy nuclear reaction phenomena in specialized heavy hydrogen and ordinary hydrogen-containing systems.1 The primary theorists in the field that is properly designated Cold Fusion/LENR have generally assumed that the excess heat phenomena is commensurate with nuclear ash (such as helium), whether already identified or presumed to be present but not yet found. That was an excellent initial hypothesis. However, the commensurate nuclear ash hypothesis has not been proved, and appears to be approximately correct in only a few experiments. During this same period, compelling evidence although not as broadly verified as data from cold fusion/LENR has also emerged for other microphysical sources of energy that were previously unexpected by accepted physics. The exemplar of this has been the "hydrino" physics work of Dr. Randall Mills and his colleagues at Black-Light Power Corporation, which was a radical outgrowth from the cold fusion field that emerged publicly in May 1991.2 Even more far-reaching is the work in vacuum energy extraction pioneered by Dr. Paulo and Alexandra Correa, which first became public in 1996.3 This vacuum energy experimentation began in the early 1980s and has been reduced to prototype technological devices, such as the patented PAGDTM (pulsed abnormal glow discharge) electric power generator, as well as many published experiments that can be performed in table-top fashion to verify the Correa Aetherometry (non-luminiferous or non-electromagnetic aether measurement science).4 In an era when mainstream science and its media is all agog about dark matter and dark energy composing the vast bulk of the universe, there is a great need to reconcile, if possible, the significant bodies of evidence from these three major experimental and theoretical streams: cold fusion/LENR, hydrino physics, and

  7. Fusion probability and survivability in estimates of heaviest nuclei production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagaidak, Roman

    2012-01-01

    A number of theoretical models have been recently developed to predict production cross sections for the heaviest nuclei in fusion-evaporation reactions. All the models reproduce cross sections obtained in experiments quite well. At the same time they give fusion probability values P fus ≡ P CN differed within several orders of the value. This difference implies a corresponding distinction in the calculated values of survivability. The production of the heaviest nuclei (from Cm to the region of superheavy elements (SHE) close to Z = 114 and N = 184) in fusion-evaporation reactions induced by heavy ions has been considered in a systematic way within the framework of the barrier-passing (fusion) model coupled with the standard statistical model (SSM) of the compound nucleus (CN) decay. Both models are incorporated into the HIVAP code. Available data on the excitation functions for fission and evaporation residues (ER) produced in very asymmetric combinations can be described rather well within the framework of HIVAP. Cross-section data obtained in these reactions allow one to choose model parameters quite definitely. Thus one can scale and fix macroscopic (liquid-drop) fission barriers for nuclei involved in the evaporation-fission cascade. In less asymmetric combinations (with 22 Ne and heavier projectiles) effects of fusion suppression caused by quasi-fission are starting to appear in the entrance channel of reactions. The P fus values derived from the capture-fission and fusion-fission cross-sections obtained at energies above the Bass barrier were plotted as a function of the Coulomb parameter. For more symmetric combinations one can deduce the P fus values semi-empirically, using the ER and fission excitation functions measured in experiments, and applying SSM model with parameters obtained in the analysis of a very asymmetric combination leading to the production of (nearly) the same CN, as was done for reactions leading to the pre-actinide nuclei formation

  8. Concept of a charged fusion product diagnostic for NSTX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeglin, W U; Valenzuela Perez, R; Darrow, D S

    2010-10-01

    The concept of a new diagnostic for NSTX to determine the time dependent charged fusion product emission profile using an array of semiconductor detectors is presented. The expected time resolution of 1-2 ms should make it possible to study the effect of magnetohydrodynamics and other plasma activities (toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE), neoclassical tearing modes (NTM), edge localized modes (ELM), etc.) on the radial transport of neutral beam ions. First simulation results of deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion proton yields for different detector arrangements and methods for inverting the simulated data to obtain the emission profile are discussed.

  9. Preliminary results of cold fusion studies using a five module high current electrolytic cell (Paper No. A2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayar, M.G.; Mitra, S.K.; Raghunathan, P.; Krishnan, M.S.; Malhotra, S.K.; Gaonkar, D.G.; Sikka, S.K.; Shyam, A.; Chitra, V.

    1989-01-01

    A high current modular palladium-nickel electrolytic cell was designed and operated to observe cold fusion reactions. The cathode was made up of palladium (25 per cent)-silver and the anode was made up of porous nickel. Using NaOD in D 2 O (20 per cent) as an electrolyte, the electrolyser was operated continuously at a current of 60 to 65 amps and applied voltage of ∼ 12.5V. The deuterium and oxygen gases produced were carried out of the cell to a recombination unit consisting of burner and condenser. The resultant heavy water was recycled back to the electrolyser. Measurement of the neutron output and tritium content of the electrolyte during and after electrolysis conclusively showed occurrence of cold fusion reactions. Gross neutron to tritium yield ratio was observed to be ∼ 10 -9 which should be taken as a lower limit, because a considerable quantity of tritium carried away by the gas stream could not recovered and taken into account. (M.G.B.). 2 tabs., 2 figs

  10. Fusion probability and survivability in estimates of heaviest nuclei production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagaidak Roman N.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Production of the heavy and heaviest nuclei (from Po to the region of superheavy elements close to Z=114 and N=184 in fusion-evaporation reactions induced by heavy ions has been considered in a systematic way within the framework of the barrier-passing model coupled with the statistical model (SM of de-excitation of a compound nucleus (CN. Excitation functions for fission and evaporation residues (ER measured in very asymmetric combinations can be described rather well. One can scale and fix macroscopic (liquid-drop fission barriers for nuclei involved in the calculation of survivability with SM. In less asymmetric combinations, effects of fusion suppression caused by quasi-fission (QF are starting to appear in the entrance channel of reactions. QF effects could be semi-empirically taken into account using fusion probabilities deduced as the ratio of measured ER cross sections to the ones obtained in the assumption of absence of the fusion suppression in corresponding reactions. SM parameters (fission barriers obtained at the analysis of a very asymmetric combination leading to the production of (nearly the same CN should be used for this evaluation.

  11. Demazure Modules, Fusion Products and Q-Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Vyjayanthi; Venkatesh, R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a family of indecomposable finite-dimensional graded modules for the current algebra associated to a simple Lie algebra. These modules are indexed by an -tuple of partitions , where α varies over a set of positive roots of and we assume that they satisfy a natural compatibility condition. In the case when the are all rectangular, for instance, we prove that these modules are Demazure modules in various levels. As a consequence, we see that the defining relations of Demazure modules can be greatly simplified. We use this simplified presentation to relate our results to the fusion products, defined in (Feigin and Loktev in Am Math Soc Transl Ser (2) 194:61-79, 1999), of representations of the current algebra. We prove that the Q-system of (Hatayama et al. in Contemporary Mathematics, vol. 248, pp. 243-291. American Mathematical Society, Providence, 1998) extends to a canonical short exact sequence of fusion products of representations associated to certain special partitions .Finally, in the last section we deal with the case of and prove that the modules we define are just fusion products of irreducible representations of the associated current algebra and give monomial bases for these modules.

  12. Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Mahaffey, James A

    2012-01-01

    As energy problems of the world grow, work toward fusion power continues at a greater pace than ever before. The topic of fusion is one that is often met with the most recognition and interest in the nuclear power arena. Written in clear and jargon-free prose, Fusion explores the big bang of creation to the blackout death of worn-out stars. A brief history of fusion research, beginning with the first tentative theories in the early 20th century, is also discussed, as well as the race for fusion power. This brand-new, full-color resource examines the various programs currently being funded or p

  13. Plasma fluctuations and confinement of fusion reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppi, B.; Pegoraro, F.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction between the fluctuations that can be excited in a magnetically confined plasma and the high-energy-particle population produced by fusion reactions is analyzed in view of its relevance to the process of thermonuclear ignition. The spectrum of the perturbations that, in the absence of fusion reaction products, would be described by the incompressible ideal magnetohydrodynamic approximation is studied considering finite value of the plasma pressure relative ot the magnetic pressure. The combined effects of the magnetic field curvature and shear are taken into account and the relevant spectrum is shown to consist of a continuous portion, that could be identified as a mixture of shear-Alfven and interchange oscillations, and a discrete unstable part corresponding to the so-called ballooning modes. The rate of diffusion of the fusion reaction products induced by oscillations in the continuous part of the spectrum, as estimated from the appropriate quasi-linear theory, is found to be significantly smaller than could be expected if normal modes (i.e., nonconvective solutions) were excited. However, a relatively wide intermediate region is identified where opalescent fluctuations, capable of achieving significant amplitudes and corresponding to a quasi-discrete spectrum, can be excited

  14. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.; Hernandez, M.T.; Jimenez-Rey, D.; Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Perlado, M.; Ibarra, A.

    2011-01-01

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  15. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A., E-mail: rpp@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, M.T. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez-Rey, D. [CMAM, UAM, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perlado, M. [IFN, ETSII, UPM, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, A. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  16. On a possibility of cold fusion in deuterium-saturated YBa2Cu3O7-x ceramics in superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipson, A.G.; Sakov, D.M.; Toporov, Yu.P.; Gromov, V.V.; Deryagin, B.V.

    1991-01-01

    A possibility to generate neutrons by deuterated YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x ceramics in superconducting (T c ) and normal (T>T c ) states is studied. The presented data points to a relationship between the processes of cold nuclear fusion and high-temperature superconductivity in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x pellets deuterated at T c (77< T<90 K)

  17. Increase energy efficiency in the cold production; Steigerung der Energieeffizienz in der Kaelteerzeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paatzsch, Rene [Institut fuer Luft- und Kaeltetechnik gGmbH, Dresden (Germany). Hauptbereich Kaelte- und Waermepumpentechnik; Berg, Hans-Peter [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH und Co. KG, Ingelheim (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    According to a study by ILK Dresden the cold production in the field of pharmaceutical manufacturing at Boehringer has been adjusted. By installing a turbo chiller and the sliding control of the cooling water temperature depending on the wet bulb temperature the COP of the cold production was improved of 3.1 to 4.5 currently. (orig.)

  18. The big experimental manual of Free Energy. Cold Fusion - Tesla-Waves - Space-Quantum-Energy - a.o.; Das grosse Freie Energie Experimentier-Handbuch. Kalte Fusion - Tesla-Wellen - Raum-Quanten-Energie - u.v.m.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lay, P.; Chmela, H.; Wiedergut, W.

    2004-07-01

    The main topics of the lectures are: Experiments on cold fusion; Information on space-quantum energy; phenomena of rotating magnets; advanced electrostatic motors; generation of scalar waves; complex rotating fields and levitation from an advanced view; free energy converters. (GL)

  19. Effect of deformations on the compactness of odd-Z superheavy nuclei formed in cold and hot fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurjit; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2018-03-01

    Using the extended fragmentation theory, the compactness of hot and cold fusion reactions is analyzed for odd-Z nuclei ranging Z = 105- 117. The calculations for the present work are carried out at T = 0MeV and ℓ = 0 ħ, as the temperature and angular momentum effects remain silent while addressing the orientation degree of freedom (i.e. compact angle configuration). In the hot fusion, 48Ca (spherical) + actinide (prolate) reaction, the non-equatorial compact (nec) shape is obtained for Z = 113 nucleus. On the other hand, Z > 113 nuclei favor equatorial compact (ec) configuration. The distribution of barrier height (VB) illustrate that the ec-shape is obtained when the magnitude of quadrupole deformation of the nucleus is higher than the hexadecupole deformation. In other words, negligible or small -ve β4-deformations support ec configurations. On the other hand, large (+ve) magnitude of the β4-deformation suggests that the configuration appears for compact angle θc < 90 °, leading to nec structure. Similar deformation effects are observed for Bi-induced reactions, in which not belly-to-belly compact (nbbc) configurations are seen at θc = 42 °. In addition to the effect of β2 and β4-deformations, the exclusive role of octupole deformations (β3) is also analyzed. The β3-deformations do not follow the reflection symmetry as that of β2 and β4, leading to the possible occurrence of compact configuration within 0° to 180° angular range.

  20. Heterologous production of peptides in plants: fusion proteins and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Juliane Flávia Cançado; Dias, Simoni Campos; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Lacorte, Cristiano

    2013-11-01

    Recombinant DNA technology has allowed the ectopic production of proteins and peptides of different organisms leading to biopharmaceutical production in large cultures of bacterial, yeasts and mammalian cells. Otherwise, the expression of recombinant proteins and peptides in plants is an attractive alternative presenting several advantages over the commonly used expression systems including reduced production costs, easy scale-up and reduced risks of pathogen contamination. Different types of proteins and peptides have been expressed in plants, including antibodies, antigens, and proteins and peptides of medical, veterinary and industrial applications. However, apart from providing a proof of concept, the use of plants as platforms for heterologous protein and peptide production still depends on key steps towards optimization including the enhancement of expression levels, manipulation of post-transcriptional modifications and improvements in purification methods. In this review, strategies to increase heterologous protein and peptide stability and accumulation are discussed, focusing on the expression of peptides through the use of gene fusions.

  1. Threshold region for Higgs boson production in gluon fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvini, Marco; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    2012-09-07

    We provide a quantitative determination of the effective partonic kinematics for Higgs boson production in gluon fusion in terms of the collider energy at the LHC. We use the result to assess, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, whether the large m(t) approximation is adequate and Sudakov resummation advantageous. We argue that our results hold to all perturbative orders. Based on our results, we conclude that the full inclusion of finite top mass corrections is likely to be important for accurate phenomenology for a light Higgs boson with m(H)~125 GeV at the LHC with √s=14 TeV.

  2. ICRF-induced fusion product loss in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Chang, C.S.; Zweben, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    When ICRF power is applied to plasmas in which there is no externally-supplied minority species, an enhanced loss of DD fusion products results. The characteristics of the loss are consistent with particles at or near the birth energy having their perpendicular velocity increased by the ICRF such that those near the passing/trapped boundary are carried into the first orbit loss cone. A rudimentary model of this process predicts losses of a magnitude similar to those seen. Predictions based upon this data for hypothetical ICRF ash removal from reactor plasmas suggest that the technique will not be energy efficient

  3. Mechanical design of a magnetic fusion production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S.; Jassby, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanical aspects of a tandem mirror and tokamak concepts for the tritium production mission are compared, and a proposed breeding blanket configuration for each type of reactor is presented in detail, along with a design outline of the complete fusion reaction system. In both cases, the reactor design is developed sufficiently to permit preliminary cost estimates of all components. A qualitative comparison is drawn between both concepts from the view of mechanical design and serviceability, and suggestions are made for technology proof tests on unique mechanical features. Detailed cost breakdowns indicate less than 10% difference in the overall costs of the two reactors

  4. ICRF-induced DD fusion product losses in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Budny, R.V.

    1994-10-01

    When ICRF power is applied to TFTR plasmas in which there is no externally-supplied minority species, an enhanced loss of DD fusion products results. The characteristics of the loss are consistent with particles at or near the birth energy having their perpendicular velocity increased by the ICRF such that those near the passing/trapped boundary are carried into the first orbit loss cone. A rudimentary model of this process predicts losses of a magnitude similar to those seen. Extrapolations based upon this data for hypothetical ICRF ash removal from reactor plasmas suggest that the technique will not be energy efficient

  5. Reprocessing free nuclear fuel production via fusion fission hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotschenreuther, Mike, E-mail: mtk@mail.utexas.edu [Intitute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin (United States); Valanju, Prashant; Mahajan, Swadesh [Intitute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Fusion fission hybrids, driven by a copious source of fusion neutrons can open qualitatively 'new' cycles for transmuting nuclear fertile material into fissile fuel. A totally reprocessing-free (ReFree) Th{sup 232}-U{sup 233} conversion fuel cycle is presented. Virgin fertile fuel rods are exposed to neutrons in the hybrid, and burned in a traditional light water reactor, without ever violating the integrity of the fuel rods. Throughout this cycle (during breeding in the hybrid, transport, as well as burning of the fissile fuel in a water reactor) the fissile fuel remains a part of a bulky, countable, ThO{sub 2} matrix in cladding, protected by the radiation field of all fission products. This highly proliferation-resistant mode of fuel production, as distinct from a reprocessing dominated path via fast breeder reactors (FBR), can bring great acceptability to the enterprise of nuclear fuel production, and insure that scarcity of naturally available U{sup 235} fuel does not throttle expansion of nuclear energy. It also provides a reprocessing free path to energy security for many countries. Ideas and innovations responsible for the creation of a high intensity neutron source are also presented.

  6. Reprocessing free nuclear fuel production via fusion fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotschenreuther, Mike; Valanju, Prashant; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2012-01-01

    Fusion fission hybrids, driven by a copious source of fusion neutrons can open qualitatively “new” cycles for transmuting nuclear fertile material into fissile fuel. A totally reprocessing-free (ReFree) Th 232 –U 233 conversion fuel cycle is presented. Virgin fertile fuel rods are exposed to neutrons in the hybrid, and burned in a traditional light water reactor, without ever violating the integrity of the fuel rods. Throughout this cycle (during breeding in the hybrid, transport, as well as burning of the fissile fuel in a water reactor) the fissile fuel remains a part of a bulky, countable, ThO 2 matrix in cladding, protected by the radiation field of all fission products. This highly proliferation-resistant mode of fuel production, as distinct from a reprocessing dominated path via fast breeder reactors (FBR), can bring great acceptability to the enterprise of nuclear fuel production, and insure that scarcity of naturally available U 235 fuel does not throttle expansion of nuclear energy. It also provides a reprocessing free path to energy security for many countries. Ideas and innovations responsible for the creation of a high intensity neutron source are also presented.

  7. Advanced nuclear fuel production by using fission-fusion hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kusayer, T.A.; Sahin, S.; Abdulraoof, M.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts are made at the College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh to lay out the main structure of a prototype experimental fusion and fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor blanket in cylindrical geometry. The geometry is consistent with most of the current fusion and hybrid reactor design concepts in respect of the neutronic considerations. Characteristics of the fusion chamber, fusion neutrons and the blanket are provided. The studies have further shown that 1 GWe fission-fusion reactor can produce up to 957 kg/year which is enough to fuel five light water reactors of comparable power. Fuel production can be increased further. 29 refs

  8. Application of controlled thermonuclear reactor fusion energy for food production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

    1975-06-01

    Food and energy shortages in many parts of the world in the past two years raise an immediate need for the evaluation of energy input in food production. The present paper investigates systematically (1) the energy requirement for food production, and (2) the provision of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy for major energy intensive sectors of food manufacturing. Among all the items of energy input to the ''food industry,'' fertilizers, water for irrigation, food processing industries, such as beet sugar refinery and dough making and single cell protein manufacturing, have been chosen for study in detail. A controlled thermonuclear power reactor was used to provide electrical and thermal energy for all these processes. Conceptual design of the application of controlled thermonuclear power, water and air for methanol and ammonia synthesis and single cell protein production is presented. Economic analysis shows that these processes can be competitive. (auth)

  9. Study on conceptual design system of tritium production fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui

    2004-11-01

    Conceptual design of an advanced tritium production reactor based on spherical torus, which is intermediate application of fusion energy, was presented. Different from traditional tokamak tritium production reactor design, advanced plasma physics performance and compact structural characteristics of ST were used to minimize tritium leakage and to maximize tritium breeding ratio with arrangement of tritium production blankets as possible as it can within vacuum vessel in order to produce 1 kg excess tritium except self-sufficient plasma core, corresponding plant availability 40% or more. Based on 2D neutronics calculation, preliminary conceptual design of ST-TPR was presented. Besides systematical analyses; design risk, uncertainty and backup are introduced generally for the backgrounds of next detailed conceptual design. (author)

  10. The precipitation response of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel to simulated fusion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    The precipitation response of 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel has been examined after irradiation in HFIR at 380-600 0 C, after irradiation in EBR-II at 500 0 C, and after thermal aging at 600 to 750 0 C. Eta phase forms during exposure to all environments. It constitutes a major portion of the precipitation response, and is rich in Ni, Si and Mo relative to M 23 C 6 after thermal aging. It is not normally reported in 20%-cold-worked type 316 stainless steel. The eta, M 23 C 6 , Laves, sigma, and chi precipitate phases appear at similar temperatures after HFIR, EBR-II, or thermal exposure. There are, however, some differences in relative amounts, size, and distribution of phases among the various environments. Eta phase is the only carbide-type phase observed after irradiation in HFIR from 380-550 0 C. The large cavities associated with it at 380 0 C contribute significantly to swelling. Re-solution of fine M 23 C 6 , eta, and Laves particles and re-precipitation of massive particles of sigma, M 23 C 6 and chi are observed after recrystallization in HFIR. (orig.)

  11. Destabilization of contained interacting modes by fusion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penn, G.; Riconda, C.; Coppi, B.

    1996-01-01

    The instability related to the interaction between high-frequency open-quotes contained modesclose quotes and the fusion products population in a toroidal configuration is studied. Emphasis is placed on the dependence of the growth rate on finite Larmor radius effects of the fusion products, the characteristics of the particle distribution function, and factors, such as the magnetic drift velocity and bounce-averaging, related to the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in a toroidal configuration. In particular, a sufficient degree of anisotropy in the energetic particle distribution is required in order to have a positive growth rate for realistic parameters. Only a small region of phase space is involved in the resonant interactions associated with the considered modes. We consider first the limit where the growth rate is larger than the bounce frequency (local approximation), that is the simplest case by which it is possible to identify the regions of phase space that are involved in the instability. Another evaluation of the growth rate is given in the case, that we consider realistic, where γ is comparable to the average bounce frequency of the interacting particles. We solve for γ by integrating the linearized Vlasov equation over the unperturbed particle orbits, and by reducing the integrals through saddle-point approximations

  12. Nuclear elastic scattering effects on fusion product transport in compact tori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, J.; Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper seeks to advance previous work including the effects of nuclear elastic scattering (NES) on fusion-product transport. We have found that NES may dominate the slowing-down process for high-temperature, advance-fuel plasmas which burn Cat.D or D- 3 He. A modified version of the Monte Carlo fusion product transport code, MCFRM, was used to evaluate the effects of NES on discrete fusion-product orbits in the FRM

  13. Stimulated cold fusion by positronium atoms, cross sections, and wall interactions in plasmas, used to diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Because of the technical complexities, involved in the controlled thermonuclear, reactions, a simple vicegerent agent cold plasma, stimulated by positronium atoms (achieved through a ring storage) as stimulus, introduced by this author in ITC 12 conference. In the present paper, the interaction between γ rays emitted through positronium atoms annihilation (in the forms of doublet and triplet electromagnetic photonic radiation) with plasma particles (including electrons, ions and neutral particles) investigated. Proper lifetime of singlet γ rays τs are about 100 ns and from that of triplet γ rays, i.e τt about 100 fems, reside in the following transition times in Ne and Argon elements in He-Ne and Ar lasers respectively: Ne*(3S2) [transition time τ = 105 ns] -> Ne*(2P4); Ar+*(3P4 4S) [transition time τ = 105 fems] -> Ar+(3P5). Then the interactions of γ rays with mater in plasma could follow up as treated from that of the laser and mater in one extreme while the comparison of this situation with normal plasmas in other extreme could serve as diagnostics key role in magnetically confined plasmas reactors. Collisions between charge and neutral species in plasma with electromagnetic radiation (γ photonic radiation) including the energy loss and scattering lead to different consequences. Light electrons can take up appreciably amounts of energy from the incident rays, lead to heating cold plasma, whereas massive ions absorb very little energy. Thus loss of incident energy in radiation occurs almost entirely in collisions with electrons , which, referred to the γ rays energy this would led to plasma heating about thermonuclear reaction ( Eγ = hν = 0.5 MeV). The heavy ions and neutral species in interaction with electromagnetic γ radiation, result on the other hand in scattering, in turn may increase the ionization level of the cold plasma, toward fully ionized plasma. Although all the essential features of these different interaction cross sections deduced

  14. Control of biological hazards in cold smoked salmon production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huss, Hans Henrik; Embarek, Peter Karim Ben; Jeppesen, V.F.

    1995-01-01

    An outline of the common processing technology for cold smoked salmon in Denmark is presented. The safety hazards related to pathogenic bacteria, parasites and biogenic amines are discussed with special emphasis on hazards related to Clostridium botulinum and Listeria monocytogenes. Critical...... control points are identified for all hazards except growth of L. monocytogenes. For this reason a limitation of shelf life to three weeks at +5 degrees C far cold smoked vacuum-packed salmon having greater than or equal to 3% water phase salt is recommended...

  15. Managing fusion high-level waste-A strategy for burning the long-lived products in fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion devices appear to be a viable option for burning their own high-level waste (HLW). We propose a novel strategy to eliminate (or minimize) the HLW generated by fusion systems. The main source of the fusion HLW includes the structural and recycled materials, refractory metals, and liquid breeders. The basic idea involves recycling and reprocessing the waste, separating the long-lived radionuclides from the bulk low-level waste, and irradiating the limited amount of HLW in a specially designed module to transmute the long-lived products into short-lived radioisotopes or preferably, stable elements. The potential performance of the new concept seems promising. Our analysis indicated moderate to excellent transmutation rates could be achieved in advanced fusion designs. Successive irradiation should burn the majority of the HLW. The figures of merit for the concept relate to the HLW burn-up fraction, neutron economy, and impact on tritium breeding. Hopefully, the added design requirements could be accommodated easily in fusion power plants and the cost of the proposed system would be much less than disposal in a deep geological HLW repository. Overall, this innovative approach offers benefits to fusion systems and helps earn public acceptance for fusion as a HLW-free source of clean nuclear energy

  16. A 1.5--4 Kelvin detachable cold-sample transfer system: Application to inertially confined fusion with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, N.; Barden, J.; Fan, Q.; Honig, A.

    1990-01-01

    A compact cold-transfer apparatus for engaging and retrieving samples at liquid helium temperatures (1.5--4K), maintaining the samples at such temperatures for periods of hours, and subsequently inserting them in diverse apparatuses followed by disengagement, is described. The properties of several thermal radiation-insulating shrouds, necessary for very low sample temperatures, are presented. The immediate intended application is transportable target-shells containing highly spin-polarized deuterons in solid HD or D 2 for inertially confined fusion (ICF) experiments. The system is also valuable for unpolarized high-density fusion fuels, as well as for other applications which are discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs

  17. Production and guide tube transmission of very cold neutrons from pulsed cold source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, Masahiko; Okumura, Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    The intensity and the energy spectra of Very Cold Neutrons (VCN) transmitted through a curved guide tube were measured by using the time-of-flight method of VCN. In the measurements, the curved guide tube having a characteristic neutron velocity of about 70 m/s is combined to a pulsed cold source of an electron linac in an internal target geometry. A space dependence of the VCN spectra was observed on the radial positions of a detector at the guide tube exit. A simple theoretical analysis on the transmission of VCN in the curved guide tube is also presented with taking into consideration about the effects of a finite size and a finite distance of the VCN-emitting source, and simple analytical formulas for the exit spectra of the guide tube are given. Comparisons between the experimental results and the theoretical calculations show good agreements, and the satisfactory performance of the present VCN guide tube assembly was ascertained. These results present also instructive features for understanding the structures and the space dependence of the exit spectra of a neutron guide tube. The VCN spectra at the guide tube exit can be divided into a few energy regions according to the transmission processes of VCN. Thus, the present study provides useful informations for the preparations of a VCN source with a curved guide tube. (author)

  18. Production of Medical isotope Technecium-99 from DT Fusion neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguski, John; Gentile, Charles; Ascione, George

    2011-10-01

    High energy neutrons produced in DT fusion reactors have a secondary application for use in the synthesis of valuable man-made isotopes utilized in industry today. One such isotope is metastable Technecium-99 (Tc99m), a low energy gamma emitter used in ~ 85% of all medical imaging diagnostics. Tc99m is created through beta decay of Molybdenum-99 (Mo99), which itself has only a 66 hour half-life and must be created from a neutron capture by the widely available and stable isotope Molydenum-98. Current worldwide production of Tc99m occurs in just five locations and relies on obtaining the fission byproduct Mo99 from highly enriched Uranium reactors. A Tc99m generator using DT fusion neutrons, however, could potentially be operated at individual hospitals and medical facilities without the use of any fissile material. The neutron interaction of the DT neutrons with Molybdenum in a potential device geometry was modeled using Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. Trial experiments were also performed to test the viability of using DT neutrons to create ample quantities of Tc99m. Modeling and test results will follow.

  19. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kokoro; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-01-01

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in 1 H- 15 N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  20. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kokoro [Fujifilm Corporation, Analysis Technology Center (Japan); Kojima, Chojiro, E-mail: kojima@protein.osaka-u.ac.j [Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST), Graduate School of Biological Sciences (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  1. Fokker-Planck Modelling of Delayed Loss of Charged Fusion Products in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edenstrasser, J.W.; Goloborod'ko, V.Ya.; Reznik, S.N.; Yavorskij, V.A.; Zweben, S.

    1998-01-01

    The results of a Fokker-Planck simulation of the ripple-induced loss of charged fusion products in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) are presented. It is shown that the main features of the measured ''delayed loss'' of partially thermalized fusion products, such as the differences between deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium discharges, the plasma current and major radius dependencies, etc., are in satisfactory agreement with the classical collisional ripple transport mechanism. The inclusion of the inward shift of the vacuum flux surfaces turns out to be necessary for an adequate and consistent explanation of the origin of the partially thermalized fusion product loss to the bottom of TFTR

  2. Recycle of valuable products from oily cold rolling mill sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Shen-gen; Tian, Jian-jun; Pan, De-an; Liu, Yang; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2013-10-01

    Oily cold rolling mill (CRM) sludge contains lots of iron and alloying elements along with plenty of hazardous organic components, which makes it as an attractive secondary source and an environmental contaminant at the same time. The compound methods of "vacuum distillation + oxidizing roasting" and "vacuum distillation + hydrogen reduction" were employed for the recycle of oily cold rolling mill sludge. First, the sludge was dynamically vacuum distilled in a rotating furnace at 50 r/min and 600°C for 3 h, which removed almost hazardous organic components, obtaining 89.2wt% ferrous resultant. Then, high purity ferric oxide powders (99.2wt%) and reduced iron powders (98.9wt%) were obtained when the distillation residues were oxidized and reduced, respectively. The distillation oil can be used for fuel or chemical feedstock, and the distillation gases can be collected and reused as a fuel.

  3. Effective donor cell fusion conditions for production of cloned dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, JungEun; Oh, HyunJu; Hong, SoGun; Kim, MinJung; Kim, GeonA; Koo, OkJae; Kang, SungKeun; Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2011-03-01

    As shown by the birth of the first cloned dog 'Snuppy', a protocol to produce viable cloned dogs has been reported. In order to evaluate optimum fusion conditions for improving dog cloning efficiency, in vivo matured oocytes were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a female Pekingese using different fusion conditions. Fusion with needle vs chamber methods, and with low vs high pulse strength was compared by evaluating fusion rate and in vivo development of canine cloned embryos. The fusion rates in the high voltage groups were significantly higher than in the low voltage groups regardless of fusion method (83.5 vs 66.1% for the needle fusion method, 67.4 vs 37.9% for the fusion chamber method). After embryo transfer, one each pregnancy was detected after using the needle fusion method with high and low voltage and in the chamber fusion method with high voltage, whereas no pregnancy was detected using the chamber method with low voltage. However, only the pregnancy from the needle fusion method with high voltage was maintained to term and one healthy puppy was delivered. The results of the present study demonstrated that two DC pulses of 3.8 to 4.0 kV/cm for 15 μsec using the needle fusion method were the most effective method for the production of cloned dogs under the conditions of this experiment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Vitrification of organic products in a cold crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Myung Jae; Park, Jong Kil; Jouan, A.; Ladirat, C.; Merlin, S.; Pujadas, V.

    1997-01-01

    A worldwide increasing interest is presently observed for the waste vitrification whether they are radioactive or hazardous. Vitrification confines the waste in a stable and inert material and reduces significantly the waste volume which has a major effect on the disposal cost. The waste vitrification has been primarily applied for the treatment of high level radioactive waste from spent fuels reprocessing. In France, the CEA had a significant contribution in that field by developing in the 60's a technology based on metallic crucible heated by induction. The CEA continued to be actively engaged in an R and D effort and, since the 80's, is developing an advanced technology based on a cold crucible heated by induction. This technology particularly well fits with the requirements associated with LAW/Man waste treatment. Laboratory as well as preliminary full scale tests have been conducted with encouraging results to investigate the feasibility of direct ion exchange resins vitrification in a cold crucible. KEPRI investigated, In the past years, the different high temperature technologies which were available on the market and able to treat the low- and medium-level active waste produced by the NPP. The most promising technologies identified as a result of the studies were the cold crucible melter (CCM) for the conditioning of the evaporator concentrate, the ions exchange resins and the solid combustible waste and the plasma torch for the remaining solid waste such as filters

  5. Investigation on cold fusion phenomena using gas-metal loading experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanza, F.; Bertolini, G.; Vocino, V.; Parnisari, E.; Ronsecco, C.

    1992-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that tritium is produced in deuterated titanium. The data obtained are highly scattered and non reproducible. In order to try to define better the phenomenon a series of tests have been performed using various metals and alloys and different deuterating conditions. Sheets and shavings of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, tantalum, zircaloy 2 and Ti-Zr 5O% alloy have been tested. The tritium production is obtained as a difference of the tritium content in the deuterated metal and the initial content of tritium in the deuterium gas. The amount of tritium produced is low and reproducibility is rather poor. A statistical analysis shows that significant differences are obtained varying the type of metal used. In general the tritium production increases with the atomic number of the metal. Moreover significantly higher productions of tritium have been obtained using materials of technical purity as tantalum, zircaloy 2 and Ti-Zr alloy

  6. The Potential of Cold Plasma for Safe and Sustainable Food Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Paula; Ziuzina, Dana; Boehm, Daniela; Cullen, Patrick J; Keener, Kevin

    2018-06-01

    Cold plasma science and technology is increasingly investigated for translation to a plethora of issues in the agriculture and food sectors. The diversity of the mechanisms of action of cold plasma, and the flexibility as a standalone technology or one that can integrate with other technologies, provide a rich resource for driving innovative solutions. The emerging understanding of the longer-term role of cold plasma reactive species and follow-on effects across a range of systems will suggest how cold plasma may be optimally applied to biological systems in the agricultural and food sectors. Here we present the current status, emerging issues, regulatory context, and opportunities of cold plasma with respect to the broad stages of primary and secondary food production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. THE IMPACT OF A MECHANICAL PRESS ON THE ACCURACY OF PRODUCTS IN COLD FORGING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krusic, V.; Arentoft, Mogens; Rodic, T.

    2005-01-01

    Cold extrusion is an economic production process for the production of elements of complex forms and accurate dimensions. The first part of the article explains the impact that a mechanical press has on the accuracy of products. It describes the mechanical press main characteristics and in additi...

  8. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein mediates cold air inducible airway mucin production through TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lingxiu; Ran, Danhua; Xie, Wenyue; Xu, Qing; Zhou, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important feature in patients with chronic inflammatory airway diseases and cold air stimulation has been shown to be associated with the severity of these diseases. However, the regulatory mechanisms that mediate excessive mucin production under cold stress remain elusive. Recently, the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) has been shown to be markedly induced after exposure to cold air. In this study, we sought to explore the expression of CIRP within bronchial biopsy specimens, the effect on mucin5AC (MUC5AC) production in chronic inflammatory airway diseases and the potential signaling pathways involved in cold air stimulation process. We found that CIRP protein expression was significantly increased in patients with COPD and in mice treated with cold air. Moreover, cold air stimulation induced MUC5AC expression in wild-type mice but not in CIRP(-/-) mice. In vitro, cold air stress significantly elevated the transcriptional and protein expression levels of MUC5AC in human bronchial epithelial cells. CIRP, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and phosphorylated NF-κB p65 (p-p65) increased significantly in response to cold stress and CIRP siRNA, TLR4 - neutralizing Ab and a specific inhibitor of NF-κB could attenuated cold stress inducible MUC5AC expression. In addition, CIRP siRNA could hindered the expression levels of TLR4 and p-p65 both induced by cold stress. Taken together, these results suggest that airway epithelial cells constitutively express CIRP in vitro and in vivo. CIRP is responsible for cold-inducible MUC5AC expression by activating TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Technology assessment of laser-fusion power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.; Frank, T.G.

    1976-01-01

    The inherent features of laser-induced fusion, some laser-fusion reactor concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation are discussed. Theoretical fusion-pellet microexplosion energy release characteristics are described and the effects of pellet design options on pellet-microexplosion characteristics are discussed. The results of analyses to assess the engineering feasibility of reactor cavities for which protection of cavity components is provided either by suitable ablative materials or by diversion of plasmas by magnetic fields are presented. Two conceptual laser-fusion electric generating stations, based on different laser-fusion reactor concepts, are described. Technology developments for ultimate commercial application are outlined

  10. Production of hollow microspheres for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.

    1994-12-01

    The targets used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are plastic capsules roughly 0.5 mm in diameter. The capsules, which typically have wall thicknesses from 20 to 60 μm, must possess extraordinary symmetry and concentricity and must have surface finishes of less than 1000 Angstrom peak-to-valley variation over surface contours of from 10 to 100's of μm. This paper reviews the fabrication of these capsules, focusing on the production of the thin-walled polystyrene microshell mandrel around which the capsule is built. The relationship between the capsule characteristics, especially surface finish, and capsule performance is discussed, as are the methods of surface characterization and modification necessary for experiments designed to study the effects of surface roughness on implosion dynamics. Targets for the next generation of ICF facilities using more powerful laser drivers will have to be larger while meeting the same or even more stringent symmetry and surface finish requirements. Some of the technologies for meeting these needs are discussed briefly

  11. Methane impurity production in the fusion reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.T.

    1984-11-01

    Fusion requires temperatures of the order of 10 8 degrees C. In order to attain the required temperature it will be essential to minimise the energy losses from the plasma. Impurities are a major cause of plasma cooling. Ionization of impurity species in the plasma leads to a subsequent decay and emission of radiation. The most common low Z contaminants to be consideed are water and methane produced by reaction of hydrogen isotopes with oxygen and carbon. This review focuses on the methane production problem. We will be concerned with the sources of carbon in the reactor and also with the reactivity of carbon with hydrogen molecules, atoms and ions and the synergistic effects which can arise from coincident fluxes of electrons and photons and the effects of radiation-induced damage of the materials involved. While the reactor first wall will provide the most hostile environment for methane producton, most of the reactions discussed can occur in breeder blankets and also in other tritium facilities such as fuel handling, purification and storage facilities

  12. Evidence of Higgs Boson Production through Vector Boson Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00333580

    The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 provided confirmation of the proposed mechanism for preserving the electroweak $SU(2) \\times U(1)$ gauge symmetry of the Standard Model of particle physics. It also heralded in a new era of precision Higgs physics. This thesis presents a measurement of the rate at which the Higgs boson is produced by vector boson fusion in the \\wwlnln decay channel. With gauge boson couplings in both the production and decay vertices, a VBF measurement in this channel is a powerful probe of the $VVH$ vertex strength. Using $4.5$~fb$^{-1}$ and $20.3$~fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data collected at respective center-of-mass energies of 7 and $8 \\tev$ in the ATLAS detector, measurements of the statistical significance and the signal strength are carried out in the Higgs mass range $100 \\leq m_H \\leq 200 \\gev$. These measurements are enhanced with a boosted decision tree that exploits the correlations between eight kinematic inputs in order to separate signal and background processes. At the...

  13. Study of fusion product effects in field-reversed mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driemeyer, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of fusion products (fps) on Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) reactor concepts has been evaluated through the development of two new computer models. The first code (MCFRM) treats fps as test particles in a fixed background plasma, which is represented as a fluid. MCFRM includes a Monte Carlo treatment of Coulomb scattering and thus provides an accurate treatment of fp behavior even at lower energies where pitch-angle scattering becomes important. The second code (FRMOD) is a steady-state, globally averaged, two-fluid (ion and electron), point model of the FRM plasma that incorporates fp heating and ash buildup values which are consistent with the MCFRM calculations. These codes have been used extensively in the development of an advanced-fuel FRM reactor design (SAFFIRE). A Catalyzed-D version of the plant is also discussed along with an investigation of the steady-state energy distribution of fps in the FRM. User guides for the two computer codes are also included

  14. Process for manufacture of inertial confinement fusion targets and resulting product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, D.E.; Wise, K.D.; Wuttke, G.H.; Masnari, N.A.; Rensel, W.B.; Robinson, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A method of manufacturing inertial confinement fusion targets is described which is adaptable for high volume production of low cost targets in a wide variety of sizes. The targets include a spherical pellet of fusion fuel surrounded by a protective concentric shell. (UK)

  15. QCD and electroweak interference in Higgs production by gauge boson fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Jeppe R.; Smillie, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    We explicitly calculate the contribution to Higgs production at the LHC from the interference between gluon fusion and weak vector boson fusion, and compare it to the pure QCD and pure electroweak result. While the effect is small at tree level, we speculate it will be significantly enhanced by loop effects

  16. An unexpected response of torulopsis glabrata fusion products to x-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeotti, C.L.; Sriprakash, K.S.; Batum, C.M.; Clark-Walker, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    Intra-species fusion products of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces unisporus and Torulopsis glabrata have been isolated following polyethylene glycol-induced fusion of protoplasts and selection for prototrophic colonies. Staining with lomofungin showed that all fusion products were uninucleate. Measurement of DNA content mostly gave values between haploid and diploid levels indicating that the majority of fusion products were aneuploid. Nevertheless fusion products of S. cerevisiae and S. unisporus were, as expected, more resistant to X-irradiation than their haploid parents. By contrast, the X-ray doze-response curve of all T. glabrata fusion products was indistinguishable from their progenitors despite the fact that mitotic segregants could be recovered amongst the survivors to X-rays. A possible explanation for the behaviour towards X-rays of T. glabrata fusion products is that this species lacks a DNA repair pathway involving recombination between homologous chromosomes. We conclude from this study that the shape of the X-ray dose-response curve should not be taken to indicate the ploidy of new yeast isolates without supporting data. (orig.)

  17. Linear induction accelerators for fusion and neutron production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barletta, W.A.; California Univ., Los Angeles, CA

    1993-08-01

    Linear induction accelerators (LIA) with pulsed power drives can produce high energy, intense beams or electrons, protons, or heavy ions with megawatts of average power. The continuing development of highly reliable LIA components permits the use such accelerators as cost-effective beam sources to drive fusion pellets with heavy ions, to produce intense neutron fluxes using proton beams, and to generate with electrons microwave power to drive magnetic fusion reactors and high gradient, rf-linacs

  18. Heat and cold accumulators in vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauranen, P.; Wikstroem, L. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Advanced Materials, Tampere (Finland)); Heikkinen, J. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Building Services and Indoor Environment, Espoo (Finland)); Laurikko, J.; Elonen, T. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Emission Control, Espoo (Finland)); Seppaelae, A. (Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Applied Thermodynamics, Espoo (Finland)). Email: ari.seppala@tkk.fi

    2009-07-01

    Phase Change Material (PCM) based heat and cold accumulators have been tailored for transport applications including a mail delivery van as well as the cold chains of foodstuff and blood products. The PCMs can store relative large amount of thermal energy in a narrow temperature interval as latent heat of fusion of their melting and crystallization processes. Compact heat and cold accumulators can be designed using PCMs. The aim of the project has been to reduce the exhaust gas and noise emissions and improve the fuel economy of the transport systems and to improve the reliability of the cold chains studied by storing thermal energy in PCM accumulators. (orig.)

  19. Measurements of charged fusion product diffusion in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    The single particle confinement of charged fusion products, namely the 1 MeV triton and the 3 MeV proton, has been studied using a detector located near the outer midplane of TFTR. The detector, which measure the flux of escaping particles, is composed of a scintillator (ZnS(Ag)) and a system of collimating apertures, which permit pitch angle, energy and time resolution. It is mounted on a movable probe which can be inserted 25 cm into the vacuum vessel. Measurements indicate a level of losses higher than expected from a first-orbit loss mechanism alone. The primary candidate for explaining the observed anomalous losses is the toroidal field (TF) stochastic ripple diffusion, theoretically discovered by Goldston, White and Boozer. This loss mechanism is expected to be localized near the outer midplane where, at least at high current ({approx gt} 1.0 MA) it would locally dominate over first-orbit losses. Calculations made with a mapping particle orbit code (MAPLOS) show a semi-quantitative agreement with the measurements. The predominant uncertainties in the numerical simulations were found to originate from the modeling of the first wall geometry and also from the assumed plasma current and source profiles. Direct measurements of the diffusion rate were performed by shadowing the detector with a second movable probe used as an obstacle. The diffusion rate was also measured by moving the detector behind the radius of the RF limiters, located on the outer wall. Comparisons of these experimental results with numerical simulations, which include diffusive mechanisms, indicate a quantitative agreement with the TF stochastic ripple diffusion model.

  20. Measurements of charged fusion product diffusion in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boivin, Rejean Louis [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The single particle confinement of charged fusion products, namely the 1 MeV triton and the 3 MeV proton, has been studied using a detector located near the outer midplane of TFTR. The detector, which measure the flux of escaping particles, is composed of a scintillator [ZnS(Ag)] and a system of collimating apertures, which permit pitch angle, energy and time resolution. It is mounted on a movable probe which can be inserted 25 cm into the vacuum vessel. Measurements indicate a level of losses higher than expected from a first-orbit loss mechanism alone. The primary candidate for explaining the observed anomalous losses is the toroidal field (TF) stochastic ripple diffusion, theoretically discovered by Goldston, White and Boozer. This loss mechanism is expected to be localized near the outer midplane where, at least at high current (≳ 1.0 MA) it would locally dominate over first-orbit losses. Calculations made with a mapping particle orbit code (MAPLOS) show a semi-quantitative agreement with the measurements. The predominant uncertainties in the numerical simulations were found to originate from the modeling of the first wall geometry and also from the assumed plasma current and source profiles. Direct measurements of the diffusion rate were performed by shadowing the detector with a second movable probe used as an obstacle. The diffusion rate was also measured by moving the detector behind the radius of the RF limiters, located on the outer wall. Comparisons of these experimental results with numerical simulations, which include diffusive mechanisms, indicate a quantitative agreement with the TF stochastic ripple diffusion model.

  1. Measurements of charged fusion product diffusion in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boivin, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    The single particle confinement of charged fusion products, namely the 1 MeV triton and the 3 MeV proton, has been studied using a detector located near the outer midplane of TFTR. The detector, which measure the flux of escaping particles, is composed of a scintillator [ZnS(Ag)] and a system of collimating apertures, which permit pitch angle, energy and time resolution. It is mounted on a movable probe which can be inserted 25 cm into the vacuum vessel. Measurements indicate a level of losses higher than expected from a first-orbit loss mechanism alone. The primary candidate for explaining the observed anomalous losses is the toroidal field (TF) stochastic ripple diffusion, theoretically discovered by Goldston, White and Boozer. This loss mechanism is expected to be localized near the outer midplane where, at least at high current (approx-gt 1.0 MA) it would locally dominate over first-orbit losses. Calculations made with a mapping particle orbit code (MAPLOS) show a semi-quantitative agreement with the measurements. The predominant uncertainties in the numerical simulations were found to originate from the modeling of the first wall geometry and also from the assumed plasma current and source profiles. Direct measurements of the diffusion rate were performed by shadowing the detector with a second movable probe used as an obstacle. The diffusion rate was also measured by moving the detector behind the radius of the RF limiters, located on the outer wall. Comparisons of these experimental results with numerical simulations, which include diffusive mechanisms, indicate a quantitative agreement with the TF stochastic ripple diffusion model

  2. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F B; Hone, M A; Jarvis, O N; Loughlin, M J; Sadler, G [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Adams, J M; Bond, D S; Watkins, N [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.; Howarth, P J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    The effect of a sawtooth crash on the radial distribution of the slowing down fusion product tritons and on beams ions, is examined with measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line-integrals before and after sawtooth crashes. In deuterium discharges, the 14 MeV neutron production was wholly attributable to burnup of the 1 MeV fusion product tritons from d-d fusion. The local emissivity of 14 MeV neutrons, and hence of the profile of thermalizing tritons, is shown to be only weakly affected by crashes in the discharges studied. This is in contradiction with the apparent behaviour of injected beam ions as deduced from a study of the considerable changes in local emissivity of the 2.5 MeV neutrons. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the fusion product tritons is consistent with the scaling of the beam injected deuterium. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  3. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.; Hone, M.A.; Jarvis, O.N.; Loughlin, M.J.; Sadler, G.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of a sawtooth crash on the radial distribution of the slowing down fusion product tritons and on beams ions, is examined with measurements of the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line-integrals before and after sawtooth crashes. In deuterium discharges, the 14 MeV neutron production was wholly attributable to burnup of the 1 MeV fusion product tritons from d-d fusion. The local emissivity of 14 MeV neutrons, and hence of the profile of thermalizing tritons, is shown to be only weakly affected by crashes in the discharges studied. This is in contradiction with the apparent behaviour of injected beam ions as deduced from a study of the considerable changes in local emissivity of the 2.5 MeV neutrons. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the fusion product tritons is consistent with the scaling of the beam injected deuterium. 1 ref., 6 figs

  4. Advanced fusion welding processes, solid state joining and a successful marriage. [production of aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, F. R.

    1972-01-01

    Joining processes for aerospace systems combine fusion welding and solid state joining during production of metal structures. Detailed characteristics of electron beam welding, plasma arc welding, diffusion welding, inertia welding and weldbond processes are discussed.

  5. HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from a LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 129 I, 99 Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,α), (n,γ), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R = 1.0 to 3.0) requirements. These studies also indicate that masses on the order of 1.0 g at densities of rho greater than or equal to 500.0 g/cm 3 are required for a practical fusion-based fission product transmutation system

  6. Process and device for energy production from thermonuclear fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussard, R.W.; Coppi, Bruno.

    1977-01-01

    An energy generating system is described using a fusion reaction. It includes several contrivances for confining a plasma in an area, a protective device around a significant part of each of these confinement contrivances, an appliance for introducing a fusion reaction fuel in each of the confinements so that the plasma may be formed. Each confinement can be separated from the protective device so that it may be replaced by another. The system is connected to the confinements, to the protective devices or to both. It enables the thermal energy to be extracted and transformed into another form, electric, mechanical or both [fr

  7. Some thoughts on the production of muons for fusion catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapline, G.; Moir, R.

    1986-01-01

    For muon-catalyzed fusion to be of practical interest, a very efficient means of producing muons must be found. We describe here some schemes for producing muons that may be more energy efficient than any heretofore proposed. There are, in particular, some potential advantages of creating muons from collisions of high-energy tritons confined in a magnetic mirror configuration. If one could catalyze 200 fusions per muon and employ a uranium blanket that would multiply the neutron energy by a factor of ten, one might produce electricity with an overall plant efficiency (ratio of electric energy produced to nuclear energy released) approaching 30%

  8. Growth characteristics and productivity of cold-tolerant “Kowinearly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth characteristics and productivity of cold-tolerant “Kowinearly” Italian ryegrass in the northern part of South Korea. Gi Jun Choi, Hee Chung Ji, Ki-Yong Kim, Hyung Soo Park, Sung Seo, Ki-Won Lee, Sang-Hoon Lee ...

  9. A Protein Disulfide Isomerase Gene Fusion Expression System That Increases the Extracellular Productivity of Bacillus brevis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajino, Tsutomu; Ohto, Chikara; Muramatsu, Masayoshi; Obata, Shusei; Udaka, Shigezo; Yamada, Yukio; Takahashi, Haruo

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a versatile Bacillus brevis expression and secretion system based on the use of fungal protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) as a gene fusion partner. Fusion with PDI increased the extracellular production of heterologous proteins (light chain of immunoglobulin G, 8-fold; geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, 12-fold). Linkage to PDI prevented the aggregation of the secreted proteins, resulting in high-level accumulation of fusion proteins in soluble and biologically active forms. We also show that the disulfide isomerase activity of PDI in a fusion protein is responsible for the suppression of the aggregation of the protein with intradisulfide, whereas aggregation of the protein without intradisulfide was prevented even when the protein was fused to a mutant PDI whose two active sites were disrupted, suggesting that another PDI function, such as chaperone-like activity, synergistically prevented the aggregation of heterologous proteins in the PDI fusion expression system. PMID:10653729

  10. The pion (muon) energy production cost in muon catalyzed fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeev, N.G.; Solov'ev, M.I.

    1995-01-01

    The article presents the main steps in the history of the study on the muon catalysis of nuclear fusion. The practical application of the muon catalysis phenomenon to obtain the energy gain is briefly discussed. The details of the problem to produce pion (muon) yield with minimal energy expenses have been considered. 31 refs., 4 tabs

  11. Towards the production of an ultra cold antihydrogen beam with the AEGIS apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storey, James William, E-mail: james.storey@cern.ch [University of Zurich, Physik-Institut (Switzerland); Collaboration: AEGIS Collaboration

    2012-12-15

    The AEGIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment is an international collaboration, based at CERN, with the experimental goal of performing the first direct measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen. In the first phase of the experiment, a gravity measurement with 1% precision will be performed by passing a beam of ultra cold antihydrogen atoms through a classical Moire deflectometer coupled to a position sensitive detector. The key requirements for this measurement are the production of ultra cold (T{approx}100 mK) Rydberg state antihydrogen and the subsequent Stark acceleration of these atoms. The aim is to produce Rydberg state antihydrogen by means of the charge exchange reaction between ultra cold antiprotons (T{approx}100 mK) and Rydberg state positronium. This paper will present details of the developments necessary for the successful production of the ultra cold antihydrogen beam, with emphasis on the detector that is required for the development of these techniques. Issues covered will include the detection of antihydrogen production and temperature, as well as detection of the effects of Stark acceleration.

  12. Cold stress improves the production of artemisinin depending on the increase in endogenous jasmonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanhong; Wang, Huanyan; Chen, Yupei; Zhu, Shunqin; Chen, Min; Lan, Xiaozhong; Chen, Guoping; Liao, Zhihua

    2017-05-01

    Previous publications reported that the artemisinin level was increased in Artemisia annua following a night-frost period. However, the molecular mechanism was not clear. In this study, we found that exogenous jasmonate (JA) effectively enhanced the freezing tolerance of A. annua. The JA biosynthetic genes (LOX1, LOX2, allene oxide cyclase [AOC], and jasmonate resistant 1 [JAR1]) were induced by cold stress, leading to an increase in endogenous JA in cold-treated A. annua. Increased endogenous JA enhanced the expression of three JA-responsive transcription factors, ethylene response factor 1, ethylene response factor 2, and octadecanoid-responsive AP2/ERF, all of which were reported to transcriptionally activate the expression of artemisinin biosynthetic genes, such as amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS), CYP71AV1, DBR2, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1). Furthermore, the expression levels of the four artemisinin biosynthetic genes were also significantly increased under cold stress. Consequently, the levels of artemisinin and related secondary metabolites, such as dihydroartemisinic acid, artemisinin B, and artemisinic acid, were increased in A. annua under cold stress. Our study points to a molecular mechanism in which the production of artemisinin is regulated by cold stress in A. annua. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...... enhancing DD and D3He fusion reactions. Modelling and measuring the fast deuterium tail accurately is essential for quantifying the fusion products. This paper presents the modelling of the D distribution function resulting from the NBI+ICRF heating scheme, reinforced by a comparison with dedicated JET fast...

  14. The production and investigation of cold antihydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittner, H.

    2005-04-01

    This work reports on experiments in which antihydrogen atoms have been produced in cryogenic Penning traps from antiproton and positron plasmas by two different methods and on experiments that have been carried out subsequently in order to investigate the antihydrogen atoms. By the first method antihydrogen atoms have been formed during the process of positron cooling of antiprotons in so called nested Penning traps and detected via a field ionization method. A measurement of the state distribution has revealed that the antihydrogen atoms are formed in highly excited states. This suggests along with the high production rate that the antihydrogen atoms are formed by three-body recombination processes and subsequent collisional deexcitations. However current theory cannot yet account for the measured state distribution. Typical radii of the detected antihydrogen atoms lie in the range between 0.4 μm and 0.15 μm. The deepest bound antihydrogen atoms have radii below 0.1 μm.The kinetic energy of the weakest bound antihydrogen atoms has been measured to about 200 meV. By the second method antihydrogen atoms have been synthesized in charge-exchange processes. Lasers are used to produce a Rydberg cesium beam within the cryogenic Penning trap that collides with trapped positrons so that Rydberg positronium atoms are formed via charge-exchange reactions. The Rydberg positronium atoms that collide with nearby stored antiprotons form antihydrogen atoms in charge-exchange reactions. So far, 14±4 antihydrogen atoms have been detected background-free via a field-ionization method. The antihydrogen atoms produced via the two-step charge-exchange mechanism are expected to have a temperature of 4.2 K, the temperature of the antiprotons from which they are formed

  15. Enhanced fuel production in thorium fusion hybrid blankets utilizing uranium multipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitulski, R.H.; Chapin, D.L.; Klevans, E.

    1979-01-01

    The multiplication of 14 MeV D-T fusion neutrons via (n,2n), (n,3n), and fission reactions by 238 U is well known and established. This study consistently evaluates the effectiveness of a depleted (tails) UO 2 multiplier on increasing the production of 233 U and tritium in a thorium/lithium fusion--fission hybrid blanket. Nuclear performance is evaluated as a function of exposure and zone thickness

  16. Intergenus Protoplast Fusion between Pichia manshurica and Rhodosporidium paludigenum to Increase the Production of Inulinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wijanarka Wijanarka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study was to identify the optimum concentration of the lytic enzyme Glucanex for protoplast isolation and to conduct fusion for the purpose of increasing inulinase production. The study performs the protoplast fusion technique using Pichia manshurica and Rhodosporidium paludigenum. Protoplast fusion consists of a series of stages: protoplast isolation, protoplast fusion, protoplast regeneration, and analysis of hybrid fusion results. Protoplast isolation and fusion success rate are determined by various factors, including age of the culture, media type, and type of lytic enzymes used. Hybrid results were analyzed using a fungicide as a marker and measuring specific growth rate (μ of the hybrid compared with parental growth rates. Results demonstrated that a concentration of 4 mg/mL of Glucanex produces the greatest number of protoplasts, 7.2 x 1010 (cell/mL for P. manshurica and 8.8 x 1010 (cell/mL for Rh. paludigenum. The results of analysis of hybrid fusions indicate that the study has identified a new fusant, called fusant F4. Fusant F4 is capable of producing the highest inulinase, 0.6892 IU, compared with parentals P. manshurica, 0557 IU, and Rh. paludigenum, 0.3263 IU. Fusant F4 has specific growth rate (μ of 0.3360/h and generation time (g of 2.0629 h.

  17. Energetic-economic analysis of inertial fusion plants with tritium commercial production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezzani, M.; Cerullo, N.; Lanza, S.

    2000-01-01

    The realization of nuclear power plants based on fusion principles is expected to be, at the moment, very expensive. As a result the expected cost of electricity (COE) of fusion power plants is much higher than the COE of fission and fossil power plants. Thus it is necessary to study new solutions for fusion power plant designs to reduce the COE. An interesting solution for the first generation of fusion plants is to produce a surplus of tritium for commercial purposes. The present paper is concerned with the study of whether such a tritium surplus production can improve the plant economic balance, so that the COE is reduced, and to what extent. The result was that such a production allows a considerable reduction of COE and seems to be a good direction for development for the first generation of fusion power plants. To give an example, for a reference inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plant the rise of the plant net tritium breeding ratio (TBR n ) from 1 to 1.2 would allow, in the conservative estimate of a tritium market price (C T ) of 5 M$/kg, a COE reduction of about 20%. In the estimate of a TBR n rise from 1 to 1.3 and of a C T value of 10 M$/kg, COE reduction could be more than 50%! In conclusion, the present paper points out the influence of TBR increase on COE reduction. Such a conclusion, which holds true for every fusion plant, is much more valid for ICF plants in which it is possible to reach higher TBR values and to use tritium extraction systems easily. Thus, considering the relevant economic advantages, a commercial tritium surplus production should not be disregarded for first generation fusion power plant designs, in particular for ICF plant designs

  18. HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from an LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 129 I, 99 Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,α), (n,γ), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R=1.0 to 3.0) requirements

  19. Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

    2012-01-02

    Two scenarios are typically envisioned for thorium fuel cycles: 'open' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th and fission of {sup 233}U in situ without reprocessing or 'closed' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th followed by reprocessing, and recycling of {sup 233}U either in situ or in critical fission reactors. This study evaluates a third option based on the possibility of breeding fissile material in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor and burning the same fuel in a critical reactor without any reprocessing or reconditioning. This fuel cycle requires the hybrid and the critical reactor to use the same fuel form. TRISO particles embedded in carbon pebbles were selected as the preferred form of fuel and an inertial laser fusion system featuring a subcritical blanket was combined with critical pebble bed reactors, either gas-cooled or liquid-salt-cooled. The hybrid reactor was modeled based on the earlier, hybrid version of the LLNL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE1) system, whereas the critical reactors were modeled according to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) design. An extensive neutronic analysis was carried out for both the hybrid and the fission reactors in order to track the fuel composition at each stage of the fuel cycle and ultimately determine the plant support ratio, which has been defined as the ratio between the thermal power generated in fission reactors and the fusion power required to breed the fissile fuel burnt in these fission reactors. It was found that the maximum attainable plant support ratio for a thorium fuel cycle that employs neither enrichment nor reprocessing is about 2. This requires tuning the neutron energy towards high energy for breeding and towards thermal energy for burning. A high fuel loading in the pebbles allows a faster spectrum in the hybrid blanket; mixing dummy carbon pebbles with fuel pebbles enables a softer spectrum in

  20. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  1. Deep inelastic collisions at near-barrier energies and search for cold donor-fragment production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    Deep inelastic collisions in the near barrier energies of the mass asymmetric systems are of importance since controversial results on energy partition are being reported. Energy dissipation and the partition of dissipated energy among the reaction partners are of interest. Search for cold donor-fragment production at near barrier energies were carried out on a mass asymmetric system like Ni+Pb. (author). 13 refs., 8 figs

  2. Anomalous delayed loss of trapped D-D fusion products in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Mynick, H.E.

    1993-02-01

    A new anomalous delayed loss of D-D fusion products has been measured at the bottom of the TFRR vessel. This loss is delayed by ∼ 0.2 sec with respect to the usual prompt first-orbit loss, and has a correspondingly lower energy, i.e. about half the fusion product birth energy. This loss process dominates the total fusion product loss measured 90 degrees below the midplane for plasma currents. I≥ 1.8 MA and major radii near R=2.45 m, e.g. for recent TFTR supershots. This delayed feature can occur without large coherent MED activity, although it can be strongly modulated by such activity. Several possible causes for this phenomenon are discussed, but no clear explanation for this delayed loss has yet been found

  3. Performance requirements of an inertial-fusion-energy source for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1983-01-01

    Performance of an inertial fusion system for the production of hydrogen is compared to a tandem-mirror-system hydrogen producer. Both systems use the General Atomic sulfur-iodine hydrogen-production cycle and produce no net electric power to the grid. An ICF-driven hydrogen producer will have higher system gains and lower electrical-consumption ratios than the design point for the tandem-mirror system if the inertial-fusion-energy gain eta Q > 8.8. For the ICF system to have a higher hydrogen production rate per unit fusion power than the tandem-mirror system requires that eta Q > 17. These can be achieved utilizing realistic laser and pellet performances

  4. Loss of alpha-like MeV fusion products from TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Boivin, R.L.; Diesso, M.; Hayes, S.E.; Hendel, H.W.; Park, H.; Strachan, J.D.

    1990-03-01

    A detailed comparison between the observed and expected loss of alpha-like MeV fusion products in TFTR is presented. The D-D fusion products (mainly the 1 MeV triton) were measured with an 2-D imaging scintillation detector. The expected first-orbit loss was calculated with a simple Lorentz orbit code. In almost all cases the measured loss was consistent with the expected first-orbit loss model. Exceptions are noted for small major radius plasmas and during strong MHD activity. 37 refs., 28 figs

  5. Hydrogen production in early generation fusion power plant and its socio-economic implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, S.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: This paper describes technical possibility of high temperature blanket for the early generation of fusion power plant and its application to hydrogen production. Its anticipated implication and strategy from the socio-economic aspects will be also discussed. Material and energy balances, such as fuel supply and delivery of product energy from fusion plants, as well as waste discharge and accident scenario that lead to environmental impact, are characterized by blanket concepts. Thus blankets are considered to dominate the feature of fusion energy that should respond to the requirements of the sponsors, i.e., public and future market. Fusion blanket concept based on the combinations of LiPb and SiC materials are regarded as a candidate for ITER/TBM, and at the same time, applied in various DEMO designs encompassing high temperature output. Recent developments of SiC-LiPb blanket in Japan, EU, US or China suggests staged development paths starting from TBMs and targeting high temperature blanket and efficient energy output from early generation plants. These strategies are strongly affected by the views of these parties on fusion energy, from the aspects of socio-economics. Hydrogen production process with the high temperature blanket is one of the most important issues, because temperature range much higher than is possible with current or near future fission plants are needed, suggesting market possibility different from that of fission. Fuel cycles, particularly lithium supply and TBR control will be also important. Self-sustained fusion fuel cycle requires technical capability to maintain the lithium contents. Liquid blanket has an advantage in continuous and real-time control TBR in a plant, but large amount of lithium-6 and initial tritium supply remains as issues. As for the environmental effect, normal operation release, assumed accidental scenario, and rad-waste will be the key issue to dominate social acceptance of fusion. (author)

  6. Hydrogen production in early generation fusion power plant and its socio-economic implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yasushi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes technical possibility of high temperature blanket for the early generation of fusion power plant and its application to hydrogen production. Its anticipated implication and strategy from the socio-economic aspects will be also discussed. Material and energy balances, such as fuel supply and delivery of product energy from fusion plants, as well as waste discharge and accident scenario that lead to environmental impact, are characterized by blanket concepts. Thus blankets are considered to dominate the feature of fusion energy that should respond to the requirements of the sponsors, i.e., public and future market. Fusion blanket concept based on the combinations of LiPb and SiC materials are regarded as a candidate for ITER/TBM, and at the same time, applied in various DEMO designs encompassing high temperature output. Recent developments of SiC-LiPb blanket in Japan, EU, US or China suggests staged development paths starting from TBMs and targeting high temperature blanket and efficient energy output from early generation plants. These strategies are strongly affected by the views of these parties on fusion energy, from the aspects of socio-economics. Hydrogen production process with the high temperature blanket is one of the most important issues, because temperature range much higher than is possible with current or near future fission plants are needed, suggesting market possibility different from that of fission. Fuel cycles, particularly lithium supply and TBR control will be also important. Self-sustained fusion fuel cycle requires technical capability to maintain the lithium contents. Liquid blanket has an advantage in continuous and real-time control TBR in a plant, but large amount of lithium-6 and initial tritium supply remains as issues. As for the environmental effect, normal operation release, assumed accidental scenario, and rad-waste will be the key issue to dominate social acceptance of fusion. (author)

  7. Determination of procedures for transmutation of fission product wastes by fusion neutrons. Volume 2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, G.P.

    1980-12-01

    This study is concerned with the engineering aspects of the transmutation of fission products utilizing neutrons generated in fusion reactors. It is assumed that fusion reactors, although not yet developed, will be available around the turn of the century. Therefore, early studies of this type are appropriate as a guide to the large amount of further investigations that will be needed to fully evaluate this concept. Not all of the radioactive products from light water reactors can be economically transmuted, but it appears that the most hazardous can. This requires that fission-product wastes must first be separated into a number of fractions, and in some instances this must be accomplished with extremely high separation factors. A review of current commercial separation processes and of promising methods that are now in the laboratory stage indicate that the necessary processes can most likely be developed but will require an active and sustained development program. Current fusion reactor concepts were examined as to their suitability for transmuting the separated fission wastes. It was concluded that the long-lived fission products were most amenable to transmutation. The medium-lived fission products, Cs-137 and Sr-90, require higher neutron fluxes than are available in the most developed fusion reactor concepts. Concepts which are less developed may eventually be adaptable as transmuters of these fission products

  8. Cold alkaline extraction as a pretreatment for bioethanol production from eucalyptus, sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Danila Morais de; Sevastyanova, Olena; Queiroz, José Humberto de; Colodette, Jorge Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Mathematical approach to optimize the process of cold alkaline extraction. • Hemicelluloses and lignin removal from biomasses by cold alkaline extraction. • Higher xylan and lignin removal for straw during pretreatment. • Formation of pseudo-extractives for eucalyptus during pretreatment. • Higher ethanol production for pretreated sugarcane straw. - Abstract: Optimal conditions for the cold alkaline extraction (CAE) pretreatment of eucalyptus, sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw are proposed in view of their subsequent bioconversion into ethanol through the semi-simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSSF) process (with presaccharification followed by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation, or SSF). The optimum conditions, which are identified based on an experiment with a factorial central composite design, resulted in the removal of 46%, 52% and 61% of the xylan and 15%, 37% and 45% of the lignin for eucalyptus, bagasse and straw, respectively. The formation of pseudo-extractives was observed during the CAE of eucalyptus. Despite the similar glucose concentration and yield for all biomasses after 12 h of presaccharification, the highest yield (0.065 g_e_t_h_a_n_o_l/g_b_i_o_m_a_s_s), concentrations (5.74 g L"−"1) and volumetric productivity for ethanol (0.57 g L"−"1 h"−"1) were observed for the sugarcane straw. This finding was most likely related to the improved accessibility of cellulose that resulted from the removal of the largest amount of xylan and lignin.

  9. Evaluation of Losses Of Cold Energy of Cryogen Products in The Transport Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglanov, Dmitry; Sarmin, Dmitry; Tsapkova, Alexandra; Burdina, Yana

    2017-12-01

    At present, there are problems of energy saving in various areas of human life and in power complexes of industrial plants. One possible solution to the problem of increasing energy efficiency is the use of liquefied natural gas and its cold energy. Pipelines for fuel or gas supply in cryogen supply systems have different length depending on the mutual position of storage and cryogen consumption devices relatively to a start construction. Cryogen supply and transport systems include a lot of fittings of different assortment. Reservoirs can be installed on different elevation points. To reduce heat inleak and decrease cold energy of cryogen product different kinds of thermal insulation are used. Cryogen pipelines provide required operation conditions of storage and gasifying systems. The aim of the thermal calculation of cryogen transport and supply systems is to define the value of cryogen heat. In this paper it is shown values of cryogen temperature rise due to heat inleaks at cryogen’s transfer along transport systems for ethane, methane, oxygen and nitrogen were calculated. Heat inleaks also due to hydraulic losses were calculated. Specific losses of cold energy of cryogen product for laminar and turbulent flow were calculated. Correspondences of temperature rise, critical pipeline’s length and Reynolds number were defined for nitrogen, argon, methane and oxygen.

  10. K factor for Higgs boson production via gluon fusion process at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper soft gluon corrections for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders are calculated. It is found that the soft contributions for the Higgs boson production via gluon fusion process is large and it cannot be neglected even at SSC energy. Some qualitative discussions for the QCD corrections to the Higgs boson production at hadron colliders and their background processes are presented for various Higgs boson mass cases

  11. Impact of cough and common cold on productivity, absenteeism, and daily life in the United States: ACHOO Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Eccles, Ron; Blaiss, Michael S; Wingertzahn, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    Although the common cold is among the most frequent ailments encountered in clinical practice, little is known about its impact on productivity, absenteeism, and daily life. The United States Attitudes of Consumers Toward Health, Cough, and Cold (ACHOO) survey was developed to inform healthcare providers on patients' experience of cough/cold. This analysis focuses on the impact of cough/cold on daily activity, productivity, and absenteeism; other results are reported elsewhere. ACHOO was a 36-question online survey. US adult Internet/mobile device users (N = 3333) were recruited in October 2012. Response quotas modeled on 2010 US Census data ensured a demographically representative sample; 75% of completed surveys were randomized as the primary analysis pool. Demographics and impact of cough/cold were reported using means, frequencies, and percentages. Weighted least squares regression or weighted paired t-test were used to identify factors associated with greater impact. The analysis pool (N = 2505) included 1342 (53.6%) women and 1163 (46.4%) men (mean ages, 46.7 and 45.9 years). A majority (84.7%) had ≥1 cold in the past year. Fifty-two percent said cough/cold impacted daily life a fair amount to a lot. Productivity decreased by a mean 26.4%, and 44.5% of respondents reported work/school absenteeism (usually 1-2 days) during a cold. Overall, 93% of survey participants reported sleep difficulty (slight to extreme) during a cough/cold. Among all respondents, 57% reported cough or nasal congestion as the symptoms making sleep difficult. Higher frequency of colds, more cold symptoms, difficulty sleeping, and worse overall health status correlated with greater impact on productivity, absenteeism, and daily life. Study limitations include the potential for recall bias given the retrospective nature of the self-reports. Furthermore, no attempt was made to distinguish treatment effects, if any, from those of the underlying cough/cold. To our knowledge, this is

  12. The slender bubble model for very slow degassing in porous media and cold production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chraibi, M. [Total, Paris (France); Zaleski, S. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, London (United Kingdom)]|[Paris Univ., Paris (France); Franco, F. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, London (United Kingdom)]|[Total, Paris (France)

    2008-10-15

    Cold oil production leads to degassing of the light species and the formation of a bubbly phase. This is often referred to as the foamy oil effect and is particularly observed with heavy oils, combining high viscosity and asphaltenes. The presence and behaviour of a foamy-oil effect is critical to the cold production process. However, because a wide range of different petrophysical parameters and experimental factors interact in a complex manner, this process is not a well-understood production mechanism. This study focused on improving the understanding of the solution gas drive mechanism in primary heavy oil recovery. A Darcy-scale model was developed that took into account the basic physical phenomena of bubble nucleation, bubble growth by solute diffusion and expansion, and bubble mobilization. The relative permeability of the gas phase was replaced by an expression for the gas mobility with new physical effects related to capillarity, viscosity, gravity, and bubble geometry. The purpose was to fit the productions with a limited number of parameters, having physical meaning, independently from the depletion rate. The paper also presented several simplifications of the basic Darcy-scale equations, that enabled the production prediction in a much simpler manner than through full simulations. The full set of Darcy-scale equations were solved using a numerical solution. The formation of strong gradients of the gas phase saturation were shown to depend on gravity and viscosity. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of 95 Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire

  14. Metabolic and environmental aspects of fusion reactor activation products: niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterly, C.E.; Shank, K.E.

    1977-11-01

    A summary of the metabolic and environmental aspects of niobium is presented. The toxicological symptoms from exposure to niobium are given, along with lethal concentration values for acute and chronic exposures. Existing human data are presented; animal uptake and retention data are analyzed for various routes of administration. Recommended metabolic values are also presented along with comments concerning their use and appropriateness. The natural distribution of niobium is given for freshwater, seawater, and the biosphere. Concentration factors and retention of /sup 95/Nb in the environment are discussed with reference to: plant retention via leaf absorption; plant retention via root uptake; uptake in terrestrial animals from plants; uptake in freshwater organisms; uptake in marine organisms; and movement in soil. Conclusions are drawn regarding needs for future work in these areas. This review was undertaken because niobium is expected to be a key metal in the development of commercial fusion reactors. It is recognized that niobium will likely not be used in the first generation reactors as a structural material but will appear as an alloy in such materials as superconducting wire.

  15. Economic requirements for competitive laser fusion power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    An economic model of a laser fusion commercial power plant is used to identify the design and operating regimes of the driver, target and reaction chamber that will result in economic competitiveness with future fission and coal plants. The authors find that, for a plant with a net power of 1 GW/sub e/, the cost of the driver must be less than $0.4 to 0.6 B, and the recirculating power fraction must be less than 25%. Target gain improvements at low driver energy are the most beneficial but also the most difficult to achieve. The optimal driver energy decreases with increasing target technology. The sensitivity of the cost of electricity to variations in cost and performance parameters decreases with increasing target technology. If chamber pulse rates of a few Hz can be achieved, then gains of 80-100 are sufficient, and higher pulse rates do not help much. Economic competitiveness becomes more difficult with decreasing plant size. Finally, decreasing the cost of the balance of plant has the greatest beneficial effect on economic competitiveness

  16. NNLO QCD corrections for the differential Higgs boson production cross-section in gluon fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasiou, Charalampos

    2006-01-01

    I describe a recent computation of the NNLO QCD corrections for the fully differential cross-section for Higgs boson production in the gluon fusion channel. This result is an application of a new method for calculating perturbative corrections beyond the next-to-leading order

  17. Nuclear elastic scattering effects on fusion product transport in the FRM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, J.C.; Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    Large energy transfer (LET) events such as nuclear elastic scatterng (NES) are shown to have significant effects on fusion product transport in the field-reversed mirror. The method used and preliminary results obtained from the study on NES effects on f/sub p/ orbits are described

  18. Parton-shower matching systematics in vector-boson-fusion WW production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Michael [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe (Germany); Plaetzer, Simon [Durham University, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-15

    We perform a detailed analysis of next-to-leading order plus parton-shower matching in vector-boson-fusion WW production including leptonic decays. The study is performed in the Herwig 7 framework interfaced to VBFNLO 3, using the angular-ordered and dipole-based parton-shower algorithms combined with the subtractive and multiplicative-matching algorithms. (orig.)

  19. Electrostatic levitation, control and transport in high rate, low cost production of inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Johnson, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion requires production of power plant grade targets at high rates and process yield. A review of present project specifications and techniques to produce targets is discussed with special emphasis on automating the processes and combining them with an electrostatic transport and suspension system through the power plant target factory

  20. The impact of PDF and alphas uncertainties on Higgs Production in gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demartin, Federico; Forte, Stefano; Mariani, Elisa; Rojo, Juan; Vicini, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of uncertainties due to parton distributions and the strong coupling on the gluon-fusion production cross section of the Standard Model Higgs at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. We compare procedures and results when three recent sets of PDFs are used, CTEQ6.6, MSTW08

  1. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F.B.; Hone, M.A.; Jarvis, O.N.; Loughlin, M.J.; Sadler, G. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S.; Watkins, N. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom); Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of a sawtooth crash on the radial distribution of the slowing down fusion product tritons and on beam ions. The JET neutron emission profile monitor was used to measure the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line-integrals before and after sawtooth crashes in the Joint European Torus (JET). In deuterium discharges, the 14 MeV neutron production was wholly attributable to burnup of the 1 MeV fusion product tritons from d-d fusion. It has been known for many years that the global emission of 14 MeV neutrons is not affected by sawtooth crashes. Examination of the data obtained with the profile monitor shows that the local emissivity of 14 MeV neutrons, and hence of the profile of thermalizing tritons, is only weakly affected by crashes in the discharges studied. This is in contradiction with the apparent behaviour of injected beam ions as deduced from a study of the considerable changes in local emissivity of the 2.5 MeV neutrons. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the fusion product tritons is consistent with the scaling of the beam injected deuterium. (author) 1 ref., 6 figs.

  2. The perspectives of fusion energy: The roadmap towards energy production and fusion energy in a distributed energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2014-01-01

    at very high temperature where all matter is in the plasma state as the involved energies are orders of magnitude higher than typical chemical binding energies. It is one of the great science and engineering challenges to construct a viable power plant based on fusion energy. Fusion research is a world...... The presentation will discuss the present status of the fusion energy research and review the EU Roadmap towards a fusion power plant. Further the cost of fusion energy is assessed as well as how it can be integrated in the distributed energy system......Controlled thermonuclear fusion has the potential of providing an environmentally friendly and inexhaustible energy source for mankind. Fusion energy, which powers our sun and the stars, is released when light elements, such as the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, fuse together. This occurs...

  3. Cold neutron production in liquid para- and normal-H sub 2 moderators

    CERN Document Server

    Morishima, N

    2002-01-01

    A neutron transport analysis is performed for liquid H sub 2 moderators with 100% para and normal (ortho:para=0.75:0.25) fractions. Four sets of energy-averaged cross-sections (group constants) for liquid ortho- and para-H sub 2 at melting and boiling points are generated and neutron energy range between 0.1 mu eV and 10 eV is broken into 80 groups. Basic moderating characteristics are studied of a model cold-neutron source in a one-dimensional bare-slab geometry. It is shown that liquid para-H sub 2 is superior in cold neutron production to liquid normal H sub 2 on account of a para-to-ortho transition (molecular rotational excitation) and a good transmission property with a mean free path of about 10 cm. In the case of neutron extraction from the inside of the source, high intensity of cold neutrons is possible with liquid normal H sub 2 at higher temperatures up to the boiling point.

  4. Fusion power production from TFTR plasmas fueled with deuterium and tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.

    1994-03-01

    Peak fusion power production of 6.2 ± 0.4 MW has been achieved in TFTR plasmas heated by deuterium and tritium neutral beams at a total power of 29.5 MW. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha particle density of 1.2 x 10 17 m -3 without the appearance of either disruptive MHD events or detectable changes in Alfven wave activity. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles agreed with the approximately 5% losses expected from alpha particles which are born on unconfined orbits

  5. The effective cost of tritium for tokamak fusion power reactors with reduced tritium production systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilligan, J.G.; Evans, K.

    1983-01-01

    If sufficient tritium cannot be produced and processed in tokamak blankets then at least two alternatives are possible. Tritium can be purchased; or reactors with reduced tritium (RT) content in the plasma can be designed. The latter choice may require development of magnet technology etc., but the authors show that the impact on the cost-of-electricity may be mild. Cost tradeoffs are compared to the market value of tritium. Adequate tritium production in fusion blankets is preferred, but the authors show there is some flexibility in the deployment of fusion if this is not possible

  6. Enhanced loss of fusion products during mode conversion heating in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Majeski, R.; Fisch, N.J.; Heeter, R.F.; Herrmann, H.W.; Herrmann, M.C.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-07-01

    Ion Bernstein waves (IBWS) have been generated by mode conversion of ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) fast waves in TFTR. The loss rate of fusion products in these discharges can be large, up to 10 times the first orbit loss rate. The losses are observed at the passing/trapped boundary, indicating that passing particles are being moved onto loss orbits either by increase of their v perpendicular due to the wave, by outward transport in minor radius, or both. The lost particles appear to be DD fusion produced tritons heated to ∼1.5 times their birth energy

  7. Nuclear data for the production of radioisotopes in fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, E.T.; Schenter, R.E.; Mann, F.M.; Ikeda, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The fusion materials irradiation facility (FMIF) is a neutron source generator that will produce a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron field for testing candidate fusion materials under reactor irradiation conditions. The construction of such a facility is one of the very important development stages toward realization of fusion energy as a practical energy source for electricity production. As a result of the high-intensity neutron field, 10 MW/m 2 or more equivalent neutron wall loading, and the relatively high-energy (10- to 20-MeV) neutrons, the FMIF, as future fusion reactors, also bears the potential capability of producing a significant quantity of radioisotopes. A study is being conducted to identify the potential capability of the FMIF to produce radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications. Two types of radioisotopes are involved: one is already available; the second might not be readily available using conventional production methods. For those radioisotopes that are not readily available, the FMIF could develop significant benefits for future generations as a result of the availability of such radioisotopes for medical or industrial applications. The current production of radioisotopes could help finance the operation of the FMIF for irradiating the candidate fusion materials; thus this concept is attractive. In any case, nuclear data are needed for calculating the neutron flux and spectrum in the FMIF and the potential production rates of these isotopes. In this paper, the authors report the result of a preliminary investigation on the production of 99 Mo, the parent radioisotope for 99m Tc

  8. The Analysis of Product Traits and Innovation Process of Multi Level Marketing Business at Talk Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Suwarno, Sutrisno

    2013-01-01

    Multi Level Marketing Business nowadays is rapidly growing. In recent years, there have been so many new Multi Level Marketing Business coming out with their own specific offers and products. One of the advantages of MLM Business is the contribution it makes to economic growth. It makes it possible for the national income to continuously grow. The objectives can be achieved from this research are to examine product traits and innovation process of Talk Fusion. Theories supporting research are...

  9. Thermonuclear fusion: from fundamental research to energy production? Science and technology report No. 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, Guy; Blanzat, Bernard; Aspect, Alain; Aymar, Robert; Bielak, Bogdan; Decroisette, Michel; Martin, Georges; Andre, Michel; Schirmann, Daniel; Garbet, Xavier; Jacquinot, Jean; Laviron, Clement; Migus, Arnold; Moreau, Rene; Pironneau, Olivier; Quere, Yves; Vallee, Alain; Dercourt, Jean; Bayer, Charles; Juraszek, Denis; Deutsch, Claude; Le Garrec, Bruno; Hennequin, Pascale; Peysson, Yves; Rax, Jean-Marcel; Pesme, Denis; Bauche, Jacques; Monier-Garbet, Pascale; Stamm, Roland; Zerah, Gilles; Ghendrih, Philippe; Layet, Roland; Grosman, Andre; Alamo, Ana; Giancarli, Luciano; Poitevin, Yves; Rigal, Emmanuel; Chieze, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    This work has been commissioned by the French ministry of Education, Sciences and Research, its aim is to provide a reliable account of the state of development of thermonuclear fusion. This report makes a point on the scientific knowledge accumulated on the topic and highlights the research programs that are necessary to overcome the technological difficulties and draws the necessary steps before an industrial application to electricity production. This report is divided into 10 chapters: 1) tokamak technology and ITER, 2) inertial fusion, 3) magnetized hot plasmas, 4) laser-plasma interaction and peta-watt lasers, 5) atomic physics and fusion, 6) computer simulation, 7) plasma-wall interaction, 8) materials for fusion reactors, 9) safety analysis, and 10) inertial fusion and astrophysics. This report has been written by a large panel of experts gathered by the French Academy of Sciences. The comments on the issue by the 3 French organizations: Cea, Cnrs and SFP (French Society of Physics) follow the last chapter

  10. Aspects of ultra-cold neutron production in radiation fields at the FRM II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wlokka, Stephan Albrecht

    2016-08-17

    Neutrons are called ''ultra-cold'', if they are reflected by a material surface under all angles of incident. They can then be stored for long times (ca. 1000s). In the new UCN source at the FRM II, Deuterium will be used to produce the UCN. Its behaviour under irradiation was investigated. Additionally the transport properties of new UCN guides were tested. Also, the helium-3 content of purified helium samples was examined, because using this type of helium greatly reduces the tritium production when used at the reactor.

  11. Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/psi Production: Intrinsic and Extrinsic Transverse Momentum Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro, E.G.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Lansberg, J.P.; /Heidelberg U.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2010-08-26

    Cold nuclear matter effects on J/{psi} production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions are evaluated taking into account the specific J/{psi}-production kinematics at the partonic level, the shadowing of the initial parton distributions and the absorption in the nuclear matter. We consider two different parton processes for the c{bar c}-pair production: one with collinear gluons and a recoiling gluon in the final state and the other with initial gluons carrying intrinsic transverse momentum. Our results are compared to RHIC observables. The smaller values of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} in the forward rapidity region (with respect to the mid rapidity region) are partially explained, therefore potentially reducing the need for recombination effects.

  12. The Impact of a Mechanical Press on the Accuracy of Products and the Reliability of Tools in Cold Forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krusic, V.; Arentoft, Mogens; Rodic, T.

    2005-01-01

    Cold extrusion is an economic production process for the production of elements of complex forms and accurate dimensions. The first part of the article is about the impact that mechanical press has on the accuracy of products and reliability of tools. There is a description of the mechanical pres...

  13. 75 FR 36119 - In the Matter of Certain Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamp (“CCFL”) Inverter Circuits and Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... Cathode Fluorescent Lamp (``CCFL'') Inverter Circuits and Products Containing the Same; Notice of... States after importation of certain cold cathode fluorescent lamp inverter circuits and products..., and the sale within the United States after importation of CCFL inverter circuits and products...

  14. Conceptual design of tritium production fusion reactor based on spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui; Huang Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual design of an advanced tritium production fusion reactor based on spherical torus, which is intermediate application of fusion energy, was presented in this paper. Differing from the traditional tokamak tritium production reactor design, advanced plasma physics performance and compact structural characteristics of ST were used to minimize tritium leakage and maximize tritium breeding ratio with arrangement of tritium production blankets within vacuum vessel as possible in order to produce 1 kg excess tritium except need of self-sufficient plasma core with 40% or more corresponding plant availability. Based on 2D neutronics calculation, preliminary conceptual design of ST-TPR was presented, providing the backgrounds and reference for next detailed conceptual design

  15. Enhanced production of nitric oxide in A549 cells through activation of TRPA1 ion channel by cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenwu; Wang, Zhonghua; Cao, Jianping; Wang, Xu; Han, Yaling; Ma, Zhuang

    2014-08-31

    The respiratory epithelium is exposed to the external environment, and inhalation of cold air is common during the season of winter. In addition, the lung is a major source of nitric oxide (NO). However, the effect of cold stress on the production of NO is still unclear. In the present work, We measured the change of NO in single cell with DACF-DA and the change in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in A549 cell. We observed that cold stress (from 20 °C to 5 °C) induced an increase of NO in A549 cell, which was completely abolished by applying an extracellular Ca(2+) free medium. Further experiments showed that cold-sensing transient receptor potential subfamily member 1 (TRPA1) channel agonist (allyl isothiocyanate, AITC) increased the production of NO and the level of [Ca(2+)]c in A549 cell. Additionally, TRPA1 inhibitor, Ruthenium red (RR) and camphor, significantly blocked the enhanced production of NO and the rise of [Ca(2+)]c induced by AITC or cold stimulation, respectively. Taken together, these data indicated that cold-induced TRPA1 activation was responsible for the enhanced production of NO in A549 cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Power plant production of inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Johnson, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Many of the current techniques for fabricating experimental targets appear to be directly extendable to the high-rate, low-cost production of reactor targets. This report describes several new techniques that, in conjunction with the expansion of existing techniques, can constitute a target factory. We have evaluated this concept on the basis of a generalized reactor target design and the projected specifications of reactor-grade targets

  17. Potential low-level waste disposal limits for activation products from fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1983-09-01

    Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) scientists are involved in studies considering alternative construction materials for the first wall of commercial fusion reactors. To permit a comparison of radioactivity levels, both the level of activation and an acceptable limit for the radionuclides present must be known. Generic material composition guidelines can be developed using the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations governing the near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. These regulations consider wastes defined as containing source, special nuclear, or by-product materials arising from research, industrial, medical, and nuclear fuel-cycle activities. However, not all of the activation products produced in low-level wastes from fusion reactors are considered by the NRC in their regulations. The purpose of this report is to present potential low-level waste-disposal limits for ten radionuclides resulting from fusion reactor operations that are not considered in the NRC low-level waste regulations. These potential limits will be used by HEDL scientists to complete their generic material composition guidelines for the first wall of commercial fusion reactors

  18. Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department`s first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department`s legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle.

  19. Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department's first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department's legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle

  20. Gluon fusion Higgs production in the CP violating MSSM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Shruti; Liebler, Stefan; Weiglein, Georg [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The MSSM with complex parameters has emerged as an attractive SUSY candidate providing new sources of CP-violation, which are well motivated in the context of the observed imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe. In order to study the effects of the complex parameters, which enter via loop contributions, an accurate prediction for the Higgs production cross-section is required. In this talk, we present a study of these effects carried out with an implementation in the program SusHi linked to FeynHiggs.

  1. Factors associated with Listeria monocytogenes contamination of cold-smoked pork products produced in Latvia and Lithuania.

    OpenAIRE

    Berzins,-A; Horman,-A; Lunden,-J; Korkeala,-H

    2007-01-01

    A total of 312 samples of sliced, vacuum packaged, cold-smoked pork from 15 meat processing plants in Latvia and Lithuania, obtained over a 15-month period from 2003 until 2004, were analyzed for the presence of Listeria monocytogenes at the end of their shelf-life. Overall, 120 samples (38%) tested positive for L. monocytogenes. Despite the long storing period, the levels of L. monocytogenes in cold-smoked pork products were low. Manufacturing processes were studied at seven meat processing ...

  2. Resummation improved rapidity spectrum for gluon fusion Higgs production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Markus A.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Michel, Johannes K.L.; Muenster Univ.

    2017-02-01

    Gluon-induced processes such as Higgs production typically exhibit large perturbative corrections. These partially arise from large virtual corrections to the gluon form factor, which at timelike momentum transfer contains Sudakov logarithms evaluated at negative arguments ln 2 (-1)=-π 2 . It has been observed that resumming these terms in the timelike form factor leads to a much improved perturbative convergence for the total cross section. We discuss how to consistently incorporate the resummed form factor into the perturbative predictions for generic cross sections differential in the Born kinematics, including in particular the Higgs rapidity spectrum. We verify that this indeed improves the perturbative convergence, leading to smaller and more reliable perturbative uncertainties, and that this is not affected by cancellations between resummed and unresummed contributions. Combining both fixed-order and resummation uncertainties, the perturbative uncertainty for the total cross section at N 3 LO+N 3 LL φ ' is about a factor of two smaller than at N 3 LO. The perturbative uncertainty of the rapidity spectrum at NNLO+NNLL φ ' is similarly reduced compared to NNLO. We also study the analogous resummation for quark-induced processes, namely Higgs production through bottom quark annihilation and the Drell-Yan rapidity spectrum. For the former the resummation leads to a small improvement, while for the latter it confirms the already small uncertainties of the fixed-order predictions.

  3. Ion cyclotron emission due to collective instability of fusion products and beam ions in TFTR and JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendy, R.O.; McClements, K.G.; Lashmore Davies, C.N.; Cottrell, G.A.; Majeski, R.; Cauffman, S.

    1995-01-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been observed from neutral beam heated TFTR and JET tritium experiments at sequential cyclotron harmonics of both fusion products and beam ions. The emission originates from the outer midplane plasma, where fusion products and beam ions are likely to have a drifting ring-type velocity-space distribution that is anisotropic and sharply peaked. Fusion product driven ICE can be attributed to the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, which involves the excitation of obliquely propagating waves on the fast Alfven/ion Bernstein branch at cyclotron harmonics of the fusion products. Differences between ICE observations in JET and TFTR appear to reflect the sensitivity of the instability growth rate to the ratio υ birth /c A , where υ birth is the fusion product birth speed and c A is the local Alfven speed: for fusion products in the outer midplane edge of TFTR supershots, υ birth A ; for alpha particles in the outer midplane edge of JET, the opposite inequality applies. If sub-Alfvenic fusion products are isotropic or have undergone even a moderate degree of thermalization, the magnetoacoustic instability cannot occur. In contrast, the super-Alfvenic alpha particles that are present in the outer midplane of JET can drive the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability even if they are isotropic or have a relatively broad distribution of speeds. These conclusions may account for the observation that fusion product driven ICE in JET persists for longer than fusion product driven ICE in TFTR. A separate mechanism is proposed for the excitation of beam driven ICE in TFTR: electrostatic ion cyclotron harmonic waves, supported by strongly sub-Alfvenic beam ions, can be destabilized by a low concentration of such ions with a very anrrow spread of velocities in the parallel direction. 25 refs, 14 figs

  4. Ion cyclotron emission due to collective instability of fusion products and beam ions in TFTR and JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendy, R.O.; Clements, K.G.; Lashmore-Davies, C.N.; Cottrell, G.A.; Majeski, R.; Cauffman, S.

    1995-06-01

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) has been observed from neutral beam-heated TFTR and JET tritium experiments at sequential cyclotron harmonics of both fusion products and beam ions. The emission originates from the outer mid-plane plasma, where fusion products and beam ions are likely to have a drifting ring-type velocity-space distribution which is anisotropic and sharply peaked. Fusion product-driven ICE in both TFTR and JET can be attributed to the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability, which involves the excitation of obliquely propagating waves on the fast Alfven/ion Bernstein branch at cyclotron harmonics of the fusion products. Differences between ICE observations in JET and TFTR appear to reflect the sensitivity of the instability growth rate to the ratio υ birth /c A , where υ birth is the fusion product birth speed and c A is the local Alfven speed:for fusion products in the outer midplane edge of TFTR, υ birth A ; for alpha-particles in the outer midplane edge of JET, the opposite inequality applies. If sub-Alfvenic fusion products are isotropic or have undergone even a moderate degree of thermalization, the magnetoacoustic instability cannot occur. In contrast, the super-Alfvenic alpha-particles which are present in the outer mid-plane of JET can drive the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability even if they are isotropic or have a relatively broad distribution of speeds. These conclusions may account for the observation that fusion product-driven ICE in JET persists for longer than fusion product-driven ICE in TFTR. (Author)

  5. Near threshold two meson production in hardonic fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, R.

    1991-01-01

    An approved and funded exclusive COSY experiment is presented, which focuses on near threshold two meson production via the reactions p+d→ 3 He + π + π - and p+d→ 3 He+K + K-. It takes advantage of the high quality of the cooled external COSY beam and the existing spectrometer BIG KARL. The setup consists of a vertex wall and a scintillator cylinder and endcap covering a 4π solid angle. The large efficiency and high resolution of this detection method will yield precision data on the low energy (T 0 (975). Existing inclusive data as well as first results of a very recent 'semi-exclusive' experiment performed at SATURNE will be also be presented

  6. Discourse, Power, and Knowledge in the Management of "Big Science": The Production of Consensus in a Nuclear Fusion Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Extends a Foucauldian view of power/knowledge to the archetypical knowledge-intensive organization, the scientific research laboratory. Describes the discursive production of power/knowledge at the "big science" laboratory conducting nuclear fusion research and illuminates a critical incident in which the fusion research…

  7. Catalyzed deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium fusion blankets for high temperature process heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.M.H.; Salimi, B.

    1982-01-01

    Tritiumless blanket designs, associated with a catalyzed deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion cycle and using a single high temperature solid pebble or falling bed zone, for process heat production, are proposed. Neutronics and photonics calculations, using the Monte Carlo method, show that an about 90% heat deposition fraction is possible in the high temperature zone, compared to a 30 to 40% fraction if a deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion cycle is used with separate breeding and heat deposition zones. Such a design is intended primarily for synthetic fuels manufacture through hydrogen production using high temperature water electrolysis. A system analysis involving plant energy balances and accounting for the different fusion energy partitions into neutrons and charged particles showed that plasma amplification factors in the range of 2 are needed. In terms of maximization of process heat and electricity production, and the maximization of the ratio of high temperature process heat to electricity, the catalyzed D-D system outperforms the D-T one by about 20%. The concept is thought competitive to the lithium boiler concept for such applications, with the added potential advantages of lower tritium inventories in the plasma, reduced lithium pumping (in the case of magnetic confinement) and safety problems, less radiation damage at the first wall, and minimized risks of radioactive product contamination by tritium

  8. Biological effects of activation products and other chemicals released from fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.A.; Poston, T.M.

    1976-09-01

    Literature reviews indicate that existing information is incomplete, often contradictory, and of questionable value for the prediction and assessment of ultimate impact from fusion-associated activation products and other chemical releases. It is still uncertain which structural materials will be used in the blanket and first wall of fusion power plants. However, niobium, vanadium, vanadium-chromium alloy, vanadium-titanium alloy, sintered aluminum product, and stainless steel have been suggested. The activation products of principal concern will be the longer-lived isotopes of 26 Al, 49 V, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 55 Fe, 58 Co, 60 Co, 93 Nb, and 94 Nb. Lithium released to the environment either during the mining cycle, from power plant operation or accident, may be in the form of a number of compound types varying in solubility and affinity for biological organisms. The effects of a severe liquid metal fire or explosion involving Na or K will vary according to inherent abiotic and biotic features of the affected site. Saline, saline-alkaline, and sodic soils of arid lands would be particularly susceptible to alkaline stress. Beryllium released to the environment during the mining cycle or reactor accident situation could be in the form of a number of compound types. Adverse effects to aquatic species from routine chemical releases (biocides, corrosion inhibitors, dissolution products) may occur in the discharge of both fission and fusion power plant designs

  9. Secondary production of benthic insects in three cold-desert streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaines, W.L.

    1987-07-01

    Aquatic insect production was studied in three cold-desert streams in eastern Washington (Douglas Creek, Snively Springs, and Rattlesnake Springs). The size-frequency method was applied to individual taxa to estimate total insect production. production was also assessed for functional groups and trophic levels in each stream. Optioservus sp. (riffle beetles) and Baetis sp. (mayflies) accounted for 72% of the total insect numbers and 50% of the total biomass in Douglas Creek. Baetis sp. accounted for 42% of the total insect numbers and 25% of the total biomass in Snively Springs. Simulium sp. (blackflies) and Baetis sp. comprised 74% of the total insect numbers and 55% of the total biomass in Rattlesnake Springs. Grazer-scrapers (49%) and collectors (48%) were the most abundant functional groups in Douglas Creek. Collectors were the most abundant functional group in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Herbivores and detritivores were the most abundant trophic level in Snively Springs and Rattlesnake Springs. Dipterans (midges and blackflies) were the most productive taxa within the study streams, accounting for 40% to 70% of the total community production. Production by collectors and detritivores was the highest of all functional groups and trophic levels in all study streams.

  10. Recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen production in Aspergillus niger: evaluating the strategy of gene fusion to native glucoamylase

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    James, ER

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbiology and Biotechnology October 2012/ Vol. 96, No.2 Recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen production in Aspergillus niger: evaluating the strategy of gene fusion to native glucoamylase ER James a,c & WH van Zyl b & PJ van Zyl c & JF Görgens..., Pretoria 0001, South Africa Abstract This study demonstrates the potential of Aspergillus niger as a candidate expression system for virus- like particle production using gene fusion. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) production, targeted...

  11. Recent progress on MHD-induced loss of D-D fusion products in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Budny, R.V.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Herrmann, H.; Mynick, H.E.; Schivell, J.

    1993-08-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress made toward understanding the MHD-induced loss of D-D fusion products which has been seen on TFTR since 1988. These measurements have been made using the ''lost alpha'' diagnostic, which is described briefly. The largest MHD- induced loss occurs with coherent 3/2 or 2/1 MHD activity (kink/tearing modes), which can cause up to ∼3--5 times the first-orbit loss at I∼1.6--1.8 MA, roughly a ∼20--30% global los of D-D fusion products. Modeling of these MHD-induced losses has progressed to the point where the basic loss mechanism can be accounted for qualitatively, but the experimental results can not yet be understood quantitatively. Several alpha loss codes are being developed to improve the quantitative comparison between experiment and theory

  12. Efficient hydrogen production using heat in neutron shield of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Kunihiko; Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Hiwatari, Ryouji; Yoshida, Tomoaki

    2001-01-01

    In future perspective of energy supply, a hydrogen energy cycle is expected to play an important role as a CO 2 free fuel for mobile or co-generation systems. Fusion power plants should offer advantages, compatibilities and/or synergistic effects with or in such future energy systems. In this paper, a comprehensive power station, in which a fusion plant is integrated with a hydrogen production plant, is proposed. A tenuous heat source in the outboard shield, which is unsuitable to produce high-pressure and high-temperature steam for efficient electric power generation, is used for the hydrogen production. This integrated system provides some synergistic effects and it would be advantageous over any independent use of each plant. (author)

  13. HYPERFUSE: a novel inertial confinement system utilizing hypervelocity projectiles for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from an LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., 137 Cs or 90 Sr. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n, 2n), (n, α), etc.) that convert the long lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product

  14. Hyper fuse: a novel inertial confinement system utilizing hypervelocity projectiles for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

    1979-01-01

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from an LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with a target in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., 137 Cs or 90 Sr. The 14 MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions [e.g., (n, 2n), (n, α), etc.] that convert the long lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product

  15. Safety aspects of activation products in a compact Tokamak Fusion Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willenberg, H.J.; Bickford, W.E.

    1978-10-01

    Neutron activation of materials in a compact tokamak fusion reactor has been investigated. Results of activation product inventory, dose rate, and decay heat calculations in the blanket and injectors are presented for a reactor design with stainless steel structures. Routine transport of activated materials into the plasma and vacuum systems is discussed. Accidental release of radioactive materials as a result of liquid lithium spills is also considered

  16. 78 FR 16709 - Certain Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamp (“CCFL”) Inverter Circuits and Products Containing Same...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-666 (Modification Proceeding)] Certain Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamp (``CCFL'') Inverter Circuits and Products Containing Same; Commission's... inverter circuits and products containing the same by reason of infringement of various U.S. patents. The...

  17. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T perpendicular ≠ T parallel and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single ''dressed'' test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between ''kinetic or causal instabilities'' and ''hydrodynamic instabilities'' are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k parallel = 0 for k parallel ≠ 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an ''inverted'' population of states

  18. Energy engineering. Standardization in the domain of coldness production; Genie energetique. Normalisation dans le domaine du froid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legent, N. [Association Francaise de Normalisation (AFNOR), 92 - Paris-la-Defense (France)

    2000-10-01

    This paper deals with the recent advances in the domain of standardization and regulation of refrigeration and cold production systems used in the industry and in the commercial sector: 1 - international standardization; 2 - European standardization; 3 - international standardization in the domain of cold production (ISO/TC 86 'coldness and air conditioning', CEI 61C 'domestic refrigerating appliances', CEI 61D 'air-conditioning appliances for domestic and similar use', ISO/TC 104 'goods transportation containers'); 4 - European standardization in the domain of cold production (CEN/TC 182 'refrigerating systems - safety and environment requirements', CEN/TC 44 'household refrigerating appliances and refrigerating furniture for stores', CEN/TC 113 'heat pumps and air-conditioners', CEN/TC 141 'manometers and thermometers, measuring and recording means', CENELEC 61 'safety of domestic electrical appliances'); 5 - French standardization (international file, European file, French file, French standardization system); 6 - national standardization in other countries; 7 - regulations in the domain of cold production. (J.S.)

  19. Design of Green Cold Chain Networks for Imported Fresh Agri-Products in Belt and Road Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Fang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of Belt and Road has seen a boom of imported fresh agri-products in China. This stimulates the growth of refrigerated transport, which accounts for much more carbon emissions than traditional transport. Designing a sustainable cold chain network is of vital importance from both financial and environmental perspectives. In this research, a multi-objective linear programming model is proposed for green cold chain design for multiple imported fresh agri-products in China to balance between the two competing goals—the total cost and carbon emissions. The effect of the outdoor air temperature on the carbon emissions of transportation and maintaining distribution centers is considered. By applying the ε-constraint method, the multi-objective model is solved. Numerical examples derived from the scenario of imported fresh-agri products in China are conducted to shed light on green cold chain design under Belt and Road development.

  20. Novel, spherically-convergent ion systems for neutron source and fusion energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.; Nebel, R.A.; Ribe, F.L.; Schauer, M.M.; Schranck, L.S.; Umstadter, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Combining spherical convergence with electrostatic or electro-magnetostatic confinement of a nonneutral plasma offers the possibility of high fusion gain in a centimeter-sized system. The physics principles, scaling laws, and experimental embodiments of this approach are presented. Steps to development of this approach from its present proof-of-principle experiments to a useful fusion power reactor are outlined. This development path is much less expensive and simpler, compared to that for conventional magnetic confinement and leads to different and useful products at each stage. Reactor projections show both high mass power density and low to moderate wall loading. This approach is being tested experimentally in PFX-I (Penning Fusion eXperiment-Ions), which is based on the following recent advances: 1) Demonstration, in PFX (our former experiment), that it is possible to combine nonneutral electron plasma confinement with nonthermal, spherical focussing; 2) Theoretical development of the POPS (Periodically Oscillating Plasma Sphere) concept, which allows spherical compression of thermal-equilibrium ions; 3) The concept of a massively-modular approach to fusion power, and associated elimination of the critical problem of extremely high first wall loading. PFX-I is described. PFX-I is being designed as a small (<1.5 cm) spherical system into which moderate-energy electrons (up to 100 kV) are injected. These electrons are magnetically insulated from passing to the sphere and their space charge field is then used to spherically focus ions. Results of initial operation with electrons only are presented. Deuterium operation can produce significant neutron output with unprecedented efficiency (fusion gain Q). copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  1. Performance of introducing outdoor cold air for cooling a plant production system with artificial light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The commercial use of a plant production system with artificial light (PPAL is limited by its high initial construction and operation costs. The electric-energy consumed by heat pumps, applied mainly for cooling, accounts for 15-35% of the total electric-energy used in a PPAL. To reduce the electric-energy consumption, an air exchanger with low capacity (180 W was used for cooling by introducing outdoor cold air. In this experiment, the indoor air temperature in two PPALs (floor area: 6.2 m2 each was maintained at 25ºC and 20ºC during light and dark periods, respectively, for lettuce production. In one PPAL (PPALe, an air exchanger (air flow rate: 250 m3 h-1 was used along with a heat pump (cooling capacity: 3.2 kW to maintain the indoor air temperature at the set-point. The other PPAL (PPALc with only a heat pump (cooling capacity: 3.2 kW was used for reference. Effects of introducing outdoor cold air on energy use efficiency, coefficient of performance (COP, electric-energy consumption for cooling and growth of lettuce were investigated. The results show that: when the air temperature difference between indoor and outdoor ranged from 20.2°C to 30.0°C: 1 the average energy use efficiency of the air exchanger was 2.8 and 3.4 times greater than the COP of the heat pumps in the PPALe and PPALc, respectively; 2 hourly electric-energy consumption in the PPALe reduced by 15.8-73.7% compared with that in the PPALc; 3 daily supply of CO2 in the PPALe reduced from 0.15 kg to 0.04 kg compared with that in the PPALc; 4 no significant difference in lettuce growth was observed in both PPALs. The results indicate that using air exchanger to introduce outdoor cold air should be considered as an effective way to reduce electric-energy consumption for cooling with little effects on plant growth in a PPAL.

  2. Characterization of methane emissions from five cold heavy oil production with sands (CHOPS) facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Joseph R; Herndon, Scott C; Yacovitch, Tara I; Knighton, W Berk; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Johnson, Matthew R; Tyner, David R

    2018-03-07

    Cold heavy oil production with sands (CHOPS) is a common oil extraction method in the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan that can result in significant methane emissions due to annular venting. Little is known about the magnitude of these emissions, nor their contributions to the regional methane budget. Here the authors present the results of field measurements of methane emissions from CHOPS wells and compare them with self-reported venting rates. The tracer ratio method was used not only to analyze total site emissions but at one site it was also used to locate primary emission sources and quantify their contributions to the facility-wide emission rate, revealing the annular vent to be a dominant source. Emissions measured from five different CHOPS sites in Alberta showed large discrepancies between the measured and reported rates, with emissions being mainly underreported. These methane emission rates are placed in the context of current reporting procedures and the role that gas-oil ratio (GOR) measurements play in vented volume estimates. In addition to methane, emissions of higher hydrocarbons were also measured; a chemical "fingerprint" associated with CHOPS wells in this region reveals very low emission ratios of ethane, propane, and aromatics versus methane. The results of this study may inform future studies of CHOPS sites and aid in developing policy to mitigate regional methane emissions. Methane measurements from cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) sites identify annular venting to be a potentially major source of emissions at these facilities. The measured emission rates are generally larger than reported by operators, with uncertainty in the gas-oil ratio (GOR) possibly playing a large role in this discrepancy. These results have potential policy implications for reducing methane emissions in Alberta in order to achieve the Canadian government's goal of reducing methane emissions by 40-45% below 2012 levels within 8 yr.

  3. Diversion of flux toward sesquiterpene production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by fusion of host and heterologous enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Line; Chen, Yun; Bach, Lars Stougaard

    2011-01-01

    be limited by the inability of the heterologous enzymes to collaborate with the native yeast enzymes. This may cause loss of intermediates by diffusion or degradation or due to conversion of the intermediate through competitive pathways. To bypass this problem, we have pursued a strategy in which key enzymes...... increased the production of patchoulol, the main sesquiterpene produced by PTS, up to 2-fold. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the fusion strategy can be used in combination with traditional metabolic engineering to further increase the production of patchoulol. This simple test case of synthetic biology...

  4. Conceptual design of a hybrid fusion-fission reactor with intrinsic safety and optimized energy productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebi, Hosein; Sadat Kiai, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Designing a high yield and feasible Dense Plasma Focus for driving the reactor. • Presenting a structural method to design the dual layer cylindrical blankets. • Finding, the blanket production energy, in terms of its geometrical and material parameters. • Designing a subcritical blanket with optimization of energy amplification in detail. - Abstract: A hybrid fission-fusion reactor with a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) as a fusion core and the dual layer fissionable blanket as the energy multiplier were conceptually designed. A cylindrical DPF, energized by a 200 kJ bank energy, is considered to produce fusion neutron, and these neutrons drive the subcritical fission in the surrounding blankets. The emphasis has been placed on the safety and energy production with considering technical and economical limitations. Therefore, the k eff-t of the dual cylindrical blanket was defined and mathematically, specified. By applying the safety criterion (k eff-t ≤ 0.95), the geometrical and material parameters of the blanket optimizing the energy amplification were obtained. Finally, MCNPX code has been used to determine the detailed dimensions of the blankets and fuel rods.

  5. Engineered aggregation inhibitor fusion for production of highly amyloidogenic human islet amyloid polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirecka, Ewa Agnieszka; Gremer, Lothar; Schiefer, Stephanie; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Stoldt, Matthias; Willbold, Dieter; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is the major component of pancreatic amyloid deposits in type 2 diabetes. The structural conversion of IAPP from a monomeric state into amyloid assemblies is the subject of intense research. Recombinant production of IAPP is, however, difficult due to its extreme aggregation propensity. Here we describe a novel strategy for expression of IAPP in Escherichia coli, based on an engineered protein tag, which sequesters IAPP monomers and prevents IAPP aggregation. The IAPP-binding protein HI18 was selected by phage display from a β-wrapin library. Fusion of HI18 to IAPP enabled the soluble expression of the construct. IAPP was cleaved from the fusion construct and purified to homogeneity with a yield of 3mg of isotopically labeled peptide per liter of culture. In the monomeric state, IAPP was largely disordered as evidenced by far-UV CD and liquid-state NMR spectroscopy but competent to form amyloid fibrils according to atomic force microscopy. These results demonstrate the ability of the engineered β-wrapin HI18 for shielding the hydrophobic sequence of IAPP during expression and purification. Fusion of aggregation-inhibiting β-wrapins is a suitable approach for the recombinant production of aggregation-prone proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Phenomenological analysis of Higgs boson production through gluon fusion in association with jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, Nicolas; Luisoni, Gionata; Winter, Jan-Christopher; Yundin, Valery; Schoenherr, Marek

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed phenomenological analysis of the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson in association with up to three jets. We consider the gluon fusion channel using an effective theory in the large top-quark mass limit. Higgs boson production in gluon fusion constitutes an irreducible background to the vector boson fusion (VBF) process; hence the precise knowledge of its characteristics is a prerequisite for any measurement in the VBF channel. The calculation is carried out at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD in a fully automated way by combining the two programs GoSam and Sherpa. We present numerical results for a large variety of observables for both standard cuts and VBF selection cuts. We find that for all jet multiplicities the NLO corrections are sizeable. This is particularly true in the presence of kinematic selections enhancing the VBF topology, which are based on vetoing additional jet activity. In this case, precise predictions for the background can be made using our calculation by taking the difference between the inclusive H+2 jets and the inclusive H+3 jets result.

  7. Fusion Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Lackner, Karl; Tran, Minh Quang [eds.

    2012-09-15

    Recreating the energy production process of the Sun - nuclear fusion - on Earth in a controlled fashion is one of the greatest challenges of this century. If achieved at affordable costs, energy supply security would be greatly enhanced and environmental degradation from fossil fuels greatly diminished. Fusion Physics describes the last fifty years or so of physics and research in innovative technologies to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion for energy production. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been involved since its establishment in 1957 in fusion research. It has been the driving force behind the biennial conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, today known as the Fusion Energy Conference. Hosted by several Member States, this biennial conference provides a global forum for exchange of the latest achievements in fusion research against the backdrop of the requirements for a net energy producing fusion device and, eventually, a fusion power plant. The scientific and technological knowledge compiled during this series of conferences, as well as by the IAEA Nuclear Fusion journal, is immense and will surely continue to grow in the future. It has led to the establishment of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which represents the biggest experiment in energy production ever envisaged by humankind.

  8. Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinhua; Guo Haiping; Mou Yunfeng; Zheng Pu; Liu Rong; Yang Xiaofei; Yang Jian

    2013-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established. It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium. The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D + beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode. The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-Ⅵ data file. The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(α, β) thermal scattering model, so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors. (authors)

  9. Cold War competition and food production in China, 1957-1962.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yixin

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how Mao's grand strategy for Cold War competition inflicted a catastrophic agricultural failure in China and victimized tens of millions of Chinese peasants. It argues that Khrushchev's 1957 boast about the Soviet Union surpassing the United States in key economic areas inspired Mao to launch an industrialization program that would push the People's Republic past Great Britain in some production categories within fifteen years. Beginning in 1958 Mao imposed unrealistic targets on Chinese grain production to extract funds from agriculture for rapid industrial growth. Maoists placed relentless pressure on communist cadres for ruthless implementation of the Great Leap Forward. Contrary to Maoist plans, China's grain output in 1959-1960 declined sharply from 1957 levels and rural per capita grain retention decreased dramatically. Throughout China, party cadres' mismanagement of agricultural production was responsible for the decline in grain output, and the communist state's excessive requisition of grain caused food shortages for the peasants. But the key factor determining the famine's uneven impact on the peasantry in the provinces was the degree to which provincial leaders genuinely and energetically embraced Maoist programs. This is illustrated by a close examination of the Great Leap famine in Anhui Province.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of direct expansion configurations for electricity production by LNG cold energy recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Alessandro; Casarosa, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, after a brief review of the perspectives of the various schemes proposed for electricity generation from the regasification of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), a detailed analysis of two particular direct expansion solutions is proposed. The purpose is to identify the upper level of the energy that can be recovered with the aim of electricity production, using configurations with direct expansion. The analysis developed resorting to a simplified thermodynamic model, shows that using a direct expansion configurations with multistage turbine, values of power production typical of optimized ORC plant configurations (120 kJ for each kg of natural gas that flows through the plant) can be obtained. The development of a direct expansion plant with multistage turbine and internal heat recovery systems could permit to approach the production of more than 160 kJ for each kg of flowing liquefied natural gas. Considering values of the mass flow rate typical of LNG gas stations (e.g. 70 kg/s); this corresponds to an output power ranging between 8.3 MW and 11.4 MW. - Highlights: • Recovery of the cold energy contained in Liquefied Natural Gas. • Thermodynamic analysis of systems for electricity generation in regasification. • Direct expansion solutions with multistage expansion. • Comparison of direct expansion solutions with conventional ORC systems. • Power output in conditions typical of existing LNG regasification terminals

  11. Fission Product Separation from Pyrochemical Electrolyte by Cold Finger Melt Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versey, Joshua R. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This work contributes to the development of pyroprocessing technology as an economically viable means of separating used nuclear fuel from fission products and cladding materials. Electrolytic oxide reduction is used as a head-end step before electrorefining to reduce oxide fuel to metallic form. The electrolytic medium used in this technique is molten LiCl-Li2O. Groups I and II fission products, such as cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr), have been shown to partition from the fuel into the molten LiCl-Li2O. Various approaches of separating these fission products from the salt have been investigated by different research groups. One promising approach is based on a layer crystallization method studied at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Despite successful demonstration of this basic approach, there are questions that remain, especially concerning the development of economical and scalable operating parameters based on a comprehensive understanding of heat and mass transfer. This research explores these parameters through a series of experiments in which LiCl is purified, by concentrating CsCl in a liquid phase as purified LiCl is crystallized and removed via an argon-cooled cold finger.

  12. Workshop on cold-blanket research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-05-01

    The objective of the workshop was to identify and discuss cold-plasma blanket systems. In order to minimize the bombardment of the walls by hot neutrals the plasma should be impermeable. This requires a density edge-thickness product of nΔ > 10 15 cm -2 . An impermeable cold plasma-gas blanket surrounding a hot plasma core reduces the plasma wall/limiter interaction. Accumulation of impurities in this blanket can be expected. Fuelling from a blanket may be possible as shown by experimental results, though not fully explained by classical transport of neutrals. Refuelling of a reacting plasma had to be ensured by inward diffusion. Experimental studies of a cold impermeable plasma have been done on the tokamak-like Ringboog device. Simulation calculations for the next generation of large tokamaks using a particular transport model, indicate that the plasma edge profile can be controlled to reduce the production of sputtered impurities to an acceptable level. Impurity control requires a small fraction of the radial space to accomodate the cold-plasma layer. The problem of exhaust is, however, more complicated. If the cold-blanket scheme works as predicted in the model calculations, then α-particles generated by fusion will be transported to the cold outside layer. The Communities' experimental programme of research has been discussed in terms of the tokamaks which are available and planned. Two options present themselves for the continuation of cold-blanket research

  13. [Prokaryotic expression of trigeminy artificial fusion gene of Leptospira interrogans and the immunogenicity of its products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dong-jiao; Qiu, Xiao-feng; Wang, Jiang; Yan, Jin; Wang, Hai-bin; Zhou, Jin-cheng; Yan, Jie

    2008-11-01

    To construct lipL32/1-lipL21-OmpL1/2 fusion gene of Leptospira interrogans and its prokaryotic expression system, and to identify the immunogenicity of its products. PCR using linking primers was applied to construct lipL32/1-lipL21-OmpL1/2 fusion gene and a prokaryotic expression system of the fusion gene was then established using routine genetic engineering technique. SDS-PAGE was used to examine output of the target recombinant protein rLipL32/1-LipL21-OmpL1/2. Double immunodiffusion and Western Blot assay were applied to identify immunogenicity of rLipL32/1-LipL21-OmpL1/2. lipL32/1-lipL21-OmpL1/2 fusion gene with correct sequence and its prokaryotic expression system E.coli BL21DE3pET42a-lipL32/1-lipL21-ompL1/2 was obtained in this study. The output of rLipL32/1-LipL21- OmpL1/2 after optimisation was 37.78 mg/L. The immunodiffusion titer of rabbit antiserum against rLipL32/1-LipL21-OmpL1/2 was 1:4. The rLipL32/1-LipL21-OmpL1/2 antiserum was able to recognize rLipL32/1-LipL21-OmpL1/2, rLipL32/1, rLipL21 and rOmpL1/2. Positive Western hybridization signals were found among rLipL32/1-LipL21-OmpL1/2 and rabbit antiserum against whole cell of strain 56601 and serum from patients infected with L.interrogans serogroups Icterohaemorrhagiae, Grippotyphosa, Autumnalis and Pomona. The fusion gene lipL32/1-lipL21-OmpL1/2 and its prokaryotic expression system were successfully constructed in this study. The expressed fusion protein can be used as the antigen for developing universal genetic engineering vaccine and universal serological tests of leptospirosis.

  14. Productive infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in dendritic cells requires fusion-mediated viral entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janas, Alicia M.; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang Jianhua; Wu Li

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters dendritic cells (DCs) through endocytosis and viral receptor-mediated fusion. Although endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 entry can generate productive infection in certain cell types, including human monocyte-derived macrophages, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs appears to be dependent on fusion-mediated viral entry. It remains to be defined whether endocytosed HIV-1 in DCs can initiate productive infection. Using HIV-1 infection and cellular fractionation assays to measure productive viral infection and entry, here we show that HIV-1 enters monocyte-derived DCs predominately through endocytosis; however, endocytosed HIV-1 cannot initiate productive HIV-1 infection in DCs. In contrast, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs requires fusion-mediated viral entry. Together, these results provide functional evidence in understanding HIV-1 cis-infection of DCs, suggesting that different pathways of HIV-1 entry into DCs determine the outcome of viral infection

  15. Second international comparison on measuring techniques of tritium production rate for fusion neutronics experiments (ICMT-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Fujio; Maekawa, Hiroshi

    1993-02-01

    An second international comparison on measuring techniques of tritium production rates for fusion neutronics experiments (ICMT-2) has been performed. The purpose is to evaluate the measurement accuracy of tritium production rates in the current measurement techniques. Two 14 MeV neutron source facilities, FNS at JAERI-Japan and LOTUS at EPFL-Switzerland, were used for this purpose. Nine groups out of seven countries participated in this program. A fusion simulated blanket assembly of simple-geometry was served as the test bed at each facility, in which Li-containing samples from the participants were irradiated in an uniform neutron field. The tritium production rates were determined by the participants using their own ways by using the liquid scintillation counting method. Tritiated water sample with unknown but the same concentration was also distributed and its concentration was measured to make a common reference. The standard deviation of measured tritium production rates among participants was about 10 % for both FNS and LOTUS irradiation levels: 4x10 -13 T-atoms/Li-atom and 1.6x10 -12 T-atoms/Li-atom at a sample, respectively. This standard deviation exceeds the expected deviation of 5 % in this program. It is presumed that the deviation of 10 % is caused mainly by the systematic and unknown errors in a process of tritium extraction from the irradiated samples depending on each organization. (author)

  16. Higgs production via weak boson fusion in the standard model and the MSSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figy, Terrance; Palmer, Sophy

    2010-12-01

    Weak boson fusion is expected to be an important Higgs production channel at the LHC. Complete one-loop results for weak boson fusion in the Standard Model have been obtained by calculating the full virtual electroweak corrections and photon radiation and implementing these results into the public Monte Carlo program VBFNLO (which includes the NLO QCD corrections). Furthermore the dominant supersymmetric one-loop corrections to neutral Higgs production, in the general case where the MSSM includes complex phases, have been calculated. These results have been combined with all one-loop corrections of Standard Model type and with the propagator-type corrections from the Higgs sector of the MSSM up to the two-loop level. Within the Standard Model the electroweak corrections are found to be as important as the QCD corrections after the application of appropriate cuts. The corrections yield a shift in the cross section of order 5% for a Higgs of mass 100-200 GeV, confirming the result obtained previously in the literature. For the production of a light Higgs boson in the MSSM the Standard Model result is recovered in the decoupling limit, while the loop contributions from superpartners to the production of neutral MSSM Higgs bosons can give rise to corrections in excess of 10% away from the decoupling region. (orig.)

  17. ''Solid-state fusion'' effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    The ''Solid-State Fusion'' or ''Cold Fusion'' phenomenon, including excess heat generation and the production of nuclear particles, was first reported by Professors Martin Fleischmann and B. Stanley Pons in March 1989. The phenomenon described (the anomalous effects observed when deuterium oxide (heavy water) is electrolysed using a palladium cathode and a platinum anode in the presence of lithium deuteroxide) has many fascinating facets, not least of which is the fact that investigators are unable to produce the effects ''on demand''. Many of the experimental variables which seem to be significant were described and discussed at the ''First Annual Conference on Cold Fusion'' which was held in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, from 29th to 31st March 1990. The information presented at the conference is summarised here. Some papers addressed the excess heat effects observed, some the nuclear particles, and others the theoretical aspects. These are reviewed. At the end of the conference Fleischmann summarised all the areas where apparent evidence for solid state fusion had been obtained during the past year, namely: excess enthalpy, bursts in enthalpy; tritium, bursts in tritium; neutrons, bursts in neutrons; X-rays, gamma rays and bursts in these. He recommended that emphasis should now be concentrated on confirming reaction products, such as He 4 . New theories were emerging, but one year was too short a time in which to evaluate them fully. (author)

  18. Search for charged-particle d-d fusion products in an encapsulated Pd thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, E.; Neuhauser, B.; Ziemba, F.; Jackson, J.; Mapoles, E.; McVittie, J.; Powell, R.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by reports by Fleischmann and Pons and also Jones et al. of nuclear fusion occurring at room temperature, we attempted to look for charged particle reaction products from d-d fusion in a deuterated palladium thin film. A silicon nitride encapsulated palladium thin film (340 nanometers thick and one square centimeter in area) was fabricated on top of a semiconductor particle detector and implanted with an 80 keV D 2 + beam. The purpose of the nitride cap was to prevent deuterium from diffusing out or from being sputtered away during implantation. The detector temperature was maintained below 200 K in order to reduce pressure on the cap. During the first run of this experiment, after the ion implanter had been turned off, apparent charged particle pulses as well as bursts of activity in two nearby Geiger counters were observed with the film loaded to a nominal 150% deuterium-to-palladium ratio and a 1.3% does of 6 Li. No spectrum was obtained because of equipment malfunction. In a second run no apparent charged particles pulses were observed, but a record of the neutron flux due to induced fusion during implantation suggested that the nitride cap had failed. More experimental runs are expected in the near future

  19. Fusion of product and process data: Batch-mode and real-time streaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent De Sapio; Spike Leonard

    1999-12-01

    In today's DP product realization enterprise it is imperative to reduce the design-to-fabrication cycle time and cost while improving the quality of DP parts (reducing defects). Much of this challenge resides in the inherent gap between the product and process worlds. The lack of seamless, bi-directional flow of information prevents true concurrency in the product realization world. This report addresses a framework for product-process data fusion to help achieve next generation product realization. A fundamental objective is to create an open environment for multichannel observation of process date, and subsequent mapping of that data onto product geometry. In addition to the sensor-based observation of manufacturing processes, model-based process data provides an important complement to empirically acquired data. Two basic groups of manufacturing models are process physics, and machine kinematics and dynamics. Process physics addresses analytical models that describe the physical phenomena of the process itself. Machine kinematic and dynamic models address the mechanical behavior of the processing equipment. As a secondary objective, an attempt has been made in this report to address part of the model-based realm through the development of an open object-oriented library and toolkit for machine kinematics and dynamics. Ultimately, it is desirable to integrate design definition, with all types of process data; both sensor-based and model-based. Collectively, the goal is to allow all disciplines within the product realization enterprise to have a centralized medium for the fusion of product and process data.

  20. Antimicrobial properties and the influence of temperature on secondary metabolite production in cold environment soil fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogabaanu, U.; Weber, Jean-Frederic Faizal; Convey, Peter; Rizman-Idid, Mohammed; Alias, Siti Aisyah

    2017-12-01

    The Arctic and Antarctic share environmental extremes. To survive in such environments, microbes such as soil fungi need to compete with or protect themselves effectively from other soil microbiota and to obtain the often scarce nutrients available, and many use secondary metabolites to facilitate this. We therefore (i) screened for antimicrobial properties of cold-environment Arctic and Antarctic soil fungi, and (ii) identified changes in the secreted secondary metabolite profiles of a subset of these strains in response to temperature variation. A total of 40 polar soil fungal strains from King George Island, maritime Antarctic and Hornsund, Svalbard, High Arctic, were obtained from the Malaysian National Antarctic Research Centre culture collections. The plug assay technique was used to screen for antimicrobial potential against Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, B. cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli). About 45% of the tested fungal strains showed antimicrobial activity against at least one tested microorganism. Three fungal isolates showed good bioactivity and were subjected to secondary metabolite profiling at different temperatures (4, 10, 15 and 28 °C). We observed a range of responses in fungal metabolite production when incubated at varying temperatures, confirming an influence of environmental conditions such as temperature on the production of secondary metabolites.

  1. Wood ant nests as hot spots of carbon dioxide production and cold spots of methane oxidation in temperate forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jílková, Veronika; Picek, T.; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Frouz, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, April (2016), EGU2016-4634 ISSN 1607-7962. [European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2016. 17.04.2016-22.04.2016, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : wood ant nests * hot spots of carbon dioxide production * cold spots of methane oxidation * temperate forests Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science

  2. Fusion Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    If a fusion DEMO reactor can be brought into operation during the first half of this century, fusion power production can have a significant impact on carbon dioxide production during the latter half of the century. An assessment of fusion implementation scenarios shows that the resource demands and waste production associated with these scenarios are manageable factors. If fusion is implemented during the latter half of this century it will be one element of a portfolio of (hopefully) carbon dioxide limiting sources of electrical power. It is time to assess the regional implications of fusion power implementation. An important attribute of fusion power is the wide range of possible regions of the country, or countries in the world, where power plants can be located. Unlike most renewable energy options, fusion energy will function within a local distribution system and not require costly, and difficult, long distance transmission systems. For example, the East Coast of the United States is a prime candidate for fusion power deployment by virtue of its distance from renewable energy sources. As fossil fuels become less and less available as an energy option, the transmission of energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power will be particularly attractive for regions separated from sources of renewable energy by oceans

  3. Correlation between potential well structure and neutron production in inertial electrostatic confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yoshikawa, K.; Sato, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    The electrostatic potential well in inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) is studied using two approaches. First, the equilibrium potential profile is obtained by solving the charge neutrality condition, i.e. n i n e , assuming the appropriate distribution functions for the ions and the electrons. The formation of a double well structure is demonstrated, with a depth depending upon the ratio between the focus radii of the electrons and the ions. The correlations between the well depth and the volume integrated neutron production due to deuterium-deuterium (DD) reactions are obtained. Second, in order to study the stability of the well, the dynamic behaviours of the potential well are calculated by performing time advancing numerical simulations on the basis of the particle in cell method. Single, double and triple wells, depending on the amount of injected ion current, are observed to be formed for ions with a monoenergetic distribution. The well in the centre of the multiwell structure is unstable and oscillates with a periods much longer than the inverse ion plasma frequency. A double well structure can be formed even for ions with a spread out energy distribution when the ion current is larger than the threshold value. The time averaged neutron production by DD fusion events is proportional to a power of the ion current involved in forming the double well structure. The results strongly suggest that the high neutron production rate should be attributed to not only the well depth but also the unstable behaviour of the potential, i.e. the intermittent peaking of the density in the centre region. A numerical simulation reveals that IEC possesses a favourable dependence of fusion reactions on the injected ion current for the application to a neutron source or a fusion reactor. (author). 9 refs, 9 figs

  4. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T [perpendicular] [ne] T[parallel]and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single dressed'' test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between kinetic or causal instabilities'' and hydrodynamic instabilities'' are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k[parallel] = 0 for k[parallel] [ne] 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an inverted'' population of states.

  5. Pitch angle resolved measurements of escaping charged fusion products in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweben, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the flux of charged fusion products escaping from the TFTR plasma have been made with a new type of detector which can resolve the particle flux vs. pitch angle, energy, and time. The design of this detector is described, and results from the 1987 TFTR run are presented. These results are roughly consistent with predictions from a simple first-orbit particle loss model with respect to the pitch angle, energy, time, and plasma current dependence of the signals. 11 refs., 9 figs

  6. Fusion-product ash buildup in tokamak with radial electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downum, W.B.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The buildup of thermalized fusion products (ash) in a tokamak can seriously limit burn times. Prior studies have concentrated on deposition profile effects on alpha particle transport in tokamaks but have not considered the effect on ash of radial electric fields (either created internally, e.g. due to high-energy alpha leakage, or generated externally). The present study focuses on this issue since it appears that electric fields might offer one approach to control of the ash. Approximate field and source profiles are used, based on prior calculations

  7. Charged Higgs production via vector-boson fusion at NNLO in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaro, Marco; Maltoni, Fabio

    2010-12-01

    We present the total cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the strong coupling for single and double charged Higgs production via weak boson fusion. Results are obtained via the structure function approach, which builds upon the approximate, though very accurate, factorization of the QCD corrections between the two quark lines. The theoretical uncertainty on the total cross sections at the LHC from higher order corrections and the parton distribution uncertainties are estimated at the 2% level each for a wide range of Higgs boson masses. (orig.)

  8. Higgs production via vector-boson fusion at NNLO in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolzoni, Paolo; Moch, Sven-Olaf; Maltoni, Fabio; Zaro, Marco

    2010-03-01

    We present the total cross sections at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in the strong coupling for Higgs production via weak boson fusion. Our results are obtained via the structure function approach, which builds upon the approximate, though very accurate, factorization of the QCD corrections between the two quark lines. The theoretical uncertainty on the total cross sections at the LHC from higher order corrections and the parton distribution uncertainties are estimated at the 2% level each for a wide range of Higgs boson masses. (orig.)

  9. Pitch angle resolved measurements of escaping charged fusion products in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the flux of charged fusion products escaping from the TFTR plasma have been made with a new type of detector which can resolve the particle flux vs. pitch angle, energy, and time. The design of this detector is described, and results from the 1987 TFTR run are presented. These results are roughly consistent with predictions from a simple first-orbit particle loss model with respect to the pitch angle, energy, time, and plasma current dependence of the signals. 11 refs., 9 figs.

  10. NLO QCD corrections to Higgs boson production plus three jets in gluon fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Deurzen, H. van; Greiner, N.; Luisoni, G.; Mirabella, E.; Peraro, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Mastrolia, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Padova Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Astronomia; INFN, Sezione di Padova (Italy); Ossola, G. [New York Univ., NY (United States). New York City College of Technology; New York Univ., NY (United States). The Graduate School and University Center; Tramontano, F. [Napoli Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy)

    2013-07-15

    We report on the calculation of the cross section for Higgs boson production in association with three jets via gluon fusion, at next-to-leading-order (NLO) accuracy in QCD, in the infinite top-mass approximation. After including the complete NLO QCD corrections, we observe a strong reduction in the scale dependence of the result, and an increased steepness in the transverse momentum distributions of both the Higgs and the leading jets. The results are obtained with the combined use of GoSam, Sherpa, and the MadDipole/MadEvent framework.

  11. Higgs boson production in association with a photon via weak boson fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Arnold, Ken; Jäger, Barbara; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    We present next-to-leading order QCD corrections to Higgs production in association with a photon via weak boson fusion at a hadron collider. Utilizing the fully flexible parton level Monte-Carlo program VBFNLO, we find small overall corrections, while the shape of some distributions is sensitive to radiative contributions in certain regions of phase-space. Residual scale uncertainties at next-to-leading order are at the few-percent level. Being perturbatively well under control and exhibiting kinematic features that allow to distinguish it from potential backgrounds, this process can serve as a valuable source of information on the $Hb\\bar{b}$ Yukawa coupling.

  12. Higgs pair production in vector-boson fusion at the LHC and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishara, Fady [University of Oxford, Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Contino, Roberto [Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); EPFL, Institut de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques, Lausanne (Switzerland); CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Rojo, Juan [VU University Amsterdam, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-07-15

    The production of pairs of Higgs bosons at hadron colliders provides unique information on the Higgs sector and on the mechanism underlying electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). Most studies have concentrated on the gluon-fusion production mode which has the largest cross section. However, despite its small production rate, the vector-boson fusion channel can also be relevant since even small modifications of the Higgs couplings to vector bosons induce a striking increase of the cross section as a function of the invariant mass of the Higgs boson pair. In this work we exploit this unique signature to propose a strategy to extract the hhVV quartic coupling and provide model-independent constraints on theories where EWSB is driven by new strong interactions. We take advantage of the higher signal yield of the b anti bb anti b final state and make extensive use of jet-substructure techniques to reconstruct signal events with a boosted topology, characteristic of large partonic energies, where each Higgs boson decays to a single collimated jet. Our results demonstrate that the hhVV coupling can be measured with 45% (20%) precision at the LHC for L = 300 (3000) fb{sup -1}, while a 1% precision can be achieved at a 100 TeV collider. (orig.)

  13. Higgs pair production in vector-boson fusion at the LHC and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Fady; Contino, Roberto; Rojo, Juan

    2017-01-01

    The production of pairs of Higgs bosons at hadron colliders provides unique information on the Higgs sector and on the mechanism underlying electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB). Most studies have concentrated on the gluon-fusion production mode which has the largest cross section. However, despite its small production rate, the vector-boson fusion channel can also be relevant since even small modifications of the Higgs couplings to vector bosons induce a striking increase of the cross section as a function of the invariant mass of the Higgs boson pair. In this work we exploit this unique signature to propose a strategy to extract the hhVV quartic coupling and provide model-independent constraints on theories where EWSB is driven by new strong interactions. We take advantage of the higher signal yield of the [Formula: see text] final state and make extensive use of jet-substructure techniques to reconstruct signal events with a boosted topology, characteristic of large partonic energies, where each Higgs boson decays to a single collimated jet. Our results demonstrate that the hhVV coupling can be measured with 45% (20%) precision at the LHC for [Formula: see text] (3000) fb[Formula: see text], while a 1% precision can be achieved at a 100 TeV collider.

  14. Production of Trichoderma strains with pesticide-polyresistance by mutagenesis and protoplast fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatvani, Lóránt; Manczinger, László; Kredics, László; Szekeres, András; Antal, Zsuzsanna; Vágvölgyi, Csaba

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of two cold-tolerant Trichoderma strains belonging to the species T. harzianum and T. atroviride was determined to a series of pesticides widely used in agriculture. From the 16 pesticides tested, seven fungicides: copper sulfate, carbendazim, mancozeb, tebuconazole, imazalil, captan and thiram inhibited colony growth of the test strains significantly with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 300, 0.4, 50, 100, 100, 100 and 50 microg/ml, respectively. Mutants resistant to carbendazim and tebuconazole were produced from both wild type strains by means of UV-mutagenesis. The cross-resistance capabilities and in vitro antagonistic properties of the mutants were determined. Carbendazim-resistant mutants showed total cross-resistance to benomyl and thiabendazole at a concentration of 20 microg/ml. Intraspecific protoplast fusion was carried out between carbendazim- and tebuconazole-resistant mutants of both parental strains, and putative haploid recombinants with stable resistance to both pesticides were produced in the case of T. atroviride. These pesticide-polyresistant progenies are potential candidates for application in an integrated pest management system.

  15. DD fusion neutron production at UW-Madison using IEC devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancher, Aaron; Michalak, Matt; Kulcinski, Gerald; Santarius, John; Bonomo, Richard

    2017-10-01

    An inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device using spherical, gridded electrodes at high voltage accelerates deuterium ions, allowing for neutrons to be produced within the device from DD fusion reactions. The effects of the device cathode voltage (30-170 kV), current (30-100 mA), and pressure (0.15-1.25 mTorr) on the neutron production rate have been measured. New high voltage capabilities have resulted in the achievement of a steady state neutron production rate of 3.3x108 n/s at 175 kV, 100 mA, and 1.0 mTorr of deuterium. Applications of IEC devices include the production of DD neutrons to detect chemical explosives and special nuclear materials using active interrogation methods. Research supported by US Dept. of Homeland Security Grant 2015-DN-077-AR1095 and the Grainger Foundation.

  16. Second-order QCD effects in Higgs boson production through vector boson fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Martinez, J.; Gehrmann, T.; Glover, E. W. N.; Huss, A.

    2018-06-01

    We compute the factorising second-order QCD corrections to the electroweak production of a Higgs boson through vector boson fusion. Our calculation is fully differential in the kinematics of the Higgs boson and of the final state jets, and uses the antenna subtraction method to handle infrared singular configurations in the different parton-level contributions. Our results allow us to reassess the impact of the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to electroweak Higgs-plus-three-jet production and of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections to electroweak Higgs-plus-two-jet production. The NNLO corrections are found to be limited in magnitude to around ± 5% and are uniform in several of the kinematical variables, displaying a kinematical dependence only in the transverse momenta and rapidity separation of the two tagging jets.

  17. A study on conceptual design of tritium production fusion reactor based on spherical torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui; Huang Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual design of an advanced tritium production reactor based on spherical torus (ST), which is an intermediate application of fusion energy, is presented. Different from traditional Tokamak tritium production reactor design, advanced plasma physics performance and compact structural characteristics of ST are used to minimize tritium leakage and to maximize tritium breeding ratio with arrangement of tritium production blankets as possible as it can do within vacuum vessel in order to produce certain amount of excess tritium except self-sufficient plasma core, corresponding plant availability 40% or more. Based on 2D neutronics calculation, preliminary conceptual design of ST-TPR is presented. Based on systematical analysis, design risk, uncertainty and backup are introduced generally for the backgrounds of next detailed conceptual design. (authors)

  18. Imposition of Antidumping Duty (BAMD) Towards China€™s Cold Rolled Coil/Sheet (CRC/S) Products

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiwi, Lila

    2013-01-01

    Steel industry is a strategic sector in the economy of a country. Steel industry in Indonesia has not been able to fulfill their domestic demand that is still necessary to import steel product. However, many of these imported products are sold at dumping prices, especially those from china giving rise to unfair trade. One of trade remedy measures as a result of unfair trade remedies can recover trough the imposition of antidumping duty. In 2013, Indonesia imposes antidumping duty for Cold Rol...

  19. Avocado oil extraction processes: method for cold-pressed high-quality edible oil production versus traditional production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Costagli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill. is widely regarded as an important fruit for its nutritional values, as it is rich in vital human nutrients. The avocado fruit is mainly sold fresh on the market, which however trades also a relevant quantity of second-grade fruits with a relatively high oil content. Traditionally, this oil is extracted from dried fruits by means of organic solvents, but a mechanical method is also used in general in locations where drying systems and/or solvent extraction units cannot be installed. These traditional processes yield a grade of oil that needs subsequent refining and is mainly used in the cosmetic industry. In the late 1990s, in New Zeland, a processing company with the collaboration of Alfa Laval began producing cold-pressed avocado oil (CPAO to be sold as edible oil for salads and cooking. Over the last fifteen years, CPAO production has increased in many other countries and has led to an expansion of the market which is set to continue, given the growing interest in highquality and healthy food. Avocado oil like olive oil is extracted from the fruit pulp and in particular shares many principles of the extraction process with extra-vergin olive oil. We conducted a review of traditional and modern extraction methods with particular focus on extraction processes and technology for CPAO production.

  20. The production of advanced glass ceramic HLW forms using cold crucible induction melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutledge, V.J.; Maio, V.

    2013-01-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIM) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in a near future. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHM) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIM offers unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. It is concluded that glass ceramic waste forms that are tailored to immobilize fission products of HLW can be can be made from the HLW processed with the CCIM. The advantageous higher temperatures reached with the CCIM and unachievable with JHM allows the lanthanides, alkali, alkaline earths, and molybdenum to dissolve into a molten glass. Upon controlled cooling they go into targeted crystalline phases to form a glass ceramic waste form with higher waste loadings than achievable with borosilicate glass waste forms. Natural cooling proves to be too fast for the formation of all targeted crystalline phases

  1. Non-thermal production of neutralino cold dark matter from cosmic string decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeannerot, R.; Zhang, X.; Brandenberger, R.

    1998-12-01

    We propose a mechanism of nonthermal production of a neutralino cold dark matter particle, χ, from the decay of cosmic strings which form from the spontaneous breaking of a U(1) gauge symmetry, such as U B-L (1), in an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). By explicit calculation, we point out that with a symmetry breaking scale η of around 10 8 GeV, the decay of cosmic strings can give rise to Ω χ ≅ 1. This gives a new constraint on supersymmetric models. For example, the dark matter produced from strings will over close the universe if η is near the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. To be consistent with Ω χ ≤ 1, the mass of the new U(1) gauge boson must be much larger than the Fermi scale which makes it unobservable in upcoming accelerator experiments. In a supersymmetric model with an extra U B-L (1) symmetry, the requirement of Ω χ ≤ 1 puts an upper bound on the neutrino mass of about 30eV provided neutrino masses are generated by the see-saw mechanisms. (author)

  2. Efficient source for the production of ultradense deuterium D(-1) for laser-induced fusion (ICF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Patrik U.; Loenn, Benny; Holmlid, Leif

    2011-01-01

    A novel source which simplifies the study of ultradense deuterium D(-1) is now described. This means one step further toward deuterium fusion energy production. The source uses internal gas feed and D(-1) can now be studied without time-of-flight spectral overlap from the related dense phase D(1). The main aim here is to understand the material production parameters, and thus a relatively weak laser with focused intensity ≤10 12 W cm -2 is employed for analyzing the D(-1) material. The properties of the D(-1) material at the source are studied as a function of laser focus position outside the emitter, deuterium gas feed, laser pulse repetition frequency and laser power, and temperature of the source. These parameters influence the D(-1) cluster size, the ionization mode, and the laser fragmentation patterns.

  3. Efficient source for the production of ultradense deuterium D(-1) for laser-induced fusion (ICF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Patrik U.; Lönn, Benny; Holmlid, Leif

    2011-01-01

    A novel source which simplifies the study of ultradense deuterium D(-1) is now described. This means one step further toward deuterium fusion energy production. The source uses internal gas feed and D(-1) can now be studied without time-of-flight spectral overlap from the related dense phase D(1). The main aim here is to understand the material production parameters, and thus a relatively weak laser with focused intensity ≤1012 W cm-2 is employed for analyzing the D(-1) material. The properties of the D(-1) material at the source are studied as a function of laser focus position outside the emitter, deuterium gas feed, laser pulse repetition frequency and laser power, and temperature of the source. These parameters influence the D(-1) cluster size, the ionization mode, and the laser fragmentation patterns.

  4. Higher order corrections to mixed QCD-EW contributions to Higgs boson production in gluon fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Marco; Melnikov, Kirill; Tancredi, Lorenzo

    2018-03-01

    We present an estimate of the next-to-leading-order (NLO) QCD corrections to mixed QCD-electroweak contributions to the Higgs boson production cross section in gluon fusion, combining the recently computed three-loop virtual corrections and the approximate treatment of real emission in the soft approximation. We find that the NLO QCD corrections to the mixed QCD-electroweak contributions are nearly identical to NLO QCD corrections to QCD Higgs production. Our result confirms an earlier estimate of these O (α αs2) effects by Anastasiou et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 04 (2009) 003, 10.1088/1126-6708/2009/04/003] and provides further support for the factorization approximation of QCD and electroweak corrections.

  5. Heavy-quark production in gluon fusion at two loops in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czakon, M.

    2007-07-01

    We present the two-loop virtual QCD corrections to the production of heavy quarks in gluon fusion. The results are exact in the limit when all kinematical invariants are large compared to the mass of the heavy quark up to terms suppressed by powers of the heavy-quark mass. Our derivation uses a simple relation between massless and massive QCD scattering amplitudes as well as a direct calculation of the massive amplitude at two loops. The results presented here together with those obtained previously for quark-quark scattering form important parts of the next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections to heavy-quark production in hadron-hadron collisions. (orig.)

  6. Time To Talk About Natural Products for the Flu and Colds: What Does the Science Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Does the Science Say? Share: It’s that time of year again— cold and flu season. Each ... effects of taking probiotics for long periods of time. Most people may be able to use probiotics ...

  7. Electrical phenomena in breaking the adhesive contact and in the destruction of solids. Development stages: From the gas discharge to cold nuclear fusion (on the 90th anniversary of the Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, B. V. Deryagin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrustalev, Yu.A.

    1993-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the research performed mainly by B. V. Deryagin and his coworkers into the electrophysical phenomena that accompany the breaking of an adhesive bond and of solids themselves by a mechanical action (the charging of fresh surfaces and gas discharge processes, caused by an excess charge, the emission of electrons and of x-ray radiation, as well as cold nuclear fusion). The relationship between the emission of electrons and mechanochemical processes in solids is pointed out. 118 refs

  8. Production of Hev b5 as a fluorescent biotin-binding tripartite fusion protein in insect cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordlund, Henri R.; Laitinen, Olli H.; Uotila, Sanna T.H.; Kulmala, Minna; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Kulomaa, Markku S.

    2005-01-01

    The presented green fluorescent protein and streptavidin core-based tripartite fusion system provides a simple and efficient way for the production of proteins fused to it in insect cells. This fusion protein forms a unique tag, which serves as a multipurpose device enabling easy optimization of production, one-step purification via streptavidin-biotin interaction, and visualization of the fusion protein during downstream processing and in applications. In the present study, we demonstrate the successful production, purification, and detection of a natural rubber latex allergen Hev b5 with this system. We also describe the production of another NRL allergen with the system, Hev b1, which formed large aggregates and gave small yields in purification. The aggregates were detected at early steps by microscopical inspection of the infected insect cells producing this protein. Therefore, this fusion system can also be utilized as a fast indicator of the solubility of the expressed fusion proteins and may therefore be extremely useful in high-throughput expression approaches

  9. Production of Hev b5 as a fluorescent biotin-binding tripartite fusion protein in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordlund, Henri R; Laitinen, Olli H; Uotila, Sanna T H; Kulmala, Minna; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Kulomaa, Markku S

    2005-10-14

    The presented green fluorescent protein and streptavidin core-based tripartite fusion system provides a simple and efficient way for the production of proteins fused to it in insect cells. This fusion protein forms a unique tag, which serves as a multipurpose device enabling easy optimization of production, one-step purification via streptavidin-biotin interaction, and visualization of the fusion protein during downstream processing and in applications. In the present study, we demonstrate the successful production, purification, and detection of a natural rubber latex allergen Hev b5 with this system. We also describe the production of another NRL allergen with the system, Hev b1, which formed large aggregates and gave small yields in purification. The aggregates were detected at early steps by microscopical inspection of the infected insect cells producing this protein. Therefore, this fusion system can also be utilized as a fast indicator of the solubility of the expressed fusion proteins and may therefore be extremely useful in high-throughput expression approaches.

  10. Production and detection of cold anti-hydrogen atoms A first step towards high precision CPT test

    CERN Document Server

    Variola, A; Bonomi, G; Boutcha, A; Bowe, P; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, Michael; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, Rolf; Lindelöf, D; Lodi-Rizzini, E; Macri, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Pruys, H S; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Riedler, P; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P

    2003-01-01

    Observations of anti-hydrogen in small quantities have been reported at CERN and at FermiLab, but these experiments were not suited to spectroscopy experiments. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration reported the production and detection of very low energy anti-hydrogen atoms produced in cryogenic environment. This is the first major step in the study of antiatom's internal structure and it can lead to a high precision test of the CPT fundamental symmetry. The method of production and detection of cold anti-hydrogen will be introduced. The absolute rate of anti-hydrogen production and the signal to background ratio in the ATHENA experiment will be discussed. (7 refs) .

  11. Neutronics analysis of water-cooled energy production blanket for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jieqiong; Wang Minghuang; Chen Zhong; Qiu Yuefeng; Liu Jinchao; Bai Yunqing; Chen Hongli; Hu Yanglin

    2010-01-01

    Neutronics calculations were performed to analyse the parameters of blanket energy multiplication factor (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR) in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor for energy production named FDS (Fusion-Driven hybrid System)-EM (Energy Multiplier) blanket. The most significant and main goal of the FDS-EM blanket is to achieve the energy gain of about 1 GWe with self-sustaining tritium, i.e. the M factor is expected to be ∼90. Four different fission materials were taken into account to evaluate M in subcritical blanket: (i) depleted uranium, (ii) natural uranium, (iii) enriched uranium, and (iv) Nuclear Waste (transuranic from 33 000 MWD/MTU PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and depleted uranium) oxide. These calculations and analyses were performed using nuclear data library HENDL (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) and a home-developed code VisualBUS. The results showed that the performance of the blanket loaded with Nuclear Waste was most attractive and it could be promising to effectively obtain tritium self-sufficiency and a high-energy multiplication.

  12. Production of FMDV virus-like particles by a SUMO fusion protein approach in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shu-Mei

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virus-like particles (VLPs are formed by the self-assembly of envelope and/or capsid proteins from many viruses. Some VLPs have been proven successful as vaccines, and others have recently found applications as carriers for foreign antigens or as scaffolds in nanoparticle biotechnology. However, production of VLP was usually impeded due to low water-solubility of recombinant virus capsid proteins. Previous studies revealed that virus capsid and envelope proteins were often posttranslationally modified by SUMO in vivo, leading into a hypothesis that SUMO modification might be a common mechanism for virus proteins to retain water-solubility or prevent improper self-aggregation before virus assembly. We then propose a simple approach to produce VLPs of viruses, e.g., foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. An improved SUMO fusion protein system we developed recently was applied to the simultaneous expression of three capsid proteins of FMDV in E. coli. The three SUMO fusion proteins formed a stable heterotrimeric complex. Proteolytic removal of SUMO moieties from the ternary complexes resulted in VLPs with size and shape resembling the authentic FMDV. The method described here can also apply to produce capsid/envelope protein complexes or VLPs of other disease-causing viruses.

  13. Application of SSNTDs for measurements of fusion reaction products in high-temperature plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowska, A., E-mail: a.malinowska@ipj.gov.p [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Szydlowski, A.; Malinowski, K. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Sadowski, M.J. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM), 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Zebrowski, J. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Scholz, M.; Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM), 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Jaskola, M.; Korman, A. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    The paper describes the application of SSNTDs of the PM-355 type to diagnostics of reaction products emitted from high-temperature deuterium plasmas produced in Plasma Focus (PF) facilities. Acceleration processes occurring in plasma lead often to the generation of high-energy ion beams. Such beams induce nuclear reactions and contribute to the emission of fast neutrons, fusion protons and alpha particles from PF discharges with a deuterium gas. Ion measurements are of primary importance for understanding the mechanisms of the physical processes which drive the charged-particle acceleration. The main aim of the present studies was to perform measurements of spatial- and energy-distributions of fusion-reaction protons (about 3 MeV) within a PF facility. Results obtained from energy measurements were compared with the proton-energy spectra computed theoretically. The protons were measured by means of a set of ion pinhole cameras equipped with PM-355 detectors, which were placed at different angles relative to the electrode axis of the PF facility.

  14. Tritium production potential of beam research and magnetic fusion program technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.

    1989-03-01

    Regular replenishment of tritium in the nuclear weapons stockpile is essential to maintain our nuclear deterrent. Nuclear reactor facilities presently used for the production of tritium are aging, and their operation is being curtailed awaiting the repairs and upgrades needed to meet modern standards of safety and environment. To provide improved capability in the future, DOE plans to construct a new production reactor. Alternatives to nuclear reactor methods for the production of tritium, mainly electrically-driven accelerator or fusion systems, have been proposed many times in the past. Given the critical national security implications of maintaining adequate tritium production facilities, it is clearly worthwhile for political decision-makers to have a clear and accurate picture of the technical options that could be made available at various points in the future. The goal of this white paper is to summarize available technical information on a set of non-nuclear-reactor options for tritium production with a minimum of advocacy for any one system of implicit assumptions about politically desirable attributes. Indeed, these various options differ considerably in aspects such as the maturity of the technology, the development cost and timescales required, and the capital and operating costs of a typical ''optimized'' facility

  15. Using cold deformation methods in flow-production of steel high precision shaped sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajtsev, M.L.; Makhnev, I.F.; Shkurko, I.I.

    1975-01-01

    A final size with a preset tolerance and a required surface finish of steel high-precision sections could be achieved by a cold deformation of hot-rolled ingots-by drawing through dismountable, monolith or roller-type drawing tools or by cold rolling in roller dies. The particularities of the both techniques are compared as regards a number of complicated shaped sections and the advantages of cold rolling are showna more uniform distribution of deformations (strain hardening) across the section, that is a greater margin of plasticity with the same reductions, the less number of the operations required. Rolling is recommended in all the cases when possible as regards the section shape and the bulk volume. The rolling-mill for the calibration of high-precision sections should have no less than two shafts (so that the size could be controlled in both directions) and arrangements to withstand high axial stresses on the rollers (the stresses appearing during rolling in skew dies). When manufacturing precise shaped sections by the cold rolling method the operations are less plentiful than in the cold drawing manufacturing

  16. Strong neutron sources - How to cope with weapon material production capabilities of fusion and spallation neutron sources?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englert, M.; Franceschini, G.; Liebert, W.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we investigate the potential and relevance for weapon material production in future fusion power plants and spallation neutron sources (SNS) and sketch what should be done to strengthen these technologies against a non-peaceful use. It is shown that future commercial fusion reactors may have military implications: first, they provide an easy source of tritium for weapons, an element that does not fall under safeguards and for which diversion from a plant could probably not be detected even if some tritium accountancy is implemented. Secondly, large fusion reactors - even if not designed for fissile material breeding - could easily produce several hundred kg Pu per year with high weapon quality and very low source material requirements. If fusion-only reactors will prevail over fission-fusion hybrids in the commercialization phase of fusion technology, the safeguard challenge will be more of a legal than of a technical nature. In pure fusion reactors (and in most SNS) there should be no nuclear material present at any time by design. The presence of undeclared nuclear material would indicate a military use of the plant. This fact offers a clear-cut detection criterion for a covert use of a declared facility. Another important point is that tritium does not fall under the definition of 'nuclear material', so a pure fusion reactor or a SNS that do not use nuclear materials are not directly falling under any international non-proliferation treaty requirements. Non-proliferation treaties have to be amended to take into account that fact. (A.C.)

  17. Stochastic modelling of fusion-product transport and thermalization with nuclear elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deveaux, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are developed to model fusion-product (fp) transport and thermalization with both Rutherford scattering and nuclear elastic scattering (NES) in high-temperature (T/sub i/, T/sub e-/ > 50 keV), advanced-fuel (e.g. Cat-D, D- 3 He) plasmas. A discrete-event model is used to superimpose NES collisions on a Rutherford scattering model that contains the Spitzer coefficients of drag, velocity diffusion (VD), and pith-angle scattering (PAS). The effects of NES on fp transport and thermalization are investigated for advanced-fuel, Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) plasmas that have a significant Hamiltonian-canonical angular momentum (H-Ptheta) space loss cone which scales with the characteristic size (S identical with R/sub HV//3p/sub i/) and applied vacuum magnetic field (B 0 )

  18. Higgs production in bottom-quark fusion in a matched scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Forte

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We compute the total cross-section for Higgs boson production in bottom-quark fusion using the so-called FONLL method for the matching of a scheme in which the b-quark is treated as a massless parton to that in which it is treated as a massive final-state particle. We discuss the general framework for the application of the FONLL method to this process, and then we present explicit expressions for the case in which the next-to-next-to-leading-log five-flavor scheme result is combined with the leading-order O(αs2 four-flavor scheme computation. We compare our results in this case to the four- and five-flavor scheme computations, and to the so-called Santander matching.

  19. Development of Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of the ERG Gene Fusion Product in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoju; Qiao, Yuanyuan; Asangani, Irfan A; Ateeq, Bushra; Poliakov, Anton; Cieślik, Marcin; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V S K; Cao, Xuhong; Jing, Xiaojun; Wang, Cynthia X; Apel, Ingrid J; Wang, Rui; Tien, Jean Ching-Yi; Juckette, Kristin M; Yan, Wei; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Shaomeng; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M

    2017-04-10

    Transcription factors play a key role in the development of diverse cancers, and therapeutically targeting them has remained a challenge. In prostate cancer, the gene encoding the transcription factor ERG is recurrently rearranged and plays a critical role in prostate oncogenesis. Here, we identified a series of peptides that interact specifically with the DNA binding domain of ERG. ERG inhibitory peptides (EIPs) and derived peptidomimetics bound ERG with high affinity and specificity, leading to proteolytic degradation of the ERG protein. The EIPs attenuated ERG-mediated transcription, chromatin recruitment, protein-protein interactions, cell invasion and proliferation, and tumor growth. Thus, peptidomimetic targeting of transcription factor fusion products may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer as well as other malignancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Electroweak radiative corrections to Higgs production via vector boson fusion using soft-collinear effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuhrer, Andreas; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2011-01-01

    Soft-collinear effective theory (SCET) is applied to compute electroweak radiative corrections to Higgs production via gauge boson fusion, qq→qqH. There are several novel features which make this process an interesting application of SCET: The amplitude is proportional to the Higgs vacuum expectation value, and so is not a gauge singlet amplitude. Standard resummation methods require a gauge singlet operator and do not apply here. The SCET analysis requires operators with both collinear and soft external fields, with the Higgs vacuum expectation value being described by an external soft φ field. There is a scalar soft-collinear transition operator in the SCET Lagrangian which contributes to the scattering amplitude, and is derived here.

  1. High-level production of human interleukin-10 fusions in tobacco cell suspension cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldis, Angelo; Ahmad, Adil; Reid, Alexandra; McGarvey, Brian; Brandle, Jim; Ma, Shengwu; Jevnikar, Anthony; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Menassa, Rima

    2013-01-01

    The production of pharmaceutical proteins in plants has made much progress in recent years with the development of transient expression systems, transplastomic technology and humanizing glycosylation patterns in plants. However, the first therapeutic proteins approved for administration to humans and animals were made in plant cell suspensions for reasons of containment, rapid scale-up and lack of toxic contaminants. In this study, we have investigated the production of human interleukin-10 (IL-10) in tobacco BY-2 cell suspension and evaluated the effect of an elastin-like polypeptide tag (ELP) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag on IL-10 accumulation. We report the highest accumulation levels of hIL-10 obtained with any stable plant expression system using the ELP fusion strategy. Although IL-10-ELP has cytokine activity, its activity is reduced compared to unfused IL-10, likely caused by interference of ELP with folding of IL-10. Green fluorescent protein has no effect on IL-10 accumulation, but examining the trafficking of IL-10-GFP over the cell culture cycle revealed fluorescence in the vacuole during the stationary phase of the culture growth cycle. Analysis of isolated vacuoles indicated that GFP alone is found in vacuoles, while the full-size fusion remains in the whole-cell extract. This indicates that GFP is cleaved off prior to its trafficking to the vacuole. On the other hand, IL-10-GFP-ELP remains mostly in the ER and accumulates to high levels. Protein bodies were observed at the end of the culture cycle and are thought to arise as a consequence of high levels of accumulation in the ER. PMID:23297698

  2. Spatiotemporal fusion of multiple-satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products using Bayesian maximum entropy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qingxin; Bo, Yanchen; Zhu, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    Merging multisensor aerosol optical depth (AOD) products is an effective way to produce more spatiotemporally complete and accurate AOD products. A spatiotemporal statistical data fusion framework based on a Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) method was developed for merging satellite AOD products in East Asia. The advantages of the presented merging framework are that it not only utilizes the spatiotemporal autocorrelations but also explicitly incorporates the uncertainties of the AOD products being merged. The satellite AOD products used for merging are the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5.1 Level-2 AOD products (MOD04_L2) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Deep Blue Level 2 AOD products (SWDB_L2). The results show that the average completeness of the merged AOD data is 95.2%,which is significantly superior to the completeness of MOD04_L2 (22.9%) and SWDB_L2 (20.2%). By comparing the merged AOD to the Aerosol Robotic Network AOD records, the results show that the correlation coefficient (0.75), root-mean-square error (0.29), and mean bias (0.068) of the merged AOD are close to those (the correlation coefficient (0.82), root-mean-square error (0.19), and mean bias (0.059)) of the MODIS AOD. In the regions where both MODIS and SeaWiFS have valid observations, the accuracy of the merged AOD is higher than those of MODIS and SeaWiFS AODs. Even in regions where both MODIS and SeaWiFS AODs are missing, the accuracy of the merged AOD is also close to the accuracy of the regions where both MODIS and SeaWiFS have valid observations.

  3. Integrating Crowdsourced Data with a Land Cover Product: A Bayesian Data Fusion Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Gengler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For many environmental applications, an accurate spatial mapping of land cover is a major concern. Currently, land cover products derived from satellite data are expected to offer a fast and inexpensive way of mapping large areas. However, the quality of these products may also largely depend on the area under study. As a result, it is common that various products disagree with each other, and the assessment of their respective quality still relies on ground validation datasets. Recently, crowdsourced data have been suggested as an alternate source of information that might help overcome this problem. However, crowdsourced data still remain largely discarded in scientific studies due to their inherent poor quality assurance. The aim of this paper is to present an efficient methodology that allows the user to code information brought by crowdsourced data even if no prior quality estimation is at hand and possibly to fuse this information with existing land cover products in order to improve their accuracy. It is first suggested that information brought by volunteers can be coded as a set of inequality constraints about the probabilities of the various land use classes at the visited places. This in turn allows estimating optimal probabilities based on a maximum entropy principle and to proceed afterwards with a spatial interpolation of these volunteers’ information. Finally, a Bayesian data fusion approach can be used for fusing multiple volunteers’ contributions with a remotely-sensed land cover product. This methodology is illustrated in this paper by focusing on the mapping of croplands in Ethiopia, where the aim is to improve the mapping of cropland as coming out from a land cover product with mitigated performances. It is shown how crowdsourced information can seriously improve the quality of the final product. The corresponding results also suggest that a prior assessing of remotely-sensed data quality can seriously improve the benefit

  4. Thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisse, J.

    2000-01-01

    This document takes stock of the two ways of thermonuclear fusion research explored today: magnetic confinement fusion and inertial confinement fusion. The basic physical principles are recalled first: fundamental nuclear reactions, high temperatures, elementary properties of plasmas, ignition criterion, magnetic confinement (charged particle in a uniform magnetic field, confinement and Tokamak principle, heating of magnetized plasmas (ohmic, neutral particles, high frequency waves, other heating means), results obtained so far (scale laws and extrapolation of performances, tritium experiments, ITER project), inertial fusion (hot spot ignition, instabilities, results (Centurion-Halite program, laser experiments). The second part presents the fusion reactor and its associated technologies: principle (tritium production, heat source, neutron protection, tritium generation, materials), magnetic fusion (superconducting magnets, divertor (role, principle, realization), inertial fusion (energy vector, laser adaptation, particle beams, reaction chamber, stresses, chamber concepts (dry and wet walls, liquid walls), targets (fabrication, injection and pointing)). The third chapter concerns the socio-economic aspects of thermonuclear fusion: safety (normal operation and accidents, wastes), costs (costs structure and elementary comparison, ecological impact and external costs). (J.S.)

  5. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of ready-to-eat meat: Inactivation of Listeria innocua and changes in product quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rød, Sara Katrine; Hansen, Flemming; Leipold, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The application of cold atmospheric pressure plasma for decontamination of a sliced ready-to-eat (RTE) meat product (bresaola) inoculated with Listeria innocua was investigated. Inoculated samples were treated at 15.5, 31, and 62 W for 2–60 s inside sealed linear-low-density-polyethylene bags...... the sensory threshold level. Surface colour changes included loss of redness of ∼40% and 70% after 1 and 14 days of storage, respectively, regardless of plasma treatment. The results indicate that plasma may be applicable in surface decontamination of pre-packed RTE food products. However, oxidation may...

  6. Glacial cold-water coral growth in the Gulf of Cádiz: Implications of increased palaeo-productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienberg, Claudia; Frank, Norbert; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Stuut, Jan-Berend; Marchant, Margarita; Fietzke, Jan; Mienis, Furu; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2010-10-01

    A set of 40 Uranium-series datings obtained on the reef-forming scleractinian cold-water corals Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata revealed that during the past 400 kyr their occurrence in the Gulf of Cádiz (GoC) was almost exclusively restricted to glacial periods. This result strengthens the outcomes of former studies that coral growth in the temperate NE Atlantic encompassing the French, Iberian and Moroccan margins dominated during glacial periods, whereas in the higher latitudes (Irish and Norwegian margins) extended coral growth prevailed during interglacial periods. Thus it appears that the biogeographical limits for sustained cold-water coral growth along the NE Atlantic margin are strongly related to climate change. By focussing on the last glacial-interglacial cycle, this study shows that palaeo-productivity was increased during the last glacial. This was likely driven by the fertilisation effect of an increased input of aeolian dust and locally intensified upwelling. After the Younger Dryas cold event, the input of aeolian dust and productivity significantly decreased concurrent with an increase in water temperatures in the GoC. This primarily resulted in reduced food availability and caused a widespread demise of the formerly thriving coral ecosystems. Moreover, these climate induced changes most likely caused a latitudinal shift of areas with optimum coral growth conditions towards the northern NE Atlantic where more suitable environmental conditions established with the onset of the Holocene.

  7. Effect of cold water injection on operation of and oil production from formations of Romashkino field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingareev, R Sh; Vakhitov, G G; Sultanov, S A

    1968-11-01

    Each year about 130 million cu m of cold water are injected into this field. Since cold water can lower reservoir temperature, increase oil viscosity, deposit paraffin in the formation, and reduce oil recovery, a thermal survey of this field was conducted. The survey showed that the average reservoir temperature was not reduced by cold-water injection for 15 yr. However, local cooling was observed at distances less than 400 m from the water injection well. Through these wells more than 4 PV of water have passed. The thermal front lags 1,500 m behind the advancing water front. For this reason, cold-water injection does not reduce oil recovery where there is uniform advance of the floodwater. When the formation is heterogeneous so that water advances more rapidly in high-permeability sand than in adjoining low-permeability sand, then the cooling effect can reduce oil recovery. For this reason, it is advisable to force water into the entire interval of the oil formation. An isotherm map of the Romashkino field is shown.

  8. Evaluation of scattering laws and cross sections for calculation of production and transport of cold and ultracold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernnat, W.; Keinert, J.; Mattes, M.

    2004-01-01

    For the calculation of neutron spectra in cold and super thermal sources scattering laws for a variety of liquid and solid cyrogenic materials were evaluated and prepared for use in deterministic and Monte Carlo transport calculations. For moderator materials like liquid and solid H 2 O, liquid He, liquid D 2 O, liquid and solid H 2 and D 2 , solid CH 4 and structure materials such as Al, Bi, Pb, ZrHx, and graphite scattering law data and cross sections are available. The evaluated data were validated by comparison with measured cross sections and comparison of measured and calculated neutron spectra as far as available. Further applications are the calculation of production and transport and storing of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) in different UCN sources. The data structures of the evaluated data are prepared for the common S N -transport codes and the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of scattering laws and cross sections for calculation of production and transport of cold and ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernnat, W.; Keinert, J.; Mattes, M. [Inst. for Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems, Univ. of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    For the calculation of neutron spectra in cold and super thermal sources scattering laws for a variety of liquid and solid cyrogenic materials were evaluated and prepared for use in deterministic and Monte Carlo transport calculations. For moderator materials like liquid and solid H{sub 2}O, liquid He, liquid D{sub 2}O, liquid and solid H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}, solid CH{sub 4} and structure materials such as Al, Bi, Pb, ZrHx, and graphite scattering law data and cross sections are available. The evaluated data were validated by comparison with measured cross sections and comparison of measured and calculated neutron spectra as far as available. Further applications are the calculation of production and transport and storing of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) in different UCN sources. The data structures of the evaluated data are prepared for the common S{sub N}-transport codes and the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. (orig.)

  10. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Fusion Center, 1988--1989 report to the President

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics on fusion energy: cold fusion; alcator confinement experiments; applied plasma physics research; fusion systems; coherent electromagnetic wave generation; and fusion technology and engineering

  11. Review of fusion synfuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. 40 to 60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high-temperature electrolysis of approx. 50 to 65% are projected for fusion reactors using high-temperatures blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion

  12. Phytoremediation of azoxystrobin and its degradation products in soil by P. major L. under cold and salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeh, Ahmed Ali Ali

    2017-10-01

    Azoxystrobin is a broad-spectrum, systemic and soil-applied fungicide used for crop protection against the four major classes of pathogenic fungi. The use of azoxystrobin use has induced water pollution and ecotoxicological effects upon aquatic organisms, long half-life in soils, as well as heath issues. Such issues may be solved by phytoremediation. Here, we tested the uptake and translocation of azoxystrobin and its degradation products by Plantago major, under cold stress and salt stress. The result demonstrated that azoxystrobin significantly accumulated in P. major roots under salinity conditions more than that in the P. major roots under cold conditions and natural condition within two days of experimental period. In P. major roots and leaves, the chromatograms of HPLC for azoxystrobin and metabolites under natural condition (control) and stressed samples (cold stress and salt stress) show different patterns of metabolism pathways reflecting changes in the degradation products. Azoxystrobin carboxylic acid (AZ-acid) formed by methyl ester hydrolysis was an important route in the roots and the leaves. AZ-pyOH and AZ-benzoic were detected in P. major roots under cold and salt stress, while did not detected in P. major roots under natural condition. In the leaves, AZ-pyOH and AZ-benzoic were detected in all treatments between 4 and 12days of exposure. Shoots of the stressed plants had greater H 2 O 2 and proline contents than was observed in the control plants. The level of 100mM NaCl treatment induced significantly higher peroxidase (POD) activity than the non-treated control group. Leaf Chlorophyll contents in the plants at 80 and 100mM NaCl were significantly reduced than was observed in the control plants. I concluded that P. major had a high potential to contribute to remediation of saline-soil contaminated with azoxystrobin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. First stage of bio-jet fuel production: non-food sunflower oil extraction using cold press method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianhui Zhao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As a result of concerning petroleum price increasing and environmental impact, more attention is attracted to renewable resources for transportation fuels. Because not conflict with human and animal food resources, non-food vegetable oils are promising sources for developing bio-jet fuels. Extracting vegetable oil from oilseeds is the first critical step in the pathway of bio-jet fuel production. When sunflower seeds are de-hulled, there are always about 5%–15% broken seed kernels (fine meat particles left over as residual wastes with oil content up to 48%. However, the oil extracted from these sunflower seed residues is non-edible due to its quality not meeting food standards. Genetically modified sunflower grown on margin lands has been identified one of sustainable biofuel sources since it doesn't compete to arable land uses. Sunflower oils extraction from non-food sunflower seeds, sunflower meats, and fine sunflower meats (seed de-hulling residue was carried out using a cold press method in this study. Characterization of the sunflower oils produced was performed. The effect of cold press rotary frequency on oil recovery and quality was discussed. The results show that higher oil recovery was obtained at lower rotary frequencies. The highest oil recovery for sunflower seeds, sunflower meats, and fine sunflower meats in the tests were 75.67%, 89.74% and 83.19% respectively. The cold press operating conditions had minor influence on the sunflower oil quality. Sunflower meat oils produced at 15 Hz were preliminarily upgraded and distilled. The properties of the upgraded sunflower oils were improved. Though further study is needed for the improvement of processing cost and oil recovery, cold press has shown promising to extract oil from non-food sunflower seeds for future bio-jet fuel production.

  14. Comparison of the Benefit Feeling Rate Based on the Sho of OTC Kakkonto, Cold Remedy and Cold Remedy with Kakkonto Combination Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Mitsuyoshi; Yayoshi, Yuki; Ohara, Kousuke; Negishi, Akio; Akimoto, Hayato; Inoue, Naoko; Numajiri, Sachihiko; Ohshima, Shigeru; Honma, Seiichi; Oshima, Shinji; Kobayashi, Daisuke

    2017-10-01

    Kakkonto (KK), a traditional Japanese Kampo formulation for cold and flu, is generally sold as an OTC pharmaceuticals used for self-medication. Kampo formulations should be used according to the Sho-symptoms of Kampo medicine. These symptoms refer to the subjective symptoms themselves. Although with OTC pharmaceuticals, this is often not the case. We surveyed the relationship of agreement of Sho with the benefit feeling rate (BFR) of patients who took KK (n=555), cold remedies with KK (CK, n=315), and general cold remedies (GC, n=539) using internet research. BFR of a faster recovery was greater in participants who took the medication early and who had confidence in their physical strength in all treatment groups. BFR was significantly higher in the GC group than in the KK group for patients with headache, runny nose, blocked nose, sneezing, and cough. BFR was also significantly higher in the GC group than in the CK group for headache (males) and cough (females). BFR was the highest in the KK group for stiff shoulders. All cold remedies were more effective when taken early, and the larger the number of Sho that a patient had, the greater the BFR increased. Therefore, a cold remedy is expected to be most effective when there are many cold symptoms and when it is taken at an early stage of the common cold.

  15. Research progress in intense ion beam production for inertial confinement fusion at Cornell University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluhm, H.; Greenly, J.B.; Hammer, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent results obtained in the generation of intense pulsed light ion beams and their application to inertial confinement fusion are described. Studies of time-integrated and time-dependent beam divergence using a magnetically insulated ion diode with a ''flashboard'' anode at 11 W diode power show a directionality which is apparently due to electron dynamics in the diode. Nevertheless, ion beams having divergence angle as small as 0.5 0 have been produced at >10 8 W.cm - 2 . In another experiment with a similar diode, the anode plasma formation time varied with the detailed anode configuration, the diode voltage and the insulating magnetic field, with the longer times obtained at lower voltage and higher insulating magnetic field strength. The anode plasma density was determined to be in the 10 15 cm - 3 density range and to move away from the anode at approx.2 cm.μs - 1 in another similar experiment. Preliminary experiments performed on a 10 12 W accelerator show reasonable power coupling to a magnetically insulated ion diode, with >10 9 W.cm - 2 beams at approx.1.5 MV being generated. Computer simulations suggest that if such a beam can be focused into a plasma channel, most of its energy can be delivered to a pellet one to two metres away. In experiments on the applied Bsub(theta) diode, microwave radiation, ion production efficiency, and ion beam fluctuations all reach a maximum when the insulating magnetic field is about 1.4 times the critical field for magnetic insulation. Finally, relatively pure beams of heavy ions have been produced by making the anode with hydrocarbon-free dielectric material which contains the desired species together with other ions having substantially higher ionization potential. The sum of these results suggests that flashboard anodes operated at the few-MV level can be used to produce beams with properties suitable for inertial confinement fusion experiments on sufficiently powerful pulsed power generators. (author)

  16. Data Fusion of Gridded Snow Products Enhanced with Terrain Covariates and a Simple Snow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snauffer, A. M.; Hsieh, W. W.; Cannon, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrologic planning requires accurate estimates of regional snow water equivalent (SWE), particularly areas with hydrologic regimes dominated by spring melt. While numerous gridded data products provide such estimates, accurate representations are particularly challenging under conditions of mountainous terrain, heavy forest cover and large snow accumulations, contexts which in many ways define the province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. One promising avenue of improving SWE estimates is a data fusion approach which combines field observations with gridded SWE products and relevant covariates. A base artificial neural network (ANN) was constructed using three of the best performing gridded SWE products over BC (ERA-Interim/Land, MERRA and GLDAS-2) and simple location and time covariates. This base ANN was then enhanced to include terrain covariates (slope, aspect and Terrain Roughness Index, TRI) as well as a simple 1-layer energy balance snow model driven by gridded bias-corrected ANUSPLIN temperature and precipitation values. The ANN enhanced with all aforementioned covariates performed better than the base ANN, but most of the skill improvement was attributable to the snow model with very little contribution from the terrain covariates. The enhanced ANN improved station mean absolute error (MAE) by an average of 53% relative to the composing gridded products over the province. Interannual peak SWE correlation coefficient was found to be 0.78, an improvement of 0.05 to 0.18 over the composing products. This nonlinear approach outperformed a comparable multiple linear regression (MLR) model by 22% in MAE and 0.04 in interannual correlation. The enhanced ANN has also been shown to estimate better than the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model calibrated and run for four BC watersheds, improving MAE by 22% and correlation by 0.05. The performance improvements of the enhanced ANN are statistically significant at the 5% level across the province and

  17. Measurement of Higgs boson production via vector boson fusion in decays into W bosons with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronner, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    The vector boson fusion production rate of the Standard Model Higgs boson has been measured in decays into two W bosons, each subsequently decaying into an electron or muon and a neutrino, with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The vector boson fusion production cross section in the Standard Model is about an order of magnitude smaller than the dominant Higgs boson production cross section from gluon fusion. Proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV delivered by the LHC recorded with the ATLAS detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 21 fb -1 have been analyzed. Motivated by the recent discovery of a Higgs-like boson with a mass of (125.5±0.6) GeV and (125.7±0.4) GeV by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the LHC, the analysis is optimized for this mass. An excess of events, compatible with the Standard Model expectation for a Higgs boson with m H =125 GeV, is observed with a significance of 2.8 standard deviations when compared to the background-only expectation. The corresponding signal strength, the observed event rate relative to the Standard Model prediction of m H =125 GeV is 2.1 -0.8 +1.0 . A Higgs boson produced via vector boson fusion is excluded with 95% confidence level in the mass range between 152 GeV and 185 GeV. When combined with measurements of other Higgs boson production and decay channels by ATLAS, evidence for vector boson fusion production with a significance of 3.3 standard deviations is observed. All measurements of Higgs boson couplings to Standard Model particles are in agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.

  18. Production of proton-rich nuclei around Z = 84-90 in fusion-evaporation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Peng-Hui [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Feng, Zhao-Qing; Li, Jun-Qing; Jin, Gen-Ming [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Niu, Fei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Henan Normal University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Xinxiang (China); Guo, Ya-Fei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China); Zhang, Hong-Fei [Lanzhou University, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    Within the framework of the dinuclear system model, production cross sections of proton-rich nuclei with charged numbers of Z = 84-90 are investigated systematically. Possible combinations with the {sup 28}Si, {sup 32}S, {sup 40}Ar bombarding the target nuclides {sup 165}Ho, {sup 169}Tm, {sup 170-174}Yb, {sup 175,176}Lu, {sup 174,} {sup 176-180}Hf and {sup 181}Ta are analyzed thoroughly. The optimal excitation energies and evaporation channels are proposed to produce the proton-rich nuclei. The systems are feasible to be constructed in experiments. It is found that the neutron shell closure of N = 126 is of importance during the evaporation of neutrons. The experimental excitation functions in the {sup 40}Ar induced reactions can be nicely reproduced. The charged particle evaporation is comparable with neutrons in cooling the excited proton-rich nuclei, in particular for the channels with α and proton evaporation. The production cross section increases with the mass asymmetry of colliding systems because of the decrease of the inner fusion barrier. The channels with pure neutron evaporation depend on the isotopic targets. But it is different for the channels with charged particles and more sensitive to the odd-even effect. (orig.)

  19. Experimental investigation of the confinement of d(3He,p)α and d(d,p)t fusion reaction products in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonheure, Georges; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.

    2012-01-01

    In ITER, magnetic fusion will explore the burning plasma regime. Because such burning plasma is sustained by its own fusion reactions, alpha particles need to be confined (Hazeltine 2010 Fusion Eng. Des. 7–9 85). New experiments using d(3He,p)α and d(d,p)t fusion reaction products were performed...... in JET. Fusion product loss was measured from MHD-quiescent plasmas with a charged particle activation probe installed at a position opposite to the magnetic field ion gradient drift (see figure 1)—1.77 m above mid-plane—in the ceiling of JET tokamak. This new kind of escaping ion detector (Bonheure et...... al 2008 Fusion Sci. Technol. 53 806) provides for absolutely calibrated measurements. Both the mechanism and the magnitude of the loss are dealt with by this research. Careful analysis shows measured loss is in quantitative agreement with predictions from the classical orbit loss model. However...

  20. Geochemical Tracers and Rates of Short-Chain Alkane Production in Gulf of Mexico Cold Seep Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibert, R.; Bernard, B. B.; Brooks, J. M.; Hunter, K.; Joye, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    The organic-rich cold seep sediments in the deep Gulf of Mexico commonly contain mixtures of light hydrocarbon gases either dissolved in pore fluids, adsorbed to sediment particles, trapped in methane ice, or as free gas. The dominant component in these natural gas mixtures is typically methane (C1), but ethane (C2) and propane (C3) are nearly always present in trace or major amounts. The ratio of C1:C2:C3 varies but C2 and C3 are typically present at single digit percent levels, whereas methane usually dominates at >80%. Methane production proceeds by at least two well-studied mechanisms: either 1) by thermocatalytic cracking of fossil organic matter, or 2) as a direct product of microbial metabolism, methanogenesis. In contrast, ethane and propane production in deep-sea sediments has been historically attributed only to thermocatalytic processes. However, limited data suggests production of C2/C3 compounds through the activity of archaea. Such studies of microbial- driven dynamics of C2/C3 gases (i.e. 'alkanogenesis') in cold seep sediments are rare. Furthermore, the identities of potential substrates are poorly constrained and no attempt has been made to quantify production rates of C2/C3 gases. However, carbon isotopic data on ethane and propane from deep cores from the Gulf of Mexico suggest alkanogenesis at depth in the sediment column and alkane oxidation in uppermost oxidant-rich sediments. Here, we present the results of a series of incubation experiments using sediment slurries culled from GC600, one of the most prolific natural oil and gas seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Rates of both alkane production and oxidation were measured under a variety of conditions to assess the net rates of alkane production and elucidate the driving microbiological mechanisms and controls on the central processes of >C1 alkane cycling in cold seep sediments. Microbial processes are important both in terms of alkane production and oxidation, raising many questions as to the

  1. Ion cyclotron emission due to the newly-born fusion products induced fast Alfven wave radiative instabilities in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunasalam, V.

    1995-08-01

    The velocity distribution functions of the newly born (t = 0) charged fusion products of tokamak discharges can be approximated by a monoenergetic ring distribution with a finite v parallel such that v perpendicular ∼ v parallel ∼ v j where (M j V j 2 /2) = E j , the directed birth energy of the charged fusion product species j of mass M j . As the time t progresses these distribution functions will evolve into a Gaussian in velocity with thermal spreadings given by the perpendicular and parallel temperatures T perpendicularj (t) = T parallelj (t) with T j (t) increasing as t increases and finally reaches an isotropic saturation value of T perpendicularj (t ∼ τ j ) = T parallelj (t ∼ τ j ) = T j (t ∼ τ j ) ∼ [M j T d E j /(M j + M)] 1/2 , where T d is the temperature of the background deuterium plasma ions, M is the mass of a triton or a neutron for j = protons and alpha particles, respectively, and τ j ∼ τ sj /4 is the thermalization time of the fusion product species j in the background deuterium plasma and τ sj is the slowing-down time. For times t of the order of τ j their distributions can be approximated by a Gaussian in their total energy. Then for times t ≥ τ sj the velocity distributions of these fusion products will relax towards their appropriate slowing-down distributions. Here the authors will examine the radiative stability of all these distributions. The ion cyclotron emission from energetic ion produced by fusion reactions or neutral beam injection promises to be a useful diagnostic tool

  2. Peaceful fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englert, Matthias [IANUS, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Like other intense neutron sources fusion reactors have in principle a potential to be used for military purposes. Although the use of fissile material is usually not considered when thinking of fusion reactors (except in fusion-fission hybrid concepts) quantitative estimates about the possible production potential of future commercial fusion reactor concepts show that significant amounts of weapon grade fissile materials could be produced even with very limited amounts of source materials. In this talk detailed burnup calculations with VESTA and MCMATH using an MCNP model of the PPCS-A will be presented. We compare different irradiation positions and the isotopic vectors of the plutonium bred in different blankets of the reactor wall with the liquid lead-lithium alloy replaced by uranium. The technical, regulatory and policy challenges to manage the proliferation risks of fusion power will be addressed as well. Some of these challenges would benefit if addressed at an early stage of the research and development process. Hence, research on fusion reactor safeguards should start as early as possible and accompany the current research on experimental fusion reactors.

  3. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  4. Modelling of nitric acid production in the Advanced Cold Process Canister due to irradiation of moist air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshaw, J.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarises the work performed for SKB of Sweden on the modelling of nitric acid production in the gaseous environment of the Advanced Cold Process Canister (ACPC). The model solves the simultaneous chemical rate equations describing the radiation chemistry of He/Ar/N 2 /O 2 /H 2 O gas mixture, involving over 200 chemical reactions. The amount of nitric acid produced as a function of time for typical ACPC conditions has been calculated using the model and the results reported. 11 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  5. Secondary Organic Aerosol Production from Gasoline Vehicle Exhaust: Effects of Engine Technology, Cold Start, and Emission Certification Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunliang; Lambe, Andrew T; Saleh, Rawad; Saliba, Georges; Robinson, Allen L

    2018-02-06

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from dilute exhaust from 16 gasoline vehicles was investigated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) oxidation flow reactor during chassis dynamometer testing using the cold-start unified cycle (UC). Ten vehicles were equipped with gasoline direct injection engines (GDI vehicles) and six with port fuel injection engines (PFI vehicles) certified to a wide range of emissions standards. We measured similar SOA production from GDI and PFI vehicles certified to the same emissions standard; less SOA production from vehicles certified to stricter emissions standards; and, after accounting for differences in gas-particle partitioning, similar effective SOA yields across different engine technologies and certification standards. Therefore the ongoing, dramatic shift from PFI to GDI vehicles in the United States should not alter the contribution of gasoline vehicles to ambient SOA and the natural replacement of older vehicles with newer ones certified to stricter emissions standards should reduce atmospheric SOA levels. Compared to hot operations, cold-start exhaust had lower effective SOA yields, but still contributed more SOA overall because of substantially higher organic gas emissions. We demonstrate that the PAM reactor can be used as a screening tool for vehicle SOA production by carefully accounting for the effects of the large variations in emission rates.

  6. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  7. Production of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid using two sequential enzymes overexpressed as double-tagged fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Chung-Hsien

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two sequential enzymes in the production of sialic acids, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine 2-epimerase (GlcNAc 2-epimerase and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid aldolase (Neu5Ac aldolase, were overexpressed as double-tagged gene fusions. Both were tagged with glutathione S-transferase (GST at the N-terminus, but at the C-terminus, one was tagged with five contiguous aspartate residues (5D, and the other with five contiguous arginine residues (5R. Results Both fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and retained enzymatic activity. The fusions were designed so their surfaces were charged under enzyme reaction conditions, which allowed isolation and immobilization in a single step, through a simple capture with either an anionic or a cationic exchanger (Sepharose Q or Sepharose SP that electrostatically bound the 5D or 5R tag. The introduction of double tags only marginally altered the affinity of the enzymes for their substrates, and the double-tagged proteins were enzymatically active in both soluble and immobilized forms. Combined use of the fusion proteins led to the production of N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac from N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc. Conclusion Double-tagged gene fusions were overexpressed to yield two enzymes that perform sequential steps in sialic acid synthesis. The proteins were easily immobilized via ionic tags onto ionic exchange resins and could thus be purified by direct capture from crude protein extracts. The immobilized, double-tagged proteins were effective for one-pot enzymatic production of sialic acid.

  8. Conceptual design of the Mu2e production solenoid cold mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Lamm, M.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nicol, T.H.; Page, T.M.; Pronskikh, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The required magnetic field is produced by a series of superconducting solenoids of various apertures and lengths. This paper describes the conceptual design of the 5 T, 4 m long solenoid cold mass with 1.67 m bore with the emphasis on the magnetic, radiation and thermal analyses.

  9. Measurement of loss of DT fusion products using scintillator detectors in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Marsala, R.J.; Palladino, R.W.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-03-01

    A poloidal array of MeV ion loss probes previously used to measure DD fusion product loss has been upgraded to measure the loss of alpha particles from DT plasmas in TFTR. The following improvements to the system have been made in preparation for the use of tritium in TFTR: (1) relocation of detectors to a neutronshielded enclosure in the basement to reduce neutron-induced background signals; (2) replacement of ZnS:Cu (P31) scintillators in the probes with the Y 3 Al 5 0 12 :Ce(P46) variety to minimize damage and assure linearity at the fluxes anticipated from DT plasmas; and (3) shielding of the fiber optic bundles which carry the fight from the probes to the detectors to reduce neutron- and gamma-induced light within them. In addition to the above preparations, the probes have been absolutely calibrated for alpha particles by using the Van de Graaf accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Alpha particle losses from DT plasmas have been observed, and losses at the detector 901 below the midplane are consistent with first orbit loss

  10. Effective field theory analysis of double Higgs production via gluon fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Panico, Giuliano; Son, Minho

    2015-01-01

    We perform a detailed study of double Higgs production via gluon fusion in the Effective Field Theory (EFT) framework where effects from new physics are parametrized by local operators. Our analysis provides a perspective broader than the one followed in most of the previous analyses, where this process was merely considered as a way to extract the Higgs trilinear coupling. We focus on the $hh \\to b\\bar b\\gamma\\gamma$ channel and perform a thorough simulation of signal and background at the 14 TeV LHC and a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider. We make use of invariant mass distributions to enhance the sensitivity on the EFT coefficients and give a first assessment of the impact of jet substructure techniques on the results. The range of validity of the EFT description is estimated, as required to consistently exploit the high-energy range of distributions, pointing out the potential relevance of dimension-8 operators. Our analysis contains a few important improvements over previous studies and identifies so...

  11. Variance-reduction technique for Coulomb-nuclear thermalization of energetic fusion products in hot plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVeaux, J.C.; Miley, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    A variance-reduction technique involving use of exponential transform and angular-biasing methods has been developed. Its purpose is to minimize the variance and computer time involved in estimating the mean fusion product (fp) energy deposited in a hot, multi-region plasma under the influence of small-energy transfer Coulomb collisions and large-energy transfer nuclear elastic scattering (NES) events. This technique is applicable to high-temperature D- 3 He, Cat. D and D-T plasmas which have highly energetic fps capable of undergoing NES. A first application of this technique is made to a D- 3 He Field Reversed Mirror (FRM) where the Larmor radius of the 14.7 MeV protons are typically comparable to the plasma radius (plasma radius approx. 2 fp gyroradii) and the optimistic fp confinement (approx. 45% of 14.7 MeV protons) previously predicted is vulnerable to large orbit perturbations induced by NES. In the FRM problem, this variance reduction technique is used to estimate the fractional difference in the average fp energy deposited in the closed-field region, E/sub cf/, with and without NES collisions

  12. Double emulsion generation in the mass production of inertial confinement fusion targets using T-junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Matthew J.

    This work demonstrates a new device for the continuous controlled production of double emulsions for the manufacturing of inertial confinement fusion targets. This device can be integrated into a microfluidic approach to produce targets which should increase the yield and quality of the targets and at a lower cost. The device is a double T-Junction, which has been scaled, optimized and built to produce oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions from diameters of roughly 4 mm or less. A T-Junction is an intersection of two channels at a right angle where fluid emerges and is broken off to form droplets. A systematic study presented here has shown that a single T-Junction has four modes of operation: squeezing, dripping, transition and streaming. The droplet size may be controlled by controlling the fluid flow rate through the channels; the droplet increases with increasing dispersed flow and decreasing continuous flow. The device was utilized to produce hundreds of ˜ 2.5 mm diameter resorcinol formaldehyde double emulsions with better than 2 percent reproducibility in diameter. The device was used to produce 2.0 mm shells with an average wall thickness of 510 microns.

  13. Bioethanol production by a flocculent hybrid, CHFY0321 obtained by protoplast fusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Gi-Wook; Kang, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Yule [Changhae Institute of Cassava and Ethanol Research, Changhae Ethanol Co., LTD, Palbok-Dong 829, Dukjin-Gu, Jeonju 561-203 (Korea); Um, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Mina; Kim, Yang-Hoon [Department of Microbiology, Chungbuk National University, 410 Sungbong-Ro, Heungduk-Gu, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea)

    2010-08-15

    Fusion hybrid yeast, CHFY0321, was obtained by protoplast fusion between non-flocculent-high ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHY1011 and flocculent-low ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces bayanus KCCM12633. The hybrid yeast was used together with the parental strains to examine ethanol production in batch fermentation. Under the conditions tested, the fusion hybrid CHFY0321 flocculated to the highest degree and had the capacity to ferment well at pH 4.5 and 32 C. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation for ethanol production was carried out using a cassava (Manihot esculenta) powder hydrolysate medium containing 19.5% (w v{sup -1}) total sugar in a 5 l lab scale jar fermenter at 32 C for 65 h with an agitation speed of 2 Hz. Under these conditions, CHFY0321 showed the highest flocculating ability and the best fermentation efficiency for ethanol production compared with those of the wild-type parent strains. CHFY0321 gave a final ethanol concentration of 89.8 {+-} 0.13 g l{sup -1}, a volumetric ethanol productivity of 1.38 {+-} 0.13 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1}, and a theoretical yield of 94.2 {+-} 1.58%. These results suggest that CHFY0321 exhibited the fermentation characteristics of S. cerevisiae CHY1011 and the flocculent ability of S. bayanus KCCM12633. Therefore, the strong highly flocculent ethanol fermentative CHFY0321 has potential for improving biotechnological ethanol fermentation processes. (author)

  14. Bioethanol production by a flocculent hybrid, CHFY0321 obtained by protoplast fusion between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Gi-Wook; Um, Hyun-Ju; Kang, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Yule; Kim, Mina; Kim, Yang-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Fusion hybrid yeast, CHFY0321, was obtained by protoplast fusion between non-flocculent-high ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHY1011 and flocculent-low ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces bayanus KCCM12633. The hybrid yeast was used together with the parental strains to examine ethanol production in batch fermentation. Under the conditions tested, the fusion hybrid CHFY0321 flocculated to the highest degree and had the capacity to ferment well at pH 4.5 and 32 o C. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation for ethanol production was carried out using a cassava (Manihot esculenta) powder hydrolysate medium containing 19.5% (w v -1 ) total sugar in a 5 l lab scale jar fermenter at 32 o C for 65 h with an agitation speed of 2 Hz. Under these conditions, CHFY0321 showed the highest flocculating ability and the best fermentation efficiency for ethanol production compared with those of the wild-type parent strains. CHFY0321 gave a final ethanol concentration of 89.8 ± 0.13 g l -1 , a volumetric ethanol productivity of 1.38 ± 0.13 g l -1 h -1 , and a theoretical yield of 94.2 ± 1.58%. These results suggest that CHFY0321 exhibited the fermentation characteristics of S. cerevisiae CHY1011 and the flocculent ability of S. bayanus KCCM12633. Therefore, the strong highly flocculent ethanol fermentative CHFY0321 has potential for improving biotechnological ethanol fermentation processes.

  15. Physicochemical and technological aspects of application of anthracite of Nazar-Aylok Deposit for production of cold-bottom hearth mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokhidov, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    The present work is devoted to physicochemical and technological aspects of application of anthracite of Nazar-Aylok Deposit for production of cold-bottom hearth mass. The purpose of present work is to study the composition and physicochemical properties of initial and calcined anthracite of Nazar-Aylok Deposit, revelation of optimal parameters of its thermal treatment. Therefore, the structure, composition and physicochemical properties of anthracite of Nazar-Aylok Deposit have been studied by means of chemical, thermographic, X-ray, electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy methods; physicochemical and mechanical properties of cold-bottom hearth mass produced at various mass ratio of filler, binding and plasticizer have been studied as well; the flowsheets of production of cold-bottom hearth mass with the usage of anthracite of Nazar-Aylok Deposit have been elaborated; the pilot bitch of cold-bottom hearth mass has been produced and tested at industrial scale.

  16. Production of Arctic Sea-ice Albedo by fusion of MISR and MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbouche, Said; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2017-04-01

    We have combined data from the NASA MISR and MODIS spectro-radiometers to create a cloud-free albedo dataset specifically for sea-ice. The MISR (Multi-Angular Spectro-Radiometer) instrument on board Terra satellite has a unique ability to create high-quality Bidirectional Reflectance (BRF) over a 7 minute time interval per single overpass, thanks to its 9 cameras of different view angles (±70°,±60°,±45°,±26°). However, as MISR is limited to narrow spectral bands (443nm, 555nm, 670nm, 865nm), which is not sufficient to mask cloud effectively and robustly, we have used the sea-ice mask MOD09 product (Collection 6) from MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectoradiometer) instrument, which is also on board Terra satellite and acquiring data simultaneously. Only We have created a new and consistent sea-ice (for Arctic) albedo product that is daily, from 1st March to 22nd September for each and every year between 2000 to 2016 at two spatial grids, 1km x 1km and 5km x 5km in polar stereographic projection. Their analysis is described in a separate report [1]. References [1] Muller & Kharbouche, Variation of Arctic's Sea-ice Albedo between 2000 and 2016 by fusion of MISR and MODIS data. This conference. Acknowledgements This work was supported by www.QA4ECV.eu, a project of European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 607405. We thank our colleagues at JPL and NASA LaRC for processing these data, especially Sebastian Val and Steve Protack.

  17. THE BENEFITS OF TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING AND HYPERSPECTRAL DATA FUSION PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Buckley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Close range hyperspectral imaging is a developing method for the analysis and identification of material composition in many applications, such as in within the earth sciences. Using compact imaging devices in the field allows near-vertical topography to be imaged, thus bypassing the key limitations of viewing angle and resolution that preclude the use of airborne and spaceborne platforms. Terrestrial laser scanning allows 3D topography to be captured with high precision and spatial resolution. The combination of 3D geometry from laser scanning, and material properties from hyperspectral imaging allows new fusion products to be created, adding new information for solving application problems. This paper highlights the advantages of terrestrial lidar and hyperspectral integration, focussing on the qualitative and quantitative aspects, with examples from a geological field application. Accurate co-registration of the two data types is required. This allows 2D pixels to be linked to the 3D lidar geometry, giving increased quantitative analysis as classified material vectors are projected to 3D space for calculation of areas and examination of spatial relationships. User interpretation of hyperspectral results in a spatially-meaningful manner is facilitated using visual methods that combine the geometric and mineralogical products in a 3D environment. Point cloud classification and the use of photorealistic modelling enhance qualitative validation and interpretation, and allow image registration accuracy to be checked. A method for texture mapping of lidar meshes with multiple image textures, both conventional digital photos and hyperspectral results, is described. The integration of terrestrial laser scanning and hyperspectral imaging is a valuable means of providing new analysis methods, suitable for many applications requiring linked geometric and chemical information.

  18. Higgs boson decays and production via gluon fusion at LHC in littlest Higgs models with T parity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lei; Yang Jinmin

    2009-01-01

    We study the Higgs boson decays and production via gluon fusion at the LHC as a probe of two typical littlest Higgs models which introduce a top quark partner with different (even and odd) T parity to cancel the Higgs mass quadratic divergence contributed by the top quark. For each model, we consider two different choices for the down-type quark Yukawa couplings. We first examine the branching ratios of the Higgs boson decays and then study the production via gluon fusion followed by the decay into two photons or two weak gauge bosons. We find that the predictions can be quite different for different models or different choices of down-type quark Yukawa couplings, and all these predictions can sizably deviate from the standard model predictions. So the Higgs boson processes at the LHC can be a sensitive probe for these littlest Higgs models.

  19. Nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-zaelic, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear fusion can be relied on to solve the global energy crisis if the process of limiting the heat produced by the fusion reaction (Plasma) is successful. Currently scientists are progressively working on this aspect whereas there are two methods to limit the heat produced by fusion reaction, the two methods are auto-restriction using laser beam and magnetic restriction through the use of magnetic fields and research is carried out to improve these two methods. It is expected that at the end of this century the nuclear fusion energy will play a vital role in overcoming the global energy crisis and for these reasons, acquiring energy through the use of nuclear fusion reactors is one of the most urge nt demands of all mankind at this time. The conclusion given is that the source of fuel for energy production is readily available and inexpensive ( hydrogen atoms) and whole process is free of risks and hazards, especially to general health and the environment . Nuclear fusion importance lies in the fact that energy produced by the process is estimated to be about four to five times the energy produced by nuclear fission. (author)

  20. Imposition of Antidumping Duty (BAMD Towards China’s Cold Rolled Coil/Sheet (CRC/S Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Pratiwi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Steel industry is a strategic sector in the economy of a country. Steel industry in Indonesia has not been able to fulfill their domestic demand that is still necessary to import steel product. However, many of these imported products are sold at dumping prices, especially those from china giving rise to unfair trade. One of trade remedy measures as a result of unfair trade remedies can recover trough the imposition of antidumping duty. In 2013, Indonesia imposes antidumping duty for Cold Rolled Coil/Sheet (CRC/S from China and other countries. Imposition of antidumping duty will be analyzed descriptively with the antidumping agreement conformity. While, it cannot be denied that political factors also determine imposition of antidumping duty. It is need to use analytical theory of justice in order to enforce fair-trade

  1. Computer simulation of charged fusion-product trajectories and detection efficiency expected for future experiments within the COMPASS tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Sadowski, Marek J

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of computer simulations of charged particle motions and detection efficiencies for an ion-pinhole camera of a new diagnostic system to be used in future COMPASS tokamak experiments. A probe equipped with a nuclear track detector can deliver information about charged products of fusion reactions. The calculations were performed with a so-called Gourdon code, based on a single-particle model and toroidal symmetry. There were computed trajectories of fast ions (> 500 keV) in medium-dense plasma (n e  < 10 14  cm −3 ) and an expected detection efficiency (a ratio of the number of detected particles to that of particles emitted from plasma). The simulations showed that charged fusion products can reach the new diagnostic probe, and the expected detection efficiency can reach 2 × 10 −8 . Based on such calculations, one can determine the optimal position and orientation of the probe. The obtained results are of importance for the interpretation of fusion-product images to be recorded in future COMPASS experiments. (paper)

  2. High-energy fusion-product energy-loss measurements. Final technical report, January 1, 1981-December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.

    1983-12-01

    An experiment designed to examine the slowing down of charged fusion products in ICF plasmas was done. A time-of-flight spectrometer was used to simultaneously measure the energy spectra of D-T alphas and D 2 protons escaping from imploded glass microballoons. In order to model fusion-product slowing down in plasmas with nonclassical plasma parameters, the Ion-Sphere (or hard-sphere) potential has been used. The deceleration of fast test ions slowing down off of this potential has been calculated in a straightforward way. An interpolation between the classical slowing-down formula and the Ion-Sphere slowing-down expression in the region between classical and nonclassical plasmas has been derived. This expression, called the Ion-Sphere Interpolation Model, is valid for all fully ionized non-degenerate plasmas. Fusion-product energy deposition in the fuel is necessary for self-heating and burnwave propagation - two effects required for high-gain ICF. The University of Illinois advanced fuel hydrodynamic-burn code, AFBURN, has been used to test the sensitivity of reactor-sized targets to dE/dx. It was found that strongly burning targets are insensitive to both factor of two changes in dE/dx and inclusion of large plasma parameter effects in dE/dx. It was also found that weakly burning targets exhibit a markedly increased sensitivity to these effects

  3. [Optimization of fermentation conditions for cold-adapted amylase production by Micrococcus antarcticus and its enzymatic properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong-xi; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhi-pei

    2009-08-15

    By single factor experiments, the fermentation conditions for cold-adapted amylase production from Micrococcus antarcticus were determined as follows(medium g/L): Na2 HPO4 2.0, KH2PO4 1.0, MgSO4 x 7H2O 0.1, NaCl 5.0, (NH4)2SO4 2.5, maltose 5.0, trace element solution 5.0 mL, pH 8.0, 100 mL/Erlenmeyer flask (500 mL); cultivation was in a rotating shaker at 12 degrees C and 160 r/min for 64 h.Under those conditions,the highest total enzyme activity (2.6 U/mL) was obtained and increased by 10.8 fold compared with the original value of 0.24 U/mL before optimization. This amylase was purified by concentration with ultrafiltration membrane module, Hitrap Q anion exchange chromatography and Superdex 200 gel filtration chromatography. The optimal temperature and pH for the purified amylase were 30 degrees C and 6.0, respectively.It still showed high activity at low temperature 10-15 degrees C. It was sensitive to high temperature but was stable at pH 6.0-10.0 with at least 70% activity remained. These results indicated that it was a typical cold-adapted enzyme. The enzyme activity was stimulated by Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+ and Mg2+; but inhibited by Zn2+, Ba2+, Ag+, Cu2+, Al3+, Fe2, Fe3+, Hg2+, EDTA and citrate. This cold-adapted amylase showed resistance to inactivation of 0.1% nonionic surfactants such as Tween 80, TrintonX-100, etc. Its Km was 0.90 mg/mL.

  4. Production and evaluation of cytotoxic effects of DT386-BR2 fusion protein as a novel anti-cancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Fatemeh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a fusion protein consisting of the catalytic and translocation domains of diphtheria toxin fused to BR2, a cancer specific cell penetrating peptide, and evaluation of its cytotoxic effects for targeted eradication of cancer cells. For this purpose, The DT386-BR2 structure was predicted using Modeller 9.14 and the best predicted model was selected based on the minimum DOPE score. A synthetic gene encoding DT386-BR2 was cloned in pET28a expression vector, expressed and purified by affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed the expression of the DT386-BR2 fusion protein by revealing a band of about 47kDa after the induction of the expression. Finally, the purified protein was subjected to MTT assay for evaluation of its cyto-lethal effects on cancer and normal cell lines. Statistical analysis showed significant reduction in survival percent of HeLa and MCF-7 cancer cells in comparison to negative control (PBS), while the cytotoxic effect was not significant on the normal cells, i.e. HUVEC and HEK 293. The IC50 of DT386-BR2 for HeLa and MCF-7 was about 0.55 and 2.08μg/ml, respectively. In conclusion, the production and purification of DT386-BR2 fusion protein was successfully achieved and its cytotoxic effects on the studied cancer cell lines was established. The promising cytotoxic effects of this newly constructed fusion protein made it a suitable candidate for targeted therapy of cancer, and further in vitro and in vivo studies on this fusion protein is underway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fusion energy applied to synthetic fuel production: a report to the DOE Division of Magnetic Fusion Energy based on a preliminary study by an ad-hoc advisory group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.

    1977-10-01

    The general conclusion is that the potential for utilization of fusion energy for synthetic fuel production is favorable. Three basic methods of hydrogen production are identified: high-temperature electrolysis, thermochemical cycles, and direct radiolysis. Combinations of these and their use as in combined cycles for electric power generation are considered

  6. Cold-rolled sheets production of stainless martensite-ageing steel smelted by vacuum arc and electroslag techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, A A; Grishkov, A I; Suslin, A P; Nesterenko, A A; Lola, V N [Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Chernoj Metallurgii, Moscow (USSR)

    1975-05-01

    In cooperation with a number of metallurgical works the production of a high strength sheet stainless maraging steel EHP678 (000KH11N10M2T) has been tested by rolling cylindrical ingots of vacuum arc smelting at the blooming (the mass of rough ingots was 5.1 to 6.0 t, that of cleaned ingots - 3.8 to 5.1 t) or rectangular ingots of electroslag smelting (13 t) at the slabbing. The recommended regimes of heating and deformation are much similar to those used for the steel-KH18N10T. The output of valid cold-rolled sheets proved to be rather low (0.24 t/t for the vacuum arc smelting and 0.30 t/t for the electroslag smelting) mainly due to the losses on cleaning and a considerable portion of wrong-size slabs. The data are presented on the steel-EHP678 properties after various heat treatments. For the production of wide cold-rolled sheets of the steel EHP678 it is recommended to use steelmaking procedure with electroslag smelting including open-hearth melting in arc furnaces, rolling of ingots at the slabbing with heating up to 1260-1280 deg C (hold-up of 4.5 to 5 hrs); electroslag smelting for rectangular section slabs, rolling of ingots of electroslag smelting at the slabbing with their heating up to 1250 deg C (hold-up of 5.5 to 6 hrs), rolling at the 1680-type mill with heating up to 1250-1260 deg C (hold-up of 4 to 4.5 hrs ensuring the rolling temperature after a rough group not below 1100 deg C), quenching of hot-rolled sheets heating up to 920-940 deg C (hold-up of 3 to 3.5 min/mm), shot peening of sheets for descaling (provided the respective equipment is available) with a subsequent short-time pickling in an acid solution and cold rolling with a summary deformation of 35 to 45 %. The steelmaking with the electroslag smelting is much more profitable as regards to the fine technology of number of the main procedures, convenient cooperation of the works and a considerably greater output of the final products out of one ton of the steel produced.

  7. A comparison of the radiological impact of energy production by fission and fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancillac, F.; Despres, A.

    1990-04-01

    The impacts of respectively a light water reactor and a planned fusion reactor, for which tritium-deuterium fusion reactions will act as energy source have been compared. The comparison is made on the basis of a generated capacity of 1 GWe.year, using the following criteria: fuel inventories, radioactive releases, collective effective dose equivalent commitments to the public and the volume of wastes. The accidental risk is not introduced. Fusion reactor parameters are still subject to uncertainties, which prevent accurate quantification of radionuclide releases (tritium apart) from the nuclear plant. Only orders of magnitude extrapolated from values for the NET tokamak are given. Despite these uncertainties, it would seem more interesting, from the dosimetric point of view, to use fusion reactors to produce electricity, although problems of radioactive releases, handling and long-term storage of radioactive waste would remain. Fusion reactors also generate generate high-level wastes with long-term exposure rates that are lower than those of light water reactors [fr

  8. Cell surface expression system for the display of heterologous gene products using chimeric flagellin fusions of bacillus halodurans isolate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Plessis, A

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available system for the display of heterologous gene products using chimeric flagellin fusions of a Bacillus halodurans isolate Slide 2 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za Bacillus halodurans Alk 36 xrhombus Ability to over-produce cell... for functionality of the His-tag for metal binding. Slide 13 © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za PAGE gel showing over-production of chimeric poly-His flagellin proteins 66.2 kDa 45.0 kDa 31.0 kDa 1. LMW ladder 2. NC3 3. NHisC3 4. NC6 5...

  9. Calculated cross sections for production and destruction of some long-lived nuclides of importance in fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, M.A.; Gardner, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the production and destruction of long-lived species via neutrons, photons, and charged-particles is required in many fusion energy applications, such as reactor first-wall and blanket design, radioactive waste management, etc. Here we describe our calculational results for the production, via the (n,2n) reaction, of the following long-lived species: 150 Eu(t 1/2 = 36 y), 152 Eu(t 1/2 = 13 y), and 192m2 Ir(t 1/2 = 241 y). Some comments on calculations that we've made for destruction reactions of these species are also included

  10. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to W+W- production via vector-boson fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Barbara; Oleari, Carlo; Zeppenfeld, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Vector-boson fusion processes constitute an important class of reactions at hadron colliders, both for signals and backgrounds of new physics in the electroweak interactions. We consider what is commonly referred to as W + W - production via vector-boson fusion (with subsequent leptonic decay of the Ws), or, more precisely, e + ν e μ - ν-bar μ + 2 jets production in proton-proton scattering, with all resonant and non-resonant Feynman diagrams and spin correlations of the final-state leptons included, in the phase-space regions which are dominated by t-channel electroweak-boson exchange. We compute the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to this process, at order α 6 α s . The QCD corrections are modest, changing total cross sections by less than 10%. Remaining scale uncertainties are below 2%. A fully-flexible next-to-leading order partonic Monte Carlo program allows to demonstrate these features for cross sections within typical vector-boson-fusion acceptance cuts. Modest corrections are also found for distributions

  11. Production of direct drive cylindrical targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, N.E.; Day, R.D.; Hatch, D.J.; Sandoval, D.L.; Gomez, V.M.; Pierce, T.H.; Elliott, J.E.; Manzanares, R.

    2002-01-01

    We have made targets with cylindrical geometry for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. These targets are used in hydrodynamic experiments on the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester. The cylindrical design allows the study of three dimensional hydrodynamic effects in a pseudo 2D mode, simplifying data gathering and analysis. Direct drive refers to the fact that the target is illuminated directly by approximately 50 laser beams and is imploded by the material pressure generated from ablation of the outside of the target. The production of cylindrical targets involves numerous steps. These steps are shared in common with many other types of ICF targets but no other single target type encompasses such a wide range of fabrication techniques. These targets consist of a large number of individual parts, all fabricated from commercially purchased raw material, requiring many machining, assembly, electroplating and chemical process steps. Virtually every manufacturing and assembly process we currently possess is involved in the production of these targets. The generic target consists of a plastic cylinder (ablator) that is roughly lmm in diameter by 2.25mm long. The wall of the cylinder is roughly 0.07mm thick. There is an aluminum cylinder 0.5mm wide and O.Olmm thick centered on the inside of the plastic cylinder and coaxial with the outside plastic cylinder. The outside of this aluminum band has surface finishes of differing random average roughness. The required average surface roughness is determined in advance by experimental design based on the amount of turbulent mix to be observed. The interior of the cylinder is filled with low density polystyrene foam that is made in house. To produce a finished target additional features are added to each target. X-ray backlighters are cantilevered off the target that allow time resolved x-ray images of the imploding target to be recorded during the experiment. The x-ray backlighters are driven by additional

  12. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  13. J/psi production in proton-nucleus collisions at ALICE: cold nuclear matter really matters

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Heavy quarkonia are expected to be sensitive to the properties of strongly interacting matter, at both low and high temperatures. In nucleus-nucleus collisions, a phase transition to a deconfined state of quarks and gluons (Quark-Gluon Plasma) is thought to take place once the temperature of the system exceeds a critical temperature of the order of 150-200 MeV. The deconfined state can induce a suppression of charmonium (due to color screening, dominant at SPS and RHIC energies), which can be overturned at LHC energy by the (re)combination of the large number of free c and cbar quarks, taking place when the system cools down below the critical temperature. Cold nuclear matter also has an influence on heavy quarkonia. Such effects can be studied in proton-nucleus collisions, where no deconfined state is expected to be created. At LHC energy, they mainly include nuclear shadowing, gluon saturation, break-up of the quarkonium states, and parton energy loss in the initial and final state. The study of these eff...

  14. Elimination of Lubricants from Aluminum Cold Rolled Products Using Short Laser Pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima M.S.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a new technique to remove the surface impurities from the aluminum cold-worked sheets. The method consists to concentrate a short-time high-power pulsed laser on the materials surface and scan it in order to cover a desired area. Incrustations ablation is obtained as long as the fluency and the peak power are high enough to produce vaporization of the contaminated layer without affecting the material surface properties. The present problem consists in eliminating a desiccated soap of about 1 g/m² from the surface of a 6016-class aluminum alloy sheet. The soap is originated from the rolling process. The present laser method is intended to replace water washing when the piece cannot be soaked, when drying is difficult due to the geometry, or when environmental restrictions apply. Best results were obtained when the pulse length was 100 ns and the average laser power was 95 W. In these conditions, the surface was completely cleaned and the aluminum alloy did not suffer any structural modification.

  15. Ecosystem engineering creates a direct nutritional link between 600-m deep cold-water coral mounds and surface productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetaert, Karline; Mohn, Christian; Rengstorf, Anna; Grehan, Anthony; van Oevelen, Dick

    2016-10-01

    Cold-water corals (CWCs) form large mounds on the seafloor that are hotspots of biodiversity in the deep sea, but it remains enigmatic how CWCs can thrive in this food-limited environment. Here, we infer from model simulations that the interaction between tidal currents and CWC-formed mounds induces downwelling events of surface water that brings organic matter to 600-m deep CWCs. This positive feedback between CWC growth on carbonate mounds and enhanced food supply is essential for their sustenance in the deep sea and represents an example of ecosystem engineering of unparalleled magnitude. This ’topographically-enhanced carbon pump’ leaks organic matter that settles at greater depths. The ubiquitous presence of biogenic and geological topographies along ocean margins suggests that carbon sequestration through this pump is of global importance. These results indicate that enhanced stratification and lower surface productivity, both expected consequences of climate change, may negatively impact the energy balance of CWCs.

  16. Production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli tagged with the fusion protein CusF3H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Cortez, Teresa; Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Balderas-Renteria, Isaias; Zarate, Xristo

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant protein expression in the bacterium Escherichia coli still is the number one choice for large-scale protein production. Nevertheless, many complications can arise using this microorganism, such as low yields, the formation of inclusion bodies, and the requirement for difficult purification steps. Most of these problems can be solved with the use of fusion proteins. Here, the use of the metal-binding protein CusF3H+ is described as a new fusion protein for recombinant protein expression and purification in E. coli. We have previously shown that CusF produces large amounts of soluble protein, with low levels of formation of inclusion bodies, and that proteins can be purified using IMAC resins charged with Cu(II) ions. CusF3H+ is an enhanced variant of CusF, formed by the addition of three histidine residues at the N-terminus. These residues then can bind Ni(II) ions allowing improved purity after affinity chromatography. Expression and purification of Green Fluorescent Protein tagged with CusF3H+ showed that the mutation did not alter the capacity of the fusion protein to increase protein expression, and purity improved considerably after affinity chromatography with immobilized nickel ions; high yields are obtained after tag-removal since CusF3H+ is a small protein of just 10 kDa. Furthermore, the results of experiments involving expression of tagged proteins having medium to large molecular weights indicate that the presence of the CusF3H+ tag improves protein solubility, as compared to a His-tag. We therefore endorse CusF3H+ as a useful alternative fusion protein/affinity tag for production of recombinant proteins in E. coli. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Flow-through Z-pinch study for radiation generation and fusion energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, C.W.; Eddleman, J.L.; Moir, R.; Shumlak, U.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss a high-density fusion reactor which utilizes a flow-through Z pinch magnetic confinement configuration. Assessment of this reactor system is motivated by simplicity and small unit size (few hundred MWe) and immunity to plasma contamination made possible at high density. The type reactor discussed here would employ a liquid Li vortex as the first wall/blanket to capture fusion neutrons with minimum induced radioactivity and to achieve high wall loading and a power density of 200 w/cm 3

  18. Design study of a fusion-driven tokamak hybrid reactor for fissile fuel production. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, R.P.

    1979-05-01

    This study evaluated conceptual approaches for a tokamak fusion-driven fuel producing reactor. The conceptual design of this hybrid reactor was based on using projected state-of-the-art technology for the late 1980s. This reactor would be a demonstration plant and, therefore, first-of-a-kind considerations have been included. The conceptual definitions of two alternatives for the fusion driver were evaluated. A Two-Component Tokamak (TCT) concept, based on the TFTR plasma physics parameters, was compared to a Beam-Driven Thermonuclear (BDTN) concept, based on the USSR T-20 plasma physics parameters

  19. Clean room for the production of cold kits: two year experience with the production of kits for 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidharan, Sheela H.; Nair, Preeti; Ghodke, Archana S.; Pillai, Thara; Sheri, Kumar Uma; Vanaja, R.; Mehra, Kiran S.; Sachdev, S.S.; Sivaprasad, N.

    2010-01-01

    A new clean room has been designed and constructed at Radiopharmaceuticals Programme, BRIT keeping in view the functional aspects for the production of 'cold' kits for the preparation of 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals for supply to nuclear medicine centers and is in operation, since October, 2008. This clean room is the first clean room in the country designed exclusively for cold kit production. The clean room was validated and trial batches were produced and quality controlled prior to put it in regular production operation. The clean environment is maintained by separate AHU (air handling unit) located out side the clean room. A technical crew maintain the AHU unit and maintain record of parameters such as humidity, air flow, blower speed, chiller temperature etc. During a typical batch production not more than two persons are present in the formulation room. The formulated solution (filtered through 0.22μ membrane filter) is passed though a pass box between the formulation and dispensing area. The no. of people allowed in the dispensing area which is a critical area of class 100 is restricted to not more than four that too no person is allowed to be in between direct flow of HEPA filtered air and the dispensing table. The number of vials to be dispensed is arranged in trays and 1 ml of the formulated sterile solution is dispensed into each vial and the vials are transferred in to the lyophilization chamber. Sterile vials are introduced into class 100 area and the vials are removed after lyophilization though a pass box. After lyophilization vials are sealed with aluminum caps and stored at 2-10 deg C. Since the commissioning of the new clean room, about 120 batches of 10 different kit products were prepared and 1,20,000 kit vials were supplied to various hospitals for nuclear medicine investigation

  20. Cold Nuclear Matter effects on J/psi production at RHIC: comparing shadowing models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro, E.G.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Lansberg, J.P.; /SLAC; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2009-06-19

    We present a wide study on the comparison of different shadowing models and their influence on J/{psi} production. We have taken into account the possibility of different partonic processes for the c{bar c}-pair production. We notice that the effect of shadowing corrections on J/{psi} production clearly depends on the partonic process considered. Our results are compared to the available data on dAu collisions at RHIC energies. We try different break up cross section for each of the studied shadowing models.

  1. Reactive Desorption of CO Hydrogenation Products under Cold Pre-stellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K.-J.; Fedoseev, G.; Qasim, D.; Ioppolo, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2018-02-01

    The astronomical gas-phase detection of simple species and small organic molecules in cold pre-stellar cores, with abundances as high as ∼10‑8–10‑9 n H, contradicts the generally accepted idea that at 10 K, such species should be fully frozen out on grain surfaces. A physical or chemical mechanism that results in a net transfer from solid-state species into the gas phase offers a possible explanation. Reactive desorption, i.e., desorption following the exothermic formation of a species, is one of the options that has been proposed. In astronomical models, the fraction of molecules desorbed through this process is handled as a free parameter, as experimental studies quantifying the impact of exothermicity on desorption efficiencies are largely lacking. In this work, we present a detailed laboratory study with the goal of deriving an upper limit for the reactive desorption efficiency of species involved in the CO–H2CO–CH3OH solid-state hydrogenation reaction chain. The limit for the overall reactive desorption fraction is derived by precisely investigating the solid-state elemental carbon budget, using reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and the calibrated solid-state band-strength values for CO, H2CO and CH3OH. We find that for temperatures in the range of 10 to 14 K, an upper limit of 0.24 ± 0.02 for the overall elemental carbon loss upon CO conversion into CH3OH. This corresponds with an effective reaction desorption fraction of ≤0.07 per hydrogenation step, or ≤0.02 per H-atom induced reaction, assuming that H-atom addition and abstraction reactions equally contribute to the overall reactive desorption fraction along the hydrogenation sequence. The astronomical relevance of this finding is discussed.

  2. Characterization and Behavior of Cold Lake Blend and Western Canadian Select Diluted Bitumen Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unconventional diluted bitumen (dilbit) oil products present an increasing environmental concern because of extensive transport in North America, recent spills into aquatic habitats, and limited understanding of environmental fate and toxicity. Dilbits are blends of highly weathe...

  3. production and cost of cold patch road mats with bitumen extracted

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jamiu

    This paper reports the production of bituminous road mats with bitumen sourced from the Nigerian Tar sand, recycled .... scrap tires are produced every year, which makes the disposal of ..... particles will be round or nearly round and will pass.

  4. Simulating cold production by a coupled reservoir-geomechanics model with sand erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Xue, S. [Petro-Geotech Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-06-01

    This paper presents a newly developed fully coupled reservoir-geomechanics model with sand erosion. Sand production occurs during aggressive production induced by the impact of viscous fluid flow and the in situ stress concentration near a wellbore, as well as by perforation tips in poorly consolidated formations. This compromises oil production, increases well completion costs, and reduces the life cycles of equipment down hole and on the surface. The proposed model can be used for sand production studies in conventional oil/gas reservoirs such as the North Sea as well as in heavy oil reservoirs such as in northwestern Canada. Instead of generating a high permeability network in reservoirs, the enhanced oil production is determined by the increase in the effective wellbore radius. This paper presents the general model. A detailed study on the capillary pressure and the impact of multiphase flow on sanding and erosion will be conducted at a later date. It appears that 2 phase flow can be important to elastoplasticity if no significant sand erosion has occurred. It was determined that high porosity is induced by erosion and capillary pressure. Two phase flow can be important when the built-up drag force carries sand-fluid slurry into the well. It is concluded that viscosity and flow velocity can help estimate the slurry transport, sand rate and enhanced oil production. 22 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  5. Fusion product measurements of the local ion thermal diffusivity in the PLT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Lovberg, J.; Strachan, J.D.; Bell, R.E.

    1986-03-01

    Measurement of the gradient of the d-d fusion rate profile in an ohmic PLT plasma is used to deduce the gradient of the ion temperature and, thus, the local ion thermal diffusivity through an energy balance analysis. The inferred ion diffusivity is consistent with neoclassical theory

  6. Heavy-Ion Fusion Mechanism and Predictions of Super-Heavy Elements Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Yasuhisa; Shen Caiwan; Boilley, David; Giraud, Bertrand G.; Kosenko, Grigory

    2009-01-01

    Fusion process is shown to firstly form largely deformed mono-nucleus and then to undergo diffusion in two-dimensions with the radial and mass-asymmetry degrees of freedom. Examples of prediction of residue cross sections are given for the elements with Z = 117 and 118.

  7. Consultancy on the potential of fusion/fission sub-critical neutron systems for energy production and transmutation. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Workshop on Sub-critical Neutron Production held at the University of Maryland and the Eisenhower Institute on 11-13 October 2004 brought together members of fusion, fission and accelerator technical communities to discuss issues of spent fuel, nonproliferation, reactor safety and the use of neutrons for sub-critical operation of nuclear reactors. The Workshop strongly recommended that the fusion community work closely with other technical communities to ensure that a wider range of technical solutions is available to solve the spent fuel problem and to utilize the current actinide inventories. Participants of the Workshop recommended that a follow-on Workshop, possibly under the aegis of the IAEA, should be held in the first half of the year 2005. The Consultancy Meeting is the response to this recommendation. The objectives of the Consultancy meeting were to hold discussions on the role of fusion/fission systems in sub-critical operations of nuclear reactors. The participants agreed that development of innovative (fourth generation) fission reactors, advanced fuel cycle options, and disposition of existing spent nuclear fuel inventories in various Member Sates can significantly benefit from including sub-critical systems, which are driven by external neutron sources. Spallation neutrons produced by accelerators have been accepted in the past as the means of driving sub-critical reactors. The accelerator community deserves credit in pioneering this novel approach to reactor design. Progress in the design and operation of fusion devices now offers additional innovative means, broadening the range of sub-critical operations of fission reactors. Participants felt that fusion should participate with accelerators in providing a range of technical options in reactor design. Participants discussed concrete steps to set up a small fusion/fission system to demonstrate actinide burning in the laboratory and what advice should be given to the Agency on its role in

  8. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebel, K.; Beck, E.; Strohmaier, K.; Schaller, H.

    1986-01-01

    Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible λPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in 35 S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro

  9. Search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons in the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Heracleous, N; Kalogeropoulos, A; Keaveney, J; Kim, T J; Lowette, S; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; 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Liu, Y F; Lu, R-S; Majumder, D; Petrakou, E; Shi, X; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Wang, M; Wilken, R; Asavapibhop, B; Srimanobhas, N; Adiguzel, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kayis Topaksu, A; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatoz, A; Sogut, K; Sunar Cerci, D; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Karapinar, G; Ocalan, K; Ozpineci, A; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Bahtiyar, H; Barlas, E; Cankocak, K; Günaydin, Y O; Vardarlı, F I; Yücel, M; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Aggleton, R; Brooke, J J; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Jacob, J; Kreczko, L; Lucas, C; Meng, Z; Newbold, D M; Paramesvaran, S; Poll, A; Senkin, S; Smith, V J; Williams, T; Bell, K W; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Cockerill, D J A; 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Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Kaadze, K; Klima, B; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Ratnikova, N; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitbeck, A; Whitmore, J; Wu, W; Yang, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Cheng, T; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Kim, B; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Rinkevicius, A; Shchutska, L; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Haytmyradov, M; 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Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Bouhali, O; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Krutelyov, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kovitanggoon, K; Kunori, S; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Belknap, D A; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Duric, S; Friis, E; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Levine, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Woods, N

    A search for invisible decays of Higgs bosons is performed using the vector boson fusion and associated ZH production modes. In the ZH mode, the Z boson is required to decay to a pair of charged leptons or a [Formula: see text] quark pair. The searches use the 8 [Formula: see text] pp collision dataset collected by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 19.7 [Formula: see text]. Certain channels include data from 7 [Formula: see text] collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 [Formula: see text]. The searches are sensitive to non-standard-model invisible decays of the recently observed Higgs boson, as well as additional Higgs bosons with similar production modes and large invisible branching fractions. In all channels, the observed data are consistent with the expected standard model backgrounds. Limits are set on the production cross section times invisible branching fraction, as a function of the Higgs boson mass, for the vector boson fusion and ZH production modes. By combining all channels, and assuming standard model Higgs boson cross sections and acceptances, the observed (expected) upper limit on the invisible branching fraction at [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] is found to be 0.58 (0.44) at 95 % confidence level. We interpret this limit in terms of a Higgs-portal model of dark matter interactions.

  10. Certain physicochemical characteristics of Bi1.4Y0.6O3 prepared by the method of direct high-frequency fusion in cold crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poluyan, A.F.; Lashneva, V.V.; Vecher, A.A.; Voropaev, A.G.; Savitskij, A.A.; Tatarintsev, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Electric properties and the nature of conductivity of Bi 1.4 V 0.6 O 3 solid solution prepared by the method of direct high-frequency melting in the cold crucible are studied. A sample of Bi 1.4 Y 0.6 O 3 composition synthesized by this technique has a higher electric conductivity value as compared with analogous polycrystal sample has a cubic face-centered structure of the τ-Bi 2 O 3 type. On the basis of experimental e.m.f. values temperature dependences of pressures of oxygen dissociation for Bi 2 O 3 and Bi 1.4 Y 0.6 O 3 are calculated. Bi 1.4 Y 0.6 O 3 solid solution has lower values of Po 2 dissociation pressure as compared with bismuth oxide. This expands the limits of its application

  11. Developing a commercial production process for 500,000 targets per day: A key challenge for inertial fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodin, D.T.; Alexander, N.B.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Bozek, A.S.; Brown, L.C.; Flint, G.W.; Kilkenny, J.D.; McQuillan, B.W.; Nikroo, A.; Paguio, R.R.; Petzoldt, R.W.; Schroen, D.G.; Sheliak, J.D.; Vermillion, B.A.; Carlson, L.C.; Goodman, P.; Maksaereekul, W.; Raffray, R.; Spalding, J.; Tillack, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    As is true for current-day commercial power plants, a reliable and economic fuel supply is essential for the viability of future Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) [Energy From Inertial Fusion, edited by W. J. Hogan (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1995)] power plants. While IFE power plants will utilize deuterium-tritium (DT) bred in-house as the fusion fuel, the 'target' is the vehicle by which the fuel is delivered to the reaction chamber. Thus the cost of the target becomes a critical issue in regard to fuel cost. Typically six targets per second, or about 500 000/day are required for a nominal 1000 MW(e) power plant. The electricity value within a typical target is about $3, allocating 10% for fuel cost gives only 30 cents per target as-delivered to the chamber center. Complicating this economic goal, the target supply has many significant technical challenge - fabricating the precision fuel-containing capsule, filling it with DT, cooling it to cryogenic temperatures, layering the DT into a uniform layer, characterizing the finished product, accelerating it to high velocity for injection into the chamber, and tracking the target to steer the driver beams to meet it with micron-precision at the chamber center

  12. Influence of processing steps in cold-smoked salmon production on survival and growth of persistent and presumed non-persistent Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsby, Cisse Hedegaard; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Mohr, Mona

    2008-01-01

    conditions, (ii) fillets of salmon cold-smoked in a pilot plant and finally, (iii) assessment of the bacterial levels before and after processing during commercial scale production. L. monocytogenes proliferated on salmon blocks that were brined or dipped in liquid smoke and left at 25 degrees C......Cold-smoked salmon is a ready-to-eat product in which Listeria monocytogenes sometimes can grow to high numbers. The bacterium can colonize the processing environment and it is believed to survive or even grow during the processing steps. The purpose of the present study was to determine...... if the steps in the processing of cold-smoked salmon affect Survival and subsequent growth of a persistent strain of L. monocytogenes to a lesser degree than presumed non-persistent strains. We used a sequence of experiments increasing in complexity: (i) small salmon blocks salted, smoked or dried under model...

  13. Inertial fusion commercial power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation discusses the motivation for inertial fusion energy, a brief synopsis of five recently-completed inertial fusion power plant designs, some general conclusions drawn from these studies, and an example of an IFE hydrogen synfuel plant to suggest that future fusion studies consider broadening fusion use to low-emission fuels production as well as electricity

  14. Catalysed fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Farley, Francis

    2012-01-01

    A sizzling romance and a romp with subatomic particles at CERN. Love, discovery and adventure in the city where nations meet and beams collide. Life in a large laboratory. As always, the challenges are the same. Who leads? Who follows? Who succeeds? Who gets the credit? Who gets the women or the men? Young Jeremy arrives in CERN and joins the quest for green energy. Coping with baffling jargon and manifold dangers, he is distracted by radioactive rats, lovely ladies and an unscrupulous rival. Full of doubts and hesitations, he falls for a dazzling Danish girl, who leads him astray. His brilliant idea leads to a discovery and a new route to cold fusion. But his personal life is scrambled. Does it bring fame or failure? Tragedy or triumph?

  15. Synthetic fuels and fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J A; Powell, J; Steinberg, M [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)

    1981-03-01

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and supplement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Depending on design, electric generation efficiencies of approx. equal to 40-60% and hydrogen production efficiencies by high temperature electrolysis of approx. equal to 50-70% are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets. Fusion/coal symbiotic systems appear economically promising for the first generation of commercial fusion synfuels plants. Coal production requirements and the environmental effects of large-scale coal usage would be greatly reduced by a fusion/coal system. In the long-term, there could be a gradual transition to an inexhaustible energy system based solely on fusion.

  16. Recycle bioreactor for bioethanol production from wheat starch. 1. Cold enzyme hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, X.; Hill, G.A.; MacDonald, D.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2001-06-01

    A 5 L membrane bioreactor system has been designed and operated at low temperature to hydrolyze starch granules directly to sugars using barley {alpha}-amylase. The system includes a temperature and pH controlled, well-mixed bioreactor; microfilters to separate and recycle granules; and ultrafilters to separate and recycle enzyme molecules. Operation in batch mode demonstrated similar kinetics and low productivity observed earlier in shake flasks, whereas continuous flow operation was not successful due to enzyme inhibition and degradation. Sequential batch mode operation, involving filtration after each batch hydrolysis, produced optimum productivity measured at 0.16 grams of starch granules hydrolyzed per gram of enzyme per hour for more than 100 hours of operation. (author)

  17. Design of Fusion Proteins for Efficient and Soluble Production of Immunogenic Ebola Virus Glycoprotein in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yang; Lu, Yuan; Yan, Yishu; Liu, Xinxin; Su, Nan; Zhang, Chong; Bi, Shengli; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2018-03-03

    The Ebola hemorrhagic fever caused by Ebola virus is an extremely dangerous disease, and effective therapeutic agents are still lacking. Platforms for the efficient production of vaccines are crucial to ensure quick response against an Ebola virus outbreak. Ebola virus glycoprotein (EbolaGP) on the virion surface is responsible for membrane binding and virus entry, thus becoming the key target for vaccine development. However, heterologous expression of this protein still faces engineering challenges such as low production levels and insoluble aggregation. Here, the authors design and compare various fusion strategies, attaching great importance to the solubility-enhancing effect, and tag removal process. It is found that a C-terminal intein-based tag greatly enhances the solubility of EbolaGP and allows one-step chromatographic purification of the untagged EbolaGP through thiol-catalyzed self-cleavage. The purified untagged EbolaGP alone or with Freund's adjuvant are highly immunogenic, as confirmed in a mouse model. Consequently, the present study puts forward a new strategy for the efficient and soluble expression of untagged immunogenic EbolaGP. The intein-based protein fusion approach may be of importance for the large-scale production of Ebola virus subunit vaccine. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. End-to-end gene fusions and their impact on the production of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizk, Mazen; Antranikian, Garabed; Elleuche, Skander

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Multifunctional enzymes offer an interesting approach for biomass degradation. ► Size and conformation of separate constructs play a role in the effectiveness of chimeras. ► A connecting linker allows for maximal flexibility and increased thermostability. ► Genes with functional similarities are the best choice for fusion candidates. -- Abstract: The reduction of fossil fuels, coupled with its increase in price, has made the search for alternative energy resources more plausible. One of the topics gaining fast interest is the utilization of lignocellulose, the main component of plants. Its primary constituents, cellulose and hemicellulose, can be degraded by a series of enzymes present in microorganisms, into simple sugars, later used for bioethanol production. Thermophilic bacteria have proven to be an interesting source of enzymes required for hydrolysis since they can withstand high and denaturing temperatures, which are usually required for processes involving biomass degradation. However, the cost associated with the whole enzymatic process is staggering. A solution for cost effective and highly active production is through the construction of multifunctional enzyme complexes harboring the function of more than one enzyme needed for the hydrolysis process. There are various strategies for the degradation of complex biomass ranging from the regulation of the enzymes involved, to cellulosomes, and proteins harboring more than one enzymatic activity. In this review, the construction of multifunctional biomass degrading enzymes through end-to-end gene fusions, and its impact on production and activity by choosing the enzymes and linkers is assessed.

  19. Tritium production, management and its impact on safety for a D-3He fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Herring, S.; Sawan, M.

    1991-11-01

    About three percent of the fusion energy produced by a D- 3 He reactor is in the form of neutrons. Those neutrons are generated by D-D and D-T reactions, with the tritium produced by the D-D fusion. The neutrons will react with structural steel, deuterium, 3 He and shielding material to produce tritium. About half of the tritium generated by the D-D reaction will not burn in the plasma and will exit as a part of the plasma exhaust. Thus, there is enough tritium produced in a D- 3 He reactor and careful management will be required. The tritium produced in the shield and plasma can be managed with an acceptable effect on cost and safety. 3 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Multi-objective optimization of bioethanol production during cold enzyme starch hydrolysis in very high gravity cassava mash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingling, Bao; Li, Chen; Honglin, Wang; Xiwen, Yu; Zongcheng, Yan

    2011-09-01

    Cold enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for bioethanol production were optimized using multi-objective optimization. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the effects of α-amylase, glucoamylase, liquefaction temperature and liquefaction time on S. cerevisiae biomass, ethanol concentration and starch utilization ratio. The optimum hydrolysis conditions were: 224 IU/g(starch) α-amylase, 694 IU/g(starch) glucoamylase, 77°C and 104 min for biomass; 264 IU/g(starch) α-amylase, 392 IU/g(starch) glucoamylase, 60°C and 85 min for ethanol concentration; 214 IU/g(starch) α-amylase, 398 IU/g(starch) glucoamylase, 79°C and 117 min for starch utilization ratio. The hydrolysis conditions were subsequently evaluated by multi-objectives optimization utilizing the weighted coefficient methods. The Pareto solutions for biomass (3.655-4.380×10(8)cells/ml), ethanol concentration (15.96-18.25 wt.%) and starch utilization ratio (92.50-94.64%) were obtained. The optimized conditions were shown to be feasible and reliable through verification tests. This kind of multi-objective optimization is of potential importance in industrial bioethanol production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnostics considerations for the inertial confinement approach to controlled thermonuclear fusion power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, L.

    1978-01-01

    It is concluded that although the challenges facing diagnosticians working on the inertial confinement approach to controlled fusion are large and varied, the means potentially available to meet them are more than adequate. No new instrumentation fields need be opened; rather, substantial extensions of those already being explored by workers in ICF will suffice. Also, large contributions may be expected from other technological applications thrusts, as well as from the general, currently rapid advance of the entire physical technology base

  2. Status of fusion maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Effective maintenance will be an essential ingredient in determining fusion system productivity. This level of productivity will result only after close attention is paid to the entire system as an entity and appropriate integration of the elements is made. The status of fusion maintenance is reviewed in the context of the entire system. While there are many challenging developmental tasks ahead in fusion maintenance, the required technologies are available in several high-technology industries, including nuclear fission

  3. Production of muons for fusion catalysis in a magnetic mirror configuration. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Chapline, G.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    For muon-catalyzed fusion to be of practical interest, a very efficient means of producing muons must be found. We describe a scheme for producing muons that may be more energy efficient than any heretofore proposed. There are, in particular, some potential advantages of creating muons from collisions of high energy tritons confined in a magnetic mirror configuration. If one could catalyze 200 fusions per muon and employ a uranium blanket that would multiply the neutron energy by a factor of 10, one might produce electricity with an overall plant efficiency (ratio of electric energy produced to nuclear energy released) approaching 30%. One possible near term application of a muon-producing magnetic-mirror scheme would be to build a high-flux neutron source for radiation damage studies. The careful arrangement of triton orbits will result in many of the π - 's being produced near the axis of the magnetic mirror. The pions quickly decay into muons, which are transported into a small (few-cm-diameter) reactor chamber producing approximately 1-MW/m 2 neutron flux on the chamber walls, using a laboratory accelerator and magnetic mirror. The costs of construction and operation of the triton injection accelerator probably introduces most of the uncertainty in the viability of this scheme. If a 10-μA, 600 MeV neutral triton accelerator could be built for less than $100 million and operated cheaply enough, one might well bring muon-catalyzed fusion into practical use

  4. The inhibition of N2O production by ocean acidification in cold temperate and polar waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Andrew P.; Brown, Ian J.; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B.

    2016-05-01

    The effects of ocean acidification (OA) on nitrous oxide (N2O) production and on the community composition of ammonium oxidizing archaea (AOA) were examined in the northern and southern sub-polar and polar Atlantic Ocean. Two research cruises were performed during June 2012 between the North Sea and Arctic Greenland and Barent Seas, and in January-February 2013 to the Antarctic Scotia Sea. Seven stations were occupied in all during which shipboard experimental manipulations of the carbonate chemistry were performed through additions of NaHCO3-+HCl in order to examine the impact of short-term (48 h for N2O and between 96 and 168 h for AOA) exposure to control and elevated conditions of OA. During each experiment, triplicate incubations were performed at ambient conditions and at 3 lowered levels of pH which varied between 0.06 and 0.4 units according to the total scale and which were targeted at CO2 partial pressures of 500, 750 and 1000 μatm. The AOA assemblage in both Arctic and Antarctic regions was dominated by two major archetypes that represent the marine AOA clades most often detected in seawater. There were no significant changes in AOA assemblage composition between the beginning and end of the incubation experiments. N2O production was sensitive to decreasing pHT at all stations and decreased by between 2.4% and 44% with reduced pHT values of between 0.06 and 0.4. The reduction in N2O yield from nitrification was directly related to a decrease of between 28% and 67% in available NH3 as a result of the pH driven shift in the NH3:NH4+ equilibrium. The maximum reduction in N2O production at conditions projected for the end of the 21st century was estimated to be 0.82 Tg N y-1.

  5. Research-to-operations (R2O) for the Space Environmental Effects Fusion System (SEEFS) system-impact products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Stephen

    The Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RVBX) and the Space Environment Branch of the Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC SLG/WMLE) have combined efforts to design, develop, test, implement, and validate numerical and graphical products for Air Force Space Command's (AFSPC) Space Environmental Effects Fusion System (SEEFS). These products are generated to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense weapons, navigation, communications, and surveillance systems. Jointly developed projects that have been completed as prototypes and are undergoing development for real-time operations include a SEEFS architecture and database, five system-impact products, and a high-level decision aid product. This first round of SEEFS products includes the Solar Radio Burst Effects (SoRBE) on radar and satellite communications, Radar Auroral Clutter (RAC), Scintillation Effects on radar and satellite communications (RadScint and SatScint), and Satellite Surface and Deep Charge/Discharge (Char/D) products. This presentation will provide overviews of the current system impact products, along with plans and potentials for future products expected for the SEEFS program. The overviews will include information on applicable research-to-operations (R2O) issues, to include input data coverage and quality control, output confidence levels, modeling standards, and validation efforts.

  6. Contemporary formulation and distribution practices for cold-filled acid products: Australian industry survey and modeling of published pathogen inactivation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, B; Scurrah, K J; Ross, T

    2010-05-01

    A survey of 12 Australian manufacturers indicated that mild-tasting acids and preservatives are used to partially replace acetic acid in cold-filled acid dressings and sauces. In contrast to traditional ambient temperature distribution practices, some manufacturers indicated that they supply the food service sector with cold-filled acid products prechilled for incorporation into ready-to-eat foods. The Comité des Industries des Mayonnaises et Sauces Condimentaires de la Communauté Economique Européenne (CIMSCEE) Code, a formulation guideline used by the industry to predict the safety of cold-filled acid formulations with respect to Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, does not extend to the use of acids and preservatives other than acetic acid nor does it consider the effects of chill distribution. We found insufficient data in the published literature to comprehensively model the response of S. enterica and E. coli to all of the predictor variables (i.e., pH, acetic acid, NaCl, sugars, other acids, preservatives, and storage temperature) of relevance for contemporary cold-filled acid products in Australia. In particular, we noted a lack of inactivation data for S. enterica at aqueous-phase NaCl concentrations of >3% (wt/wt). However, our simple models clearly identified pH and 1/absolute temperature of storage as the most important variables generally determining inactivation. To develop robust models to predict the effect of contemporary formulation and storage variables on product safety, additional empirical data are required. Until such models are available, our results support challenge testing of cold-filled acid products to ascertain their safety, as suggested by the CIMSCEE, but suggest consideration of challenging with both E. coli and S. enterica at incubation temperatures relevant to intended product distribution temperatures.

  7. Radiation hazards due to activated corrosion and neutron sputtering products in fusion reactor coolant and tritium breeding fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The accumulation of radioactive corrosion and neutron sputtering products on the surfaces of components in fusion reactor coolant and tritium breeding systems can cause significant personnel access problems. Remote maintenance techniques or special treatment may be required to limit the amount of radiation exposure to plant operational and maintenance personnel. A computer code, RAPTOR, has been developed to estimate the transport of this activated material throughout a fusion heat transfer and/or tritium breeding material loop. A method is devised which treats the components of the loop individually and determines the source rates, deposition and erosion rates, decay rates, and purification rates of these radioactive materials. RAPTOR has been applied to the MARS and Starfire conceptual reactor designs to determine the degree of the possible radiation hazard due to these products. Due to the very high corrosion release rate by HT-9 when exposed to LiPb in the MARS reactor design, the radiation fields surrounding the primary system will preclude direct contact maintenance even after shutdown. Even the removal of the radioactive LiPb from the system will not decrease the radiation fields to reasonable levels. The Starfire primary system will exhibit radiation fields similar to those found in present pressurized water reactors. (orig.)

  8. Fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    This textbook covers the physics and technology upon which future fusion power reactors will be based. It reviews the history of fusion, reaction physics, plasma physics, heating, and confinement. Descriptions of commercial plants and design concepts are included. Topics covered include: fusion reactions and fuel resources; reaction rates; ignition, and confinement; basic plasma directory; Tokamak confinement physics; fusion technology; STARFIRE: A commercial Tokamak fusion power plant. MARS: A tandem-mirror fusion power plant; and other fusion reactor concepts

  9. Manufacturing wizardry : products to tame heat, cold, deserts, swamps and underground infernos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaremko, G.

    1997-01-01

    Some examples of Canadian oil and natural gas service equipment are cited as examples of exportable Canadian know-how. Foremosts are Canadian made, all terrain vehicles, designed to work in rugged terrain. Calgary-based Foremost Industries Inc., has sold several of their industrial vehicles for the Taklamakan, the high desert in the Tarim Basin of northwestern China. The huge vehicles with monster tires can haul up to 70 tonnes of material and leave very little or no mark on the wilderness. Foremost Industries Inc. is also an international corporation with branches in Nevada and Indiana. Their success stems from the fact that they were able to develop a vehicle for well drilling that would withstand the rough terrain and extreme climate conditions across western and northern Canada. Atco, a Calgary-based company, has developed quality portable housing to shelter surveyors, geologists, and drilling-rig crews. Another company, Reynolds Manufacturing, has developed safety clothing for workers in the oil industry. Canadian Oilfield Rigs and Equipment Fabrication Inc., manufacture volume production technology packages such as wireline data recording vehicles and well-service rigs, sold in markets from Algeria to Venezuela. 5 figs

  10. Fusion in the energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusion energy is the fundamental energy source of the Universe, as the energy of the Sun and the stars are produced by fusion of e.g. hydrogen to helium. Fusion energy research is a strongly international endeavor aiming at realizing fusion energy production in power plants on Earth. Reaching...... of integration into the future electricity system and socio-economic studies of fusion energy will be presented, referring to the programme of Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF) under the European Fusion Energy Agreement (EFDA)....

  11. A survey of selected neutron-activation reactions with short-lived products of importance to fusion reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, R.C.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-11-01

    The status of the cross sections for production of short-lived radioactivities in the intense high-energy neutron fields associated with D-T fusion reactors is investigated. The main concerns relative to these very radioactive isotopes are with radiation damage to sensitive components such as superconducting magnets, the decay-heat problem and the safety of personnel during operation of the facility. The present report surveys the status of nuclear data required to assess these problems. The study is limited to a few high-priority nuclear reactions which appear to be of critical concern in this context. Other reactions of lesser concern are listed but are not treated in the present work. Among the factors that were considered in defining the relevant reactions and setting priorities are: quantities of the elemental materials in a fusion reactor, isotopic abundances within elemental categories, the decay properties of the induced radioactive byproducts, the reaction cross sections, and the nature of the decay radiations. Attention has been focused on radioactive species with half lives in the range from about 1 second to 15 minutes. Available cross-section and reaction-product decay information from the literature has been compiled and included in the report. Uncertainties have been estimated by examining several sets of experimental as well as evaluated data. Comments on the general status of data for various high-priority reactions are offered. On the basis of this investigation, it has been found that the nuclear data are in reasonably good shape for some of the most important reactions but are unacceptable for others. Based on this investigation, the reactions which should be given the greatest attention are: 16 O(n,p) 16 N, 55 Mn(n,p) 55 Cr, 57 Fe(n,p) 57 Mn, 186 W(n,2n) 185m W, and 207 Pb(n,n') 207m Pb. However, the development of fusion power would benefit from an across-the-board refinement in these nuclear data so that a more accurate quantitative

  12. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  13. Production and characterization of active recombinant interleukin-12/eGFP fusion protein in stably-transfected DF1 chicken cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsing Chieh; Chen, Yu San; Shen, Pin Chun; Shien, Jui Hung; Lee, Long Huw; Chiu, Hua Hsien

    2015-01-01

    The adjuvant activity of chicken interleukin-12 (chIL-12) protein has been described as similar to that of mammalian IL-12. Recombinant chIL-12 can be produced using several methods, but chIL-12 production in eukaryotic cells is lower than that in prokaryotic cells. Stimulating compounds, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), can be added to animal cell cultures to overcome this drawback. In this study, we constructed a cell line, DF1/chIL-12 which stably expressed a fusion protein, chIL-12 and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) connected by a (G4 S)3 linker sequence. Fusion protein production was increased when cells were cultured in the presence of DMSO. When 1 × 10(6) DF1/chIL-12 cells were inoculated in a T-175 flask containing 30 mL of media, incubated for 15 h, and further cultivated in the presence of 4% DMSO for 48 h, the production of total fusion protein was mostly enhanced compared with the production of total fusion protein by using cell lysates induced with DMSO at other concentrations. The concentrations of the unpurified and purified total fusion proteins in cell lysates were 2,781 ± 2.72 ng mL(-1) and 2,207 ± 3.28 ng mL(-1) , respectively. The recovery rate was 79%. The fusion protein stimulated chicken splenocytes to produce IFN-γ, which was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in the culture supernatant, indicating that treating DF1/chIL-12 cells with DMSO or producing chIL-12 in a fusion protein form does not have adverse effects on the bioactivity of chIL-12. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold.

  15. A new way to compute charges fusion products trajectories. Application to the detection of 3 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doloc, C.M.; Martin, G.

    1995-01-01

    We report here recent results concerning the 3 MeV Fusion Proton trajectories in the Tore-Supra Tokamak. The orbit computations were made in a new and unusual manner based on a topological equation which governs these trajectories. This method eludes both the problem of computing precision and the need to follow a large number of particles along their orbit: it allows to draw a topological map of trajectories, i.e. to find all possible trajectory classes, without any numerical computation. It gives also the transitions occurring between the various classes. The confinement of the proton orbits and the optimisation of the detector location were studied under the same topological rules. The need to develop this subject comes from the necessity to explain a large quantity of experimental data recorded by a silicon detector system on Tore-Supra. Experimental analysis of the Charged Fusion Product (CFP) is ensured by this unique detection system which allows to obtain simultaneously energy and pitch-angle resolution. (authors). 9 refs., 11 figs

  16. Novel thermostable clostridial strains through protoplast fusion for enhanced biobutanol production at higher temperature—preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ferhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to improve the thermal stability of clostridium strains for enhanced biobutanol production. Thermostable clostridia species were developed through protoplast fusion between mesophilic clostridial species (i.e., Clostridium beijerinckii and Clostridium acetobutylicum and thermophilic clostridial species (i.e., Clostridium thermocellum. Production of biobutanol was examined in the present preliminary study using the clostridium strains and their protoplast fusants using sugar mixture with composition identical to that of wheat straw acid hydrolysate. Maximum biobutanol production of 9.4 g/L was achieved by a fused strain at 45 °C with total sugar consumption of 66% compared to that at 35 °C (i.e., 8.4 g/L production and 64% total sugar consumption. Glucose and xylose uptake rates were generally higher compared to all other individual sugars in the feedstock. In general, average cell concentrations were in close proximity for all parenting and fused strains at 35 °C; i.e., in the range of 5.12 × 107 to 5.49 × 107 cells/mL. Average cell concentration of fusants between the mesophilic clostridial species and the thermophilic clostridial species slightly increased to ~ 5.62 × 107 cells/mL at a higher temperature of 45 °C. These results, in addition to the ones obtained for the butanol production, demonstrate enhanced thermal stability of both fusants at a higher temperature (45 °C.

  17. Magnetic-fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    In February 1980, the Director of Energy Research requested that the Energy Research Advisory Board (ERAB) review the Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetic Fusion Program. Of particular concern to the DOE was the judicious choice of the next major steps toward demonstration of economic power production from fusion. Of equal concern was the overall soundness of the DOE Magnetic Fusion Program: its pace, scope, and funding profiles. Their finding and recommendations are included

  18. Spectra of neutrons and fusion charged products produced in a dense laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtsev, V.A.; Dyatlov, V.D.; Krzhizhanovskij, R.E.; Levkovskij, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of laser-produced plasma diagnostics has been investigated by measuring spectra of neutrons and alpha particles produced in the T(d,n) 4 He reaction. Using the Monte Carlo method the spectra have been calculated for nine states of the deuterium-tritium plasma with the temperature of 1;5 and 10 keV and the density of 0.2; 1 and 10 g/cm 3 respectively. The initial radius of the target was assumed to be 0.01 cm at the density of 0.2 g/cm 3 . It is shown that the neutron and alpha spectra can serve as plasma diagnostics parameters in laser fusion

  19. The role of fusion reaction products in the stability of EBT reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtowicz, D.; Kammash, T.

    1985-01-01

    The potential of the EBT plasma confinement device as a fusion reactor depends critically on its ability to support a sufficiently large power density which in turn means a large enough beta defined as the ratio of the plasma pressure to magnetic field pressure. The maximum allowable beta is generally dictated by the stability of the system to hydromagnetic (MHD) modes. In this paper we examine the stability of such modes for a D-T plasma and assess the effect of the alpha particles on these instabilities. We find that the alphas have the most destabilizing effect, as reflected in the drop of the ion beta, at the instant of birth and that recovery of stability is achieved as the alphas approach equilibration with the ions of the plasma. In short, there appears to be no serious adverse effects on the reactor beta resulting from alpha-induced instabilities

  20. Self-limitation of impurity production by radiation cooling at the edge of a fusion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, J.; Lackner, K.; Wunderlich, R.

    1982-04-01

    The influence of radiation cooling at the edge of a fusion plasma on the plasma-wall interaction is numerically studied for parameters typical of the ZEPHYR ignition experiment. Various transport and impurity influx models and different external heating methods are studied using the 1D tokamak transport code BALDUR developed at Princeton. The results demonstrate the self-consistent formation of a radiating boundary layer (photosphere) for a wide range of parameters, limiting the impurity concentration in the plasma to a tolerable value. While the plasma behaviour is rather insensitive to model assumptions, the sputtering rate and the corresponding wall erosion depend on various parameters. Methods for external control of the photosphere and - more important - of the wall erosion are also discussed. (orig.)

  1. CP-even scalar boson production via gluon fusion at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasiou, Charalampos; Dulat, Falko; Furlan, Elisabetta; Gehrmann, Thomas; Herzog, Franz; Lazopoulos, Achilleas; Mistlberger, Bernhard

    2016-09-07

    In view of the searches at the LHC for scalar particle resonances in addition to the 125 GeV Higgs boson, we present the cross section for a CP-even scalar produced via gluon fusion at N3LO in perturbative QCD assuming that it couples directly to gluons in an effective theory approach. We refine our prediction by taking into account the possibility that the scalar couples to the top-quark and computing the corresponding contributions through NLO in perturbative QCD. We assess the theoretical uncertainties of the cross section due to missing higher-order QCD effects and we provide the necessary information for obtaining the cross section value and uncertainty from our results in specific scenarios beyond the Standard Model. We also give detailed results for the case of a 750 GeV scalar, which will be the subject of intense experimental studies.

  2. Flow design and simulation of a gas compression system for hydrogen fusion energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avital, E J; Salvatore, E [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Rd London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Munjiza, A [Civil Engineering, University of Split, Livanjska 2100 Split (Croatia); Suponitsky, V; Plant, D; Laberge, M, E-mail: e.avital@qmul.ac.uk [General Fusion Inc.,108-3680 Bonneville Place, Burnaby, BC V3N 4T5 (Canada)

    2017-08-15

    An innovative gas compression system is proposed and computationally researched to achieve a short time response as needed in engineering applications such as hydrogen fusion energy reactors and high speed hammers. The system consists of a reservoir containing high pressure gas connected to a straight tube which in turn is connected to a spherical duct, where at the sphere’s centre plasma resides in the case of a fusion reactor. Diaphragm located inside the straight tube separates the reservoir’s high pressure gas from the rest of the plenum. Once the diaphragm is breached the high pressure gas enters the plenum to drive pistons located on the inner wall of the spherical duct that will eventually end compressing the plasma. Quasi-1D and axisymmetric flow formulations are used to design and analyse the flow dynamics. A spike is designed for the interface between the straight tube and the spherical duct to provide a smooth geometry transition for the flow. Flow simulations show high supersonic flow hitting the end of the spherical duct, generating a return shock wave propagating upstream and raising the pressure above the reservoir pressure as in the hammer wave problem, potentially giving temporary pressure boost to the pistons. Good agreement is revealed between the two flow formulations pointing to the usefulness of the quasi-1D formulation as a rapid solver. Nevertheless, a mild time delay in the axisymmetric flow simulation occurred due to moderate two-dimensionality effects. The compression system is settled down in a few milliseconds for a spherical duct of 0.8 m diameter using Helium gas and a uniform duct cross-section area. Various system geometries are analysed using instantaneous and time history flow plots. (paper)

  3. Flow design and simulation of a gas compression system for hydrogen fusion energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital, E. J.; Salvatore, E.; Munjiza, A.; Suponitsky, V.; Plant, D.; Laberge, M.

    2017-08-01

    An innovative gas compression system is proposed and computationally researched to achieve a short time response as needed in engineering applications such as hydrogen fusion energy reactors and high speed hammers. The system consists of a reservoir containing high pressure gas connected to a straight tube which in turn is connected to a spherical duct, where at the sphere’s centre plasma resides in the case of a fusion reactor. Diaphragm located inside the straight tube separates the reservoir’s high pressure gas from the rest of the plenum. Once the diaphragm is breached the high pressure gas enters the plenum to drive pistons located on the inner wall of the spherical duct that will eventually end compressing the plasma. Quasi-1D and axisymmetric flow formulations are used to design and analyse the flow dynamics. A spike is designed for the interface between the straight tube and the spherical duct to provide a smooth geometry transition for the flow. Flow simulations show high supersonic flow hitting the end of the spherical duct, generating a return shock wave propagating upstream and raising the pressure above the reservoir pressure as in the hammer wave problem, potentially giving temporary pressure boost to the pistons. Good agreement is revealed between the two flow formulations pointing to the usefulness of the quasi-1D formulation as a rapid solver. Nevertheless, a mild time delay in the axisymmetric flow simulation occurred due to moderate two-dimensionality effects. The compression system is settled down in a few milliseconds for a spherical duct of 0.8 m diameter using Helium gas and a uniform duct cross-section area. Various system geometries are analysed using instantaneous and time history flow plots.

  4. Cold injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  5. Higgs Boson Pair Production in Gluon Fusion at Next-to-Leading Order with Full Top-Quark Mass Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowka, S; Greiner, N; Heinrich, G; Jones, S P; Kerner, M; Schlenk, J; Schubert, U; Zirke, T

    2016-07-01

    We present the calculation of the cross section and invariant mass distribution for Higgs boson pair production in gluon fusion at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD. Top-quark masses are fully taken into account throughout the calculation. The virtual two-loop amplitude has been generated using an extension of the program GoSam supplemented with an interface to Reduze for the integral reduction. The occurring integrals have been calculated numerically using the program SecDec. Our results, including the full top-quark mass dependence for the first time, allow us to assess the validity of various approximations proposed in the literature, which we also recalculate. We find substantial deviations between the NLO result and the different approximations, which emphasizes the importance of including the full top-quark mass dependence at NLO.

  6. Optimizing HIV-1 protease production in Escherichia coli as fusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piubelli Luciano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is the etiological agent in AIDS and related diseases. The aspartyl protease encoded by the 5' portion of the pol gene is responsible for proteolytic processing of the gag-pol polyprotein precursor to yield the mature capsid protein and the reverse transcriptase and integrase enzymes. The HIV protease (HIV-1Pr is considered an attractive target for designing inhibitors which could be used to tackle AIDS and therefore it is still the object of a number of investigations. Results A recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1Pr was overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells as a fusion protein with bacterial periplasmic protein dithiol oxidase (DsbA or glutathione S-transferase (GST, also containing a six-histidine tag sequence. Protein expression was optimized by designing a suitable HIV-1Pr cDNA (for E. coli expression and to avoid autoproteolysis and by screening six different E. coli strains and five growth media. The best expression yields were achieved in E. coli BL21-Codon Plus(DE3-RIL host and in TB or M9 medium to which 1% (w/v glucose was added to minimize basal expression. Among the different parameters assayed, the presence of a buffer system (based on phosphate salts and a growth temperature of 37°C after adding IPTG played the main role in enhancing protease expression (up to 10 mg of chimeric DsbA:HIV-1Pr/L fermentation broth. GST:HIVPr was in part (50% produced as soluble protein while the overexpressed DsbA:HIV-1Pr chimeric protein largely accumulated in inclusion bodies as unprocessed fusion protein. A simple refolding procedure was developed on HiTrap Chelating column that yielded a refolded DsbA:HIV-1Pr with a > 80% recovery. Finally, enterokinase digestion of resolubilized DsbA:HIV-1Pr gave more than 2 mg of HIV-1Pr per liter of fermentation broth with a purity ≤ 80%, while PreScission protease cleavage of soluble GST:HIVPr yielded ~ 0.15 mg of pure HIV-1

  7. Laser fusion program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmett, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    This program is structured to proceed through a series of well defined fusion milestones to proof of the scientific feasibility, of laser fusion with the Shiva Nova system. Concurrently, those key technical areas, such as advanced lasers, which are required to progress beyond proof of feasibility, are being studied. We have identified and quantified the opportunities and key technical issues in military applications, such as weapons effects simulations, and in civilian applications, such as central-station electric power production. We summarize the current status and future plans for the laser fusion program at LLL, emphasizing the civilian applications of laser fusion

  8. Fusion technology for the production of PbLi eutectic alloys; Obtencion de aleaciones eutecticas PbLi mediante procesos de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrena, M. J.; Gomez de Salazar, J. M.; Quinones, J.; Pascual, L.; Soria, A.

    2012-07-01

    The development of thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), whose objective is to produce energy from nuclear fusion, has raised the study of Pb-Li eutectic alloys, as they have been selected for the manufacture of test blanket modules (TBM). However, during the manufacturing process of the Pb-Li alloys, thermal conditions used result in a loss of litium element, which inhibits the formation of eutectic structures. In this work we have done fusion of pure lead and lithium, evaluating different process parameters to obtain Pb-Li (17 at. %) eutectic alloys. The alloys manufactured were characterized by DSC, SEM-EDX and microhardness tests. From these studies we noted that the used of an induction reactor and the process parameters optimized to obtain Pb-Li alloy allow for completely eutectic ingots and high chemical homogeneity and microstructural. (Author) 26 refs.

  9. Fusion Approaches for Land Cover Map Production Using High Resolution Image Time Series without Reference Data of the Corresponding Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Tardy

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Optical sensor time series images allow one to produce land cover maps at a large scale. The supervised classification algorithms have been shown to be the best to produce maps automatically with good accuracy. The main drawback of these methods is the need for reference data, the collection of which can introduce important production delays. Therefore, the maps are often available too late for some applications. Domain adaptation methods seem to be efficient for using past data for land cover map production. According to this idea, the main goal of this study is to propose several simple past data fusion schemes to override the current land cover map production delays. A single classifier approach and three voting rules are considered to produce maps without reference data of the corresponding period. These four approaches reach an overall accuracy of around 80% with a 17-class nomenclature using Formosat-2 image time series. A study of the impact of the number of past periods used is also done. It shows that the overall accuracy increases with the number of periods used. The proposed methods require at least two or three previous years to be used.

  10. Evaluating MODIS Collection 6 Dark Target Over Water Aerosol Products for Multi-sensor Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Y.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.; McHardy, T. M.; Lee, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol products have been widely used in aerosol related climate, visibility, and air quality studies for more than a decade. Recently, the MODIS collection 6 (c6) aerosol products from MODIS-Aqua have been released. The reported changes between Collection 5 and Collection 6 include updates in the retrieving algorithms and a new cloud filtering process for the over-ocean products. Thus it is necessary to fully evaluate the collection 6 products for applications that require high quality MODIS aerosol optical depth data, such as operational aerosol data assimilation. The uncertainties in the MODIS c6 DT over ocean products are studied through both inter-comparing with the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) aerosol products and by evaluation against ground truth. Special attention is given to the low bias in MODIS DT products due to the misclassifications of heavy aerosol plumes as clouds. Finally, a quality assured data assimilation grade aerosol optical product is constructed for aerosol data assimilation related applications.

  11. Coatings for fusion reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattox, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The internal surfaces of a tokamak fusion reactor control the impurity injection and gas recycling into the fusion plasma. Coating of internal surfaces may provide a desirable and possibly necessary design flexibility for achieving the temperatures, ion densities and containment times necessary for net energy production from fusion reactions to take place. In this paper the reactor environments seen by various componentare reviewed along with possible materials responses. Characteristics of coating-substrate systems, important to fusion applications, are delineated and the present status of coating development for fusion applications is reviewed. Coating development for fusion applications is just beginning and poses a unique and important challenge for materials development

  12. Cold Sore

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may reduce how often they return. Symptoms A cold sore usually passes through several stages: Tingling and itching. Many people feel an itching, burning or tingling sensation around their lips for a day or so ...

  13. Enhancement of yellow pigment production by intraspecific protoplast fusion of Monascus spp. yellow mutant (ade(-)) and white mutant (prototroph).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinsupa, Worawan; Phansiri, Salak; Thongpradis, Panida; Yongsmith, Busaba; Pothiratana, Chetsada

    2016-01-10

    To breed industrially useful strains of a slow-growing, yellow pigment producing strain of Monascus sp., protoplasts of Monascus purpureus yellow mutant (ade(-)) and rapid-growing M. purpureus white mutant (prototroph) were fused and fusants were selected on minimal medium (MM). Preliminary conventional protoplast fusion of the two strains was performed and the result showed that only white colonies were detected on MM. It was not able to differentiate the fusants from the white parental prototroph. To solve this problem, the white parental prototroph was thus pretreated with 20mM iodoacetamide (IOA) for cytoplasm inactivation and subsequently taken into protoplast fusion with slow-growing Monascus yellow mutant. Under this development technique, only the fusants, with viable cytoplasm from Monascus yellow mutant (ade(-)), could thus grow on MM, whereas neither IOA pretreated white parental prototroph nor yellow auxotroph (ade(-)) could survive. Fifty-three fusants isolated from yellow colonies obtained through this developed technique were subsequently inoculated on complete medium (MY agar). Fifteen distinguished yellow colonies from their parental yellow mutant were then selected for biochemical, morphological and fermentative properties in cassava starch and soybean flour (SS) broth. Finally, three most stable fusants (F7, F10 and F43) were then selected and compared in rice solid culture. Enhancement of yellow pigment production over the parental yellow auxotroph was found in F7 and F10, while enhanced glucoamylase activity was found in F43. The formation of fusants was further confirmed by monacolin K content, which was intermediate between the two parents (monacolin K-producing yellow auxotroph and non-monacolin K producing white prototroph). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. EMP Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    KUNTAY, Isık

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel fusion scheme, called EMP Fusion, which has the promise of achieving breakeven and realizing commercial fusion power. The method is based on harnessing the power of an electromagnetic pulse generated by the now well-developed flux compression technology. The electromagnetic pulse acts as a means of both heating up the plasma and confining the plasma, eliminating intermediate steps. The EMP Fusion device is simpler compared to other fusion devices and this reduces...

  15. Methods for increasing production of 3-methyl-2-butenol using fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Howard; Keasling, Jay D.

    2017-04-25

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for increasing production of 3-methyl-2-butenol in a de novo synthetic pathway in a genetically modified host cell using isopentenyl disphosphate (IPP) as a substrate.

  16. Ecosystem engineering creates a direct nutritional link between 600-m deep cold-water coral mounds and surface productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.; Mohn, C.; Rengstorf, A.; Grehan, A.; Van Oevelen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-water corals (CWCs) form large mounds on the seafloor that are hotspots of biodiversity in the deep sea, but it remains enigmatic how CWCs can thrive in this food-limited environment. Here, we infer from model simulations that the interaction between tidal currents and CWC-formed mounds induces

  17. Diboson Production, Vector Boson Fusion and Vector Boson Scattering measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Cong; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the cross sections of the production of pairs of electroweak gauge bosons at the LHC constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The ATLAS collaboration has performed detailed measurements of integrated and differential cross sections of the production of heavy di-boson pairs, such as WW, WZ and ZZ, in the fully-leptonic and partially in the semi-leptonic final states at centre-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV. Moreover, searches for the production of three W bosons or of a W boson and a photon together with a Z or W boson at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV will be presented. These studies are closely connected to the electroweak production of a heavy boson and a photon together with two jets. Evidence has been found for the exclusive production of W boson pairs, which will be presented in this talk. When selecting two jets at high invariant mass in addition to the production of th...

  18. The study of genotype, cold pretreatment, low-dose gamma irradiation and 2,4-D concentration effect on wheat doubled haploid production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naserian, B.; Vedadi, C.; Karbalaii, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this study, response of a cultivar (Atrak) and two lines (F3 2005 and F3 2104) of wheat , and effect of cold pretreatment, low dose gamma irradiation and 2,4-D (2,4 mg l -1 ) were investigated to anther culture response. Donar plants were grown under field conditions in early spring. Anthers were plated on modified CHB medium containing 2, 4-D (2, 4 mg l -1 ), 0.5 mg l -1 Kinetin and 90 g l -1 Sucrose. Percent of Callus formation in 100 anther and percent of plantlet in 100 calli were measured. Results indicated that genotype, cold pretreatment and 2,4-D concentrations had significant effect on anther culture response. F3 2005 showed highest callus induction and plantlet production and F3 2104 had lowest response. This experiment indicated that androgenic traits are controlled by genotype and environmental factors. Further more these traits are controlled independently. (author)

  19. Development of Deep Learning Based Data Fusion Approach for Accurate Rainfall Estimation Using Ground Radar and Satellite Precipitation Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Chandra, C. V.; Tan, H.; Cifelli, R.; Xie, P.

    2016-12-01

    Rainfall estimation based on onboard satellite measurements has been an important topic in satellite meteorology for decades. A number of precipitation products at multiple time and space scales have been developed based upon satellite observations. For example, NOAA Climate Prediction Center has developed a morphing technique (i.e., CMORPH) to produce global precipitation products by combining existing space based rainfall estimates. The CMORPH products are essentially derived based on geostationary satellite IR brightness temperature information and retrievals from passive microwave measurements (Joyce et al. 2004). Although the space-based precipitation products provide an excellent tool for regional and global hydrologic and climate studies as well as improved situational awareness for operational forecasts, its accuracy is limited due to the sampling limitations, particularly for extreme events such as very light and/or heavy rain. On the other hand, ground-based radar is more mature science for quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), especially after the implementation of dual-polarization technique and further enhanced by urban scale radar networks. Therefore, ground radars are often critical for providing local scale rainfall estimation and a "heads-up" for operational forecasters to issue watches and warnings as well as validation of various space measurements and products. The CASA DFW QPE system, which is based on dual-polarization X-band CASA radars and a local S-band WSR-88DP radar, has demonstrated its excellent performance during several years of operation in a variety of precipitation regimes. The real-time CASA DFW QPE products are used extensively for localized hydrometeorological applications such as urban flash flood forecasting. In this paper, a neural network based data fusion mechanism is introduced to improve the satellite-based CMORPH precipitation product by taking into account the ground radar measurements. A deep learning system is

  20. Fusion fuel blanket technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, I.J.; Gierszewski, P.

    1987-05-01

    The fusion blanket surrounds the burning hydrogen core of a fusion reactor. It is in this blanket that most of the energy released by the nuclear fusion of deuterium-tritium is converted into useful product, and where tritium fuel is produced to enable further operation of the reactor. As fusion research turns from present short-pulse physics experiments to long-burn engineering tests in the 1990's, energy removal and tritium production capabilities become important. This technology will involve new materials, conditions and processes with applications both to fusion and beyond. In this paper, we introduce features of proposed blanket designs and update and status of international research. In focusing on the Canadian blanket technology program, we discuss the aqueous lithium salt blanket concept, and the in-reactor tritium recovery test program