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Sample records for coincidence eico spectroscopy

  1. Development of an electron electron ion coincidence analyzer for Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Okada, Naoyuki; Oyamada, Ken; Okusawa, Makoto; Okudaira, Koji K.; Mase, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) analyzer for Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (coASMA), a miniature cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface is irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons are energy-analyzed and detected by the coASMA and the CMA, while desorbed ions are detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was tested by measuring Si-LVV-Si-2p APECS data of clean Si(1 1 1)7 x 7 and Si(1 1 1)7 x 7 covered by dissociated H 2 O, and by measuring the Auger-electron photoion coincidence (AEPICO) spectra of condensed H 2 O at the 4a 1 <- O 1s resonance

  2. Development of an Apparatus for High-Resolution Auger Photoelectron Coincidence Spectroscopy (APECS) and Electron Ion Coincidence (EICO) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Mase, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Okusawa, Makoto

    We have developed an electron electron ion coincidence (EEICO) apparatus for high-resolution Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS) and electron ion coincidence (EICO) spectroscopy. It consists of a coaxially symmetric mirror electron energy analyzer (ASMA), a miniature double-pass cylindrical mirror electron energy analyzer (DP-CMA), a miniature time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), a magnetic shield, an xyz stage, a tilt-adjustment mechanism, and a conflat flange with an outer diameter of 203 mm. A sample surface was irradiated by synchrotron radiation, and emitted electrons were energy-analyzed and detected by the ASMA and the DP-CMA, while desorbed ions were mass-analyzed and detected by the TOF-MS. The performance of the new EEICO analyzer was evaluated by measuring Si 2p photoelectron spectra of clean Si(001)-2×1 and Si(111)-7×7, and by measuring Si-L23VV-Si-2p Auger photoelectron coincidence spectra (Si-L23VV-Si-2p APECS) of clean Si(001)-2×1.

  3. Coincident photoelectron spectroscopy on superconductors; Koinzidente Photoelektronenspektroskopie an Supraleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Aim of the performed experiments of this thesis was to attempt to detect Cooper pairs as carriers of the superconducting current directly by means of the photoelectric effect. The method of the coincident photoelectron spectroscopy aims thereby at the detection of two coherently emitted electrons by the interaction with a photon. Because electrostatic analyzers typically cover only a very small spatial angle, which goes along with very low coincidence rates, in connection with this thesis a time-of-flight projection system has been developed, which maps nearly the whole spatial angle on a position-resolving detector. The pulsed light source in form of special synchrotron radiation necessary for the measurement has been adjusted so weak, that only single photons could arrive at the sample. Spectroscoped were beside test measurements on silver layers both a lead monocrystal as representative of the classical BCS superconductors and monocrystalline Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} from the family of the high-temperature superconductors. With excitation energies up to 40 eV could be shown that sufficiently smooth and clean surfaces in the superconducting phase exhibit within the resolving power of about 0.5 eV no recognizable differences in comparison to the normally conducting phase. Beside these studies furthermore the simple photoemission at the different samples and especially in the case of the lead crystal is treated, because here no comparable results are known. Thereby the whole momentum space is discussed and the Fermi surface established as three-dimensional model, by means of which the measurement results are discussed. in the theoretical descriptions different models for the Cooper-pair production are presented, whereby to the momentum exchange with the crystal a special role is attributed, because this can only occur in direct excitations via discrete lattice vectors.

  4. A new apparatus for electron-ion multiple coincidence momentum imaging spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Y.; Kato, M.; Pruemper, G.; Liu, X.-J.; Lischke, T.; Ueda, K.; Tamenori, Y.; Oura, M.; Yamaoka, H.; Suzuki, I.H.; Saito, N.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new experimental apparatus for the electron-ion multiple coincidence momentum imaging spectroscopy in order to obtain the angular distributions of vibration-resolved photoelectrons from molecules fixed in space. The apparatus consists of a four-stage molecular supersonic jet and a spectrometer analyzing three-dimensional momenta of fragment ions and electrons in coincidence

  5. Imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy with velocity focusing electron optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodi, Andras; Johnson, Melanie; Gerber, Thomas; Gengeliczki, Zsolt; Sztaray, Balint; Baer, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    An imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectrometer at the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline of the Swiss Light Source is presented and a few initial measurements are reported. Monochromatic synchrotron VUV radiation ionizes the cooled or thermal gas-phase sample. Photoelectrons are velocity focused, with better than 1 meV resolution for threshold electrons, and also act as start signal for the ion time-of-flight analysis. The ions are accelerated in a relatively low, 40-80 V cm -1 field, which enables the direct measurement of rate constants in the 10 3 -10 7 s -1 range. All electron and ion events are recorded in a triggerless multiple-start/multiple-stop setup, which makes it possible to carry out coincidence experiments at >100 kHz event frequencies. As examples, the threshold photoelectron spectrum of the argon dimer and the breakdown diagrams for hydrogen atom loss in room temperature methane and the chlorine atom loss in cold chlorobenzene are shown and discussed.

  6. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arp, U.

    1996-01-01

    Argon L 2.3 -M 2.3 M 2.3 Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with Kα fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons

  7. Evaluation of accidental coincidences for time-differential Moessbauer-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alflen, M.; Meyer, W.

    1995-01-01

    The accidental coincidences of a measuring system based on time-to-amplitude conversion are considered in some detail for the case of low starting and high stopping rates. Two types of accidental coincidences are distinguished, those carrying time information and those without time information. Neglecting any deadtime effects of the detectors, analytical expressions for the calculation of the time distribution of the random coincidences are evaluated. The analytical expressions have been confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations. The procedure is applied to time-differential Moessbauer spectroscopy in order to extract the time spectra of true coincidences. The measured spectrum in a time channel turns out to be a superposition of the true spectrum (true coincidences), a time integral spectrum (random coincidences), and a weighted superposition of true spectra of other time channels (random but time carrying information). A measurement with a single line 57 Co/Rh-source and single line K[Fe(CN) 6 ].3H 2 O-absorber with stopping rates of 1 MBq shows agreement between the theoretical time-filtered spectra and the corrected measured spectra of true coincidences. ((orig.))

  8. Advances in threshold photoelectron spectroscopy (TPES) and threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Tomas; Tuckett, Richard P

    2017-04-12

    The history and evolution of molecular threshold photoelectron spectroscopy and threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy (TPEPICO) over the last fifty years are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on instrumentation and the extraction of dynamical information about energy selected ion dissociation, not on the detailed spectroscopy of certain molecules. Three important advances have expanded greatly the power of the technique, and permitted its implementation on modern synchrotron radiation beamlines. The use of velocity focusing of threshold electrons onto an imaging detector in the 1990s simultaneously improved the sensitivity and electron energy resolution, and also facilitated the subtraction of hot electron background in both threshold electron spectroscopy and TPEPICO studies. The development of multi-start multi-stop collection detectors for both electrons and ions in the 2000s permitted the use of the full intensity of modern synchrotron radiation thereby greatly improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Finally, recent developments involving imaging electrons in a range of energies as well as ions onto separate position-sensitive detectors has further improved the collection sensitivity so that low density samples found in a variety of studies can be investigated. As a result, photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy is now well positioned to address a range of challenging problems that include the quantitative determination of compositions of isomer mixtures, and the detection and spectroscopy of free radicals produced in pyrolysis or discharge sources as well as in combustion studies.

  9. Observation of relaxation on time scale of core hole decay by coincidence photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2007-01-01

    It is shown by a many-body theory that when the relaxation time of a metastable core hole state(s) to the most stable one is comparable to or shorter than core hole decay time of the former state(s), a comparison between the singles (noncoincidence) photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) spectrum and the coincidence one provides a direct evidence of the relaxation. In principle the variation with photoelectron kinetic energy of relaxation (or charge transfer (CT)) time can be determined. By singles measurement the correlation of a photoelectron generated by creation of the metastable states not only with an Auger electron generated by annihilation of the same core hole state but also with an Auger electron generated by annihilation of the stable state via relaxation of the metastable state, is completely lost, unless only the metastable state is observed by PES, whereas the correlation often manifests directly in the coincidence spectra. Thus, compared to the coincidence spectroscopy the singles one is often much less capable of elucidating the competition between relaxation and core hole decay of a metastable state. Such examples are discussed

  10. Positron annihilation in polypropylene studied by lifetime and coincidence Doppler-broadening spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djourelov, N.; He, C.; Suzuki, T.; Shantarovich, V. P.; Ito, Y.; Kondo, K.; Ito, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The momentum density distributions (MDDs) of electrons taking part in the annihilation processes in polypropylene (PP) have been measured by coincidence Doppler-broadening spectroscopy. MDDs at the beginning of measurements to those at the saturation level of Ps formation have been compared in order to follow the possible changes in concentration of carbonyl groups (CG). A high initial CG concentration in PP has been observed, while for antioxidant-containing PP no significant presence of CG has been detected, and no changes have been observed during positron irradiation.

  11. Coincident Auger electron and recoil ion momentum spectroscopy for low-energy ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, G. E-mail: glaurent@ganil.fr; Tarisien, M.; Flechard, X.; Jardin, P.; Guillaume, L.; Sobocinski, P.; Adoui, L.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Chesnel, J.-Y.; Fremont, F.; Hennecart, D.; Lienard, E.; Maunoury, L.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Cassimi, A

    2003-05-01

    The recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (RIMS) method combined with the detection of Auger electrons has been used successfully to analyse double electron capture following O{sup 6+} + He collisions at low impact velocities. Although RIMS and Auger spectroscopies are known to be efficient tools to obtain details on the primary processes occurring during the collision, the conjunction of both techniques provides new insights on the electron capture process. In the present experiment, triple coincidence detection of the scattered projectile, the target recoil ion and the Auger electron allows for a precise identification of the doubly excited states O{sup 4+} (1s{sup 2}nln{sup '}l{sup '}) populated after double electron-capture events.

  12. Photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence spectroscopy of free molecules: New experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich, Volker; Barth, Silko; Lischke, Toralf; Joshi, Sanjeev; Arion, Tiberiu; Mucke, Melanie; Foerstel, Marko; Bradshaw, Alex M.; Hergenhahn, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Photoelectron-Auger electron coincidence spectroscopy probes the dicationic states produced by Auger decay following the photoionization of core or inner valence levels in atoms, molecules or clusters. Moreover, the technique provides valuable insight into the dynamics of core hole decay. This paper serves the dual purpose of demonstrating the additional information obtained by this technique compared to Auger spectroscopy alone as well as of describing the new IPP/FHI apparatus at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation source. The distinguishing feature of the latter is the capability to record both the photoelectron and Auger electron with good energy and angle resolution, for which purpose a large hemispherical electrostatic analyser is combined with several linear time-of-flight spectrometers. New results are reported for the K-shell photoionization of oxygen (O 2 ) and the subsequent KVV Auger decay. Calculations in the literature for non-coincident O 2 Auger spectra are found to be in moderately good agreement with the new data.

  13. Binding energies and isomerization in metallocene ions from threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révész, Agnes; Szepes, László; Baer, Tomas; Sztáray, Bálint

    2010-12-22

    Metallocene ions (Cp(2)M(+), M = Cr, Co, Ni) were studied by threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy (TPEPICO) to investigate the mechanism, energetics, and kinetics of the ionic dissociation processes. The examined energy-selected Cp(2)M(+) ions fragment by losing the neutral cyclopentadienyl ligand. In addition, CH and C(2)H(2) losses appear as minor channels, while the cobaltocene ion also loses an H atom. A possible isomerization pathway has also been observed for Cp(2)Ni(+), yielding a complex with pentafulvalene (C(10)H(8)) with a loss of H(2). In order to determine the 0 K appearance energies for the CpM(+) fragment ions, the asymmetric time-of-flight peak shapes and the breakdown diagrams of the energy-selected metallocene ions were modeled by both the rigid activated complex (RAC) Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theory and the simplified statistical adiabatic channel model (SSACM). The following appearance energies were obtained with SSACM, which is more reliable for loose transition states: 10.57 ± 0.14, 11.01 ± 0.13, and 10.18 ± 0.13 eV for M = Cr, Co, and Ni, respectively. These values combined with the corresponding adiabatic ionization energies yield M-Cp bond dissociation energies in Cp(2)M(+) ions of 5.04 ± 0.16, 5.77 ± 0.15, and 3.96 ± 0.15 eV. Density functional calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory were used to determine the structures of these complexes and to provide parameters necessary for the analysis of the experimental data. The trends in the M-Cp bond energies can be related to the electronic structures of the metallocene ions based on a simple molecular orbital picture.

  14. Electron irradiation effect of polyurethane using coincidence doppler-broadening spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, D.J.; Zhang, J.D.; Leung, J.K.C.; Beling, C.D.; Liu, L.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: To understand the electron irradiation effects on polymer, polyether-urethane (ETPU) samples of 2m m in thickness and 1 0 m m in diameter were irradiated by a 1.8M eV electron beam with beam current of 3 ma at room temperature. The irradiated doses are 5 kGy, 10 kGy, 15 kGy, 30 kGy, 100 kGy and 150 kGy. ETPU was manufactured by mixing PTMG-100, TDI-100 and MOCA. The momentum density distributions (MMDs) of electrons taking part in the annihilation processes of positron-electron pairs in ETPU have been measured by coincidence Doppler-broadening spectroscopy (CDBS). By presenting the ratio of the counts in every channel of the measured CDB spectrum to the corresponding counts from a reference spectrum (pristine ETPU), we observed that the change in MMDs is not significant for doses lower than 10 kGy. However, high momentum part of MMDs exhibit an obvious decrease for dose exceeding 15 kGy and then slowly down to steady with doses until 150 kGy. This valley occurs at around 15 x1 0 3m οc and is well known as oxygen-specific, indicative of a less positron trapping by oxygen atoms in some samples of higher dose radiation. It is postulated that the radiation will break the crosslinkings, allowing the trace water and oxygen molecules to be released from the sample surface. Excess NCO groups in ETPU would crosslink with urethane and urea groups to produce allophanate and biuret groups. After receiving a certain amount of electron irradiation, crosslinked allophanate and biuret groups would produce degradation. Thus, residual water and oxygen trapped in ETPU by the crosslinking would diffuse out. However, the irradiation doses up to 150 kGy in this experiment are still not large enough to induce strong degradation of urethane and urea groups

  15. Subtraction of random coincidences in γ-ray spectroscopy: A new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Ghugre, S.S.; Basu, S.K.; Garg, U.; Ray, S.; Sinha, A.K.; Zhu, S.

    2006-01-01

    A new analytical method for estimation and subsequent subtraction of random coincidences has been developed. It utilizes the knowledge of the counts in the main diagonal of a background-subtracted symmetric data set for the estimation of the events originating from random coincidences. This procedure has been successfully applied to several data sets. It could be a valuable tool for low-fold data sets, especially for low-cross-section events

  16. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of 238,239Pu and 241Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, Michael P.; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-01

    A technique to determine the isotopics of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by measuring the coincidence of the alpha particle during radioactive decay with the conversion electron (or Auger) emitted during the relaxation of the daughter isotope. This presents a unique signature to allow the deconvolution of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm2 silicon drift detector. A passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector provided measurements of alpha spectroscopy. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20–55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information to aid in the coincident measurement approach.

  17. Positron Annihilation in Carbon Nanotubes Studied by Coincidence Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, H.; Sato, K.; Kanazawa, I.; Sano, M.

    2008-05-01

    In order to assign the sites of positron annihilation, coincidence Doppler broadening spectra were measured for a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal, graphite powder, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MNTs) and cup-stacked carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The spectrum for graphite powder normalized to that for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is almost flat in the momentum region from 7×10-3 to 13×10-3 mec, having a ratio close to unity. The flat spectrum demonstrates that positrons injected into graphite powder annihilate in the interlayer spaces of piled graphite sheets, in the same manner as positrons in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite annihilate in the bulk. The coincidence Doppler broadening spectra for MNTs and CNTs are quite different from that for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which indicates that positrons injected into MNTs and CYTs annihilate not in the bulk, but on surface. The positron lifetime spectrum for multi-walled carbon nanotubes is analyzed in terms of a single component due to surface-trapped positrons, while that for CNTs is decomposed into three components attributable to para-positronium surface-trapped positrons and ortho-positronium. The difference between the coincidence Doppler broadening spectrum for CNTs and that for MNTs is explained in terms of positron annihilation on zigzag surfaces of CNTs which are composed of both graphite-sheet and graphite-edge planes.

  18. Interaction of multicharged ions with molecules (CO{sub 2}, C{sub 60}) by coincident electron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. CAR-IRSAMC

    2001-07-01

    First results for the investigation of electron capture processes in collisions between multicharged ions and molecule targets using electron spectroscopy in coincidence with charged fragments, are presented. It is shown that a much more detailed investigation of the capture reaction can be achieved using molecular instead of heavy atomic targets provided that an analysis of the target dissociation is made. The collisional systems {sup 18}O{sup 8+}+Ar, CO{sub 2} and C{sub 60} have been studied at 80 keV. Non coincident electron spectra as well as first results of double or triple coincidence experiments are discussed. Kinetic energy distributions of the C{sub n}{sup +} fragments (n=1 to 8) produced in multiple capture processes from C{sub 60} target are given. A detailed investigation of the double capture process with CO{sub 2} molecule allows the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions (KERD) which characterize the dissociation of CO{sub 2}{sup 2+} molecular ions; our results are found to be very similar to those measured in double photoionisation experiments. (orig.)

  19. Application of coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy to polypropylene and polyethylene: taking into account the positronium formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djourelov, N.; Suzuki, T.; Yu, R.S.; Shantarovich, V.; Kondo, K

    2004-07-12

    The coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) and positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) techniques were applied to study low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene (PP), and antioxidant containing polypropylene (PPA). It was demonstrated that the Doppler-broadened lines for LDPE and PPA could be decomposed into two components a narrow component due to positronium (Ps) annihilation and another broader one due to free positron annihilation. The determined Ps-component in the Doppler-broadened line was used to calculate the Ps-corrected CDB ratios for HDPE and PP to LDPE. Different ways to compare CDB ratios in polymers were discussed. During a long-term ({approx}500 h) positron-irradiation experiment at a low temperature (50 K), a significant enhancement of the carbonyl group concentration in PP was found by means of CDB technique, while the enhancement in HDPE was very slight.

  20. Application of coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy to polypropylene and polyethylene: taking into account the positronium formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djourelov, N.; Suzuki, T.; Yu, R. S.; Shantarovich, V.; Kondo, K.

    2004-07-01

    The coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) and positron annihilation lifetime (PAL) techniques were applied to study low-density polyethylene (LDPE), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polypropylene (PP), and antioxidant containing polypropylene (PPA). It was demonstrated that the Doppler-broadened lines for LDPE and PPA could be decomposed into two components a narrow component due to positronium (Ps) annihilation and another broader one due to free positron annihilation. The determined Ps-component in the Doppler-broadened line was used to calculate the Ps-corrected CDB ratios for HDPE and PP to LDPE. Different ways to compare CDB ratios in polymers were discussed. During a long-term (˜500 h) positron-irradiation experiment at a low temperature (50 K), a significant enhancement of the carbonyl group concentration in PP was found by means of CDB technique, while the enhancement in HDPE was very slight.

  1. Imaging the electron transfer reaction of Ne2+ with Ar using position-sensitive coincidence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, Sarah M; Hu Wanping; Price, Stephen D

    2002-01-01

    A new experiment, employing position-sensitive detection coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, has been used to investigate the single-electron transfer reaction between Ne 2+ and Ar by detecting the resulting pairs of singly charged ions in coincidence. The experimental technique allows the determination of the individual velocity vectors of the ionic products, in the centre-of-mass frame, for each reactive event detected. The experiments show that forward scattering dominates the reactivity, although a bimodal angular distribution is apparent. In addition, the spectra show that at laboratory frame collision energies from 4-14 eV the reactivity is dominated by Ne 2+ (2p 4 , 3 P) accepting an electron from an argon atom to form the ground state of Ne + together with an Ar + ion in an excited electronic level, predominantly arising from the Ar + (3s 2 3p 4 3d) configuration. The form of this reactivity, and the differences between the reactivity observed in these experiments and those performed at higher collision energies, are well reproduced by Landau-Zener theory

  2. High spin gamma-ray coincidence spectroscopy with large detector arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, M.H.

    1992-12-01

    In-beam γ-ray spectroscopy has been used to study rapidly rotating nuclei in the rare-earth region. The experiments were performed using the high-resolution multi detector arrays ESSA30 and TESSA3 at the Nuclear Structure Facility, Daresbury Laboratories in Great Britain and the NORDBALL at the Niels Bohr Tandem Accelerator at Risoe in Denmark. The studied nuclei were produced using heavy-ion induced fusion-evaporation reactions. New techniques for the analysis of γ-γ correlation spectra were developed. These involves viewing the two-dimensional γ-γ spectrum as well as projection in both energy axes, determination of centroids and volumes of peaks and full two-dimensional Gauss fits of an arbitrarily shaped area. The data acquisition system of the NORDBALL multi detector array is presented. In two of the studied nuclei ( 167 Lu and 163 Tm) the strongly shape driving πh 9/2 [541]1/2 - is studied. The shift to larger frequency of the neutron AB crossing in these decay sequences is not fully understood. The study of 171 Re revealed a second backbend of the [402]5/2 + band. The observed bandcrossings are interpreted using the CSM and three-band mixing calculations. The study of 171,172 W revealed five new bands and although these nuclei are expected to be stably deformed the small differences in the formation showed to be crucial in order to reproduce data well. (au)

  3. Positron annihilation in polypropylene studied by lifetime and coincidence Doppler-broadening spectroscopy[Positron annihilation; Doppler broadening; Coincidence Doppler system; PP; Antioxidant; Carbonyl group; Irradiation effect; Core electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djourelov, N. E-mail: nikdjour@post.kek.jp; He, C.; Suzuki, T.; Shantarovich, V.P.; Ito, Y.; Kondo, K.; Ito, Y

    2003-12-01

    The momentum density distributions (MDDs) of electrons taking part in the annihilation processes in polypropylene (PP) have been measured by coincidence Doppler-broadening spectroscopy. MDDs at the beginning of measurements to those at the saturation level of Ps formation have been compared in order to follow the possible changes in concentration of carbonyl groups (CG). A high initial CG concentration in PP has been observed, while for antioxidant-containing PP no significant presence of CG has been detected, and no changes have been observed during positron irradiation.

  4. Investigation of the chemical vicinity of defects in Mg and AZ31 with positron coincident Doppler boarding spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Martin

    2008-03-10

    Within the scope of the present work, two main goals have been achieved: Firstly, the coincident Doppler broadening spectrometer (CDBS) at the high intense positron source NEPOMUC has been elaborately improved in order to increase the spatial resolution for defect mapping measurements and to investigate samples with shallow positron trapping sites which are present e. g. in magnesium. Secondly, as an application, the chemical vicinity of defects in the industrially used magnesium based alloy AZ31 has been examined by means of the detailed investigation of ion-irradiated specimen with positron annihilation spectroscopy. Detailed simulations with the finite-element simulation tool COMSOL were used to optimize the focal diameter of the positron beam at the sample position in order to increase the spatial resolution. With a value of 0.3 mm, sub-mm resolution has now been reached. The CDBS has been furthermore equipped with a sample cooling unit in order to reach liquid nitrogen temperature, maintaining the feature of scanning the sample for defect mapping. Defects and their chemical surrounding in ion irradiated magnesium and the magnesium based alloy AZ31 were then investigated on an atomic scale with the CDBS. In the respective spectra the chemical information and the defect contribution have been thoroughly separated. For this purpose, samples of annealed Mg were irradiated with Mg-ions in order to create exclusively defects. In addition Al- and Zn-ion irradiations on Mg-samples were performed in order to create samples with both defects and impurity atoms. The ion irradiated area on the samples was investigated with laterally and depth resolved positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) and compared with SRIM-simulations of the vacancy distribution. The investigation of the chemical vicinity of crystal defects in AZ31 was performed with CDBS on Mg-ion irradiated AZ31 with Mg-ion irradiated Mg. The outer tail of the energy distribution in the annihilation

  5. Alpha and conversion electron spectroscopy of {sup 238,239}Pu and {sup 241}Am and alpha-conversion electron coincidence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, Michael P., E-mail: michael.dion@pnnl.gov; Miller, Brian W.; Warren, Glen A.

    2016-09-11

    A technique to determine the isotopic constituents of a mixed actinide sample has been proposed by a coincident alpha-conversion electron measurement. This presents a unique signature to allow the unfolding of isotopes that possess overlapping alpha particle energy and reduce backgrounds of an unseparated sample. The work presented here are results of conversion electron spectroscopy of {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu using a dual-stage peltier-cooled 25 mm{sup 2} silicon drift detector and alpha spectroscopy with a passivated ion implanted planar silicon detector. The conversion electron spectra were evaluated from 20–55 keV based on fits to the dominant conversion electron emissions, which allowed the relative conversion electron emission intensities to be determined. These measurements provide crucial singles spectral information and calibration to aid in the coincident measurement approach. Furthermore, an alpha-conversion electron spectrometer was assembled using the silicon based detectors described and results of a coincident spectrum analysis is reported for {sup 241}Am.

  6. The influence of radiation and light on Ps formation in PMMA and PE studied by coincidence Doppler-broadening spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, T; Shantarovich, V; Kondo, K; Hamada, E; Matso, M; Ma Li; Ito, Y

    2003-01-01

    Using two Ge detectors, the high-resolution Doppler-broadening energy spectra of positron annihilation gamma rays has been obtained by measuring the coincidences of the two photons. Light bleaching and oxygen effects on positron annihilation were investigated in this way. A large enhancement of the high-momentum part of the coincidence Doppler spectra was observed in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA), which contains oxygen atoms in the polymer structure. Bleaching experiments in PMMA and in copolymer ethylene-methylmethacrylate EMMA (LDPE+MMA 3 mol%) have demonstrated that the enhancement effect may be due to the trapping of positrons by the polar -C sup + 6-O sup - groups, followed by positron annihilation with the electrons belonging to oxygen.

  7. Multiple capture investigated by coincident electron spectroscopy in X{sup 7+}+Ar, at 70 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto-Capelle, P.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, D.; Bordenave-Montesquieu, A. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Lab. Collisions-Agregats-Reactivite

    1999-11-01

    The multiple electron capture in N{sup 7+} + Ar and F{sup 7+}(1s{sup 2}) + Ar systems is investigated at 70 keV with a new electron-recoil ion charge coincidence experiment. The whole electron energy range has been studied. Up to six electrons are found to be captured into autoionizing states. The recoil ion charge distribution associated with the emission of electrons is similar for both systems and found to be in good agreement with the prediction of Niehaus`s model roughly adapted to take into account autoionizing cascades. New findings for the coincident double and triple captures are briefly discussed. A capture of an inner L-shell electron of Ar into the K-shell of the projectile is also observed in N{sup 7+} + Ar collisions. (orig.) 10 refs.

  8. Size effects in van der Waals clusters studied by spin and angle-resolved electron spectroscopy and multi-coincidence ion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolles, D; Pesic, Z D; Zhang, H; Bilodeau, R C; Bozek, J D; Berrah, N

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the valence and inner-shell photoionization of free rare-gas clusters by means of angle and spin resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and momentum resolving electron-multi-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The electron measurements probe the evolution of the photoelectron angular distribution and spin polarization parameters as a function of photon energy and cluster size, and reveal a strong cluster size dependence of the photoelectron angular distributions in certain photon energy regions. In contrast, the spin polarization parameter of the cluster photoelectrons is found to be very close to the atomic value for all covered photon energies and cluster sizes. The ion imaging measurements, which probe the fragmentation dynamics of multiply charged van der Waals clusters, also exhibit a pronounced cluster size dependence

  9. Experiments using coincidence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar Dhani.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments on γ spectroscopy using the simple coincidence techniques, including investigation of angular distribution of γ radiation from annihilation process in decay of Na 22 , γ - γ angular correlation technique in decay of Co 60 , decay scheme study of Bi 207 and life time measurement of nuclear Pb 207 excited state have been carried out. (author)

  10. THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF AG/CU(100) SURFACE ALLOYS STUDIES BY AUGER-PHOTOELECTRON COINCIDENCE SPECTROSCOPY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ARENA,D.A.; BARTYNSKI,R.A.; HULBERT,S.L.

    2001-10-08

    We have measured the Ag and Pd M{sub 5}VV Auger spectrum in coincidence with Ag and Pd 4d{sub 5/2} photoelectrons for the Ag/Cu(100) and Pd/Cu(100) systems, respectively, as a function of admetal coverage. These systems form surface alloys (i.e. random substitutional alloys in the first atomic layer) for impurity concentrations in the 0.1 monolayer range. For these systems, the centroid of the impurity 4d levels is expected to shift away from the Fermi level by {approx}1 eV [Ruban et al., Journal of Molecular Catalysis. A 115 (1997) 421], an effect that should be easily seen in coincidence core-valence-valence Auger spectra. We find that the impurity Auger spectra of both systems shift in a manner that is consistent with d-band moving away from EF. However, the shift for Pd is considerably smaller than expected, and a shift almost absent for Ag. The disagreement between theory and experiment is most likely caused by the neglect of lattice relaxations in the calculations.

  11. The effect of Coster-Kronig transition on the Auger-photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy spectra of early 3d-transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2004-01-01

    The singles L23-M45M45 Auger-electron spectroscopy (AES) spectrum of early 3d-transition metal can be fitted by a weighted sum of the density of the single-hole states and that of the two-hole states, broadened by the initial L23-hole lifetime width, respectively (in the present paper we denote the atomic shells Lx, My, and Nz by LX, MY and NZ, respectively). With increasing occupancy of the 3d band the probability of creating the two-hole states by the L23-M45M45 Auger transition and the L2-L3M45 Coster-Kronig (CK) transition increases. However, the M45 hole created by the CK transition is delocalized and becomes decoupled (screened out) from the L3-hole decay so that the L3M45 two-hole state 'decays' to the single L3-hole state before the L3-hole decays. Thus the singles AES spectrum by the L2-L3-M45(M45) CK-transition preceded Auger transition and the singles one by the L3-M45(M45) Auger-transition overlap. We can study the M45-hole dynamics by Auger-photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy because the coincidence spectral lineshape depends on the dynamics of the M45 hole created by the CK transition

  12. Core-valence coupling in the Ru 4p photoexcitation/Auger decay process: Auger-photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotter, R.; Siu, W.-K.; Bartynski, R. A.; Hulbert, S. L.; Wu, Xilin; Zitnik, M.; Nozoye, H.

    2000-01-01

    The N 23 VV Auger spectrum of Ru has been measured in coincidence with 4p 1/2 and with 4p 3/2 photoelectrons. Unlike other metals that exhibit bandlike Auger decays, we find that the two Auger spectra are not shifted by the difference in core level binding energies. A consistent description of these transitions and the core level line shape requires consideration of the relativistic multiplet splitting in the intermediate core hole state and two-valence-hole Auger final state. The results suggest that the large linewidth of the 4p levels is primarily due to multiplet splitting, and that an N 2 (N 3 N 45 )N 45 N 45 super-Coster-Kronig transition is only a minor decay channel. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  13. VUV photoionization of acetamide studied by electron/ion coincidence spectroscopy in the 8-24 eV photon energy range

    KAUST Repository

    Schwell, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A VUV photoionization study of acetamide was carried out over the 8-24 eV photon energy range using synchrotron radiation and photoelectron/photoion coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy. Threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) measurements were also made. Photoion yield curves and branching ratios were measured for the parent ion and six fragment ions. The adiabatic ionization energy of acetamide was determined as I.E. (1 2A′) = (9.71 ± 0.02) eV, in agreement with an earlier reported photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) value. The adiabatic energy of the first excited state of the ion, 1 2A″, was determined to be ≈10.1 eV. Assignments of the fragment ions and the pathways of their formation by dissociative photoionization were made. The neutral species lost in the principal dissociative photoionization processes are CH 3, NH 2, NH 3, CO, HCCO and NH 2CO. Heats of formation are derived for all ions detected and are compared with literature values. Some astrophysical implications of these results are discussed. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Optical simulations for the S3 project - Super separator spectrometer - gamma-electron coincidence spectroscopy of a transfermium nucleus: the 251Md101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dechery, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    In analogy with the atomic closed shells giving rise to the stability and high ionisation energies of noble gases, nuclear physics also has its magic numbers of protons and neutrons which enhance nuclear structure stability. Knowledge of the structure of doubly-magic nuclei, both proton and neutron numbers, is crucial to parameterize theoretical models. The discovery of the next and ultimate magic numbers will provide a strong constraint on the many predictions. These two numbers are like the centre coordinates of an area of enhanced stability of the nuclear chart, well known as 'island of stability'. These superheavy nuclei only exist due to pure quantum shell effects. My thesis work deals with two distinct, but complementary, aspects of fundamental physics with the common goal of studying these extreme mass nuclei structure. The first part corresponds to the development of a next generation instrument for nuclear physics to allow synthesis and spectroscopy studies of superheavy nuclei: the Super Separator Spectrometer S 3 . This project will be installed at SPIRAL2 (GANIL) and has been approved by the French Research National Agency (ANR) within the EQUIPEX framework. It has been designed to take advantage of the high intensity heavy ion beam from the LINAC, giving access to a wide range of physical programs. The second part corresponds to the preparation, realisation and analysis of an experiment on 251-Mendelevium in which the very first prompt gamma-electron coincidence spectroscopy was performed for a transfermium nuclei. (author) [fr

  15. The Efficiency Of Coincidence Spectroscopy With Two Semi-Conductor Detectors At 0.5 - 8 MeV Energy Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Dinh Khang; Mangengo Lumenganod; Nguyen Xuan Hai; Ho Huu Thang; Nguyen An Son; Nguyen Duc Hoa

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency function of detector is provided by manufacturer only when user request to manufacture. Even in this case, these functions still need to be tested by experiments. The efficiency of spectrometer is a function which depend energy, measurement geometry and sample geometry. Further more in the coincidence spectrometer, the efficiency depend both of detector efficiencies and distribute cascade energy. So, determined efficiency function of coincidence spectrometer is very complex. This report presents the results of determining the relative efficiency of coincidence spectrometer at Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. The experimental was determined by 35 Cl(n th ,γ) 36 Cl reaction and interpolated for 0.5 - 8 MeV energy region. (author)

  16. Inexpensive read-out for coincident electron spectroscopy with a transmission electron microscope at nanometer scale using micro channel plates and multistrip anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollander, R.W.; Bom, V.R.; Van Eijk, C.W.E.; Faber, J.S.; Hoevers, H.; Kruit, P.

    1994-01-01

    The elemental composition of a sample at nanometer scale is determined by measurement of the characteristic energy of Auger electrons, emitted in coincidence with incoming primary electrons from a microbeam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). Single electrons are detected with position sensitive detectors, consisting of MicroChannel Plates (MCP) and MultiStrip Anodes (MSA), one for the energy of the Auger electrons (Auger-detector) and one for the energy loss of primary electrons (EELS-detector). The MSAs are sensed with LeCroy 2735DC preamplifiers. The fast readout is based on LeCroy's PCOS III system. On the detection of a coincidence (Event) energy data of Auger and EELS are combined with timing data to an Event word. Event words are stored in list mode in a VME memory module. Blocks of Event words are scanned by transputers in VME and two-dimensional energy histograms are filled using the timing information to obtain a maximal true/accidental ratio. The resulting histograms are stored on disk of a PC-386, which also controls data taking. The system is designed to handle 10 5 Events per second, 90% of which are accidental. In the histograms the ''true'' to ''accidental'' ratio will be 5. The dead time is 15%. ((orig.))

  17. Surface-site-selective study of valence electronic structures of clean Si(100)-2x1 using Si-L23VV Auger electron-Si-2p photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakiuchi, Takuhiro; Nagaoka, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Shogo; Fujita, Narihiko; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Mase, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Valence electronic structures of a clean Si(100)-2x1 surface are investigated in a surface-site-selective way using Si-L 23 VV Auger electron-Si-2p photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy. The Si-L 23 VV Auger electron spectra measured in coincidence with Si-2p photoelectrons emitted from the Si up-atoms or Si 2nd-layer of Si(100)-2x1 suggest that the position where the highest density of valence electronic states located in the vicinity of the Si up-atoms is shifted by 0.8 eV towards lower binding energy relative to that in the vicinity of the Si 2nd-layer. Furthermore, the valence band maximum in the vicinity of the Si up-atoms is indicated to be shifted by 0.1 eV towards lower binding energy relative to that in the vicinity of the Si 2nd-layer. These results are direct evidence of the transfer of negative charge from the Si 2nd-layer to the Si up-atoms. (author)

  18. A β - γ coincidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agullo, F.

    1960-01-01

    A β - γ coincidence method for absolute counting is given. The fundamental principles are revised and the experimental part is detailed. The results from 1 98 Au irradiated in the JEN 1 Swimming pool reactor are given. The maximal accuracy is 1 per cent. (Author) 11 refs

  19. Coincidence studies with antiprotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, M; Walters, H R J [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen' s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D; Mohallem, J R [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, P.O Box 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T, E-mail: mmcgovern06@qub.ac.u [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    We present a short overview of a new method for calculating fully differential cross sections that is able to describe any aspect of coincidence measurements involving heavy projectiles. The method is based upon impact parameter close coupling with pseudostates. Examples from antiproton impact ionization are shown.

  20. Prospects in coincidence experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laget, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The sensitivity of virtual photons to the local variations of the charge and magnetization densities is exploited to study the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction inside the nucleus. The possibility of varying energy, squared mass and longitudinal polarization of the photons independently enables us to disentangle the mechanisms related to the internal structure of the nucleon (e.g. quark interchange) and the contribution due to meson exchange. Coincidence experiments of the type (e,e'N) and (e,e'NN) are performed to suppress the meson contribution to the longitudinal part of the quasi-elastic peak. Four typical examples of coincidence experiments induced by virtual photons are discussed: experiments (1) on the spectroscopic structure of the quasi-elastic peak and the problem of deep lying hole states; (2) on the structure of the continuum; (3) on the low energy side of the quasi-elastic peak; and finally a three-arm coincidence experiment. (Auth.)

  1. Shift register neutron coincidence module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, M.M.; Swansen, J.E.; East, L.V.

    1975-11-01

    A neutron coincidence module was designed using multistage shift registers to produce the coincidence gates and a crystal controlled oscillator with variable clock outputs to change the gate lengths. The advantage of this system over the conventional, thermal-neutron coincidence gates is a decrease in deadtime by more than an order of magnitude

  2. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  3. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  4. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  5. spectroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... Full Length Research Paper. Determination of lactic acid bacteria in Kaşar cheese and identification by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. İlkay Turhan1* and Zübeyde Öner2. 1Department of Nutrition and Dietetic, School of Health Sciences, T.C.Istanbul Arel University, 34537 Buyukcekmece /.

  6. A portable neutron coincidence counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peurrung, A.J.; Bowyer, S.M.; Craig, R.A.; Dudder, G.B.; Knopf, M.A.; Panisko, M.E.; Reeder, P.L.; Stromswold, D.C.; Sunberg, D.S.

    1996-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has designed and constructed a prototype portable neutron coincidence counter intended for use in a variety of applications, such as the verification and inspection of weapons components, safety measurements for novel and challenging situations, portable portal deployment to prevent the transportation of fissile materials, uranium enrichment measurements in hard-to-reach locations, waste assays for objects that cannot be measured by existing measurement systems, and decontamination and decommissioning. The counting system weighs less than 40 kg and is composed of parts each weighing no more than 5 kg. In addition, the counter`s design is sufficiently flexible to allow rapid, reliable assembly around containers of nearly arbitrary size and shape. The counter is able to discern the presence of 1 kg of weapons-grade plutonium within an ALR-8 (30-gal drum) in roughly 100 seconds and 10 g in roughly 1000 seconds. The counter`s electronics are also designed for maximum adaptability, allowing operation under a wide variety of circumstances, including exposure to gamma-ray fields of 1 R/h. This report provides a detailed review of the design and construction process. Finally, preliminary experimental measurements that confirm the performance capabilities of this counter are discussed. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Statistical data filtration in neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddingfield, D.H.; Menlove, H.O.

    1992-11-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of statistical data filtration to minimize the contribution of matrix materials in 200-ell drums to the nondestructive assay of plutonium. Those matrices were examined: polyethylene, concrete, aluminum, iron, cadmium, and lead. Statistical filtration of neutron coincidence data improved the low-end sensitivity of coincidence counters. Spurious data arising from electrical noise, matrix spallation, and geometric effects were smoothed in a predictable fashion by the statistical filter. The filter effectively lowers the minimum detectable mass limit that can be achieved for plutonium assay using passive neutron coincidence counting

  8. Coincidence method for determination of radionuclides activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrukhovich, S.K.; Berestov, A.V.; Rudak, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    The radon and radium activity measurements using six-crystal gamma-gamma coincidence, 4 -spectrometer PRIPJAT and radioactivity measurements in different samples of meat and vegetation by 32-crystal spectrometer ARGUS, are described. Radiation detector with 4 -geometry provides higher efficiency, and therefore shorter counting time than a detector without such geometry. However, its application is limited by the fact that obtained spectrum contains summing peaks of all γ-quanta registered in coincidence. Multiparameter information on coincident photon emission can be obtained only by a detection system where the 4 -geometry is made by many detectors, such are both the PRIPJAT and the ARGUS - γ-coincidence spectrometer of the Crystal Ball type in the Institute of Physics, Minsk [1,2]. There are other characteristics, as background conditions, energy and time resolution, makes it ve suitable for investigation of rare decays and interactions, cascade transitions, k intensity radiations etc. We are developing a method of 2 26R a and 2 26 Rn measurement by a multidetector 4 -spectrometer. The method is based on coincidence counting of γ-rays from two step cascade transitions that follow - decay of 2 14 Bi. Its application to the PRIPL spectrometer, which has 6 Nal(Tl) detectors, is presented here, as well as the method of the determination of radionuclide activities based on the registration of the cascades intensity of γ-rays of different multiplicity using ARGUS

  9. Quintessence, Cosmic Coincidence, and the Cosmological Constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatev, I.; Wang, L.; Steinhardt, P.J.; Steinhardt, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that a large fraction of the energy density of the Universe has negative pressure. One explanation is vacuum energy density; another is quintessence in the form of a scalar field slowly evolving down a potential. In either case, a key problem is to explain why the energy density nearly coincides with the matter density today. The densities decrease at different rates as the Universe expands, so coincidence today appears to require that their ratio be set to a specific, infinitesimal value in the early Universe. In this paper, we introduce the notion of a open-quotes tracker field,close quotes a form of quintessence, and show how it may explain the coincidence, adding new motivation for the quintessence scenario. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  10. Coincidence-counting corrections for accidental coincidences, set dead time and intrinsic dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyllie, H.A.

    1998-01-01

    An equation is derived for calculating the radioactivity of a source from the results of coincidence counting, taking into account dead-time losses and accidental coincidences. The corrections allow for the extension of the set dead time in the p channel by the intrinsic dead time. Experimental verification shows improvement over a previous equation. (author)

  11. Coincidence imaging system with electron optics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kroupa, M.; Jakubek, J.; Krejčí, F.; Žemlička, J.; Horáček, Miroslav; Radlička, Tomáš; Vlček, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 633, Supl. 1 (2011), S270-S273 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : electron optics * coincidence Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2011

  12. Development of coincidence processing module for PEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Baotong; Shuai Lei; Li Ke

    2011-01-01

    For the breast cancer diagnosis and therapy, a prototype of positron emission mammography (PEM) was developed in Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. In this paper, the design of coincidence processing module (CPM) for this PEM was presented. Both the hardware architecture and the software logic were introduced. In this design, the CPM used the Rocket IO fast interface in FPGA and fiber technology to acquire the preprocessed data from the continuous sampling module (CSM) and then selected the valid event with the coincidence timing window method, which was performed in the FPGA on the daughter board. The CPM transmits the processed data to host computer via gigabit Ethernet. The whole system was controlled by CAN bus. The primary tests indicate that the performance of this design is good. (authors)

  13. Recent progress with digital coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butcher, K.S.A.; Watt, G.C.; Alexiev, D.

    1999-01-01

    Digital Coincidence Counting (DCC) is a new technique, based on the older method of analogue coincidence counting. It has been developed by ANSTO as a faster more reliable means of determining the activity of ionising radiation samples. The technique employs a dual channel analogue to digital converter acquisition system for collecting pulse information from a 4Π beta detector and a NaI(Tl) gamma detector. The digitised pulse information is stored on a high speed hard disk and timing information for both channels is also stored. The data may subsequently be recalled and analysed using software based algorithms. The system is operational and results are now being routinely collected and analysed. Some of the early work is presented for Co-60, Na-22 and Sm-153

  14. Improved coincidence rejection for silicon drift detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Richard B.

    2010-12-01

    The high count rates possible with silicon drift detectors (SDDs) raise the importance of coincidence ("pile-up") rejection in the pulse processor. Detection efficiency for close coincidence is energy dependent, with resolving times increasing sharply when at least one X-ray of the pair is below 1 keV. Traditional pile-up detection for low energies is done by applying a width test to the output of a shaping filter. SDDs have varying rise times at the preamplifier output due to the expansion of the charge cloud with drift path length, which limits the effectiveness of pulse width testing. Novel digital methods have been developed, which are largely immune to variations in rise time and significantly improve pulse-pair resolving times. Digital pulse processor filter parameters must take resolving times into account to achieve good sum peak position and shape for optimum software removal of sum peak artifacts during spectrum post-processing.

  15. Coincident-inclusive electrofission angular correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda Neto, J.D.T.

    1983-08-01

    A method for the joint analysis of coincident and inclusive electrofission data, in order to minimize effects of the model dependence of data interpretation, is developed. Explicit calculations of the (e,e'f) angular correlations are presented. The potentialities of the method to the study of sub- and near-barrier properties of the fission process, and to the study of the giant resonances fission mode, are discussed. (Author) [pt

  16. Timing coincidence studies with fast photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoof, M.A.; Raoof, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The time response of RCA C70045D photomultipliers was studied using a subnanosecond light flasher. The tubes, which have an output rise time of approximately 0.5 ns, were used in coincidence to study the variations in the fwhm of the time spectrum over a certain dynamic range of pulse amplitudes for both leading edge and constant fraction discrimination. A comparison has also been made for the measured time resolutions with some of the other fast photomultipliers. (orig.)

  17. Multi-gamma windows coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yunpeng

    1998-10-01

    In 4πβ-γ coincidence measurement of radioactivity, efficiency extrapolation method has been applied for a long time. According to the principle developed by P. J. Campion, usually a single gamma window is selected, and also an useful assumption is introduced that efficiency of individual β-branch are linearly related to one another, resulting in a simply linear efficiency function. Generally, the extrapolation curve is not linear so in practice an unspecified efficiency function which is usually defined simply as a polynomial in N c /N γ is introduced. Because of the unspecification of the efficiency function, systematic errors may arise theoretically from which the polynominal function is either inaccurate or unsuitable for extrapolation. To solve this problem, a new method, which is called multi-gamma windows coincidence method is proposed, and a new linear extrapolation equation based on average β efficiency is strictly derived from the basic coincidence equations with the least approximation. Theoretically, this method is applicable to any simple or complex decay (except pure β decay and some decay with long life metastable energy level) with minimum systematic errors

  18. The Nielsen Coincidence Number of Maps into Tori. | Jezierski ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of connected components of the coincidence set of a pair of maps between two tori (possibly of different dimensions). Mathematics Subject Classification (1991): 55M20 Keywords: coincidence index, coincidence Nielsen number, fixed points and coincidences tori, Nielsen Quaestiones Mathematicae 24(2) 2001, 217-223 ...

  19. A Real Time Digital Coincidence Processor for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, H.M.; Jones, W.F.; Casey, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    A Real Time Digital Coincidence Processor has been developed for use in the Positron Emission Tomograph (PET) ECAT scanners manufactured by Computer Technology and Imaging, Inc. (CTI). The primary functions of the Coincidence Processor include: receive from the BGO detector modules serial data, which includes timing information and detector identification; process the received data to form coincidence detector pairs; and present the coincidence pair data to a Real Time Sorter. The primary design emphasis was placed on the Coincidence Processor being able to process the detector data into coincidence pairs at real time rates. This paper briefly describes the Coincidence Processor and some of the considerations that went into its design

  20. A method for coincidence timing resolution enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermis, E. E., E-mail: elermis@hotmail.com; Celiktas, C. [Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Pilicer, E. [Faculty of Arts and Science, Physics Department, Uludag University, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2016-05-15

    A method including the coincidence time resolution improvement for a TOF/positron emission tomography system was suggested. The spectrometer for this aim was composed of two NaI(Tl) and two plastic scintillation detectors. Experimental results were supported by FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation program by constructing the detector setup in software medium. Present experimental results verified our previous results and conclusions obtained from the suggested method. It was concluded that better resolutions would help the improvement not only on the TOF gain but also on the spatial resolution, leading to better images and helping the Physician in his/her diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Coincidence logic modules for criticality alarming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaief, C.C. III.

    1977-04-01

    A coincidence Logic Module and a companion contact closure Relay Module utilizing the NIM Standard have been developed for criticality alarming. The units provide an ALARM whenever two or more out of N detectors become activated. In addition, an ALERT is generated whenever one or more detectors is activated or when certain electronic component failures occur. The number of detector inputs (N) can be expanded in groups of six by adding modules. Serial and parallel redundancy were used to reduce the probability of system failure

  2. Cosmical coincidences and the Dirac-cosmos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treder, H.J.

    1984-09-01

    The cosmical coincidences given by the relations between macro- and microphysical quantities suggest a manifold of small bangs and not universal big bang in the evolution of the meta-galaxy. An approximative model of such universe may be the Dirac-cosmos. The hypothesis is discussed that the small bangs are the relations of the super-galaxies. In this cases there are to be found two different values of the Hubble-parameter according to the differently evolutionary scenaries for the meta-galaxis and for super-galaxies.

  3. A tandem time–of–flight spectrometer for negative–ion/positive–ion coincidence measurements with soft x-ray excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stråhlman, Christian, E-mail: Christian.Strahlman@maxlab.lu.se; Sankari, Rami; Nyholm, Ralf [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Kivimäki, Antti [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche—Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Laboratorio TASC, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Richter, Robert [Elettra–Sincrotrone Trieste, Area Science Park, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Coreno, Marcello [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche—Istituto di Struttura della Materia, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    We present a newly constructed spectrometer for negative–ion/positive–ion coincidence spectroscopy of gaseous samples. The instrument consists of two time–of–flight ion spectrometers and a magnetic momentum filter for deflection of electrons. The instrument can measure double and triple coincidences between mass–resolved negative and positive ions with high detection efficiency. First results include identification of several negative–ion/positive–ion coincidence channels following inner-shell photoexcitation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6})

  4. Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron coincidence gate utilisation factor for passive neutron coincidence counting

    CERN Document Server

    Bourva, L C A

    1999-01-01

    The general purpose neutron-photon-electron Monte Carlo N-Particle code, MCNP sup T sup M , has been used to simulate the neutronic characteristics of the on-site laboratory passive neutron coincidence counter to be installed, under Euratom Safeguards Directorate supervision, at the Sellafield reprocessing plant in Cumbria, UK. This detector is part of a series of nondestructive assay instruments to be installed for the accurate determination of the plutonium content of nuclear materials. The present work focuses on one aspect of this task, namely, the accurate calculation of the coincidence gate utilisation factor. This parameter is an important term in the interpretative model used to analyse the passive neutron coincidence count data acquired using pulse train deconvolution electronics based on the shift register technique. It accounts for the limited proportion of neutrons detected within the time interval for which the electronics gate is open. The Monte Carlo code MCF, presented in this work, represents...

  5. The Washington Large Area Time Coincidence Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, R.; Berns, H.G.; Buchli, M.; Burnett, T.H.; Edmon, P.; Gran, R.; Haff, T.; Lemagie; Muhs, E.; Wheel, G.; Wilkes, R.J.

    2003-07-01

    WALTA (WAshington Large-area Time-coincidence Array) aims to study ultra-high energy (> 1018 eV) cosmic rays (UHECR) by placing detector elements in Seattle area secondary scho ols, and linking their data acquisition systems to the University of Washington via a computer network. The goal of WALTA is to have teachers and students become active participants in forefront scientific project, while building a long term partnership between the scho ols and the university-based physics research community. Considerable progress has been made in recruiting and training teachers and equipping scho ol sites since the last ICRC, including development of a low-cost data acquisition card in collab oration with Fermilab and the University of Nebraska.

  6. More accurate thermal neutron coincidence counting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, N.

    1978-01-01

    Using passive thermal neutron coincidence counting techniques, the accuracy of nondestructive assays of fertile material can be improved significantly using a two-ring detector. It was shown how the use of a function of the coincidence count rate ring-ratio can provide a detector response rate that is independent of variations in neutron detection efficiency caused by varying sample moderation. Furthermore, the correction for multiplication caused by SF- and (α,n)-neutrons is shown to be separable into the product of a function of the effective mass of 240 Pu (plutonium correction) and a function of the (α,n) reaction probability (matrix correction). The matrix correction is described by a function of the singles count rate ring-ratio. This correction factor is empirically observed to be identical for any combination of PuO 2 powder and matrix materials SiO 2 and MgO because of the similar relation of the (α,n)-Q value and (α,n)-reaction cross section among these matrix nuclei. However the matrix correction expression is expected to be different for matrix materials such as Na, Al, and/or Li. Nevertheless, it should be recognized that for comparison measurements among samples of similar matrix content, it is expected that some function of the singles count rate ring-ratio can be defined to account for variations in the matrix correction due to differences in the intimacy of mixture among the samples. Furthermore the magnitude of this singles count rate ring-ratio serves to identify the contaminant generating the (α,n)-neutrons. Such information is useful in process control

  7. Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron coincidence gate utilisation factor for passive neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourva, L.C.A.; Croft, S.

    1999-01-01

    The general purpose neutron-photon-electron Monte Carlo N-Particle code, MCNP TM , has been used to simulate the neutronic characteristics of the on-site laboratory passive neutron coincidence counter to be installed, under Euratom Safeguards Directorate supervision, at the Sellafield reprocessing plant in Cumbria, UK. This detector is part of a series of nondestructive assay instruments to be installed for the accurate determination of the plutonium content of nuclear materials. The present work focuses on one aspect of this task, namely, the accurate calculation of the coincidence gate utilisation factor. This parameter is an important term in the interpretative model used to analyse the passive neutron coincidence count data acquired using pulse train deconvolution electronics based on the shift register technique. It accounts for the limited proportion of neutrons detected within the time interval for which the electronics gate is open. The Monte Carlo code MCF, presented in this work, represents a new evaluation technique for the estimation of gate utilisation factors. It uses the die-away profile of a neutron coincidence chamber generated either by MCNP TM , or by other means, to simulate the neutron detection arrival time pattern originating from independent spontaneous fission events. A shift register simulation algorithm, embedded in the MCF code, then calculates the coincidence counts scored within the electronics gate. The gate utilisation factor is then deduced by dividing the coincidence counts obtained with that obtained in the same Monte Carlo run, but for an ideal detection system with a coincidence gate utilisation factor equal to unity. The MCF code has been benchmarked against analytical results calculated for both single and double exponential die-away profiles. These results are presented along with the development of the closed form algebraic expressions for the two cases. Results of this validity check showed very good agreement. On this

  8. Fast counting electronics for neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swansen, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a high speed circuit for accurate neutron coincidence counting comprising: neutron detecting means for providing an above-threshold signal upon neutron detection; amplifying means inputted by the neutron detecting means for providing a pulse output having a pulse width of about 0.5 microseconds upon the input of each above threshold signal; digital processing means inputted by the pulse output of the amplifying means for generating a pulse responsive to each input pulse from the amplifying means and having a pulse width of about 50 nanoseconds effective for processing an expected neutron event rate of about 1 Mpps: pulse stretching means inputted by the digital processing means for producing a pulse having a pulse width of several milliseconds for each pulse received form the digital processing means; visual indicating means inputted by the pulse stretching means for producing a visual output for each pulse received from the digital processing means; and derandomizing means effective to receive the 50 ns neutron event pulses from the digital processing means for storage at a rate up to the neutron event rate of 1 Mpps and having first counter means for storing the input neutron event pulses

  9. Obesity and asthma: association or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Daniella Fernandes; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Toro, Adyleia Dalbo Contrera; Baracat, Emilio Carlos Elias; Barros Filho, Antonio Azevedo

    2010-01-01

    Asthma and obesity are among the major causes of morbidity in childhood and adolescence. Early obesity increases the chances of chronic degenerative diseases in adults. Although the concomitance or both clinical situations are being demonstrated in various studies, the intrinsic mechanisms of this association are still very little known. Therefore, the objective of this article was to review the main studies on the association of obesity and asthma and check if there is a cause-effect relation between them. Systematic review based on indexed data bases MEDLINE (PubMed) and SciELO. Original articles (cross-sectional, case-control, and prospective studies) and meta-analysis published in the period that ranges from January 1998 to January 2008 were reviewed. Studies published in English, Spanish, and Portuguese were researched. Although there are various studies on growing prevalence of asthma and obesity, few of them establish cause-effect relations between them. Physiopathological mechanisms and factors involved in this process are still little known. Methodological rigor in future studies must seek for answers to better understand if there is association between asthma and obesity or if the relationship between both diseases is a coincidence.

  10. K-chameleon and the coincidence problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Hao; Cai Ronggen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid model of k-essence and chameleon, named as k-chameleon. In this model, due to the chameleon mechanism, the directly strong coupling between the k-chameleon field and matters (cold dark matters and baryons) is allowed. In the radiation-dominated epoch, the interaction between the k-chameleon field and background matters can be neglected; the behavior of the k-chameleon therefore is the same as that of the ordinary k-essence. After the onset of matter domination, the strong coupling between the k-chameleon and matters dramatically changes the result of the ordinary k-essence. We find that during the matter-dominated epoch, only two kinds of attractors may exist: one is the familiar K attractor and the other is a completely new, dubbed C attractor. Once the Universe is attracted into the C attractor, the fraction energy densities of the k-chameleon Ω φ and dust matter Ω m are fixed and comparable, and the Universe will undergo a power-law accelerated expansion. One can adjust the model so that the K attractor does not appear. Thus, the k-chameleon model provides a natural solution to the cosmological coincidence problem

  11. Operations manual for the megachannel gamma-ray coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.

    1977-01-01

    To aid in the study of nuclear structures, a megachannel pulse-height coincidence analysis system on a PDP-8 computer was constructed. The system digitizes the energies of coincident gamma-rays and stores the resultant information on a moving-head disk. The system uses a minicomputer to sort and store gamma-gamma coincident information on line. The megachannel system and how to use it are described

  12. Digital gamma-gamma coincidence HPGe system for environmental analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Nikola; Roos, Per; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2017-01-01

    The performance of a new gamma-gamma coincidence spectrometer system for environmental samples analysis at the Center for Nuclear Technologies of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) is reported. Nutech Coincidence Low Energy Germanium Sandwich (NUCLeGeS) system consists of two HPGe detector...... in a surface laboratory with a digital acquisition system used to collect the data in time-stamped list mode with 10. ns time resolution. The spectrometer is used in both anticoincidence and coincidence modes....

  13. Principle of coincidence method and application in activity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Mou; Dai Yihua; Ni Jianzhong

    2008-01-01

    The basic principle of coincidence method was discussed. The basic principle was generalized by analysing the actual example, and the condition in theory of coincidence method was brought forward. The cause of variation of efficiency curve and the effect of dead-time in activity measurement were explained using the above principle and condition. This principle of coincidence method provides the foundation in theory for activity measurement. (authors)

  14. X-ray spectral line coincidences between fluorine VIII (and IX) and transition metal lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charatis, G.; Rockett, P.D.; Burkhalter, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy was performed in the 12 to 15 A region, recording L-shell lines from selected laser-irradiated transition metals. Line coincidences and near coincidences were identified between Fe, Cr, Mn, and Ni L-spectra, and F VIII and F IX K-shell lines. Wavelengths were determined to accuracies of 1 to 3 mA and will be utilized in selecting potential pumping candidates in future x-ray lasing schemes. High-resolution x-ray spectra were collected under controlled illumination and target conditions using 1.05 μm and 0.527 μm laser excitation with the KMS CHROMA laser

  15. Gamma-X-ray coincidence Moessbauer spectroscopic study of the aftereffects in sulfate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Makita, T.; Fukumura, K.

    1990-01-01

    The anomalous charge states formed after the electron capture decay of 57 Co in FeSO 4 .H 2 O and FeSO 4 .7H 2 O are investigated using the conventional Moessbauer emission spectroscopy and a gamma-X ray coincidence method. This method is based on the idea that a Moessbauer spectrum observed with the coincidence technique only when K-X rays are emitted is reflected by isolated events with a reduced influence of the Auger-electron self-irradiation. The formation of the anomalous electronic and structural configuration is attributed to the self-radiolysis of the H 2 O and SO 4 2- ligands in the nearest and the second nearest coordination shells around the decaying atom. (orig.)

  16. Shift-register coincidence electronics system for thermal neutron counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swansen, J.E.; Collinsworth, P.R.; Krick, M.S.

    1980-04-01

    An improved shift-register, coincidence-counting logic circuit, developed for use with thermal neutron well counters, is described in detail. A distinguishing feature of the circuit is its ability to operate usefully at neutron counting rates of several hundred kHz. A portable electronics package incorporating the new coincidence logic and support circuits is also described

  17. Coincidence of and collinearity between game theoretic solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Theo; Funaki, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The first part is the study of several conditions which are sufficient for the coincidence of the prenucleolus concept and the egalitarian nonseparable contribution (ENSC-) method. The main sufficient condition for the coincidence involved requires that the maximal excesses at the ENSC-solution are

  18. Identification of peaks in multidimensional coincidence {gamma}-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhac, Miroslav E-mail: fyzimiro@savba.sk; Kliman, Jan; Matousek, Vladislav; Veselsky, Martin; Turzo, Ivan

    2000-03-21

    In the paper a new algorithm to find peaks in two, three and multidimensional spectra, measured in large multidetector {gamma}-ray arrays, is derived. Given the dimension m, the algorithm is selective to m-fold coincidence peaks. It is insensitive to intersections of lower-fold coincidences, hereinafter called ridges.

  19. A magnetic-lens - mini-orange coincidence spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargholtz, C.; Holmberg, L.; Ruus, N.; Tegner, P.E.; Weiss, G.

    1997-04-01

    A coincidence spectrometer consisting of a Gerholm type magnetic lens and a permanent magnet mini-orange spectrometer is described. Electron-electron or electron-positron coincidences may be registered in various angular settings. The spectrometer has been developed mainly to search for anomalous contributions to Bhabha scattering or positrons and is at present used for such studies. 6 refs

  20. An Inexpensive Coincidence Circuit for the Pasco Geiger Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Fichera, F; Librizzi, F; Riggi, F

    2005-01-01

    A simple coincidence circuit was devised to carry out educational coincidence experiments involving the use of Geiger counters. The system was tested by commercially available Geiger sensors from PASCO, and is intended to be used in collaboration with high school students and teachers

  1. Recovery and normalization of triple coincidences in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Eduardo, E-mail: elage@mit.edu; Parot, Vicente; Dave, Shivang R.; Herraiz, Joaquin L. [Madrid-MIT M+Visión Consortium, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Moore, Stephen C.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Park, Mi-Ae [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Udías, Jose M. [Grupo de Física Nuclear, Departamento de Física Atómica Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, CEI Moncloa, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Vaquero, Juan J. [Departamento de Ingeniería Biomédica e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Leganés 28911 (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Triple coincidences in positron emission tomography (PET) are events in which three γ-rays are detected simultaneously. These events, though potentially useful for enhancing the sensitivity of PET scanners, are discarded or processed without special consideration in current systems, because there is not a clear criterion for assigning them to a unique line-of-response (LOR). Methods proposed for recovering such events usually rely on the use of highly specialized detection systems, hampering general adoption, and/or are based on Compton-scatter kinematics and, consequently, are limited in accuracy by the energy resolution of standard PET detectors. In this work, the authors propose a simple and general solution for recovering triple coincidences, which does not require specialized detectors or additional energy resolution requirements. Methods: To recover triple coincidences, the authors’ method distributes such events among their possible LORs using the relative proportions of double coincidences in these LORs. The authors show analytically that this assignment scheme represents the maximum-likelihood solution for the triple-coincidence distribution problem. The PET component of a preclinical PET/CT scanner was adapted to enable the acquisition and processing of triple coincidences. Since the efficiencies for detecting double and triple events were found to be different throughout the scanner field-of-view, a normalization procedure specific for triple coincidences was also developed. The effect of including triple coincidences using their method was compared against the cases of equally weighting the triples among their possible LORs and discarding all the triple events. The authors used as figures of merit for this comparison sensitivity, noise-equivalent count (NEC) rates and image quality calculated as described in the NEMA NU-4 protocol for the assessment of preclinical PET scanners. Results: The addition of triple-coincidence events with the

  2. Introduction to Neutron Coincidence Counter Design Based on Boron-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-01-22

    The Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation Policy (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is ultimately to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report, providing background information for this project, is the deliverable under Task 1 of the project.

  3. Software correction of scatter coincidence in positron CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, M.; Iinuma, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a software correction of scatter coincidence in positron CT which is based on an estimation of scatter projections from true projections by an integral transform. Kernels for the integral transform are projected distributions of scatter coincidences for a line source at different positions in a water phantom and are calculated by Klein-Nishina's formula. True projections of any composite object can be determined from measured projections by iterative applications of the integral transform. The correction method was tested in computer simulations and phantom experiments with Positologica. The results showed that effects of scatter coincidence are not negligible in the quantitation of images, but the correction reduces them significantly. (orig.)

  4. Some target assay uncertainties for passive neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensslin, N.; Langner, D.G.; Menlove, H.O.; Miller, M.C.; Russo, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides some target assay uncertainties for passive neutron coincidence counting of plutonium metal, oxide, mixed oxide, and scrap and waste. The target values are based in part on past user experience and in part on the estimated results from new coincidence counting techniques that are under development. The paper summarizes assay error sources and the new coincidence techniques, and recommends the technique that is likely to yield the lowest assay uncertainty for a given material type. These target assay uncertainties are intended to be useful for NDA instrument selection and assay variance propagation studies for both new and existing facilities. 14 refs., 3 tabs

  5. Digital gamma-gamma coincidence HPGe system for environmental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Nikola; Roos, Per; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2017-08-01

    The performance of a new gamma-gamma coincidence spectrometer system for environmental samples analysis at the Center for Nuclear Technologies of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) is reported. Nutech Coincidence Low Energy Germanium Sandwich (NUCLeGeS) system consists of two HPGe detectors in a surface laboratory with a digital acquisition system used to collect the data in time-stamped list mode with 10ns time resolution. The spectrometer is used in both anticoincidence and coincidence modes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Low-resource synchronous coincidence processor for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, Giancarlo; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Pedro; Santos, Andres

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new FPGA-based method for coincidence detection in positron emission tomography. The method requires low device resources and no specific peripherals in order to resolve coincident digital pulses within a time window of a few nanoseconds. This method has been validated with a low-end Xilinx Spartan-3E and provided coincidence resolutions lower than 6 ns. This resolution depends directly on the signal propagation properties of the target device and the maximum available clock frequency, therefore it is expected to improve considerably on higher-end FPGAs.

  7. Multiplicity sorter for shift-register coincidence electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swansen, J.E.; Collinsworth, P.R.; Krick, M.S.; Peterson, D.L.

    1982-02-01

    A multiplicity sorter for the latest Los Alamos National Laboratory version of shift-register coincidence electronics is described. The multiplicity information taken from the coincidence-gate up-down counter is decoded and gated onto the output lines by prompt real-plus-accidental (R+A) and delayed accidental (A) strobes. Multiplicities of 0-7 and greater than or equal to 8 are sorted for both the R+A and A gates

  8. Detection of helium in irradiated Fe9Cr alloys by coincidence Doppler broadening of slow positron annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xingzhong; Zhu, Te; Jin, Shuoxue; Kuang, Peng; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Eryang; Gong, Yihao; Guo, Liping; Wang, Baoyi

    2017-03-01

    An element analysis method, coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy of slow positron annihilation, was employed to detect helium in ion-irradiated Fe9Cr alloys. Spectra with higher peak to background ratio were recorded using a two-HPGe detector coincidence measuring system. It means that information in the high-momentum area of the spectra can be used to identify helium in metals. This identification is not entirely dependent on the helium concentration in the specimens, but is related to the structure and microscopic arrangement of atoms surrounding the positron annihilation site. The results of Doppler broadening spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy show that vacancies and dislocations were formed in ion-irradiated specimens. Thermal helium desorption spectrometry was performed to obtain the types of He traps.

  9. Electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    An introduction to the various techniques in electron spectroscopy is presented. These techniques include: (1) UV Photoelectron spectroscopy, (2) X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy, (3) Auger electron spectroscopy, (4) Electron energy loss spectroscopy, (5) Penning ionization spectroscopy and (6) Ion neutralization spectroscopy. The radiations used in each technique, the basis of the technique and the special information obtained in structure determination in atoms and molecules by each technique are summarised. (A.K.)

  10. CDL, a Precise, Low-Cost Coincidence Detector Latch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Joost

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The electronic detection of the coincidence of two events is still a key ingredient for high-performance applications, such as Positron Emission Tomography and Quantum Optics. Such applications are demanding, since the precision of their calculations and thus their conclusions directly depend on the duration of the interval in which two events are considered coincidental. This paper proposes a new circuitry, called coincidence detector latch (CDL, which is derived from standard RS latches. The CDL has the following advantages: low complexity, fully synthesizable, and high scalability. Even in its simple implementation, it achieves a coincidence window width as short as 115 ps, which is more than 10 times better than that reported by recent research.

  11. Importance of interpolation and coincidence errors in data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccherini, Simone; Carli, Bruno; Tirelli, Cecilia; Zoppetti, Nicola; Del Bianco, Samuele; Cortesi, Ugo; Kujanpää, Jukka; Dragani, Rossana

    2018-02-01

    The complete data fusion (CDF) method is applied to ozone profiles obtained from simulated measurements in the ultraviolet and in the thermal infrared in the framework of the Sentinel 4 mission of the Copernicus programme. We observe that the quality of the fused products is degraded when the fusing profiles are either retrieved on different vertical grids or referred to different true profiles. To address this shortcoming, a generalization of the complete data fusion method, which takes into account interpolation and coincidence errors, is presented. This upgrade overcomes the encountered problems and provides products of good quality when the fusing profiles are both retrieved on different vertical grids and referred to different true profiles. The impact of the interpolation and coincidence errors on number of degrees of freedom and errors of the fused profile is also analysed. The approach developed here to account for the interpolation and coincidence errors can also be followed to include other error components, such as forward model errors.

  12. A training and educational tool for neutron coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huszti, J.; Bagi, J.; Langner, D.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron coincidence counting techniques are widely used for nuclear safeguards inspection. They are based on the detection of time correlated neutrons created from spontaneous or induced fission of plutonium and some other actinides. IAEA inspectors are trained to know and to use this technique, but it is not easy to illustrate and explain the basics of the neutron coincidence counting. The traditional shift registers or multiplicity counters give only multiplicity distributions and the singles, doubles and triples count rates. Using the list mode method for the recording and evaluation of neutron coincidence data makes it easier to teach this technique. List mode acquisition is a relatively new way to collect data in neutron coincidence counting. It is based on the recording of the follow-up times of neutron pulses originating from a neutron detector into a file. The recorded pulse train can be evaluated with special software after the measurement. Hardware and software for list mode neutron coincidence acquisition have been developed in the Institute of Isotopes and is called a Pulse Train Reader. A system called Virtual Source for replaying pulse trains registered with the list mode device has also been developed. The list mode device and the pulse train 're-player' together build a good educational tool for teaching the basics of neutron coincidence counting. Some features of the follow-up time, multiplicity and Rossi-alpha distributions can be well demonstrated by replaying artificially generated or pre-recorded pulse trains. The choice of real sources is stored on DVD. There is no need to transport and maintain real sources for the training. Virtual sources also give the possibility of investigating rare sources that trainees would not have access to otherwise. (authors)

  13. Data acquisition and processing system for coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xu

    1990-07-01

    An instrument has been designed for the absolute measurement of radioactivity with 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence. The instrument can be used as a standard device for the radioactivity measurement in metrology laboratories. Also it can be used in the nuclear science and engineering research for absolute measurement of nuclear decay rate. The control of the system dead time and coincidence resolving time is digitized. The precision can reach ±2 ns. For data acquisition and communication the normalizing GPIB interface system technique is adopted. The measuring error caused by this instrument itself can be better than ±0.02%

  14. Standardization of portable assay instrumentation: the neutron-coincidence tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.

    1983-01-01

    Standardization of portable neutron assay instrumentation has been achieved by using the neutron coincidence technique as a common basis for a wide range of instruments and applications. The electronics originally developed for the High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter has been adapted to both passive- and active-assay instrumentation for field verification of bulk plutonium, inventory samples, pellets, powders, nitrates, high-enriched uranium, and materials-testing-reactor, light-water-reactor, and mixed-oxide fuel assemblies. The family of detectors developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their performance under in-field conditions are described. 16 figures, 3 tables

  15. Automatic classification of gammas-gamma coincidence matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Los Arcos Merino, J. M.; Gonzalez, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The information obtained during a coincidence experiment, recorded on magnetic tape by a MULTI-8 minicomputer, is transferred to a new tape in 36 bit words, using the program LEC0M8. The classification in two dimensional matrix form is carried out off-line, on a magnetic disk file, by the program CLAFI. On finishing classification one obtains a copy of the coincidence matrix on the second magnetic tape. Both programs are written to be processed in that order with the UNIVAC 1106 computer of J.E.N. (Author) 4 refs

  16. Optical Co-Incidence Gate | Srinivasulu | African Journal of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper explains Optical co-incidence gate, realized using Unijunction transistors (UJT), Light emitting diodes (LED) and Photo-resistors (LDR), which works on 1.8Vdc instead of 3Vdc. The power dissipation of the designed gate is only 3 mW. This optical gate finds application in the field of Mechatronics, Instrumentation ...

  17. Analysis of (HI, xnγ) coincidence spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattabiraman, N.S.; Ghugre, S.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    The increase in the sensitivity and the detection limits of the modern third generation gamma detector arrays, has made it necessary to properly understand and estimate the observed background in such experiments. The present paper extends the two algorithms to improve the genuine photo-peak-photo-peak coincident events of interest

  18. Coincidence and common fixed point theorems in compact Hausdorff spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeqing Liu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of coincidence and fixed points for continuous mappings in compact Hausdorff spaces is established. Some equivalent conditions of the existence of fixed and common fixed points for any continuous mapping and a pair of mappings in compact Hausdorff spaces are given, respectively. Our results extend, improve, and unify the corresponding results due to Jungck, Liu, and Singh and Rao.

  19. Non-minimal quintessence: Dynamics and coincidence problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Brans–Dicke scalar–tensor theory provides a conformal coupling of the scalar field with gravity in Einstein's frame. This model is equivalent to an interacting quintessence in which dark matter is coupled to dark energy. This provides a natural mechanism to alleviate the coincidence problem. We investigate the dynamics of ...

  20. Application of coincidence techniques to fusion product measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, T.J.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Strachan, J.D.

    1986-06-01

    Measurement of two products of a fusion reaction in coincidence is proposed. Possible detector arrays and sample count rates have been evaluated for reactions in the TFR and TEXT tokamaks and in the TFTR neutral beamlines. The count rates indicate that this method is feasible on existing devices

  1. Non-minimal quintessence: Dynamics and coincidence problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Brans–Dicke scalar–tensor theory provides a conformal coupling of the scalar field with gravity in Einstein's frame. This model is equivalent to an interacting quintessence in which dark matter is coupled to dark energy. This provides a natural mechanism to alleviate the coincidence problem. We investigate the ...

  2. Chemical application of positron annihilation through triple coincidence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegnasubramanian, S.; Gangadharan, S.

    1982-01-01

    This report summarises the work on the application of triple coincidence measurement of annihilation radiation for providing chemical state information; the observations have been corroborated by angular correlation and Doppler broadening measurements and supplemented by the magnetic quenching in the angular correlation and peak-to-valley ratio in the Ge(Li) singles spectrum for the 511 keV line. (author)

  3. Proposed mechanisms for coincidence detection in the auditory brainstem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršálek, Petr; Lánský, Petr

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 6 (2005), s. 445-451 ISSN 0340-1200 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400110401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : neuronal modeling * coincidence detection * hearing Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.398, year: 2005

  4. A {beta} - {gamma} coincidence; Metodo de coincidencias {beta} - {gamma}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo, F.

    1960-07-01

    A {beta} - {gamma} coincidence method for absolute counting is given. The fundamental principles are revised and the experimental part is detailed. The results from {sup 1}98 Au irradiated in the JEN 1 Swimming pool reactor are given. The maximal accuracy is 1 per cent. (Author) 11 refs.

  5. Using CHIMERA detector at LNS for gamma-particle coincidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardella G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently evaluated the quality of γ-ray angular distributions that can be extracted in particle-gamma coincidence measurements using the CHIMERA detector at LNS. γ-rays have been detected using the CsI(Tl detectors of the spherical part of the CHIMERA array. Very clean γ-rays angular distributions were extracted in reactions induced by different stable beams impinging on 12C thin targets. The results evidenced an effect of projectile spin flip on the γ-rays angular distributions. γ-particle coincidence measurements were also performed in reactions induced by neutron rich exotic beams produced through in-flight fragmentation at LNS. In recent experiments also the Farcos array was used to improve energy and angular resolution measurements of the detected charged particles. Results obtained with both stable and radioactive beams are reported.

  6. Simplified slow anti-coincidence circuit for Compton suppression systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish [Department of Applied Sciences, College of Technological Studies, Public Authority for Applied Education and Training, P.O. Box 42325, Shuwaikh 70654 (Kuwait)], E-mail: ds.alazmi@paaet.edu.kw

    2008-08-15

    Slow coincidence circuits for the anti-coincidence measurements have been considered for use in Compton suppression technique. The simplified version of the slow circuit has been found to be fast enough, satisfactory and allows an easy system setup, particularly with the advantage of the automatic threshold setting of the low-level discrimination. A well-type NaI detector as the main detector surrounded by plastic guard detector has been arranged to investigate the performance of the Compton suppression spectrometer using the simplified slow circuit. The system has been tested to observe the improvement in the energy spectra for medium to high-energy gamma-ray photons from terrestrial and environmental samples.

  7. Device for multi-dimensional γ-γ-coincidence study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruzinova, T.M.; Erokhina, K.I.; Kutuzov, V.I.; Lemberg, I.Kh.; Petrov, S.A.; Revenko, V.S.; Senin, A.T.; Chugunov, I.N.; Shishlinov, V.M.

    1977-01-01

    A device for studying multi-dimensional γ-γ coincidences is described which operates on-line with the BESM-4 computer. The device comprises Ge(Li) detectors, analog-to-digital converters, shaper discriminators and fast amplifiers. To control the device operation as a whole and to elaborate necessary commands, an information distributor has been developed. The following specific features of the device operation are noted: the device may operate both in the regime of recording spectra of direct γ radiation in the block memory of multi-channel analyzer, and in the regime of data transfer to the computer memory; the device performs registration of coincidences; it transfers information to the computer which has a channel of direct access to the memory. The procedure of data processing is considered, the data being recorded on a magnetic tape. Partial spectra obtained are in a good agreement with data obtained elsewhere

  8. What can we learn about fragmentation from coincidence experiments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    It has become clear that in order to characterize a complex process such as nuclear fragmentation more exclusive experimental measurements must be performed, i.e., the correlations between coincident fragments must be determined. Some types of correlations are readily interpreted in terms of specific mechanisms, for example, the angular correlation between two heavy fragments. Binary (fission-like) breakup results in relatively strong angular correlations, while no strong correlations are expected for a multi-body fragmentation mechanism. Data from coincidence measurements of the fragmentation of uranium and gold targets by relativistic projectiles are presented which illustrate these points. The interplay between such experiments and model calculations of fragmentation is discussed. 19 refs., 9 figs

  9. Simplified slow anti-coincidence circuit for Compton suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish

    2008-01-01

    Slow coincidence circuits for the anti-coincidence measurements have been considered for use in Compton suppression technique. The simplified version of the slow circuit has been found to be fast enough, satisfactory and allows an easy system setup, particularly with the advantage of the automatic threshold setting of the low-level discrimination. A well-type NaI detector as the main detector surrounded by plastic guard detector has been arranged to investigate the performance of the Compton suppression spectrometer using the simplified slow circuit. The system has been tested to observe the improvement in the energy spectra for medium to high-energy gamma-ray photons from terrestrial and environmental samples

  10. Data Acquisition System for Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Yu Xiaoqi; Yang Tao

    2005-01-01

    A Data Acquisition System (DAQ) for electron energy loss coincident spectrometers (EELCS) has been developed. The system is composed of a Multiplex Time-Digital Converter (TDC) that measures the flying time of positive and negative ions and a one-dimension position-sensitive detector that records the energy loss of scattering electrons. The experimental data are buffered in a first-in-first-out (FIFO) memory module, then transferred from the FIFO memory to PC by the USB interface. The DAQ system can record the flying time of several ions in one collision, and allows of different data collection modes. The system has been demonstrated at the Electron Energy Loss Coincident Spectrometers at the Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics, USTC. A detail description of the whole system is given and experimental results shown

  11. The coincidence of dementia and intracranial tumours. Avoidable misdiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, M.; Maerz, U.

    1997-01-01

    The case of a 66-year-old female suffering from a large olfactory groove meningioma with first diagnosis of 'Alzheimer's disease' exemplifies problems that occur in the differential diagnosis of dementia. Special regard is given to the coincidence of dementia and intracranial tumours. The case described above shows that early neuroimaging is advisable to exclude idiopathic from remediable dementias in order to offer the possibility of intervention. (orig.) [de

  12. A coincidence of addiction to "Kratom" and severe primary hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheleg, Sergey V; Collins, Gregory B

    2011-12-01

    Here we present a case of a coincidence of addiction to "Kratom" (botanically known as Mitragyna speciosa Korth) and developed severe primary hypothyroidism. We are discussing a possibility that high dose of indole alkaloid mitragynine (the major alkaloid identified from "Kratom") might reduce the normal response of the thyroid gland to thyroid-stimulating hormone resulting in primary hypothyroidism. Further experimental investigations of mitragynine as a possible suppressor of thyroid gland function would be a matter of interest.

  13. High-level neutron coincidence counter (HLNCC): users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Menlove, H.O.

    1979-06-01

    This manual describes the portable High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter (HLNCC) developed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) for the assay of plutonium, particularly by inspectors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The counter is designed for the measurement of the effective 240 Pu mass in plutonium samples which may have a high plutonium content. The following topics are discussed: principle of operation, description of the system, operating procedures, and applications

  14. Post training REMs coincident auditory stimulation enhances memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C; Weeden, K

    1990-06-01

    Sleep activity was monitored in 20 freshman college students for two consecutive nights. Subjects were assigned to 4 equal groups and all were asked to learn a complex logic task before bed on the second night. Two groups of subjects learned the task with a constant clicking noise in the background (cued groups), while two groups simply learned the task (non cued). During the night, one cued and one non cued group were presented with auditory clicks during REM sleep such as to coincide with all REMs of at least 100 microvolts. The second cued group was given auditory clicks during REM sleep, but only during the REMs "quiet" times. The second non-cued control group was never given any nighttime auditory stimulations. The cued REMs coincident group showed a significant 23% improvement in task performance when tested one week later. The non cued REMs coincident group showed only an 8.8% improvement which was not significant. The cued REMs quiet and non-stimulated control groups showed no change in task performance when retested. The results were interpreted as support for the idea that the cued auditory stimulation induced a "recall" of the learned material during the REM sleep state in order for further memory processing to take place.

  15. Importance of interpolation and coincidence errors in data fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ceccherini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The complete data fusion (CDF method is applied to ozone profiles obtained from simulated measurements in the ultraviolet and in the thermal infrared in the framework of the Sentinel 4 mission of the Copernicus programme. We observe that the quality of the fused products is degraded when the fusing profiles are either retrieved on different vertical grids or referred to different true profiles. To address this shortcoming, a generalization of the complete data fusion method, which takes into account interpolation and coincidence errors, is presented. This upgrade overcomes the encountered problems and provides products of good quality when the fusing profiles are both retrieved on different vertical grids and referred to different true profiles. The impact of the interpolation and coincidence errors on number of degrees of freedom and errors of the fused profile is also analysed. The approach developed here to account for the interpolation and coincidence errors can also be followed to include other error components, such as forward model errors.

  16. High sensitivity neutron activation analysis using coincidence counting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shogo; Okada, Yukiko; Hirai, Shoji

    1999-01-01

    Four kinds of standard samples such as river sediment (NIES CRM No.16), Typical Japanese Diet, otoliths and river water were irradiated by TRIGA-II (100 kW, 3.7x10 12 n cm -2 s -1 ) for 6 h. After irradiation and cooling, they were analyzed by the coincidence counting method and a conventional γ-ray spectrometry. Se, Ba and Hf were determined by 75 Se 265 keV, 131 Ba 496 keV and 181 Hf 482 keV. On the river sediment sample, Ba and Hf showed the same values by two methods, but Se value contained Ta by the conventional method, although the coincidence counting method could analyze Se. On Typical Japanese Diet and otoliths, Se could be determined by two methods and Ba and Hf determined by the coincidence counting method but not determined by the conventional method. Se value in the river water agreed with the authorization value. (S.Y.)

  17. Recent Advances in Digital Coincidence Counting for Radionuclide Metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keightley, John; Bobin, Christophe; Bouchard, Jacques; Capogni, Marco; Loreti, Stefano; Roteta, Miguel

    2013-06-01

    The radioactivity measurement techniques developed within the EURAMET EMRP 'MetroFission' Joint Research Project, were aimed at performing on-site activity measurements at the primary standard level (4πβ-γ coincidence counting) for a wide range of radionuclides utilizing recent advances in high-speed digital sampling and digital signal processing. The state-of-the-art technology employed within this project provides up to 14-bit digitizer systems operating with sampling rates in the order of 10 8 to 10 9 samples-per-second, incorporating on-board FPGA devices, which greatly enhances the application of digital signal processing for the implementation of digital coincidence counting. These devices when coupled to suitable analysis software, demonstrate a significant improvement in the provision of primary standards of radioactivity. This manuscript provides a description of the systems employed, along with recommendations regarding optimization of the digital sampling of signals from photo-multiplier tubes and pre-amplifiers and compare the benefits of 'off-line' versus 'on-line' 4πβ-γ digital coincidence counting systems. (authors)

  18. X-ray line coincidence photopumping in a solar flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, F. P.; Poppenhaeger, K.; Mathioudakis, M.; Rose, S. J.; Flowerdew, J.; Hynes, D.; Christian, D. J.; Nilsen, J.; Johnson, W. R.

    2018-03-01

    Line coincidence photopumping is a process where the electrons of an atomic or molecular species are radiatively excited through the absorption of line emission from another species at a coincident wavelength. There are many instances of line coincidence photopumping in astrophysical sources at optical and ultraviolet wavelengths, with the most famous example being Bowen fluorescence (pumping of O III 303.80 Å by He II), but none to our knowledge in X-rays. However, here we report on a scheme where a He-like line of Ne IX at 11.000 Å is photopumped by He-like Na X at 11.003 Å, which predicts significant intensity enhancement in the Ne IX 82.76 Å transition under physical conditions found in solar flare plasmas. A comparison of our theoretical models with published X-ray observations of a solar flare obtained during a rocket flight provides evidence for line enhancement, with the measured degree of enhancement being consistent with that expected from theory, a truly surprising result. Observations of this enhancement during flares on stars other than the Sun would provide a powerful new diagnostic tool for determining the sizes of flare loops in these distant, spatially unresolved, astronomical sources.

  19. Monitoring polariton dynamics in the LHCII photosynthetic antenna in a microcavity by two-photon coincidence counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhedong; Saurabh, Prasoon; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Debnath, Arunangshu; Mukamel, Shaul

    2018-02-01

    The relaxation dynamics of light-harvesting complex II in an optical cavity is explored theoretically by multidimensional photon coincidence counting spectroscopy. This technique reveals the dynamics in both single (e) and double (f) excitation bands. We study how the polariton dynamics are affected by coupling to photon modes and molecular vibrations described by a realistic spectral density at 77 K. Without the cavity, the e- and f-band energy transfer pathways are not clearly resolved due to the line broadening caused by fast exciton dephasing. The strong coupling to cavity photons results in well-resolved polariton modes. The hybrid nature of polaritons slows down their energy transfer rates.

  20. Coincident-site lattice matching during van der Waals epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Boschker, Jos E.; Galves, Lauren A.; Flissikowski, Timur; Lopes, Joao Marcelo J.; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy is an attractive method for the fabrication of vdW heterostructures. Here Sb2Te3 films grown on three different kind of graphene substrates (monolayer epitaxial graphene, quasi freestanding bilayer graphene and the SiC (6?3???6?3)R30? buffer layer) are used to study the vdW epitaxy between two 2-dimensionally (2D) bonded materials. It is shown that the Sb2Te3 /graphene interface is stable and that coincidence lattices are formed between the epilayers and substrate ...

  1. Preliminary results of a neutron-gamma coincidence experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercey, R.B.; Dunnam, F.E.; Muga, M.L.; Rester, A.C.; Ramayya, A.V.; Hamilton, J.H.; Eberth, J.; Zganjar, E.F.

    1984-01-01

    The recently completed neutron multiplicity detector dubbed PANDA (Pentagonal Annular Neutron Detector Array) is fully described later in this report. The new detector was recently used for the first time on-line at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility to measure neutron-gamma coincidence in the 24 Mg( 58 Ni,xαypzn) reaction. The detector configuration for the experiment is shown. The PANDA was situated in the forward direction, coaxial to the beam line with five gamma-ray detectors placed at +/- 90 0 , +/- 135 0 , and 0 0 . 2 figures

  2. Correlated multiphoton holes: absence of multiphoton coincidence events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afek, I; Ambar, O; Silberberg, Y

    2010-08-27

    We generate bipartite states of light which exhibit an absence of multiphoton coincidence events between two modes amid a constant background flux. These "correlated photon holes" are produced by mixing a coherent state and relatively weak spontaneous parametric down-conversion by using a balanced beam splitter. Correlated holes with arbitrarily high photon numbers may be obtained by adjusting the relative phase and amplitude of the inputs. We measure states of up to five photons and verify their nonclassicality. The scheme provides a route for observation of high-photon-number nonclassical correlations without requiring intense quantum resources.

  3. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  4. Some remarks on dead-time losses of coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Dead-time effects for coincident pulses are known to be a very difficult subject. Apart from some trivial cases, no rigorous results are yet known. For all practical applications, approximate solutions are used, the quality of which is difficult to judge. Whereas in general they seem to be sufficiently reliable, their deficiency begins to show up clearly for very high count rates. Unfortunately, the present small note will not really improve this situation. It may, however, provide some guideline for the credibility of the various approaches which have been suggested

  5. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

  6. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included

  7. Coincidence corrected efficiency calibration of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aucott, Timothy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brand, Alexander [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiPrete, David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-20

    The authors present a reliable method to calibrate the full-energy efficiency and the coincidence correction factors using a commonly-available mixed source gamma standard. This is accomplished by measuring the peak areas from both summing and non-summing decay schemes and simultaneously fitting both the full-energy efficiency, as well as the total efficiency, as functions of energy. By using known decay schemes, these functions can then be used to provide correction factors for other nuclides not included in the calibration standard.

  8. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  9. Cochlear spike synchronization and neuron coincidence detection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Rolf

    2018-02-01

    Coincidence detection of a spike pattern fed from the cochlea into a single neuron is investigated using a physical Finite-Difference model of the cochlea and a physiologically motivated neuron model. Previous studies have shown experimental evidence of increased spike synchronization in the nucleus cochlearis and the trapezoid body [Joris et al., J. Neurophysiol. 71(3), 1022-1036 and 1037-1051 (1994)] and models show tone partial phase synchronization at the transition from mechanical waves on the basilar membrane into spike patterns [Ch. F. Babbs, J. Biophys. 2011, 435135]. Still the traveling speed of waves on the basilar membrane cause a frequency-dependent time delay of simultaneously incoming sound wavefronts up to 10 ms. The present model shows nearly perfect synchronization of multiple spike inputs as neuron outputs with interspike intervals (ISI) at the periodicity of the incoming sound for frequencies from about 30 to 300 Hz for two different amounts of afferent nerve fiber neuron inputs. Coincidence detection serves here as a fusion of multiple inputs into one single event enhancing pitch periodicity detection for low frequencies, impulse detection, or increased sound or speech intelligibility due to dereverberation.

  10. Stroboscopic vision and sustained attention during coincidence-anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Rafael; Huertas, Florentino; Uji, Makoto; Bennett, Simon J

    2017-12-20

    We compared coincidence-anticipation performance in normal vision and stroboscopic vision as a function of time-on-task. Participants estimated the arrival time of a real object that moved with constant acceleration (-0.7, 0, +0.7 m/s 2 ) in a pseudo-randomised order across 4 blocks of 30 trials in both vision conditions, received in a counter-balanced order. Participants (n = 20) became more errorful (accuracy and variability) in the normal vision condition as a function of time-on-task, whereas performance was maintained in the stroboscopic vision condition. We interpret these data as showing that participants failed to maintain coincidence-anticipation performance in the normal vision condition due to monotony and attentional underload. In contrast, the stroboscopic vision condition placed a greater demand on visual-spatial memory for motion extrapolation, and thus participants did not experience the typical vigilance decrement in performance. While short-term adaptation effects from practicing in stroboscopic vision are promising, future work needs to consider for how long participants can maintain effortful processing, and whether there are negative carry-over effects from cognitive fatigue when transferring to normal vision.

  11. Coincidence of lung cancer and silicosis in Czechoslovak uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, S.; Urbanova, S.

    1988-01-01

    27 patients with established coincidence of lung cancer and silicosis from a group of 1607 cases of lung cancer from radioactive compounds, and 166 cases of pneumoconiosis were reported by the Occupational Diseases Ward of the works Institute of National Health in Uranium Industry in the 1962 to 1986 years. Lung cancer was found in 16% of reported silicosis patients, in 81% it was simple silicosis, in 50% of cases in was an epidermoid type of cancer. In two cases the malignant process originated in the silicotic node, in one case from a tuberculoma. Lung cancer occurred most frequently in the right lower lung region. The mean age of the silicosis group was 48.6 years and 56.0 years for the lung cancer group. No difference was thus seen from the mean age of patients with lung cancer from radioactive compounds diagnosed in the years 1976 to 1980 but it was significantly lower that the reported average age of patients with coincidence of lung cancer and pneumoconiosis in the population not exposed to ionizing radiation. (author). 2 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs

  12. Performance of a coincidence based blood activity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.

    1989-12-01

    A new device has been constructed that measures the positron emitting radio-tracer concentration in arterial blood by extracting blood with a peristaltic pump, then measuring the activity concentration by detecting coincident pairs of 511 keV photons with a pair of heavy inorganic scintillators attached to photomultiplier tubes. The sensitivity of this device is experimentally determined to be 610 counts/second per μCi/ml, and has a paralyzing dead time of 1.2 μs, so is capable of measuring blood activity concentration as high as 1 mCi/ml. Its performance is compared to two other blood monitoring methods: discrete blood samples counted with a well counter and device that uses a plastic scintillator to directly detect positrons. The positron detection efficiency of this device for 18 F is greater than the plastic scintillation counter, and also eliminates the radioisotope dependent correction factors necessary to convert count rate to absolute concentration. Coincident photon detection also has the potential of reducing the background compared to direct positron detection, thereby increasing the minimum detectable isotope concentration. 10 refs., 6 figs

  13. Is there another coincidence problem at the reionization epoch?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombriser, Lucas; Smer-Barreto, Vanessa

    2017-12-01

    The cosmological coincidences between the matter and radiation energy densities at recombination as well as between the densities of matter and the cosmological constant at the present time are well known. We point out that, moreover, the third intersection between the energy densities of radiation and the cosmological constant coincides with the reionization epoch. To quantify the statistical relevance of this concurrence, we compute the Bayes factor between the concordance cosmology with free Thomson scattering optical depth and a model for which this parameter is inferred from imposing a match between the time of density equality and the epoch of reionization. This is to characterize the potential explanatory gain if one were to find a parameter-free physical connection. We find a very strong preference for such a concurrence on the Jeffreys scale from current cosmological observations. We furthermore discuss the effect of the choice of priors, changes in reionization history, and free sum of neutrino masses. We also estimate the impact of adding intermediate polarization data from the Planck High Frequency Instrument and prospects for future 21 cm surveys. In the first case, the preference for the correlation remains substantial, whereas future data may give results more decisive in pro or substantial in contra of it. Finally, we provide a discussion on different interpretations of these findings. In particular, we show how a connection between the star-formation history and the cosmological background dynamics can give rise to this concurrence.

  14. Terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation I will review methods for spectroscopy in the THz range, with special emphasis on the practical implementation of the technique known ad THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). THz-TDS has revived the old field of far-infrared spectroscopy, and enabled a wealth of new...... activities that promise commercial potential for spectroscopic applications in the THz range. This will be illustrated with examples of spectroscopy of liquids inside their bottles as well as sensitive, quantitative spectroscopy in waveguides....

  15. Positron emission tomography with gamma camera in coincidence mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertel, A.; Hoer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using F-18 FDG has been estbalished in clinical diagnostics with first indications especially in oncology. To install a conventional PET tomography (dedicated PET) is financially costly and restricted to PET examinations only. Increasing demand for PET diagnostics on one hand and restricted financial resources in the health system on the other hand led industry to develop SPECT cameras to be operated in coincidence mode (camera PET) in order to offer nuclear medicine physicians cost-effective devices for PET diagnostic. At the same time camera PET is inferior to conventional PET regarding sensitivity and detection-efficiency for 511 keV photons. Does camera-PET offer a reliable alternative to conventional PET? The first larger comparative studies are now available, so a first apraisal about the technical clinical performance of camera-PET can be done. (orig.) [de

  16. The spallation in reverse kinematics: what for a coincidence measurement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducret, J.E.

    2006-07-01

    The Spaladin installation has been designed to study spallation reactions in reverse kinematics. Furthermore, the heavy and light fragments are detected by coincidence which allows us to get an instantaneous picture of the reaction at a level of accuracy better than that obtained through inclusive measurement. The first part is dedicated to the theoretical description of the different mechanisms involved in the spallation reactions. In the second part we describe the Spaladin installation and report some results on the reaction: Fe 56 + p at an energy of 1 GeV/nucleon. In the third part we expose the performance of the installation through its simulation with the Geant-IV model. We present a study about the sensitivity of the Spaladin installation to theoretical predictions. The fourth part is dedicated to the future experiments that will be performed with the Spaladin installation. (A.C.)

  17. A high-efficiency neutron coincidence counter for small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.C.; Menlove, H.O.; Russo, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The inventory sample coincidence counter (INVS) has been modified to enhance its performance. The new design is suitable for use with a glove box sample-well (in-line application) as well as for use in the standard at-line mode. The counter has been redesigned to count more efficiently and be less sensitive to variations in sample position. These factors lead to a higher degree of precision and accuracy in a given counting period and allow for the practical use of the INVS counter with gamma-ray isotopics to obtain a plutonium assay independent of operator declarations and time-consuming chemicals analysis. A calculation study was performed using the Los Alamos transport code MCNP to optimize the design parameters. 5 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  18. Analysis of 125Xe electron-photon coincidence decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingberg, F.J.; Biegalski, S.R.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), environmental gas samples originating from nuclear fission are analyzed for the presence of 131m Xe, 133m Xe, 133 Xe, and 135 Xe. In this work, the non-traditional radioxenon isotope 125 Xe was investigated. The isotope was produced as an isotopically pure sample via neutron activation of 124 Xe at the University of Texas at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab's TRIGA MARK II Reactor. The sample was then measured using a HPGe detector as well as an ARSA-style b-c coincidence detector. Potential sources and sensitivities for production of 125 Xe are also considered for relevance to the CTBT verification mission. (author)

  19. Analysis of coincidence-time loopholes in experimental Bell tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, B. G.; Hill, A.; Kwiat, P. G.; Knill, E.; Nam, S. W.; Coakley, K.; Glancy, S.; Shalm, L. K.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-09-01

    We apply a distance-based Bell-test analysis method [E. Knill et al., Phys. Rev. A 91, 032105 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.032105] to three experimental data sets where conventional analyses failed or required additional assumptions. The first is produced from a classical source exploiting a "coincidence-time loophole" for which standard analysis falsely shows a Bell violation. The second is from a source previously shown to violate a Bell inequality; the distance-based analysis agrees with the previous results but with fewer assumptions. The third data set does not show a violation with standard analysis despite the high source quality, but is shown to have a strong violation with the distance-based analysis method.

  20. On the spatial coincidence of hydroxyl and methanol masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Menten, K. M.; Lepp, S.; Dalgarno, A.

    1995-01-01

    We argue that purely gas-phase chemical models for the production of OH in hydroxyl masers around ultracompact H II regions such as W3(OH) cannot account for the CH_3OH in the methanol masers that are found to coincide with the hydroxyl masers in these sources. We suggest that the CH_3OH in the masers is injected into the gas phase by evaporation of the grain mantles, the grains being heated by the passage of weak shocks. Gas evaporation also injects H_2O into the gas. Photodissociation of H_2O, CH_3OH and OH occur at similar rates, and substantial abundances of CH_3OH and OH coexist.

  1. Passive Time Coincidence Measurements with HEU and DU Metal Castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConchie, Seth M.; Hausladen, Paul; Mihalczo, John T.; Wright, Michael C.; Archer, Daniel E.

    2008-01-01

    A Department of Energy sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Y-12 National Security Complex program of passive time coincidence measurements has been initiated at Y-12 to evaluate the ability to determine the presence of high enriched uranium (HEU) and distinguish it from depleted uranium (DU). This program uses the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) without an active interrogation source. Previous passive NMIS measurements with Pu metal and Pu oxide have been successful in determining the Pu mass, assuming a known 240Pu content. The spontaneous fission of uranium metal is considerably lower than Pu and measurements of this type have been performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This work presents results of measurements of HEU and DU metal castings using moderated 3He detectors.

  2. Modern spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hollas, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The latest edition of this highly acclaimed title introduces the reader to a wide range of spectroscopies, and includes both the background theory and applications to structure determination and chemical analysis.  It covers rotational, vibrational, electronic, photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy, as well as EXAFs and the theory of lasers and laser spectroscopy. A  revised and updated edition of a successful, clearly written book Includes the latest developments in modern laser techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy and femtosecond lasers Provides numerous worked examples, calculations and questions at the end of chapters.

  3. Calibration of HPGe-HPGe coincidence spectrometer through performing standardisation of 125I activity by X-ray-gamma coincidence spectrometry using two HPGe detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Nikola; Roos, Per; Hou, Xiaolin; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2018-02-01

    An X-ray-gamma coincidence measurement method for efficiency calibration of a HPGe-HPGe system, using the methodology for activity standardisation of 125I, has been developed. By taking one list-mode time-stamped measurement of the 125I source, six spectra were generated in post-processing: total spectra, coincidence spectra and energy gated coincidence spectra for each of the two detectors. The method provides enough observables for source activity to be determined without a prior knowledge of the detector efficiencies. In addition, once the source is calibrated in this way the same spectra can also be used to perform efficiency calibration of the individual detectors in the low energy range. This new methodology for source activity determination is an alternative to the already established X-ray-(X-ray, gamma) coincidence counting method; with two NaI(Tl) detectors and the sum-peak method using a single HPGe detector. When compared to the coincidence counting method using two NaI(Tl) detectors, the newly developed method displays improved energy resolution of HPGe detectors combined with measurement of only full peak areas, without the need for total efficiency determination. This enables activity determination even in presence of other gamma emitters in the sample. Standard coincidence counting with NaI(Tl) detectors provides lower uncertainties. The method has been used for calibration of a coincidence HPGe spectrometer in the low energy range of 125I and fine adjustments of a Monte Carlo model of the coincidence system.

  4. Electronic spectroscopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared region is a versatile spectroscopic technique, as both d-d and charge transfer transitions of supported TMI can be probed. One of the advantages of electronic spectroscopy is that the obtained information is

  5. Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  6. Chemical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, J.; Brun, T.O.; Dianoux, A.J.; Howard, J.; Rush, J.J.; White, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of chemical spectroscopy with neutrons is to utilize the dependence of neutron scattering cross-sections on isotope and on momentum transfer (which probes the spatial extent of the excitation) to understand fundamental and applied aspects of the dynamics of molecules and fluids. Chemical spectroscopy is divided into three energy ranges: vibrational spectroscopy, 25-500 MeV, for which much of the work is done on Be-filter analyzer instruments; low energy spectroscopy, less than 25 MeV; and high resolution spectroscopy, less than 1 MeV, which typically is performed on backscattering spectrometers. Representative examples of measurements of the Q-depenence of vibrational spectra, higher energy resolution as well as extension of the Q-range to lower values at high energy transfers, and provisions of higher sensitivities in vibrational spectroscopy are discussed. High resolution, high sensitivity, and polarization analysis studies in low energy spectroscopy are discussed. Applications of very high resolution spectroscopy are also discussed

  7. Coincidence and awareness of oral parafunctions in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, H; Nawrot, P; Mazan, M; Bielicka, B; Sumisławska, M; Pomianowski, R

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and awareness of particular types of oral parafunctions in young healthy students and any association with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The study was performed in a randomly selected group of 303 healthy students (mean age 18.8 years) from the vocational technical school in Wrocław, Poland, who underwent a routine clinical examination and functional analysis of the mouth. On taking the history all subjects were asked about their awareness of various forms of parafunctional activity in their mouth. Almost all subjects revealed various oral parafunctions such as: bruxism, nail and pen biting, chewing gum, and biting the mucosa of lip or cheek. These habits were present singly or as double, triple or even fourfold coincidences in a single person. The most frequent oral parafunctions were habitual gum chewing and bruxism. Subjects were very seldom aware of the last parafunction. TMDs were more prevalent in the presence of bruxism than in other oral parafunctions. The studied students revealed various types of oral parafunctions, however most of them were not aware of clenching and grinding their teeth.

  8. Optical Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrhaug, Erling

    The work presented in this thesis is broadly concerned with how complexation reactions and molecular motion can be characterized with the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy. The thesis aims to show a relatively broad range of methods for probing physico-chemical properties in fluorophore...... containing systems and are characterized using techniques in optical spectroscopy. Of the standard techniques in optical spectroscopy, particular attention has been paid to those based on time-resolved measurements and polarization, which is reflected in the experiment design in the projects. Not all...... reactions by optical spectroscopy. In project 1 simple steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy is used to determine the stoichiometries and equilibrium constants in the inclusion complex formation between cyclodextrins and derivatives of the water-insoluble oligo(phenylene vinylene) in aqueous...

  9. Coincident Observations of Surface Ozone and NMVOCs over Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The vertical profiles of ozone are measured coincidently with non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi international airport (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E) during the years 2012 - 2014. Some of the profiles show elevated surface ozone >95 ppbv during the winter months (December, January and February). The ground-level NMVOCs obtained from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system also show elevated values of acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. NMVOCs and ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than the values in winter season. NMVOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption, and serve as precursor of ozone. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the NMVOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. Abu Dhabi is located at the edge of the Arabian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in the neighboring Gulf region. The preliminary results indicate that wintertime enhancement in ozone is associated with large values of NMVOCs at Abu Dhabi. The domestic production of surface ozone is estimated from the combination of oxygen recombination and NMVOCs and compared with the data. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in Abu Dhabi is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries. We will present ozone sounding and NMVOCs data and our model estimates of surface ozone, including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  10. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., ultrafast lasers (atto- and femto-second lasers) and parametric oscillators, coherent matter waves, Doppler-free Fourier spectroscopy with optical frequency combs, interference spectroscopy, quantum optics, the interferometric detection of gravitational waves and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  11. Hadron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binon, F.; Frere, J.M.; Peigneux, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    HADRON 89 is the third of a series of biennial conferences on hadron spectroscopy which are now replacing the former separate meson and baryon spectroscopy conferences. The first one, HADRON 85, was held at the University of Maryland. The second one, HADRON 87, has taken place at KEK in Tsukuba in Japan. This conference is divided into 7 sessions bearing on: - session 1 Light mesons and exotics (19 conferences) - session 2 Light mesons and exotics-theory-phonomenology (15 conferences) - session 3 Theoretical problems (14 conferences) - session 4 New detectors factories (9 conferences) - session 5 Baryons (7 conferences) - session 6 Heavy flavor spectroscopy (7 conferences) - session 7 Concluding hadron 89 (3 conferences)

  12. Electronic spectroscopies

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared region is a versatile spectroscopic technique, as both d-d and charge transfer transitions of supported TMI can be probed. One of the advantages of electronic spectroscopy is that the obtained information is directly chemical since the outer shell electrons of the TMI are probed and provide information about the oxidation state and coordination environment of TMI on surfaces. Furthermore, the DRS technique ca...

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  14. Obesidade e asma: associação ou coincidência? Obesity and asthma: association or coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Fernandes Camilo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A asma e a obesidade estão entre as maiores causas de morbidade na infância e adolescência. A obesidade precoce aumenta as chances de doenças crônicas degenerativas no adulto. Embora a concomitância de ambas as situações clínicas vem sendo demonstrada em vários estudos, os mecanismos intrínsecos dessa associação ainda são pouco conhecidos. Portanto, o objetivo deste artigo foi revisar os principais trabalhos sobre a associação de obesidade e asma e verificar se existe relação de causa e efeito entre ambas. FONTES DOS DADOS: Revisão sistemática baseada em bases de dados indexadas MEDLINE (PubMed e SciELO. Foram revisados artigos originais (transversal, caso-controle e prospectivo e meta-análises publicados no período de janeiro de 1998 a janeiro de 2008. Foram pesquisados estudos divulgados em língua inglesa, espanhola e portuguesa. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Embora existam muitos estudos sobre as crescentes prevalências da asma e da obesidade, poucos estabelecem relações de causa e efeito entre ambas. Os mecanismos fisiopatológicos e os fatores envolvidos nesse processo ainda são pouco conhecidos. CONCLUSÃO: O rigor metodológico em estudos futuros deverá buscar respostas para melhor entender se existe associação entre asma e obesidade, ou se a relação entre ambas as doenças é coincidência.OBJECTIVE: Asthma and obesity are among the major causes of morbidity in childhood and adolescence. Early obesity increases the chances of chronic degenerative diseases in adults. Although the concomitance or both clinical situations are being demonstrated in various studies, the intrinsic mechanisms of this association are still very little known. Therefore, the objective of this article was to review the main studies on the association of obesity and asthma and check if there is a cause-effect relation between them. SOURCES: Systematic review based on indexed data bases MEDLINE (PubMed and SciELO. Original articles

  15. Differential coincidence circuit in the 10-10 second region (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zurk, R.; Grenoble-1 Univ., 38; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1960-01-01

    A coincidence circuit of low resolution time using the differential coincidence Bay principle is described. It uses three 6BN6 tubes ordered to chronotron structure. Results with Radiotechnique 56 AVP photomultipliers and for 60 Co γ-γ coincidences are 4,6.10 -10 s (full width at half maximum) if the efficiency is ε = 40 per cent and also 7,2.10 -10 s if ε = 85 per cent. (author) [fr

  16. Description and performance characteristics for the neutron Coincidence Collar for the verification of reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.

    1981-08-01

    An active neutron interrogation method has been developed for the measurement of 235 U content in fresh fuel assemblies. The neutron Coincidence Collar uses neutron interrogation with an AmLi neutron source and coincidence counting the induced fission reaction neutrons from the 235 U. This manual describes the system components, operation, and performance characteristics. Applications of the Coincidence Collar to PWR and BWR types of reactor fuel assemblies are described

  17. Calibration of four neutron coincidence collars for PWR fresh fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Baere, P.; Carchon, R.; Smaers, G.; Smith, B.G.R.; Cranston, R.; Levy-Gorget, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    A measurement campaign was set up in order to calibrate four Neutron Coincidence Collars. For this purpose, a PWR fuel mock-up was used, as well as a series of real size PWR fuel assemblies. Calibration functions were set up, representing net real coincidence rate as a function of mass loading. All these calibration expressions have been referred to a general calibration expression, by applying some correction factors on the real coincidence count rate. (Author)

  18. Quantifying radionuclide signatures from a γ–γ coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, Richard; Jackson, Mark J.; Davies, Ashley V.

    2015-01-01

    A method for quantifying gamma coincidence signatures has been developed, and tested in conjunction with a high-efficiency multi-detector system to quickly identify trace amounts of radioactive material. The γ–γ system utilises fully digital electronics and list-mode acquisition to time–stamp each event, allowing coincidence matrices to be easily produced alongside typical ‘singles’ spectra. To quantify the coincidence signatures a software package has been developed to calculate efficiency and cascade summing corrected branching ratios. This utilises ENSDF records as an input, and can be fully automated, allowing the user to quickly and easily create/update a coincidence library that contains all possible γ and conversion electron cascades, associated cascade emission probabilities, and true-coincidence summing corrected γ cascade detection probabilities. It is also fully searchable by energy, nuclide, coincidence pair, γ multiplicity, cascade probability and half-life of the cascade. The probabilities calculated were tested using measurements performed on the γ–γ system, and found to provide accurate results for the nuclides investigated. Given the flexibility of the method, (it only relies on evaluated nuclear data, and accurate efficiency characterisations), the software can now be utilised for a variety of systems, quickly and easily calculating coincidence signature probabilities. - Highlights: • Monte-Carlo based software developed to easily create/update a coincidence signal library for environmental radionuclides. • Coincidence library utilised to accurately quantify gamma coincidence signatures. • All coincidence signature probabilities are corrected for cascade summing, conversion electron emission and pair production. • Key CTBTO relevant radionuclides have been tested to verify the calculated correction factors. • Accurately quantifying coincidence signals during routine analysis will allow dramatically improved detection

  19. The coincidence of IgA nephropathy and Fabry disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maixnerová Dita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IgA nephropathy (IgAN is the most common glomerulonephritis, which may also coexist with other diseases. We present two patients with an unusual coincidence of IgAN and Fabry disease (FD. Case presentation A 26 year-old man underwent a renal biopsy in February 2001. Histopathology showed very advanced IgAN and vascular changes as a result of hypertension. Because of his progressive renal insufficiency the patient began hemodialysis in August 2001. By means of the blood spot test screening method the diagnosis of FD was suspected. Low activity of alpha-galactosidase A in the patient’s plasma and leukocytes and DNA analysis confirmed the diagnosis of FD. Enzyme replacement therapy started in July 2004. Then the patient underwent kidney transplantation in November 2005. Currently, his actual serum creatinine level is 250 μmol/l. Other organ damages included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, neuropathic pain and febrile crisis. After enzyme replacement therapy, myocardial hypertrophy has stabilized and other symptoms have disappeared. No further progression of the disease has been noted. The other patient, a 30 year-old woman, suffered from long-term hematuria with a good renal function. Recently, proteinuria (2.6 g/day appeared and a renal biopsy was performed. Histopathology showed IgAN with remarkably enlarged podocytes. A combination of IgAN and a high suspicion of FD was diagnosed. Electron microscopy revealed dense deposits in paramesangial areas typical for IgAN and podocytes with inclusive zebra bodies and myelin figures characteristic of FD. FD was confirmed by the decreased alpha-galactosidase A activity in plasma and leukocytes and by DNA and RNA analysis. Enzyme replacement therapy and family screening were initiated. Conclusions Our results emphasize the role of complexity in the process of diagnostic evaluation of kidney biopsy samples. Electron microscopy represents an integral part of histopathology, and genetic

  20. Studies on the true coincidence correction in measuring filter samples by gamma spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lian Qi; Chang Yong Fu; Xia Bing

    2002-01-01

    The true coincidence correction in measuring filter samples has been studied by high efficiency HPGe gamma detectors. The true coincidence correction for a specific three excited levels de-excitation case has been analyzed, and the typical analytical expressions of true coincidence correction factors have been given. According to the measured relative efficiency on the detector surface with 8 'single' energy gamma emitters and efficiency of filter samples, the peak and total efficiency surfaces are fitted. The true coincidence correction factors of sup 6 sup 0 Co and sup 1 sup 5 sup 2 Eu calculated by the efficiency surfaces agree well with experimental results

  1. Coincidence-anticipation timing and reaction time in youth tennis and table tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Emre; Koçak, Settar

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the coincidence-anticipation timing and reaction times (RT) of 10- to 14-year-old tennis and table tennis players and examine possible sex differences. 107 (51.4%) tennis and 101 (48.6%) table tennis players participated in this study. Players were compared on coincidence-anticipation timing and reaction time. Tennis players performed with less error in the coincidence-anticipation timing task than table tennis players, whereas table tennis players had lower mean reaction time than tennis players. It was also found that male players made fewer errors in the coincidence-anticipation timing task than their female counterparts.

  2. Spectroscopy by frequency entangled photon pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2003-01-01

    Quantum spectroscopy was performed using the frequency-entangled broadband photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. An absorptive sample was placed in front of the idler photon detector, and the frequency of signal photons was resolved by a diffraction grating. The absorption spectrum of the sample was measured by counting the coincidences, and the result is in agreement with the one measured by a conventional spectrophotometer with a classical light source.

  3. Radio-interferometric Monitoring of FRB 131104: A Coincident AGN Flare, but No Evidence for a Cosmic Fireball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon, R. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Ravi, V., E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au, E-mail: vikram@caltech.edu [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    The localization of fast radio bursts (FRBs) has been hindered by the poor angular resolution of the detection observations and inconclusive identification of transient or variable counterparts. Recently a γ -ray pulse of 380 s duration has been associated with FRB 131104. We report on radio-continuum imaging observations of the original localization region of the FRB, beginning three days after the event and comprising 25 epochs over 2.5 years. We argue that the probability of an association between the FRB and the γ -ray transient has been overestimated. We provide upper limits on radio afterglow emission that would be predicted if the γ -ray transient was associated with an energetic γ -ray burst. We further report the discovery of an unusual variable radio source spatially and temporally coincident with FRB 131104, but not spatially coincident with the γ -ray event. The radio variable flares by a factor of 3 above its long-term average within 10 day of the FRB at 7.5 GHz, with a factor-of-2 increase at 5.5 GHz. Since the flare, the variable has persisted with only modest modulation and never approached the flux density observed in the days after the FRB. We identify an optical counterpart to the variable. Optical and infrared photometry, and deep optical spectroscopy, suggest that the object is a narrow-line radio active galactic nucleus.

  4. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, D; Forsberg, U; Golubev, P; Sarmiento, L G; Yakushev, A; Andersson, L-L; Di Nitto, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Gates, J M; Gregorich, K E; Gross, C J; Heßberger, F P; Herzberg, R-D; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kratz, J V; Rykaczewski, K; Schädel, M; Åberg, S; Ackermann, D; Block, M; Brand, H; Carlsson, B G; Cox, D; Derkx, X; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Fahlander, C; Gerl, J; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Krier, J; Kojouharov, I; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Papadakis, P; Ragnarsson, I; Runke, J; Schaffner, H; Schausten, B; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Torres, T; Traut, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Ward, A; Ward, D E; Wiehl, N

    2013-09-13

    A high-resolution α, x-ray, and γ-ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated α-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z=115. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z>112. Comprehensive Monte Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  5. A COSMIC COINCIDENCE: THE POWER-LAW GALAXY CORRELATION FUNCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Douglas F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    are satellites, the relative difference in mass between the halos of isolated galaxies and halos that contain a single satellite on average, and the rareness of halos that host galaxies. These pieces are intertwined and we find no simple, universal rule for which a power law ξ(r) will occur. However, we do show that the physics responsible for setting the galaxy content of halos do not care about the conditions needed to achieve a power law ξ(r) and that these conditions are met only in a narrow mass and redshift range. We conclude that the power-law nature of ξ(r) for L * and fainter galaxy samples at low redshift is a cosmic coincidence.

  6. The Cryogenic AntiCoincidence detector for ATHENA X-IFU: a program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macculi, C.; Argan, A.; D'Andrea, M.; Lotti, S.; Laurenza, M.; Piro, L.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Torrioli, G.; Fiorini, M.; Molendi, S.; Uslenghi, M.; Mineo, T.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Cavazzuti, E.

    2016-07-01

    The ATHENA observatory is the second large-class ESA mission, in the context of the Cosmic Vision 2015 - 2025, scheduled to be launched on 2028 at L2 orbit. One of the two on-board instruments is the X-IFU (X-ray Integral Field Unit): it is a TES-based kilo-pixels order array able to perform simultaneous high-grade energy spectroscopy (2.5 eV at 6 keV) and imaging over the 5 arcmin FoV. The X-IFU sensitivity is degraded by the particles background which is induced by primary protons of both solar and Cosmic Rays origin, and secondary electrons. The studies performed by Geant4 simulations depict a scenario where it is mandatory the use of reduction techniques that combine an active anticoincidence detector and a passive electron shielding to reduce the background expected in L2 orbit down to the goal level of 0.005 cts/cm2/s/keV, so enabling the characterization of faint or diffuse sources (e.g. WHIM or Galaxy cluster outskirts). From the detector point of view this is possible by adopting a Cryogenic AntiCoincidence (CryoAC) placed within a proper optimized environment surrounding the X-IFU TES array. It is a 4-pixels detector made of wide area Silicon absorbers sensed by Ir TESes, and put at a distance design of the CryoAC. Both the background studies and the detector development work is on-going to provide confident results about the expected residual background at the TES-array level, and the single pixel design to produce a detector for testing activity on 2016/2017. Here we will provide an overview of the CryoAC program, discussing some details about the background assessment having impact on the CryoAC design, the last single pixel characterization, the structural issues, followed by some programmatic aspects.

  7. Optogalvanic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianarosa, P.; Demers, Y.; Gagne, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Laser induced optogalvanic spectroscopy in a hollow cathode-produced plasma has been used to resolve the isotopic structure of some absorption lines in uranium. We have shown that the optogalvanic signal associated with any isotope can be related to the concentration of that isotope in a multi-isotopic sample. From the results we have obtained, optogalvanic spectroscopy of sputtered samples appears to be an interesting approach to the isotopic analysis of both natural and enriched uranium and could easily be applied to the analysis of other fissile elements, such as the plutonium isotopes

  8. Emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    This 16th article in the series of biennial reviews of emission spectroscopy surveys with emphasis the emission spectrochemical literature appearing in referred publications during 1976 and 1977. Books and general reviews of emission spectroscopy and closely related subjects are considered in the first section, whereas specific reviews and texts are included in each of the five tropical sections. Spectral descriptions and classifications are examined in the second section. An abbreviated instrumentation section follows, and standards, samples, calibrations, and calculations are evaluated in the fourth section. The emphasis on excitation sources reflects the size of section five. In the sixth section, important applications are explored

  9. Experimental study on the possibility of reducing background for the gamma coincidence spectrometer with high pure germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh Sy Hien

    2012-01-01

    Gamma coincidence spectrometers with HPGe detectors are used for environmental research, nuclear reactions (n, γ), (n, 2 γ) due to Compton backgrounds of their gamma spectra are very low. In this work, three types of coincidence spectrometers such as gamma coincidence spectrometer, gamma coincidence spectrometers with TAC and sum coincidence spectrometer using HPGe are described. Some experimental results obtained by using gamma coincidence spectrometers are presented. Especially, taking advantages of the software and hardware of the sum coincidence spectrometer used for research of nuclear reactions (n, γ), (n, 2 γ), we have converted the spectrometer to one with very low background level. (author)

  10. Coupled Coincidence Point and Coupled Common Fixed Point Theorems in Partially Ordered Metric Spaces with -Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Dejan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the concept of a -compatible mapping to obtain a coupled coincidence point and a coupled point of coincidence for nonlinear contractive mappings in partially ordered metric spaces equipped with -distances. Related coupled common fixed point theorems for such mappings are also proved. Our results generalize, extend, and unify several well-known comparable results in the literature.

  11. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  12. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klösgen, Beate; Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    causes relaxation processes with characteristic contributions to the frequency-dependent complex dielectric constant. These dipolar relaxations were initially described by Debye (Polare Molekeln 1929). They are the basis of impedance spectroscopy (K’Owino and Sadik Electroanalysis 17(23):2101–2113, 2005...

  13. Spectroscopy of fission fragments using prompt-delayed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-02

    Aug 2, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Spectroscopy of fission fragments using prompt-delayed coincidence technique ... Author Affiliations. R Palit1 S Biswas1. Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005, India ...

  14. Flexoelectric spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J F

    2013-08-21

    Flexoelectricity is an increasingly popular subject because it can be extremely large in thin films and permits switching of devices in nonpolar (non-piezoelectric) crystals via application of inhomogeneous stresses. However, recent work has been limited to macroscopic measurement of voltage or strain. Here, we discuss the vibrational spectroscopy of flexoelectricity as a recommended new tool for thin-film characterization, with special emphasis upon incommensurate crystals.

  15. Flexoelectric spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J F

    2013-01-01

    Flexoelectricity is an increasingly popular subject because it can be extremely large in thin films and permits switching of devices in nonpolar (non-piezoelectric) crystals via application of inhomogeneous stresses. However, recent work has been limited to macroscopic measurement of voltage or strain. Here, we discuss the vibrational spectroscopy of flexoelectricity as a recommended new tool for thin-film characterization, with special emphasis upon incommensurate crystals. (viewpoint)

  16. Testing the Cosmic Coincidence Problem and the Nature of Dark Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalal, Neal; Abazajian, Kevork; Jenkins, Elizabeth; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2001-01-01

    Dark energy models which alter the relative scaling behavior of dark energy and matter could provide a natural solution to the cosmic coincidence problem -- why the densities of dark energy and dark matter are comparable today. A generalized class of dark energy models is introduced which allows noncanonical scaling of the ratio of dark matter and dark energy with the Robertson-Walker scale factor a(t) . We show that determining whether there is a coincidence problem, and the extent of cosmic coincidence, can be addressed by several forthcoming experiments

  17. Instrument limitation of accuracy of absolute measurement by method of 4π beta-gamma coincidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plkh, J.

    1979-01-01

    Accuracy is discussed of determination of coincidence channels dead-time in 4π β-γ installation and determination of coincidence resolution time as well as conditions for determination and accuracy of these parameters. Conditions are considered under which these parameters have not been determined and there is wrong performance of the installation. Special attention was paid to the electronic circuit of the γ-channel. It has been shown that as a result of wrong performance of electronic circuit a new type of wrong coincidence appeared [ru

  18. Study of the coincidences between the gravitational wave detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS in 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astone, P; Babusci, D; Bassan, M; Bonifazi, P; Carelli, P; Cavallari, G; Coccia, E; Cosmelli, C; D'Antonio, S; Fafone, V; Federici, G; Frasca, S; Giordano, G; Marini, A; Minenkov, Y; Modena, I; Modestino, G; Moleti, A; Pallottino, G V; Pizzella, G; Quintieri, L; Rocchi, A; Ronga, F; Terenzi, R; Torrioli, G; Visco, M

    2002-01-01

    We report the result from a search for bursts of gravitational waves using data collected by the cryogenic resonant detectors EXPLORER and NAUTILUS during 2001 for a total measuring time of 90 days. With these data we repeated the coincidence search performed on the 1998 data (which showed a small coincidence excess) applying data analysis algorithms based on known physical characteristics of the detectors. With the 2001 data, a new interesting coincidence excess is found when the detectors are favourably oriented with respect to the galactic disc

  19. The IAEA neutron coincidence counting (INCC) and the DEMING least-squares fitting programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Harker, W.C.; Rinard, P.M.; Wenz, T.R.; Lewis, W.; Pham, P.; Ridder, P. de

    1998-01-01

    Two computer programs are described: (1) the INCC (IAEA or International Neutron Coincidence Counting) program and (2) the DEMING curve-fitting program. The INCC program is an IAEA version of the Los Alamos NCC (Neutron Coincidence Counting) code. The DEMING program is an upgrade of earlier Windows reg-sign and DOS codes with the same name. The versions described are INCC 3.00 and DEMING 1.11. The INCC and DEMING codes provide inspectors with the software support needed to perform calibration and verification measurements with all of the neutron coincidence counting systems used in IAEA inspections for the nondestructive assay of plutonium and uranium

  20. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosch, A.

    1982-01-01

    In this work examples of the various aspects of photoelectron spectroscopy are given. The investigation was started with the development of an angle-resolved spectrometer so that the first chapters deal with angle-resolved ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy. To indicate the possibilities and pitfalls of the technique, in chapter II the theory is briefly reviewed. In chapter III the instrument is described. The system is based on the cylindrical mirror deflection analyzer, which is modified and improved for angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. In combination with a position sensitive detector, a spectrometer is developed with which simultaneously several angle-resolved spectra can be recorded. In chapter IV, the results are reported of angle-integrated UPS experiments on dilute alloys. Using the improved energy resolution of the instrument the author was able to study the impurity states more accurately and shows that the photoemission technique has become an important tool in the study of impurities and the interactions involved. XPS and Auger results obtained from dilute alloys are presented in chapter V. It is shown that these systems are especially suited for the study of correlation effects and can provide interesting problems related to the satellite structure and the interaction of the impurity with the host. In chapter VI, the valence bands of ternary alloys are studied with UPS and compared to recent band structure calculation. The core level shifts are analyzed in a simple, thermodynamic scheme. (Auth.)

  1. Comparison of satellite reflectance algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a in a temperate reservoir using coincident hyperspectral aircraft imagery and dense coincident surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    We analyzed 10 established and 4 new satellite reflectance algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in a temperate reservoir in southwest Ohio using coincident hyperspectral aircraft imagery and dense water truth collected within one hour of image acquisition to develop si...

  2. High proportion of smaller ranged hummingbird species coincides with ecological specialization across the Americas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jesper; Martín González, Ana M.; Maruyama, Pietro K.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological communities that experience stable climate conditions have been speculated to preserve more specialized interspecific associations and have higher proportions of smaller ranged species (SRS). Thus, areas with disproportionally large numbers of SRS are expected to coincide geographicall...

  3. A gamma-gamma coincidence spectrometric method for rapid characterization of uranium isotopic fingerprints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weihua Zhang; Jing Yi; Pawel Mekarski; Kurt Ungar; Barry Hauck; Kramer, G.H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on initial efforts for uranium isotopic analysis using gamma-rays and X-ray fluorescence coincidence. In this study, a gamma-gamma coincidence spectrometry was developed. The spectrometry consists of two NaI(Tl) scintillators and XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The developed spectrometry was optimized according to the considerations of output count rate and gamma peak energy resolution. It has been demonstrated that the spectrometry provides an effective method of assessing the content of uranium isotopes for nuclear materials. The main advantages of this approach over the conventional gamma spectrometry include the fact that 235 U enrichment can be graphically characterized by its unique coincidence 'fingerprints'. The method could be further developed for fast uranium isotope verification with an established gamma-gamma coincidence spectral imaging library by various nuclear materials. (author)

  4. Calibration of nuclides by gamma-gamma sum peak coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guevara, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of extending sum peak coincidence counting to the direct calibration of gamma-ray emitters having particular decay schemes was investigated, also checkings of the measurement accuracy, by comparing with more precise beta-gamma coincidence counting have been performed. New theoretical studies and experiments were developed, demonstrating the reliability of the procedure. Uncertainties of less than one percent were obtained when certain radioactive sources were measured. The application of the procedure to 60 Co, 22 Na, 47 Ca and 148 Pm was studied. Theoretical bases of sum peak coincidence counting were set in order to extend it as an alternative method for absolute activity determination. In this respect, theoretical studies were performed for positive and negative beta decay, and electron capture, either accompanied or unaccompanied by coincident gamma rays. They include decay schemes containing up to three daughter nuclide excited levels, for different geometrical configurations. Equations are proposed for a possible generalization of the procedure. (M.E.L.) [es

  5. Reproduction of the coincidence effect in gamma ray spectrometry by using Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S. H.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. H.

    2001-01-01

    Scintillation detector such as NaI(TI), or semiconductor detector, such as HPGe, are used for Measurement/Assessment of the radiation type and radiation activity. The measured energy spectrum are used for measuring the radiation type and activity. Corrections for true coincidence due to emit more than 2 photons at the same time and random coincidence due to measuring system when increasing of the radiation intensity. For accurate assessment, measurement with adequate measure system is performed, and corrections for coincidence are performed in the hardware aspect and software aspect. In general, there are limitations or difficulties in measurement of radiation assessment, computational simulation is instead used. In simulation, it has much advantages than measurement in technically, timely, and financially, it is widely used instead of measurement. In this study, the method to reproduce of the coincidence effect was proposed by using monte carlo method

  6. A method for measuring the energy spectrum of coincidence events in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertzen, Andrew L; Stout, David B; Thompson, Christopher J

    2010-01-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) system energy response is typically characterized in singles detection mode, yet there are situations in which the energy spectrum of coincidence events might be different than the spectrum measured in singles mode. Examples include imaging with isotopes that emit a prompt gamma in coincidence with a positron emission, imaging with low activity in a LSO/LYSO-based cameras, in which the intrinsic activity is significant, and in high scatter situations where the two 511 keV photons have different scattering probabilities (i.e. off-center line source). The ability to accurately measure the energy spectrum of coincidence events could be used for validating simulation models, optimizing energy discriminator levels and examining scatter models and corrections. For many PET systems operating in coincidence mode, the only method available for estimating the energy spectrum is to step the lower and upper level discriminators (LLD and ULD). Simple measurement techniques such as using a narrow sliding energy window or stepping only the LLD will not yield a spectrum of coincidence events that is accurate for cases where there are different energy components contributing to the spectrum. In this work we propose a new method of measuring the energy spectrum of coincidence events in PET based on a linear combination of two sets of coincident count measurements: one made by stepping the LLD and one made by stepping the ULD. The method was tested using both Monte Carlo simulations of a Siemens microPET R4 camera and measured data acquired on a Siemens Inveon PET camera. The results show that our energy spectrum calculation method accurately measures the coincident energy spectra for cases including the beta/gamma spectrum of the (176)Lu intrinsic activity present in the LSO scintillator crystals, a (68)Ge source and an (124)I source (in which there are prompt gamma-rays emitted together with the positron).

  7. The supermassive black hole coincident with the luminous transient ASASSN-15lh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krühler, T.; Fraser, M.; Leloudas, G.; Schulze, S.; Stone, N. C.; van Velzen, S.; Amorin, R.; Hjorth, J.; Jonker, P. G.; Kann, D. A.; Kim, S.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Mehner, A.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.

    2018-02-01

    The progenitors of astronomical transients are linked to a specific stellar population and galactic environment, and observing their host galaxies hence constrains the physical nature of the transient itself. Here, we use imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope, and spatially resolved, medium-resolution spectroscopy from the Very Large Telescope obtained with X-shooter and MUSE to study the host of the very luminous transient ASASSN-15lh. The dominant stellar population at the transient site is old (around 1 to 2 Gyr) without signs of recent star formation. We also detect emission from ionized gas, originating from three different, time invariable, narrow components of collisionally excited metal and Balmer lines. The ratios of emission lines in the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagnostic diagram indicate that the ionization source is a weak active galactic nucleus with a black hole mass of M• = 5-3+8 × 108 M⊙, derived through the M•-σ relation. The narrow line components show spatial and velocity offsets on scales of 1 kpc and 500 km s-1, respectively; these offsets are best explained by gas kinematics in the narrow-line region. The location of the central component, which we argue is also the position of the supermassive black hole, aligns with that of the transient within an uncertainty of 170 pc. Using this positional coincidence as well as other similarities with the hosts of tidal disruption events, we strengthen the argument that the transient emission observed as ASASSN-15lh is related to the disruption of a star around a supermassive black hole, most probably spinning with a Kerr parameter a• ≳ 0.5. Based on observations at ESO, Program IDs: 097.D-1054, 297.B-5035, 099.D-0115.The data used in this manuscript are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/610/A14

  8. Standardization of 59Fe 4πβ(LS)-γcoincidence counting with digital sampling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agusbudiman, A.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, J. M.; Park, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    The radionuclide 59Fe decays with a half-life of 44.494(12) days, by several beta minus emission to the ground state and to four excited states of 59 Co, mainly to the 1099 keV and 1291 keV (Bé et al., 2004). The activity of 59 Fe was measured by 4 πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting method with digital sampling technique. A gamma spectrometry analysis was also conducted to check the impurities of the source. As comparison, the activity were also measured by using the 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system and 4πβ (LS)-γ anti-coincidence method. The radionuclide 59Fe has been standardized using the 4πβ(LS)-γcoincidence counting with digital sampling method. The result was in a good agreement with the result from 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting and the 4πβ(LS)-γ anti-coincidence method

  9. An investigation of a coincidence detection system for an all-digital small animal PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Chen Yuanbao; Long Anwen; Chen Xin; Wu Zhongyi; Zhang Yongxue; Xie Qingguo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and design a coincidence detection system for an all-digital small animal PET scanner and evaluate its preliminary performance properties. Methods: This coincidence module adopted a coincidence identification mode based on singles data in list-mode.Using digital signal processing technology, energy calibration, crystal identification, timing alignment and coincidence events extraction were performed on singles data in list-mode. The obtained data could be used for image reconstruction. Results: The 13 × 13 crystal array was well recognized by the position histogram of one lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystal block. In the coincidence timing histogram of the micro-Derenzo phantom, 1.36 ns full width at half maximum was obtained. The rods with a diameter of 1.2 mm were clearly displayed in the reconstructed image of the micro-Derenzo phantom. Conclusion: The coincidence module can provide satisfactory performance to meet the design needs of an all-digital small animal PET scanner. (authors)

  10. Laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Demtröder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Keeping abreast of the latest techniques and applications, this new edition of the standard reference and graduate text on laser spectroscopy has been completely revised and expanded. While the general concept is unchanged, the new edition features a broad array of new material, e.g., frequency doubling in external cavities, reliable cw-parametric oscillators, tunable narrow-band UV sources, more sensitive detection techniques, tunable femtosecond and sub-femtosecond lasers (X-ray region and the attosecond range), control of atomic and molecular excitations, frequency combs able to synchronize independent femtosecond lasers, coherent matter waves, and still more applications in chemical analysis, medical diagnostics, and engineering.

  11. General survey of recent development of photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edamoto, Kazuyuki

    1994-01-01

    On the present state of the recent development of photoemission spectroscopy, by limiting the topics to the development of the spectroscopy proper and the development contributing to the progress of surface science, general explanation is made. As to the development that enabled to heighten spectrum resolution, surface core-level shift and the precise measurement of the Fermi surface of surface level are described, showing the example. Also a number of the developments which enabled the utilization of the light source, of which the wavelength is variable, and which was brought about by synchrotron radiation beam, were mentioned. Besides, spin polarized photoelectron spectroscopy, the development of photoelectron microscope and others are outlined. Photoemission spectroscopy is very useful for analyzing the electron condition of solid surfaces. There are two factors in heightening core level spectrum resolution, namely, heightening the resolution of an electron energy analyzer proper and the utilization of synchrotron radiation as a light source. High resolution core-level spectra, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and as the light source of which the wavelength is variable, resonance photoemission spectroscopy, constant initial state spectroscopy and soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and as the recently developed spectroscopy, spin polarized photoemission spectroscopy, Auger photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy and photoelectron microscope are explained. (K.I.)

  12. A Century of Galaxy Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Vera C.

    1995-10-01

    The first successful spectrum of a galaxy, M31, was obtained in 1898 and published in a two-page paper in the young Astrophysical Journal (Scheiner 1899). Thus the first century of galaxy spectroscopy and the first century of the Astrophysical Journal are almost coincident; I celebrate both in this paper. I describe the very early history of the determination of internal kinematics in spiral galaxies, often by quoting the astronomers' own published words. By mid-century, observations with improved optical and radio telescopes offered evidence that much of the matter in a galaxy is dark. As the century ends, research interests have enlarged to include study of spheroidal and disk galaxies with complex nuclear (and other) kinematics. These complicated velocity patterns are understood as the result of interactions, acquisitions, and mergers, and offer clear evidence of the important role of gravitational effects in galaxy evolution.

  13. Hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    Spectra of hadrons show various and complex structures due to the strong coupling constants of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) constituting its fundamental theory. For their understandings, two parameters, i.e., (1) the quark mass and (2) their excitation energies are playing important roles. In low energies, for example, rather simple structures similar to the positronium appear in the heavy quarks such as charms and bottoms. It has been, however, strongly suggested by the recent experiments that the molecular resonant state shows up when the threshold to decay to mesons is exceeded. On the other hand, chiral symmetry and its breaking play important roles in the dynamics of light quarks. Strange quarks are in between and show special behaviors. In the present lecture, the fundamental concept of the hadron spectroscopy based on the QCD is expounded to illustrate the present understandings and problems of the hadron spectroscopy. Sections are composed of 1. Introduction, 2. Fundamental Concepts (hadrons, quarks and QCD), 3. Quark models and exotic hadrons, 4. Lattice QCD and QCD sum rules. For sections 1 to 3, only outline of the concepts is described because of the limited space. Exotic hadrons, many quark pictures of light hadrons and number of quarks in hadrons are described briefly. (S. Funahashi)

  14. Development of an analysis methodology applied to 4πβ-γ software coincidence data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancaccio, Franco; Dias, Mauro da Silva; Toledo, Fabio de

    2009-01-01

    The present work describes the new software methodology under development at the IPEN Nuclear Metrology Laboratory for radionuclide standardizations with 4πβ-γ coincidence technique. The software includes the Coincidence Graphic User Interface (GUI) and the Coincidence Analysis Program. The first results for a 60 Co sample measurement are discussed and compared to the results obtained with two different conventional coincidence systems. (author)

  15. Determination of trace elements in scallop and fish otolith by instrumental neutron activation analysis using anti-coincidence and coincidence counting methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shogo; Okada, Yukiko; Hirai, Shoji

    2005-01-01

    Trace element concentrations in scallop reference material and fish otolith certified reference materials prepared at the National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) of Japan were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Nine aliquots of scallop sample (ca. 252∼507 mg) and five aliquots of fish otolith sample (ca. 502 ∼ 988 mg) and comparative standards were irradiated for a short time (10 s) at a thermal neutron flux of 1.5 x 10 12 n cm -2 s -1 (pneumatic transfer) and for a long time (6 h) at a thermal neutron flux of 3.7 x 10 12 n cm -2 s -1 (central thimble) in the Rikkyo University Research Reactor (100 kW). The irradiated samples were measured by conventional γ-ray spectrometry using a coaxial Ge detector, and by anti-coincidence and coincidence γ-ray spectrometry with a coaxial Ge detector and a well-type NaI (Tl) detector to determine as many trace elements as possible with high sensitivity. The concentrations of 34 elements of the NIES No.15 scallop reference material and 16 elements of the NIES No.22 fish otolith CRM were determined. Using the coincidence counting method to determine Se, Ba and Hf, the lower limit of the determination was improved by 2 times compared with the conventional counting method. (author)

  16. Comparison of Satellite Reflectance Algorithms for Estimating Phycocyanin Values and Cyanobacterial Total Biovolume in a Temperate Reservoir Using Coincident Hyperspectral Aircraft Imagery and Dense Coincident Surface Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Beck

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed 27 established and new simple and therefore perhaps portable satellite phycocyanin pigment reflectance algorithms for estimating cyanobacterial values in a temperate 8.9 km2 reservoir in southwest Ohio using coincident hyperspectral aircraft imagery and dense coincident water surface observations collected from 44 sites within 1 h of image acquisition. The algorithms were adapted to real Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI, synthetic WorldView-2, Sentinel-2, Landsat-8, MODIS and Sentinel-3/MERIS/OLCI imagery resulting in 184 variants and corresponding image products. Image products were compared to the cyanobacterial coincident surface observation measurements to identify groups of promising algorithms for operational algal bloom monitoring. Several of the algorithms were found useful for estimating phycocyanin values with each sensor type except MODIS in this small lake. In situ phycocyanin measurements correlated strongly (r2 = 0.757 with cyanobacterial sum of total biovolume (CSTB allowing us to estimate both phycocyanin values and CSTB for all of the satellites considered except MODIS in this situation.

  17. Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemcik, T.

    1984-01-01

    The emission and absorption of photons taking place without changes in the frequency spectrum of the crystal lattice are known as the Moessbauer effect. It takes place in the low energy levels of heavy nuclei in solid lattices at low temperatures. On the basis of the hyperfine structure of Moessbauer spectra the notions are explained of isomer shift, quadrupole splitting and magnetic splitting. The principle and function are explained of Moessbauer spectrometers and the methods of graphical processing of spectra, also the use of the least square fit. Moessbauer spectroscopy is nondestructive, highly sensitive and selective and makes structural resolution possible. It is used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of compounds. Examples are given of the use of this method for mineralogical and crystallo-chemical analysis of lunar minerals and rocks, for analysis of corrosion products of iron and for phase analysis of alloys. (M.D.)

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirley, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in photoelectron spectroscopy at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: the orientation of CO on Pt(III) and Ni(III) surfaces from angle-resolved photoemission; photoemission from CO on Pt(III) in the range 40 eV less than or equal to dirac constant ω less than or equal to 150 eV; photoemission studies of electron states at clean surfaces using synchrotron radiation; angle and energy dependent photoemission studies of plasmon loss structure in Al and In; d-orbital directed photoemission from copper; interpretation of angle-resolved x-ray photoemission from valence bands; atomic cross-section effects in soft x-ray photoemission from Ag, Au, and Pt valence bands; x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of transition metal difluorides; x-ray photoemission investigation of the density of states of B'-NiAl; the electronic structure of SrTiO 3 and some simple related oxides; fluorescence lifetime measurements of np 5 (n+1)S' states in krypton and xenon; Zeeman beats in the resonance fluorescence of the 3P 1 , states in krypton and xenon; lifetime measurements of rare-gas dimers; configuration interaction effects in the atomic photoelectron spectra of Ba, Sm, Eu, and Yb; glow discharge lamps as electron sources for electron impact excitation; electron impact excitation of electron correlation states in Ca, Sr, and Ba; photoelectron spectroscopy of atomic and molecular bismuth; relativistic effects in the uv photoelectron spectra of group VI diatomic molecules; and relative gas-phase acidities and basicities from a proton potential model

  19. Recovering the triple coincidence of non-pure positron emitters in preclinical PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Chen, Szu-Yu; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2016-03-01

    Non-pure positron emitters, with their long half-lives, allow for the tracing of slow biochemical processes which cannot be adequately examined by the commonly used short-lived positron emitters. Most of these isotopes emit high-energy cascade gamma rays in addition to positron decay that can be detected and create a triple coincidence with annihilation photons. Triple coincidence is discarded in most scanners, however, the majority of the triple coincidence contains true photon pairs that can be recovered. In this study, we propose a strategy for recovering triple coincidence events to raise the sensitivity of PET imaging for non-pure positron emitters. To identify the true line of response (LOR) from a triple coincidence, a framework utilizing geometrical, energy and temporal information is proposed. The geometrical criterion is based on the assumption that the LOR with the largest radial offset among the three sub pairs of triple coincidences is least likely to be a true LOR. Then, a confidence time window is used to test the valid LOR among those within triple coincidence. Finally, a likelihood ratio discriminant rule based on the energy probability density distribution of cascade and annihilation gammas is established to identify the true LOR. An Inveon preclinical PET scanner was modeled with GATE (GEANT4 application for tomographic emission) Monte Carlo software. We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in terms of identification fraction, noise equivalent count rates (NECR), and image quality on various phantoms. With the inclusion of triple coincidence events using the proposed method, the NECR was found to increase from 11% to 26% and 19% to 29% for I-124 and Br-76, respectively, when 7.4-185 MBq of activity was used. Compared to the reconstructed images using double coincidence, this technique increased the SNR by 5.1-7.3% for I-124 and 9.3-10.3% for Br-76 within the activity range of 9.25-74 MBq, without compromising the spatial resolution or

  20. Digital Pulse Shape Analysis with Phoswich Detectors to Simplify Coincidence Measurements of Radioactive Xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, Wolfgang; Tan, Hui; Warburton, William K.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2005-01-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty establishes a network of monitoring stations to detect radioactive Xenon in the atmosphere from nuclear weapons testing. One such monitoring system is the Automated Radio-xenon Sampler/Analyzer (ARSA) developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which uses a complex arrangement of separate beta and gamma detectors to detect beta-gamma coincidences from the Xe isotopes of interest. The coincidence measurement is very sensitive, but the large number of detectors and photomultiplier tubes require careful calibration which makes the system hard to use. It has been suggested that beta-gamma coincidences could be detected with only a single photomultiplier tube and electronics channel by using a phoswich detector consisting of optically coupled beta and gamma detectors (Ely, 2003). In that work, rise time analysis of signals from a phoswich detector was explored as a method to determine if interactions occurred in either the beta or the gamma detector or in both simultaneously. However, this approach was not able to detect coincidences with the required sensitivity or to measure the beta and gamma energies with sufficient precision for Xenon monitoring. In this paper, we present a new algorithm to detect coincidences by pulse shape analysis of the signals from a BC-404/CsI(Tl) phoswich detector. Implemented on fast digital readout electronics, the algorithm achieves clear separation of beta only, gamma only and coincidence events, accurate measurement of both beta and gamma energies, and has an error rate for detecting coincidences of less than 0.1%. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport and light collection were performed to optimize design parameters for a replacement detector module for the ARSA system, obtaining an estimated coincidence detection efficiency of 82-92% and a background rejection rate better than 99%. The new phoswich/pulse shape analysis method is thus suitable to simplify the existing ARSA

  1. A Nal-Nal Coincidence Low Background Counting System for Low-Level gamma -Ray Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharshar, T.

    1998-01-01

    A Nal-Nal coincidence low background counting system has been constructed to be used in neutron activation analysis and radioenvironmental measurements. The slow timing technique, using the Constant Fraction Timing Single Channel Analyzer and Coincidence unit, was used in the present system. To improve the coincidence counting efficiency of the system, four 3.8cm x 2.5cmNaI(Tl) detectors were used. A special scintillation preamplifier with three inputs and one output was constructed for summing the outputs of three PM tubes. The performance of the new system was tested using radioactive point sources and some environmental samples. The system characteristics and its special features are discussed

  2. Application of multiparameter coincidence spectrometry using a Ge detectors array to neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsukawa, Y.; Oshima, M.; Hayakawa, T.; Toh, Y.; Shinohara, N.

    2002-01-01

    The method of multiparameter coincidence spectrometry based on γ-γ coincidence is widely used for the nuclear structure studies, because of its high sensitivity to γ-rays. In this study, feasibility of the method of multiparameter coincidence spectrometry for analytical chemistry was examined. Two reference igneous rock samples (JP-1, JB-1a) issued by the Geological Survey of Japan were irradiated at a research reactor, and the γ-rays from the radioisotopes produced via neutron capture reactions were measured using an array of 12 Ge detectors with BGO Compton suppressors, GEMINI. Simultaneously 24 elements were analyzed without chemical separation. The observed smallest component was Eu contained in JP-1 with abundance of 4 ppb

  3. Instrumentation and data handling. I. Positron coincidence imaging with the TOKIM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    In addition to the conventional singles mode of operation, the TOKIM system's two Anger-type gamma cameras may be used in the (stationary, 180 0 opposition) coincidence mode, making it possible to achieve tomographic imaging with three-dimensional spatial resolution and high detection sensitivity, utilizing β + emitting radioisotopes. This method, however, suffers from certain inherent limitations. Our efforts during this past year to improve upon the TOKIM imaging capability in the β + mode have been directed towards the reduction of the limitations by the following means: the removal of out of focal plane image contributions through a computerized iterative correction procedure, coupled with coincidence aperture limitation to achieve uniform sensitivity across a reasonable portion of the detector pair diameter, and the application of Muehllehner's graded filter approach to the TOKIM to increase the ratio of usable coincidence events versus singles count rate

  4. Simulations of Lithium-Based Neutron Coincidence Counter for Gd-Loaded Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowles, Christian C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kouzes, Richard T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Siciliano, Edward R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Lithium-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology Coincidence Counting for Gd-loaded Fuels at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the development of a lithium-based neutron coincidence counter for nondestructively assaying Gd loaded nuclear fuel. This report provides results from MCNP simulations of a lithium-based coincidence counter for the possible measurement of Gd-loaded nuclear fuel. A comparison of lithium-based simulations and UNCL-II simulations with and without Gd loaded fuel is provided. A lithium-based model, referred to as PLNS3A-R1, showed strong promise for assaying Gd loaded fuel.

  5. Convergent input from brainstem coincidence detectors onto delay-sensitive neurons in the inferior colliculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, D; Jiang, D; Shackleton, T M; Palmer, A R

    1998-08-01

    Responses of low-frequency neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized guinea pigs were studied with binaural beats to assess their mean best interaural phase (BP) to a range of stimulating frequencies. Phase plots (stimulating frequency vs BP) were produced, from which measures of characteristic delay (CD) and characteristic phase (CP) for each neuron were obtained. The CD provides an estimate of the difference in travel time from each ear to coincidence-detector neurons in the brainstem. The CP indicates the mechanism underpinning the coincidence detector responses. A linear phase plot indicates a single, constant delay between the coincidence-detector inputs from the two ears. In more than half (54 of 90) of the neurons, the phase plot was not linear. We hypothesized that neurons with nonlinear phase plots received convergent input from brainstem coincidence detectors with different CDs. Presentation of a second tone with a fixed, unfavorable delay suppressed the response of one input, linearizing the phase plot and revealing other inputs to be relatively simple coincidence detectors. For some neurons with highly complex phase plots, the suppressor tone altered BP values, but did not resolve the nature of the inputs. For neurons with linear phase plots, the suppressor tone either completely abolished their responses or reduced their discharge rate with no change in BP. By selectively suppressing inputs with a second tone, we are able to reveal the nature of underlying binaural inputs to IC neurons, confirming the hypothesis that the complex phase plots of many IC neurons are a result of convergence from simple brainstem coincidence detectors.

  6. SIMP spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3→2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e + e − colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing ‘hidden valley’ phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  7. SIMP spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochberg, Yonit [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kuflik, Eric [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca NY 14853 (United States); Murayama, Hitoshi [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI),University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Center for Japanese Studies, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    We study the interactions between strongly interacting massive particle dark matter and the Standard Model via a massive vector boson that is kinetically mixed with the hypercharge gauge boson. The relic abundance is set by 3→2 self-interactions of the dark matter, while the interactions with the vector mediator enable kinetic equilibrium between the dark and visible sectors. We show that a wide range of parameters is phenomenologically viable and can be probed in various ways. Astrophysical and cosmological constraints are evaded due to the p-wave nature of dark matter annihilation into visible particles, while direct detection methods using electron recoils can be sensitive to parts of the parameter space. In addition, we propose performing spectroscopy of the strongly coupled dark sector at e{sup +}e{sup −} colliders, where the energy of a mono-photon can track the resonance structure of the dark sector. Alternatively, some resonances may decay back into Standard Model leptons or jets, realizing ‘hidden valley’ phenomenology at the LHC and ILC in a concrete fashion.

  8. Amateur spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, M. V.

    1998-06-01

    (The 1997 Presidential Address to the British Astronomical Association.) Auguste Comte is remembered for an unfortunate remark. In 1825 he said the chemical composition of stars would never be revealed. Within a decade or so the heart of the atom was being explored in remote stars through the science of spectroscopy. In simplistic terms one can regard the atom as a miniature solar system, but with the novel option that electrons (representing planets) having the ability to 'jump' from one orbit to another. In 'falling' to a lower orbit a photon of light of precise wavelength is released to travel outwards. When the electron 'jumps' to a higher orbit a photon of light is absorbed. This is taking place on a vast scale which we observe as lines in the spectrum - their position and prominence relates to the particular atomic element, temperature and pressure within the stellar atmosphere. It is beyond the scope of this Address to discuss the various processes that affect spectra, or to provide a mathematical explanation which can be found elsewhere. In any case the lack of a deep understanding does not preclude enjoyable or useful observations. Methods and results from amateurs conducting such observations are discussed in this paper.

  9. Planetary spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, U.

    1988-01-01

    The main goal of the research is charge coupled device (CCD) spectroscopic and imaging studies of the solar system in support of spacecraft investigations. Studies include the physical behavior of comets, the atmosphere of the gaseous planets, and the solid surfaces of satellites and asteroids. The major observing program consisted of approximately 50 nights of photometry of Comet Halley in order to resolve the controversy over this comet's rotation period. This data is presently being analyzed. Additional observing projects included the spectroscopic occultation of Charon by Pluto, reflection spectroscopy of Mercury, and a spectrum of the satellite Oberon. Mercury data does not corroborate the Fe(++) absorption feature reported by McCord and Clark at 8800 A but instead potentially shows a weaker feature at longer wavelengths. This position is in much closer accord with expectations for Mercury since a band center near 8800 A implies too little Fe(++) on Mercury, especially if band shifts with temperature are considered. The Pluto project proved that the deep methane absorptions visible in their combined specta are due soley to Pluto with Charon showing a flat and featureless spectrum. It appears that if Charon ever contained a substantial methane component, the satellite's low surface gravity could not hold it and the methane evaporated and escaped

  10. Coincidence and common fixed point of F-contractions via $CLR_{ST}$ property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Tomar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to establish the existence of coincidence and common fixed point of F-contractions via CLRST property. Our results generalize, extend and improve the results of Wardowski [D. Wardowski, Fixed points of a new type of contractive mappings in complete metric spaces, Fixed Point Theory and Applications (2012 2012:94, 6 pages, doi: 10.1186/1687-1812-2012-94], Batra et al. [Coincidence Point Theorem for a New Type of Contraction on Metric Spaces, Int. Journal of Math. Analysis, Vol. 8(27 2014, 1315-1320] and others existing in literature. Examples are also given in support of our results.

  11. Boron-Coated Straw Collar for Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jianwei; Croft, Stephen; McElroy, Robert Dennis

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design and optimize, in simulation space, an active neutron coincidence counter (or collar) using boron-coated straws (BCSs) as a non- 3 He replacement to the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL). UNCL has been used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) since the 1980s to verify the 235 U content in fresh light water reactor fuel assemblies for safeguards purposes. This report documents the design and optimization of the BCS collar.

  12. Boron-Coated Straw Collar for Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Croft, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McElroy, Robert Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design and optimize, in simulation space, an active neutron coincidence counter (or collar) using boron-coated straws (BCSs) as a non-3He replacement to the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL). UNCL has been used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and European Atomic Energy Community (Euratom) since the 1980s to verify the 235U content in fresh light water reactor fuel assemblies for safeguards purposes. This report documents the design and optimization of the BCS collar.

  13. LIGO Triggered Search for Coincidence with High Energy Photon Survey Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2009-01-01

    LIGO is about to begin a new, higher sensitivity science run, where gravitational detection is plausible. A possible candidate for detection is a compact binary merger, which would also be likely to emit a high energy electromagnetic signal. Coincident observation of the gw signal from a compact merger with an x-ray or gamma-ray signal would add considerable weight to the claim for gw detection. In this talk I will consider the possibility of using LIGO triggers with time and sky position to perform a coincident analysis of EM signals from the RXTE, SWIFT, and FERMI missions.

  14. Determination of plutonium in nuclear fuels using the neutron coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehnel, K.

    1978-03-01

    In assays for plutonium the neutron coincidence technique is often used. This method which is based on measuring spontaneous fission rates is examined both experimentally and theoretically. A novel coincidence unit is described which works in effect without deadtime and which therefore has advantages over the currently used design. For waste samples a principle for measurement is described which avoids space dependence effects by rotating the probe in an asymmetric detector. Formulae are developed for the statistical error and various effects of deadtimes are discussed. Further it is shown that neutron multiplication in the sample is an important source of errors, especially when the (α, n)-background is neglected. (author)

  15. Study and development of a spectrometer with Compton suppression and gamma coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, D.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of a spectrometer consisting of a Ge detector surrounded by a NaI(T1) detector that can operate in Compton-suppression and gamma-gamma coincidence modes. The criteria that led to this measurement configuration are discussed and the spectrometer performances are shown for 60 Co and 137 Cs gamma-ray sources. The results for the measurement of 189 Ir (Compton suppression) and for the measurement of 101 Rh (gamma-gamma coincidence) in the presence of other radioisotopes are given. 83 Rb and 105 Ag isotopes are also measured with this spectrometer [fr

  16. A 15 channel 2- and 3-fold coincidence counting system for radioactivity standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.R.S.; Meyer, B.R.; Raave, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The 4π β-γ liquid scintillation coincidence counting system which is used at the National Accelerator Centre for standardizing radioisotopes, has been extended to allow for up to fifteen data points to be measured simultaneously by introducing a 15-fold coincidence unit and a 32-channel scaler into the system. A new control / data acquisition computer program has been written and its operation explained in detail. The advantages of the new system are discussed, and the activity of a 139 Ce source as measured by the new system and the old 3-fold system is compared

  17. n-Tupled Coincidence Point Theorems for Probabilistic ψ-Contractions in Menger Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penumarthy Parvateesam Murthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduced n-tupled coincidence point for a pair of maps T:Xn→X and A:X→X in Menger space. Utilizing the properties of the pseudometric and the triangular norm, we will establish n-tupled coincidence point theorems under weak compatibility as well as n-tupled fixed point theorems for hybrid probabilistic ψ-contractions with a gauge function. Our main results do not require the conditions of continuity and monotonicity of ψ. At the end of this paper, an example is given to support our main theorem.

  18. A study on application of 18F-FDG coincidence imaging in diagnosis of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianjun; Huang Gang; Shi Yiping; Yuan Jimin; Zhu Cuiying; Xu Qing

    2004-01-01

    To study the value of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging in diagnosis of cancer, 101 patients who were suspicious of cancer were 18 F-FDG coincidence imaged before operation. Diagnoses of visual and semi-quantitative analysis were compared with the pathologic results after operation. The sensitivity and speciality of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging were 84.61% and 78.26% in detecting cancer, while accuracy was 83.1%. For patients with a cancer of less than 2 cm, the sensitivity and speciality were 80% and 100%, accuracy was 82.35%. When standard of diagnosis was higher than 2.0 in T/N value, the sensitivity and speciality were 85.90% and 82.61%, while accuracy was 85.15%; when visual analysis was combined with semi-quantitative analysis, the sensitivity and speciality were 88.5% and 87.0%, while accuracy was 88.11%. In conclusion, it is of higher value to diagnose cancers with 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging and the accuracy of diagnosis can be improved by visual analysis combined with semi-quantitative analysis. (authors)

  19. Pre-coincidence brain activity predicts the perceptual outcome of streaming/bouncing motion display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Wang, Yajie; Jia, Lina; Feng, Chengzhi; Liao, Yu; Feng, Wenfeng

    2017-08-18

    When two identical visual discs move toward each other on a two-dimensional visual display, they can be perceived as either "streaming through" or "bouncing off" each other after their coincidence. Previous studies have observed a strong bias toward the streaming percept. Additionally, the incidence of the bouncing percept in this ambiguous display could be increased by various factors, such as a brief sound at the moment of coincidence and a momentary pause of the two discs. The streaming/bouncing bistable motion phenomenon has been studied intensively since its discovery. However, little is known regarding the neural basis underling the perceptual ambiguity in the classic version of the streaming/bouncing motion display. The present study investigated the neural basis of the perception disambiguating underling the processing of the streaming/bouncing bistable motion display using event-related potential (ERP) recordings. Surprisingly, the amplitude of frontal central P2 (220-260 ms) that was elicited by the moving discs ~200 ms before the coincidence of the two discs was observed to be predictive of subsequent streaming or bouncing percept. A larger P2 amplitude was observed for streaming percept than the bouncing percept. These findings suggest that the streaming/bouncing bistable perception may have been disambiguated unconsciously ~200 ms before the coincidence of the two discs.

  20. Metformin and lactic acidosis : cause or coincidence? A review of case reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stades, AME; Heikens, JT; Erkelens, DW; Holleman, F; Hoekstra, JBL

    Objective. Metformin has been associated with the serious side-effect lactic acidosis. However, it remains unclear whether the use of metformin was a cause or a coincidence in lactic acidosis. Design. A literature search of the Index Medicus (1959-66) and of the databases Embase, Medline, Medline

  1. Real Time Coincidence Detection Engine for High Count Rate Timestamp Based PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrault, M.-A.; Oliver, J. F.; Bergeron, M.; Lecomte, R.; Fontaine, R.

    2010-02-01

    Coincidence engines follow two main implementation flows: timestamp based systems and AND-gate based systems. The latter have been more widespread in recent years because of its lower cost and high efficiency. However, they are highly dependent on the selected electronic components, they have limited flexibility once assembled and they are customized to fit a specific scanner's geometry. Timestamp based systems are gathering more attention lately, especially with high channel count fully digital systems. These new systems must however cope with important singles count rates. One option is to record every detected event and postpone coincidence detection offline. For daily use systems, a real time engine is preferable because it dramatically reduces data volume and hence image preprocessing time and raw data management. This paper presents the timestamp based coincidence engine for the LabPET¿, a small animal PET scanner with up to 4608 individual readout avalanche photodiode channels. The engine can handle up to 100 million single events per second and has extensive flexibility because it resides in programmable logic devices. It can be adapted for any detector geometry or channel count, can be ported to newer, faster programmable devices and can have extra modules added to take advantage of scanner-specific features. Finally, the user can select between full processing mode for imaging protocols and minimum processing mode to study different approaches for coincidence detection with offline software.

  2. Use of sum-peak and coincidence counting methods for activity standardization of {sup 22}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, E.M. de, E-mail: estela@ird.gov.br [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Iwahara, A.; Poledna, R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva, M.A.L. da [Coordenacao Geral de Instalacoes Nucleares/Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, R. Gal. Severiano, 90 - Botafogo, CEP 22290-901 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tauhata, L. [Fundacao Carlos Chagas Filho de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FAPERJ), Av. Erasmo Braga, 118-6 Degree-Sign andar, CEP 20020-000 Centro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Delgado, J.U. [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende, s/n, Recreio, CEP 22780-160 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear (LIN/PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Caixa Postal 68509, CEP 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    A solution containing the positron emitter {sup 22}Na has been absolutely standardized using the 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence counting method and the sum-peak spectrometry counting method. In the 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence method two ways for the activity concentration measurements were used: gating on the 1275 keV photopeak and on the 1786 keV sum-peak where the knowledge of the {beta}{sup +}-branching ratio is required. In the sum-peak method the measurements were carried out using three experimental arrangements: the first composed by a well type 5 in. Multiplication-Sign 5 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal, the second by a 3 in. Multiplication-Sign 3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal placed on the top of the first, resulting in a 4{pi} counting geometry and the third arrangement is a high purity coaxial germanium detector. The results that are obtained by these two methods are compatible within the standard uncertainty values with a coverage factor of k=2 ({approx}95% of the confidence level). This means that the sum-peak counting with its more simple experimental setup than the complex coincidence 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} counting system gives consistent results for the activity standardization of {sup 22}Na with smaller uncertainties. Besides, the time period involved to attain the result of the standardization was quite shorter than the coincidence measurements used in this work.

  3. Increased coincidence detection for quantum versus pseudo-generated random numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshoff, Lieze; Jolij, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    People often see meaning in stimuli that are typically considered meaningless. According to Von Lucadou’s idea of Generalized Quantum Teory (GQT), such perceived coincidences, or examples of synchronicity, may be the result of entanglement between a conscious observer and the physical world. Here we

  4. Calculation of coincidence summing corrections for a specific small soil sample geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmer, R.G.; Gehrke, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Previously, a system was developed at the INEL for measuring the {gamma}-ray emitting nuclides in small soil samples for the purpose of environmental monitoring. These samples were counted close to a {approx}20% Ge detector and, therefore, it was necessary to take into account the coincidence summing that occurs for some nuclides. In order to improve the technical basis for the coincidence summing corrections, the authors have carried out a study of the variation in the coincidence summing probability with position within the sample volume. A Monte Carlo electron and photon transport code (CYLTRAN) was used to compute peak and total efficiencies for various photon energies from 30 to 2,000 keV at 30 points throughout the sample volume. The geometry for these calculations included the various components of the detector and source along with the shielding. The associated coincidence summing corrections were computed at these 30 positions in the sample volume and then averaged for the whole source. The influence of the soil and the detector shielding on the efficiencies was investigated.

  5. Study of the pygmy dipole resonance in Mo-94 using the (alpha, alpha ' gamma) coincidence technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derya, V.; Endres, J.; Elvers, M.; Harakeh, M. N.; Pietralla, N.; Romig, C.; Savran, D.; Scheck, M.; Siebenhuehner, F.; Stoica, V. I.; Wortche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2013-01-01

    The (alpha, alpha' gamma) reaction at E-alpha = 136 MeV was used to study the electric dipole response in the open-shell vibrational nucleus Mo-94 below the neutron-separation threshold. The coincidence experiment has been performed at the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut in Groningen, The

  6. COINCIDENCE MEASUREMENTS BETWEEN ELECTRONS FROM PROJECTILE AUTOIONIZATION AND TARGET IONS IN SPECIFIC CHARGE STATES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTHUMUS, JH; LUKEY, P; MORGENSTERN, R

    1991-01-01

    For Ar9+ collisions on Ar we have - by means of a coincidence method - identified the number of primarily transferred electrons leading eventually to the emission of projectile Auger electrons at various energies. Auger cascades are found to play an important role: most of the high energy electrons

  7. Calibration and adjustment of the EGRET coincidence/time-of-flight system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    The coincidence/time-of-flight system of the energetic gamma ray experiment telescope (EGRET) on NASA's Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) consists of two layers of sixteen scintillator tiles. These tiles are paired into 96 coincidence telescopes. Valid coincidence and time-of-flight values (indicating downward moving particles) from one of these telescopes are two of the requirements for an EGRET event trigger. To maximize up-down discrimination, variations in the mean timing value of the telescopes must be minimized. The timing values of the 96 telescopes are not independent, hence they cannot be individually adjusted to calibrate the system. An iterative approach was devised to determine adjustments to the length of the photomultiplier signal cables. These adjustments were made directly in units of time using a time domain reflectometry technique, by timing the reflection of a fast pulse from the unterminated end of eable, and observing the charge in signal propagation time as the length of the cable was shortened. Two constant fraction discriminators, a time-to-amplitude converter and a pulse height analyzer were used for these measurements. Using this direct time measuring approach, the timing values for the 96 EGRET coincidence/time-of-flight telescopes were adjusted with an FWHM variation of less than 450 ps (± 1 TOF timing channel). (orig.)

  8. A simple and versatile data acquisition system for software coincidence and pulse-height discrimination in 4πβ-γ coincidence experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Y; Yamada, T; Unno, Y; Yunoki, A; Sato, Y; Hino, Y

    2012-09-01

    A simple but versatile data acquisition system for software coincidence experiments is described, in which any time stamping and live time controller are not provided. Signals from β- and γ-channels are fed to separately two fast ADCs (16 bits, 25 MHz clock maximum) via variable delay circuits and pulse-height stretchers, and also to pulse-height discriminators. The discriminating level was set to just above the electronic noise. Two ADCs were controlled with a common clock signal, and triggered simultaneously by the logic OR pulses from both discriminators. Paired digital signals for each sampling were sent to buffer memories connected to main PC with a FIFO (First-In, First-Out) pipe via USB. After data acquisition in list mode, various processing including pulse-height analyses was performed using MS-Excel (version 2007 and later). The usefulness of this system was demonstrated for 4πβ(PS)-4πγ coincidence measurements of (60)Co, (134)Cs and (152)Eu. Possibilities of other extended applications will be touched upon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Detecting gravitational waves from inspiraling binaries with a network of detectors: Coherent versus coincident strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Himan; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev; Sago, Norichika; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2006-01-01

    We compare two strategies of multidetector detection of compact binary inspiral signals, namely, the coincidence and the coherent. For simplicity we consider here two identical detectors having the same power spectral density of noise, that of initial LIGO, located in the same place and having the same orientation. We consider the cases of independent noise as well as that of correlated noise. The coincident strategy involves separately making two candidate event lists, one for each detector, and from these choosing those pairs of events from the two lists which lie within a suitable parameter window, which then are called coincidence detections. The coherent strategy on the other hand involves combining the data phase coherently, so as to obtain a single network statistic which is then compared with a single threshold. Here we attempt to shed light on the question as to which strategy is better. We compare the performances of the two methods by plotting the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) for the two strategies. Several of the results are obtained analytically in order to gain insight. Further we perform numerical simulations in order to determine certain parameters in the analytic formulae and thus obtain the final complete results. We consider here several cases from the relatively simple to the astrophysically more relevant in order to establish our results. The bottom line is that the coherent strategy although more computationally expensive in general than the coincidence strategy, is superior to the coincidence strategy--considerably less false dismissal probability for the same false alarm probability in the viable false alarm regime

  10. Photoelectron photoion coincidence imaging of ultrafast control in multichannel molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, C Stefan; Ram, N Bhargava; Irimia, Daniel; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2011-01-01

    The control of multichannel ionic fragmentation dynamics in CF3I is studied by femtosecond pulse shaping and velocity map photoelectron photoion coincidence imaging. When CF3I is photoexcited with femtosecond laser pulses around 540 nm there are two major ions observed in the time-of-flight mass spectrum, the parent CF3I+ ion and the CF3+ fragment ion. In this first study we focussed on the influence of LCD-shaped laser pulses on the molecular dynamics. The three-dimensional recoil distribution of electrons and ions were imaged in coincidence using a single time-of-flight delay line detector. By fast switching of the voltages on the various velocity map ion lenses after detection of the electron, both the electron and the coincident ion are measured with the same imaging detector. These results demonstrate that a significant simplification of a photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging apparatus is in principle possible using switched lens voltages. It is observed that shaped laser fields like chirped pulses, double pulses, and multiple pulses can enhance the CF3+CF3I+ ratio by up to 100%. The total energetics of the dynamics is revealed by analysis of the coincident photoelectron spectra and the kinetic energy of the CF3+ and I fragments. Both the parent CF3I+ and the CF3+ fragment result from a five-photon excitation process. The fragments are formed with very low kinetic energy. The photoelectron spectra and CF3+/CF3I+ ratio vary with the center wavelength of the shaped laser pulses. An optimal enhancement of the CF3+/CF3I+ ratio by about 60% is observed for the double pulse excitation when the pulses are spaced 60 fs apart. We propose that the control mechanism is determined by dynamics on neutral excited states and we discuss the results in relation to the location of electronically excited (Rydberg) states of CF3I.

  11. Investigation of highly activated materials by conventional positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabelova, V.; Petriska, M.; Slugen, V.; Krsjak, V.

    2013-01-01

    Positron annihilation process is helpful tool for material microstructure study. Many useful methods for detecting vacancies and their clusters in various alloys use its principle. Experimental procedure of positron source preparation (radioactive 22 Na) for these methods is difficult task. The unusual small sample dimensions of studied irradiated Eurofer 97 alloy form difficult conditions for its manufacturing. The unique sodium positron source proper preparation is confirmed by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy (CDBS) in Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. (authors)

  12. Mössbauer spectra obtained using β - γ coincidence method after 57Mn implantation into LiH and LiD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Kubo, M. K.; Mihara, M.; Nagatomo, T.; Sato, W.; Miyazaki, J.; Tanigawa, S.; Natori, D.; Sato, S.; Kitagawa, A.

    2016-12-01

    Highly energetic 57Mn ( T 1/2 = 1.45 m) was generated by nuclear projectile fragmentation in a heavy-ion accelerator, and implanted into lithium hydride (LiH) and lithium deuteride (LiD) at 578 K. Mössbauer spectroscopy with β - γ coincidence detection was then carried out on the 57Fe obtained from β -decay of the 57Mn to study the time dependence of the site distributions and coordination environments of dilute Fe atoms implanted in the LiH and LiD. The results suggest that the Fe atoms can substitute for either the Li and H or D atoms within 100 ns. Additionally, the displacement behavior of the substitutional 57Fe atoms on the lattice sites is discussed.

  13. Mössbauer spectra obtained using β − γ coincidence method after {sup 57}Mn implantation into LiH and LiD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Y.; Kobayashi, Y., E-mail: kyoshio@pc.uec.ac.jp [University of Electro-Communication, Graduate School of Engineering and Science (Japan); Yamada, Y. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Kubo, M. K. [International Christian University, Division of Arts Science (Japan); Mihara, M. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Nagatomo, T. [RIKEN, Nishina Center Accelerator Based Science (Japan); Sato, W. [Kanazawa University, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Miyazaki, J. [Tokyo University Agri. Technology, Department of Chemistry and Engineering (Japan); Tanigawa, S.; Natori, D. [University of Electro-Communication, Graduate School of Engineering and Science (Japan); Sato, S.; Kitagawa, A. [National Institute Radiological Sciences (NIRS) (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Highly energetic {sup 57}Mn (T{sub 1/2} = 1.45 m) was generated by nuclear projectile fragmentation in a heavy-ion accelerator, and implanted into lithium hydride (LiH) and lithium deuteride (LiD) at 578 K. Mössbauer spectroscopy with β − γ coincidence detection was then carried out on the {sup 57}Fe obtained from β{sup −}decay of the {sup 57}Mn to study the time dependence of the site distributions and coordination environments of dilute Fe atoms implanted in the LiH and LiD. The results suggest that the Fe atoms can substitute for either the Li and H or D atoms within 100 ns. Additionally, the displacement behavior of the substitutional {sup 57}Fe atoms on the lattice sites is discussed.

  14. Coincidence Doppler broadening and 3DAP study of the pre-precipitation stage of an Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honma, T.; Yanagita, S.; Hono, K.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pre-precipitation solute clustering in Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Ag and Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloys has been investigated by coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) spectroscopy of positron annihilation and three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) analysis. Although Ag-Mg co-clusters form in the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy in the early stage of aging, no evidence for the co-cluster formation was obtained from the Li containing alloy using 3DAP. While CDB spectra indicated that vacancies are associated with Ag after aging for 15 s in the Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy, vacancy-Ag association is suppressed in the Li containing alloy. Based on the 3DAP and CDB results, the reasons for the completely different clustering behaviors observed in these two similar alloys are discussed

  15. The spallation in reverse kinematics: what for a coincidence measurement?; La spallation en cinematique inverse: pourquoi faire une mesure en coincidence?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducret, J.E

    2006-07-15

    The Spaladin installation has been designed to study spallation reactions in reverse kinematics. Furthermore, the heavy and light fragments are detected by coincidence which allows us to get an instantaneous picture of the reaction at a level of accuracy better than that obtained through inclusive measurement. The first part is dedicated to the theoretical description of the different mechanisms involved in the spallation reactions. In the second part we describe the Spaladin installation and report some results on the reaction: Fe{sup 56} + p at an energy of 1 GeV/nucleon. In the third part we expose the performance of the installation through its simulation with the Geant-IV model. We present a study about the sensitivity of the Spaladin installation to theoretical predictions. The fourth part is dedicated to the future experiments that will be performed with the Spaladin installation. (A.C.)

  16. Calculation of “LS-curves” for coincidence summing corrections in gamma ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidmar, Tim; Korun, Matjaž

    2006-01-01

    When coincidence summing correction factors for extended samples are calculated in gamma-ray spectrometry from full-energy-peak and total efficiencies, their variation over the sample volume needs to be considered. In other words, the correction factors cannot be computed as if the sample were a point source. A method developed by Blaauw and Gelsema takes the variation of the efficiencies over the sample volume into account. It introduces the so-called LS-curve in the calibration procedure and only requires the preparation of a single standard for each sample geometry. We propose to replace the standard preparation by calculation and we show that the LS-curves resulting from our method yield coincidence summing correction factors that are consistent with the LS values obtained from experimental data.

  17. Performance evaluation of BGO block detectors used in positron emission tomography and a coincidence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. H.; Choi, Y.; Lim, K. C.; Lee, M. Y.; Woo, S. K.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, S. E.; Choi, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the basic performances of the BGO block detectors, which is used in the GE Advance positron emission tomography. The block detector is composed of 36 small BGO crystals coupled to two 2-channel photomultiplier tubes. In this study, we measured the crystal map and the intrinsic energy resolution of the detector. The coincidence signals between the detectors were also obtained using F-18. The intrinsic energy resolution of the block detector was 69% FWHM at 140 keV and 33% FWHM at 511 keV. High quality crystal map and the coincidence signals between the detectors were successfully obtained. The timing resolution of the detectors are being measured. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of developing high performance positron emission tomography

  18. A processing circuit for overlapped pulse signals for a thermal neutron coincidence counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chul-Yong; Lee, Tae-hoon; Kim, Ho-dong

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a processing circuit for overlapped pulse signals. The overlapped pulse signals are generated when the pulse signals of a He-3 detector, by using a neutron coincidence counter, are connected to shift register coincidence electronics by an OR gate device. The developed circuit detects the overlapped pulse signals from among four input signals and produces new 50 ns pulse wide signals. We considered a case where two pulse signals are simultaneously overlapped among four signals. This circuit was tested with an ACP safeguards neutron counter (ASNC) for an advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) and a 252 Cf neutron source at high rates. The loss rate of the output signal was reduced by 1.27% for singles and 4.75% for doubles when compared with the OR gate device. Also the variation for the triples was much bigger.

  19. A processing circuit for overlapped pulse signals for a thermal neutron coincidence counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a processing circuit for overlapped pulse signals. The overlapped pulse signals are generated when the pulse signals of a He-3 detector, by using a neutron coincidence counter, are connected to shift register coincidence electronics by an OR gate device. The developed circuit detects the overlapped pulse signals from among four input signals and produces new 50 ns pulse wide signals. We considered a case where two pulse signals are simultaneously overlapped among four signals. This circuit was tested with an ACP safeguards neutron counter (ASNC) for an advanced spent fuel conditioning process (ACP) and a (252)Cf neutron source at high rates. The loss rate of the output signal was reduced by 1.27% for singles and 4.75% for doubles when compared with the OR gate device. Also the variation for the triples was much bigger.

  20. Studies of weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via coincidence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Rowland, C; Champagne, A E; Dummer, A K; Fitzgerald, R; Harley, E C T; Mosher, J; Runkle, R

    2002-01-01

    A method for measuring weak capture-gamma-ray resonances via gamma gamma-coincidence counting techniques is described. The coincidence apparatus consisted of a large-volume germanium detector and an annular NaI(Tl) crystal. The setup was tested by measuring the weak E sub R =227 keV resonance in sup 2 sup 6 Mg(p,gamma) sup 2 sup 7 Al. Absolute germanium and NaI(Tl) counting efficiencies for a range of gamma-ray energies and for different detector-target geometries are presented. Studies of the gamma-ray background in our spectra are described. Compared to previous work, our method improves the detection sensitivity for weak capture-gamma-ray resonances by a factor of approx 100. The usefulness of the present technique for investigations of interest to nuclear astrophysics is discussed.

  1. SPADnet: Embedded coincidence in a smart sensor network for PET applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruschini, C., E-mail: claudio.bruschini@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Charbon, E. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Veerappan, C. [Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Braga, L.H.C.; Massari, N.; Perenzoni, M.; Gasparini, L.; Stoppa, D. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento (Italy); Walker, R.; Erdogan, A.; Henderson, R.K. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); East, S.; Grant, L. [STMicroelectronics (R and D) Ltd, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Jatekos, B.; Ujhelyi, F.; Erdei, G.; Lörincz, E. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME), Budapest (Hungary); André, L.; Maingault, L.; Reboud, V. [CEA-LETI, Grenoble (France); and others

    2014-01-11

    In this paper we illustrate the core technologies at the basis of the European SPADnet project ( (www.spadnet.eu)), and present the corresponding first results. SPADnet is aimed at a new generation of MRI-compatible, scalable large area image sensors, based on CMOS technology, that are networked to perform gamma-ray detection and coincidence to be used primarily in (Time-of-Flight) Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The project innovates in several areas of PET systems, from optical coupling to single-photon sensor architectures, from intelligent ring networks to reconstruction algorithms. In addition, SPADnet introduced the first computational model enabling study of the full chain from gamma photons to network coincidence detection through scintillation events, optical coupling, etc.

  2. SPADnet: Embedded coincidence in a smart sensor network for PET applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschini, C.; Charbon, E.; Veerappan, C.; Braga, L.H.C.; Massari, N.; Perenzoni, M.; Gasparini, L.; Stoppa, D.; Walker, R.; Erdogan, A.; Henderson, R.K.; East, S.; Grant, L.; Jatekos, B.; Ujhelyi, F.; Erdei, G.; Lörincz, E.; André, L.; Maingault, L.; Reboud, V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we illustrate the core technologies at the basis of the European SPADnet project ( (www.spadnet.eu)), and present the corresponding first results. SPADnet is aimed at a new generation of MRI-compatible, scalable large area image sensors, based on CMOS technology, that are networked to perform gamma-ray detection and coincidence to be used primarily in (Time-of-Flight) Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The project innovates in several areas of PET systems, from optical coupling to single-photon sensor architectures, from intelligent ring networks to reconstruction algorithms. In addition, SPADnet introduced the first computational model enabling study of the full chain from gamma photons to network coincidence detection through scintillation events, optical coupling, etc

  3. A deadtime reduction circuit for thermal neutron coincidence counters with Amptek preamplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, S.C.; Krick, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a deadtime reduction circuit for thermal neutron coincidence counters using Amptek preamplifier/amplifier/discriminator circuits. The principle is to remove the overlap between the output pulses from the Amptek circuits by adding a derandomizer between the Amptek circuits and the shift-register coincidence electronics. We implemented the derandomizer as an Actel programmable logic array; the derandomizer board is small and can be mounted in the high-voltage junction box with the Amptek circuits, if desired. Up to 32 Amptek circuits can be used with one derandomizer. The derandomizer has seven outputs: four groups of eight inputs, two groups of 16 inputs, and one group of 32 inputs. We selected these groupings to facilitate detector ring-ratio measurements. The circuit was tested with the five-ring research multiplicity counter, which has five output signals-one for each ring. The counter's deadtime was reduced from 70 to 30 ns

  4. Detection of coincident radiations in a single transducer by pulse shape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, William K [Menlo Park, CA

    2008-03-11

    Pulse shape analysis determines if two radiations are in coincidence. A transducer is provided that, when it absorbs the first radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a shorter time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed first radiation and, when it absorbs the second radiation produces an output pulse that is characterized by a longer time constant and whose area is nominally proportional to the energy of the absorbed second radiation. When radiation is absorbed, the output pulse is detected and two integrals are formed, the first over a time period representative of the first time constant and the second over a time period representative of the second time constant. The values of the two integrals are examined to determine whether the first radiation, the second radiation, or both were absorbed in the transducer, the latter condition defining a coincident event.

  5. LINEAR BUNDLES WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF COINCIDENCE OF CIRCLE AND ELLIPSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polezhaev Yuriy Olegovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Compositions represented by geometrical graphic models of circular and elliptical shapes enjoy wide application in architectural and interior design. The research of variations of coincidences of circles and ellipses is a relevant subject of exploration. In the paper, the authors analyze some of the multiplicity of coincidences, and an example of their practical implementation (a church dome model. The section of an object is "amalgamated" into the architectural concept of the structure, the relief and theological ideas. Geometric interlinks, compositions and figurations of interconnected diameters, circular and elliptical arcs, their tangency, incidences and interspaces have always been of interest to researchers; they have triggered the search for harmonious and rational solutions in civil engineering and architecture. Advancements in theoretical geometrography and its software applications facilitate new solutions.

  6. Equivalence of computer codes for calculation of coincidence summing correction factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidmar, T.; Capogni, M.; Hult, M.; Hurtado, S.; Kastlander, J.; Lutter, G.; Lépy, M.-C.; Martinkovič, J.; Ramebäck, H.; Sima, O.; Tzika, F.; Vidmar, G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to check for equivalence of computer codes that can perform calculations of true coincidence summing correction factors. All calculations were performed for a set of well-defined detector and sample parameters, without any reference to empirical data. For a p-type detector model the application of different codes resulted in satisfactory agreement in the calculated correction factors. For high-efficiency geometries in combination with an n-type detector and a radionuclide emitting abundant X-rays the results were scattered. - Highlights: • Measured and calculated true coincidence corrections differ in recent study. • We checked for equivalence of computer codes that can perform such calculations. • Codes compared with each other for a set of well-defined detector and sample models. • Satisfactory agreement between the codes for a p-type detector model. • Large differences for an n-type detector model and X-ray emitting radionuclides

  7. Use of γ-γ coincidence spectrometry in the geochemical study of diamictites from South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, H.; Koeberl, Ch.; McDonald, I.; Reimold, W.U.

    2000-01-01

    γ-γ coincidence spectrometry was used to investigate the possible presence of a meteoritical component in 27 samples of South African diamictites. Recently, several studies have suggested that some tillites/diamictites may represent impact breccias, but a petrographical study by our group found no evidence for the presence of impact-characteristic shocked minerals. The siderophile elements, such as Cr, Co, Ni, and, especially, the platinum group elements, have high abundances in meteorites, but low abundances in terrestrial crustal rocks. The Ir content of the diamictites was measured with the new iridium coincidence spectrometer (ICS) at the University of Vienna, with detection limits of around 0.02 ppb. No enrichments in the contents of Ir and other siderophile elements compared to average crustal concentrations were found; thus, no unequivocal evidence for an impact origin of these diamictites of the South African Dwyka Group can be documented. (author)

  8. Ion-ion coincidence imaging at high event rate using an in-vacuum pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jingming; Furch, Federico J.; Durá, Judith; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John; Schulz, Claus Peter; Rouzée, Arnaud; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2017-07-01

    A new ion-ion coincidence imaging spectrometer based on a pixelated complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector has been developed for the investigation of molecular ionization and fragmentation processes in strong laser fields. Used as a part of a velocity map imaging spectrometer, the detection system is comprised of a set of microchannel plates and a Timepix detector. A fast time-to-digital converter (TDC) is used to enhance the ion time-of-flight resolution by correlating timestamps registered separately by the Timepix detector and the TDC. In addition, sub-pixel spatial resolution (principle experiment on strong field dissociative double ionization of carbon dioxide molecules (CO2), using a 400 kHz repetition rate laser system. The experimental results demonstrate that the spectrometer can detect multiple ions in coincidence, making it a valuable tool for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules in strong laser fields.

  9. Performances of the Coincidence Matrix ASIC of the ATLAS Barrel Level-1 Muon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Pastore, F; Vari, R; Veneziano, S

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Barrel Level-1 muon trigger handles data coming from the Resistive Plate Chamber detectors, structured in three concentric layers inside the air-core barrel toroid. The trigger classifies muons within different programmable transverse momentum thresholds, and tags the identified tracks with the corresponding bunch crossing number. The algorithm looks for hit coincidences within different detector layers inside the programmed geometrical road which defines the transverse momentum cut. The Coincidence Matrix ASIC implements the trigger algorithm and the readout of the RPC detector, processing hit signals coming from up to four detector layers. It finds muon track candidates and generates the output trigger patterns with a latency of a few 25 ns bunch crossing periods, and produces and time tags the readout hit patterns. Due to the different performance needs and limitations in the maximum power dissipation and technology, the CMA input pipeline and trigger logic and the time interpolator run at the wo...

  10. Coincidence system for standardization of radionuclides using a 4 pi plastic scintillator detector

    CERN Document Server

    Baccarelli, A M; Koskinas, M F

    2003-01-01

    A coincidence system using a plastic scintillator detector in 4 pi geometry has been developed and applied for the standardization of radionuclides. The scintillator shape and dimensions have been optimized for maximum charge particle detection efficiency, while keeping background low and a nearly constant gamma-ray efficiency for different points from the radioactive source. The gamma-ray events were measured with a NaI(Tl) scintillation counter. The electronic system for processing pulses consisted of logic gates and delay modules feeding a time-to-amplitude converter with output to a multichannel analyzer. The alpha detection efficiency measured with sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am was around 95% and the beta detection efficiency for sup 6 sup 0 Co was around 67%. Activity measurements of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am and sup 6 sup 0 Co were performed and the results showed good agreement when compared with a conventional coincidence system employing a 4 pi proportional counter.

  11. New tools for analyzing the Mexican economy: indexes of coincident and leading economic indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Keith R. Phillips; Lucinda Vargas; Victor Zarnowitz

    1996-01-01

    New composite indexes presented in this article could prove useful in analyzing and forecasting the Mexican economy. Keith Phillips, Lucinda Vargas, and Victor Zarnowitz present composite indexes of leading and coincident indexes for Mexico. In constructing the indexes, the economists use an approach similar to that developed by the National Bureau of Economic Research to create the composite indexes of U.S. economic activity. The authors classify peaks and troughs in the Mexican business cyc...

  12. Surgical guidance system using hand-held probe with accompanying positron coincidence detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.

    2017-10-10

    A surgical guidance system offering different levels of imaging capability while maintaining the same hand-held convenient small size of light-weight intra-operative probes. The surgical guidance system includes a second detector, typically an imager, located behind the area of surgical interest to form a coincidence guidance system with the hand-held probe. This approach is focused on the detection of positron emitting biomarkers with gamma rays accompanying positron emissions from the radiolabeled nuclei.

  13. 'TrueCoinc' software utility for calculation of the true coincidence correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudar, S.

    2002-01-01

    The true coincidence correction plays an important role in the overall accuracy of the γ ray spectrometry especially in the case of present-day high volume detectors. The calculation of true coincidence corrections needs detailed nuclear structure information. Recently these data are available in computerized form from the Nuclear Data Centers through the Internet or on a CD-ROM of the Table of Isotopes. The aim has been to develop software for this calculation, using available databases for the levels data. The user has to supply only the parameters of the detector to be used. The new computer program runs under the Windows 95/98 operating system. In the framework of the project a new formula was prepared for calculating the summing out correction and calculation of the intensity of alias lines (sum peaks). The file converter for reading the ENDSF-2 type files was completed. Reading and converting the original ENDSF was added to the program. A computer accessible database of the X rays energies and intensities was created. The X ray emissions were taken in account in the 'summing out' calculation. Calculation of the true coincidence 'summing in' correction was done. The output was arranged to show independently two types of corrections and to calculate the final correction as multiplication of the two. A minimal intensity threshold can be set to show the final list only for the strongest lines. The calculation takes into account all the transitions, independently of the threshold. The program calculates the intensity of X rays (K, L lines). The true coincidence corrections for X rays were calculated. The intensities of the alias γ lines were calculated. (author)

  14. Coincidences and Estimation of Entropies of Random Variables with Large Cardinalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Nemenman

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We perform an asymptotic analysis of the NSB estimator of entropy of a discrete random variable. The analysis illuminates the dependence of the estimates on the number of coincidences in the sample and shows that the estimator has a well defined limit for a large cardinality of the studied variable. This allows estimation of entropy with no a priori assumptions about the cardinality. Software implementation of the algorithm is available.

  15. Double Photon Emission Coincidence Imaging using GAGG-SiPM pixel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazoe, K.; Uenomachi, M.; Mizumachi, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Masao, Y.; Shoji, Y.; Kamada, K.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2017-12-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) is a useful medical imaging modality using single photon detection from radioactive tracers, such as 99Tc and 111In, however further development of increasing the contrast in the image is still under investigation. A novel method (Double Photon Emission CT / DPECT) using a coincidence detection of two cascade gamma-rays from 111In is proposed and characterized in this study. 111In, which is well-known and commonly used as a SPECT tracer, emits two cascade photons of 171 keV and 245 keV with a short delay of approximately 85 ns. The coincidence detection of two gamma-rays theoretically determines the position in a single point compared with a line in single photon detection and increases the signal to noise ratio drastically. A fabricated pixel detector for this purpose consists of 8 × 8 array of high-resolution type 1.5 mm thickness Ce:GAGG (3.9% @ 662 keV, 6.63g/cm3, C&A Co. Ce:Gd3Ga2.7Al2.3O12 2.5 × 2.5 × 1.5 mm3) crystals coupled a 3 mm pixel SiPM array (Hamamatsu MPPC S13361-2050NS-08). The signal from each pixel is processed and readout using time over threshold (TOT) based parallel processing circuit to extract the energy and timing information. The coincidence was detected by FPGA with the frequency of 400 MHz. Two pixel detectors coupled to parallel-hole collimators are located at the degree of 90 to determine the position and coincidence events (time window =1 μs) are detected and used for making back-projection image. The basic principle of DPECT is characterized including the detection efficiency and timing resolution.

  16. A coincidence point result in Menger spaces using a control function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Binayak S. [Department of Mathematics, Bengal Engineering and Science University, P.O. B. Garden, Shibpur, Howrah, West Bengal 711103 (India); Das, Krishnapada [Department of Mathematics, Bengal Engineering and Science University, P.O. B. Garden, Shibpur, Howrah, West Bengal 711103 (India)], E-mail: kestapm@yahoo.co.in

    2009-12-15

    In the present work we prove a coincidence point theorem in Menger spaces with a t-norm T which satisfies the condition sup{l_brace}T(t,t):t<1{r_brace}=1. As a corollary of our theorem we obtain some existing results in metric spaces and probabilistic metric spaces. Particularly our result implies a probabilistic generalization of Banach contraction mapping theorem. We also support our result by an example.

  17. Field tests and evaluations of the IAEA Active-Well Coincidence Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Rinard, P.M.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes and evaluates field tests of the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) at Winfrith and Dounreay, United Kingdom. The applicability of the AWCC for assaying the uranium content of a wide variety of materials was demonstrated and calibration curves were generated. The AWCC was used in three modes (fast, thermal, and passive) while assaying powders, pellets, cartridges, plates, assorted residues, and materials-testing-reactor fuel assemblies

  18. A Contractive Metric for Systems of Conservation Laws with Coinciding Shock and Rarefaction Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, A.

    We introduce two algorithms for the construction of weak, entropy-admissible solutions to a class of systems of conservation laws with coinciding shock and rarefaction curves. Global existence, uniqueness, and continuous dependence are proved for all solutions obtained by our constructive procedure. The generated semigroup is contractive with respect to a Riemann-type metric, defined in terms of Glimm's wave interaction functional, equivalent to the usual L1 distance.

  19. High-level neutron coincidence counter (HLNCC): users' manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krick, M.S.; Menlove, H.O.

    1979-06-01

    This manual describes the portable High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter (HLNCC) developed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) for the assay of plutonium, particularly by inspectors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The counter is designed for the measurement of the effective /sup 240/Pu mass in plutonium samples which may have a high plutonium content. The following topics are discussed: principle of operation, description of the system, operating procedures, and applications.

  20. Determination of U-chain concentration in NaI(Tl) scintillator by delayed coincidence method

    CERN Document Server

    Umehara, S; Koori, N; Kudomi, N; Kume, K; Kuramoto, H; Nakayama, S; Shimojo, T; Takahisa, K; Tsubakida, R; Tsujimoto, Y; Yoshida, S

    2002-01-01

    We have accurately determined U-chain concentration in a detector by means of the beta-alpha delayed coincidence method. This method can measure the radioactivity of the order of 10 sup - sup 7 Bq/kg. It corresponds to the concentration of the order of 0.01 ppt under the assumption that the U-chain is in the secular radioactive equilibrium, by a signal-to-noise ratio of one to one.

  1. Hippocampal sharp wave bursts coincide with neocortical “up-state” transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Battaglia, Francesco P.; Sutherland, Gary R.; McNaughton, Bruce L.

    2004-01-01

    The sleeping neocortex shows nested oscillatory activity in different frequency ranges, characterized by fluctuations between “up-states” and “down-states.” High-density neuronal ensemble recordings in rats now reveal the interaction between synchronized activity in the hippocampus and neocortex: Electroencephalographic sharp waves in the hippocampus were more probable during down-states than during up-states, and tended to coincide with transitions from down-states to up-states. The form of ...

  2. A Monte Carlo Model for Neutron Coincidence Counting with Fast Organic Liquid Scintillation Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamage, Kelum A.A.; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Cave, Frank D.

    2013-06-01

    Neutron coincidence counting is an established, nondestructive method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of nuclear materials. Several even-numbered nuclei of the actinide isotopes, and especially even-numbered plutonium isotopes, undergo spontaneous fission, resulting in the emission of neutrons which are correlated in time. The characteristics of this i.e. the multiplicity can be used to identify each isotope in question. Similarly, the corresponding characteristics of isotopes that are susceptible to stimulated fission are somewhat isotope-related, and also dependent on the energy of the incident neutron that stimulates the fission event, and this can hence be used to identify and quantify isotopes also. Most of the neutron coincidence counters currently used are based on 3 He gas tubes. In the 3 He-filled gas proportional-counter, the (n, p) reaction is largely responsible for the detection of slow neutrons and hence neutrons have to be slowed down to thermal energies. As a result, moderator and shielding materials are essential components of many systems designed to assess quantities of fissile materials. The use of a moderator, however, extends the die-away time of the detector necessitating a larger coincidence window and, further, 3 He is now in short supply and expensive. In this paper, a simulation based on the Monte Carlo method is described which has been performed using MCNPX 2.6.0, to model the geometry of a sector-shaped liquid scintillation detector in response to coincident neutron events. The detection of neutrons from a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pellet using an organic liquid scintillator has been simulated for different thicknesses of scintillators. In this new neutron detector, a layer of lead has been used to reduce the gamma-ray fluence reaching the scintillator. The effect of lead for neutron detection has also been estimated by considering different thicknesses of lead layers. (authors)

  3. 3D Silicon Coincidence Avalanche Detector (3D-SiCAD) for charged particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignetti, M. M.; Calmon, F.; Pittet, P.; Pares, G.; Cellier, R.; Quiquerez, L.; Chaves de Albuquerque, T.; Bechetoille, E.; Testa, E.; Lopez, J.-P.; Dauvergne, D.; Savoy-Navarro, A.

    2018-02-01

    Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) are p-n junctions operated in Geiger Mode by applying a reverse bias above the breakdown voltage. SPADs have the advantage of featuring single photon sensitivity with timing resolution in the picoseconds range. Nevertheless, their relatively high Dark Count Rate (DCR) is a major issue for charged particle detection, especially when it is much higher than the incoming particle rate. To tackle this issue, we have developed a 3D Silicon Coincidence Avalanche Detector (3D-SiCAD). This novel device implements two vertically aligned SPADs featuring on-chip electronics for the detection of coincident avalanche events occurring on both SPADs. Such a coincidence detection mode allows an efficient discrimination of events related to an incoming charged particle (producing a quasi-simultaneous activation of both SPADs) from dark counts occurring independently on each SPAD. A 3D-SiCAD detector prototype has been fabricated in CMOS technology adopting a 3D flip-chip integration technique, and the main results of its characterization are reported in this work. The particle detection efficiency and noise rejection capability for this novel device have been evaluated by means of a β- strontium-90 radioactive source. Moreover the impact of the main operating parameters (i.e. the hold-off time, the coincidence window duration, the SPAD excess bias voltage) over the particle detection efficiency has been studied. Measurements have been performed with different β- particles rates and show that a 3D-SiCAD device outperforms single SPAD detectors: the former is indeed capable to detect particle rates much lower than the individual DCR observed in a single SPAD-based detectors (i.e. 2 to 3 orders of magnitudes lower).

  4. Dissociative Ionization Mechanism and Appearance Energies in Adipic Acid Revealed by Imaging Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence, Selective Deuteration, and Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heringa, Maarten F; Slowik, Jay G; Prévôt, André S H; Baltensperger, Urs; Hemberger, Patrick; Bodi, Andras

    2016-05-26

    Adipic acid, a model compound for oxygenated organic aerosol, has been studied at the VUV beamline of the Swiss Light Source. Internal energy selected cations were prepared by threshold photoionization using vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy (iPEPICO). The threshold photoelectron spectrum yields a vertical ionization energy (IE) of 10.5 eV, significantly above the calculated adiabatic IE of 8.6 eV. The cationic minimum is accessible after vertical ionization by H-transfer from one of the γ-carbons to a carbonyl oxygen and is sufficiently energetic to decay by water loss at the ionization onset. The slope of the breakdown curves, quantum chemical calculations, and selective deuteration of the carboxylic hydrogens establish the dissociative photoionization mechanism. After ionization, one γ-methylene hydrogen and the two carboxylic hydrogens are randomized prior to H2O loss. On the basis of the deuteration degree in the H2O + CO-loss product at higher energies, a direct water-loss channel without complete randomization also exists. The breakdown diagram and center of gravity of the H2O + CO-loss peak were modeled to obtain 0 K appearance energies of 10.77, 10.32, and 11.53 eV for H2O + CO loss, CH2COOH loss, and H2O + CH2COOH loss from adipic acid. These agree well with the CBS-QB3 calculated values of 10.68, 10.45, and 11.57 eV, respectively, which shows that threshold photoionization can yield energetics data as long as the dissociation is statistical, even when the parent ion cannot be observed. The results can be used as a starting point for a deeper understanding of the ionization and low-energy fragmentation of organic aerosol components.

  5. The effect of acute caffeine ingestion on coincidence anticipation timing in younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Tallis, Jason; Wright, Sheila Leddington; Eyre, Emma L J; Bryant, Elizabeth; Langdon, Dominic

    2014-09-01

    This study compared the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on coincidence timing accuracy in younger and older adults. Thirteen young (aged 18-25 years, age: 20 ± 2 years, 7 females, 5 males) and 13 older (aged 61-77 years, age: 68 ± 6 years, 9 females, 3 males) adults, all who were habitual moderate caffeine consumers undertook measures of coincident anticipation timing performance pre- and post-acute caffeine (3 mg/kg) or placebo ingestion administered in a double blind, randomized fashion. Results indicated significant pre-to-post X substance (caffeine vs. placebo) interactions for absolute (P = 0.02, Pη(2) = 0.204) and variable error (P = 0.015, Pη(2) = 0.221). In both cases, error (absolute or variable) improved pre-to-post ingestion in the caffeine condition but not in the placebo condition. There were no significant differences due to age (younger vs. older adults, P > 0.05) in any of the analyses. The results of this study suggest that acute caffeine ingestion positively influence coincidence anticipation timing performance in both younger and older adults, who are moderate habitual caffeine consumers. Such effects might therefore be useful for older adults in enhancing ability to undertake cognitive-perceptual tasks which involve interceptive actions.

  6. Unattended mode monitoring of passive neutron coincidence detector systems using a commercial data logger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.G.R.; Outram, J.D.; Storey, M.

    1991-01-01

    A commercial Data Logger for unattended passive neutron coincidence data acquisition is described. This consists of an inexpensive commercial Data Logging equipment attached to a neutron coincidence electronics and a software package for data review. The Data Logger permits both the flexible configuration of a passive neutron coincidence measurement system for unattended mode monitoring and the storage of the measured Totals and Reals count rates. An additional feature of the Data Logger is a custom software package providing for the complete analysis of the stored data and yielding an assay of each item passing through the measurement cavity. The analysis includes an input for different isotopic compositions, the calculation of the multiplication corrected Reals rates, the inclusion of a calibration functions, and the determination of 240 Pu masses. The software package for data review displays the Totals and Reals count rates logged by the Data Logger as a function of time. In addition the custom software provides input files to the data review package to display the multiplication corrected Reals count rates and the measured 240 Pu masses as a function of time. Information on the Data Logger is presented along with the monitoring mode specifications. The analysis functions implemented are described as is the data review software. Results are presented for a specific application

  7. New approach to calculate the true-coincidence effect of HpGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alnour, I. A., E-mail: aaibrahim3@live.utm.my, E-mail: ibrahim.elnour@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, 12223 Khartoum (Sudan); Wagiran, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai,Johor (Malaysia); Ibrahim, N. [Faculty of Defence Science and Technology, National Defence University of Malaysia, Kem Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hamzah, S.; Elias, M. S. [Malaysia Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor D.E. (Malaysia); Siong, W. B. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Resource Science & Technology, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 94300 Kota Samarahan, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The corrections for true-coincidence effects in HpGe detector are important, especially at low source-to-detector distances. This work established an approach to calculate the true-coincidence effects experimentally for HpGe detectors of type Canberra GC3018 and Ortec GEM25-76-XLB-C, which are in operation at neutron activation analysis lab in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM). The correction for true-coincidence effects was performed close to detector at distances 2 and 5 cm using {sup 57}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 133}Ba and {sup 137}Cs as standard point sources. The correction factors were ranged between 0.93-1.10 at 2 cm and 0.97-1.00 at 5 cm for Canberra HpGe detector; whereas for Ortec HpGe detector ranged between 0.92-1.13 and 0.95-100 at 2 and 5 cm respectively. The change in efficiency calibration curve of the detector at 2 and 5 cm after correction was found to be less than 1%. Moreover, the polynomial parameters functions were simulated through a computer program, MATLAB in order to find an accurate fit to the experimental data points.

  8. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Kathryn M. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States); Hoffmann, George R. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)]. E-mail: ghoffmann@holycross.edu

    2007-03-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, {beta}-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv{sup +} revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state.

  9. A new double imaging velocity focusing coincidence experiment: i{sup 2}PEPICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodi, Andras; Hemberger, Patrick; Gerber, Thomas [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen 5232 (Switzerland); Sztaray, Balint [Department of Chemistry, University of the Pacific, Stockton, California 95211 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline of the Swiss Light Source has been upgraded after two years of operation. A new, turntable-type monochromator was constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institut, which allows for fast yaw-alignment as well as quick grating change and exchange. In addition to the original imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence endstation (iPEPICO), a second, complementary double imaging setup (i{sup 2}PEPICO) has been built. Volatile samples can be introduced at room temperature or in a molecular beam, a pyrolysis source allows for radical production, and non-volatile solids can be evaporated in a heated cell. Monochromatic VUV radiation ionizes the sample and both photoelectrons and photoions are velocity map imaged onto two fast position sensitive detectors and detected in delayed coincidence. High intensity synchrotron radiation leads to ionization rates above 10{sup 5} s{sup -1}. New data acquisition and processing approaches are discussed for recording coincidence processes at high rates. The setup is capable of resolving pulsed molecular beam profiles and the synchrotron time structure temporally. The latter is shown by photoelectron autocorrelation, which displays both the 1.04 MHz ring clock frequency as well as resolving the micro-pulses with a separation of 2 ns. Kinetic energy release analysis on the dissociative photoionization of CF{sub 4} indicates a dissociation mechanism change in the Franck-Condon allowed energy range of the first ion state.

  10. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, Kathryn M.; Hoffmann, George R.

    2007-01-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, β-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv + revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state

  11. Low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy using an X-ray-escape gated proportional counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregers Hansen, P.; Nielsen, H.L.; Williams, E.T.

    1965-01-01

    The utility of a gas-filled proportional counter in low-energy γ spectroscopy is greatly increased if it is operated in coincidence with an escaping fluorescent X-ray. An apparatus, having an efficiency greater than 10% of singles, is described and several examples are given. An efficiency curve...

  12. Coincidence Point, Best Approximation, and Best Proximity Theorems for Condensing Set-Valued Maps in Hyperconvex Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farajzadeh AP

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In hyperconvex metric spaces, we first present a coincidence point theorem for condensing set-valued self-maps. Then we consider the best approximation problem and the best proximity problem for set-valued mappings that are condensing. As an application, we derive a coincidence point theorem for nonself-condensing set-valued maps.

  13. Search for transient gravitational waves in coincidence with short-duration radio transients during 2007-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderon Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Purrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stiles, C.D.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Archibald, A. M.; Banaszak, S.; Berndsen, A.; Boyles, J.; Cardoso, R. F.; Chawla, P.; Cherry, A.; Dartez, L. P.; Day-Lewis, F.D.; Epstein, C. R.; Ford, A. J.; Flanigan, J.; Garcia, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hinojosa, J; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Keane, E. F.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Leake, S.; Lorimer, D.; Lunsford, G.; Lynch, R. S.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McPhee, C. A.; Penucci, T.; Ransom, S.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Rohr, M. D. W.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; van Leeuwen, J.; Walker, A. N.; Wells, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single-pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO, Virgo, and GEO interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes fast

  14. Construction of a γ-γ and β-γ coincidence measurement system for precise determination of nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo; Katoh, Toshio

    1999-01-01

    A γ-γ and β-γ coincidence measurement system was constructed for the precise determination of nuclear data, such as thermal neutron capture cross sections and γ-ray emission probabilities. The validity of the system was tested by a γ-γ coincidence measurement with a 60 Co standard source. (author)

  15. Imaging photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules by femtosecond multiphoton coincidence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H. M., E-mail: m.h.m.janssen@vu.nl [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Powis, Ivan [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-21

    Here, we provide a detailed account of novel experiments employing electron-ion coincidence imaging to discriminate chiral molecules. The full three-dimensional angular scattering distribution of electrons is measured after photoexcitation with either left or right circular polarized light. The experiment is performed using a simplified photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging setup employing only a single particle imaging detector. Results are reported applying this technique to enantiomers of the chiral molecule camphor after three-photon ionization by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 380 nm. The electron-ion coincidence imaging provides the photoelectron spectrum of mass-selected ions that are observed in the time-of-flight mass spectra. The coincident photoelectron spectra of the parent camphor ion and the various fragment ions are the same, so it can be concluded that fragmentation of camphor happens after ionization. We discuss the forward-backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution which is expressed in Legendre polynomials with moments up to order six. Furthermore, we present a method, similar to one-photon electron circular dichroism, to quantify the strength of the chiral electron asymmetry in a single parameter. The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution of camphor is measured to be 8% at 400 nm. The electron circular dichroism using femtosecond multiphoton excitation is of opposite sign and about 60% larger than the electron dichroism observed before in near-threshold one-photon ionization with synchrotron excitation. We interpret our multiphoton ionization as being resonant at the two-photon level with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of camphor. Theoretical calculations are presented that model the photoelectron angular distribution from a prealigned camphor molecule using density functional theory and continuum multiple scattering X alpha photoelectron scattering calculations

  16. Effect of inter-crystal scatter on estimation methods for random coincidences and subsequent correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Espallardo, I; Spanoudaki, V; Ziegler, S I; Rafecas, M; McElroy, D P

    2008-01-01

    Random coincidences can contribute substantially to the background in positron emission tomography (PET). Several estimation methods are being used for correcting them. The goal of this study was to investigate the validity of techniques for random coincidence estimation, with various low-energy thresholds (LETs). Simulated singles list-mode data of the MADPET-II small animal PET scanner were used as input. The simulations have been performed using the GATE simulation toolkit. Several sources with different geometries have been employed. We evaluated the number of random events using three methods: delayed window (DW), singles rate (SR) and time histogram fitting (TH). Since the GATE simulations allow random and true coincidences to be distinguished, a comparison between the number of random coincidences estimated using the standard methods and the number obtained using GATE was performed. An overestimation in the number of random events was observed using the DW and SR methods. This overestimation decreases for LETs higher than 255 keV. It is additionally reduced when the single events which have undergone a Compton interaction in crystals before being detected are removed from the data. These two observations lead us to infer that the overestimation is due to inter-crystal scatter. The effect of this mismatch in the reconstructed images is important for quantification because it leads to an underestimation of activity. This was shown using a hot-cold-background source with 3.7 MBq total activity in the background region and a 1.59 MBq total activity in the hot region. For both 200 keV and 400 keV LET, an overestimation of random coincidences for the DW and SR methods was observed, resulting in approximately 1.5% or more (at 200 keV LET: 1.7% for DW and 7% for SR) and less than 1% (at 400 keV LET: both methods) underestimation of activity within the background region. In almost all cases, images obtained by compensating for random events in the reconstruction

  17. Sub-Doppler spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansch, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy, tunable cw sources, and Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy. Discusses saturation spectroscopy; continuous wave saturation spectroscopy in the ultraviolet; and two-photon spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen 1S-2S. Focuses on Doppler-free laser spectroscopy of gaseous samples. Explains that in saturation spectroscopy, a monochromatic laser beam ''labels'' a group of atoms within a narrow range of axial velocities through excitation or optical pumping, and a Doppler-free spectrum of these selected atoms is observed with a second, counterpropagating beam. Notes that in two-photon spectroscopy it is possible to record Doppler-free spectra without any need for velocity selection by excitation with two counterpropagating laser beams whose first order Doppler shifts cancel

  18. Progress in K spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, D.W.G.S.

    1977-07-01

    The progress in the field of K* spectroscopy is reviewed within the framework of the simple harmonic oscillator quark model, and contrasted with the recent progress made in the charmonium spectroscopy

  19. Basic molecular spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Gorry, PA

    1985-01-01

    BASIC Molecular Spectroscopy discusses the utilization of the Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code (BASIC) programming language in molecular spectroscopy. The book is comprised of five chapters that provide an introduction to molecular spectroscopy through programs written in BASIC. The coverage of the text includes rotational spectra, vibrational spectra, and Raman and electronic spectra. The book will be of great use to students who are currently taking a course in molecular spectroscopy.

  20. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  1. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented. (GHT)

  2. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Topics covered by the conference include: fast beam spectroscopy; astrophysical and other spectra; highly ionized spectroscopy; complex spectra; rydberg levels; fine structure, hyperfine structure and isotope shift; lineshapes; lifetimes, oscillator strengths and Einstein coefficients; and spectroscopy with lasers. Abstracts of the conference papers are presented

  3. Clinical value of 18F-FDG coincidence imaging for diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning Yanli; Lou Cen; Huang Zhongke; Shi Guohua; Chen Dongfang; Mu Da

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging for diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: A total of 45 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (33 males and 12 females, average age (55.56 ± 13.50) years), who underwent 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging before treatment, were studied retrospectively. The images of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging (GE Millennium VG SPECT) and MRI were analyzed. The radioactivity ratio of the accumulated regions to cerebellum (T/NT)was calculated by ROI technique. The volume of nasopharyngeal carcinoma was recorded by MRI. The positive rates of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging and EB virus-related antibody measurements were compared by paired χ 2 test. The correlation between T/NT ratios and tumor volumes were tested by Pearson correlation, and then ROC curves were established. The T/NT ratios and tumor volumes of different groups (different first symptoms, clinical stages, T stages, pathological classification and outcomes, with or without lymph node enlargement) were compared by t-test and rank sum test. Results: The positive rate of 18 F-FDG coincidence imaging was 97.78% (44/45), and the positive rate of EB virus-related antibody measurement was 95.56% (43/45, χ 2 =1.33, P>0.05). The T/NT ratio (2.439 ±1.119) and tumor volume ((7.311 ± 8.280) cm 3 ) of primary lesions had a positive correlation (r=0.463, P<0.05). The cut-off values of T/NT ratio and the tumor volume were 2.396 and 7.348 cm 3 , respectively, by ROC curves. T/NT ratios in groups with or without first symptom of epistaxis (2.847 ± 1.254 vs 2.082 ± 0.863, t=-2.409) and groups with or without facial numbness (2.855 ± 1.261 vs 2.134 ± 0.913, t=-2.225) were both significantly different (both P<0.05). T/NT ratios of differentiated and undifferentiated cancer were 2.266 ± 0.997 and 2.971 ± 1.351, respectively (t=-2.018, P<0.05). There was a significant difference of tumor volumes between groups with or without facial numbness (t=-2.684, P<0

  4. Disintegration rate of Tc -99m and In -111 radioactive solutions in coincidence systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, Andreia Barreto de

    2011-01-01

    The 111 In and 99 mTc standardization in a 4πβ-γ coincidence system is described. The 111 In was produced by the reaction of 111 Cd (p, n) 111 In in the cyclotron. The 111 In decays with a half life of 2.8 days by electron capture process, populating the excited levels of 111 Cd, emitting two main gamma rays with energies of 171 keV and 245 keV. The 99m Tc decay with a half life of 6.007 h for isomeric transition, from the radioactive decay of 99 Mo. 111 In standardization was carried out in a 4πβ-γ system, consisted of a gas flow proportional counter with 4π geometry coupled to a pair of NaI(Tl) scintillation counter with conventional electronics. The gamma window was set comprising the (171 keV + 245 keV) total absorption energy peaks. The choice of the window was based on the analysis of the extrapolation curves prediction, obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. The 99 mTc standardization has been accomplished by the 4πβ-γ coincidence method using a thin window proportional counter in a 4π geometry coupled to a single NaI(Tl) scintillation counter. The beta efficiency was varied by electronic discrimination using a software coincidence counting system (SCS). Two windows were selected for the gamma channel: one at 140 keV gamma ray and the other at 20 keV X ray total absorption peaks. The result of the experimental activity of 111 In two solutions agree with the results obtained by Monte Carlo simulation. The experimental activities of 99m Tc for the two gamma windows are in agreement within the experimental uncertainty, indicating that the adopted methodology is adequate. (author)

  5. A simultaneous beta and coincidence-gamma imaging system for plant leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Homayoon; Wen, Jie; Mathews, Aswin J.; Komarov, Sergey; Wang, Qiang; Li, Ke; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-05-01

    Positron emitting isotopes, such as 11C, 13N, and 18F, can be used to label molecules. The tracers, such as 11CO2, are delivered to plants to study their biological processes, particularly metabolism and photosynthesis, which may contribute to the development of plants that have a higher yield of crops and biomass. Measurements and resulting images from PET scanners are not quantitative in young plant structures or in plant leaves due to poor positron annihilation in thin objects. To address this problem we have designed, assembled, modeled, and tested a nuclear imaging system (simultaneous beta-gamma imager). The imager can simultaneously detect positrons ({β+} ) and coincidence-gamma rays (γ). The imaging system employs two planar detectors; one is a regular gamma detector which has a LYSO crystal array, and the other is a phoswich detector which has an additional BC-404 plastic scintillator for beta detection. A forward model for positrons is proposed along with a joint image reconstruction formulation to utilize the beta and coincidence-gamma measurements for estimating radioactivity distribution in plant leaves. The joint reconstruction algorithm first reconstructs beta and gamma images independently to estimate the thickness component of the beta forward model and afterward jointly estimates the radioactivity distribution in the object. We have validated the physics model and reconstruction framework through a phantom imaging study and imaging a tomato leaf that has absorbed 11CO2. The results demonstrate that the simultaneously acquired beta and coincidence-gamma data, combined with our proposed joint reconstruction algorithm, improved the quantitative accuracy of estimating radioactivity distribution in thin objects such as leaves. We used the structural similarity (SSIM) index for comparing the leaf images from the simultaneous beta-gamma imager with the ground truth image. The jointly reconstructed images yield SSIM indices of 0.69 and 0.63, whereas the

  6. Coinciding exercise with peak serum caffeine does not improve cycling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Tina L; Jenkins, David G; Taaffe, Dennis R; Leveritt, Michael D; Coombes, Jeff S

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether coinciding peak serum caffeine concentration with the onset of exercise enhances subsequent endurance performance. Randomised, double-blind, crossover. In this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study, 14 male trained cyclists and triathletes (age 31±5year, body mass 75.4±5.7 kg, VO₂max 69.5±6.1 mL kg⁻¹ min⁻¹ and peak power output 417±35W, mean±SD) consumed 6 mg kg(-1) caffeine or a placebo either 1h (C(1h)) prior to completing a 40 km time trial or when the start of exercise coincided with individual peak serum caffeine concentrations (C(peak)). C(peak) was determined from a separate 'caffeine profiling' session that involved monitoring caffeine concentrations in the blood every 30 min over a 4h period. Following caffeine ingestion, peak serum caffeine occurred 120 min in 12 participants and 150 min in 2 participants. Time to complete the 40 km time trial was significantly faster (2.0%; p=0.002) in C(1h) compared to placebo. No statistically significant improvement in performance was noted in the C(peak) trial versus placebo (1.1%; p=0.240). Whilst no differences in metabolic markers were found between C(peak) and placebo conditions, plasma concentrations of glucose (p=0.005), norepinephrine and epinephrine (p≤0.002) were higher in the C(1h) trial 6 min post-exercise versus placebo. In contrast to coinciding peak serum caffeine concentration with exercise onset, caffeine consumed 60 min prior to exercise resulted in significant improvements in 40 km time trial performance. The ergogenic effect of caffeine was not found to be related to peak caffeine concentration in the blood at the onset of endurance exercise. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Estimating accidental coincidences for pixelated PET detectors and singles list-mode acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafecas, M.; Torres, I.; Spanoudaki, V.; McElroy, D.P.; Ziegler, S.I.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the validity of random estimation techniques for various low energy thresholds (LETs) and single list-mode data sets in small animal PET. While a LET below 255 keV helps to increase the sensitivity, it also results in an increase of random coincidences and inter-crystal scatter (ICS). The study is carried out for MADPET-II, a dual-layer positron emission tomography (PET) scanner prototype consisting of LSO crystals read out individually by APDs. The data are acquired in singles list-mode format, and coincidences are computed post-acquisition. To estimate randoms, we have used the delayed coincidence window method (DW), and the singles rate model (SR). Various phantoms were simulated using GATE. For LETs under 255 keV, the number of random events R, estimated using the SR and the DW methods, is larger than the number of randoms which was directly computed from GATE simulations, and R(SR)>R(DW)>R(GATE). The higher the LET, the smaller the overestimation. For LETs >255 keV, R(DW)/R(GATE) ∼1. If scattered singles were excluded from the file, this discrepancy between R(DW or SR) and R(GATE) significantly diminished. This fact points out to ICS as the effect responsible for the mismatch, since for LETs lower than 255 keV, all singles related to an ICS event can be detected independently, thus altering the singles rate. Therefore, if low LETs are used, random estimation techniques should account for ICS

  8. Coherent Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eesley, G L

    1981-01-01

    Coherent Raman Spectroscopy provides a unified and general account of the fundamental aspects of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy, also known as coherent Raman spectroscopy. The theoretical basis from which coherent Raman spectroscopy developed is described, along with its applications, utility, and implementation as well as advantages and disadvantages. Experimental data which typifies each technique is presented. This book is comprised of four chapters and opens with an overview of nonlinear optics and coherent Raman spectroscopy, followed by a discussion on nonlinear transfer function of matter

  9. Performance demonstration of 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, D B; Anuradha, R; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M S; Tomar, B S

    2016-02-01

    A standardization of (134)Cs and (131)I was carried out in order to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for standardization of radionuclides with complex decay scheme. The coincidence analyzer, capable of analyzing coincidence between beta and two gamma windows simultaneously, was developed and used for the standardization. The use of this dual coincidence analyzer has reduced the total experimental time by half. The activity concentrations obtained using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, a 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system, and the CIEMAT/NIST method are in excellent agreement with each other within uncertainty limits and hence demonstrates its performance for standardization of radionuclides decaying with complex decay scheme. Hence use of this 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system can be an alternative method suitable to standardize radionuclides with complex decay scheme with acceptable precision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Calibration and performance testing of the IAEA Aquila Active Well Coincidence Counter (Unit 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O..; Siebelist, R.; Wenz, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    An Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and a portable shift register (PSR-B) produced by Aquila Technologies Group, Inc., have been tested and cross-calibrated with existing AWCCs used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report summarizes the results of these tests and the cross-calibration of the detector. In addition, updated tables summarizing the cross-calibration of existing AWCCs and AmLi sources are also included. Using the Aquila PSR-B with existing IAEA software requires secondary software also supplied by Aquila to set up the PSR-B with the appropriate measurement parameters

  11. Constructing coincident indices of economic activity for the Latin American economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Victor Issler

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has three main contributions. The first is to propose an individual coincident indicator for the following Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Mexico. In order to obtain similar series to those traditionally used in business-cycle research in constructing coincident indices (output, sales, income and employment we were forced to back-cast several individual country series which were not available in a long time-series span. The second contribution is to establish a chronology of recessions for these countries, covering the period from 1980 to 2012 on a monthly basis. Based on this chronology, the countries are compared in several respects. The final contribution is to propose an aggregate coincident indicator for the Latin American economy, which weights individual-country composite indices. Finally, this indicator is compared with the coincident indicator (The Conference Board - TCB of the U.S. economy. We find that the U.S. indicator Granger-causes the Latin American indicator in statistical testsEsse artigo tem 3 contribuições à literatura de ciclos de negócios. A primeira é a de construir indicadores coincidentes de atividade econômica para Argentina, Brasil, Chile, Colômbia e México, usando pesos idênticos para as séries de Emprego, Produção, Renda, e Vendas. Para tal, tivemos que fazer o back-cast de algumas séries chave para poder construir esses indicadores. A segunda é a de estabelecer uma cronologia de recessões para esses países no período 1980-2012 em bases mensais. Com base na última, fazemos comparações em várias dimensões. Finalmente, nossa última contribuição é propor um índice coincidente agregado para a América Latina, que é comparado ao índice agregado dos EUA. Esta comparação indica que o índice coincidente dos EUA Granger-causa o da América Latina, mas a recíproca não é verdadeira

  12. Efficiency-optimized low-cost TDPAC spectrometer using a versatile routing/coincidence unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renteria, M.; Bibiloni, A. G.; Darriba, G. N.; Errico, L. A.; Munoz, E. L.; Richard, D.; Runco, J.

    2008-01-01

    A highly efficient, reliable, and low-cost γ-γ TDPAC spectrometer, PACAr, optimized for 181 Hf-implanted low-activity samples, is presented. A versatile EPROM-based routing/coincidence unit was developed and implemented to be use with the memory-card-based multichannel analyzer hosted in a personal computer. The excellent energy resolution and very good overall resolution and efficiency of PACAr are analyzed and compare with advanced and already tested fast-fast and slow-fast PAC spectrometers.

  13. Efficiency-optimized low-cost TDPAC spectrometer using a versatile routing/coincidence unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renteria, M., E-mail: renteria@fisica.unlp.edu.ar; Bibiloni, A. G.; Darriba, G. N.; Errico, L. A.; Munoz, E. L.; Richard, D.; Runco, J. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas (Argentina)

    2008-01-15

    A highly efficient, reliable, and low-cost {gamma}-{gamma} TDPAC spectrometer, PACAr, optimized for {sup 181}Hf-implanted low-activity samples, is presented. A versatile EPROM-based routing/coincidence unit was developed and implemented to be use with the memory-card-based multichannel analyzer hosted in a personal computer. The excellent energy resolution and very good overall resolution and efficiency of PACAr are analyzed and compare with advanced and already tested fast-fast and slow-fast PAC spectrometers.

  14. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and immunodeficiency with coincident NEMO and EDA Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Keller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ectodermal dysplasias (ED are uncommon genetic disorders resulting in abnormalities in ectodermally-derived structures. Though many ED-associated genes have been described, the NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO encoded by the IKBKG gene is unique in that mutations also result in severe humoral and cellular immunologic defects. We describe three unrelated kindreds with defects in both EDA and IKBKG resulting from an X-chromosome crossover. This demonstrates the importance of thorough immunologic consideration of patients with ED even when an EDA etiology is confirmed, and raises the possibility of a specific phenotype arising from coincident mutations in EDA and IKBKB.

  15. Extraction of plate bending stiffness from coincidence angles of sound transmission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian E; Shaw, Matthew D; Harker, Blaine M

    2015-01-01

    The bending stiffness in a homogeneous, isotropic, thin plate is experimentally derived from measurements of coincidence angles extracted from supercritical sound transmission versus frequency measurements. A computer controlled turn table rotates a plate sample and a receiver array, placed in the near field of the plate. The array is used to track the transmitted sound through the plate, generated by a far-field stationary source, using beam forming. The array technique enables measurement of plates measuring only one wavelength in width. Two examples are used for proof of concept, including an aluminum plate in air and an alumina plate under water.

  16. Uranium cross-calibration measurements using an active well coincidence counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, V.; Prochine, I.; Smirnov, V.; Ensslin, N.; Carillo, L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on the cross-calibration of an Active Well Coincidence Counter for use in the Materials Protection, Control, and Accountability Graduate Program at the Moscow State Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). The cross-calibration procedure and its application to nuclear material types available at MEPhI for instructional purposes is described. Cross-calibration results at Los Alamos and initial applications at MEPhI are summarized. Based on the results so far, the authors conclude that the cross-calibration approach seems useful, with good prospects for potential applications at other Russian and US Dept. of Energy facilities

  17. Phantom dark energy with varying-mass dark matter particles: Acceleration and cosmic coincidence problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Genly; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate several varying-mass dark matter particle models in the framework of phantom cosmology. We examine whether there exist late-time cosmological solutions, corresponding to an accelerating universe and possessing dark energy and dark matter densities of the same order. Imposing exponential or power-law potentials and exponential or power-law mass dependence, we conclude that the coincidence problem cannot be solved or even alleviated. Thus, if dark energy is attributed to the phantom paradigm, varying-mass dark matter models cannot fulfill the basic requirement that led to their construction.

  18. beta sup + -gamma coincidence positron lifetime spectrometer with positron energy selection by electromagnetic lens

    CERN Document Server

    Chalermkarnnon, P; Araki, H; Shirai, Y; Shishido, I

    2002-01-01

    A beta sup + -gamma coincidence positron lifetime spectrometer equipped with two electromagnetic lenses was constructed. The electromagnetic lens was used to have energy-selected positron beam. It accomplished a time resolution of 385 ps (FWHM) for the total system with a Pilot U plastic scintillator. By using a silicon avalanche diode instead of Pilot U plastic scintillator to initiate start timing signals, the time resolution was improved to 345 ps (FWHM). With this method, in-situ positron lifetime measurements at high temperatures or under high stresses can be attained easily. (author)

  19. Absolute measurements of the alpha-gamma emitters activities by a sum-coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, C.C.B.

    1982-01-01

    The absolute activity of U-235 contained in a UO 2 sample, using a sum-coincidence circuit which selected only the alpha particles which were simultaneous with the well known 184 Kev gamma radiation from Th-231. The alpha particles were detected by ZnS(Ag) scintillator specially designed to show its maximun efficiency for U-235 alpha particles, whereas the gamma radiation was detected by NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The values obtained for the half-life of U-235 was compared with data from various observers using different experimental techniques. (Author) [pt

  20. Cogroups in the category of connected graded algebras whose inverse and antipode coincide

    OpenAIRE

    Kihara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Let A be a cogroup in the category of connected graded algebras over a commutative ring R. Let nu denote the inverse of A and chi the antipode of the underlying Hopf algebra of A. We clarify the differences and similarities of nu and chi, and show that nu coincides with chi if and only if A is commutative as a graded algebra. Let A^co_CG be the category of cogroups satisfying these equivalent conditions. If R is a field, the category A^co_CG is completely determined. We also establish an equi...

  1. Method for improving the gamma-transition cascade spectra amplitude resolution during coincidence code computerized processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhovoj, A.M.; Khitrov, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    A method of unfolding the differential γ-cascade spectra during radiation capture of slow neutrons based on the computeri-- zed processing of the results of measurements performed, by means of a spectrometer with two Ge(Li) detectors is suggested. The efficiency of the method is illustrated using as an example the spectrum of 35 Cl(n, γ) reaction corresponding to the 8580 keV peak. It is shown that the above approach permits to improve the resolution by 1.2-2.6 times without decrease in registration efficiency within the framework of the method of coincidence pulse amplitude summation

  2. 65Zn and 133Ba standardizing by photon-photon coincidence counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Jamir S.; da Cruz, Paulo A. L.; Iwahara, Akira; Delgado, José U.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2018-03-01

    The LNMRI/Brazil has deployed a system using X-gamma coincidence technique for the standardizing radionuclide, which present simple and complex decay scheme with X-rays of energy below 100 keV. The work was carried on radionuclide metrology laboratory using a sodium iodide detector, for gamma photons, in combination with a high purity germanium detector for X-rays. Samples of 65Zn and 133Ba were standardized and the results for both radionuclides showed good precision and accuracy when compared with reference values. The standardization differences were 0.72 % for 65Zn and 0.48 % for 133Ba samples.

  3. Study of the continuum in heavy ion inelastic spectra by light particle coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpaci, J.A.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Chomaz, P.; Frascaria, N.; Garron, J.P.; Roynette, J.C.; Suomijarvi, T.; Van der Woude, A.; Alamanos, N.; Fernandez, B.; Gillibert, A.; Van der Woude, A.; Lepine, A.

    1990-01-01

    The continuum in heavy ion inelastic spectra contains, in addition to the excitation of target nucleus states, contributions from pick-up break-up and knock out reactions. In the case of the 40 Ca + 40 Ca collision at 50 MeV/N these contributions are separated and their relative importance assessed by the measurement of light charged particles in coincidence with the inelastically scattered fragments. The pick-up break-up contribution is found to make up less than half of the cross section at high excitation energies, conversely, the knock out process is important

  4. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  5. Coincidences in analysis: Sigmund Freud and the strange case of Dr Forsyth and Herr von Vorsicht.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierri, Maria

    2010-08-01

    Freud's interest in thought transference opens the possibility for psychoanalytic research on the primary preverbal language and the maternal function, which the emphasis on verbal and paternal communication had hidden in the background of the setting. The author advances a new interpretation of coincidences in analysis and of the psychopathology of everyday life of the setting. Starting from a strange coincidence, new hypotheses are submitted following additional readings of the unpublished manuscript of the 'Forsyth case', recovered by the author, in regard to a significant moment of transformation, both in Freud and in psychoanalysis, at the end of the war. This phase corresponds first to a change of language, from German to English, as well as to the foundation of the International Journal of Psychoanalysis by Ernest Jones. In particular, the roots of the metapsychological turn of the 1920s are explored, together with the opening of private and productive thoughts in the area of 'telepathy' that joined Freud, Ferenczi, and Anna Freud in a true 'dialogue of unconsciouses'. The free association between A Child Is Being Beaten, Beyond the Pleasure Principle, and the clinical experience with 'Herr B.' is outlined in order to understand Freud's heroic self-analysis at the time when he was treating his daughter Anna and grieving the death of his beloved Sophie. Copyright © 2010 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  6. Hypernuclear weak decay experiments at KEK: n-n and n-p coincidence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outa, H.; Ajimura, S.; Aoki, K.; Banu, A.; Bhang, H.C.; Fukuda, T.; Hashimoto, O.; Hwang, J.I.; Kameoka, S.; Kang, B.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, M.J.; Maruta, T.; Miura, Y.; Miyake, Y.; Nagae, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakamura, S.N.; Noumi, H.; Okada, S.; Okayasu, Y.; Park, H.; Saha, P.K.; Sato, Y.; Sekimoto, M.; Takahashi, T.; Tamura, H.; Tanida, K.; Toyoda, A.; Tsukada, K.; Watanabe, T.; Yim, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We performed a coincidence measurement of two nucleons emitted from the nonmesonic weak decay (NMWD) of 5 Λ He and 12 Λ C formed via the (π+,K+) reaction. In both of n+p and n+n pair coincidence spectra, we observed a clean back-to-back correlation coming from the two-body decay of Λp->np and Λn->nn, respectively. We obtained the ratio of the nucleon pair numbers, Nnn/Nnp ( 5 Λ He)=0.45-bar +/--bar 0.11-bar (stat)-bar +/--bar 0.03-bar (syst) in the kinematic region of cosθNN-0.8. Since each decay mode was exclusively detected, the measured ratio should be close to the ratio of Γ(Λp->nn)/Γ(Λn->np). The Γn/Γp ratio was measured also for the NMWD of 12 Λ C. It is also close to 0.5. Those ratios are consistent with recent theoretical calculations based on the heavy meson/direct quark exchange picture

  7. Correlation-Based Amplitude Estimation of Coincident Partials in Monaural Musical Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme Garcia Arnal Barbedo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for estimating the amplitude of coincident partials generated by harmonic musical sources (instruments and vocals. It was developed as an alternative to the commonly used interpolation approach, which has several limitations in terms of performance and applicability. The strategy is based on the following observations: (a the parameters of partials vary with time; (b such a variation tends to be correlated when the partials belong to the same source; (c the presence of an interfering coincident partial reduces the correlation; and (d such a reduction is proportional to the relative amplitude of the interfering partial. Besides the improved accuracy, the proposed technique has other advantages over its predecessors: it works properly even if the sources have the same fundamental frequency, it is able to estimate the first partial (fundamental, which is not possible using the conventional interpolation method, it can estimate the amplitude of a given partial even if its neighbors suffer intense interference from other sources, it works properly under noisy conditions, and it is immune to intraframe permutation errors. Experimental results show that the strategy clearly outperforms the interpolation approach.

  8. Development of Simultaneous Beta-and-Coincidence-Gamma Imager for Plant Imaging Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Yuan-Chuan [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). School of Medicine

    2016-09-30

    The goal of this project is to develop a novel imaging system that can simultaneously acquire beta and coincidence gamma images of positron sources in thin objects such as leaves of plants. This hybrid imager can be used to measure carbon assimilation in plants quantitatively and in real-time after C-11 labeled carbon-dioxide is administered. A better understanding of carbon assimilation, particularly under the increasingly elevated atmospheric CO2 level, is extremely critical for plant scientists who study food crop and biofuel production. Phase 1 of this project is focused on the technology development with 3 specific aims: (1) develop a hybrid detector that can detect beta and gamma rays simultaneously; (2) develop an imaging system that can differentiate these two types of radiation and acquire beta and coincidence gamma images in real-time; (3) develop techniques to quantify radiotracer distribution using beta and gamma images. Phase 2 of this project is to apply technologies developed in phase 1 to study plants using positron-emitting radionuclide such as 11C to study carbon assimilation in biofuel plants.

  9. PET with a coincidence gamma camera: results in selected oncological questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauer, I.; Haase, A; Adam, S.; Prueter, I.; Richter, E.; Baehre, M.

    2001-01-01

    Since early 1997, about 1660 investigations with coincidence gamma camera PET (CGC-PET) have been performed in our department, mostly undertaken for oncological questions. Based on these data, several retrospective and prospective studies were performed. In the following, the results in CUP (cancer of unknown primary) syndrome, melanoma and malignant lymphoma are presented. Methods: CGC-PET was performed after application of 250-350 MBq [ 18 F]FDG using a coincidence double head gamma camera with 19 mm Nal cristal. CUP-Syndrome: After completing conventional diagnostic procedures, 32 patients have been examined in a prospective study, including 25 patients with recently detected CUP and 7 patients undergoing restaging after therapy. Localization of the primary tumor was successful in 12 (38%) cases. Melanoma: We evaluated 50 studies in 41 patients suffering from melanoma, retrospectively. CGC-PET showed a sensitivity of 76%, and a specificity of 94%. In comparison to conventional diagnostic methods, CGC-PET delineated important additional information in 16%. CGC-PET was superior to morphological diagnostic tools in the differentiation between residual scar tissue and active tumor following immunochemotherapy. Malignant lymphoma: 29 CGC-PET in 29 patients were performed for staging of malignant lymphoma, sensitivity was 86% versus 88% for CT. Overall CGC-PET showed additional information to conventional diagnostic methods, but revealed problems in detecting small infiltrations of organs. In restaging malignant melanoma (26 patients, 33 studies), specificity of CGC-PET was superior to conventional diagnostics (92% versus 35%). (orig.) [de

  10. Total variation-based method for radar coincidence imaging with model mismatch for extended target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Kaicheng; Zhou, Xiaoli; Cheng, Yongqiang; Fan, Bo; Qin, Yuliang

    2017-11-01

    Originating from traditional optical coincidence imaging, radar coincidence imaging (RCI) is a staring/forward-looking imaging technique. In RCI, the reference matrix must be computed precisely to reconstruct the image as preferred; unfortunately, such precision is almost impossible due to the existence of model mismatch in practical applications. Although some conventional sparse recovery algorithms are proposed to solve the model-mismatch problem, they are inapplicable to nonsparse targets. We therefore sought to derive the signal model of RCI with model mismatch by replacing the sparsity constraint item with total variation (TV) regularization in the sparse total least squares optimization problem; in this manner, we obtain the objective function of RCI with model mismatch for an extended target. A more robust and efficient algorithm called TV-TLS is proposed, in which the objective function is divided into two parts and the perturbation matrix and scattering coefficients are updated alternately. Moreover, due to the ability of TV regularization to recover sparse signal or image with sparse gradient, TV-TLS method is also applicable to sparse recovering. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that, for uniform extended targets, sparse targets, and real extended targets, the algorithm can achieve preferred imaging performance both in suppressing noise and in adapting to model mismatch.

  11. Cosmology of a FLRW 3-brane, late-time cosmic acceleration, and the cosmic coincidence

    CERN Document Server

    Doolin, Ciaran

    2013-01-01

    A late epoch cosmic acceleration may be naturally entangled with cosmic coincidence - the observation that at the onset of acceleration the vacuum energy density fraction nearly coincides with the matter density fraction. In this letter we show that this is indeed the case with the cosmology of a Friedmann-Lama\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) 3-brane in a 5-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. We derive the 4-dimensional effective action on a FLRW 3-brane, which helps define a general reduction formula, namely $M_P^{2}=\\rho_{b}/|\\Lambda_5|$, where $M_{P}$ is the effective Planck mass, $\\Lambda_5$ is the 5-dimensional cosmological constant and $\\rho_b$ is the sum of the 3-brane tension $V$ and the matter density $\\rho$. The behavior of the background solution is consistent with the results based on the form of the 4D effective potential. Although the range of variation in $\\rho_{b}$ is strongly constrained, the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis bound on the time variation of the renormalised Newton constant $G_N = (8\\pi...

  12. Determination of the absolute activity by the coincidences 4πβ-γ method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urcelay Silva, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The 4π beta-gamma coincidence method for absolute determination of activities is extremely important in the production of high-precision radioactive sources. By means of this method it is possible to obtain absolute measurements of decay to within 0.1%. Thanks to the high efficiency of the 4π counter, most of the corrections required - background, random coincidences, dead time, decay scheme and detector efficiency - are small. The paper describes the experimental set-up showing the pulses in the two branches of the system, together with the conditions under which the 4πbeta flux detector functions. To determine whether the system was functioning satisfactorily, the activity of four cobalt-60 standards (supplied by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures based at Sevres in France) was determined and the differences obtained were less than 0.5% with respect to the certificates accompanying the sources. Alterations to the flux detector are suggested so that higher accuracy may be obtained. (author)

  13. Topologically associating domains are ancient features that coincide with Metazoan clusters of extreme noncoding conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmston, Nathan; Ing-Simmons, Elizabeth; Tan, Ge; Perry, Malcolm; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Lenhard, Boris

    2017-09-05

    Developmental genes in metazoan genomes are surrounded by dense clusters of conserved noncoding elements (CNEs). CNEs exhibit unexplained extreme levels of sequence conservation, with many acting as developmental long-range enhancers. Clusters of CNEs define the span of regulatory inputs for many important developmental regulators and have been described previously as genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs). Their function and distribution around important regulatory genes raises the question of how they relate to 3D conformation of these loci. Here, we show that clusters of CNEs strongly coincide with topological organisation, predicting the boundaries of hundreds of topologically associating domains (TADs) in human and Drosophila. The set of TADs that are associated with high levels of noncoding conservation exhibit distinct properties compared to TADs devoid of extreme noncoding conservation. The close correspondence between extreme noncoding conservation and TADs suggests that these TADs are ancient, revealing a regulatory architecture conserved over hundreds of millions of years.Metazoan genomes contain many clusters of conserved noncoding elements. Here, the authors provide evidence that these clusters coincide with distinct topologically associating domains in humans and Drosophila, revealing a conserved regulatory genomic architecture.

  14. Investigating the γ decay of 65Ni from particle-γ coincidence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, L. Crespo; Larsen, A. C.; Garrote, F. L. Bello; Eriksen, T. K.; Giacoppo, F.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Klintefjord, M.; Renstrøm, T.; Sahin, E.; Siem, S.; Tornyi, T. G.; Tveten, G. M.

    2017-07-01

    The γ decay of 65Ni has been studied from particle-γ coincidence data on the 64Ni(d ,p γ )65Ni reaction. γ -ray spectra at excitation energies below Ex≈2 MeV have been studied and compared with previous measurements. Coincidences corresponding to Ex≈4.4 -6.1 MeV have been used to constrain the shape of the nuclear level density and γ -strength function of 65Ni by means of the Oslo method. The experimental γ -strength function presents an enhancement at γ energies below Eγ≈3 MeV . In addition, a resonance-like structure centered at Eγ≈4.6 MeV is seen together with accumulated strength at Eγ≈2.6 -3.6 MeV . The obtained results contribute to the systematic study of γ decay in the Ni isotopes, which is of great interest for the understanding of both single-particle and collective nuclear structure phenomena.

  15. A new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Louise G.; Schear, Melissa A.; Hendricks, John S.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Croft, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The existing MCNPX(trademark) PTRAC coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the isotopes that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and isotope). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design that has been developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile isotopes of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  16. A new approach to beta-gamma coincidence counting. Advance report on the Samar electronic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, J. E. de; Granados, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    In 4π β-γ coincidence measurements, precision on the evaluation of coincidence counting losses is made difficult because of complex overlapping effects between theβ--and γ-side dead times due to pre cursive counted events. In this context the SAMAR electronic system is aimed to give a precise way of automatic counting and reduce the need for calculated corrections. This report describes its configuration and basic features. The SAMAR has been conceived in such a manner that both beta and gamma chains are sharing a common and non extending dead-time which is simultaneously applied to both channels. The shared dead time is made to be the only one inserted throughout the chains. Overlapping effects vanish and the three counting channels have identical transmission ratios. A new dead-time circuit based on fast linear gates as blocking elements has been developed. Application of the two-oscillator Muller's method evidences a fully non-extending character. Automatism is implemented by using a live timer corrective channel controlling the counting scalers. (Author) 21 refs

  17. Evaluation of double photon coincidence Compton imaging method with GEANT4 simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Yuri; Shimazoe, Kenji; Mizumachi, Yuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    Compton imaging has been used for various applications including astronomical observations, radioactive waste management, and biomedical imaging. The positions of radioisotopes are determined in the intersections of multiple cone traces through a large number of events, which reduces signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the images. We have developed an advanced Compton imaging method to localize radioisotopes with high SNR by using information of the interactions of Compton scattering caused by two gamma rays at the same time, as the double photon coincidence Compton imaging method. The targeted radioisotopes of this imaging method are specific nuclides that emit several gamma rays at the same time such as 60Co, 134Cs, and 111In, etc. Since their locations are determined in the intersections of two Compton cones, the most of cone traces would disappear in the three-dimensional space, which enhances the SNR and angular resolution. In this paper, the comparison of the double photon coincidence Compton imaging method and the single photon Compton imaging method was conducted by using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation.

  18. Coincidence of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque, osteoporosis, and periodontal bone loss in dental panoramic radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, Aruna; Ganguly, Rumpa [Dept. of Diagnosis and Health Promotion, Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston (United States); Soroushian, Sheila [Dept. of Orthodontics, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC(United States)

    2013-12-15

    This study was performed to assess the correlation of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque (CCAP), the mandibular cortical index, and periodontal bone loss in panoramic radiographs. One hundred eighty-five panoramic radiographs with CCAP and 234 without this finding were evaluated by 3 observers for the presence of osseous changes related to osteoporosis and periodontal bone loss. Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the two groups for an association of CCAP with the mandibular cortical index and periodontal bone loss, respectively. There was a statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and osseous changes related to osteopenia/osteoporosis, with a p-value <0.001. There was no statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and periodontal bone loss. When comparing the 2 groups, 'With CCAP' and 'Without CCAP', there was a statistically significant association with the mean body mass index (BMI), number of remaining teeth, positive history of diabetes mellitus, and vascular accidents. There was no statistically significant association with gender or a history of smoking. This study identified a possible concurrence of CCAP and mandibular cortical changes secondary to osteopenia/osteoporosis in panoramic radiographs. This could demonstrate the important role of dental professionals in screening for these systemic conditions, leading to timely and appropriate referrals resulting in early interventions and thus improving overall health.

  19. Coincidence of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque, osteoporosis, and periodontal bone loss in dental panoramic radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, Aruna; Ganguly, Rumpa; Soroushian, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to assess the correlation of calcified carotid atheromatous plaque (CCAP), the mandibular cortical index, and periodontal bone loss in panoramic radiographs. One hundred eighty-five panoramic radiographs with CCAP and 234 without this finding were evaluated by 3 observers for the presence of osseous changes related to osteoporosis and periodontal bone loss. Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the two groups for an association of CCAP with the mandibular cortical index and periodontal bone loss, respectively. There was a statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and osseous changes related to osteopenia/osteoporosis, with a p-value <0.001. There was no statistically significant coincidence of CCAP and periodontal bone loss. When comparing the 2 groups, 'With CCAP' and 'Without CCAP', there was a statistically significant association with the mean body mass index (BMI), number of remaining teeth, positive history of diabetes mellitus, and vascular accidents. There was no statistically significant association with gender or a history of smoking. This study identified a possible concurrence of CCAP and mandibular cortical changes secondary to osteopenia/osteoporosis in panoramic radiographs. This could demonstrate the important role of dental professionals in screening for these systemic conditions, leading to timely and appropriate referrals resulting in early interventions and thus improving overall health.

  20. Exploring short-GRB afterglow parameter space for observations in coincidence with gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Resmi, L.; Misra, Kuntal; Pai, Archana; Arun, K. G.

    2018-03-01

    Short duration Gamma Ray Bursts (SGRB) and their afterglows are among the most promising electromagnetic (EM) counterparts of Neutron Star (NS) mergers. The afterglow emission is broad-band, visible across the entire electromagnetic window from γ-ray to radio frequencies. The flux evolution in these frequencies is sensitive to the multidimensional afterglow physical parameter space. Observations of gravitational wave (GW) from BNS mergers in spatial and temporal coincidence with SGRB and associated afterglows can provide valuable constraints on afterglow physics. We run simulations of GW-detected BNS events and assuming that all of them are associated with a GRB jet which also produces an afterglow, investigate how detections or non-detections in X-ray, optical and radio frequencies can be influenced by the parameter space. We narrow down the regions of afterglow parameter space for a uniform top-hat jet model, which would result in different detection scenarios. We list inferences which can be drawn on the physics of GRB afterglows from multimessenger astronomy with coincident GW-EM observations.

  1. Unique Coincidence and Fixed Point Theorem for g-Weakly C-Contractive Mappings in Partial Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saud M. Alsulami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove that every map satisfying the g-weakly C-contractive inequality in partial metric space has a unique coincidence point. Our results generalize several well-known existing results in the literature.

  2. Spectroscopy of Burn Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-01

    first task was to select and purchase a Visible/Near- infrared spectrophotometer suitable for non-contacting spectroscopy of biological tissues...FiLE COPY AD 0 NContract No: DAMD17-88-C-8125 N Title: Spectroscopy of Burn Wounds I Principal Investigator: Martin A. Afromowitz, Ph.D. PI Address...Include Security Classification) SPECTROSCOPY OF BURN WOUNDS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Martin A. Afromowitz, Ph.D., and James B. Callis, Ph.D. 13a. TYPE OF

  3. Coincidence and coherent data analysis methods for gravitational wave bursts in a network of interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Porter, Edward K.

    2003-01-01

    Network data analysis methods are the only way to properly separate real gravitational wave (GW) transient events from detector noise. They can be divided into two generic classes: the coincidence method and the coherent analysis. The former uses lists of selected events provided by each interferometer belonging to the network and tries to correlate them in time to identify a physical signal. Instead of this binary treatment of detector outputs (signal present or absent), the latter method involves first the merging of the interferometer data and looks for a common pattern, consistent with an assumed GW waveform and a given source location in the sky. The thresholds are only applied later, to validate or not the hypothesis made. As coherent algorithms use more complete information than coincidence methods, they are expected to provide better detection performances, but at a higher computational cost. An efficient filter must yield a good compromise between a low false alarm rate (hence triggering on data at a manageable rate) and a high detection efficiency. Therefore, the comparison of the two approaches is achieved using so-called receiving operating characteristics (ROC), giving the relationship between the false alarm rate and the detection efficiency for a given method. This paper investigates this question via Monte Carlo simulations, using the network model developed in a previous article. Its main conclusions are the following. First, a three-interferometer network such as Virgo-LIGO is found to be too small to reach good detection efficiencies at low false alarm rates: larger configurations are suitable to reach a confidence level high enough to validate as true GW a detected event. In addition, an efficient network must contain interferometers with comparable sensitivities: studying the three-interferometer LIGO network shows that the 2-km interferometer with half sensitivity leads to a strong reduction of performances as compared to a network of three

  4. γγ-coincidence in the neutron rich nucleus 25F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajta, Zs.; Sohler, D.; Dombradi, Zs.; Azaiez, F.; Belleguic, M.; Brown, B.A.; Becker, F.

    2012-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The 25 F isotope, having a valence proton in addition to the doubly closed shell 24 O core, is expected to have a rather simple structure: its energy spectrum can be described as a few single proton states coupled to the ground and excited states of the neighboring oxygen nucleus, 24 O. However, states arising from cross shell excitations may also be present. According to theoretical calculations intruder states may appear in 25 F somewhat above the neutron separation energy. To see if any of these states is bound the structure of 25 F was studied at GANIL by in-beam γ-spectroscopic technique in the double step fragmentation reaction. In the experiment the primary beam of 36 S delivered by the two GANIL cyclotrons at an energy of 77.5 MeVA and an intensity of 400 pnA hit a carbon target of 348 mg/cm 2 thickness placed in the SISSI device. The produced nuclei were selected through the Alpha spectrometer. The secondary beam was mainly composed of 24 F, 25,26 Ne, 27,28 Na and 29,30 Mg. The fragments produced by reactions of the secondary beam on an 'active' target made of a plastic scintillator sandwiched by two carbon foils were collected and identified at the focal plane of the SPEG spectrometer by the combined use of ΔE, E, TOF information. 74 BaF 2 scintillators surrounding the secondary target detected the γ rays from the fragments. The γ-spectra were corrected for the Doppler-shift caused by the large fragment velocity. As the detectors were closely packed, the γ rays could easily scatter from one detector to another. To decrease the background caused by the scattered particles, we used the array in anti-Compton mode. On the basis of the analysis of γ-ray spectrum taken for 25 F 6 γ lines are assigned to the studied nucleus between 750 and 4200 keV. To help the level scheme construction, γγ-coincidence matrices were created. Putting a gate on the most intense 1720-keV γ line, it was found to be in coincidence with

  5. Simultaneous, coincident 2-D ACAR and DBAR using segmented HPGe detectors incorporating sub-pixel interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Christopher S; Burggraf, Larry W; Petrosky, James C; Oxley, Mark E; Adamson, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional Positron Annihilation Spectrometry System (3D PASS) for determination of 3D electron-positron (e - -e + ) momentum densities by measuring coincident annihilation photons was designed, constructed and characterized. 3D PASS collects a single data set including correlated photon energies and coincident photon positions which are typically collected separately by two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D ACAR) and two-detector coincident Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation (CDBAR) spectrometry. 3D PASS is composed of two position-sensitive, high-purity germanium (HPGe) double-sided strip detectors (DSSD(s)) linked together by a 32-channel, 50 MHz digital electronics suite. The DSSDs data were analyzed to determine location of photon detection events using an interpolation method to achieve a spatial resolution less than the 5-mm width of the DSSDs' charge collection strips. The interpolation method relies on measuring a figure-of-merit proportional to the area of the transient charges observed on both strips directly adjacent to the charge collection strip detecting the full charge deposited by the annihilation photon. This sub-pixel resolution, corresponding to the error associated with event location within a sub-pixel was measured for both DSSDs using the approach outlined in Williams et al [1] and was on the order of ± 0.20 mm (± one-standard deviation). As a result of the sub-pixel resolution, the distance between the DSSDs and material sample was reduced by a factor of five compared to what is typically required in 2D ACAR systems was necessary to achieve 0.5-mrad angular resolution. This reduction in the system's footprint decreases attenuation of the annihilation photons in the air between the material sample and the DSSDs and increases the solid angle between the sample and the DSSDs, ultimately resulting in higher system detection efficiency. 3D PASS was characterized in the same manner comparable to

  6. Advances in DUV spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Mogensen, Claus Tilsted

    The would-be advantages of deep UV (DUV) spectroscopy are well known, but the potential applications have so far not been fully realized due to technological limitations and, perhaps, lack of bright ideas. However, new components and new knowledge about DUV spectra and spectroscopic methods...... combined with increasing needs for solutions to practical problems in environmental protection, medicine and pollution monitoring promise a new era in DUV spectroscopy. Here we shall review the basis for DUV spectroscopy, both DUV fluorescence and DUV Raman spectroscopy, and describe recent advances...

  7. Coincidence system for absolute measuring of radionuclide activity using surface barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koskinas, M.F.; Dias, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    A system for the standardization of alpha-gamma radionuclides has been developed at IPEN. Two surface barrier detectors are coupled to two thin-window NaI(Tl) crystals, suitable for low energy gamma ray detection. The performance of the system has been verified by means of the standardization of a Am-241 solution. The absolute activity has been obtained using the extrapolation method applied to the 4πα-γ coincidence technique. The alpha efficiency was varied by placing absorbers over the source or by changing the source to detector distance. The results were compared to those obtained by the linear extrapolation method, using a flow-gas 4π proportional counter. The agreement between the results were around 99.5%. (Author) [pt

  8. The underwater coincidence counter for plutonium measurements in mixed-oxide fuel assemblies manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccleston, G.W.; Menlove, H.O.; Abhold, M.; Baker, M.; Pecos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This manual describes the Underwater Coincidence Counter (UWCC) that has been designed for the measurement of plutonium in mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to irradiation. The UWCC uses high-efficiency 3 He neutron detectors to measure the spontaneous-fission and induced-fission rates in the fuel assembly. Measurements can be made on MOX fuel assemblies in air or underwater. The neutron counting rate is analyzed for singles, doubles, and triples time correlations to determine the 240 Pu effective mass per unit length of the fuel assembly. The system can verify the plutonium loading per unit length to a precision of less than 1% in a measurement time of 2 to 3 minutes. System design, components, performance tests, and operational characteristics are described in this manual

  9. Reduction of elevated IGF-1 levels in coincident amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEREIRA, ERLICK A. C.; TURNER, MARTIN R.; WASS, JOHN A. H.; TALBOT, KEVIN

    2011-01-01

    We report a patient presenting with ALS in whom acromegaly was later confirmed. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) has been tried in the treatment of ALS and despite equivocal results from clinical trials, efforts have continued to try to harness the significant positive effects on motor neuron growth observed in vitro and in survival of mouse models of the disease. One subsequent study has reported an association between higher circulating serum IGF-1 levels and longer disease duration in ALS patients. Concern therefore arose in our case that treatment of the acromegaly with a somatostatin analogue might adversely affect the natural course of his ALS through lowering of potentially beneficial IGF-1 levels. Through clinical observation and prognostic modelling we suggest that this concern was unfounded. The potential interaction of these two rarely coincident disorders in our patient is discussed. PMID:19634028

  10. γ-Particle coincidence technique for the study of nuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagatto, V.A.B., E-mail: vinicius.zagatto@gmail.com [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, J.R.B.; Allegro, P.R.P.; Chamon, L.C.; Cybulska, E.W.; Medina, N.H.; Ribas, R.V.; Seale, W.A.; Silva, C.P.; Gasques, L.R. [Instituto de Física da Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil); Zahn, G.S.; Genezini, F.A.; Shorto, J.M.B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (Brazil); Lubian, J.; Linares, R. [Instituto de Física da Universidade Federal Fluminense (Brazil); Toufen, D.L. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil); Silveira, M.A.G. [Centro Universitário da FEI (Brazil); Rossi, E.S. [Centro Universitário FIEO – UNIFIEO (Brazil); Nobre, G.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Saci-Perere γ ray spectrometer (located at the Pelletron AcceleratorLaboratory – IFUSP) was employed to implement the γ-particle coincidence technique for the study of nuclear reaction mechanisms. For this, the {sup 18}O+{sup 110}Pd reaction has been studied in the beam energy range of 45–54 MeV. Several corrections to the data due to various effects (energy and angle integrations, beam spot size, γ detector finite size and the vacuum de-alignment) are small and well controlled. The aim of this work was to establish a proper method to analyze the data and identify the reaction mechanisms involved. To achieve this goal the inelastic scattering to the first excited state of {sup 110}Pd has been extracted and compared to coupled channel calculations using the São Paulo Potential (PSP), being reasonably well described by it.

  11. Molecular photoionisation using synchrotron radiation. Photoelectron photoion coincidence and circular dichroism

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Macias, G A

    2002-01-01

    The first ionisation potential of the CF sub 3 radical has been determined in this work from the appearance potential of the CF sub 3 sup + fragment, formed in the photofragmentation of CF sub 3 Br. In obtaining this value special care has been taken in removing the contributions from second order light and internal energy of the fragmenting parent ion. The resulting ionisation potential was found to be in very good agreement with a number of recent theoretical calculations. The valence photoelectron spectra of three monoterpenes such as limonene, carvone and camphor have been recorded along with their mass spectra taken in coincidence with energy selected photoelectrons, providing information about state selected parent ion fragmentation channels. A new photoelectron spectrometer based on the Alien box design has been studied by ray-tracing simulations. It will include a two dimensional position sensitive detector system consisting in two micro channel plates in a chevron stack and a delay-line anode to enco...

  12. A new reaction chamber for heavy ion, light particles - gamma ray coincidences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovici, M.; Simion, V.; Andronic, A.; Berceanu, I.; Buta, A.; Duma, M.; Moisa, D.; Pop, A.; Migneco, E.; Del Zoppo, A.; Bellia, G.

    1994-01-01

    Available as short communication only. In order to perform heavy ion, light particles -gamma ray coincidence measurements the experimental set-up DRACULA is foreseen to be connected with the gamma ray filter existing at LNS Catania. For this purpose a new reaction chamber was constructed. It consists of a spherical body (200 mm in diameter), an exit part toward the big ionization chamber, an entrance part having three beam pipes, a target holder part and an inspecting window. As one can see from the figure attached, the chamber gives the possibility to perform measurements at three different angles. Around the chamber a number of 13 big NaI(Tl) crystals and 4-6 Ge(Li) detectors hold by a special frame are foreseen to be installed. (Author) 1 Fig., 2 Refs

  13. Digital data recording system for the 4 πβ-γ coincidence apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaha, V.V.; Srivastava, P.K.

    1975-01-01

    The data recording system for the 4πβ-γ coincidence apparatus consists of three scalers, a timer, a day-clock, a print control unit and a Hewlett-Packard printer. The print control unit serves as an interface unit as well as generates necessary electronic commands for starting, scanning, recycling and actuating the printer. It also generates the run number and identification number. It has made the data recording and recycling completely automatic. The report describes the data recording system which has been in continuous use since March 1973. Brief description of the scalers, the timer, the day-clock and the printer is given. The print control unit is described and the working of the data handling, scanning and cycle counting sections is explained. (author)

  14. A coincidence-type ion-electron converter detector for low-energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benka, O.; Weinzierl, P.; Dobrozemsky, R.; Stratowa, C.

    1981-04-01

    A coincidence type ion-electron converter detector has been developed and used - together with an electrostatic energy-analyser - for precision measurements of the energy distribution of recoil protons from free-neutron decay. The most important aspect of the development was, besides keeping the background below 0,2 counts/sec in the presence of a certain radiation background, to achieve a high and energy-independent counting probability for protons with energies between 100 and 1000 eV. With an acceleration voltage of about 25 kV and Al-foils (20 to 35 ug/cmsup2) as converter, we obtained counting efficiences of 70 to 85 percent. The design and performance of the detector system, employing six foils with different sensitive areas, are described and discussed in detail. (author)

  15. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  16. Frequent floods in the European Alps coincide with cooler periods of the past 2500 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glur, Lukas; Wirth, Stefanie B; Büntgen, Ulf; Gilli, Adrian; Haug, Gerald H; Schär, Christoph; Beer, Jürg; Anselmetti, Flavio S

    2013-09-26

    Severe floods triggered by intense precipitation are among the most destructive natural hazards in Alpine environments, frequently causing large financial and societal damage. Potential enhanced flood occurrence due to global climate change would thus increase threat to settlements, infrastructure, and human lives in the affected regions. Yet, projections of intense precipitation exhibit major uncertainties and robust reconstructions of Alpine floods are limited to the instrumental and historical period. Here we present a 2500-year long flood reconstruction for the European Alps, based on dated sedimentary flood deposits from ten lakes in Switzerland. We show that periods with high flood frequency coincide with cool summer temperatures. This wet-cold synchronism suggests enhanced flood occurrence to be triggered by latitudinal shifts of Atlantic and Mediterranean storm tracks. This paleoclimatic perspective reveals natural analogues for varying climate conditions, and thus can contribute to a better understanding and improved projections of weather extremes under climate change.

  17. The Anti-Coincidence Detector for the GLAST Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseev, A.A.; Hartman, R.C.; Ormes, J.F.; Thompson, D.J.; Amato, M.J.; Johnson, T.E.; Segal, K.N.; Sheppard, D.A.

    2007-03-23

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of the Anti-Coincidence Detector (ACD) for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT). The ACD is LAT's first-level defense against the charged cosmic ray background that outnumbers the gamma rays by 3-5 orders of magnitude. The ACD covers the top and 4 sides of the LAT tracking detector, requiring a total active area of {approx}8.3 square meters. The ACD detector utilizes plastic scintillator tiles with wave-length shifting fiber readout. In order to suppress self-veto by shower particles at high gamma-ray energies, the ACD is segmented into 89 tiles of different sizes. The overall ACD efficiency for detection of singly charged relativistic particles entering the tracking detector from the top or sides of the LAT exceeds the required 0.9997.

  18. Subducting slab ultra-slow velocity layer coincident with silent earthquakes in southern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Teh-Ru Alex; Helmberger, Donald V; Brudzinski, Michael R; Clayton, Robert W; Davis, Paul; Pérez-Campos, Xyoli; Singh, Shri K

    2009-04-24

    Great earthquakes have repeatedly occurred on the plate interface in a few shallow-dipping subduction zones where the subducting and overriding plates are strongly locked. Silent earthquakes (or slow slip events) were recently discovered at the down-dip extension of the locked zone and interact with the earthquake cycle. Here, we show that locally observed converted SP arrivals and teleseismic underside reflections that sample the top of the subducting plate in southern Mexico reveal that the ultra-slow velocity layer (USL) varies spatially (3 to 5 kilometers, with an S-wave velocity of approximately 2.0 to 2.7 kilometers per second). Most slow slip patches coincide with the presence of the USL, and they are bounded by the absence of the USL. The extent of the USL delineates the zone of transitional frictional behavior.

  19. Upgrading DRACULA setup to be used for light products - fission fragments coincidence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simion, V.; Petrovici, M.; Pop, A.; Berceanu, I.; Duma, M.; Moisa, D.; Pagano, A.; Geraci, E.

    1999-01-01

    At low bombarding energy (E/A 238 U give rise to a number of fission processes, all leading to very similar fission products. Therefore, in order to understand the fission processes in this energy domain it is of interest to determine the amount of fission occurring after a peripheral interaction relative to that originating from compound nucleus formation. Although the detection of a projectile residue (PLF) in coincidence with the fission fragments is a very promising probe for the macroscopic features of the mechanism of induced fission, at incident energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier (E/A 2 cross section area uses the phoswich technique by coupling a thin fast NE102A plastic scintillator to a 10 cm long BaF 2 crystal of hexagonal section. The BaF 2 crystal detectors have been successfully used in modular multielement detector ARGOS in the context of GANCT and HOTCT researches at LNS. The light response of the phoswich configuration as a function of the plastic thickness and of the energy and charge of the incident ion has been studied at Tandem energies. Both arrays will be placed in separate vacuum chambers attached to the remaining large angular opening windows of the reaction chamber. By rotating the whole device the fission fragment detection arrays will cover a range of 96 angle in the horizontal plane. The main advantage of this setup is that it allows to perform continuous measurements in energy and angle of the reaction products. The geometry of the whole device has been tested by Monte Carlo calculations using the code ELPHIC. The coincidence condition is completely fulfilled for the first two positions of the setup and partially for the third one. Measurements are intended to be performed at the SMP Tandem from LNS-Catania using light beams ( 16 O, 19 F, 20 Ne, 32 S) at ∼ 6 MeV/A on high fissility parameter targets. (authors)

  20. Analysis of Coincident HICO and Airborne Hyperspectral Images Over Lake Erie Western Basin HABs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Michael T., Jr.

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) produce waterborne toxins that pose a significant threat to people, livestock, and wildlife. Nearly 40 million people in both Canada and the U.S. depend on Great Lakes water. In the summer of 2014, in the Lake Erie Western Basin, an HAB of the cyanobacteria Microcystis was so severe that a do-not-drink advisory was in effect for the greater Toledo area, Ohio. This advisory applied to the water supply to over 400,000 people from a single water intake. Bloom intensity, composition, and spatial variability were investigated by comparing coincidental hyperspectral data from NASA's HICO, and NASA GRC's HSI airborne sensor, with on-lake ASD radiometer measurements and in situ water quality testing as ground reference data. Coincident data sets were obtained with HICO only on one day in 2014, however all other datasets coincide four times in 2015. Remote sensing data were atmospherically corrected using the empirical line method, utilizing dark reference spectra from a nearby asphalt parking lot measured from ASD and HSI radiometers. Cyanobacteria Index (CI) images were created from processed images using the Wynne (2010) algorithm, previously used for MODIS and MERIS imagery. This algorithm-generated CI images provide reliable results for both ground level (R2=0.921), airborne (R2=0.7981), and satellite imagery (R2=0.7794) for seven sampling points. The ability to robustly atmospherically correct and generate useful CI maps from airborne and satellite sensors can provide a time- and cost-effective method for HABs analysis. Timely processing of these high spatial and spectral resolution remote sensing data can aid in management of water intake resources. These results will help to improve methods leading to HABs mapping by testing different algal retrieval algorithms and atmospheric correction techniques using a three tiered hyperspectral sensor approach utilizing satellite, airborne, and ground level sensors, coupled with water quality

  1. Song pattern recognition in crickets based on a delay-line and coincidence-detector mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedwig, Berthold; Sarmiento-Ponce, Edith Julieta

    2017-05-31

    Acoustic communication requires filter mechanisms to process and recognize key features of the perceived signals. We analysed such a filter mechanism in field crickets ( Gryllus bimaculatus ), which communicate with species-specific repetitive patterns of sound pulses and chirps. A delay-line and coincidence-detection mechanism, in which each sound pulse has an impact on the processing of the following pulse, is implicated to underlie the recognition of the species-specific pulse pattern. Based on this concept, we hypothesized that altering the duration of a single pulse or inter-pulse interval in three-pulse chirps will lead to different behavioural responses. Phonotaxis was tested in female crickets walking on a trackball exposed to different sound paradigms. Changing the duration of either the first, second or third pulse of the chirps led to three different characteristic tuning curves. Long first pulses decreased the phonotactic response whereas phonotaxis remained strong when the third pulse was long. Chirps with three pulses of increasing duration of 5, 20 and 50 ms elicited phonotaxis, but the chirps were not attractive when played in reverse order. This demonstrates specific, pulse duration-dependent effects while sequences of pulses are processed. The data are in agreement with a mechanism in which processing of a sound pulse has an effect on the processing of the subsequent pulse, as outlined in the flow of activity in a delay-line and coincidence-detector circuit. Additionally our data reveal a substantial increase in the gain of phonotaxis, when the number of pulses of a chirp is increased from two to three. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Correction for variable moderation and multiplication effects associated with thermal neutron coincidence counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, N.

    1978-01-01

    A correction is described for multiplication and moderation when doing passive thermal neutron coincidence counting nondestructive assay measurements on powder samples of PuO 2 mixed arbitrarily with MgO, SiO 2 , and moderating material. The multiplication correction expression is shown to be approximately separable into the product of two independent terms; F/sub Pu/ which depends on the mass of 240 Pu, and F/sub αn/ which depends on properties of the matrix material. Necessary assumptions for separability are (1) isotopic abundances are constant, and (2) fission cross sections are independent of incident neutron energy: both of which are reasonable for the 8% 240 Pu powder samples considered here. Furthermore since all prompt fission neutrons are expected to have nearly the same energy distributions, variations among different samples can be due only to the moderating properties of the samples. Relative energy distributions are provided by a thermal neutron well counter having two concentric rings of 3 He proportional counters placed symmetrically about the well. Measured outer-to-inner ring ratios raised to an empirically determined power for coincidences, (N/sup I//N/sup O/)/sup Z/, and singles, (T/sup O//T/sup I/)/sup delta/, provide corrections for moderation and F/sub αn/ respectively, and F/sub Pu/ is approximated by M 240 /sup X//M 240 . The exponents are calibration constants determined by a least squares fitting procedure using standards' data. System calibration is greatly simplified using the separability principle. Once appropriate models are established for F/sub Pu/ and F/sub αn/, only a few standards are necessary to determine the calibration constants associated with these terms. Since F/sub Pu/ is expressed as a function of M 240 , correction for multiplication in a subsequent assay demands only a measurement of F/sub αn/

  3. STDP allows close-to-optimal spatiotemporal spike pattern detection by single coincidence detector neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masquelier, Timothée

    2017-06-29

    Repeating spatiotemporal spike patterns exist and carry information. How this information is extracted by downstream neurons is unclear. Here we theoretically investigate to what extent a single cell could detect a given spike pattern and what the optimal parameters to do so are, in particular the membrane time constant τ. Using a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neuron with homogeneous Poisson input, we computed this optimum analytically. We found that a relatively small τ (at most a few tens of ms) is usually optimal, even when the pattern is much longer. This is somewhat counter-intuitive as the resulting detector ignores most of the pattern, due to its fast memory decay. Next, we wondered if spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) could enable a neuron to reach the theoretical optimum. We simulated a LIF equipped with additive STDP, and repeatedly exposed it to a given input spike pattern. As in previous studies, the LIF progressively became selective to the repeating pattern with no supervision, even when the pattern was embedded in Poisson activity. Here we show that, using certain STDP parameters, the resulting pattern detector is optimal. These mechanisms may explain how humans learn repeating sensory sequences. Long sequences could be recognized thanks to coincidence detectors working at a much shorter timescale. This is consistent with the fact that recognition is still possible if a sound sequence is compressed, played backward, or scrambled using 10-ms bins. Coincidence detection is a simple yet powerful mechanism, which could be the main function of neurons in the brain. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Applications of LaBr3(Ce) Gamma-ray Spectrometer Arrays for Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radionuclide Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, PH; Shearman, R.; Daniel, T.; Lorusso, G.; Collins, SM; Judge, SM; Bell; Pearce, AK; Gurgi, LA; Rudigier, M.; Podolyák, Zs; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R.; Kisyov, S.

    2016-10-01

    An overview of the use of discrete energy gamma-ray detectors based on cerium- doped LaBr3 scintillators for use in nuclear spectroscopy is presented. This review includes recent applications of such detectors in mixed, 'hybrid' gamma-ray coincidence detection arrays such ROSPHERE at IFIN-HH, Bucharest; EXILL+FATIMA at ILL Grenoble, France; GAMMASPHERE+FATIMA at Argonne National Laboratory, USA; FATIMA + EURICA, at RIKEN, Japan; and the National Nuclear Array (NANA) at the UK's National Physical Laboratory. This conference paper highlights the capabilities and limitations of using these sub-nanosecond 'fast-timing', medium-resolution gamma-ray detectors for both nuclear structure research and radionuclide standardisation. Potential future application of such coincidence scintillator arrays in measurements of civilian nuclear fuel waste evaluation and assay is demonstrated using coincidence spectroscopy of a mixed 134,7Cs source.

  5. Value of coincidence gamma camera PET for diagnosing head and neck tumors: functional imaging and image coregistration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresel, S.; Brinkbaeumer, K.; Schmid, R.; Hahn, K.

    2001-01-01

    54 patients suffering from head and neck tumors (30 m, 24 f, age: 32-67 years) were examined using dedicated PET and coincidence gamma camera PET after injection of 185-350 MBq [ 18 F]FDG. Examinations were carried out on the dedicated PET first (Siemens ECAT Exact HR+) followed by a scan on the coincidence gamma camera PET (Picker Prism 2000 XP-PCD, Marconi Axis g-PET 2 AZ). Dedicated PET was acquired in 3D mode, coincidence gamma camera PET was performed in list mode using an axial filter. Reconstruction of data was performed iteratively on both, dedicated PET and coincidence gamma camera PET. All patients received a CT scan in multislice technique (Siemens Somatom Plus 4, Marconi MX 8000). Image coregistration was performed on an Odyssey workstation (Marconi). All findings have been verified by the gold standard histology or in case of negative histology by follow-up. Results: Using dedicated PET the primary or recurrent lesion was correctly diagnosed in 47/48 patients, using coincidence gamma camera PET in 46/48 patients and using CT in 25/48 patients. Metastatic disease in cervical lymph nodes was diagnosed in 17/18 patients with dedicated PET, in 16/18 patients with coincidence gamma camera PET and in 15/18 with CT. False-positive results with regard to lymph node metastasis were seen with one patient for dedicated PET and hybrid PET, respectively, and with 18 patients for CT. In a total of 11 patients unknown metastatic lesions were seen with dedicated PET and with coincidence gamma camera PET elsewhere in the body (lung: n = 7, bone: n = 3, liver: n = 1). Additional malignant disease other than the head and neck tumor was found in 4 patients. (orig.) [de

  6. Heterodyned holographic spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, NG

    In holographic spectroscopy an image of an interference pattern is projected onto a detector and transformed back to the input spectrum. The general characteristics are similar to those of Fourier transform spectroscopy, but the spectrum is obtained without scanning. In the heterodyned arrangement

  7. Hadron spectroscopy: Workshop summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comyn, M.

    1993-01-01

    The hadron spectroscopy sessions of the Working Group on Hadron and Nuclear Spectroscopy are summarized. The present status of the field is discussed, along with the main priorities and open questions for the future. The required characteristics of optimum future facilities are outlined

  8. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule spectroscopy. (SMS), confocal microscopy,. FCS, sm-FRET, FLIM. 1 High-resolution spectrum re- fers to a spectrum consisting of very sharp lines. The sharp lines clearly display transitions to ...

  9. Acoustic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sitters, G.; Kamsma, D.; Thalhammer, G.; Ritsch-Marte, M.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Force spectroscopy has become an indispensable tool to unravel the structural and mechanochemical properties of biomolecules. Here we extend the force spectroscopy toolbox with an acoustic manipulation device that can exert forces from subpiconewtons to hundreds of piconewtons on thousands of

  10. Infrared diode laser spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Civiš, Svatopluk; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Matulková, Irena

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2010), s. 408-420 ISSN 1230-3402 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : FTIR spectroscopy * absorption spectroscopy * laser diodes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.027, year: 2010

  11. Secondary cell wall development in cotton fibers as examined with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering were examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. The selected harvesting points coincide with secondary cell wall (SCW) development in the fibers. Progressive but moderat...

  12. Quantum-limit spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ficek, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the main ideas, methods, and recent developments of quantum-limit optical spectroscopy and applications to quantum information, resolution spectroscopy, measurements beyond quantum limits, measurement of decoherence, and entanglement. Quantum-limit spectroscopy lies at the frontier of current experimental and theoretical techniques, and is one of the areas of atomic spectroscopy where the quantization of the field is essential to predict and interpret the existing experimental results. Currently, there is an increasing interest in quantum and precision spectroscopy both theoretically and experimentally, due to significant progress in trapping and cooling of single atoms and ions. This progress allows one to explore in the most intimate detail the ways in which light interacts with atoms and to measure spectral properties and quantum effects with high precision. Moreover, it allows one to perform subtle tests of quantum mechanics on the single atom and single photon scale which were hardly eve...

  13. Performance of coincidence imaging with long-lived positron emitters as an alternative to dedicated PET and SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandström, Mattias; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Kairemo, Kalevi; Lundqvist, Hans; Lubberink, Mark

    2004-12-01

    An important application of quantitative imaging in nuclear medicine is the estimation of absorbed doses in radionuclide therapy. Depending on the radionuclide used for therapy, quantitative imaging of the kinetics of the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical could be done using planar imaging, SPECT or PET. Since many nuclear medicine departments have a gamma camera system that is also suitable for coincidence imaging, the performance of these systems with respect to quantitative imaging of PET isotopes that could be of use in radionuclide dosimetry is of interest. We investigated the performance of a gamma camera with coincidence imaging capabilities with 99mTc, 111In, 18F and 76Br and a dedicated PET system with 18F and 76Br, using a single standard set of phantom measurements. Here, 76Br was taken as a typical example of prompt gamma-emitting PET isotopes that are applicable in radionuclide therapy dosimetry such as 86Y and 124I. Image quality measurements show comparable image contrasts for 76Br coincidence imaging and 111In SPECT. Although the spatial resolution of coincidence imaging is better than single photon imaging, the contrast obtained with 76Br is not better than that with 99mTc or 111In because of the prompt gamma involved. Additional improvements are necessary to allow for quantitative coincidence imaging of long-lived, prompt gamma producing positron emitters.

  14. Method and program for decay scheme reconstruction based on formal logical analysis of gamma-gamma coincidence matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, J.; Tsupko-Sitnikov, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    A new, rigorously substantiated approach to construction of decay schemes on the basis of γ-γ coincidence data is described. Complete decay modes (concrete cascades of transitions from excited to the ground-state of a nucleus excited in a decay or a reaction) and continuity regions in complete modes (regions of successive transitions) are isolated by logical operations with rows (columns) of a symmetrical coincidence matrix where rows (columns) correspond to energies of coinciding transitions and matrix elements are unities and zeros, depending on the presence or absence of the given coincidence. To reject false complete modes and continuity regions arising from incompleteness of the coincidence data and errors in them, energy selection is introduced for complete modes and continuity regions, which demands that total energy of their constituent transitions should be equal to total energy of some other complete modes and continuity regions and to the energies of singles. With the continuity regions found, it is possible to order transitions in the selected complete modes and to algorithmize matching of complete modes into a decay scheme. 10 refs., 3 figs

  15. A Web-based Google-Earth Coincident Imaging Tool for Satellite Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killough, B. D.; Chander, G.; Gowda, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating international efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to meet the needs of its nine “Societal Benefit Areas”, of which the most demanding, in terms of accuracy, is climate. To accomplish this vision, satellite on-orbit and ground-based data calibration and validation (Cal/Val) of Earth observation measurements are critical to our scientific understanding of the Earth system. Existing tools supporting space mission Cal/Val are often developed for specific campaigns or events with little desire for broad application. This paper describes a web-based Google-Earth based tool for the calculation of coincident satellite observations with the intention to support a diverse international group of satellite missions to improve data continuity, interoperability and data fusion. The Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS), which includes 28 space agencies and 20 other national and international organizations, are currently operating and planning over 240 Earth observation satellites in the next 15 years. The technology described here will better enable the use of multiple sensors to promote increased coordination toward a GEOSS. The CEOS Systems Engineering Office (SEO) and the Working Group on Calibration and Validation (WGCV) support the development of the CEOS Visualization Environment (COVE) tool to enhance international coordination of data exchange, mission planning and Cal/Val events. The objective is to develop a simple and intuitive application tool that leverages the capabilities of Google-Earth web to display satellite sensor coverage areas and for the identification of coincident scene locations along with dynamic menus for flexibility and content display. Key features and capabilities include user-defined evaluation periods (start and end dates) and regions of interest (rectangular areas) and multi-user collaboration. Users can select two or more CEOS missions from a

  16. Cocaine Promotes Coincidence Detection and Lowers Induction Threshold during Hebbian Associative Synaptic Potentiation in Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hongyu; Yao, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-25

    Addictive drugs usurp neural plasticity mechanisms that normally serve reward-related learning and memory, primarily by evoking changes in glutamatergic synaptic strength in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine circuitry. Here, we show that repeated cocaine exposure in vivo does not alter synaptic strength in the mouse prefrontal cortex during an early period of withdrawal, but instead modifies a Hebbian quantitative synaptic learning rule by broadening the temporal window and lowers the induction threshold for spike-timing-dependent LTP (t-LTP). After repeated, but not single, daily cocaine injections, t-LTP in layer V pyramidal neurons is induced at +30 ms, a normally ineffective timing interval for t-LTP induction in saline-exposed mice. This cocaine-induced, extended-timing t-LTP lasts for ∼1 week after terminating cocaine and is accompanied by an increased susceptibility to potentiation by fewer pre-post spike pairs, indicating a reduced t-LTP induction threshold. Basal synaptic strength and the maximal attainable t-LTP magnitude remain unchanged after cocaine exposure. We further show that the cocaine facilitation of t-LTP induction is caused by sensitized D1-cAMP/protein kinase A dopamine signaling in pyramidal neurons, which then pathologically recruits voltage-gated l-type Ca 2+ channels that synergize with GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors to drive t-LTP at extended timing. Our results illustrate a mechanism by which cocaine, acting on a key neuromodulation pathway, modifies the coincidence detection window during Hebbian plasticity to facilitate associative synaptic potentiation in prefrontal excitatory circuits. By modifying rules that govern activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, addictive drugs can derail the experience-driven neural circuit remodeling process important for executive control of reward and addiction. It is believed that addictive drugs often render an addict's brain reward system hypersensitive, leaving the individual more susceptible to

  17. Femto-second dynamics probed by resonant photoemission and coincidence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miron, C.; Ceolin, D.; Morin, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: It is well known nowadays that inner-shell excitation induces very rich dynamics where nuclear motion and electronic decay compete on a very short time scale, like in the case of ultra-fast molecular dissociation. Since the st experimental evidence was given by P. Morin and I. Nenner in 1986 for HBr and until now, it was shown that it acted as a general phenomenon taking place in a large variety of molecular systems. A nice consequence of such a process was shown by Prof. Svensson's group in Sweden by resonant photoemission measurements of the decay of the O 1s → σ * core-excited state in O 2 : the Auger-Doppler effect. More recently, a Japanese group demonstrated that the Auger-Doppler effect may be employed as a probe of the Auger emission anisotropy. The present talk will mainly deal with the mechanisms of intra-molecular ultra-fast chemical reaction pathways induced by inner-shell excitation and probed by energy selected resonant Auger electron-ion coincidences (ES-RAEPICO) and resonant photoemission measurements. Such a reactive pathway could be revealed through the appearance of rearrangement products. The dynamics of such ultra-fast chemical reactions, if they occur, will be entirely governed by the competition between the nuclear motion in the core-excited state and electronic decay (Auger decay). Since the chemical reaction is able to occur only during the lifetime of the core-excited state, the Auger decay may be seen in this context as a chemical reaction inhibitor, which leads the excited system towards a different relaxation pathway. The measurement in coincidence of the kinetic energy of the ejected Auger electrons and of fragment ions is able to reveal in such a case the energetics and kinematics of the possible decay mechanisms. Moreover, the photon energy detuning with respect to the nominal core-excitation energy allows changing the energy of the reactants and influence the chemical dynamics on a femtosecond time scale

  18. [REPAIR OF THUMB PULP DEFECTS WITH SIDE ISLAND FLAP COINCIDING DORSAL BRANCH OF DIGITAL NERVE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huanyou; Wang, Bin; Lu, Aidong; Li, Ruiguo; Chen, Chao; Ma, Tiepeng

    2014-07-01

    To explore the effectiveness of the side island flap coinciding dorsal branch of the digital. nerve for repairing thumb pulp defects. Between May 2008 and July 2012, 36 cases of thumb pulp defects were treated with the side island flap coinciding dorsal branch of the digital nerve. There were 26 males and 10 females, aged 21-51 years (mean, 32.4 years). The injury causes included electric saw injury in 14 cases, punchpress injury in 8 cases, machine twist injury in 5 cases, door crushing injury in 5 cases, and glass cutting injury in 4 cases. The left hand was involved in 12 cases and the right hand in 24 cases. Combined injuries included tendon and bone exposure in all cases, fracture of the distal phalanx in 3 cases, and nail bed lacerations in 2 cases. The defect size ranged from 1.4 cm x 1.2 cm to 2.5 cm x 2.1 cm; and the flap size ranged from 1.8 cm x 1.4 cm to 3.0 cm x 2.5 cm. Two flaps with distal skin flap tension blisters and skin scabbing, which were cured after dressing changes; the wound healed by first intension in the other 34 cases. The skin grafts at donor site survived, and primary healing of incision was obtained. The patients were followed up 3-15 months (mean, 8 months). The appearance and function restored well. Two-point discrimination of the flap was 5.2 mm on average (range, 4-8 mm) at last follow-up. The finger joint had no stiff. According to the upper extremity function evaluation criteria issued by the Hand Surgery Society of Chinese Medical Association, the sensation was S4 in 33 and S3+ in 3 cases. No ectopic feeling was observed. The extension and flexion activity of fingers at donor site was normal, the sensation reached S4 with no atrophy of the finger. With constant anatomy, reliable blood supply, and safe operation, the anastomoses of the finger side island flap with dorsal branch of digital nerve is a better method to repair thumb pulp defects because it also effectively overcome the ectopic feeling with traditional methods and

  19. Homogeneity spoil spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, J.; Boesch, C.; Martin, E.; Grutter, R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the problems of in vivo MR spectroscopy of P-31 is spectra localization. Surface coil spectroscopy, which is the method of choice for clinical applications, suffers from the high-intensity signal from subcutaneous muscle tissue, which masks the spectrum of interest from deeper structures. In order to suppress this signal while maintaining the simplicity of surface coil spectroscopy, the authors introduced a small sheet of ferromagnetically dotted plastic between the surface coil and the body. This sheet destroys locally the field homogeneity and therefore all signal from structures around the coil. The very high reproducibility of the simple experimental procedure allows long-term studies important for monitoring tumor therapy

  20. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  1. Search for Transient Gravitational Waves in Coincidence with Short-Duration Radio Transients During 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Hughey, Brennan; Zanolin, Michele; Szczepanczyk, Marek; Gill, Kiranjyot; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single-pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory), Virgo (Variability of Solar Irradiance and Gravity Oscillations) and GEO (German-UK Interferometric Detector) interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes fast radio bursts using similar methods. Data analyzed in these searches were collected between 2007 and 2013. Possible sources of emission of both short-duration radio signals and transient gravitational-wave emission include star quakes on neutron stars, binary coalescence of neutron stars, and cosmic string cusps. While no evidence for gravitational-wave emission in coincidence with these radio transients was found, the current analysis serves as a prototype for similar future searches using more sensitive second-generation interferometers.

  2. A First Search for Coincident Gravitational Waves and High Energy Neutrinos Using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES Data from 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Samarai, Al; Albert, A.; Andre, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the underwater neutrino telescope ANTARES in its 5 line configuration during the period January - September 2007, which coincided with the fifth and first science runs of LIGO and Virgo, respectively. The LIGO-Virgo data were analysed for candidate gravitational-wave signals coincident in time and direction with the neutrino events. No significant coincident events were observed. We place limits on the density of joint high energy neutrino - gravitational wave emission events in the local universe, and compare them with densities of merger and core-collapse events.

  3. A first search for coincident gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos using LIGO, Virgo and ANTARES data from 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Samarai, I. Al; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coniglione, R.; Core, L.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fehn, K.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Ferry, S.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Hallewell, G.; Hamal, M.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lambard, G.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Martini, S.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sapienza, P.; Schmid, J.; Schnabel, J.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Trovato, A.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Visser, E.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Emilio, M. Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow–Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave bursts associated with high energy neutrinos. Together, these messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, particularly at high energy. Our search uses neutrinos detected by the underwater neutrino telescope ANTARES in its 5 line configuration during the period January - September 2007, which coincided with the fifth and first science runs of LIGO and Virgo, respectively. The LIGO-Virgo data were analysed for candidate gravitational-wave signals coincident in time and direction with the neutrino events. No significant coincident events were observed. We place limits on the density of joint high energy neutrino - gravitational wave emission events in the local universe, and compare them with densities of merger and core-collapse events.

  4. Implementation of the active neutron Coincidence Collar for the verification of unirradiated PWR and BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Keddar, A.

    1982-01-01

    An active neutron interrogation technique has been developed for the measurement of the 235 U content in fresh fuel assemblies. The method employs an AmLi neutron source to induce fission reactions in the fuel assembly and coincidence counting of the resulting fission reaction neutrons. When no interrogation source is present, the passive neutron coincidence rate gives a measure of the 238 U by the spontaneous fission reactions. The system can be applied to the fissile content determination in fresh fuel assemblies for accountability, criticality control, and safeguards purposes. Field tests have been performed by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) staff using the Coincidence Collar to verify the 235 U content in light-water-reactor fuel assemblies. The results gave an accuracy of 1 to 2% in the active mode ( 235 U) and 2 to 3% in the passive mode ( 238 U) under field conditions

  5. A new 4π(LS)-γ coincidence counter at NCBJ RC POLATOM with TDCR detector in the beta channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemek, T; Jęczmieniowski, A; Cacko, D; Broda, R; Lech, E

    2016-03-01

    A new 4π(LS)-γ coincidence system (TDCRG) was built at the NCBJ RC POLATOM. The counter consists of a TDCR detector in the beta channel and scintillation detector with NaI(Tl) crystal in the gamma channel. The system is equipped with a digital board with FPGA, which records and analyses coincidences in the TDCR detector and coincidences between the beta and gamma channels. The characteristics of the system and a scheme of the FPGA implementation with behavioral simulation are given. The TDCRG counter was validated by activity measurements on (14)C and (60)Co solutions standardized in RC POLATOM using previously validated methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Corrections for the effects of accidental coincidences, Compton scatter, and object size in positron emission mammography (PEM) imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond Raylman; Stanislaw Majewski; Randolph Wojcik; Andrew Weisenberger; Brian Kross; Vladimir Popov

    2001-06-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) has begun to show promise as an effective method for the detection of breast lesions. Due to its utilization of tumor-avid radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides, this technique may be especially useful in imaging of women with radiodense or fibrocystic breasts. While the use of these radiotracers affords PEM unique capabilities, it also introduces some limitations. Specifically, acceptance of accidental and Compton-scattered coincidence events can decrease lesion detectability. The authors studied the effect of accidental coincidence events on PEM images produced by the presence of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose in the organs of a subject using an anthropomorphic phantom. A delayed-coincidence technique was tested as a method for correcting PEM images for the occurrence of accidental events. Also, a Compton scatter correction algorithm designed specifically for PEM was developed and tested using a compressed breast phantom.

  7. "Islam" In the Anti-Multicultural Rhetoric of Western European Politicians and Anthropologists: Congruence or Coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Pišev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent rhetoric of the "end" or "failure" of multiculturalism in Europe and beyond came as no surprise to anthropologists. Moreover, the statements made by leading politicians of key European economies seem as though they are based on the decades old anthropological critique of the consequences of the failed implementation of multicultural policies in Europe and on the global level. It is as though the messages we have been getting over the course of the last few years – that multicultural policies are contraindicated, that they weaken the contacts between cultures, rob individuals of the right to change and chose their identities and strengthen intra-cultural mediators of power, with patriarchy, violence against women and children, leaving school, religious fundamentalism and even terrorism as main consequences – are being read by politicians from anthropological analyses of abuses of collective "cultural" rights. The paper considers the nature of this similarity between the discourse of politicians and anthropologists with a special emphasis on the status of "Islam" in them, and discusses whether it is congruence or mere coincidence of stances toward minorities, immigrants and cultural differences, as toward the regulations which were tasked with protecting this diversity as a fundamental European value which today, at least at the rhetorical level, seems to be fading.

  8. Cosmological dynamics of D-BIonic and DBI scalar field and coincidence problem of dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panpanich, Sirachak; Maeda, Kei-ichi; Mizuno, Shuntaro

    2017-05-01

    We study the cosmological dynamics of a D-BIonic and Dirac-Born-Infeld scalar field, which is coupled to matter fluid. For the exponential potential and the exponential couplings, we find a new analytic scaling solution yielding the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Since it is shown to be an attractor for some range of the coupling parameters, the density parameter of matter fluid can be the observed value, as in the coupled quintessence with a canonical scalar field. Contrary to the usual coupled quintessence, where the value of the matter coupling giving the observed density parameter is too large to satisfy the observational constraint from the cosmic microwave background, we show that the D-BIonic theory can give a similar solution with a much smaller value of matter coupling. As a result, together with the fact that the D-BIonic theory has a screening mechanism, the D-BIonic theory can solve the so-called coincidence problem as well as the dark energy problem.

  9. A Rapid Coordinate Transformation Method Applied in Industrial Robot Calibration Based on Characteristic Line Coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bailing; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Shi, Xiaojia

    2016-02-18

    Coordinate transformation plays an indispensable role in industrial measurements, including photogrammetry, geodesy, laser 3-D measurement and robotics. The widely applied methods of coordinate transformation are generally based on solving the equations of point clouds. Despite the high accuracy, this might result in no solution due to the use of ill conditioned matrices. In this paper, a novel coordinate transformation method is proposed, not based on the equation solution but based on the geometric transformation. We construct characteristic lines to represent the coordinate systems. According to the space geometry relation, the characteristic line scan is made to coincide by a series of rotations and translations. The transformation matrix can be obtained using matrix transformation theory. Experiments are designed to compare the proposed method with other methods. The results show that the proposed method has the same high accuracy, but the operation is more convenient and flexible. A multi-sensor combined measurement system is also presented to improve the position accuracy of a robot with the calibration of the robot kinematic parameters. Experimental verification shows that the position accuracy of robot manipulator is improved by 45.8% with the proposed method and robot calibration.

  10. A Rapid Coordinate Transformation Method Applied in Industrial Robot Calibration Based on Characteristic Line Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailing Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Coordinate transformation plays an indispensable role in industrial measurements, including photogrammetry, geodesy, laser 3-D measurement and robotics. The widely applied methods of coordinate transformation are generally based on solving the equations of point clouds. Despite the high accuracy, this might result in no solution due to the use of ill conditioned matrices. In this paper, a novel coordinate transformation method is proposed, not based on the equation solution but based on the geometric transformation. We construct characteristic lines to represent the coordinate systems. According to the space geometry relation, the characteristic line scan is made to coincide by a series of rotations and translations. The transformation matrix can be obtained using matrix transformation theory. Experiments are designed to compare the proposed method with other methods. The results show that the proposed method has the same high accuracy, but the operation is more convenient and flexible. A multi-sensor combined measurement system is also presented to improve the position accuracy of a robot with the calibration of the robot kinematic parameters. Experimental verification shows that the position accuracy of robot manipulator is improved by 45.8% with the proposed method and robot calibration.

  11. First satellite measurements of chemical changes in coincidence with sprite activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, Enrico; São Sabbas, Fernanda; Kero, Antti; Soula, Serge; Carlotti, Massimo; Chanrion, Olivier; Dinelli, Bianca Maria; Papandrea, Enzo; Castelli, Elisa; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-05-01

    The last twenty years have seen the discovery of electric discharges in the Earth's atmosphere above thunderstorms, the so-called sprites and jets. It has been suggested that they impact the atmospheric chemistry and possibly affect the ozone layer through their repeated occurrence. Whereas theoretical studies and laboratory experiments suggest enhancement of such gasses as nitrogen oxides by up to hundreds of percent within sprites, a definitive detection of their chemical effects have to date been unsuccessful. In this paper, we report on the first measurements of atmospheric chemical perturbations recorded in coincidence with sprite activity. A striking event occurred on 25 August 2003 when the MIPAS spectrometer onboard the Envisat satellite recorded spectroscopic measurements soon after a sequence of 11 sprites observed above Corsica (France) by Eurosprite ground facilities (details of the convective system are discussed in a companion paper by São Sabbas et al.). The measurements show an enhancement of ambient nitrous oxide by 80% at 52 km altitude in the region above the parent thunderstorm. The recorded chemical changes imply sprites can exert significant modification of the atmospheric chemistry at a regional scale, confirming model and laboratory predictions of sprite-chemistry, and requiring a new estimate of their global impact. The results of the analysis and their implications are discussed.

  12. Calculation of Coincidence Summing Correction Factors for an HPGe detector using GEANT4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubrone, G.; Ortiz, J.; Gallardo, S.; Martorell, S.; Bas, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to calculate the True Coincidence Summing Correction Factors (TSCFs) for an HPGe coaxial detector in order to correct the summing effect as a result of the presence of 88 Y and 60 Co in a multigamma source used to obtain a calibration efficiency curve. Results were obtained for three volumetric sources using the Monte Carlo toolkit, GEANT4. The first part of this paper deals with modeling the detector in order to obtain a simulated full energy peak efficiency curve. A quantitative comparison between the measured and simulated values was made across the entire energy range under study. The True Summing Correction Factors were calculated for 88 Y and 60 Co using the full peak efficiencies obtained with GEANT4. This methodology was subsequently applied to 134 Cs, and presented a complex decay scheme. - Highlights: • True Summing Correction Factors have been calculated for an HPGe detector. • GEANT4 toolkit has been used to calculate the efficiency curve for different source geometries. • Quantitative comparisons have been made using appropriate statistical tests to validate the simulations. • The average differences between simulated and measurement efficiencies are lower than 2%.

  13. Cosmologies with variable parameters and dynamical cosmon: implications on the cosmic coincidence problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, Javier; Sola, Joan; Stefancic, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    Dynamical dark energy (DE) has been proposed to explain various aspects of the cosmological constant (CC) problem(s). For example, it is very difficult to accept that a strictly constant Λ-term constitutes the ultimate explanation for the DE in our Universe. It is also hard to acquiesce in the idea that we accidentally happen to live in an epoch where the CC contributes an energy density value ρ Λ = Λ/8πG right in the ballpark of the rapidly diluting matter density ρ m ∼ 1/a 3 . It should perhaps be more plausible to conceive that the vacuum energy, ρ Λ , is actually a dynamical quantity as the Universe itself. More generally, we could even entertain the possibility that the total DE is in fact a mixture of ρ Λ and other dynamical components (e.g. fields, higher order terms in the effective action etc) which can be represented collectively by an effective entity X (dubbed the 'cosmon'). The 'cosmon', therefore, acts as a dynamical DE component different from the vacuum energy. While it can actually behave phantom-like by itself, the overall DE fluid may effectively appear as standard quintessence, or even mimic at present an almost exact CC behaviour. Thanks to the versatility of such cosmic fluid we can show that a composite DE system of this sort ('ΛXCDM') may have a key to resolving the mysterious coincidence problem

  14. A Rapid Coordinate Transformation Method Applied in Industrial Robot Calibration Based on Characteristic Line Coincidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bailing; Zhang, Fumin; Qu, Xinghua; Shi, Xiaojia

    2016-01-01

    Coordinate transformation plays an indispensable role in industrial measurements, including photogrammetry, geodesy, laser 3-D measurement and robotics. The widely applied methods of coordinate transformation are generally based on solving the equations of point clouds. Despite the high accuracy, this might result in no solution due to the use of ill conditioned matrices. In this paper, a novel coordinate transformation method is proposed, not based on the equation solution but based on the geometric transformation. We construct characteristic lines to represent the coordinate systems. According to the space geometry relation, the characteristic line scan is made to coincide by a series of rotations and translations. The transformation matrix can be obtained using matrix transformation theory. Experiments are designed to compare the proposed method with other methods. The results show that the proposed method has the same high accuracy, but the operation is more convenient and flexible. A multi-sensor combined measurement system is also presented to improve the position accuracy of a robot with the calibration of the robot kinematic parameters. Experimental verification shows that the position accuracy of robot manipulator is improved by 45.8% with the proposed method and robot calibration. PMID:26901203

  15. Estimation of coincidence and correlation in non-analogous Monte Carlo particle transport - 159

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szieberth, M.; Leen Kloosterman, J.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional non-analogous Monte Carlo methods are optimized to preserve the mean value of the distributions and therefore they are not suited for non-Boltzmann problems like the estimation of coincidences or correlations. This paper presents a general method called history splitting for the non-analogous estimation of such quantities. The basic principle of the method is that a non-analogous particle history can be interpreted as a collection of analogous histories with different weights according to the probability of their realization. Calculations with a simple Monte Carlo program for a pulse-height-type estimator prove that the method is feasible and provides unbiased estimation. Different variance reduction techniques have been tried with the method and Russian roulette turned out to be ineffective in high multiplicity systems. An alternative history control method is applied instead. Simulation results of a Feynman-α measurement shows that even the reconstruction of the higher moments is possible with the history splitting method, which makes the simulation of neutron noise measurements feasible. (authors)

  16. Coincidence Efficiency Measurement Using 11B(p,n)11C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Megan; Padalino, Stephen; Polsin, Danae; Krieger, Michael; Stillman, Collin; Bienstock, Mollie; Ellison, Drew; Simone, Angela; Yuly, Mark; Mann, Keith; Reynolds, Tyler; Sangster, Craig

    2012-10-01

    An attempt to measure the 12C(n,2n)11C cross section for high energy neutrons in the range of 20-30 MeV was conducted using Ohio University's accelerator facility as a fast neutron source. The neutrons were incident on a graphite target and the β+ decay of the activated carbon-11 nuclei were observed in an on-axis gamma ray detector pair. To pre-determine the efficiency of this gamma ray detector system, a boron-11 activation experiment was performed. Using SUNY Geneseo's 1.7 MV tandem pelletron accelerator, 3.1 MeV protons were incident upon the 11B foil inducing the 11B(p,n)11C reaction to occur at a high rate of activation. The 11C decays via β+ emission, then upon annihilation with an electron creates characteristic 511-511 keV photon pairs which were counted using coincidence methods. Since the 11B(p,n) cross section is well defined, a calculation was performed to determine the expected number of activations and later compared to the total number of decays observed in the counting system. Funded in part by a grant from the DOE through the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  17. Coincident nonlinear changes in the endocrine and immune systems due to low-frequency magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A A; Wolcott, R M; Chervenak, R; Jourd'heuil, F; Nilsen, E; Frilot, C; Pruett, S B

    2001-01-01

    The characteristic biological effects of low-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) appear to be functional changes in the central nervous, endocrine and immune systems. For unapparent reasons, however, the results of similar studies have often differed markedly from one another. We recognized that it had generally been assumed, in the studies, that EMF effects would exhibit a dose-effect relationship, which is a basic property of linear systems. Prompted by recent developments in the theory on nonlinear systems, we hypothesized that there was a nonlinear relationship between EMFs and the effects they produced in the endocrine and immune systems. We developed a novel analytical method that could be used to distinguish between linear and nonlinear effects, and we employed it to examine the effect of EMFs on the endocrine and immune systems. Mice exposed to 5 G, 60 Hz for 1-175 days in 7 independent experiments reliably exhibited changes in serum corticosterone and lymphoid phenotype when the data were analyzed while allowing that the field exposure and the resulting effects could be nonlinearly related. When the analysis was restricted to linear relationships, no effects due to the field were found. The results indicated that transduction of EMFs resulted in changes in both the endocrine and immune systems, and that the laws governing the changes in each system were not the type that govern conventional dose-effect relationships. Evidence based on mathematical modeling was found suggesting that the coincident changes could have been causally related. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Coincident In Vitro Analysis of DNA-PK-Dependent and -Independent Nonhomologous End Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Hendrickson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian cells, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are primarily repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ. The current model suggests that the Ku 70/80 heterodimer binds to DSB ends and recruits DNA-PKcs to form the active DNA-dependent protein kinase, DNA-PK. Subsequently, XRCC4, DNA ligase IV, XLF and most likely, other unidentified components participate in the final DSB ligation step. Therefore, DNA-PK plays a key role in NHEJ due to its structural and regulatory functions that mediate DSB end joining. However, recent studies show that additional DNA-PK-independent NHEJ pathways also exist. Unfortunately, the presence of DNA-PKcs appears to inhibit DNA-PK-independent NHEJ, and in vitro analysis of DNA-PK-independent NHEJ in the presence of the DNA-PKcs protein remains problematic. We have developed an in vitro assay that is preferentially active for DNA-PK-independent DSB repair based solely on its reaction conditions, facilitating coincident differential biochemical analysis of the two pathways. The results indicate the biochemically distinct nature of the end-joining mechanisms represented by the DNA-PK-dependent and -independent NHEJ assays as well as functional differences between the two pathways.

  19. Rhizobitoxine-induced Chlorosis Occurs in Coincidence with Methionine Deficiency in Soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Shin; Sugawara, Masayuki; Yuhashi, Ken-Ichi; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Rhizobitoxine, produced by the legume symbiont Bradyrhizobium elkanii, inhibits cystathionine-β-lyase (EC 4·4·1·8) in methionine biosynthesis and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACC) in ethylene biosynthesis. Rhizobitoxine production by B. elkanii enhances nodulation of host legumes via the inhibition of ethylene synthesis, but causes foliar chlorosis in susceptible soybeans, though how it does so remains to be investigated. The aim of this study was to examine the physiological basis of rhizobitoxine-induced chlorosis in soybeans. Methods Wild-type B. elkanii and a rhizobitoxine-deficient mutant were inoculated in Glycine max ‘Lee’. Thirty days after inoculation, the upper parts of soybean shoots were analysed for amino acid contents. Chlorotic soybeans inoculated with wild-type B. elkanii were treated with methionine and ACC to assess the effects of the chemicals on the chlorosis. Key Results Chlorotic upper shoots of soybeans inoculated with wild-type B. elkanii had a lower methionine content and higher accumulation of the methionine precursors than those with the rhizobitoxine-deficient mutant. In addition, the foliar chlorosis was alleviated by the application of methionine. Conclusions Rhizobitoxine-induced chlorosis occurs in coincidence with methionine deficiency as a result of cystathione-β-lyase inhibition during methionine biosynthesis. PMID:17525098

  20. Radar Coincidence Imaging for Off-Grid Target Using Frequency-Hopping Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar coincidence imaging (RCI is a high-resolution staring imaging technique without the limitation of the target relative motion. To achieve better imaging performance, sparse reconstruction is commonly used. While its performance is based on the assumption that the scatterers are located at the prediscretized grid-cell centers, otherwise, off-grid emerges and the performance of RCI degrades significantly. In this paper, RCI using frequency-hopping (FH waveforms is considered. The off-grid effects are analyzed, and the corresponding constrained Cramér-Rao bound (CCRB is derived based on the mean square error (MSE of the “oracle” estimator. For off-grid RCI, the process is composed of two stages: grid matching and off-grid error (OGE calibration, where two-dimension (2D band-excluded locally optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (BLOOMP and alternating iteration minimization (AIM algorithms are proposed, respectively. Unlike traditional sparse recovery methods, BLOOMP realizes the recovery in the refinement grids by overwhelming the shortages of coherent dictionary and is robust to noise and OGE. AIM calibration algorithm adaptively adjusts the OGE and, meanwhile, seeks the optimal target reconstruction result.

  1. First coincidences in pre-clinical Compton camera prototype for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studen, A.; Burdette, D.; Chesi, E.; Cindro, V.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Dulinski, W.; Fuster, J.; Han, L.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Llosá, G.; Marques, A. C.; Malakhov, N.; Meier, D.; Mikuž, M.; Park, S. J.; Roe, S.; Rogers, W. L.; Steinberg, J.; Weilhammer, P.; Wilderman, S. J.; Zhang, L.; Žontar, D.

    2004-09-01

    Compton collimated imaging may improve the detection of gamma rays emitted by radioisotopes used in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We present a crude prototype consisting of a single 500μm thick, 256 pad silicon detector with pad size of 1.4×1.4mm2, combined with a 15×15×1cm3 NaI scintillator crystal coupled to a set of 20 photo multipliers. Emphasis is placed on the performance of the silicon detector and the associated read-out electronics, which has so far proved to be the most challenging part of the set-up. Results were obtained using the VATAGP3, 128 channel low-noise self-triggering ASIC as the silicon detector's front-end. The noise distribution (σ) of the spectroscopic outputs gave an equivalent noise charge (ENC) with a mean value of =137e with a spread of 10e, corresponding to an energy resolution of 1.15keV FWHM for the scattered electron energy. Threshold settings above 8.2keV were required for stable operation of the trigger. Coincident Compton scatter events in both modules were observed for photons emitted by 57Co source with principal gamma ray energies of 122 and 136keV.

  2. The Rare Coincidence: Nonrecurrent Laryngeal Nerve Pointed by a Zuckerkandl's Tubercle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Gurleyik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of thyroid operations mainly depends on complete anatomical knowledge. Anatomical and embryological variations of the inferior laryngeal nerve (ILN, of the thyroid gland itself and unusual relations between ILN and the gland threaten operation security are discussed. The patient with toxic multinodular goiter is treated with total thyroidectomy. During dissection of the right lobe, the right ILN which has nonrecurrent course arising directly from cervical vagus nerve is identified and fully isolated until its laryngeal entry. At the operation, we observe bilateral Zuckerkandl's tubercles (ZTs as posterior extension of both lateral lobes. The left ILN has usual recurrent course in the trachea-esophageal groove. The right ZT is placed between upper and middle third of the lobe points the nonrecurrent ILN. The coincidence of non-recurrent ILN pointed by a ZT is rare anatomical and embryological feature of this case. Based on anatomical and embryological variations, we suggest identification and full exposure of ILN before attempting excision of adjacent structures, like the ZT which has surgical importance for completeness of thyroidectomy.

  3. Does functional recovery of hibernating myocardium coincide with improvement in perfusion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeishi, Yasuchika; Tonooka, Ichiro; Chiba, Junya; Abe, Shinya; Tsuiki, Kai; Tomoike, Hitonobu; Yasui, Shoji.

    1992-01-01

    To determine how much recovery of hibernating myocardium coincide with perfusion improvement, 49 patients underwent radionuclide left ventriculography and exercise Tl-201 myocardial scintigraphy (Ex-Tl) before and one month after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). The left ventricle was divided into 6 segments for the assessment of wall motion and Tl-201 uptake. One month after CABG, wall motion improvement was found in a total of 74 segments (seg A), and was also associated with perfusion improvement in 66 segments (89%). Although 8 segments showed wall motion improvement at follow-up examinations (seg B), 7 (88%) had been improved for perfusion one month after CABG. Preoperative akinesis or dyskinesis was more frequently observed for seg B (75%) than seg A (34%). Similarly, seg B was associated with lower %Tl-201 uptake as compared with seg A (74±9% vs 83±8%). In conclusion, perfusion recovery preceded recovery of hibernating myocardium in some segments, suggesting the involvement of stunned myocardium. These segments were associated with severe wall motion abnormality before CABG and lower Tl-201 uptake. (N.K.)

  4. Intrinsic coincident full-Stokes polarimeter using stacked organic photovoltaics and architectural comparison of polarimeter techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruonan; Sen, Pratik; O'Connor, B. T.; Kudenov, M. W.

    2017-08-01

    An intrinsic coincident full-Stokes polarimeter is demonstrated by using stain-aligned polymer-based organic photovoltaics (OPVs) which can preferentially absorb certain polarized states of incident light. The photovoltaic-based polarimeter is capable of measuring four stokes parameters by cascading four semitransparent OPVs in series along the same optical axis. Two wave plates were incorporated into the system to modulate the S3 stokes parameter so as to reduce the condition number of the measurement matrix. The model for the full-Stokes polarimeter was established and validated, demonstrating an average RMS error of 0.84%. The optimization, based on minimizing the condition number of the 4-cell OPV design, showed that a condition number of 2.4 is possible. Performance of this in-line polarimeter concept was compared to other polarimeter architectures, including Division of Time (DoT), Division of Amplitude (DoAm), Division of Focal Plane (DoFP), and Division of Aperture (DoA) from signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) perspective. This in-line polarimeter concept has the potential to enable both high temporal (as compared with a DoT polarimeter) and high spatial resolution (as compared with DoFP and DoA polarimeters). We conclude that the intrinsic design has the same √2 SNR advantage as the DoAm polarimeter, but with greater compactness.

  5. Severe mammal declines coincide with proliferation of invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorcas, Michael E.; Wilson, John D.; Reed, Robert N.; Snow, Ray W.; Rochford, Michael R.; Miller, Melissa A.; Meshaka, Walter E.; Andreadis, Paul T.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Romagosa, Christina M.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2012-01-01

    Invasive species represent a significant threat to global biodiversity and a substantial economic burden. Burmese pythons, giant constricting snakes native to Asia, now are found throughout much of southern Florida, including all of Everglades National Park (ENP). Pythons have increased dramatically in both abundance and geographic range since 2000 and consume a wide variety of mammals and birds. Here we report severe apparent declines in mammal populations that coincide temporally and spatially with the proliferation of pythons in ENP. Before 2000, mammals were encountered frequently during nocturnal road surveys within ENP. In contrast, road surveys totaling 56,971 km from 2003–2011 documented a 99.3% decrease in the frequency of raccoon observations, decreases of 98.9% and 87.5% for opossum and bobcat observations, respectively, and failed to detect rabbits. Road surveys also revealed that these species are more common in areas where pythons have been discovered only recently and are most abundant outside the python's current introduced range. These findings suggest that predation by pythons has resulted in dramatic declines in mammals within ENP and that introduced apex predators, such as giant constrictors, can exert significant top-down pressure on prey populations. Severe declines in easily observed and/or common mammals, such as raccoons and bobcats, bode poorly for species of conservation concern, which often are more difficult to sample and occur at lower densities.

  6. Flow structure from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface in shallow water flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahraman Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vortex formation from a horizontal cylinder coincident with a free surface of a shallow water flow having a depth of 25.4 [mm] was experimentally investigated using the PIV technique. Instantaneous and time-averaged flow patterns in the wake region of the cylinder were examined for three different cylinder diameter values under the fully developed turbulent boundary layer condition. Reynolds numbers were in the range of 1124£ Re£ 3374 and Froude numbers were in the range of 0.41 £ Fr £ 0.71 based on the cylinder diameter. It was found that a jet-like flow giving rise to increasing the flow entrainment between the core and wake regions depending on the cylinder diameter was formed between the lower surface of the cylinder and bottom surface of the channel. Vorticity intensity, Reynolds stress correlations and the primary recirculating bubble lengths were grown to higher values with increasing the cylinder diameter. On the other hand, in the case of the lowest level of the jet-like flow emanating from the beneath of the smallest cylinder, the variation of flow characteristics were attenuated significantly in a shorter distance. The variation of the reattachment location of the separated flow to the free-surface is a strong function of the cylinder diameter and the Froude number.

  7. Performances evaluation of the coincidence detection on a gamma-camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreuille, O. de; Gaillard, J.F.; Brasse, D.; Bendriem, B.; Groiselle, C.; Rocchisani, J.M.; Moretti, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    The performance of the VERTEX gamma-camera (ADAC) working in coincidence mode are investigated using a protocol derived from the NEMA and IEC recommendations. With a field of view determined by two rectangular detectors (50.8 cm x 40 cm) composed of NaI crystal, this camera allows a 3-D acquisition with different energy window configurations: photopeak-photopeak only (PP) and photopeak-photopeak + photopeak-Compton (PC). An energy resolution of 11% and a scatter fraction of 27% and 33% for the 3D-PP and 3D-PC mode respectively are the main significant results of our study. The spatial resolution equals 5.9 mm and the limit of the detectability ranges from 16 mm to 13 mm for a contrast of 2.5: as a function of the random estimation, the maximum of the Noise Equivalent Count rate varies from 3 kcps to 4.5 kcps for the PP mode and from 3.85 kcps to 6.1 kcps for the PC mode. These maxima are reached for a concentration of 8 kBq/ml for the PP mode and 5 kBq/ml for the PC mode. These values are compared with the results obtained by other groups for the VERTEX gamma camera and several dedicated PET systems. (authors)

  8. Automatic classification of gammas-gamma coincidence matrices; Clasificacion automatizada de matrices de coincidencias Gamma-Gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Los Arcos Merino, J. M.; Gonzalez, J. A.

    1978-07-01

    The information obtained during a coincidence experiment, recorded on magnetic tape by a MULTI-8 minicomputer, is transferred to a new tape in 36 bit words, using the program LEC0M8. The classification in two dimensional matrix form is carried out off-line, on a magnetic disk file, by the program CLAFI. On finishing classification one obtains a copy of the coincidence matrix on the second magnetic tape. Both programs are written to be processed in that order with the UNIVAC 1106 computer of J.E.N. (Author) 4 refs.

  9. IR Spectroscopy. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenzler, H.; Gremlich, H.U.

    2002-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: absorption and molecular design, spectrometers, sample preparation, qualitative spectral interpretation and assertions, near-infrared and far-infrared spectroscopy, reference spectra and expert systems

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    ARTICLE. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Biological Applications. B G Hegde. Recently, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectros- copy has emerged as a powerful tool to study the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules such as proteins, protein aggregates ... research interests are.

  11. Foundations of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stenholm, Stig

    2005-01-01

    A simple presentation of the theoretical foundations of steady-state laser spectroscopy, this text helps students to apply theory to calculations with a systematic series of examples and exercises. 1984 edition.

  12. Charmonium spectroscopy, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahn, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    The state of charmonium spectroscopy is reviewed. All analyses proceed from a spin-dependent, non-relativistic Schroedinger equation. Many of the possible branching ratios for charm like states are investigated. 17 refs

  13. Dual THz comb spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    Optical frequency combs are innovative tools for broadband spectroscopy because a series of comb modes can serve as frequency markers that are traceable to a microwave frequency standard. However, a mode distribution that is too discrete limits the spectral sampling interval to the mode frequency spacing even though individual mode linewidth is sufficiently narrow. Here, using a combination of a spectral interleaving and dual-comb spectroscopy in the terahertz (THz) region, we achieved a spectral sampling interval equal to the mode linewidth rather than the mode spacing. The spectrally interleaved THz comb was realized by sweeping the laser repetition frequency and interleaving additional frequency marks. In low-pressure gas spectroscopy, we achieved an improved spectral sampling density of 2.5 MHz and enhanced spectral accuracy of 8.39 × 10-7 in the THz region. The proposed method is a powerful tool for simultaneously achieving high resolution, high accuracy, and broad spectral coverage in THz spectroscopy.

  14. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the

  15. Methods of laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, Y.; Ben-Reuven, A.; Rosenbluh, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the one-atom maser and cavity quantum electrodynamics; Rydberg atoms and radiation; investigation of nonthermal population distributions with femtosecond optical pulses; intra- and intermolecular energy transfer of large molecules in solution after picosecond excitation; new techniques of time-resolved infrared and Raman spectroscopy using ultrashort laser pulses; spectral linewidth of semiconductor lasers; the hydrogen atom in a new light; laser frequency division and stabilization; modified optical Bloch equations for solids; CARS spectroscopy of transient species; off resonant laser induced ring emission; UV laser ionization spectroscopy and ion photochemistry; laser spectroscopy of proton-transfer in microsolvent clusters; recent advances in intramolecular electronic energy transfer; and photoionization and dissociation of the H 2 molecule near the ionization threshold

  16. EDITORIAL: Nano Meets Spectroscopy Nano Meets Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2012-08-01

    The multidisciplinary two-day Nano Meets Spectroscopy (NMS) event was held at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, UK, in September 2011. The event was planned from the outset to be at the interface of several areas—in particular, spectroscopy and nanoscience, and to bring together topics and people with different approaches to achieving common goals in biomolecular science. Hence the meeting cut across traditional boundaries and brought together researchers using diverse techniques, particularly fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Despite engaging common problems, these techniques are frequently seen as mutually exclusive with the two communities rarely interacting at conferences. The meeting was widely seen to have lived up to its billing in good measure. It attracted the maximum capacity of ~120 participants, including 22 distinguished speakers (9 from outside the UK), over 50 posters and a vibrant corporate exhibition comprising 10 leading instrument companies and IOP Publishing. The organizers were Professor David Birch (Chair), Dr Karen Faulds and Professor Duncan Graham of the University of Strathclyde, Professor Cait MacPhee of the University of Edinburgh and Dr Alex Knight of NPL. The event was sponsored by the European Science Foundation, the Institute of Physics, the Royal Society of Chemistry, NPL and the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The full programme and abstracts are available at http://sensor.phys.strath.ac.uk/nms/program.php. The programme was quite ambitious in terms of the breadth and depth of scope. The interdisciplinary and synergistic concept of 'X meets Y' played well, cross-fertilization between different fields often being a source of inspiration and progress. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy provided the core, but the meeting had little repetition and also attracted contributions on more specialist techniques such as CARS, super-resolution, single molecule and chiral methods. In terms of application the

  17. Spectroscopy stepping stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, M.R.; Sturman, B.T.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the elemental composition of samples has long been a basic task of analytical science. Some very powerful and convenient approaches are based on the wavelength-specific absorption or emission of light by gas-phase atoms. Techniques briefly described as examples of analytical atomic spectrometry include atomic emission and absorption spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma emission and mass spectroscopy and laser induced breakdown spectrometry

  18. Clearance of an immunosuppressive virus from the CNS coincides with immune reanimation and diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGavern Dorian B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Once a virus infection establishes persistence in the central nervous system (CNS, it is especially difficult to eliminate from this specialized compartment. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to fully understand scenarios during which a persisting virus is ultimately purged from the CNS by the adaptive immune system. Such a scenario can be found following infection of adult mice with an immunosuppressive variant of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV referred to as clone 13. In this study we demonstrate that following intravenous inoculation, clone 13 rapidly infected peripheral tissues within one week, but more slowly inundated the entire brain parenchyma over the course of a month. During the establishment of persistence, we observed that genetically tagged LCMV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL progressively lost function; however, the severity of this loss in the CNS was never as substantial as that observed in the periphery. One of the most impressive features of this model system is that the peripheral T cell response eventually regains functionality at ~60–80 days post-infection, and this was associated with a rapid decline in virus from the periphery. Coincident with this "reanimation phase" was a massive influx of CD4 T and B cells into the CNS and a dramatic reduction in viral distribution. In fact, olfactory bulb neurons served as the last refuge for the persisting virus, which was ultimately purged from the CNS within 200 days post-infection. These data indicate that a functionally revived immune response can prevail over a virus that establishes widespread presence both in the periphery and brain parenchyma, and that therapeutic enhancement of an existing response could serve as an effective means to thwart long term CNS persistence.

  19. Development and Testing of the Positron Identification By Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, D.; Connell, J. J.; Lopate, C.; Bickford, B.

    2014-12-01

    Moderate energy positrons (~few to 10 MeV) have seldom been observed in the Heliosphere, due primarily to there not having been dedicated instruments for such measurements. Their detection would have implications in the study of Solar energetic particle events and the transport and modulation of the Solar wind and Galactic cosmic rays. The Positron Identification by Coincident Annihilation Photons (PICAP) system is designed specifically to measure these moderate energy positrons by simultaneously detecting the two 511-keV γ-ray photons that result from a positron stopping in the instrument and the subsequent electron-positron annihilation. This method is also expected to effectively discriminate positrons from protons by measuring the amount of energy deposited in the detectors (dE/dx versus residual energy). PICAP offers a low-mass, low-power option for measuring positrons, electrons, and ions in space. Following Monte Carlo modeling, a PICAP laboratory prototype, adaptable to a space-flight design, was designed, built, and tested. This instrument is comprised of (Si) solid-state detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and high-Z BGO crystal scintillator suitable for detecting the 511-keV γ rays. The prototype underwent preliminary laboratory testing and calibration using radioactive sources for the purpose of establishing functionality. It has since been exposed to beams of energetic protons (up to ~200 MeV) at Massachusetts General Hospital's Francis H. Burr Proton Beam Therapy Center and positrons and electrons (up to ~10 MeV) at Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center. The goal is to validate modeling and determine the performance of the instrument concept. We will present a summary of modeling calculations and analysis of data taken at the accelerator tests. This work is 95% supported by NASA Grant NNX10AC10G.

  20. Dynamic remodeling of lipids coincides with dengue virus replication in the midgut of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunya Chotiwan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the first comprehensive analysis of the midgut metabolome of Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector for arboviruses such as dengue, Zika, chikungunya and yellow fever viruses. Transmission of these viruses depends on their ability to infect, replicate and disseminate from several tissues in the mosquito vector. The metabolic environments within these tissues play crucial roles in these processes. Since these viruses are enveloped, viral replication, assembly and release occur on cellular membranes primed through the manipulation of host metabolism. Interference with this virus infection-induced metabolic environment is detrimental to viral replication in human and mosquito cell culture models. Here we present the first insight into the metabolic environment induced during arbovirus replication in Aedes aegypti. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we have analyzed the temporal metabolic perturbations that occur following dengue virus infection of the midgut tissue. This is the primary site of infection and replication, preceding systemic viral dissemination and transmission. We identified metabolites that exhibited a dynamic-profile across early-, mid- and late-infection time points. We observed a marked increase in the lipid content. An increase in glycerophospholipids, sphingolipids and fatty acyls was coincident with the kinetics of viral replication. Elevation of glycerolipid levels suggested a diversion of resources during infection from energy storage to synthetic pathways. Elevated levels of acyl-carnitines were observed, signaling disruptions in mitochondrial function and possible diversion of energy production. A central hub in the sphingolipid pathway that influenced dihydroceramide to ceramide ratios was identified as critical for the virus life cycle. This study also resulted in the first reconstruction of the sphingolipid pathway in Aedes aegypti. Given conservation in the replication mechanisms of several

  1. Acute motor axonal neuropathy associated with anal carcinoma: Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome or coincidence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J. L.; Amezcua, S.; Pascual, J.; Algara, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Assessment of the association of an acute motor axonal neuropathy with a squamous cell anal carcinoma. Background: Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes are not a direct consequence of neither primary tumor nor its metastasis. They often parallel the course of the malignancy but may be the presenting sign of an occult cancer. Sometimes it is very difficult to distinguish if it is a paraneoplastic syndrome or just a coincidence. Materials and methods: We report a 60-year-old man that presented with an acute motor deficit of the four limbs. Clinical examination found a pure and severe motor deficit in the four limbs. No sensory abnormality was found and all motor nerves were unexcitable. Electromyography suggested the diagnosis of acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN). Four months after developing the AMAN, blood in the stool revealed anal carcinoma. The patient was treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Radiation was given to the tumor and to the pelvis, including inguinal nodes, over a five-week period plus fluorouracil and mitomycin. We investigated the presence of anti ganglioside antibodies as studies suggest that carcinomas can express antigens shared with Schwann cells. Results: Anti-GM1 IgG antibodies were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Other antibodies, including antinuclear nucleoprotein antibody (anti-Hu), anti-Tr, anti-Ri, anti-CV2, anti-amphiphysin and anti-Yo, were negative. Clinical improvement of the motor state was observed at the fourth week of oncologic treatment. Conclusion: The presence of anti-GM1 IgG antibodies and the clinical improvement of the motor state after concurrent chemoradiotherapy lead us to believe there is an association between anal carcinoma and this severe impairment. (authors)

  2. Epidemic pasteurellosis in a bighorn sheep population coinciding with the appearance of a domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Janet L; Martin, Daniel J; Lukacs, Paul M; Miller, Michael W

    2008-04-01

    A pneumonia epidemic reduced bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) survival and recruitment during 1997-2000 in a population comprised of three interconnected wintering herds (Kenosha Mountains, Sugarloaf Mountain, Twin Eagles) that inhabited the Kenosha and Tarryall Mountain ranges in central Colorado, USA. The onset of this epidemic coincided temporally and spatially with the appearance of a single domestic sheep (Ovis aires) on the Sugarloaf Mountain herd's winter range in December 1997. Although only bighorns in the Sugarloaf Mountain herd were affected in 1997-98, cases also occurred during 1998-99 in the other two wintering herds, likely after the epidemic spread via established seasonal movements of male bighorns. In all, we located 86 bighorn carcasses during 1997-2000. Three species of Pasteurella were isolated in various combinations from affected lung tissues from 20 bighorn carcasses where tissues were available and suitable for diagnostic evaluation; with one exception, beta-hemolytic mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica (primarily reported as biogroup 1(G) or 1(alphaG)) was isolated from lung tissues of cases evaluated during winter 1997-98. The epidemic dramatically lowered adult bighorn monthly survival in all three herds; a model that included an acute epidemic effect, differing between sexes and with vaccination status, that diminished linearly over the next 12 mo best represented field data. In addition to the direct mortality associated with epidemics in these three herds, lamb recruitment in years following the pneumonia epidemic also was depressed as compared to years prior to the epidemic. Based on observations presented here, pasteurellosis epidemics in free-ranging bighorn sheep can arise through incursion of domestic sheep onto native ranges, and thus minimizing contact between domestic and bighorn sheep appears to be a logical principle for bighorn sheep conservation.

  3. Shifting brucellosis risk in livestock coincides with spreading seroprevalence in elk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Angela; Cross, Paul C.; Portacci, Katie; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Edwards, William H.

    2017-01-01

    Tracking and preventing the spillover of disease from wildlife to livestock can be difficult when rare outbreaks occur across large landscapes. In these cases, broad scale ecological studies could help identify risk factors and patterns of risk to inform management and reduce incidence of disease. Between 2002 and 2014, 21 livestock herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) were affected by brucellosis, a bacterial disease caused by Brucella abortus, while no affected herds were detected between 1990 and 2001. Using a Bayesian analysis, we examined several ecological covariates that may be associated with affected livestock herds across the region. We showed that livestock risk has been increasing over time and expanding outward from the historical nexus of brucellosis in wild elk on Wyoming’s feeding grounds where elk are supplementally fed during the winter. Although elk were the presumed source of cattle infections, occurrences of affected livestock herds were only weakly associated with the density of seropositive elk across the GYA. However, the shift in livestock risk did coincide with recent increases in brucellosis seroprevalence in unfed elk populations. As increasing brucellosis in unfed elk likely stemmed from high levels of the disease in fed elk, disease-related costs of feeding elk have probably been incurred across the entire GYA, rather than solely around the feeding grounds. Our results suggest that focused disease mitigation in areas where seroprevalence in unfed elk is high could reduce the spillover of brucellosis to livestock. We also highlight the need to better understand the epidemiology of spillover events with detailed histories of disease testing, calving, and movement of infected livestock. Finally, we recommend using case-control studies to investigate local factors important to livestock risk.

  4. Shifting brucellosis risk in livestock coincides with spreading seroprevalence in elk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Brennan

    Full Text Available Tracking and preventing the spillover of disease from wildlife to livestock can be difficult when rare outbreaks occur across large landscapes. In these cases, broad scale ecological studies could help identify risk factors and patterns of risk to inform management and reduce incidence of disease. Between 2002 and 2014, 21 livestock herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA were affected by brucellosis, a bacterial disease caused by Brucella abortus, while no affected herds were detected between 1990 and 2001. Using a Bayesian analysis, we examined several ecological covariates that may be associated with affected livestock herds across the region. We showed that livestock risk has been increasing over time and expanding outward from the historical nexus of brucellosis in wild elk on Wyoming's feeding grounds where elk are supplementally fed during the winter. Although elk were the presumed source of cattle infections, occurrences of affected livestock herds were only weakly associated with the density of seropositive elk across the GYA. However, the shift in livestock risk did coincide with recent increases in brucellosis seroprevalence in unfed elk populations. As increasing brucellosis in unfed elk likely stemmed from high levels of the disease in fed elk, disease-related costs of feeding elk have probably been incurred across the entire GYA, rather than solely around the feeding grounds. Our results suggest that focused disease mitigation in areas where seroprevalence in unfed elk is high could reduce the spillover of brucellosis to livestock. We also highlight the need to better understand the epidemiology of spillover events with detailed histories of disease testing, calving, and movement of infected livestock. Finally, we recommend using case-control studies to investigate local factors important to livestock risk.

  5. Early dystrophin loss is coincident with the transition of compensated cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Fernanda P; Dos Santos, Daniele O; Blefari, Valdecir; Silva, Carlos A; Machado, Juliano; Kettelhut, Isis do Carmo; Ramos, Simone G; Baruffi, Marcelo Dias; Salgado, Helio C; Prado, Cibele M

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension causes cardiac hypertrophy, one of the most important risk factors for heart failure (HF). Despite the importance of cardiac hypertrophy as a risk factor for the development of HF, not all hypertrophied hearts will ultimately fail. Alterations of cytoskeletal and sarcolemma-associated proteins are considered markers cardiac remodeling during HF. Dystrophin provides mechanical stability to the plasma membrane through its interactions with the actin cytoskeleton and, indirectly, to extracellular matrix proteins. This study was undertaken to evaluate dystrophin and calpain-1 in the transition from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to HF. Wistar rats were subjected to abdominal aorta constriction and killed at 30, 60 and 90 days post surgery (dps). Cardiac function and blood pressure were evaluated. The hearts were collected and Western blotting and immunofluorescence performed for dystrophin, calpain-1, alpha-fodrin and calpastatin. Statistical analyses were performed and considered significant when pDystrophin expression was lightly increased at 30 and 60 dps and HH group. HD group showed decreased expression of dystrophin and calpastatin and increased expression of calpain-1 and alpha-fodrin fragments. The first signals of dystrophin reduction were observed as early as 60 dps. In conclusion, some hearts present a distinct molecular pattern at an early stage of the disease; this pattern could provide an opportunity to identify these failure-prone hearts during the development of the cardiac disease. We showed that decreased expression of dystrophin and increased expression of calpains are coincident and could work as possible therapeutic targets to prevent heart failure as a consequence of cardiac hypertrophy.

  6. Functional recovery of hibernating myocardium after coronary bypass surgery: Does it coincide with improvement in perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeishi, Y.; Tono-oka, I.; Kubota, I.; Ikeda, K.; Masakane, I.; Chiba, J.; Abe, S.; Tsuiki, K.; Komatani, A.; Yamaguchi, I.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the relationship between functional recovery and improvement in perfusion after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), 49 patients were studied. Radionuclide angiography was performed before, 1 month after, and 6 to 12 months after CABG to evaluate regional wall motion. Exercise thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging was done before and 1 month after CABG to assess regional perfusion. Preoperative asynergy was observed in 108 segments, and 74 of them showed an improvement in wall motion 1 month after CABG (segment A). Sixty-six of these segments (89%) were associated with an improvement in perfusion. Eight segments that had not improved 1 month after CABG demonstrated a delayed recovery of wall motion 6 to 12 months after CABG (segment B). However, seven of eight segments (88%) already showed an improvement in perfusion 1 month after CABG. A total of 82 segments exhibited functional recovery after CABG and were considered hibernating segments. In the preoperative study segment B more frequently had areas of akinesis or dyskinesis than segment A (75% vs 34%, p less than 0.05). The mean percent thallium-201 uptake in segment B was lower than that in segment A (74% ± 9% vs 83% ± 8%, p less than 0.05). Functional recovery of hibernating myocardium usually coincided with an improvement in perfusion. However, delayed functional recovery after reperfusion was observed in some instances. Severe asynergy and severe thallium-201 defects were more frequently observed in these segments with delayed recovery. Hibernating myocardium might remain stunned during those recovery periods

  7. Shifting brucellosis risk in livestock coincides with spreading seroprevalence in elk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Angela; Cross, Paul C; Portacci, Katie; Scurlock, Brandon M; Edwards, William H

    2017-01-01

    Tracking and preventing the spillover of disease from wildlife to livestock can be difficult when rare outbreaks occur across large landscapes. In these cases, broad scale ecological studies could help identify risk factors and patterns of risk to inform management and reduce incidence of disease. Between 2002 and 2014, 21 livestock herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) were affected by brucellosis, a bacterial disease caused by Brucella abortus, while no affected herds were detected between 1990 and 2001. Using a Bayesian analysis, we examined several ecological covariates that may be associated with affected livestock herds across the region. We showed that livestock risk has been increasing over time and expanding outward from the historical nexus of brucellosis in wild elk on Wyoming's feeding grounds where elk are supplementally fed during the winter. Although elk were the presumed source of cattle infections, occurrences of affected livestock herds were only weakly associated with the density of seropositive elk across the GYA. However, the shift in livestock risk did coincide with recent increases in brucellosis seroprevalence in unfed elk populations. As increasing brucellosis in unfed elk likely stemmed from high levels of the disease in fed elk, disease-related costs of feeding elk have probably been incurred across the entire GYA, rather than solely around the feeding grounds. Our results suggest that focused disease mitigation in areas where seroprevalence in unfed elk is high could reduce the spillover of brucellosis to livestock. We also highlight the need to better understand the epidemiology of spillover events with detailed histories of disease testing, calving, and movement of infected livestock. Finally, we recommend using case-control studies to investigate local factors important to livestock risk.

  8. Study of a 4πβ-γ coincidence system for absolute radionuclide activity measurement using plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piuvezam Filho, Helio

    2007-01-01

    The present work was intended to study a coincidence system 4π(PS)β-γ for absolute activity measurement using plastic scintillators in 4π geometry. Along with experiments on the coincidence system, simulations were also performed applying the Monte Carlo Method, by means of codes PENELOPE and ESQUEMA. These simulations were performed in order to calculate the extrapolation curve of the coincidence system 4π(PS)β-γ and compare it to experimental data. A new geometry was proposed to the coincidence system adding up a second photomultiplier tube to the previous system for improving light collection from the plastic scintillator, as this system presented limitations in the minimum detected energy due to the presence of electronic noise and low gain. The results show that an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was obtained, as well as in the minimum detected energy. Moreover, there was an increase in the detection efficiency. With these modifications, it is now possible to calibrate radionuclides which emit low energy electrons or X-rays, increasing the number of radionuclides that can be standardized with this type of system.(author)

  9. Coincidence measurements with the use of detectors measuring the energy of the radiances (proportional meters and scintillation counter)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartory, M.

    1953-01-01

    In the setting of the realization of a set of installations permitting of the measures of coincidences between sorted radiances according to their energies, an installation understanding a proportional counter and a scintillation counter has been constructed and optimized. It has been used to do some measures of coincidences between X K photons and photons γ issued at the time of the radioactive transformation of the selenium 75 (electronic capture). The efficiency of the proportional meter has been determined roughly. Besides, a proportional counter of solid angle neighboring of 4π was able to achieve measures of coincidences while only doing one selection of amplitudes: indeed, the simultaneity of the detection of two radiances appear by an impulse whose amplitude is the sum of the amplitudes of the impulses resulting from each of the studied radiations. This method, applied to the coincidences between X-rays, permitted to bring the information on the diagram of decay of the arsenic 73. Besides, the coefficient of internal conversion of a consecutive transition to this decay has been valued. (author) [fr

  10. γ-Ray spectroscopy using a binned likelihood approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermigny, J. R.; Iliadis, C.; Buckner, M. Q.; Kelly, K. J.

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of a reaction cross section from a pulse height spectrum is a ubiquitous problem in experimental nuclear physics. In γ-ray spectroscopy, this is accomplished frequently by measuring the intensity of full-energy primary transition peaks and correcting the intensities for experimental artifacts, such as detection efficiencies and angular correlations. Implicit in this procedure is the assumption that full-energy peaks do not overlap with any secondary peaks, escape peaks, or environmental backgrounds. However, for complex γ-ray cascades, this is often not the case. Furthermore, this technique is difficult to adapt for coincidence spectroscopy, where intensities depend not only on the detection efficiency, but also the detailed decay scheme. We present a method that incorporates the intensities of the entire spectrum (e.g., primary and secondary transition peaks, escape peaks, Compton continua, etc.) into a statistical model, where the transition intensities and branching ratios can be determined using Bayesian statistical inference. This new method provides an elegant solution to the difficulties associated with analyzing coincidence spectra. We describe it in detail and examine its efficacy in the analysis of 18O(p,γ)19F and 25Mg(p,γ)26Al resonance data. For the 18O(p,γ)19F reaction, the measured branching ratios improve upon the literature values, with a factor of 3 reduction in the uncertainties.

  11. Moessbauer spectroscopy. Tutorial book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Langouche, Guido

    2013-01-01

    First textbook on Moessbauer Spectroscopy covering the complete field. Offers a concise introduction to all aspects of Moessbauer spectroscopy by the leading experts in the field. Tutorials on Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Since the discovery of the Moessbauer Effect many excellent books have been published for researchers and for doctoral and master level students. However, there appears to be no textbook available for final year bachelor students, nor for people working in industry who have received only basic courses in classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, chemistry and materials science. The challenge of this book is to give an introduction to Moessbauer Spectroscopy for this level. The ultimate goal of this book is to give this audience not only a scientific introduction to the technique, but also to demonstrate in an attractive way the power of Moessbauer Spectroscopy in many fields of science, in order to create interest among the readers in joining the community of Moessbauer spectroscopists. This is particularly important at times where in many Moessbauer laboratories succession is at stake.

  12. Primary Standardization of 152Eu by 4πβ(LS) – γ (Nal) coincidence counting and CIEMAT-NIST method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzzarin, A.; da Cruz, P. A. L.; Ferreira Filho, A. L.; Iwahara, A.

    2018-03-01

    The 4πβ-γ coincidence counting and CIEMAT/NIST liquid scintillation method were used in the standardization of a solution of 152Eu. In CIEMAT/NIST method, measurements were performed in a Liquid Scintillation Counter model Wallac 1414. In the 4πβ-γ coincidence counting, the solution was standardized using a coincidence method with ‘‘beta-efficiency extrapolation”. A simple 4πβ-γ coincidence system was used, with acrylic scintillation cell coupled to two coincident photomultipliers at 180° each other and NaI(Tl) detector. The activity concentrations obtained were 156.934 ± 0.722 and 157.403 ± 0.113 kBq/g, respectively, for CIEMAT/NIST and 4πβ-γ coincidence counting measurement methods.

  13. Spectroscopy of 189Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, A.M.; Byrne, A.P.; Dracoulis, G.D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Brown, T.; Carpenter, M.P.; Conticchio, L.F.; Davids, C.N.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.; Nisius, D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Recent studies of the very neutron-deficient lead isotopes 188 , 190 Pb have shown evidence for competing structures which may be attributed to the coexistence of spherical, weakly-deformed oblate and moderately-deformed prolate shapes. These studies have relied strongly on the observation of isomers to distinguish the properties of the states concerned. However, prior to the present work, information on the properties of the yrast and near-yrast states in the neighbouring, odd-A isotope 189 Pb was tentative and fragmentary. In an experiment at the Argonne National Laboratory, prompt gamma-gamma coincidence data on 189 Pb were obtained with the 158 Gd( 36 Ar,5n) reaction. In this experiment, mass identification of the gamma-radiation was provided by coincident detection of recoiling evaporation residues in the ANL Fragment Mass Analyser. In a second experiment, at the Australian National University, using the 164 Er( 29 Si,4n) reaction, an isomer with a 32-μs lifetime was identified in 189 Pb and the main features of the level scheme below this isomer were established. The results will be discussed in the light of the structures identified in the heavier odd-mass lead isotopes and in the neighbouring even-mass isotopes

  14. Plasmon enhanced spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroca, Ricardo F

    2013-04-21

    Surface enhanced spectroscopy encompasses a broad field of linear and nonlinear optical techniques that arose with the discovery of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. SERS enabled ultrasensitive and single molecule detection with molecular fingerprint specificity, opening the door for a large variety of chemical sensing applications. Basically, from the beginning it was realized that the necessary condition for SERS to be observed was the presence of a metallic nanostructure, and with this condition, the optical enhancement found a home in the field of plasmonics. Although plasmonic practitioners claim that SERS is "the most spectacular application of plasmonics", perhaps it is more appropriate to say that the spectacular development of plasmonics is due to SERS. Here is a brief recollection from surface enhanced spectroscopy to plasmon enhanced spectroscopy.

  15. Terahertz Spectroscopy and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Zeitler, Axel; Kuwata-Gonokami, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    "This book presents the current state of knowledge in the field of terahertz spectroscopy, providing a comprehensive source of information for beginners and experienced researchers alike whose interests lie in this area. The book aims to explain the fundamental physics that underpins terahertz  technology and to describe its key applications. Highlights of scientific research in the field of terahertz science are also outlined in some chapters, providing an overview as well as giving an insight into future directions for research.  Over the past decade terahertz spectroscopy has developed into one of the most rapidly growing areas of its kind, gaining an important impact across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Due to substantial advances in femtosecond laser technology, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) has established itself as the dominant spectroscopic technique for experimental scientists interested in measurements at this frequency range. In solids and liquids THz radiation is in reso...

  16. The Rationale of Crisis Management – On the Handling of Coincidence in Economic Situation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bendixen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this essay is too complex a problem as to cover all details in depth and, thus, draws its attention only to core aspects of the handling of coincidence leaving out sophisticated studies and analytic findings as well as detailed reference to economic literature though there is not very much. On the other hand, for a lot of actual as well as general reasons, the subject is too important a matter as to ignore the serious methodological problems of crisis management, which are rooted in some politically still active bias hidden in orthodox neo-classical economics (Stiglitz 2010. If crisis management continues to follow traditional rationales, it will fail realizing the increasing dynamic of crises within the globalising economies of the world. No existing economy can be considered as an isolated system of its own embedded in a stable composition of societal surroundings. Obviously, many a critical situation has its origin in the sphere of civilization, of political discrepancies, and of administrative inflexibilities. On the other hand, any grave amplitude of markets would touch the entire social surrounding. The belief in the markets’ strength of self-regulation is a dangerous construction of orthodox economics (Bendixen 2009b, 2010. The view on crises suggested here is that of a holistic approach to understand a critical situation. Any interpretation of a situation includes empirical dates and figures based on analytic research, but solving a problem is not an act of logical derivation from findings, as if a solution can be excavated in the mud of reality by empirical studies only. Empirical figures report events of the past; the future does not reveal any empiricism. This would be a contradiction in itself. The end of a crisis as well as the search for solutions to fight the problems revealed is unavoidably a view into the future. Therefore, the rationale of crisis management cannot be made of pure empiricism but should include a

  17. Abrupt hydroclimate disruption across the Australian arid zone 50 ka coincident with human colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. H.; Fogel, M. L.; Magee, J. W.; Gagan, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    Although many studies focus on how climate change impacted ancient societies, in Australia a growing body of evidence indicates that activities of the earliest human colonizers in turn altered the Australian climate. We utilize the stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen preserved in near-continuous 100 ka time series of avian eggshell from five regions across the Australian arid zone to reconstruct ecosystem status (d13C) and effective moisture (d18O). Training sets of sub-modern samples provide the basis for the reconstructions. Together, d13C and d18O provide independent estimates of ecosystem status and climate over the past 100 ka from the same dated sample, reducing correlation uncertainties between proxies. Changes in eggshell d13C document a dramatic reduction of palatable summer-wet C4 grasses in all regions between 50 and 45 ka, that has persisted through to modern times. Continuous 100 ka records of effective moisture derived from eggshell d18O show moist conditions from 100 to 60 ka, with variable drying after 60 ka, but the strong shift toward greatest aridity is coincident with the onset of the last glacial maximum 30 ka ago, 15 ka after the observed ecosystem restructuring. Combining the d13C and d18O time-series shows that an abrupt and permanent restructuring of the moisture/ecosystem balance occurred between 50 and 45 ka. Additional studies show that most large monsoon-fed inland arid-zone lakes carried permanent water at least intermittently between 120 and 50 ka, but never experienced permanent deep-water status after 45 ka, despite a wide range of global climate states, including the early Holocene when most other monsoon systems were reinvigorated. The lack of exceptional climate shifts either locally or globally between 60 and 40 ka eliminates climate as the cause of the ecosystem restructuring and persistent lake desiccation. Collectively these data suggest the wave of human colonization across Australia in altered land surface characteristics

  18. Unexpected decline in tuberculosis cases coincident with economic recession -- United States, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston Carla A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 1953, through the cooperation of state and local health departments, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has collected information on incident cases of tuberculosis (TB disease in the United States. In 2009, TB case rates declined -11.4%, compared to an average annual -3.8% decline since 2000. The unexpectedly large decline raised concerns that TB cases may have gone unreported. To address the unexpected decline, we examined trends from multiple sources on TB treatment initiation, medication sales, and laboratory and genotyping data on culture-positive TB. Methods We analyzed 142,174 incident TB cases reported to the U. S. National Tuberculosis Surveillance System (NTSS during January 1, 2000-December 31, 2009; TB control program data from 59 public health reporting areas; self-reported data from 50 CDC-funded public health laboratories; monthly electronic prescription claims for new TB therapy prescriptions; and complete genotyping results available for NTSS cases. Accounting for prior trends using regression and time-series analyses, we calculated the deviation between observed and expected TB cases in 2009 according to patient and clinical characteristics, and assessed at what point in time the deviation occurred. Results The overall deviation in TB cases in 2009 was -7.9%, with -994 fewer cases reported than expected (P Conclusions Our assessments show that the decline in reported TB was not an artifact of changes in surveillance methods; rather, similar declines were found through multiple data sources. While the steady decline of TB cases before 2009 suggests ongoing improvement in TB control, we were not able to identify any substantial change in TB control activities or TB transmission that would account for the abrupt decline in 2009. It is possible that other multiple causes coincident with economic recession in the United States, including decreased immigration and delayed access to

  19. A first search for coincident gravitational waves and high energy neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Palma, Irene

    2012-08-14

    We present the results of the first search for gravitational wave (GW) bursts associated with high energy neutrinos (HEN), detected by the underwater neutrino telescope ANTARES in its 5 lines configuration, during the fifth LIGO science run and first Virgo science run. The data used in this analysis were collected from February 9 to September 30 2007. Cataclysmic cosmic events with burst activity can be plausible sources of concomitant GW and HEN. Such messengers could reveal new, hidden sources that are not observed by conventional photon astronomy, in particular at high energy. In a first stage of the analysis, HEN candidates, detected during the operation of the ANTARES Telescope were selected. In a second stage, GW candidates in time and space correlation with the HEN events were searched for in LIGO and Virgo data. During this first joint GW+HEN search, no coincident event was observed. We set limits on the population density of different types of concurrent GW-HEN sources. For short GRB-like sources, related to the merger of two compact objects, the density upper limit is {rho}{sub GW-HEN}{sup SGRB}

  20. Design of an electronic system with simultaneous registering of pulse amplitude and event time applied to the 4πβ-γ coincidence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo, Fabio de

    2009-01-01

    The 4πβ-γ coincidence method for absolute radionuclide activity measurement has been considered for many years as a primary standard in Nuclear Metrology, because of dependence on few observable quantities and high accuracy. The Laboratorio de Metrologia Nuclear (LMN) - Nuclear Metrology Laboratory -, at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) - Nuclear and Energy Research Institute -, among its measurement techniques, uses the 4πβ-γ coincidence method. Recently a new technique known as 'software coincidence' has been used, with many advantages over the conventional coincidence methodology. In order to update the methodologies for radionuclide standardizations, the LMN developed a new system based on the software coincidence technique, described in the present work. This system uses the same nuclear set up for beta and gamma detection. The new software coincidence electronics uses a National Instruments (NI) acquisition card connected to a microcomputer and, through a connection panel, to the nuclear detection set up. The card configuration and controlling is accomplished by software using the LabVIEW, a NI proprietary product. This system records into disk files all the amplitudes and occurrence times for beta and gamma detected pulses. A suitable software was developed (the coincidence analysis program) to process the recorded data in order to obtain beta, gamma and coincidence counts and perform calculation of the radioactive source activity. The work also presents and discusses the results obtained with the first version of the coincidence analysis program, as well as perspectives for future works. (author)

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, K. M.; Ridgway, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews applications of IR techniques in stellar classification, studies of stellar photospheres, elemental and isotopic abundances, and the nature of remnant and ejected matter in near-circumstellar regions. Qualitative IR spectral classification of cool and hot stars is discussed, along with IR spectra of peculiar composite star systems and of obscured stars, and IR characteristics of stellar populations. The use of IR spectroscopy in theoretical modeling of stellar atmospheres is examined, IR indicators of stellar atmospheric composition are described, and contributions of IR spectroscopy to the study of stellar recycling of interstellar matter are summarized. The future of IR astronomy is also considered.

  2. Coincidence of flowering time and the productivity and quality of cauliflower hybrid seeds Coincidência de florescimento entre linhagens de couve-flor na produtividade e qualidade de sementes híbridas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Fontanetti Verdial

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The missing of flowering synchronization between the self-incompatible lines in a crop field of cauliflower hybrid seeds besides making the seed production smaller can compromise the genetic purity of them. The coincidence of the flowering time between two cauliflower lines was examined to study its effect on the productivity and quality of hybrid seeds. The treatments consisted of six different sowing dates, every fifteen days, using a self-incompatible tropical line pollinated by a winter line which does not present self-incompatibility. The following characteristics were evaluated: leaf average area and number of flowers per plant, number of siliques per plant, number and weight of seeds per plant, weight of thousand seeds and average number of seeds per silique. The germination standard test and genetic seed purity were determined for each treatment. The coincident flowering season between cauliflower lines affects directly the productivity and the genetic quality of the produced hybrid seeds. The closer the flowering time coincidence between the lines, the greater the number of seeds per silique and the smaller the percentage of non-hybrid seedlings. However, the coincidence of the flowering season between lines was found to influence physiological seed quality.A falta de sincronismo de florescimento entre as linhagens auto incompatíveis em um campo de produção de sementes híbridas de couve flor pode além de reduzir a produção de sementes comprometer a pureza genética das mesmas. Com o objetivo de estudar o efeito da coincidência de florescimento entre linhagens de couve-flor na produtividade e qualidade de sementes híbridas, foi realizado o presente experimento. Os tratamentos consistiram em seis diferentes épocas de semeadura, espaçadas a cada quinze dias, de uma linhagem de verão auto-incompatível que foi polinizada por uma linhagem de inverno que não apresenta auto-incompatibilidade. Observou-se a coincidência do

  3. Realisation of a {beta} spectrometer solenoidal and a double {beta} spectrometer at coincidence; Realisation d'un spectrometre {beta} solenoidal et d'un double spectrometre {beta} a coincidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-06-15

    The two spectrometers have been achieved to tackle numerous problems of nuclear spectrometry. They possess different fields of application that complete themselves. The solenoidal spectrometer permits the determination of the energy limits of {beta} spectra and of their shape; it also permits the determination of the coefficients of internal conversion and reports {alpha}{sub K} / {alpha}{sub L} and it is especially efficient for the accurate energy levels of the {gamma} rays by photoelectric effect. The double coincidence spectrometer has been conceived to get a good efficiency in coincidence: indeed, the sum of the solid angles used for the {beta} and {gamma} emission is rather little lower to 4{pi} steradians. To get this efficiency, one should have sacrificed a little the resolution that is lower to the one obtained with the solenoidal spectrometer for a same brightness. Each of the elements of the double spectrometer can also be adapted to the study of angular correlations {beta}{gamma} and e{sup -}{gamma}. In this use, it is superior to the thin magnetic lens used up to here. The double spectrometer also permits the survey of the coincidences e{sup -}e{sup -}, e{sup -}{beta} of a equivalent way to a double lens; it can also be consider some adaptation for the survey of the angular correlations e{sup -}e{sup -}, e{sup -}{beta}. Finally, we applied the methods by simple spectrometry and by coincidence spectrometry, to the study of the radiances of the following radioelements: {sup 76}As (26 h), {sup 122}Sb (2,8 j), {sup 124}Sb (60 j), {sup 125}Sb (2,7 years). (M.B.) [French] Les deux spectrometres qui ont ete realises permettent d'aborder un grand nombre de problemes de spectrometrie nucleaire. Ils possedent des champs d'application tres differents qui se completent. Le spectrometre solenoidal permet la determination des energies limites des spectres {beta} et de leur forme; il permet aussi la determination des coefficients de conversion interne et

  4. Dye lasers in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.; Luther, J.; Steudel, A.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of dye lasers which are relevant to atomic spectroscopy are discussed. Several experiments made possible by tunable dye lasers are discussed. Applications of high spectral density dye lasers are covered in areas such as absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, photoionization and photodetachment, and two- and multi-photon processes. Applications which take advantage of the narrow bandwidth of tunable dye lasers are discussed, including saturation spectroscopy, fluorescence line narrowing, classic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, nonoptical detection of optical resonances, heterodyne spectroscopy, and nonlinear coherent resonant phenomena. (26 figures, 180 references) (U.S.)

  5. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. General Article Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 151-164. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Astronomical Spectroscopy -24 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in Mendeleev's Periodic Table when the latter was formulated in. 1869. Cesium was discovered ten years earlier, in 1859; it is the first element discovered by spectroscopy. Kirchhoff and Bunsen continued their search; another new element was discovered in. 1860. It was named rubidium, and it filled up another slot in the.

  7. Outlook for baryon spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripp, R.D.

    1976-09-01

    The review of baryon spectroscopy includes a number of new generation experiments with greatly improved statistics which have emerged and are enhancing experimental knowledge of baryon resonances. The future research directions are pointed out, and some problems and deficiencies which can be resolved with contemporary techniques are mentioned

  8. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  9. Charmonium spectroscopy - A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to a renewed interest in the precision spectroscopy of charmonium. These are the successful exploitation of proton-antiproton annihilation in the /× = 2 9-4.0. GeV range at Fermilab (FNAL experiments E760, E835), and the BEs spectrometer program at BEPC, the electron positron collider at Beijing. Both these experiments.

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  11. Charmonium spectroscopy - A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A review is presented of the latest developments in the spectroscopy of char- monium. Keywords. Charmonium ... More than half the decays measured have errors larger than 30%. The bound states,. ' (21Л0) and .... at sLAC claimed to have found it, but no other past experiment succeeded in confirming it. E760 and E835 ...

  12. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    essential to understand their structure. Membrane-bound proteins are generally not amenable to crystallization and often their sizes are so large that conventional techniques such as X-ray crystal- lography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy will have limited applications in deciphering their structure. In.

  13. Spectroscopy of new particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, G.

    1977-08-01

    A review of the spectroscopy of the ''psions'' with hidden charm or charm quantum number ch = o is followed by a discussion of charmed mesons and baryons. The anomalous C-μ events and the heavy lepton hypothesis are briefly considered

  14. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    RESONANCE. February 2015. GENERAL ARTICLE. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy. Every Molecule is Different! Kankan Bhattacharyya. Keywords. Single-molecule ..... Resonance Energy. Transfer (FRET) is an elegant technique to measure the distance between a donor and an acceptor molecule. FRET refers to the.

  15. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  16. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Single-Molecule Spectroscopy: Every Molecule is Different! ... Author Affiliations. Kankan Bhattacharyya1. Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 India.

  17. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  19. An automated LS(β)- NaI(Tl)(γ) coincidence system as absolute standard for radioactivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Leena; Das, A P; Ravindra, Anuradha; Kulkarni, D B; Kulkarni, M S

    2018-03-06

    4πβ-γ coincidence method is a powerful and widely used method to determine the absolute activity concentration of radioactive solutions. A new automated liquid scintillator based coincidence system has been designed, developed, tested and established as absolute standard for radioactivity measurements. The automation is achieved using PLC (programmable logic controller) and SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition). Radioactive solution of 60 Co was standardized to compare the performance of the automated system with proportional counter based absolute standard maintained in the laboratory. The activity concentrations determined using these two systems were in very good agreement; the new automated system can be used for absolute measurement of activity concentration of radioactive solutions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Detection in coincidence of gravitational wave bursts with a network of interferometric detectors: Geometric acceptance and timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Canitrot, Philippe; Cavalier, Fabien; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Pradier, Thierry

    2002-01-01

    Detecting gravitational wave bursts (characterized by short durations and poorly modeled waveforms) requires coincidences between several interferometric detectors in order to reject nonstationary noise events. As the wave amplitude seen in a detector depends on its location with respect to the source direction and as the signal to noise ratio of these bursts is expected to be low, coincidences between antennas may not be very likely. This paper investigates this question from a statistical point of view by using a simple model of a network of detectors; it also estimates the timing precision of a detection in an interferometer, which is an important issue for the reconstruction of the source location based on time delays

  1. An Optimized Design of Single-Channel Beta-Gamma Coincidence Phoswich Detector by Geant4 Monte Carlo Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimized single-channel phoswich well detector design has been proposed and assessed in order to improve beta-gamma coincidence measurement sensitivity of xenon radioisotopes. This newly designed phoswich well detector consists of a plastic beta counting cell (BC404 embedded in a CsI(Tl crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The BC404 is configured in a cylindrical pipe shape to minimise light collection deterioration. The CsI(Tl crystal consists of a rectangular part and a semicylindrical scintillation part as a light reflector to increase light gathering. Compared with a PhosWatch detector, the final optimized detector geometry showed 15% improvement in the energy resolution of a 131mXe 129.4 keV conversion electron peak. The predicted beta-gamma coincidence efficiencies of xenon radioisotopes have also been improved accordingly.

  2. Coincidence theory: Seeking a perceptual preference for just intonation, equal temperament, and Pythagorean intonation in excerpts for wind instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Derle Ray

    Coincidence theory states that when the components of harmony are in enhanced alignment the sound will be more consonant to the human auditory system. An objective method of examining the components of harmony is by investigating alignment of the mathematics of a particular sound or harmony. The study examined preference responses to excerpts tuned in just intonation, Pythagorean intonation, and equal temperament. Musical excerpts were presented in pairs and study subjects simply picked one version from the pair that they perceived as the most consonant. Results of the study revealed an overall preference for equal temperament in contradiction to coincidence theory. Several additional areas for research are suggested to further investigate the results of this study.

  3. Activity determination of a {sup 201}Tl solution by 4πβ-γ and sum-peak coincidence methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzzarin, Anelise; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu, E-mail: aruzzarin@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Cursos de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (LIN/PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear. Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Silva, Monica A. L. da [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Iwahara, Akira; Silva, Ronaldo L. da; Filho, Octavio L.T.; Poledna, Roberto [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (LNMRI/IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes

    2015-07-01

    {sup 201}Tl is used in nuclear medicine in cardiac imaging for evaluating the injury level in cardiac muscle at rest and exercise. In this work the activity concentration of a {sup 201}Tl radioactive solution has been absolutely determined using the 4πβ-γ coincidence and sum-peak coincidence methods. The presence of {sup 202}Tl radioactive impurity that imposes some difficult in the activity measurements was taken into account in the measurements. In the sum-peak method a planar germanium detector was used. The half-lives were evaluated by the reference source method and the results obtained were (3.033 ± 0.004) d and (12.320 ± 0.163) d, respectively, for {sup 201}Tl and {sup 202}Tl. (author)

  4. Standardization of 68Ge-68Ga using 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system for activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, D B; Joseph, Leena; Anuradha, R; Kulkarni, M S; Tomar, B S

    2017-05-01

    68 Ga has great scope for use in future for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging due to its very fast blood clearance and fast target localization, even though at present 18 F is widely used. 68 Ge in equilibrium with 68 Ga ( 68 Ge- 68 Ga) can also be used as a surrogate for 18 F calibration, as 18 F source standardization can be done at national metrology institute (NMI) but, these standards cannot be sent to nuclear medicine centers (NMCs) across India for calibration of isotope calibrators, due to the short half-life of 18 F (110min). Providing 68 Ge- 68 Ga standards to NMCs requires that first standardization must be carried out at NMI (BARC in India) to provide traceability to the measurements carried out at NMCs. In the present work, standardization of 68 Ge- 68 Ga was carried out using 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system and CIEMAT/NIST efficiency tracing technique. The decay scheme correction factors for two gamma windows were calculated by Monte Carlo technique using general purpose code FLUKA. The activity concentration values were normalized by the activity concentration obtained by 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system using window-1. The final result reported to BIPM for 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting was calculated by taking arithmetic mean of activity concentrations obtained for two gamma windows. The normalized activity concentration obtained by 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting was 0.998±0.005 and that obtained using CIEMAT/NIST efficiency tracing was 1.002±0.007 which are in excellent agreement within uncertainty limits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. (e,e'f) coincidence experiments for fission decay of giant resonances in 235,238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, T.; Heil, R.D.; Kneissl, U.; Pecho, W.; Wilke, W.; Emrich, H.J.; Kihm, T.; Knoepfle, K.T.

    1988-01-01

    Extending previous work on 238 U, 235 U(e,e'f) coincidence data were taken at 4 momentum transfers yielding both E1, E2/E0 and E3 form factors and the respective multipole strength distributions in the giant resonance region of 238 U (4 x x /Γ a is obtained as a function of excitation energy for separated multipoles. The giant E2 resonance exhibits an increased symmetric fission contribution compared to E1 and E3 resonances. (orig.)

  6. Using anisotropies in prompt fission neutron coincidences to assess the neutron multiplication of highly multiplying subcritical plutonium assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J.M., E-mail: jonathan_mueller@ncsu.edu; Mattingly, J.

    2016-07-21

    There is a significant and well-known anisotropy between the prompt neutrons emitted from a single fission event; these neutrons are most likely to be observed at angles near 0° or 180° relative to each other. However, the propagation of this anisotropy through different generations of a fission chain reaction has not been previously studied. We have measured this anisotropy in neutron–neutron coincidences from a subcritical highly-multiplying assembly of plutonium metal. The assembly was a 4.5 kg α-phase plutonium metal sphere composed of 94% {sup 239}Pu and 6% {sup 240}Pu by mass. Data were collected using two EJ-309 liquid scintillators and two EJ-299 plastic scintillators. The angular distribution of neutron–neutron coincidences was measured at 90° and 180° and found to be largely isotropic. Simulations were performed using MCNPX-PoliMi of similar plutonium metal spheres of varying sizes and a correlation between the neutron multiplication of the assembly and the anisotropy of neutron–neutron coincidences was observed. In principle, this correlation could be used to assess the neutron multiplication of an unknown assembly.

  7. Using anisotropies in prompt fission neutron coincidences to assess the neutron multiplication of highly multiplying subcritical plutonium assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J. M.; Mattingly, J.

    2016-07-01

    There is a significant and well-known anisotropy between the prompt neutrons emitted from a single fission event; these neutrons are most likely to be observed at angles near 0° or 180° relative to each other. However, the propagation of this anisotropy through different generations of a fission chain reaction has not been previously studied. We have measured this anisotropy in neutron-neutron coincidences from a subcritical highly-multiplying assembly of plutonium metal. The assembly was a 4.5 kg α-phase plutonium metal sphere composed of 94% 239Pu and 6% 240Pu by mass. Data were collected using two EJ-309 liquid scintillators and two EJ-299 plastic scintillators. The angular distribution of neutron-neutron coincidences was measured at 90° and 180° and found to be largely isotropic. Simulations were performed using MCNPX-PoliMi of similar plutonium metal spheres of varying sizes and a correlation between the neutron multiplication of the assembly and the anisotropy of neutron-neutron coincidences was observed. In principle, this correlation could be used to assess the neutron multiplication of an unknown assembly.

  8. International symposium on NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication consists of 32 papers and presentations from the field of NMR spectroscopy applications submitted to the International Symposium on NMR Spectroscopy held at Smolenice between 29 Sep and 3 Oct, 1980. (B.S.)

  9. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy - Recent Advancement of Raman Spectroscopy. Ujjal Kumar Sur. General Article Volume 15 Issue 2 February 2010 pp 154-164 ...

  10. Development of liquid scintillation based 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system and demonstration of its performance by standardization of ⁶⁰Co.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, D B; Anuradha, R; Joseph, Leena; Tomar, B S

    2013-02-01

    A single-vial, single-PMT 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system has been developed at the Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC. It has advantages of simple sample preparation, higher counting efficiency and the absence of self absorption over the conventional proportional counter based 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system. The performance of the system is demonstrated by standardizing a (60)Co solution using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system and CIEMAT/NIST method and comparing the results obtained by each method. The detection efficiency of liquid scintillation counter of the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system was varied by color quenching, by chemical quenching and by varying the bias voltage applied to the LSC PMT. For the proportional counter based 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system the detection efficiency was varied by source self absorption. The activity concentrations obtained using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, the 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system and the CIEMAT/NIST method are comparable within the uncertainty limits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. {sup 18}F-FDG for the staging of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Comparison of a dual-head coincidence gamma camera with dedicated PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiepolt, C.; Beuthien-Baumann, B.; Hliscs, R.; Bredow, J.; Kuehne, A.; Kropp, J.; Burchert, W.; Franke, W. [Univ. of Dresden (Germany). Carl Gustav Carus Medical School

    2000-10-01

    Coincidence imaging with a dual-head gamma camera may offer a cost-effective alternative to dedicated PET. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of coincidence imaging and PET in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Thirty-one patients were studied after thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation. They were injected with a single dose of 300 MBq {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Scanning was performed on a dedicated PET system after 1 hr, and on a coincidence gamma camera after 4 hrs. Based on a lesion-by-lesion comparison, coincidence imaging and PET concurred in 69% of 118 lesions. Based on lesions size, concurrence was 96% in lesions larger than 1.5 cm, and 62% in those between 1 and 1.5 cm. Lesions smaller than 1 cm could not be identified with coincidence imaging. Identical staging was obtained with coincidence imaging and PET in 26/31 patients (84%). In four patients FDG accumulating lesions were shown by both the coincidence camera and the dedicated scanner, but not detectable with any other imaging means and were confirmed histologically on surgery. Although a coincidence camera is technically inferior to a dedicated PET scanner, it may provide clinically useful results in situations were a lesion of sufficient size and FDG uptake is to be expected, e.g. when evaluating a known lesion for malignancy. (author)

  12. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of the imidogen radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Gustavo A., E-mail: gustavo.garcia@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Gans, Bérenger [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, Univ Paris-Sud, CNRS, Bât 210, Univ Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Tang, Xiaofeng [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Ward, Michael; Batut, Sébastien [PC2A, Université de Lille 1, UMR CNRS-USTL 8522, Cité Scientifique Bât. C11, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nahon, Laurent [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Fittschen, Christa [PC2A, Université de Lille 1, UMR CNRS-USTL 8522, Cité Scientifique Bât. C11, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Loison, Jean-Christophe [ISM, Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, 351 cours de la Libération, 33405 Talence Cedex (France)

    2015-08-15

    We present the threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of the imidogen radical (NH) recorded in the photon energy region up to 1 eV above its first ionization threshold. The radical was produced by reaction of NH{sub 3} and F in a microwave discharge flow-tube and photoionized using vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. A double imaging coincidence spectrometer was used to record mass-selected spectra and avoid contributions from the byproducts present in the reactor and background gas. The energy region includes the ground X{sup +2}Π and first electronically excited a{sup +4}Σ{sup −} states of NH{sup +}. Strong adiabatic transitions and weak vibrational progressions up to v{sup +} = 2 are observed for both electronic states. The rotational profile seen in the origin band has been modeled using existing neutral and cationic spectroscopic constants leading to a precise determination of the adiabatic ionization energy at 13.480 ± 0.002 eV.

  13. Ionization photophysics and spectroscopy of dicyanoacetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, Sydney; Champion, Norbert; Schwell, Martin; Bénilan, Yves; Fray, Nicolas; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Gaie-Levrel, François; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Photoionization of dicyanoacetylene was studied using synchrotron radiation over the excitation range 8–25 eV, with photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques. The absolute ionization cross-section and detailed spectroscopic aspects of the parent ion were recorded. The adiabatic ionization energy of dicyanoacetylene was measured as 11.80 ± 0.01 eV. A detailed analysis of the cation spectroscopy involves new aspects and new assignments of the vibrational components to excitation of the quasi-degenerate A 2 Π g , B 2 Σ g + states as well as the C 2 Σ u + and D 2 Π u states of the cation. Some of the structured autoionization features observed in the 12.4–15 eV region of the total ion yield spectrum were assigned to vibrational components of valence shell transitions and to two previously unknown Rydberg series converging to the D 2 Π u state of C 4 N 2 + . The appearance energies of the fragment ions C 4 N + , C 3 N + , C 4 + , C 2 N + , and C 2 + were measured and their heats of formation were determined and compared with existing literature values. Thermochemical calculations of the appearance potentials of these and other weaker ions were used to infer aspects of dissociative ionization pathways

  14. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Peterson, V.J.; Floyd, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This atlas of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy records the spectra of the elements in a way that would reveal the general nature of the spectra, in all their simplicity or complexity; and offers a definitive summary of the most prominent spectral lines of the elements, i.e., those most likely to be useful for the determination of trace and ultratrace concentrations; it provides reliable estimates, based on the recorded experimental spectra, of the powers of detection of the listed prominent lines; and assesses the very important problem of spectral interferences. The atlas is composed of three main sections. Part I is concerned with the historical aspects of compilations of spectral information. Part II is based on 232 wavelength scans of 70 elements. Each of the wavelength scans covers an 80 nm spectral region. These scans allow a rapid comparison of the background and spectral line intensities emitted in the ICP and provide a ready means for identification of the most prominent lines of each element and for estimation of the trace element analytical capabilities of these lines. A listing of 973 prominent lines with associated detection limits is also presented. Part III addresses the problem of spectral interferences. On this topic a detailed collection of coincidence profiles is presented for 281 of the most prominent lines, each with profiles of ten of the most prevalent concomitants superimposed. (Auth.)

  15. Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keevil, Stephen F

    2006-01-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications. (topical review)

  16. Mid-infrared upconversion spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Andersen, H. V.

    2016-01-01

    Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy is emerging as an attractive alternative to near-infrared or visible spectroscopy. MIR spectroscopy offers a unique possibility to probe the fundamental absorption bands of a large number of gases as well as the vibrational spectra of complex molecules. In this paper...

  17. Antihydrogen Experiment Gravity Interferometry Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Trezzi, D; Dassa, L; Rienacker, B; Khalidova, O; Ferrari, G; Krasnicky, D; Perini, D; Cerchiari, G; Belov, A; Boscolo, I; Sacerdoti, M G; Ferragut, R O; Nedelec, P; Hinterberger, A; Al-qaradawi, I; Malbrunot, C L S; Brusa, R S; Prelz, F; Manuzio, G; Riccardi, C; Fontana, A; Genova, P; Haider, S; Haug, F; Turbabin, A; Castelli, F; Testera, G; Lagomarsino, V E; Doser, M; Penasa, L; Gninenko, S; Cataneo, F; Zenoni, A; Cabaret, L; Comparat, D P; Zmeskal, J; Scampoli, P; Nesteruk, K P; Dudarev, A; Kellerbauer, A G; Mariazzi, S; Carraro, C; Zavatarelli, S M

    The AEGIS experiment (Antihydrogen Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) has the aim of carrying out the first measurement of the gravitational interaction of antimatter to a precision of 1%, by applying techniques from atomic physics, laser spectroscopy and interferometry to a beam of antihydrogen atoms. A further goal of the experiment is to carry out spectroscopy of the antihydrogen atoms in flight.

  18. BATSE spectroscopy detector calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Ford, L.; Matteson, J.; Lestrade, J. P.; Teegarden, B.; Schaefer, B.; Cline, T.; Briggs, M.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the channel-to-energy calibration of the Spectroscopy Detectors of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). These detectors consist of NaI(TI) crystals viewed by photomultiplier tubes whose output in turn is measured by a pulse height analyzer. The calibration of these detectors has been complicated by frequent gain changes and by nonlinearities specific to the BATSE detectors. Nonlinearities in the light output from the NaI crystal and in the pulse height analyzer are shifted relative to each other by changes in the gain of the photomultiplier tube. We present the analytical model which is the basis of our calibration methodology, and outline how the empirical coefficients in this approach were determined. We also describe the complications peculiar to the Spectroscopy Detectors, and how our understanding of the detectors' operation led us to a solution to these problems.

  19. Hadron spectroscopy with COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhard, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    The COmmon Muon and Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy is a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS accelerator. In the past two years hadron spectroscopy was brought into focus. A huge amount of data was taken, using hadronic beams at a momentum of 190 GeV$/c$ impinging on hydrogen, lead, nickel and tungsten targets. The primary goal for the hadron programme is the study of resonance production by diractive scattering, central production and photon exchange. To bring clarity in the intriguing question about the existence of exotic states, such as glueballs and hybrids, the analysis of several channels have been started. We present here a selective overview of the current status.

  20. Visible spectroscopy on ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, J.V.

    1991-12-01

    In this report visible spectroscopy and impurity investigations on ASDEX are reviewed and several sets of visible spectra are presented. As a basis for identification of metallic impurity lines during plasma discharges spectra from a stainless steel - Cu arc have been recorded. In a next step a spectrum overview of ASDEX discharges is shown which reveals the dominating role of lines from light impurities like carbon and oxygen throughout the UV and visible range (2000 A ≤ λ ≤ 8000 A). Metallic impurity lines of neutrals or single ionized atoms are observed near localized surfaces. The dramatic effect of impurity reduction by boronization of the vessel walls is demonstrated in a few examples. In extension to some ivesti-gations already published, further diagnostic applications of visible spectroscopy are presented. Finally, the hardware and software system used on ASDEX are described in detail. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  2. Basic Principles of Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy deals with the production, measurement, and interpretation of spectra arising from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. There are many different spectroscopic methods available for solving a wide range of analytical problems. The methods differ with respect to the species to be analyzed (such as molecular or atomic spectroscopy), the type of radiation-matter interaction to be monitored (such as absorption, emission, or diffraction), and the region of the electromagnetic spectrum used in the analysis. Spectroscopic methods are very informative and widely used for both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Spectroscopic methods based on the absorption or emission of radiation in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), infrared (IR), and radio (nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR) frequency ranges are most commonly encountered in traditional food analysis laboratories. Each of these methods is distinct in that it monitors different types of molecular or atomic transitions. The basis of these transitions is explained in the following sections.

  3. Hadron spectroscopy in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Palano, Antimo

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The data collected in the LHC Run I enables precision spectroscopy studies of beauty and charm hadrons. The latest results on spectroscopy of conventional and exotic hadrons are reviewed. In particular the discovery of the first charmonium pentaquark states in the $J/\\psi p$ system, the possible existence of four-quark states decaying to $J/\\psi \\phi$ and the confirmation of resonant nature of the $Z_c(4430)^−$ mesonic state are discussed. In the sector of charmed baryons, the observation of five new $\\Omega_c$ states, the observation of the $\\Xi^+_{cc}$ and the study of charmed baryons decaying to $D^0 p$ are presented.

  4. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  5. Femtosecond laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hannaford, Peter

    2005-01-01

    As concepts and methodologies have evolved over the past two decades, the realm of ultrafast science has become vast and exciting and has impacted many areas of chemistry, biology and physics, and other fields such as materials science, electrical engineering, and optical communication. The field has recently exploded with the announcement of a series of remarkable new developments and advances. This volume surveys this recent growth in eleven chapters written by leading international researchers in the field. It includes sections on femtosecond optical frequency combs, soft x-ray femtosecond laser sources, and attosecond laser sources. In addition, the contributors address real-time spectroscopy of molecular vibrations with sub-5-fs pulses and multidimensional femtosecond coherent spectroscopies for studying molecular and electron dynamics. Novel methods for measuring and characterizing ultrashort laser pulses and ultrashort pulses of light are also described. The topics covered are revolutionizing the field...

  6. Development of liquid scintillation based 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system and demonstration of its performance by standardization of 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, D.B.; Anuradha, R.; Joseph, Leena; Tomar, B.S.

    2013-01-01

    A single-vial, single-PMT 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system has been developed at the Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC. It has advantages of simple sample preparation, higher counting efficiency and the absence of self absorption over the conventional proportional counter based 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system. The performance of the system is demonstrated by standardizing a 60 Co solution using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system and CIEMAT/NIST method and comparing the results obtained by each method. The detection efficiency of liquid scintillation counter of the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system was varied by color quenching, by chemical quenching and by varying the bias voltage applied to the LSC PMT. For the proportional counter based 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system the detection efficiency was varied by source self absorption. The activity concentrations obtained using the 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system, the 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system and the CIEMAT/NIST method are comparable within the uncertainty limits. - Highlights: ► A 4πβ(LS)-γ coincidence counting system has been developed in the laboratory. ► The performance of the system is demonstrated by standardizing a 60 Co solution. ► Three methods viz. 4πβ(LS)-γ, 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence counting system, and CIEMAT/NIST method are used. ► The activity concentrations obtained by different methods are comparable within uncertainty limits.

  7. 2008 Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip J. Reid

    2009-09-21

    The conference focuses on using vibrational spectroscopy to probe structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and interfaces. The goal is to bring together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of systems.

  8. Infrared spectroscopy in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The use of infrared spectroscopy in astronomy has increased dramatically in the past ten years. The broad design considerations are discussed in terms of wavelength coverage and resolution. Three rough resolution ranges, lambda/Delta lambda of approximately 100, 1000 and 10,000, are identified in which various types of astronomical problems can be studied. Numerous existing systems are briefly discussed and references are given to more complete descriptions.

  9. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sroubek, Z.; Zavadil, J.; Kubec, F.

    1977-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy is one of the modern methods suitable for the analysis of thin films and solid state surfaces. The method is capable of providing the compositional information with a depth resolution below 0.1 μm and a sensitivity of the order of 10 -3 ppm for some impurities. The review article contains a description of the method, a list of typical applications and a short account of relevant theories. (author)

  10. Total Absorption Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, B.; Gelletly, W.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of determining the distribution of beta decay strength (B(GT)) as a function of excitation energy in the daughter nucleus is discussed. Total Absorption Spectroscopy is shown to provide a way of determining the B(GT) precisely. A brief history of such measurements and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique, is followed by examples of two recent studies using the technique. (authors)

  11. Optical imaging and spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Brady, David J

    2009-01-01

    An essential reference for optical sensor system design This is the first text to present an integrated view of the optical and mathematical analysis tools necessary to understand computational optical system design. It presents the foundations of computational optical sensor design with a focus entirely on digital imaging and spectroscopy. It systematically covers: Coded aperture and tomographic imaging Sampling and transformations in optical systems, including wavelets and generalized sampling techniques essential to digital system analysis Geometric, wave, and statis

  12. Vibrational Spectroscopy and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Kwak, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Role of vibrational spectroscopy in solving problems related to astrobiology will be discussed. Vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for identifying molecules. Theoretical approach used in this work is based on direct computation of anharmonic vibrational frequencies and intensities from electronic structure codes. One of the applications of this computational technique is possible identification of biological building blocks (amino acids, small peptides, DNA bases) in the interstellar medium (ISM). Identifying small biological molecules in the ISM is very important from the point of view of origin of life. Hybrid (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) theoretical techniques will be discussed that may allow to obtain accurate vibrational spectra of biomolecular building blocks and to create a database of spectroscopic signatures that can assist observations of these molecules in space. Another application of the direct computational spectroscopy technique is to help to design and analyze experimental observations of ice surfaces of one of the Jupiter's moons, Europa, that possibly contains hydrated salts. The presence of hydrated salts on the surface can be an indication of a subsurface ocean and the possible existence of life forms inhabiting such an ocean.

  13. Biomolecular EPR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hagen, Wilfred Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive, Up-to-Date Coverage of Spectroscopy Theory and its Applications to Biological SystemsAlthough a multitude of books have been published about spectroscopy, most of them only occasionally refer to biological systems and the specific problems of biomolecular EPR (bioEPR). Biomolecular EPR Spectroscopy provides a practical introduction to bioEPR and demonstrates how this remarkable tool allows researchers to delve into the structural, functional, and analytical analysis of paramagnetic molecules found in the biochemistry of all species on the planet. A Must-Have Reference in an Intrinsically Multidisciplinary FieldThis authoritative reference seamlessly covers all important bioEPR applications, including low-spin and high-spin metalloproteins, spin traps and spin lables, interaction between active sites, and redox systems. It is loaded with practical tricks as well as do's and don'ts that are based on the author's 30 years of experience in the field. The book also comes with an unprecedented set of...

  14. Layman friendly spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentic, Stipo; Sessions, Sharon

    Affordable consumer grade spectroscopes (e.g. SCiO, Qualcomm Tricorder XPRIZE) are becoming more available to the general public. We introduce the concepts of spectroscopy to the public and K12 students and motivate them to delve deeper into spectroscopy in a dramatic participatory presentation and play. We use diffraction gratings, lasers, and light sources of different spectral properties to provide a direct experience of spectroscopy techniques. Finally, we invite the audience to build their own spectroscope--utilizing the APS SpectraSnapp cell phone application--and study light sources surrounding them in everyday life. We recontextualize the stigma that science is hard (e.g. ``Math, Science Popular Until Students Realize They're Hard,'' The Wall Street Journal) by presenting the material in such a way that it demonstrates the scientific method, and aiming to make failure an impersonal scientific tool--rather than a measure of one's ability, which is often a reason for shying away from science. We will present lessons we have learned in doing our outreach to audiences of different ages. This work is funded by the APS Outreach Grant ``Captain, we have matter matters!'' We thank New Mexico Tech Physics Department and Physics Club for help and technical equipment.

  15. Potential of Raman and Infrared Spectroscopy for Plant Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, H.

    2008-11-01

    Various mid-infrared (MIR) and Raman spectroscopic methods applied to the analysis of valuable plant substances or quality parameters in selected horticultural and agricultural crops are presented. Generally, both spectroscopy techniques allow to identify simultaneously characteristic key bands of individual plant components (e.g. carotenoids, alkaloids, polyacetylenes, fatty acids, amino acids, terpenoids). In contrast to MIR methods Raman spectroscopy mostly does not need any sample pre-treatment; even fresh plant material can be analysed without difficulty because water shows only weak Raman scattering properties. In some cases a significant sensivity enhancement of Raman signals can be achieved if the exciting laser wavelength is adjusted to the absorption range of particular plant chromophores such as carotenoids (Resonance Raman effect). Applying FT-IR or FT Raman micro-spectroscopy the distribution of certain plant constituents in the cell wall can be identified without the need for any physical separation. Furthermore it is also possible to analyse secondary metabolites occurring in the cell vacuoles if significant key bands do not coincide with the spectral background of the plant matrix.

  16. Probability of coincident vaccination in the 24 or 48 hours preceding sudden infant death syndrome death in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Julia M L; Hull, Brynley P; Hayen, Andrew; Gidding, Heather F; Burgess, Margaret A

    2005-06-01

    Vaccination does not cause sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). However, SIDS peaks at 2 months of age, when vaccination encounters are frequent. There are no published estimates using population data on age of death and immunization coverage to indicate to practitioners how often coincident vaccination may occur by chance. This study aimed to determine the probability that an Australian infant who has died of SIDS was vaccinated in the days before death. An analytical study of population death data and immunization coverage was conducted for Australian children who were born between April 1, 2002, and March 31, 2003. Also evaluated were Australian children who were registered as dying of SIDS between 1997 and 2001. The main outcomes measured were distribution of SIDS deaths by age and distribution of immunization coverage by age. The probability of recent vaccination and SIDS coinciding varied by age and day of the week of death. The overall estimated probability of vaccination within the last 24 hours for a child who has died of SIDS in Australia is estimated as 1.3%. In the last 48 hours, it is 2.6%. With the average number of SIDS deaths for the period 1997-2001 equal to 130 cases per year, we estimated that a case of SIDS will occur when vaccination was given in the last 24 hours in 1.7 cases per year and within 48 hours in 3.5 cases. Although coincident vaccination and SIDS should not be a frequent problem, it can be expected to occur at least annually in Australia by chance alone. The probabilities of vaccination by age estimated in this study can also be applied to estimate the probability of a vaccination encounter for children who have experienced any unusual medical condition or death, when these occurrences are known to be unrelated to vaccination.

  17. Development of an ultrahigh-resolution Si-PM-based dual-head GAGG coincidence imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Kato, Katsuhiko [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Hatazawa, Jun [Department of Molecular Imaging in Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Tracer Kinetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    A silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for high resolution PET systems due to its small channel size and high gain. Using Si-PMs, it will be possible to develop a high resolution imaging systems. For this purpose, we developed a small field-of-view (FOV) ultrahigh-resolution Si-PM-based dual-head coincidence imaging system for small animals and plant research. A new scintillator, Ce doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 12}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (GAGG), was selected because of its high light output and its emission wavelength matched with the Si-PM arrays and contained no radioactivity. Each coincidence imaging block detector consists of 0.5×0.5×5 mm{sup 3} GAGG pixels combined with a 0.1-mm thick reflector to form a 20×17 matrix that was optically coupled to a Si-PM array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 1.5-mm thick light guide. The GAGG block size was 12.0×10.2 mm{sup 2}. Two GAGG block detectors were positioned face to face and set on a flexible arm based detector stand. All 0.5 mm GAGG pixels in the block detectors were clearly resolved in the 2-dimensional position histogram. The energy resolution was 14.4% FWHM for the Cs-137 gamma ray. The spatial resolution was 0.7 mm FWHM measured using a 0.25 mm diameter Na-22 point source. Small animal and plant images were successfully obtained. We conclude that our developed ultrahigh-resolution Si-PM-based dual-head coincidence imaging system is promising for small animal and plant imaging research.

  18. Development of an ultrahigh-resolution Si-PM-based dual-head GAGG coincidence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Kato, Katsuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun

    2013-03-01

    A silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for high resolution PET systems due to its small channel size and high gain. Using Si-PMs, it will be possible to develop a high resolution imaging systems. For this purpose, we developed a small field-of-view (FOV) ultrahigh-resolution Si-PM-based dual-head coincidence imaging system for small animals and plant research. A new scintillator, Ce doped Gd3Al12Ga3O12 (GAGG), was selected because of its high light output and its emission wavelength matched with the Si-PM arrays and contained no radioactivity. Each coincidence imaging block detector consists of 0.5×0.5×5 mm3 GAGG pixels combined with a 0.1-mm thick reflector to form a 20×17 matrix that was optically coupled to a Si-PM array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 1.5-mm thick light guide. The GAGG block size was 12.0×10.2 mm2. Two GAGG block detectors were positioned face to face and set on a flexible arm based detector stand. All 0.5 mm GAGG pixels in the block detectors were clearly resolved in the 2-dimensional position histogram. The energy resolution was 14.4% FWHM for the Cs-137 gamma ray. The spatial resolution was 0.7 mm FWHM measured using a 0.25 mm diameter Na-22 point source. Small animal and plant images were successfully obtained. We conclude that our developed ultrahigh-resolution Si-PM-based dual-head coincidence imaging system is promising for small animal and plant imaging research.

  19. Evaluation of equipment performance, patient dose, imaging quality, and diagnostic coincidence in five Mexico City mammography services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandan, María-Ester; Ruiz-Trejo, César; Verdejo-Silva, Maricela; Guevara, Martha; Lozano-Zalce, Horacio; Madero-Preciado, Luis; Martín, Julia; Noel-Etienne, Louise-Marie; Ramírez-Arias, José-Luis; Soto, Jesús; Villaseñor, Yolanda

    2004-01-01

    Regulations concerning the use of x-rays in medical diagnoses were published in Mexico in 1997. In this work, we evaluate technical aspects of mammography services in the Mexico City area and radiation dose and coincidence between the radiological interpretation by the institution radiologist and by a panel of experts. Following methodology proposed by the American College of Radiology and the European Community among others, we have evaluated the performance of six mammography systems in Mexico City public and private services. The studied services carry out approximately one half of the mammography studies in the capital's metropolitan area. The systems comply with 53-82% of a total of 31 applied quality control tests and measurements, which include the mammography unit, x-ray generation, collimation, automatic exposure control, compression devices, grid and image receptor, film processing, darkroom, viewboxes, dose, film rejection, and image quality. The elements that most frequently fail are film processing, darkroom, and light boxes; average ACR phantom score is 11.2 (9.5, 12.0); mean average glandular dose measured with the phantom is 1.00 (0.71-1.15) mGy, and measured in patients is 1.75 (0.3, 4.9) mGy; coincidence between radiologic reports (BI-RADS) by the institution radiologist and a panel of experts is obtained in 35% of studied cases. Statistical analysis of results indicated that the level of equipment performance is correlated with image quality, image quality estimated by the panel of radiologists is correlated with phantom score, and coincidence in clinical mammography reports is not correlated with equipment performance and appears to depend on the radiologist's experience.

  20. Cardiovascular risk factors are really linked in the metabolic syndrome: this phenomenon suggests clustering rather than coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Kamimura, Norihito; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Makiyama, Yashiro; Usuda, Yoshimaru; Watanabe, Tohru; Kurashina, Yoshiaki

    2006-05-10

    The accumulation of cardiovascular risk factors can be seen in a single person but it needs to be determined if this occurs more frequently than might be explained by mere coincidence. This study involved 119,412 adults: 41,819 males and 77,593 females, who were 40 years of age or older and who underwent an annual health examination. From the clinical and biochemical data, the actual prevalence of a combination of 3 or more factors: abnormal body mass index (> or =25.0), hypertension, high triglyceride (> or =150 mg/dl), low HDL cholesterol (metabolism (fasting blood sugar > or =110 mg/dl or HbA1c. > or =5.5%) was determined. Then, the prevalence of a corresponding combination of 3-5 factors was predicted from the prevalence of each factor on the assumption that their combination occurs as a result of coincidence. The criteria of metabolic syndrome (> or =3 risk factors) was met in 17,842 (14.9%) of the examinees. The actual prevalence of any combination of 3-5 factors of metabolic syndrome was more frequent than those expected to occur by coincidence (P metabolic syndrome compared to that in the total examinees but it was 1.7 to 2.1 times higher in hypertension and high triglyceride. The former two were clustering more than hypertension or high triglyceride in metabolic syndrome. Abnormal levels of serum creatinine and total cholesterol were found more often in metabolic syndrome. Combinations of risk factors of metabolic syndrome were found more frequently than coincidental phenomenon in the subjects from the general population. These finding suggest that these risk factors do cluster and obesity and insulin resistance were suggested to be linked with metabolic syndrome more than hypertension or high triglyceride.

  1. A new method of time difference measurement: The time difference method by dual phase coincidence points detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei

    1993-01-01

    In the high accurate measurement of periodic signals, the greatest common factor frequency and its characteristics have special functions. A method of time difference measurement - the time difference method by dual 'phase coincidence points' detection is described. This method utilizes the characteristics of the greatest common factor frequency to measure time or phase difference between periodic signals. It can suit a very wide frequency range. Measurement precision and potential accuracy of several picoseconds were demonstrated with this new method. The instrument based on this method is very simple, and the demand for the common oscillator is low. This method and instrument can be used widely.

  2. HPGe detector photopeak efficiency calculation including self-absorption and coincidence corrections for Marinelli beaker sources using compact analytical expressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Mahmoud I.

    2001-01-01

    Direct mathematical methods to calculate total and full-energy peak (photopeak) efficiencies, coincidence correction factors and the source self-absorption of a closed end coaxial HPGe detector for Marinelli beaker sources have been derived. The source self-absorption is determined by calculating the photon path length in the source volume. The attenuation of photons by the Marinelli beaker and the detector cap materials is also calculated. In the experiments gamma aqueous sources containing several radionuclides covering the energy range from 60 to 1836 keV were used. By comparison, the theoretical and experimental full-energy peak efficiency values are in good agreement

  3. Determination iodine in biological materials using instrumental neutron activation and anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.H.; Chatt, A.

    1997-01-01

    Iodine is an element of interest in nutritional research. Its lower limit of safe and adequate daily dietary intake for adults varies between 150 and 200 micrograms per day. In the present study, an epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis (EINAA) method in conjunction with anti-coincidence counting has been developed for the determination of ppb levels of iodine in individual food items. Typically 200-300 mg of a sample are irradiated for 10 or 20 minutes at the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in an epithermal flux of 1x10 11 n cm -2 s -1 , followed by 1 min decay and then counting for 30 min. The 443-keV gamma-ray of 128 I is used for measuring iodine content by anti-coincidence counting. The anti-coincidence spectrometer consists of a 25% HPGe detector surrounded by a 10''x10'' NaI(TI) annulus and a 3''x3'' NaI(TI) plug. This system has a peak-to-Compton ratio of about 650 to 1 for the 661.6-keV photopeak of 137 Cs. The Compton background resulting from the scattering of many gamma-rays of energies higher than 443 keV can be reduced by a factor of about 4 using anti-coincidence counting compared to conventional counting. The detection limit for iodine can be improved by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on the sample matrix, dead time, position of the annulus and counting geometry among several other factors.The lowest detection limit of 5 ppb can be achieved for low-salt foods. This limit is comparable to that obtained by a preconcentration NAA (PNAA) method. However, a detection limit of 20 ppb is more realistic for samples containing high amounts of Na, Cl and Al. The results obtained for many reference materials are in good agreement with the certified values and those reported by the PNAA method. Details of the methods and results will be reported

  4. Determination iodine in biological materials using instrumental neutron activation and anti-coincidence gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W.H.; Chatt, A. [Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Radiochemistry Research Laboratory

    1997-10-01

    Iodine is an element of interest in nutritional research. Its lower limit of safe and adequate daily dietary intake for adults varies between 150 and 200 micrograms per day. In the present study, an epithermal instrumental neutron activation analysis (EINAA) method in conjunction with anti-coincidence counting has been developed for the determination of ppb levels of iodine in individual food items. Typically 200-300 mg of a sample are irradiated for 10 or 20 minutes at the Dalhousie University SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in an epithermal flux of 1x10{sup 11} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, followed by 1 min decay and then counting for 30 min. The 443-keV gamma-ray of {sup 128}I is used for measuring iodine content by anti-coincidence counting. The anti-coincidence spectrometer consists of a 25% HPGe detector surrounded by a 10``x10`` NaI(TI) annulus and a 3``x3`` NaI(TI) plug. This system has a peak-to-Compton ratio of about 650 to 1 for the 661.6-keV photopeak of {sup 137}Cs. The Compton background resulting from the scattering of many gamma-rays of energies higher than 443 keV can be reduced by a factor of about 4 using anti-coincidence counting compared to conventional counting. The detection limit for iodine can be improved by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on the sample matrix, dead time, position of the annulus and counting geometry among several other factors.The lowest detection limit of 5 ppb can be achieved for low-salt foods. This limit is comparable to that obtained by a preconcentration NAA (PNAA) method. However, a detection limit of 20 ppb is more realistic for samples containing high amounts of Na, Cl and Al. The results obtained for many reference materials are in good agreement with the certified values and those reported by the PNAA method. Details of the methods and results will be reported 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Insights into the high-pressure behavior of kaolinite from infrared spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, M. D.; Montgomery, W.; Balan, Etienne; Lerch, P.

    2012-01-01

    The high-pressure behavior of Keokuk kaolinite has been studied to 9.5 GPa by infrared spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The kaolinite-I -> kaolinite-II and kaolinite-II -> kaolinite-III transformations have clear spectroscopic expression, with discontinuities coinciding with the transformation pressures bracketed by X-ray diffraction (Welch and Crichton in Am Mineral 95: 651654, 2010). The experimental spectra have been interpreted from band assignments derived from density functiona...

  6. Moessbauer spectroscopy on actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boge, M.

    1988-01-01

    The wide spatial extend of the 5f electrons leads a broad spectrum of chemical and physical properties, in particular magnetic, in compounds of light actinides. Their behaviour goes from the localized magnetism of lanthanides to the itinerant magnetism often found in transition metals compounds. One parameter which strongly influences the magnetic character is the actinide-actinide distance. Moessbauer spectroscopy of the 59.5 KeV resonance in 237 Np allows a detailed study of local magnetic properties of the Np ion. Some results are presented on compounds of different crystallographic structure, showing the large variety of magnetic properties

  7. MR spectroscopy in dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, T.; Gerigk, L.; Giesel, F.; Schuster, L.; Essig, M.

    2010-01-01

    With an increasingly aging population we are faced with the problem of an increasing number of dementia patients. In addition to clinical, neuropsychological and laboratory procedures, MRI plays an important role in the early diagnosis of dementia. In addition to various morphological changes functional changes can also help in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia. Overall the diagnosis of dementia can be improved by using parameters from MR spectroscopy. This article focuses on MR spectroscopic changes in the physiological aging process as well as on changes in mild cognitive impairment a precursor of Alzheimer's dementia, in Alzheimer's dementia, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia. (orig.) [de

  8. Fourier transforms in spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kauppinen, Jyrki

    2000-01-01

    This modern approach to the subject is clearly and logically structured, and gives readers an understanding of the essence of Fourier transforms and their applications. All important aspects are included with respect to their use with optical spectroscopic data. Based on popular lectures, the authors provide the mathematical fundamentals and numerical applications which are essential in practical use. The main part of the book is dedicated to applications of FT in signal processing and spectroscopy, with IR and NIR, NMR and mass spectrometry dealt with both from a theoretical and practical poi

  9. Plasma polarization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Iwamae, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Plasma Polarization Spectroscopy (PPS) is now becoming a standard diagnostic technique for working with laboratory plasmas. This new area needs a comprehensive framework, both experimental and theoretical. This book reviews the historical development of PPS, develops a general theoretical formulation to deal with this phenomenon, along with an overview of relevant cross sections, and reports on laboratory experiments so far performed. It also includes various facets that are interesting from this standpoint, e.g. X-ray lasers and effects of microwave irradiation. It also offers a timely discussion of instrumentation that is quite important in a practical PPS experiment.

  10. Study of the processes of ion pairs formation by the method of ion-ion coincidence: I2 and chlorine-containing hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    A method of ion-ion coincidences was suggested to study the process of ion pairs formation during molecule photoionization. The principle of action of ion-ion coincidence method is based on recording of only the negative and positive ions that formed as a result of a molecule decomposition. The flowsheet of the facility of ion-ion coincidences was presented. The processes of ion pairs formation in iodine, chloroform, propyl-, n-propenyl-, tert.butyl- and benzyl-chlorides were studied. A simple model permitting to evaluate the dependence of quantum yield of ion pair formation on excitation energy was suggested

  11. Measuring cloud thermodynamic phase with shortwave infrared imaging spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; McCubbin, Ian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Desert Research Institute, Reno Nevada USA; Gao, Bo Cai [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington District of Columbia USA; Green, Robert O. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Matthews, Alyssa A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Mei, Fan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Meyer, Kerry G. [Goddard Earth Science Technology and Research, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia Maryland USA; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenland Maryland USA; Platnick, Steven [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenland Maryland USA; Schmid, Beat [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Tomlinson, Jason [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Wilcox, Eric [Desert Research Institute, Reno Nevada USA

    2016-08-12

    Shortwave Infrared imaging spectroscopy enables accurate remote mapping of cloud thermodynamic phase at high spatial resolution. We describe a measurement strategy to exploit signatures of liquid and ice absorption in cloud top apparent reflectance spectra from 1.4 to 1.8 μm. This signal is generally insensitive to confounding factors such as solar angles, view angles, and surface albedo. We first evaluate the approach in simulation and then apply it to airborne data acquired in the Calwater-2/ACAPEX campaign of Winter 2015. Here NASA’s “Classic” Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-C) remotely observed diverse cloud formations while the U.S. Department of Energy ARM Aerial Facility G-1 aircraft measured cloud integral and microphysical properties in situ. Finally, the coincident measurements demonstrate good separation of the thermodynamic phases for relatively homogeneous clouds.

  12. Many-body effect in the partial singles N2,3 photoelectron spectroscopy spectrum of atomic Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2008-01-01

    We can extract out the photoelectron kinetic energy (KE) dependent imaginary part of the core-hole self-energy by employing Auger-photoelectron coincidence spectroscopy (APECS). The variation with photoelectron KE in the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) spectral peak intensity of a selected decay channel measured in coincidence with photoelectrons of a selected KE is the partial singles (non-coincidence) photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) spectrum, i.e., the product of the singles PES one and the branching ratio of the partial Auger decay width of a selected decay channel to the imaginary part of the core-hole self-energy. When a decay channel the partial Auger decay width of which is photoelectron KE independent is selected, we can extract out spectroscopically the imaginary part of the core-hole self-energy because the variation with photoelectron KE in the relative spectral intensity of the partial singles PES spectrum to the singles one is that in the branching ratio of the partial Auger decay width of a selected decay channel. As an example we discussed the N 2,3 -hole self-energy of atomic Cd

  13. Genomic analysis of urogenital and rectalNeisseria meningitidisisolates reveals encapsulated hyperinvasive meningococci and coincident multidrug-resistant gonococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Odile B; Cole, Kevin; Peters, Joanna; Cresswell, Fiona; Dean, Gillian; Eyre, David W; Paul, John; Maiden, Martin Cj

    2017-09-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) outbreaks in men who have sex with men (MSM) have been associated with meningococcal colonisation of the urethra and rectum, but little is known about this colonisation or co-colonisation with the closely related gonococcus. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was employed to explore these phenomena. Meningococci isolated from the urogenital tract and rectum (n=23) and coincident gonococci (n=14) were analysed by WGS along with contemporary meningococci from IMD (n=11). All isolates were obtained from hospital admissions in Brighton, UK, 2011-2013. Assembled WGS were deposited in the PubMLST/neisseria database (http://pubmlst.org/neisseria) and compared at genomic loci common to gonococci or meningococci. As expected, most meningococci from IMD were encapsulated and belonged to hyperinvasive lineages. So too were meningococci found in the urogenital tract and rectum, contrasting to those asymptomatically carried in the nasopharynx where such meningococci are rare. Five hyperinvasive meningococcal lineages and four distinct gonococcal genotypes were recovered, including multiresistant ST-1901 (NG MAST-1407) gonococci. These data were consistent with a predisposition for potentially virulent encapsulated hyperinvasive meningococci to colonise the urethra and rectum, which suggests their involvement in MSM IMD outbreaks. The coincidence of multiresistant gonococci raises wider public health concerns. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Sub-millimeter nuclear medical imaging with high sensitivity in positron emission tomography using β+γ coincidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C.; Habs, D.; Parodi, K.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a nuclear medical imaging technique, employing triple-γ trajectory intersections from β+-γ coincidences, able to reach sub-millimeter spatial resolution in 3 dimensions with a reduced requirement of reconstructed intersections per voxel compared to a conventional PET reconstruction analysis. This 'γ-PET' technique draws on specific β+-decaying isotopes, simultaneously emitting an additional photon. Exploiting the triple coincidence between the positron annihilation and the third photon, it is possible to separate the reconstructed 'true' events from background. In order to characterize this technique, Monte-Carlo simulations and image reconstructions have been performed. The achievable spatial resolution has been found to reach ca. 0.4 mm (FWHM) in each direction for the visualization of a 22Na point source. Only 40 intersections are sufficient for a reliable sub-millimeter image reconstruction of a point source embedded in a scattering volume of water inside a voxel volume of about 1 mm3 ('high-resolution mode'). Moreover, starting with an injected activity of 400 MBq for 76Br, the same number of only about 40 reconstructed intersections are needed in case of a larger voxel volume of 2 x 2 x 3 mm3 ('high-sensitivity mode'). Requiring such a low number of reconstructed events significantly reduces the required acquisition time for image reconstruction (in the above case to about 140 s) and thus may open up the perspective for a quasi real-time imaging.

  15. On the determination of iridium in diverse geological samples employing HPGe-coincidence/NaI(Tl)-anticoincidence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, A. V.; Parekh, P. P.; Cumming, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the Ir content of a variety of geological samples determined by the high-purity Ge-coincidence/NaI(Tl)-anticoincidence gamma-ray spectrometry (henceforth referred to as coincidence/anticoincidence technique) and by the conventional INAA. The advantages of this technique are: (1) the Ir content of the samples is obtained (ppm to a fraction of ppb ranges) not only by the 468.1 keV peak as in the conventional INAA but also by the 784.6 keV and 920.9 keV sum peaks, which gives more confidence in the values obtained; and (2) it is well suited for the samples with high Compton background for which it is difficult to measure the Ir content by the conventional INAA technique. The practical sensitivity of this technique depends on the sample matrix. Under present experimental conditions, it varied from 0.1 ng for Mn nodules and 0.004 ng for Libyan Desert Glass. Iridium values obtained on small (about 1 microg) olivine grains demonstrate the potential application of this new technique to microsamples. The principle and methodology of this new technique as well as its advantages and disadvantages over the conventional INAA are discussed.

  16. Fast digital 4πβ-4πγ coincidence counting with offline analysis at IRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresa Durán, M; Nedjadi, Youcef; Juget, Frédéric; Bochud, François; Bailat, Claude

    2018-04-01

    IRA recently launched a project to digitize all the data acquisition systems it uses for primary radionuclide standardizations. It is well-known that the digital approach presents numerous advantages over the traditional analog electronics such as information losslessness, scalability, online and/or offline data processing, and it is also a solution to the growing difficulties to repair or renew ageing modules. As a first step in this wider program, our institute set-up a 4πβ-4πγ digital coincidence counting system, with FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array)-based commercial boards from National Instruments (NI), to perform data acquisition and offline data analysis. Choosing all components and software from the same supplier provides a full compact and consistent electronic system. To demonstrate and validate the capacity of this system to standardize the activity of radioisotopes, we compare its predictions for the activity concentration of 133 Ba, 166m Ho and 18 F solutions with the results from a coincidence counting system with analog electronics, as well as with the results from other primary methods and a secondary measurement performed with an IG11 ionization chamber (CIR, chambre d'ionization de référence) with an equivalent activity traceable to the Système International de Référence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visuo-perceptual capabilities predict sensitivity for coinciding auditory and visual transients in multi-element displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhoff, Hauke S; Gehrer, Nina A

    2017-01-01

    In order to obtain a coherent representation of the outside world, auditory and visual information are integrated during human information processing. There is remarkable variance among observers in the capability to integrate auditory and visual information. Here, we propose that visuo-perceptual capabilities predict detection performance for audiovisually coinciding transients in multi-element displays due to severe capacity limitations in audiovisual integration. In the reported experiment, we employed an individual differences approach in order to investigate this hypothesis. Therefore, we measured performance in a useful-field-of-view task that captures detection performance for briefly presented stimuli across a large perceptual field. Furthermore, we measured sensitivity for visual direction changes that coincide with tones within the same participants. Our results show that individual differences in visuo-perceptual capabilities predicted sensitivity for the presence of audiovisually synchronous events among competing visual stimuli. To ensure that this correlation does not stem from superordinate factors, we also tested performance in an unrelated working memory task. Performance in this task was independent of sensitivity for the presence of audiovisually synchronous events. Our findings strengthen the proposed link between visuo-perceptual capabilities and audiovisual integration. The results also suggest that basic visuo-perceptual capabilities provide the basis for the subsequent integration of auditory and visual information.

  18. Study of rare neutron induced processes and coincidence analyses to identify and reduce background contributions in the COBRA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, Jan Horst Karl

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the COBRA experiment is the observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay, primarily of the isotope 116 Cd. The applied semiconductor detectors of cadmium zinc telluride that are 90% to be enriched enable both the detection and the source of this decay. The half-lives of decays of this kind are expected in the range of more than 10 26 years. Therefore, the reduction of contributions to the background is of decisive importance. The main subjects of this work are, on the one hand, the time synchronization of the data, which provides the basis for coincidence analysis. This analysis method has access not only to identification of contributions to the background, but also to observe decays involving positron annihilation and decays into excited states. In this study, the intrinsic detector contamination of some decay products of 238 U and 232 Th was measured and sensitivities to the half-lives of the decays like 120 Te and 128 Te in each case to the first excited state of daughter products are given. On the other hand, qualitative studies on the importance of neutrons in the COBRA experiment were conducted. These have shown that fast neutrons, thus with energies greater than 10 keV, only result in an insignificant contribution to the background for the detection of neutrinoless double-beta decay of the 116 Cd. Previous studies have also shown that the thermal neutron flux can be in situ determined by coincidence analysis.

  19. Coincidence (e,e'p) Scattering on 40Ar and 48Ti to Aid Precision Neutrino Oscillation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Dan; E12-14-012 Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutrino oscillations are an active area of research, with experiments such as DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment). DUNE will make use of large liquid argon detectors to perform a precision measurement of the CP violating phase. Hence, an understanding of the argon nuclear ground state and its response to (anti-)neutrino interactions is of paramount importance. Information about the nuclear ground state is encapsulated in the spectral function, S (k , E) , the joint probability of removing a nucleon of momentum k = |k | from the ground state leaving the residual (A-1) system with excitation energy E. E12-14-012 at Jefferson Lab ran in early 2017 and has measured the argon spectral function through coincidence (e ,e' p) scattering on 40Ar and 48Ti. The results of E12-14-012 are important to both the neutrino and nuclear physics communities. A direct measurement of the coincidence (e ,e' p) cross section from 40Ar and 48Ti will provide valuable information about the argon nucleus, as well as the experimental input necessary to constrain theoretical models used to calculate S (k , E) , paving the way for reliable estimates of the neutrino cross sections. Data from E12-14-012 is currently being analyzed at UVA and Va. Tech. Supported in part by the Department of Energy Grant No: DE-FG02-96ER40950.

  20. Summing coincidence errors using Eu-152 lungs to calibrate a lung-counting system: are they significant?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Gary H.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Lopez, Maria A.; Hauck, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The use of a lung phantom containing 152Eu/241Am activity can provide a sufficient number of energy lines to generate an efficiency calibration for the in vivo measurements of radioactive materials in the lungs. However, due to the number of energy lines associated with 152Eu, coincidence summing occurs and can present a problem when using such a phantom for calibrating lung-counting systems. A Summing Peak Effect Study was conducted at three laboratories to determine the effect of using an efficiency calibration based on a 152Eu/241Am lung phantom. The measurement data at all three laboratories showed the presence of sum peaks. However, two of the three laboratories found only small biases (<5%) when using the 152Eu/241Am calibration. The third facility noted a 25% to 30% positive bias in the 140-keV to 190-keV energy range that prevents the use of the 152Eu/241Am lung phantom for routine calibrations. Although manufactured by different vendors, the three facilities use similar types of detectors (38 cm2 by 25 mm thick or 38 cm2 by 30 mm thick) for counting. These study results underscore the need to evaluate the coincidence summing effect when using a nuclide such as 152Eu for the calibration of low energy lung counting systems